The East Carolinian, October 6, 1983






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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.J2
Thursday, October 6,1983
Greenville, s.C.
10 Pages
ECU Minister
Makes Bid For
City Council

a
Hadden
By ANDREA MARKELLO
SiafT Writer
The Greenville City Council's comprehensive plan
for growth in downtown Greenville over the next
10 12 years is a primary concern in Rev. William L.
Hadden's decision to run for a fourth term on the
council.
Hadden, who has also served as ECU's Episcopal
campus minister for the past 15 years, believes the
key to the plan is revitaliza-
tion. According to Hadden,
the university is represented
by a strong hand with
Chancellor John Howell
and Mayor Percy Cox
working together.
Major issues of current
relevance include student
transit and private off-
campus housing. Dick
Blake, assistant to
Chancellor Howell, hopes
to combine the campus and
community bus systems.
'The city is talking about combined grants from
the city transit agency for the students and the com-
munity Hadden said. "The city currently main-
tains the responsibility for repairing campus buses.
With the availability of federal grants to the city of
Greenville, used with the city bus system, plans could
be made to incorporate them into the campus bus
system he said. A final goal would be to establish a
bus system to serve the campus and community
together.
With the issue concerning student housing, Had-
den supports construction of private dorm-
condominiums in the downtown Greenville area.
"Business has fallen in downtown Greenville during
the last years Hadden said. "The population is
moving away, and establishment of more adult
dorms and condominiums would be a first step in
creating a bigger tax base he said.
Hadden also supports the "talent bank made up
of volunteers used in city commissions and commit-
tees. Hadden said there is a large group of talented
people from the university involved in city govern-
ment.
First elected in in 1975, Hadden was re-elected to
the city council in 1979 and 1981.
MedProfessor
Dies At 35;
Shocks School
By ELIZABETH PAGE
Suff Writer
Dr. John C. Yeager, 35,
associate professor of physiology
at ECU, died Sept. 26 in Pitt
County Memorial Hospital. The
cause has not been released.
"It was a shock to the whole
department said Robert
Thurber, chairman of the
physiology Department. "He was
an excellent researcher, teacher
and gentleman
Yeager conducted research in
cardiovascular disease and was an
active member of the American
Heart Association.
Yeager had worked for seven
years in the ECU physiology
department, since 1976.
Circulation 10,000
Defender Claims
Honor Board 9s
Actions Improper
4 �Mn
ROB POOLC - ft, L,b
Swear, He Was This Tall
An ECU student discusses her last blind date with friends in front of the Student Supply
More. Come Now, surely he wasn't that short.
School Emblem
ECU Gets New Mascot
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Start Writer
This year ECU will be sporting a new
mascot which has been described as more
clear, classier and better than before.
After two years and 16 revisions, the
university has come up with a new image
to symbolize its athletic teams.
The new pirate mascot was drawn by
senior art major David Franks, who took
ideas from an ad hoc committee set up by
Chancellor John Howell and chaired by
David B. Stevens, university attorney. The
new mascot is a cartoon character with a
broad chest, a trimmed appearance in
comparison to the former figure and a
tough look.
"The image of the old pirate was to do
in your opponent any way possible,
whether sub him in the back or cut his
throat Stevens said. "We think the new
pirate is just as tough, rugged and ready
for battle with all opponents without hav-
ing the appearence of a
scrunge he said.
Stevens said the new
mascot reflects the
tougher image ECU is
trying to project of its
athletic teams.
The comparison of
ECU's mascot to other
universities' emblems
was another reason for
the change, according
to Richard Laing, former dean of the ECU
School of Art. He said that when one
looks at the mascots of different university
teams a good caricature is easy to pot.
"We wanted something that showed some
class Laing said.
Pirate Mascot
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Start Writer
Student Public Defender
Stephen Sherbin contends that a
recent hearing of the ECU Honor
Board was handled improperly. In
response to Sherbin's contention,
James Mallory, associate dean of
student life, said "He's all wet
During the hearing ECU stu-
dent Keith Carter was convicted
of plagiarism resulting from a
poem published in the 1983 Rebel.
Carter was then given a $250 fine,
one year's probation and a written
reprimand as well as being re-
quired to write a formal letter of
apology to the Rebel.
Sherbin said he feels Carter
should not have been given the
punishment because the hearing
was handled improperly. "I
recommended that they (the
Honor Board) hand down no
sanction because of the
violation Sherbin said. The case
will be appealed after Fall break
when the Review Board is ap-
pointed. Sherbin said he plans to
bring out the alleged improprieties
in the appeal.
Carter's poem was taken from a
song on an Alice Cooper album
and according to Sherbin, assis-
tant student attorney general,
Rick Brown, who tried the case,
was unprepared because he did
not have the album. "The defen-
dant was the only person in the
room who had heard the record
Sherbin said.
"I plead no contest to not being
prepared Brown said. "The
reason 1 didn't bring the album
was that I was not aware the
defense was going to contend a
difference between the two (the
song and the poem)
After Brown and Sherbin made
their closing statements, the board
requested the Cooper album as
additional evidence. Brown then
purchased the album and addi-
tional statements were made, a
procedure Sherbin says was im-
proper because closing statements
had already been presented.
"I gave the Honor Board ab-
solute hell and told them they
were violating procedure Sher-
bin said. He added that he felt
they had overstepped their bounds
in asking for further evidence and
stated that their sole duty was to
pass down a sanction.
"I was very disappointed with
the performance of the Honor
Board, but my faith in the judicial
system is still as strong as ever
Sherbin said.
"I checked with the university
attorney and the procedures were
correct Mallory said. Mallory
also said the appeal was granted
only because of the severity of
Carter's sentence, not because the
procedures were in question.
"The main objective of the
system is to be fair and make sure
the truth comes out said Stu-
dent Attorney General Harry
Dest. "The Honor Board did not
do anything out of the ordinary
nor did it violate students' con-
stitutional rights
"I think the Honor Board did
what was right. They found out
the truth; they got the informa-
tion to mmkc m decision. Mad they
made it Brown said.
Honors Seminars 'Bigger And Better9
Yeager
Yeager received his
undergraduate degree at Miami of
Ohio. He also attended Ohio State
University, where he received a
doctorate in physiology.
Yeager also attended Michigan
State University for post-
doctorate work.
Yeager is survived gby his two
children, Matie, 4, and Danny,2,
as well as his wife, Elizabeth.
The ECU Honors Program has
announced its list of seminars and
course sections for the Spring
semester in time for pre-
registration, and the offerings and
range of topics is bigger and better
than ever, according to the pro-
gram's director, English professor
David Sanders.
The program is offering five
special topic seminars beginning
in January, including one that is
being repeated from last Spring by
popular demand and one that is
being co-taught, for the first time
ever, by an undergraduate honors
student.
Honors seminars are designed
to be taught primarily through
class discussion rather than by lec-
ture. Most seminars are headed by
two professors and meet once a
week for two hours. They count
for three semester hours of
General College credit.
,4The Literature of the
Holocaust" is the course, taught
by foreign language associate pro-
fessor Michael Bassman, to be of-
fered for the second time next
Spring. The Tuesday night class
will look at the reign of Nazis and
the lasting implications of their
actions on the world through
literature written from a variety of
viewpoints.
"Futures: An International
Perspective" is the first seminar
to be co-taught by an honors
undergraduate student, Keith
Hoggard. The course will focus
on Alvin Toffler's The Third
Wave and examine man's future
through a variety of readings. The
class will also be led by professor
Ralph Steele.
A seminar focusing on medicine
from a humanistic point of view
will be led by John Moskop of the
medical school and associate pro-
fessor of sociology Paul Tschet-
ter. The course, "Patients, Physi-
cians and Society: Exploring the
Medical Humanities will have
guest speakers from variety of
disciplines including philosophy,
literature, history and an-
thropology.
Yuri Karageorge of the foreign
languages and literature depart-
ment will lead the seminar
"Reason and Libido in Contem-
porary Theater which is to ex-
amine man's concern for his own
survival as reflected through
European and American drama.
A seminar taught by George
Bailey of the philosophy depart-
ment, "Classical Philosophical
Problems and Current Attempts
to Resolve Them will present
living philosphers' attempts to ad-
dress traditional questions. This is
the only course set to meet three
times a week for one hour ses-
sions.
The Honors Program is also of-
fering several special sections of
regular freshman and sophomore
courses such as freshman English,
introductory anthropology,
health and American history.
The courses are designed for
and limited to students with a 3.5
grade point average. Those who
have a special interest in a class
can obtain permission to enroll by
getting a recommendation from a
faculty member or from Sanders.
Sanders urged interested
students to sign up for the courses
and told them not to be afraid of
the "honors" label. Students
grades usually go up rather than
down after taking the honors
courses, he said.
The honors department has not
only expanded its course offerings
but its overall program as well this
year. There is an honors lounge
available to students in the pro-
gram, on the second floor of
Ragsdale Hall, and Sanders' posi-
tion as head of the program has
been upgraded from coordinator
to director, allowing him to spend
more time with the program.
Languages Learned Too Late
RALEIGH (UPI) � A study
committee urged the State Board
of Education Wednesday to offer
foreign language classes to every
student every day, but some board
members worried the idea would
translate into expensive programs.
Nevertheless, the board told of-
ficials in the state Department of
Public Instruction to write a
timetable and a budget for im-
plementing the committee's 19
recommendations.
The Foreign Language Cur-
riculum Study Committee, con-
sisting of language teachers and
state education officials, said cur-
rent language programs begin too
late in a student's career, are of-
fered too sporadically, stress
academic rather than practical
training and generally do not take
advantage of new teaching techni-
ques.
It recommended every student
study a second language from
Kindergarten through 12th grade.
Currently only 10 percent of all
high school students complete at
least two years of high school
language classes, and only S3 per-
cent of all high schools offer
more. In addition, just eight
school units teacher elementary
school students a foreign
language.
The committee said the
language training should be ex-
panded in the high schools first
and then go into junior high
school and Kindergarten classes
simultaneously.
French, German and Spanish
should remain the basic modern
foreign languages offered, the
committee said, but every high
school student eventually should
get the chance to take Latin as
well. It added that non-traditional
languages, such as Japanese and
Arabic, should be offered when
possible.
The subject matter should be
shifted slightly, the committee
said, to include more practical in-
formation that a worker in North
Carolina could use. There is a
need for North Carolinians who
can speak German and work in
the state's furniture industry, for
example, the group said.
Most of the other recommenda-
tions call for improving the quali-
ty of language teachers as well as
their work surroundings.
Several board members said
they liked the ideas but worried
about the cost or the time involv-
ed.
"It looks to me like we're going
to have to take out of what we're
already doing to do this said
board member John Tart of
Goldsboro.
But George T. "Terry"
Whitlatch, a Winston-Salem
junior high school principal who
served as study committee chair-
man, said researchers have found
that foreign language courses can
improve a student's abilities in
English as well. He also disputed
arguments that the program will
be too expensive.
"It would be fiscally irresponsi-
ve to start a massive program,
but there are cost-effective ways
to do this he said. For example,
he said students can take courses
by television or with the help of
computers.
ROMRT PtAatAU.
All The Comforts Of Home
ECU students
gad a roof over
this squirrel and set him op in kb owa penoaal pad. A soft, comfy place to He dowa
bead - he's doiag better thaa soaae ECU
?





