The East Carolinian, September 27, 1983






m

�he SaBt (Earnltman
it
Vol.58 NoT
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday, September 27, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
FBI Liaison
Friday Calls Story Unfair
By PATRICK O'NEILL
University of North Carolina
President William C. Friday
claims he was "abused" and "un-
fairly treated" as a result of a
news story that appeared in the
Sept. 16 edition of the Daily Tar
Heel, the student newspaper at the
UNC-Chapel
Hill.
The story,
v. rirten by
UNC law
graduate Alex
C h a r n s ,
quoted from
FBI files that
Friday was
listed as a
"special cor-
respondent"
with the
bureau during the late 1960s and
early 1970s. Friday denies that he
ever worked for the FBI except in
cases when he served as a
character witness for students ap-
plying for government jobs.
"I did not know anything about
any list, I was not asked about any
list and I was not told I was being
put on such a list Friday said
Monday in a telephone interview.
Charns obtained 700 pages of
material under the Freedom of In-
formation Act. A majority of the
files revealed for the first time the
FBI's extensive involvement with
and infiltration of campus
political groups.
Fridav said the headline of the
Friday
Daily Tar Heel story was "patent-
ly unfair The headline,
"Documents link UNC President
with FBI and the content of the
story were supported by the
paper's editor, Kerry DeRochi.
"Any news of FBI infiltration at
this campus is news for the cam-
pus newspaper DeRuchi said.
"The story was fair and
accurate
Friday called the headline was
"grossly misleading" and said
there was no story to be drawn
from the FBI files.
DeRochi said she had spoken
with Friday about the story to
clear up some details regarding its
content. The Daily Tar Heel story
was a version of a similar story
which also appeared in the Sept.
16 edition of North Carolina In-
dependent.
Both stories dealt primarily
with FBI involvement in infiltra-
tion of UNC civil rights groups.
The documents obtained by
Charns said the FBI placed an
undercover agent within the Black
Student Movement. The FBI's
Charlotte office applied for and
received permission to investigate
the movement from former FBI
head J. Edgar Hoover. The in-
vestigation began April 4, 1968.
"In 1971 Hoover wrote that the
BSM did not meet the criteria for
a subversive organization
reported the Daily Tar Heel story.
Charns, now employed by the
Circulation 10,000
Torpedo Recovered
By ECU Scientists
At Cape Fear Site
See UNC, Page 6
STUART MORGAN
Wes Hall, (right) guides the Confederate torpedo from the Privateer
while Gordon Watts winds the crank hoisting the 300-pound torpedo
aboard "Murphy Base the program's converted landing craft.
Returning To Teaching
ECl. So�5 Bureau
Eugenia M. Zallen has an-
nounced that she will resign as
dean of the School of Home
Economics at ECU to devote
fulltime to teaching and scholarly
activity.
Zallen's resignation will be ef-
fective at the end of the second
summer session next year. A na-
tional search will be conducted to
choose a successor, who will
become the third dean in the
school's history.
"Dr. Zallen has resigned as
dean of the School of Home
Economics effective at the end of
the second summer session of
Home Ec. Dean Resigns
1984 to return to full-time faculty
status said Angelo A. Volpe,
vice chancellor for academic af-
fairs. "I wish Dr. Zallen every
success in her future teaching ser-
vice and scholarly activities
Zallen joined the School of
Home Economics as professor
and dean in July, 1980. She had
served six years as director of the
School of Home Economics at the
University of Oklahoma.
A native of Jacksonville, Ala
Zallen received her undergraduate
degree at Auburn University. She
received the MS degree at Purdue
and her PhD from the University
of Tennessee. Her professional
appointments have included ex-
perience at Duke Medical Center,
Emory University Hospital, Pur-
due, Auburn and the University
of Maryland.
The School of Home
Economics recently was reac-
credited for the next 10 years by
the Council for Professional
Development of the American
Home Economics Assoication. In
the Council's report, the school
was cited as "outstanding" and
was commended for its ad-
ministrative support as well as the
organizaitonal and leadership ac-
complishments of Dean Zallen.
By STUART MORGAN
Staff Writer
A large Civil War torpedo was
recovered from the Blossum's
Ferry site on the Northeast Cape
Fear River near Wilmington last
week by a research team from
ECU's Maritime History and
Underwater Research program.