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 6, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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otec that your announce
"lent ah' un as long as you
.van' ana suggest that you do not
� . on this column tor
'�
r h e oeadime tor an
merits is 3 p m Monday
lor 'he Tuesday paper and 3
� Aeanosdav tor the Thurs
c�- pape' No announcements
� eo .itter these deadlines
be p' "?ed
- - space is available to ail
rgani tations and
� ts
PRE HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
STUDENTS
There will be a pledge meeting
tor al' interested pre health pro
tessions students of Alpha Ep
Silon Delta. ECU Pre medical
ronor society at 7 p m on Tues
day Oct ll in Flanagan 307
AEO provides many contacts
ana �un tor all pre professioanl
students Refreshments will be
served Dr Ed Bartlert will
scea on Sports Medicine and
aspec's of Orthopedic Surgery
a ' .10 p m.
PRIMETIME
Campus Crusade for Christ is
sponsoring -prime Time" this
Thursday at 7 p m in the Nurs
ing Building Rm 101 Please
- s for fun fellowship and
B-bie �'jdy We are looking for
warn -�eting you
SURFING CLUB
There will be a surfing club
meeting down stairs in
Memorial Gym a' 7 cm on
tnursdey Od 6 Anyone who
p am tc go to cioaa tor fall
IeaK must a'tencf this meeting
EPISCOPAL
WORSHIP
A serv ce o� Evening Prayer
w be reaa at St Paul's
EP'Scopa Church (one block
north of Garret Mall at 40e
courth st on Tuesday. Oct ll at
5 X p m
CAOPTRAINING
There will be a tracing ses
sion held by the campus Alcohol
and Drug Program on Monday,
Oct 10 at 4 p m in room 210 Er
win Hall This will be the third in
a senes of none framing sessions
or- peer counseling Help pro
-note responsible decisions con
cermng drugs and alcohol
Become a trained student
volunteer CADP is student
operated service
AFTER THE GAME
"COURT PARTY"
kappa Sigma, Kappa Alpha.
Alpha XI Delta and Alpha Phi,
will be sponsoring a court party
to be held at the KA House after
tha game, Saturday Oct. �
against Southwest Loulsana.
Tha party starts at 5,00 and
there will be a live band to be en
nounced later. BYOB. Go
Plratesl See you mere!
SIERRA CLUB
Interested in canoeing, hiking,
conservation and environment?
Try the Sierra Club. This
month's meeting program
features reptiles of NC. Upcom
ing canoe trips to Hammock's
Beach and Whlteoak River will
be described Current conser
vaiton information discussed
Meeting time 0 p.m Monday
Oct 10 basement of First
Presbyterian Church, corner of
14th St and Elm
NATIONAL
TEACHER
EXAMINATIONS
The National Teacher
Examinations Sepcialty Areas
will be offered at East Carotin
University on Saturday. Nov 12.
Appiicaiton blanks are to be
completed an mailed to the
Educational Testing Service,
Box 911 R. Princeton, NJ 08541
to arrive by Oct 10. applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, RM 105 Speight
Building
ALLIED HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
ADMISSION TEST
The Allied Health Professions
Admission Test will be offered
at East Carolina University on
Saturday. Nov 19 Appiicaiton
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the Psychological
Corp 304 East 45th St. New
York, NY 10017 to arrive by Oct
U. Applications may be obtain
ed from the ECU Testing
Center, Rm 105 Speight
Building
SIGN LANGUAGE
CLUBMEETING
The Sign Language Club is
having a meeting mis coming
Monday in Mendenhali rm 244
We ere discussing tne proposed
camping trip and other ec
tivities in this coming year The
meeting will start at 6 30 p m
please come Oin us, everyone is
welcome
IFCMEETING
The Inter Fraternity Council
will have a meeting today at 5 00
p m in the Multi purpose room
in Mendenhali
SIGMA TAU
DELTA
Sigma Teu Delta, me English
honor society, will hoM Its first
meeting of tha year on Thurs-
day, Oct. at 7 jo p.m. In room
Ml of Mendenhali Student
Canter
SNOW SKI
XMAS BREAK
There will be a meeting of all
persons interested In snow ski
Ing on Tuesday October 25 at
4:30 p.m. In Memorial Gym lot.
A trip to Snowshoe W VA. for
Janurary l 6 has been schedul
ed. Reservations for slopeslde
accomodations will be taken at
this meeting. Slides and movies
will be shown. Classes are
available for all levels of skiers-
novice thru super advanced
racers. There Is limited space
available this year so get your
group together early to insure
your space on the ECU
Christmas Ski Trip to snow shoe,
W VA. for further Information
contact Ms. Jo Saunders, 205
Memorial Gym or call 757 6000
TRANSFORM
YOURSELF
Is change and growth good?
What does God's Word, the Bi
ble, say. Read Romans 12:1,2
and Epheslans Chapter 4.
(especially verses 15 and la)
YES, God wants us to grow up
spiritually so we can be our best
in all categories of life Come by
Mendenhali Student Center
Monday, Oct 10 at 5:30 p.m.
where we teach the truth of
God's Word dynamicly. (Room
212, next to the Music Listening
Center)
BINGOICE
CREAM PARTY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring another
ever popular bingoice cream
party on Tuesday, Oct 11 at 7
p.m. In the Mendenhali Student
Center Multi-purpose room.
Ya'M come and bring a friend I
Admission is only 50 cents and
the ice cream Is delicious
PHI
ALPHA THETA
There will be a meeting of Phi
Alpha Thefa on Thursday, Oc
tober 6 at 3 p.m. In the Richard
C Todd Room. Allmembers and
perspective members are urged
to attend
SOCCER
OFFICIALS
The training clinic for Soccer
Officials to be hired by the
Department of Intramural
Recreational Services will begin
Tuesday October 11, 1903 at 6
p.m in Room 102 of Memorial
Gymnasium Rules, interpreta
tions and mechanics will be
discussed Off trials will be hired
based on practical and written
tests. Soccer Officials clinic,
Tues Oct 11, 1983, 4pm Rm
102, Mem Gym
PREMEDT
STUDENTS
Pre registration tor general
college students Intending to
major in medical Technology
has been changed to THURS
DAY, OCT 6. 19�3 in Brewster
D112 at 7 p.m. Forms and
schedules will not be available
in time to pre register on Tues-
day
HONORS
PROGRAM
SOCIAL
All students who have recelv
ed Invitations to take courses in
the Honors Program spring
semester are Invited to socialize
with otherHonors students and
meet the Honors faculty for the
present and the spring
semesters on Monday. October
10. from 3 - 5 p.m. In the Honors
Lounge (next to 201 Ragsdale)
OLD TESTAMENT
Topics presented in our class
on the Old Testament have
been: How the Old Testament
testifies of Jesus Christ, The
Creation, The Fall of Adam, and
The Patriarchs. Please attend I
We promise that you will not be
disappointed. Class meets from
6 30 8 00 p m each Thursday in
Brewster building room 3038
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers and Pledges of
PI Kappa Phi fraternity would
like to congratulate the Little
Sisters Pledges. We know that
you made an excellent choice
and will have a great time. Just
work hard) Also congratulations
to the PI Kapp "A" football
team for making the playoffs
and also to the "B"football team
tor finishing 5 1. Good luck in the
playoffs.
FRISBEECLUB
The ECU Frisbee Club wil be
hosting the NATURAL LIGHT
ULTIMAX ULTIMATE TOUR
NAMENT this weekend Come
on our and bring your Frisbee,
your cat, your dog and your
grandmother. Everyone is in
vltedlll
FACULTYSTAFF
INTRAMURALS
Intramural competition for
ECU FacultyStaff members
will begin Monday October 10.
1983 Flag Football Is the activt
ty and sign up days to enter a
team art Monday October 3 and
Tuesday October 4 from 8am
to 4 p.m in Room 105B of
Memorial Gym Teams play
with six (6) playes on the field
and a maximum of six (A)
substitutes Games are played
on the Intramural fields just
north of Ficklen Stadium
Teams can consist of members
of a department or of several
different departments However
the teams are constructed
loosen up the hands tor catching
and the legs for running Get a
team together and get with the
action
BE A CLOWN
irs time to enter the fun and
exciting world of entertainment
The 1983 Homecoming Parade is
iust around the corner Any
valid ECU student, faculty or
staff member is invited to dress
as a clown and walks In the
parade if you like helium
balloons, there will be lots of
purple and gold ones to give to
people along the parade route If
interested, call Mendenhali Stu
dent Center at 757 6411, Ext 213.
Everyone Is welcome
POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will
meet this Thursday, October 4,
In Mendenhali Rm. 235 at 8:00
p.m. Those planning to attend
and wanting clritcal feedback on
their poetry should bring six or
eight copies of each poem to be
read and discussed. Meetings
are open to anyone Interested in
poetry. Participation In reading
and discussion is optional.
ULTIMAX
It's this weekend The
NATURAL LIGHT ULTIMAX
ULTIMATE TOURNAMENT
Games will begin at 12 00 noon
on Saturday and Sunday Oct 8
and 9 and will be played on the
College Hill fields (bottom of
College Hill Drive). This Is your
chance to see the hottest
ultimate teams on the East
Coast. Come watch the "Irate"
attack.
WRESTLING
The ECU Wrestling Sport Club
is practicing Tuesday and
Thursday evenings from 9 p.m.
to 11 p.m. In the Exercise Room
108 of Memorial Gym All
students Interested in working
our with the Wrestling Club
should attend these work-out
sessions.
MARCH ON
RALEIGH
On Oct. 22 people from
throughout the state will par
tlcipate In the "March on
Raleigh The focous of the
march is to "Stop first strike
weapons in Europe, Reverse the
arms race, Freeze nuclear
weapons (and) Fund human
needs Several speakers will
speak during a morning rally
behind the M.C. State
Legislature For more into. Call
758 4904 or 752 5724
S.A.B. MEETING
There will be a S A B Meeting
in Room 248 of Mendenhali.
Monday, Oct 10 at 5 p m All
members should attend!
CRESCENTCLUB
The Crescent Club of Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity, Inc , will
sponsoring a car wash on Friday
evening from 2 4 pm and Sun
day evening Irom 12:30 3 30
p.m. at the corner of 10th and
Cofanche St in the parking lot
between McDonald's and Fast
Fare Come support a good
FRAT. while you eat a BIG Mac
CHEMISTRY
SEMINAR
Or Charles B Boss. North
Carolina State University will
present a seminar entitled
"Chemistry in Flames Atomic
Spectrometric Studies" (A joint
seminar with the trace elements
lab. Department of Surgery,
ECU School o� Medicine) on Fri
day, October 7, 1983 2 p m In
Flanagan Building Room 201
Refreshments will be served in
room 204 following the seminar.
CROSS
CAMPUS RACE
Two Cross Campus races will
be held Homecoming Day Satur-
day Oct 29. A 2.5 mile race will
start at 9 a.m. and a 5.0 mile
race will start at 9:30 a.m. Both
races start near the bleachers at
the ECU varsity track. Bunting
Field. The race course is 95 per-
cent on grass and traverses In
and about the area surrounding
Mlnges Coliseum, Ficklen
Stadium, Bunting Field, Harr-
ington and the women's Softball
field. The races, which are spon-
sored by the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices, are open to participation
by all ECU students, staff and
ECU alumni.
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY MIXER
The ECSCOTA (East Carolina
Student committee Occupa-
tional Therapy Association) will
be having a mixer party at 4:30
p m Wednesday Oct 12 in
Mendenhali Multipurpose Rm.
All interested Students pursuing
a career in O.T should attend,
there will be Demonstrations, a
movie and presentations by
local O.T. clinlcans. Pre-
reglstration will take place im-
mediately following the mixer at
7:30 p.m.
FRISBEECLUB
Watch for the Natural Light
"Ultlmax Ultimate" Tourna
ment coming Oct 8-9 to the East
Carolina University campus.
Top North Carolina ultimate
teams will compete cash and
prizes in this event sponsored by
the ECU Frisbee Disc Sport
Club The weekend should prove
to be ultimate The IRATES
practice every Tuesday, Thurs
day and Sunday on the College
Hill fields at 5 p.m. and promise
to be one of the favorites in the
tournament All interested disc
duffers are encouraged to attend
the practices and whip the disc
The Frisbee Club will meet
Tuesday oct 2 at 830 p.m. in
Rm 247 of Mendenhali. Join one
of ECU'S most exciting sport
clubs Be there or be octangular.
SPORT
CLUB COUNCIL
The second meeting for the
1983 84 Sport Club Council will
be held Wednesday Oct 19, at 4
p m in Rm. 1058 of Memorial
Gymnasium. Attendance ts re-
quired of representative of ac-
tive sport clues Persons or
groups Interested m forming a
sport club are invited at attend
Representatives are asked to
prepare. H needed. Trip Ap-
plications and Vehicle Requests
for the fall semester Sprot
Club Council Meeting. Weds Oct
19 4 p m RM I05B, Memorial
Gym
WORLD FOOD
DAY SKIT
Participats in next weeks
World Food Day skit are asked
to attend tonights meeting at
7 30 p m at the Catholic
Newman Center (953 E 10th
St.) 752 4214
ALBUM SPECIALS
Album Specials slated for this
week's Electric Rainbow Radio
Show are as follows: Friday
night at 2 a.m if s tne new Dofc
ken album, titled "Breaking tha
Chains Saturday night at 4
a.m it's Black Sabbath's album
"The Mob Rules The Electric
Rainbow Radio Show has a
predominantly Heavy Metal for
mat and can be heard exclusive-
ly on WZMB 91.3 FM Friday 12 4
a.m. and Saturday 2-4 a.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
Alpha Epsiion Delta, ECU
pre medical honor society, will
have a meeting on Tuesday, Oct.
ll In Flanagan 307 at 7:30 p.m.
Dr. Ed Bertlett, an alumnus of
ECU, graduate of UNC CH
Medical School and a practicing
orthopedic surgeon, will speak
on Sports Medicine and aspects
Of orthopedic surgery All
members and guests are en-
couraged to attend I
SENIORS
The Career Planning and
Placement Service offers a can
tralized place to have three let
ters of reference as you talk to
potential employers this year. If
you wish to use this sevlce, come
by the Bloxton House and pick
up a self explanatory Registra
fion packet. Everyone should
read the description of the office
in you UNIVERSITY
CATALOG. Some companies
send recruiters to Interview
those who have registered.
Those who are registered can
receive a list of the employers
who come starting October 11.
INTENDED
SLAP MAJORS
Students interested in major
ing in Speech Language and
Auditory Pathology will meet on
Tuesday evening October 11 at 7
p.m. in Brewster D-113 Intend-
ed maiors and transfer students
with problems in their program
of study should contact the dept.
(757 4941) to make an appoint
ment to discuss their curriculum
with the chairman
T&mttoj'MaU
491IW
a�� hx.
Latest Styles ia
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The East Carolinian
Srrinn the campus comrrun-ty
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday during the Sur.i
The East Carolinian is the
oHtcial newspaper of East
�Carolina University, owned.
operated, and published for
and by the students of East
Carotina University
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POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The East
Carolinian, Old South
Building. ECU Greenville.
NC ?7834
Telephone 717-4344. 4147.
J0t
A WHALE OF A MEAL

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ALL YOU CAN EAT
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TUES WED THURS.
Banquet Facilities Available
YoungDem
CollegeRepu
Hope To In
Active Mem
758-0327
Student Opiniol
Ele
Kim
Fontenot
NAACP
Bv
SHARON
GRA v E5
Staff,Mar
Register ow!
Register GNow!
The ECU chapter
of the NAACP has
various goals for this
school year, including
increasing participa-
tion bv black
-
registr
mg i
tion
m a j o I
organ)
pus.
FREE TRIP FOR TWO
to
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(3 Days, 2 Nights)
X

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While Ordering Your
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DATE: Oct. 4,5,6 TIME: 9:00-4:00p.m.jyf HERFF JONES
SOULS G
By ANDREAne se
MARKELLOCannc
Staff �rttcr:

The new presidentform'
of ECU-SOULSBar be;
organization for thegroup
83-84 school year. Jimgood
Hackett, won a land-during
slide victory in theyea:
organization'sthe ?
Wednesday elections.King
Winning the vice-leader
president office wasSOUL
Juan Seivlav, and theand tt
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs. Air Conditioners
Stereos guns eoid silver
diamonds cameras ana
equipment typewriters
kerosene heaters
refrigerators tdorm sue on
ly), video games 4 car
tridges power tools
musical instruments
microwave evens video
recorders bicycles and
anytnmg else of value
Southern Pawn Shop
located �8S Evans Street
downtown 7 S3 344
��
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your choice of either
Also ob Oct. 8, 1983
FOOTBALL TI
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OCTOBER 6. 1983
Young Democrats,
College Republicans
Hope To Increase
Active Membership
By TINA
MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
With the '84 elec-
tions approaching,
ECU'S College
Republicans and
Young Democrats are
making plans for the
year.
According to
Stephen Sherbin,
chairman of the Col-
lege Republicans, new
members are needed
more than ever in an
election year. The
group currently has
approximately 20 ac-
tive members, most of
whom are up-
perclassmen.
Two tactics will be
used in the recruiting
process. The first,
tentatively set for Oct.
24-25, will be a
"membership table
The College
Republicans will be at
the ECU Student Sup-
Dly Store distributing
information.
A "Campus Can-
vas" will be the se-
cond recruiting
method. A survey will
be conducted door-to-
door, designed to poll
student opinions on a
series of political
issues.
The College
Republicans recently
met with the Pitt
County Republicans
and plan next year to
support Sen. Jesse
Helms' (R-N.C.) re-
election bid and Mar-
tin in the N.C.
goovernor's race.
"Let the People
Go" is the motto of
the College
republican's national
project. Each
Republican campus
chapter tries to help a
Soviet family come to
America by writing
letters to Soviet
leaders.
One issue that both
parties oppose is the
PIRG funding
system. The Public
Interest Research
Group's favored fun-
ding option is
"negative checkoff
� raising student ac-
tivity fees by two
dollars.
Buddy Connor,
chairman of the
Young Democrats,
said that they favored
PIRG but most
members oppose the
Student Opinion
funding system.
The Young
Democrats, which
was established two
weeks ago, currently
has about 15 active
members. Connor
said their recruitment
efforts will be geared
toward
underclassmen. Lack
of money is the big-
gest problem facing
the group.
The College
Republicans meet
every Tuesday at 5.30
in Mendenhall, room
212. The Young
Democrats meet in
Mendenhall the first
Thursday ard third
Tuesday of each
month at 7 p.m.
"We're going to try
to sponsor a can-
didate forum for local
or statewide
elections Connor
said. "We're also sup-
porting voter registra-
tion
Elections Discussed
Kim
Fontenot
By THERESA DULSKI
Staff Writer
Students comment on last
week's SGA elections, which were
canceled after 20 students' names
were left off the ballot for not fil-
ing financial reports.
Dokyung Kim � "They should
count those who filed the right
forms because it was one of the
things they had to do to make the
election process right. There
shouldn't be any new elections for
those who failed to file a Financial
Statement
Denise Williams, Nutrition,
Sophomore � "New elections
should be held. It was unfair. I
don't think it had equal oppor-
tunity involved
Donald Fontenot, Biology,
Senior�"Everyone was informed
that they had to file a financial
statement before the election. I
feel those who filed a financial
statement should not be penalized
for those who didn't abide by the
rules
Gary Ingram, Music,
Sophomore �"A new election is
called for because evidently it's
not going to go through because
not enough people filed for a
financial statement. It was unfair
to those who had filed for the
financial statement and that their
should do the elections over
Cancer Researcher
Scheduled To Speak
Williams
Ingram
ROB POOLE � Photo !��
A nationally promi-
nent cancer researcher
is scheduled to give a
public address on the
effects of contem-
porary science on
man's future at the
ECU School of
Medicine Oct. 10.
Donald S. Coffey,
Ph.D who holds
professorships in
urology, oncology,
pharmacology and ex-
perimental
therapeutics at the
Johns Hopkins
School of Medicine in
Baltimore, Md will
present his lecture,
"Human Destiny: A
Look at Science in
1983
The lecture will be
given at 4 p.m. in the
auditorium of the
Brody Medical
Sciences Building on
the medical school
campus.
Coffey's speech,
the same one
presented to medical
students at Hopkin's
convocation last Spr-
ing, will be delivered
NAACP Sets Goals For School Year
By
SHA.tON
GRAVES
Staff W.ittr
� The ECU chapter
of the NAACP has
various goals for this
school year, including
increasing participa-
tion bv black
students, making a
push for voter
registration and work-
ing in closer conjunc-
tion with the other
major minority
organization on cam-
pus, SOULS.
"The
black
students on campus
are just not
involved said Karen
McGill, president of
the chapter. Par-
ticipation in the
voting process by
black students needs
to be increased, she
said.
The NAACP helps
the community by
tutoring children on
various subjects at
Cornerstone Baptist
Church. There are
also plans for a free
blood pressure check
to be held on campus.
This year, the
NAACP wants to
work in closer con-
junction with
SOULS, the Society
Of United Liberal
Students. In the past,
there has been little
coordination between
the two groups.
SOULS Getting The Year Underway
By ANDREA
MARKELLO
Staff Writer
The new president
of ECU-SOULS
organization for the
83-84 school year, Jim
Hackett, won a land-
slide victory in the
organization's
Wednesday elections.
Winning the vice-
president office was
Juan Seivlay, and the
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs, Air Conditioners,
Stereos, guns, gold I silver,
diamonds, cameras and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm size on-
ly), video games & car
tridges, power tools,
musical instruments,
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles, and
anything else of value.
Southern Pawn Shop,
located 40$ Evans Street,
downtown. 752-244.
new secretary is Tracy
Cannon.
At the installation
of the new officers,
former president
Barber Battle said the
group has made some
good achievements
during the 1982-83
year. Some include
the Martin Luther
King Celebration, a
leadership workshop,
SOULS On The Mall,
and the Miss SOULS
ItiUIwS HEALTH
gYOUCAN Aaxo
DtPtNDON. SOTmorinvxfceowexby
OrxKk3b� dov ana ntght to support and unde-
rtone" you Vour wWy. comfort and privacy am
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�WrlCtfc � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
porrtmertft! i �t 2nd Trimester Abortion up to
18 Week � Free Pregnancy Tarts � Very Early
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Accaptad � CAU Tel-MeO DAY Ot MONT �
Healm care, counseling TUC D CMikis
3r education far o- nHHIl�p
pageant. Battle said
she hoped students
will become more in-
volved in the
organization
throughout the 83-84
year.
"I plan to broaden
the scope of SOULS
during the new year,
with a hope to involve
other minority
groups, such as In-
dians and foreign
students, in the
organization said
Hackett after taking
the oath of presiden-
cy. .
Hackett said he
wants to change the
image of SOULS
from being just a
black organization,
and emphasizing it as
a society of liberal
students. In doing so,
Hackett plans to send
letters and circulate
pamphlets to other
�.
f
�1
organizations.
SOULS, the Society
of United Liberal
Students, is the largest
minority organization
on campus. Every
minority student is
considered a member
and each is encourag-
ed to be an active par-
ticipant in the group.
The new SOULS of-
ficers will be working
out of room 239 in of
.Mendenhall mm
ABORTIONS UP
T0 12THWEEK
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SlrS.OO Prtftancv Test, �
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IA1MM WOMEN'S
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�17 W�t Morons.
T7
SEE
yirf
Nitty Gritty
Dirt Band
Fri. Oct. 7,1983
-OR-
FREE
Delbert McClinton
with Stove Bassett
Sat. Oct. 8,1983
Purchase a Carolina Opry, House membership for the regular price of $10.00 and receive
your choice of either ticket FREE!
Also on Oct. 8,1983 (DELBERT McCLINTON with Steve Bassett): BRING YOUR ECU
FOOTBALL TICKET STUB AND RECEIVE $2.00 OFF THE ADMISSION! ENJOY
OUR HAPPY HOUR FROM 8:30 -10;30.
Carolina Opry How to a private club for Miwbf and Gu�t only. All ABC Permits
11 m