The Confederate torpedo,
described as "unique was
transported to Greenville this
weekend for wet storage preserva-
tion and electrolytic reduciion.
On Aug. 29, the same ECU team
participated in the recovery of the
anchor of the ironclad ship USS
Monitor. The anchor, currently at
the ECU power plant, is now
undergoing the same preservation
procedure as the torpedo.
The historic torpedo, first
hoisted to the river's surface last
week from the Castle Hayne marl
river bottom 20 feet below, was
promptly returned to the river's
floor following examination so
that arrangements could be made
for its final recovery and removal
to Greenville.
A five-member ECU team, cur-
rently surveying two 18th-century
vessels at the Blossum's Ferry site
on Cape Fear, discovered the Civil
War projectile while conducting a
survey of the river bottom in the
immediate vicinity of the two
wrecked ferries.
"I had no earthly idea that the
torpedo was there claimed Gor-
don Watts, director of Under-
water Research in ECU's graduate
program. Watts, who leads the in-
vestigation at the Blossum's Ferry-
site, described the torpedo as a
"cast-iron, Confederate single
frame (one of a kind) torpedo
He said its specifications are ex-
actly like those described in the
Official Records of the Union and
Confederate avies. "In fact
Watts said, "an illustration pro-
vided in those records matches
those of the torpedo we have
found
The bullet-
shaped
torpedo, with
a height of 24
inches and
I diameter of 12
inches, weighs
more than 300
pounds.
According
to Watts, the
Watts torpedo is not
armed.
"Because the lifting eye (ring), in-
stead of a detonator, has been
placed in the nose of the torpedo,
we feel that it has never been arm-
ed he said. Precautions will be
taken, however, to ensure that the
torpedo is harmless before its
transfer and subsequent preserva-
tion.
The torpedo has four lugs
located on its base that were used
See UNDERWATER, Page 5
Night Transit Gets
Underway Saturday

Eugenia Zallen
stepping down
Two Students Assaulted In Dormitory
By GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
Three assaults on female ECU
students were among numerous
crimes logged by campus police
during Sept. 17-22.
Two of the assaults took place
on the 3rd floor of Jones Dorm
around 4:30 p.m. on Sept. 17. In
each instance, a male suspect
entered the unlocked doors of two
sleeping freshman girls.
The assailant climbed into bed
with each of his victims, fondled
them and left when asked to get
out of their rooms.
According to Lt. Gene McAbee
of the Department of Public Safe-
ty, the incidents are similar to
others reported to police by Belk
dorm residents last year.
The suspect was described as a
college-age black male with short
hair and slender build. Police pro-
cessed the rooms for finger and
shoe prints but have not yet iden-
tified the suspect.
Another assault on a female
resident happened when George
Benjamin SelbyJr 21, of E. 11th
Street, Greenville, grabbed a
female student on the second
floor hallway landing of Slay dor-
mitory. Male residents of Slay
subdued Selby until campus police
arrived. Selby was subsequently
banned from ECU.
Other crimes reported to police
include:
� a breaking and entering into
an Ay cock dormitory room. The
thief made off with $45.50 in pro-
perty Sept. 19.
� three reports of indecent ex-
posure were reported Sept. 20-21.
One was outside Slay dorm, one
at Fletcher dorm and the third on
the staffday parking lot adjacent
to Joyner Library.
By TINA MAROSCSHAK
Staff Writer
Beginning Oct. 1, the SGA
night transit bus operation will go
into effect. Buses will run
downtown on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday nights from 10 p.m.
to 2:45 a.m. (1:45 a.m. Eastern
Standard Time).
Transit Manager Bill Hilliard
said that the buses will be
operating on a trial basis and will
only continue if students
cooperate. "Student security will
be riding the bus and will remove
any disorderly passangers
Hilliard said.
Several rules will be in effect for
the night transit service. Students
must show ID and activity cards
upon request from the driver or
security. Also, food or drinks will
not be allowed on the bus, and
drivers will not make any
unscheduled stops.
The Home Federal Savings and
Loan parking lot at 543 Evans St.
will be the only bus stop in the
downtown area. All other stops
will be made at the regular
daytime locations with two addi-
tions � one in front of Fleming
dorm and one at the English an-
nex.
Buses will not operate on Oct.