�f�-WL4bV
to the ECU chapter of
Sigma XI, a national
fraternity of profes-
sional scientific
researchers. Medical
school officials stress-
ed, however, that the
public is welcome and
encouraged to attend.
44Dr. Coffey is an
outstanding teacher
and medical
scientist said
Wilhelm Frisell, assis-
tant dean and chair-
man of the
biochemistry depart-
ment ai the medical
school. "His lecture
will be of interest to
the layman as well as
faculty and students
of the university
A native Virginian,
Coffey began his
career as a corporate
chemical engineer,
then in 1959 began his
24-year association
with Johns Hopkins.
During that time he
has established a na-
tional reputation as
an investigater of the
human urogenital
system.
Walking Alone At Night?
Call Pirate Walk
757-6616
Oueen
presents
NORTH
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TheTAMS"
Happy Hour 4:30 - 7:00
"TAMS" play 7-11
Free Hot HORD'S
OCT. 8th
ECU
HOME GAME
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GENERAL PUBLIC:
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?
QUie �aat (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, cw u.
Darryl Brown. ��,f &ow
Waverly Merritt. dot aA Cindy Pleasants. � &�,o,
Hunter Fisher, �� Greg Rideout. &�,�
Ali Afrashteh. o�, �� Gordon Ipock. &�,M �,�
Geoff Hudson. cr�w �- Lizanne Jennings. &,
Michael Mayo. r� a� todd Evans, a
October 6. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Honor Board
Plagiarism Proceedings Propei
There seems to be some haggling
over the procedures in last Thurs-
day's Honor Board hearing where
an ECU student was found guilty
of plagiarism. Student Public
Defender Stephen Sherbin charged
that his client received an improper
hearing because of the prosecu-
tion's handling of the case.
Associate Dean of Student Life
James B. Mallory rebutted Sher-
bin's charges, saying that all mat-
ters were handled properly. Who is
to be believed?
Well, a look at the facts will
show the case was handled dif-
ferently, but not improperly. Most
cases are handled cut and dry. In
fact, most don't even reach the
Honor Board � only the more
serious ones make it that far. But,
this case, involving a charge con-
sidered quite serious within an
academic community, called for
the upmost care by the student
defenders and prosecutors handl-
ing it. Extraordinary measures,
like the Honor Board having the
prosecution go out and buy the
album the plagiarized song was on,
were definitely appropriate.
Courts in the "outside world"
frequently employ measures such
as these. It is not uncommon for a
judge, in the middle of an impor-
tant case, to ask the prosection or
the defense to go and find certain
pieces of information that would
help bring out the truth in the mat-
ter. And, after all, isn't justice the
ultimate goal of any judicial
system � school, state or federal?
Sherbin's contention that no
eBtmmocit
sanctions should be handed down
is wrong. He should be glad the
Honor Board cared enough to seek
out who was right and who was
wrong. The next time another
client of his might be innocent, and
he just may want the Honor Board
to resort to the type of tactics it did
last Thursday.
There seems to us to be a type of
"junior lawyer" playing going on.
Sherbin is grasping for
technicalities that don't exist and is
hurting the judicial system in the
process. Does he not want the guilt
or innocence of a person to be pro-
ved by the proceedings? Does he
just want to win? Through Dean
Mallory's comment that Sherbin is
"all wet" in his accussations, we
can assume that the public
defender is stumbling for ways to
salvage his and his client's already
lost case.
The importance of the universi-
ty's judicial system is a given.
Students before the Honor Board,
or any of the schools boards for
that matter, must be treated fairly
by all parties involved. To us, in
this case, the student was.
The argument that the public
defender is only trying to help his
client is not valid here. We agree
that it his right to appeal, but it is
not right to make accusations that
are not true. The facts he presents
of how the proceedings were con-
ducted are correct, but we, and ap-
parently Dean Mallory, find
nothing wrong with them. Instead,
it seems the case was handled cor-
rectly by the Honor Board.
Let's Balance The Budget
"NE NEW ,
PERSHINSI
MISSILE
Campus Forum
WHENITABSCTSLV,
POSTWELV. DOESNT
HAYETU&nHERE.
Can we who man the ship of state
deny it is somewhat out 0control? Our
national debt is approaching $1
trillion. A trillion dollars would be a
stack of $1,000 bills 67 miles high.
President Reagan, Feb. 18, 1981.
It took 205 years for that stack to pile
up 67 miles high. After four years of
Reagan's leadership, there will be
another 30 miles on the stack. Pass the
maple syrup!
These days, though, talk of scary
deficits is dismissed by people like
Treasury Secretary Donald Regan as a
plot by "liberals" with a "hidden
motive In fact, "deficits" has always
been a conservative war cry, not a liberal
one. Nevertheless, some liberals, in-
cluding this one, were prepared to
acknowledge in 1981 that, after 50 years
of activist government, the Augean
stable could use some tidying up.
Much of the federal budget had little
to do with stale thinking and powerful
interest groups. Perhaps Reagan, with
his charisma and his conservative ma-
jority in Congress, could do some good
that no Democrat would dare.
As it develops, Reagan has shown
almost no guts at all about clearing out
the crap. It takes no courage to slash
food stamps and other help for the poor.
It also doesn't save much money. As a
result, we now have $200 billion deficits
as far as the eye can see.
Despite all the talk about "en-
titlements" and "uncontrollables" and
so on, it's not so hard to balance the
budget. In fact, I did it over the
weekend.
My self-imposed rules were to cut
nothing that actually helps poor people,
and to raise no new revenues in ways
that would actually inhibit the
Republican virtues of work and thrift. I
didn't even start until Saturday after-
noon, and by dinner time I was halfway
there. Sunday's half was a bit tougher,
but even with time out for the papers
and the interview shows, I was done with
billions to spare by "Masterpiece
Theater You, too, can do it! Here's
how:
� Don't pay Social Security retirement
to people under 70. Depending on the
details, we could easily save $35 billion a
year this way. Life expectancy has in-
creased more than five years since Social
Security began in the 1930s. Today's
retirees would still be getting more in
benefits than what they paid in (with in-
terest). They also would still be getting a
better deal than future retirees, who will
be paying today's high payroll taxes over
most of their working lives.
� Eliminate all farm price supports.
(An optimistic $9 billion projected for
1984 � this year it was more than dou-
ble that.) Why artificially raise prices for
anything? Why aid farmers who aren't
poor? Why pay people not to grow food
when other people are going hungry?
While we're at it let's knock out $4.4
billion in special tax subsidies for the oil,
gas and timber industries. They don't
need it either.
� Stop giving away valuable services
to people who ought to pay for them.
"User fees" could raise almost $6 billion
� more than a billion just from private
plane users, this nation's most im-
probable charity case.
� Cancel the tax deduction for con-
sumer interest, including mortgages. If
we want to increase private savings and
business investment, encouraging people
to spend and borrow makes no sense.
And this deal gets better, of course, the
higher a person's tax bracket. It will cost
$36.4 billion in 1984.
� Tax capital gains at death. When
rich people die with appreciated assets,
the potential tax on their profit dies,
too. Now that there's virtually no estate
tax, this loophole is particularly un-
justified. Closing it would bring in about
$4 billion a year, even at today's very
low capital gains tax rates.
� Crack down on the tax-free fringe
benefits. Why should employer-paid
medical insurance be completely tax-free
when people who buy their own in-
surance (if they can afford it), such as
the unemployed, must use mostly after-
tax money? This oddity alone costs
about $18 billion a year in tax revenues,
while encouraging ever-higher medical
costs. Another $2 billion is lost to tax-
free "business" meals and entertain-
ment (the "three-martini lunch").
� Remember John Anderson's
50-cents-a-gallon gasoline tax? It's still a
good idea, to reduce gas consumption
and kick OPEC while it's down. The
federal gasoline tax went up a nickel last
year.
� Tax all federal benefits. Unemploy-
ment insurance, Social Security and so
on are all payments for not working.
Why should they go untaxed when
payments for working get hit? Really
poor people don't pay taxes when
they're working, and wouldn't have to
pay taxes on their benefits. The almost-
poor would pay almost nothing. But
those whose combined benefits and
wages add up to middle-class incomes
ought to pay middle-class taxes. Even
forgetting all that Social Security we're
not going to pay anymore, there's a
good $15 billion here.
� Defense. Defense spending increas-
ed from $136 billion in fiscal 1980 to
$205 billion in fiscal 1983. That's a 20
percent increase, even after inflation.
Isn't that enough? Just by holding the
line for 1984 (after inflation), we could
save $25 billion over current plans.
Total? About $190 billion, which is
just about next year's projected deficit.
Now, of course I've blithely ignored all
sorts of transitional problems and feed-
back effects and sundry complications
and blah blah blah etc etc. Complete
tax and welfare reform would be better
than these piecemeal measures, and
maybe even politically easier to achieve,
since people would be utterly bewildered
about whether they were ahead or
behind.
Most of the burden from these
changes would fall on the middle class,
since that's where most of the money is,
but there are plenty of little $2 billion
scams for the affluent that are even
more dispensible.
The point is, though, that it's not just
possible but easily possible to imagine a
balanced budget that's better for the
poor, for general prosperity and even
for national security than the sad,
deficit-ridden thing we now have (since
the best defense is a towering economy).
Maybe a real balanced budget can't be
achieved over the weekend. But
Reagan's had three years.
(c) 1983. United Feature Syndicate, loc
1 Repnmed from TTu V� Rtpv&Mcj
Employment of Distortion Tactics Seen In PIRG Editorial
I was genuinely shocked to see the
blatant disregard for the truth evidenc-
ed by the author of the editorial titled
"PIRG Accused of Being Leftist,
Deceitful" which appeared in the Sept.
29 issue of The East Carolinian.
To begin with, the author attempted
to characterize PIRGs as "left-wing
and socialist" by misrepresenting the
causes that PIRGs have been
associated with. First, he distorted the
endorsement which some PIRGs have
given to the concept of a bilateral
nuclear freeze to read that PIRGs have
worked for "disarmament for the
USA"
He twisted the work some PIRGs
have done to assure homosexuals will
not be discriminated against while
seeking employment to say that PIRGs
have worked for "job preference for
homosexuals In addition, he
characterized the Institue for Policy
Studies, a think tank founded by
members from the Kennedy Ad-
ministration's State Department, as be-
ing a "marxist and anti-American
agitation and propaganda think tank
Most any faculty member in the
Political Science department would
laugh out loud at such a definition.
Moreover, the author alleged that
PIRG has "links" with IPS. What
links? PIRG has no formal links with
IPS or any other organization because
PIRGs are thoroughly decentralized
student-run organizations. Some PIRG
at some school may have gotten some
literature from IPS because IPS had
conducted a study which provided in-
formation that was valuable to a
research project which the PIRG in
question was carrying out. For that
matter, some PIRG somewhere may
have gotten information from the
Heritage Foundation. So what?
The larger issue here; however, is
that these are just a few examples of
select issues which some PIRGs have
chosen to work on which the author
selected in an effort to portray PIRG in
an idealogicai manner. At the schools
where these projects were undertaken,
there was a concensus among PIRG
members that these were legitimate
areas of study. PIRG members propos-
ed the projects, and the PIRG board of
directors � elected by PIRG members
� selected them. What could be more
democratic?
Yet, these issues do not characterize
the work PIRGs do in general. PIRGs
primarily work on issues like women's
health care, the feasibility of building
bike paths, compiling shopper's guides
to help consumers find bargain and
the list goes on. What is socialistic or
left-wing about these issues.
The author goes on to allege that the
PIRG at Duke University attempted to
make it difficult for students to obtain
refunds by refusing to offer them in a
convenient place. This is patently un-
true. Duke PIRG gave out refunds this
year in Flower's lounge, right in the
center of campus.
What is the point of distorting the
truth and misrepresenting the facts
concerning an important issue which
students will be asked to vote on?
Shouldn't we, instead, be trying to pre-
sent the facts in an honest, clear, and
concise manner so as to educate
students? I must question what so-
meone who would willfully and
deliberately mislead people is trying to
accomplish and why.
Jay Stone
Junior, Political Science
Once More
On Sept. 29, The East Carolinian
ran a column on PIRG. The article,
filled with half truths, innuendo and
outright lies, attempted to throw a
shadow of fear over the entire PIRG
issue by describing PIRGs as deceitful
and leftist. Among the author's sallies
was the contention that some members
of PIRG who were running for SGA
were one-issue candidates and "robot-
like creatures
I am a candidate for day represen-
tative for SGA. I guess I am supposed
to be one of these "robot-like
creatures" because I support PIRG.
However, I support a number of other
issues, such as rent controls in Green-
ville, something every day student
should be interested in. As student co-
ordinator for the Poetry Forum, I am
interested in support for the aits. I
have no intention of "fading out" and
1 'leaving my voters without representa-
tion
PIRGs involve themselves in a
number of projects such as women's
health care and rape awareness, en-
vironmental issues such as dumping of
toxic wastes and consumer issues like
informing shoppers where to find
bargains and critically evaluating utili-
ty rate increases. In short, PIRG tries
to give students a political organization
through which they can have an impact
on the community. After all, we live
here too.
Nor are PIRG meetings secretive.
Meetings are held at 6:30 p.m. every
Tuesday night at Mendenhall. Anyone
is welcome to attend.
Don't be swayed by a few who
would distort the facts and try,
through fear, to decide for the many!
Aware yourself of the facts � they are
readily available. And most important-
ly, vote on Oct. 13.
AlMaginnes
Senior, English
Brewless
As we were sitting in our room the
other day sipping one of our last legal
beers, a rare thought entered our
brains: Oh No! Prohibition is back!
What is the world coming to? As of
Oct. 1, the well has run dry. Eighteen
year olds are now being treated like
Rodney Dangerfield � with absolutely
no respect.
Seriously, we must admit that we
agree with most of the provisions of
the Safe Roads Act. But when a group
of adults is stripped of its earned
priveleges for no good reason, then
there is something rotten in Denmark
(or North Carolina, as the case mav
be).
Well, the law is the law. But take
note all of you dry 18 year olds: The
1984 election will be here soon! Let's
all remember our gracious Governor
when we go to the polls, if we are not in
a combat zone then. The BOONE'S
FARM Boys will prevail!
David Maufeus
Gerald Johnson
General College
(Editor's Note: We agree the new
law was wrong for being applied
retroactively. We sincerely offer our
condolences to all those students under
19 years of age.)
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every frve issues.

Safe Road
EC
B PA1KK K
ONKI1 I
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Not only did trill
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the legal drmkir .
to 19, bir N (
ficials de.i :
enact the ia on
day mgru' Insull
added to thi
when manv of ECl
1 8 - e a
discovered
time to drink
one da e
Green
nightclub
decided n
any char. -
18-year-oids
on F
because
vohed
them out a
As a result.
as the la
night for
freshmen fl
few. 18-c
manager
Frida-
tior
"1:
tonight -v
nightclub owner To
Haines on T
There
availar
ton, Flei:
Cane
President.
Oct 12
All studer
filed with
Oct. 1:
Candida
and uork
qualifk .
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KELDOVOt!
doing nr
STARTS
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MOVIES
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I HI EASTt AKOl INIAN
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when
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: Maufeus
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nera! College
new
' - applied
ncerety offer our
� tents under
im Rules
� elcomes letters
� Mail or
tfice in the Old
rom Joyner
nfication, all let-
re name, major and
i hone number
the authorts Letters
typewritten pages,
' nted. All
ting for brevi-
l nd no personal
' permitted. Students,
' anting letters for this
led that thev are limited
issues.
Safe Roads Act
ECU Students Not Pleased With Law
B PATRICK
O'NEIl I
Maff W n,�
Not onl) did the
Sate Roads Act raise
the legal drinking age
to 19, but N C. of-
ficials decided to
enact the law on a Fri-
day night' Insult was
added to this injur
when mam of ECU's
18-year-olds
discoered that their
time to drink ran out
one da ear!
G r e e n i 1 1 e
nightclub owners
decided not to take
any chances b letting
18-year-olds in clubs
on Fnda night
because of hassles in-
volved in clearing
:hem out at midnight
As a result. Thursda
was the last "party"
night m a n
freshmen (Though a
few 18-year-olds
managed to hit the
Frida) happ hour ac-
tion.)
' 11 stops a tt e r
:onight said Attic
nightclub owner Tom
Haines on Thursdaj
l�AW.��. � '�i
referring to the admis-
sion o' 18-year-olds in
his dub "At 12:01
a.m. (Saturday morn-
ing) it would be
almost impossible to
try to get the 18-year-
olds out, so we're not
going to let them in in
the first place
Haines, who is also
vice-president of the
Greenville Downtown
Night Club Associa-
tion, has been oppos-
ed to the new drinking
age law from its in-
ception. "1 sa the
same thing every body
else does Haines
said, "It's not going
to stop a thing.
"All it's going to
do is change their
drinking habits ' not
their drinking.
K l r b y Bryson,
owner of the Elbo
Room Taern, had
similar sentiments
'They're (18-year-
olds) just going to go
and buy a case of
beer, ride out in the
country, away from
the road blocks, awa
from the highway
patrol, drink all they
want and go slam
right into a telephone
pole
Bryson, president
of the nightclub
association, said the
new law would hurt
his sales because 20
percent of his business
comes from 18-year-
olds.
To offset revenue
loss Bryson will con-
tinue to allow 18-year
olds in his club, but
not allow them to
drink. Patrons age 19
and above will be
identified bv hospital
arm bands
designating age.
Eighteen-year-olds
will have to drinks
soft drinks. They will
also have to pay a
double admission
charge to compensate
for the arm band
costs.
ECU 18-year-olds
do no appear to be
pleased with the new
law. Those downtown
on Thursday night
aUo didn't think the
law would do the job
it was created to do.
"I think it's
TT"
, ��11 �a�
mere is one Dorm Representative position
available in each of the following dorms: Belk, Cot-
ton, Fleming, Scott and White.
Candidates are also needed to run for Junior Class
President.
Oct. 12 is the deadline for all write-in candidates.
All students wishing to run for an office who have not
tiled with the SGA office must file before noon on
Oct .12.
Candidates must fill out expense account sheets
and worker lists Failure to do so will result in dis-
qualification.
Urfr-rYrr�WWWWAV.W
(SSjSEHSTtS $2.00 TIL 5:30 � jIm)
HE! DOVER!
doing rr
ENDS TODAY:
1 10-3-10-5 10 10-9 10
"A BOY AND
HIS DOG R
ENDS TODAY
1 20-V20-? 2ft 2ft- 20
THE GATES
OF HELL-
RATH) R
1:10-3 10 5:10-7:10-9:10
STARTS
FRIDAY!

ONL1
l-J-5-7-9
! � In space no one
fri -sat j can hear you scream.
ONLYS2.00IJL IBM
OPENS NOT ALL E.T.s ARE NICE rSl
V 11:30 PM THIS IS THE STORY OF ONE.J
MONTY
PYTHONS'
MEANINGl
OF LIFE"
unfair said 18-year-
old freshmen James
Lucas. "If 1 can be
drafted, I ought to be
able to drink Lucas
believes North
Carolina should have
inacted a grandfather
clause with the new
law which would
premit people who
turned 18 before Oct.
1 to continue to pur-
chase beer and wine.
"I think it stinks
said student Jill
Halley, who won't
turn 19 until next
September. "1 finally
get the privilege to
drink and now I
can't
Mark Turnillo, an
ECU 18-year-old
from Marylrnd, has
been affected twice by
new drinkig age
laws. "It changed in
Maryland right before
I turned 18 Tornillo
said. "I missed by
about six months up
there and I came
down here and they
changed the law
again
Holley and Lucas
both say the new law
won't stop them from
getting alcohol. "I'm
going to find a way to
get out anyway
Halley said. "All the
other 18-year-olds I
know are going to go
out anyway ' we'll
find a way to drink
"It's not going to
chance my drinking
habits; it's not going
to change most of my
friends' drinking
habits Lucas said.
"I'll get it, it's no pro-
blem
Read
The
Classifieds
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�f?e �aat Olarnlinian
SUBCRIPTION FORM
Name:
Address:
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Business
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Students wishing to have their parents receive The
East Carolinian can fill out the form above and drop
The East Carolinian offices, second floor. Publica-
tions building, across from the entrance of Joyner
Library. Rates are $25 for one year and $15 for six
months. See Geoff Hudson, circulation manager.
ATTIC
OCT 77
Rll G-IRL5
Ev&Ry VrcrHr
(e'Kceer Concerts)
Lflprtrs'&
ft 4lft�
liu;
Oct. 8
ujT TH Er.C.L
Fed frcKer
y
IKM IIUi
FALL SEASON
SPOR TS WE A R
AT
H.L. HODGES & BOSD'S SPORTING GOODS
RUSSELL ACTIVE WEAR
-SWEAT PANTS - $9.95
-CREWNECK - 9.95
SWEATSHIRTS
-HOODED -Reg. $12.95
SWEATSHIRTS Now 9.95
(PAY FOR THE SW EATSHIRT &
GET THE HOOD FREE)
MANY COLORS & SIZES
BEST ASSORTMENT
RUSSELL JACKETS IN TOWN!
LINED 4 HOODED!
COLORS INCLUDE:
COLUMBIA BLUE, WHITE,
GOLD, GREY, & NAVY
-PLAIN $49.95
-LETTERED - 59.95 A
(ecu & unc) cScaE
BE PREPARED FOR �octwg goods
COOL WEATHER
NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
If you re a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
senous look at the Army.
Army bands offer you an average
ot 40 performances a month In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel
The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to plav with good musiaans. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills
It s a genuine, right-now. imme-
diate opportunity
Compare it to your civilian offers
Then write: Army Opportunines, PO
Box 300, North Hollywood. CA 91603
ARMY BAND.
BEALLVOUCANBE.
1





THE EAST CAROLINJAN
Style
OCTOBER 6. 1983 Page 6
J.C. Superstar Is Slick Entertainment
Timothy Parker plays Jesus of Nazareth as he appears in the ironic
apotheosis, a prelude to his crucifiction, in Jesus Christ Superstar.
GORDON IPOCK
The audience at Wednesday
evening's opening of Jesus Christ
Superstar genuinely enjoyed this
rock passion play � but for the
usual and wrong reasons. Rather
than being moved by the story,
the audience was probably ex-
pressing delight at slick entertain-
ment.
This fault, if you want to call it
a fault, has nothing to do with the
East Carolina Playhouse's perfor-
mance. The group of
predominantly student actors did
a superb job. But slick entertain-
ment is what Jesus Christ
Superstar is all about. It's not
sophisticated fare, but slick,
brazen and audacious, and the
singers, actors and dancers were
equal to the task of pulling it off.
However, this is 1983, a dozen
years after the rock opera first
opened on Broadway in October
1971, and Superstar doesn't have
the shock value it once had. No
church groups protested outside
McGinnis Theatre as they did on
Broadway. There has been no
brouhaha here. Personally, I find
many of the TV charlatans mas-
qurading as evangelists religiously
more offensive than Superstar.
If the production doesn't of-
fend, it's not because Director
Edgar Loessin backs away from
the aspects of the opera that
originally had Christian critics so
outraged. There was plenty of
bare flesh exposed in numerous
lascivious scenes. The opening
scene of act one looked more like
Lucifer's court in hell in a rock
opera of Paradise Lost. Later, as
Jesus reclined under the tender
caress of Mary Magdalene, the
apostles lounged about, each with
a concubine at his side. The in-
timation of sexual relations bet-
ween Jesus and Mary was also
played up. When Jesus sings,
"And I think I'll sleep well
tonight Mary nods with a
knowing smile. Like Tom O'
Horgan, the original Broadway
director of Superstar, Loessin
gives full play to licentiousness.
Besides the flesh, the other
aspect that had Christians up in
arms in '71 was the denial of
Jesus' Divinity. Andrew Lloyd
Webber and Tim Rice who wrote
the music and lyrics cast Jesus as
"just a man the right man in the
right place at the right time, not
the divine Son of God. They also
ignored his Resurrection.
The ECU production retains
this humanization of Jesus.
Timothy Parker plays Jesus as a
man and a weakling of a man at
that. After Jesus' death on the
cross, the opera ends in darkness
as an unseen voice explains that
Jesus was buried in a nearby
tomb. I sat hoping to hear "And
three days later, He arose But
this production is faithful to the
original script, and the Resurrec-
tion was ignored. Perhaps this
predictable ending shouldn't have
bothered me, but it did. I left the
theatre feeling depressed rather
than uplifted.
Well enough background and
history. What of the performance
itself?
The rock music coming from
the orchestra pit electrified the au-
dience as the rock opera began.
Former Laughing Matter guitarist
John Shannon and bassist David
Garza worked well with the or-
chestra. Expectations were high as
the curtain opened, and no one
was disappointed, at least not dur-
ing the first act.
Jeanne Resua as Mary
Magdalene earned strong ap-
plause after each of her solos.
Microphones were standard for
soloists, but Resua demonstrated
that her strong, clear voice could
fill McGinnis without amplifica-
tion: She sang some solos sans
mike. Besides a strong voice,
Resua had the ability to inject
emotion into her singing at will
and give the entire performance a
lift.
Aubrey Barnes as Simon
Zealotes also deserves praise. His
single solo was the most dramatic
of the evening and earned him
bravos at curtain call. Barnes
generated charisma and excite-
ment that no other soloist match-
ed. He combined a powerful stage
presence and strong acting with a
dynamic voice.
Barnes brings to mind Ben
Vereen who played Judas in the
original Broadway production.
This production of Superstar
would have been much stronger
had Barnes also been cast as
Judas. He could have contrasted
with Jesus in a way that Loren
Watkins' Judas didn't.
Both Watkins and Timothy
Parker as Jesus gave credible per-
formances, but their physical and
emotional similarities (both
played weak men) muddied any
real conflict between Jesus and
Judas, a conflict central to
Superstar. During scenes of the
Last Supper and Jesus' arrest, the
conflict between Jesus and Judas
should be piercing; instead, it was
While Corporations Occupy South Africa,
UNC-Chapel Hill Debate Fund Divestment s
Bv JAY STONE
Staff Writer
There is a large and growing movement in the
United States today calling for divestment of funds
from corporations that invest in South Africa.
Students have been at the forefront of this move-
ment and the number of universities that have taken
action toward divestment is too numerous to list.
Those that have sold all their shares in corpora-
tions doing business in South Africa include An-
tioch and Hampshire College, Ohio University,
Michigan State, Indiana Cenral and the Universities
of Massachusetts, Oregon and Wisconsin and the
list is growing.
The divestment movement on the country's cam-
puses centers upon the university's endowment
fund and the feeling on the part of students that an
institution of higher learning must have a socially
responsible investment policy.
Currently the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill is embroiled in the controversy sur-
rounding the issue of divestment. On Februrary 8,
1983, the students at UNC were presented with a
referendum condemning the system of aparthied in
South Africa, and calling for more student involve-
ment in UNC investment decision making policy.
When the vote was tabulated the Elections Board
announced that students had voted 3,313 to 1,891
to pass a resolution to have the university divest its
stock from corporations in South Africa, and to im-
plement a task force with student representatives to
help the Board of Trustees better serve the needs of
the student body.
Ten days later, a group of students calling
themselves the UCN Public Interest Research
Group appeared before the university's Endowment
Board. UNC-PIRG presented the Board with the
results of the student referendum and their case in
support of divestment. Soon after hearing the
students' case, however, the Board of Trustees of
the Endowment decided against divestment.
The position taken and maintained by the Board
according to UNC chancellor Christopher C. For-
dham, "is that they are simply stewards of the en-
dowment fund which he added, "is similar to the
position taken by officals at Harvard University
Some students, however, interpreted the Board's
response in a less flattering manner. According to
one UNC student, John Tate, chairman of the
Board, simply handed the PIRG students a hand-
written note which said "the business of the En-
dowment Board is to maximize profit and that's
it In any case the divestment movement at UNC
did not end with the Board's decision. Students held
demonstrations in support of divestment during the
1983 spring semester. As recently as Wednesday,
Sept. 28, the Campus Government Council, the
legislative branch of the UNC student government,
passed a resolution reaffirming the students' call
for divestment.
Admittedly, the divestment issue is a complex one
and most students know very little about the
political system of a country that is thousands of
miles away. Nevertheless, many facts about the
country are clear and much more information is
readily available from a multitude of different
sources.
It is common knowledge, for example, that the
institutional foundation of South African society is
racism. Blacks are denied the right to vote in a
country where they constitute 72 percent of the
population. Yet, whites earn 64 percent of the in-
come generated by the economy while comprising
only 16 percent of the population, according to the
Africa Fund, a New York based research organiza-
tion.
Black political dissidents may be jailed without
trial and the press is prohibited from reporting the
cases of people who have been detained in this man-
ner. According to Amnesty International, the
government sanctions the use of torture on political
detainees. In addition, a shockingly, dispropor-
tianate number of blacks are excuted as compared
to whites. In 1980, out of a total of 129 people
hanged in South Africa, 85 were Africans, 43 were
coloureds, one was Indian and one was white.
The infant mortality rate is also distributed ine-
quitably among the population. According to the
Rand Daily Mail, a South African newspaper, the
infant mortality per 1000 in 1980 was 12 whites, 69
Urban Africans and 282 Rural Africans. Also,
See African, p. 7
� School Of Music Events �
2 Oct. 7OPERA SCENES, 8:15 � Scenes from: The Magic Flute 2 and The Daughter of the Regi- ment. (Please note: The Opera Scenes program will be performed on Oct. 7 onlv and there will be 9 no performance on Oct. 8 ast originally scheduled.) �
I Oct. 9DONNA COLEMAN, piano J Facultv Recital, 8:15 �
� Oct.12PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE CONCERT, 8:15 �
� Oct. 21-22ELECTRONIC MUSIC PLUsJ FESTIVAL � Oct. 21, Concert, 8! 15 � Oct. 22, All Day J
� Oct. 23SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEM-S BLE CONCERT, 8:15 � Wright Auditorium �
� Oct. 24RICHARD WITHERSPOON.J trumpet � KEITH BECK, percussion � Senior Recital, 7:30 �
� Oct. 26DAVID HASS, Trombone I Graduate Recital, 7:30 �
� Oct. 27KELLY VIA, flute J Graduate Recital, 7:30
J Oct. 28TIM WARD, voice � KIM GATLIN, piano Senior Recital, 7:30 -
Never Sav Never.9 'Bis Chill9Hit
4Never Say Never'
James Bond, British Secret Ser-
vice Agent 007, is dangerous in his
new action-packed film Sever Say
Sever Again.
In a world dominated by com-
puters and bureaucracy, he is a
man whose greatest strength lies
in his own intuitions, a man who
allows his hunches to take him
straight to the heart of the danger
and who has the courage and the
skill to face the gravest perils �
and survive.
So when SPECTRE (Special
Executor for Counter-
intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge
and Extortion) holds the world to
ransom with a devastating act of
nuclear terrorism, only Bond is
able to cut straight through to the
rotten core of the operation.
While recharging his batteries
at a health clinic, Bond's sixth
sense picks up an early warning of
SPECTRE'S plan. His involve-
ment leads him from England to
the Bahamas and the South of
France, pursued along the way by
the beautiful but deadly Fatima
Blush, a SPECTRE assassin who
is determined to get her man � in
more ways than one.
He encounters the charming but
sinister Largo, one of the richest
and most lethal men in the world,
and his mistress, the enigmatic
Domino, who is unaware of
Largo's true nature and who
becomes quite taken with the
charming Mr. Bond. The entire
SPECTRE operation is master-
minded by Bond's long-time
enemy. Ernst Stavro Blofeld.
Against this arsenal of evil,
Bond is backed up by his
American pal, Felix Leiter (who
has the knack of turning up at the
most opportune moments), as
well as by members of the British
Secret Service: "M the adoring
Miss Moneypenny, and Algy the
Armorer with his sophisticated
and ingenious collection of
devices.
Stunts, special effects and high-
speed action abound as James
Bond follows the story to its
dramatic conclusion, refusing to
take anything � well, hardly
anything � lying down.
Never Say Never Again will be
released to theatres at East
Carolina Oct. 7.
'The Big Chill'
Writerdirector Lawrence
Kasdan has helped create some of
the most popular and successful
screen entertainment in recent
years, writing or co-writing
Raiders of the Lost Ark, Con-
tinental Divide, The Empire
Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi
and the powerful drama Body
Heat, which also marked his
directorial debut.
He has now directed a unique
ensemble of contemporary young
actors in The Big Chin, which are
true to people's lives. In this film,
the characters are former college
housemates who, over the years,
have drifted apart. Members of
the baby-boom generation who
entered young adulthood as
idealistic non-conformists, they
are now, for the most part,
member of the establishment. The
young men of the story have
"grown up" to be a running-shoe
store entrpreneur, a journalist for
a popular magazine, a television
star and a disillusioned Vietnam
veteran. The women have become
a doctor, a lawyer and the wife of
a businessman.
Suddenly and unexpectedly,
this group of old friends is
reunited at the funeral of one of
their own who has committed
suicide; he was a drop-out who in
their earlier years served as their
collective conscience. Stunned by
the loss, each comes to the reu-
nion with a deep need to
reestablish the bond of caring
they once shared.
The Big Chill emerges as a bit-
tersweet testimony to a confused
generation, one that has serviced
the passions of youth and grown
through painful self-awareness
and love into adulthood.
In this context, the title The Big
Chill takes on several resonant
metaphorical meanings, from the
obvious reference to the group's
own mortality (strongly reinforc-
ed by the occasion of their reu-
nion), to the cooling of idealistic
fires in the face of more calculated
self-interest.
Kasdan and producer Michael
Shamberg cast the eight equally
important leading roles with some
of the most gifted young actors in
films today: Tom Berenger, Glenn
Close, Jeff Goldblum, William
Hurt, Kevin Kline, Mary Kay
Place, Meg Tilly and Jobeth
Williams. With the exception of
Meg Tilly, all the actors are ap-
proximately the same age and
more or less at a similar point in
each of their careers.
African
Cont'd from p. 6
while Africans make
up 72 percent of the
population, they are
allowed to per-
manently live on only
13 percent of the land.
Opponents of
divestment state that
investment by cor-
porations provides
job opportunities for
blacks and helps pro-
mote positive change.
They often site the
Sullivan Principles, a
voluntary code of
conduct for U.S.firms
operating in South
Africa drafted in
1976, which call for
non-segregation in the
work place and fair
employment prac-
tices.
According to
William Lucy,
Secretary Treasurer
for the American
Federation fo State,
County, and
Municipal
Employees, stated the
Sullivan Principles
have very little impact
on the realities of
apartheid.
"Although
(the Sul
Priciples) si
splendid on pi
Lucy was quo
saying by
News, "that
they essential
main. Paper
ciples. Anothei
of someone's gc
tentions
against the r
reality U.S.
porations, prof
of divestment
employ fewe-
one percent
working poej
South Africa
Thus, even
Principles weri
ticed they won
feet an msigi
number of wi
The Sullivan
ciples make
mand for ch
the fundai
structure of
thied, no demj
black political
In response
arguemeiv
who oppose
ment, UNC
Doug Berger i
East Caro,
"The arguem
Slick E
limp,
bordering on bathos.
Though the central
conflict between Jesus
and Judas was disap-
pointing, several
other actors kept the
show alive. Gregory
Smith as Caiaphas
was evil incarnate, a
veritable Darth
Vader. Tmothy White
as Annas played his
part well as did all of
the Jewish priests.
John Kuhn's pro-
fessional acting didn't
go unnoticed either.
His portrayl of Pon-
tius Pilate was strong
and imperial, befit-
ting a Roman gover-
nor. Yet, he convinc-
ed the audience that
he really cared about
this humble Jesus
before him, a nice
balance of strength
and tenderness.
A serious flaw in
the Broadway version
of Superstar was the
non-stop action, no
seperate acts or inter-
mission. To Loessin's
credit, he divided the
ECU production into
two acts. Unfor-
tunately, the slow
start of the second act
with scenes at the Last
Supper and in the
Garden of
Gcthsemane make for
a slow start after in-
termission, and the se-
cond act never
to hit the moi
the first act acl
But this w(
may be inherent
rock opera
music is inter
therefore sua
short worl
doesn't hold
for opera
works. The
loses its pow
an hour or so
it doesn't hi
diversity "J
phonic mus
rock music,
undeniably wi
none of the
the show's e
begins with
our senses an
by its onsu
never could
the entire all
one sitting
Costuming
production
superb. Jesus
touted
robe appear
tical to the �i
ing S20.000
ed on Broadi
sets were sim
tional and tot
quate � an
ment from t
Broadway i
The focu
is, as it shoul
people
The East
Plavhouse
ECU School
must be co
for a fine ef
rt
A woman wfc
tot I
her greatest tj
bet greatest
pOf. 8 shot M
tornpei-l
Witch it! �7s tack with Us
ffiai 'Never Say Never Agahi Eight totaled pert
the
of the
Friday aed
's Heedrix Theatre. Shoi
at 7 p.m. sod 36 p.m. Adaus.
I.D. Ami Activity Card.
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Page b
inment
iid had the- ability to inject
'tion into her singing at will
v ve the entire performance a
Barnes as Simon
jo desenes praise. His
tv :he most dramatic
vening and earned him
.it curtain call. Barnes
d charisma and excite-
U no other soloist match-
combined a powerful stage
f. md strong acting with a
imic voice.
rings to mind Ben
plaed Judas in the
Broadway production.
?duction of Superstar
Id have been much stronger
also been cast as
He could hae contrasted
n a a that Loren
I is didn't.
" � Kins and Timothy
v gave credible per-
� their physical and
larities (both
en) muddied any
'tween Jesus and
central to
v During scenes of the
: and Jesus' arrest, the
between Jesus and Judas
ild be piercing; instead, it was
Music Events
3:15 �
The Magic Flute
.?hter of the Regi- �
The Opera �
vill be performed
and there will be 9
Ocl. 8 as �

EM . piano 9
8:15 �

NSEMBLE�
� �
TR ' Ml sic PLUS,
1
: cert, 8:15 '
? ah Dav
WIND FNSEM-i
RT. 8:15
irium '
A R
WITHERSPOON
; on
Recital, 7:30
ID HASS, Trombone
aduate Recital, 30
LY VIA, flute
ite Recital. 7:30
K ARD. voice
II IN, piano
Recital, 7:30
Town
mortality (strongly reinforc-
the occasion of their reu-
to the cooling of idealistic
Is in the face of more calculated
-i merest.
asdan and producer Michael
iberg cast the eight equally
bortant leading roles with some
he most gifted young actors in
is today: Tom Berenger, Glenn
Ise, �eff Goldblum, William
t, Kevin Kline, Mary Kay
:e, Meg Tilly and Jobeth
liams. With the exception of
Tilly, all the actors are ap-
Ixiinately the same age and
pe or less at a similar point in
of their careers.
u
� Hi,
Big Chill.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6. 1983
African Rights Threatened

Cont'd from p. 6
while Africans make
up 72 percent of the
population, they are
allowed to per-
manently live on only
13 percent of the land.
Opponents of
divestment state that
investment by cor-
porations provides
job opportunities for
blacks and helps pro-
mote positive change.
They often site the
Sullivan Principles, a
voluntary code of
conduct for U.S.firms
operating in South
Africa drafted in
1976, which call for
non-segregation in the
work place and fair
employment prac-
tices.
According to
William
Secretary
for the
Federation
County,
M u n i c i
Lucy,
Treasurer
American
fo State,
and
p a 1
Employees, stated the
Sullivan Principles
have very little impact
on the realities of
apartheid.
"Although these
(the Sullivan
Priciples) sound
splendid on paper
Lucy was quoted as
saying by Action
News, "that is what
they essentially re-
main. Paper prin-
ciples. Another case
of someone's good in-
tentions dashed
against the rocks of
reality U.S. cor-
porations, proponents
of divestment say,
employ fewer than
one percent of all
working poeple in
South Africa anyway.
Thus, even if the
Principles were prac-
ticed they would af-
fect an insignificant
number of workers.
The Sullivan Prin-
ciples make no de-
mand for change in
the fundamental
structure of apar-
thied, no demand for
black political rights.
In response to the
arguements of those
who oppose divest-
ment, UNC student
Doug Berger told The
East Carolinian,
"The arguement that
U.S. corporations are
a progressive force in
South Africa is a very
fallacious arguement.
If anything, U.S. cor-
porations strengthen
apartheid by selling
the government com-
puters which help it to
maintain the pass laws
and by the statements
of some indication
that they will
cooperate with the
South African
government in the
event of civil unrest
In fact, according
to a study published
by the Africa fund,
contingency plans
prepared by the
General Motors cor-
poration indicated
that vehicles may be
taken over by the
government for civil
defense purposes. The
study added that Con-
trol Data Corporation
sold equipment to the
South African police
in violation of U.S.
commerce department
regulations.
UNC has approx-
imately two million
dollars invested in
such corporations as
General Motors,
IBM, Control Data
Corporation and
Colgate-Palmolive.
The referendum pass-
ed by students last
Feburary called for all
of the school's money
to be divested from
these corporations
within one year.
Those who favor
divestment added that
the arguement would
result in a loss of
money for the school
is contradicted by
facts. According to a
letter to the editor
written by Ashley
McKinney in The Dai-
ly Tarheel, UNC's
student newspaper,
Michigan State
University, among
other schools, actual-
ly realized a substan-
tial profit by diversi-
ty.
In the meantime,
the students involved
in the divestment
movement at Chapel
Hill continue to work
to persuade the
members of the Board
of Trustees to change
their position on
divestment.
"I'm hoping that the
student government
will begin to apply
organized pressure
Berger said.
"One thing that
Harvard students did
was set up an endow-
ment fund for divest-
ment in which seniors
donate to an alter-
native endowment
fund. They solicit
funds from alumni
wheh put financial
pressure on the Board
of Trustees Berger
added.
Recently those who
worked on divestment
presented their case to
the campus YMCA, a
large contributor to
the endowment fund.
According to Andrea
Stumpf, a spokesper-
son for the YMCA,
the organization
decided not to en-
dorse divestment'
because they felt that
the move would notj
be representative or
the sentiments of the,
Y's total membership.
"We have, however,
issued a statement I
calling for an invest-
ment policy based on
social responsibility
said Stumpf.
Meanwhile, Berger
said that he and a
group of students,
have formed a
political party and
will run candidates
for the student
government in
Feburary. If they are
successful he said,
they will work to
make the student
government adopt a
much more active role
on the issue.
presents
Thursday Night
College Night
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Friday Night
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SEE
Slick Entertainment
limp,
bordering on bathos.
Though the central
conflict between Jesus
and Judas was disap-
pointing, several
other actors kept the
show alive. Gregory
Smith as Caiaphas
was evil incarnate, a
veritable Darth
Vader. Tmothy White
as Annas played his
part well as did all of
the Jewish priests.
John Kuhn's pro-
fessional acting didn't
go unnoticed either.
His portrayl of Pon-
tius Pilate was strong
and imperial, befit-
ting a Roman gover-
nor. Yet, he convinc-
ed the audience that
he really cared about
this humble Jesus
before him, a nice
balance of strength
and tenderness.
A serious flaw in
the Broadway version
of Superstar was the
non-stop action, no
seperate acts or inter-
mission. To Loessin's
credit, he divided the
ECU production into
two acts. Unfor-
tunately, the slow
start of the second act
with scenes at the Last
Supper and in the
Garden of
Gethsemane make for
a slow start after in-
cond act never seemed
to hit the momentum
the first act achieved.
But this weakness
may be inherent to the
rock opera. Rock
music is intense and
therefore suited to
short works, but it
doesn't hold up well
for opera-length
works. The music
loses its power after
an hour or so because
it doesn't have the
diversity of sym-
phonic music. The
rock music, though
undeniably witty, has
none of the punch by
the show's end that it
begins with because
our senses are dulled
by its onslaught. I
never could listen to
the entire album at
one sitting.
Costuming for the
production was
superb. Jesus' much-
touted crucifiction
robe appeared iden-
tical to the shimmer-
ing $20,000 gown us-
ed on Broadway. The
sets were simple, fun-
tional and totally ade-
quate � an improve-
ment from the garish
Broadway originals.
The focus in the play
is, as it should be, the
people.
The East Carolina
Playhouse and the
ECU School of Music
must be commended
Jesus Christ
Superstar. The rock
opera was originally
intended to be an ex-
travaganza, a shocker
that overwhelms the
senses. Elaborate
lighting, staging,
costumes and a large
and talented cast are
prerequisites before
even attempting it.
For the departments
involved, this rock
opera provides the
same challenge that
playing and defeating
a Big Eight team pro-
vided the ECU foot-
ball team. Pulling it
off says a lot about
the Playhouse's
credentials.
Even though it's
not as controversial as
it once was,Jesus
Christ Superstar is
worth seeing for the
sheer excitement it of-
fers.
CHUBBY CHECKER
Thursday, Oct. 6,1983
HH
Purchase a Carolina Opry House membership for the regular price of $10.00 and receive
one ticket of your choice to see either: CHUBBY CHECKER, NITTY GRITTY DIRT
BAND (Fri. Oct 7), or DELBERT McCLINTON with Steve Bassett (Sat. Oct 8).
Also Thursday, Oct 6 with CHUBBY CHECKER: TWIST CONTEST FINALS! Winner
will receive an ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP TO NEW YORK CITY -plus- QQQ QQ
CASH!
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CHARLES
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?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Emory Enjoys Victory
By CINDY PLEAS ANTS
Spom Editor
When ECU Head football
Coach Ed Emory took off for his
weekly recruiting trip Monday
morning, he almost decided not to
come back.
After ECU'S 13-6 win over
Missouri Saturday, Emory found
that the Pirates are becoming a
household name throughout the
state.
"I had principals coming up to
me and congratulating me
Emory said. "It's brought us a lot
of attention. I just couldn't
believe the enthusiasm I saw. 1
just went crazy and started driving
ail around the place.
"I ended up driving over 500
miles and visited 15 different
schools
The victory over Missouri was
still fresh on Emory's mind at
Tuesday's press conference, and
with good reason � this is the
first time ECU has ever beaten a
Pirates
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
Although the ECU Pirates just
returned from Big-Eight country,
Head Coach Ed Emory said the
Pirates won't have any trouble
getting ready for Southwestern
Louisiana.
Big-Eight school.
"It's a big win he said. "It
made the whole state proud. It
was a win for North Carolina
The Pirates, now 3-1, have got-
ten off to a good start but still
have a long way to go. According
to Emory, the first wins of the
season get more important down
the road.
"If we continue winning, it (the
victory over the Tigers) will be one
of the biggest in the history of the
school he said. "But it will also
help our scheduling and
recruiting
Missouri, which is the only
Division-1 school in the state,
wasn't embarrassed Saturday
afternoon, according to Emory.
"They lost to a heckuva foot-
ball program Emory said. "It
takes pressure off an athletic
director when they schedule us.
They're not scheduling a win for a
homecoming game
Although the Pirates lost a
heartbreaker to Florida State
(47-46) and went on to beat N.C.
State, Emory believes the Pirates
didn't come together as a whole
until meeting Missouri.
"We lined up with more con-
fidence he said. "The defense
played the most dominating game
they've played since I've been
head coach.
A few players responsible for
the defensive showing were defen-
sive tackles Hal Stephens and
Steve Hamilton, defensive ends
Maury Banks and Kenny Phillips
and nose guard Gerry Rogers.
Rogers, a senior from Pott-
stown, Pa said the defense final-
ly had a chance to prove
themselves Saturday.
"For some reason, we just
didn't click before the Missouri
game he said. "We knew we
had the potential, but we hadn't
used it all. We had 3 good games,
but we hadn't had a great game
antil Missouri
LOU CLI UMONS � CCU ��� L��
Pirate Head Coach Ed Emory is still enjoying ECU's victory over Missouri Saturday, but he's got the
corner of his eye resting on this week's opponent�Southwestern Louisiana.
"The Ragin' Cajuns Emory
said, "they've been a thorn in my
side. You know, they beat me here
in my first season when we were
supposed to win.
Then, back in 1977, they also
upset East Carolina
Both of those games were
-�� mm tl rW9
i r � i
2SFi
Home Win Ag
played in Greenville, and the
Pirates would indeed like a chance
to finally knock off the Cajuns on
ECU's home turf.
In 1980, the Pirates fumbled
five times in the second half and
lost to USL 27-21.
Despite USL's 0-3 record,
Emory and the Pirates aren't tak-
ing the Cajuns lightly. "They do
have fine personnel, and vou can
expect the Ragin' Cajuns to be
ragin' when they come to Ficklen
Stadium Saturday.
"We don't have any teams that
are breathers. We're not the type
of team that can just show up and
e ect to win
At Missouri, Emory believes
the Pirates out-communicated the
Tigers and will have to do the
same against USL.
"We've got to be sound on
communication he said. "If
we're not ready mentally and
physically, they're (USL) good
enough to beat you
The Cajuns, however, haven't
been able to beat their first three
opponents this year. USL fell on
the road to Northeast Louisiana
(31-6), at home to Tennessee-
Chattanooga (38-14) and on the
road to Rice (22-21) two weeks
ago.
The Cajuns had an open r.ate
last weekend. "They have had
two weeks to prepare for us with
an open date last weekend
Emory said. "This is an advan-
tage for them, both is getting
ready for East Carolina, but also
in working out some things that
may not have gone the way they
wanted them to in the first three
games. I fully expect a real tough
game Saturday with Southwestern
Louisiana
The four-game series between
ECU and USL is 2-2. Neither
team has won a game in the series
on its home field. The Pirates
have won 38-9 and 35-31 in
Lafayette, while the Cajuns have
won 9-2 and 27-21 in Ficklen
Stadium.
Emory said he will never forget
his first meeting with the Cajuns
in 1980. "We had just beat Duke,
and we were ahead 7-6 at
Cajuns
halftime, and in tne third quarter,
we came out and fumbled five
times inside the 20-yard line They
go ahead 27-7, and we storm back
27-21. We scored again, but it was
called back.
"After that game, it was a long
year. We lost some confidence
then
Emory suspects the Cajuns are
disappointed with their record
and should come into Greenville
more hungry than ever.
"They thought they'd be 9-2
with a great chance to go to a
bowl game he said. "People
here and the students will be very
surprised with the caliber of foot-
ball team they've got. We are real-
lv concerned
Shy Stephens Looking Good
several black schools, including
LOU COMMONS �
ECU's John Robertson (79), Reggie Branch (32) and Jimmy
Walden (36) celebrate after a good offensive play against the
Missouri Tigers Saturday.
aN���ASANTS origin.lly hails from
Whiteville�a small town just a
When ECU defensive tackle few hours down the road. He has
Hal Stephens was asked to attend six brothers and sisters. Although
Tuesday's press conference for in- all of the Stephens boys are
terviews, Head Coach Ed Emory athletic, Hal is the first to play on
was a little shocked. a collegiate level.
"I hope you guys (reporters) Stephens was recruited by
can get Hal to talkhe said. "I've
been coaching Hal for four years,
and he still won't talk to me
Stephens smiled�slightly,
while his coach continued. "Now
don't let this guy fool you he
said. "He'll use all the blood and
sweat he has to get you. If he
touches you, you won't get away
from him
Stephens, known as somewhat
of an introvert is one of the
senior defensive players on the '83
squad. Last week, the defense
played its most outstanding game
yet against hard-hitting Missouri.
According to Stephens, the
seniors want to go out in style.
"This is the first recruiting
class he said. "We want to go
out looking good
6-4, 235-pound Stephens
Winston Salem State. His coacn,
Shelton Chesson, encouraged him
to take a look at ECU�his alma
mater.
Stephens did and came as a
walk-on in 1980. During that
year, he had 55 tackles to finish
sixth on the team.
In 1981, Stephens was seventh
on the defense list as a sophomore
with 43 tackles, including two for
minus 22 yards.
In 1982, this year's all-star can-
didate was the team's fifth leading
tackier with 58 tackles.
Stephens, an industrial
technology major, said the
Missouri win was one of the big-
gest thrills of his career
"It proved that we're not a
fluke team he said. "We knew
we could play with them
Coming from the southeastern
part of the state, Stephens grew
up hearing about Tar Heel fever
and Wolf pack pride.
That's why a win at N.C. State
a few weeks ago had special mean-
Hal Stephens
ECU Swim Team Gears Up For Fall
Season With Annual Pentathlon Races
defense's play. "We played well
enough to win, but we didn't do
anything exceptional he said.
"Last year, we really thought
we had them. This year we went in
with the attitude that we're gonna
win no matter what The Pirates
lost to the Wolfpack. 33-26 last
season.
Many players were hoping for a
national ranking after beating
Missouri, but Stephens isn't too
concerned about that. "I know
our team is just as good as
anybody's he said. "It (rank-
ing) doesn't really matter that
much to me
What does matter to Stephens is
winning each game at a time.
When asked how he gets psyched
up before playing each Saturday,
Stephens' response wasn't too
surprising.
"I don't like to talk to
anybody he said. "I don't
usually strike up a conversation
ing for Stephens. He wasn't too when it's time to play. I want to
thrilled, however, with the concentrate and be ready
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU swim team will gear
up for the fall season this Thurs-
day when all the swimmers com-
pete against each other in the an-
nual pentathlon.
Each swimmer will compete in
the 100-meter freestyle,
breaststroke, butterfly and
backstroke, as well as the
200-meter individual medly event.
Scoring will be based on how
many tenths of a second the in-
dividual's time is off the current
ECU varsity record.
"The pentathlon has become
somewhat of a tradition Coach
Rick Kobe said. "It's an excellent
way of determining the best
overall swimmer on the team,
because each person has to swim
every event regardless of what
stroke they specialize in
Kobe said the meet will also
determine who is in the best
shape. "Each swimmer will only
get a 20-minute break between
events, so we'll be able to see
whose times drop off near the
end
The Pirates' season is only a
month away, and Kobe will know
after the pentahion if his team is
ready for what he calls the
toughest schedule in ECU history.
The Bucs face such teams as
North Carolina, N.C. State,
Johns Hopkins, South Florida
and the Naval Academy, as the
men compete in 12 dual meets and
the women in 13.
Leading the men's team will be
last year's most valuable swim-
mer, freestyler Chris Pitelli. "We
expect Chris to close in on several
varsity records this year Kobe
said, "as well as make our
freestyle relay team one of the
best in the country
Complimenting Pitelli in the
freestyle will be Stranton Smith, a
very versatile swimmer who is also
strong in the individual medley.
Co-Captains Greg Wary and
Doug MacMillan will both be
dominaing forces in the butterfly.
Each are freshman record
holders, and MacMillan currently
holds the 200-meter varsity mark.
Diver Scott Eagle will be a key
factor in the point totals as he at-
tempts to repeat as an NCAA
regional participant.
Breaststroker and All-America
Joanne Mc Culley will be the main
force on the women's team. Kobe
expects her to Finish in the top six
at the nationals as she vies for All-
America status once again.
Cindy Newman is the most ver-
satile of the women, leading the
way in both the freestyle and but-
terfly strokes. As a freestyler she
is effective in the 50 all the way up
to the 500-meters.
Corrine Seech is strong as a
diver, and is expected to qualify
for the nationals for the second
consecutive year.
Kobe also had an excellent year
recruiting, in what he described as
"the finest crop of incoming
swimmers ever to be assembled at
ECU
"We filled all the spots where
we had some problems last year
he said, "and I don't see any
weaknesses on the men's or
women's team for the upcoming
season
Foremost among the recruits is
Chema Larranaga from Lima,
Peru. Larranaga holds two Peru-
vian national records and was a
participant in the 1980 Olympics
in Moscow.
Also joining the Pirates will be
Kevin Hildago from Chester, va.
and Caycee Paust from Rich-
mond. Both hold times in their
events that are better then the cur-
rent ECU marks.
Diver Lori Miller of Columbus,
Pa. will be a fine addition com-
plimenting current divers Eagle
and Seech. Kobe Describes both
as having national potential.
Among the 26 new recruits, 16
men and 10 women, Kobe also
managed to sign iwo YMCA Na-
tional Champions and a juinor
college All-America.
Although the Pirates are going
to be strong in every event, Kobe
will look for the most out of his
frecstylers. "We're solid all the
way from the 50 to the 1650-meter
events
Steven Hollett, a transfer stu-
dent from Tennesse who becomes
eligible in December, and Stan
Williams who returns from a
year's stay in Texas are two addi-
tional swimmers that will join the
freestyle corps in the fall.
Kobe has high expectations for
the upcoming year aad after the
pentathalon, the Pirates should be
as ready as ever to dive into the
1983-84 season.
Tbe ECU swim team
pentathlon oa
Nation's
Mistake-
By RANDY MEW
The ECU soccer
team went up against
the best colle
team in the r.ation
Wednesday, losing to
L'NC-Greensboro
6-1.
Although
Pirates only mar
one goal, it -a;
the second time -
year tha. the Spa-
have been sc
upon.
In 13 games.
which ha.e -
shutouts, UNC-C
outscored its
ponents 69-1.
The Spanar
the defer, i .
tiona! charr
the top-ranked team
in NCAA D
III The
the or
untied record
lege soccer a
When sumrr.
the game. ECU -
coach Robbie C
simplv sa.c: the Pii
e:e beaten - � i
ter ream.
UNC-C
Rod ar.sk. -

I

i .
mil
- a
UVI
VERN GOSI
Oct. 19,1
At
Tickets Avaiiai
Extension acrosj
from 8:30- 1:00PM
Sam's Lock
And Key Shoppe
7570075
1804 Dickinsen A i e
(across from Pepsi
Plant)
(24 Hours,
Complete
Friendly Sen ice
(she was formerly
with Forrest L ock
and key for 9 em
Pre-
Al
are
ECU vs
from
in Universir
parkii
Chkken. ste. sla�
t i � �
-tmm mm�waWEWl
CONCERTS
WE'RE
208
;





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 6. 1983
�A
lou ci.e�Jos - tcu ro Lab
oun salurda, but he's got the
iana.
Cajuns
and in the third quarter,
and fumbled five
2 ard line. The
d we storm back
red again, but it was
game, it was a long
st some confidence
ispects the Cajuns are
:ed with their record
d come into Greenville
gi i than ever.
ight they'd be 9-2
chance to go to a
he said. "People
jents will be very
n the caliber of foot-
e got. We are real-
�ned
Good
� pla We played well
but we didn't do
rial he said.
we really thought
This year we went in
'titude that we're gonna
ter what The Pirates
V 'pack, 33-26 last
a ere hoping for a
inking after beating
it Stephens isn't too
Kerned about that. "I know
team is just as good as
he said. "It (rank-
doesrTt really matter that
ich to me
What does matter to Stephens is
winning each game at a time.
When asked how he gets psyched
�re playing each Saturday,
response wasn't too
r ing.
don't like to talk to
iybod he said. "I don't
sually strike up a conversation
-hen it's time to play. I want to
:oncentrate and be ready
Nation 9s Best Puts It To
Mistake-Riddled Pirates
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU soccer
team went up against
the best collegiate
team in the nation
Wednesday, losing to
UNC-Greensboro,
6-1.
Although the
Pirates only managed
one goal, it was just
the second time this
year that the Spartans
have been scored
upon.
In 13 games, 12 of
which have been
shutouts, UNC-G has
outscored its op-
ponents 69-1.
The Spartans are
the defending na-
tional champions, and
the top-ranked team
in NCAA Division
III. They also have
the only unbeaten,
untied record in col-
lege soccer at 13-0.
When summarizing
the game, ECU head
coach Robbie Church
simply said the Pirates
were beaten by a bet-
ter team.
UNC-G's Eddie
Rodwanski was the
star of the game, scor-
ing a career-high three
goals. He scored his
first just seven
minutes into the
game, giving the Spar-
tans the quick upper-
hand.
Teammate Brian
Japp quickly followed
suit, giving UNC-G a
comfortable two-goal
lead. The Pirates
could have been
counted out of the
game at this point,
but ECU'S Bill Mer-
win scored an
unassisted goal just
before the half to put
ECU within striking
distance.
Church felt the
Pirates were in the
game at the half, but
said a lot of mistakes
enabled the Spartans
to turn the game into
a rout.
"Our goalie let
several balls get by
him that he shouldn't
have Church said,
"and we had a lot of
freshmen go into the
game and not do what
thev were suppposed
to "
Japp opened the se-
aaawMaaai
cond period with his
second goal, just 65
seconds into the half.
The Spartans then
began to turn it on as
Rodwanski scored
twice and Mike
Sweeney once, as
UNC-G scored their
three final goals
within a seven-minute
period midway
through the final half.
Spartan goalie Tim
Boer only had to
make three saves the
entire half, as the
Pirates were outshot
15-6 for the game.
The Pirates have a
week off before they
travel to UNC-
Wilmington for their
next match, and
Church hopes to get a
lot accomplished in(
that time.
"We're going to
concentrate on tackl-
ing and playing
tighter defense he
said. "The week off I
should help us to
regroup, and get
everybody to the
point where they're
playing like a team!
again
Sneaker Sam Sez
Pirate freshman Kevin Bigiey goes up against an earlier opponent this
year.
Almost Anything
Goes is gone, and the
results are in. The
overall winners were a
team called the Little
Rascals, and they
were thrilled with
their seemingly unex-
pected victory.
This was the ninth
annual Almost
Anything Goes, and it
was again co-
sponsored by
Budweiser and Jef-
frey's Beer and Wine
There were six events
in the competition,
which involved
everything from trac-
tor tire inner tubes to
shin guards for
hockey. A tiebreaker
of a tug of war across
the creek had been an-
ticipated, but the Lit-
tle Rascals managed
to pull out their
24-point
all. 52
ticipated.
victory. In
teams par-
Intramurais is also
offering several events
this weekend, in-
cluding the beginning
of several plavoffs in
intramural sports.
In addition to the
Pirates' home foot-
ball game this
weekend, the Irates
Frisbee Club will be
sponsoring a match
with UNC-
Greensboro on Satur-
day and Sunday. The
matches are scheduled
to begin at high noon,
so if you are not into
football, check out
the Irate action.
Next week is a big
week for registration;
four events will be
registering students
and faculty par-
ticipants.
One-on-one basket-
ball, soccer and bowl-
ing registration will be
held on October 11
and 12 in Memorial
Gym Team capta
meetings are schedul-
ed for the 24th,
the times and places
will be available a
registration. Racquet-
ball singles registra-
tion will be held Oc-
tober 11-19
Memorial Gvrr
a partic pants
meeting oched.e :
October 25
If ou need more
information n an) ol
these marra.
es, fee: free
come b the IM-Rec
ffices weel.
from 8 til 5
LIVE IN CONCERT
VERN GOSDIN and MEl McDANIEL
Oct. 19,1983 7:00pm and 9:30pm
At the Moose Lodge
Tickets Available: Furniture World, 10th St.
Extension across from Highway Patrol Station
from 8:30-1:00PM Mon-Sat. WARWICK PROD. INC.
�e-
COMMERC1AL
ART STUDENTS
20 off
rtek Camera
Films, Stats, Screens
(ask for discount card)
OPEN 12 HOURS
Monday - Thursday
Friday 9-7 Saturday 9-2
6 GEORGETOWN SHOPS
JUNIORS AND SENIORS IARN OVR $1000.00 Pf R MONTH
you are
a" average or
Junior ad se-
('� u c i e a r Prcpuis
hysics, chemistry or e n g � - � - . - -
r, earn over $1000.00 per - -
�e3rs5e's I nc udedl The Navy's "� POC
. f i cer Co I i e g' a e Progr 2 - -
qualified Irdividuals. Other be n i f i t s nc .ae:
�� $3000.00 cash onus immediately upon acceptance Into ra�
��� $22,000 starting salary - J40,000 after just four j-s
��� FrftE Medical ' ntal care and many other TAX fEE! benet its
� 33 days PAID annual vacation
��� 1 year graduate level training
� Immediate responsibility
�� Valuable engineering experience
Education benefits
Jor security with fast promotions
I f
Officer Programs
5 � � r r Center.
transcripts to:
e a in
they '
:a n
ROY SARVS U.S. NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Niviho Dr. Raleigh. NC lt
or call 1-S00-662-T231 �am-3pm. MON � THl RS
Sam's Lock
And Key Shoppe
757-0075
1804 Diclcinsen A ve.
(across from Pepsi
Plant)
(24 Hours)
Complete
Friendly Service
(she was formerly
with Forrest Lock
and key for 9 years)
COMPUTE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd.
7S-Jt23 - 24 MRS.
PLAZA 3HEL
24 hour Towing Service
U-Houl Rentals
Available
HELL
Pre-Game Bar-B-Q
Abram's & ZBT
are holding a bar-b-q
before the
ECU vs S.W. Louisiana game
Oct. 8
from 11:00am to 1:00pm
in University Professional Center
parking lot on 10th St.
Items and Prices
Effective Thru Sept.
October 8, 1983
OPEN 21 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POL tCV
Eacf of meseadver
tisec items is re
Qutrec to oe reaat
avanafcie far sale In
eacn Kroger Sav or
exceot as specif t3
i ncted in mis ao
we so rn out of a
item we win cfer
�our cnotceof a
comparaoie item
wnen avaitac-e
ref ecting me same
savings or a raif'
cnectr wnicn wilt er
11 e ou to Durcnase
me aavertisea item
at me advertised
once witftm $C aavs
Limit one manufac
turers coupon per
item
WISE
PLAIN RIDCIES
Potato
Chips
7-Oz.
Chicken, stew, slaw, Bar-b-q, hushpuppies, and lead las.
S3.75 per plate
CONCERTS
THEATER A
MOVIES
NIOHT
CLUBS
WE'RE OPEN LATE!
y S:ihvi .�1 rlt wmr Uilc nivht fun I r one of i
t,v t ' "ii1 v�.r luhc- We hae I7 mouth w;i!
. � .i i.�: ,oi r nich We're open til! 2 ')�) .)
.SUB
jainst each other hi the aaaaal
In Minges Coliseum
Ae'ica 9 Famous
foat Long Sand ch
208 E. 5 th Street
DIET PEPSI, PEPSI FREE,
SUGAR FREE PEPSI FREE OR
Pepsi
cola
2-Ltr.
N.R.
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KROCER FRENCH, ITALIAN
OR 1000 ISLAND
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ASSORTED VARIETY
JENOS
Party
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PREMIUM
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$25
8-02.
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KROCER
Orange
Juice
KROCER 2 SKIM OR
Homogenized
Milk
12-Cal.
ctn.
12-Cal.
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U.S.DA G0VT INSPECTED
CHUB PAK OR STORE MADE
Ground
oeiic�2s
A
Umlt 5 Lbs.
IN STORE BAKED
Sugar cookies
MICiaEBBaTY
Baked Ham
DOZ.





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 6.
1983
1
ACC Slides Past Pirates
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU men's
tennis team came as
close as they could to
upsetting nationally
ranked Atlantic
Christian College
Tuesday, losing the
match 5-4.
The Pirates were
without their top two
players, as number
one seed Galen Treble
was sidelined with an
ankle injury, and Paul
Owen was unable to
make the match.
"All the players
had to move up two
places, but I was very
pleased with our per-
formance under the
circumstances
Coach Pat Sherman
said. "Dan LaMont,
David Creech and Bill
O'Donnell played ex-
ceptionally well.
"The fine play of
our team was a great
credit to the depth we
have on this very
young team Sher-
man added.
The Pirates will be
in action again this
weekend when they
compete in the Camp-
bell Invitational Ten-
nis Tournament in
Buies Creek.
Results:
In singles, Thomas
Line (ACC) def.
Doug Otto 6-1, 6-3;
Chris Erikson (ACC)
def. O'Donnell 7-5,
2-6, 6-2; Creech
(ECU) def. Mike Yar-
borough 6-4, 6-2;
John Maples (ACC)
def. David Turner
6-2, 6-4; Chuck Burns
(ACC) def. Greg
Loyd 6-3, 6-1; Dan
LaMont (ECU) def.
Greg Smith 2-6, 6-4,
6-0.
In doubles, Line-
Erikson (ACC) def.
Owen-O'Donnell 6-2,
6-4; Otto-Creech
(ECU) def. Maples-
Yarborough 6-3, 6-7,
6-4; Turner-Loyd
(ECU) def. Burns-
Smith.
Florida Under NCAA Watch
GAINESVILLE,
Fla. (UPI) � Talk of
Florida's first-ever
Southeastern Con-
ference title has
drowned out rumbl-
ings of an ongoing
NCAA investigation
into alleged wrongdo-
ing in the Gators'
athletic department.
Florida is rated
sixth in this week's
United Press Interna-
tional Board of
Coaches poll as the
Gators continue to
rise despite reports
that the NCAA will
levy a punishment of
probation later this
year for a series of in-
fractions.
But Florida Coach
Charley Pell says he's
more concerned with
this weekend's oppo-
nent � Vanderbilt �
than any polls or in-
vestigations.
As for Gator
players, they've
previously dismissed
any concern over the
NCAA probe. Pell
also believes his team
is not starry-eyed over
their lofty status in
the rankings.
Florida already has
passed two major
SEC road tests �
wins over Mississippi
State and Louisiana
State � and op-
ponents such as Van-
dy Coach George
Maclntyre are heap-
ing praise all over the
Gators.
"Florida is the
most talented team in
the SEC and is
definitely playing like
it plans to win the
conference champion-
ship said Macln-
tyre. "The Gators are
an excellent group
Pell dismisses such
adulation and says
he's got problems.
Knee injuries have
claimed both of
Florida's starting
wide receivers �
Dwayne Dixon and
Gary Rolle. Pell also
says strong-armed
Commodore quarter-
back Kurt Page
presents a major pro-
blem for the Gator
defensive secondary,
which has been stung
for nearly 200 yards a
game so far this
season.
"Page sees the
whole Field very well
and they have an
outstanding and ver-
satile passing attack
Pell said. "He's com-
parable to Miami's
Bernie Kosar but
more experienced and
he presents our
defense with a big
challenge in the air
The ECU
p.m.
LOU CLBMMOM1 � BCU
's tennis team is playing at Peace College today and will take on N.C. State at home Monday at 3
Classifieds

mmm
SALE
Lifht Ultlnit Towmamant tfcU
WHWH at Coilaaa Hill Drlva.
afOTi
FOR SALE Ktcort Radar
Datac 17$ 7S-t423. Craifl car
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FOR SALE: lttl Kawasaki. 175
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PERSONAL
HAFFY BIRTHDAY Sldnay! I
lav yaw - SHiafcaHi
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OOOD FAY PROCBSSINQ mail
LEOAL HASSLESB Call
Howard J. Cummin, attorney
ar Law. H9 chanp far initial
consultation for ECU Students
Call 71
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intersection af East lath St. and
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Sept list call THUS attar J
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ACADEMIC AND PROFES-
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Bloodworm at 714-7174.
TYFINO, TERM, THESIS,
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SLEEP TIOHT while wa typ
your farm paper or thesis Call
th professionals at Word tor
Word. Typing and word process
ing. Oeorg town Shops, tad
floor call 7J
IMPORTANT
Inter-Fraternity
Council Meeting
i
Today at 5:00
MvlMTHON
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FAST FREE DELIVERY
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GREENVILLE M.C. 27834
, . 752-0888
Limit one coupon per order- coupon expires 6-1-84
ATTENTION
There will be another
meeting for prospective
Buccaneer Staff
members. Interviewing
for available positions will
take place.
America's favorite pizza
delivery people, kick-off
a wild week of
celebration with
Domino's PizzaPepsi�
Day at FicklenStadium.
And, just to keep you in
that party spirit, here
are some special
offers on delicious pizza.
PLUS! Our brand new
30 minute or FREE
quarantee.��The only
one in town!
Use our party specials
this weekend and all
week. You can taste
why we're America's
favorite pizza delivery
company.
Hours:
11AM-1AMSunThurs.
11AM-2AM Fri. & Sat.
GreenvilleECU
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd.
In Greenville:
Rivergate Shopping Cntr.
Drivers carry under $20.
Limited delivery areas.
� 1983 DowXnot EBBB ��c
WHEN: Monday, Oct. 10 at 6:00
WHERE: The Buccaneer,
Old South Building
across from Joyner Library.
TOPPING!
Add one delicious
topping to your favorite �
16" pizza FREE with
this coupon
One coupon per pizza e
Expires: 101783
At listed locations only.
I
J L
TOPPING!
Add any one of our
delicious toppings to
your favorite 12" t
pizza FREE.
One coupon per pizza a
Expires; 101783 g

i
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30 minute
or FREE
guarantee
W your pizza does not
�rrive within 30 minutes
of the time you ptace
your order, preeent
this coupon tome
� win be free of charge
One coupon per pizza,
��" '� M. �
� '

. a"i
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 6, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 06, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.292
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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