14-15 (Fall break), or Nov. 24-26
(Thanksgiving). Dec. 10 will be
the last night of operation. The
service will then be re-evaluated.
Bus Schedule
Gold:
Fleming5 after hour
English A nnex JO after hour
10th & the Hill13 after hour
College Hill15 after hour
Stratford Arms Apts hour
Hargett 's Drugs25 til hour
Home Federal15 til hour
Purple:
Univ. Condo10 after hour
Cannon Court 12 after hour
Eastbrook 13 after hour
Riverbluff20 after hour
Kings Row Vi hour
Villiage Green25 til hour
College View24 til hour
Cypress23 til hour
Home Federal 15 til hour
Escorts Not Needed
Women Petition New Rule
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
Many female residents of Jones
Residence Hall are petitioning
against a new rule requiring that
male students be escorted when
visiting the second and third
floors.
Carolyn Fulghum, associate
dean of residence life, said that
the rule was made after many
female residents complained
AnnouncementsPage 2
EditorialPage 4
EntertainmentPage 7
Mick LaSallePage 7
SportsPage 11
ClassifiedsPage 14
about males loitering in the halls
and invading their privacy. "In
the beginning we've always had
problems with visitation (in coed
dorms). We must educate the men
that the women are concerned
she said.
Jones houses male students on
the first floor and female students
on the second and third floors.
The petition circulating on the
third floor states: "We, the girls
of the third floor of Jones
Residence Hall, are submitting
this petition in opposition of the
escort service now in effect. We
feel that this in unnecessary and
(we) can establish other ways of
protection among ourselves The
petition on the second floor is the
same. One female resident that
signed the petition said that she
does feel safer, but thinks that
another solution would suffice. "I
dont' like the rule at all she
said.
Another resident said that she
feels the escort service is too
drastic. "It's mainly a hassle � it
doesn't seem to be our guys that
are causing the problems. This is
their home too she said.
"It's hard after about five
weeks of school (without the rule)
to enforce something like that
said another resident.
According to a resident assis-
tant in Jones dorm, over 75 per-
cent of the residents have signed
the petition. The petition will be
presented at the next house coun-
cil meeting.
When asked if the petition will
change the situation, Vanessa
Higdon, Jones Residence Hall
director, said, "I think our
department prides itself in that we
do listen to students
David Franks (center), creator of the new ECU athletic Pirate emblem, signs documents gjrring the nniver-
sity full righto to the ate of the design. Looking on are university attorney Dr. David Stevens (right) tad
Rkhard Laing, former dean of the ECU School of Art. Both inea helped speariiead efforto to de3oD
ECU emblems. p
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THE EAST CAROL 1N1AN
SEPTEMBER 27, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it vou Of your organization
wovia . Ke to nave an item
prinfo in the announcement
column oiease tvpe il on an an
novncement torm ano send if to
The East Carolinian m care ol
rhe oroduction manager
Announcement torms are
�vailaMe a' the East Carolinian
oltce n the Publications
9i ding F'yers ano nanjwrit
��n .ot) on odd s.zeo paper can
no' te a.ep'ed
Then s no rge tor an
nrx nccments but spae is often
limited Therefore we cannot
Oua'�ee that vocr announce
me a run as long as you
�a" and suggest thai . ot oo not
re'y solely or '� s r�t mn Km
pup k -�
T e deadline 'or an
�� its is 3 pm Monday
for 'ii ruesdav paper ano ?
v ��� - � � rhe 'rturs
dy pa - N nenfj
received aftet nese deadline?
-�
' " S iva �: � o all
cot is and
oet jri ,�-�.
CHRISTIAN
COFFEHOUSE
ar- some good clean tun'
Come x ' � the Apdng
Pta e �� Saturday nigtrt and
�� By � ptesanl a�riosfphere ot
Christian re s p an I I
Ae new fr ends and en ov gooc
i re we I c o me
regardless of denom nation
The Abiding Place A Chris
tia" Cortehouse � ova tea a
SI r the Methodist S'udent
Centet 3pen ev� � Saturday
LAST CHANCE
HAPPY HOUR
Pharo S
(Downtown a-c Budweiser
jrese-1' Last Chance "apoy
The Wtfl irom 7
H pit A. M.f nappy hour
pr � Qeei i gging
cce' s I hance lor you to
- tes with a key as the
'Grand Pr re HV� a so lave
pie favorite music
ire SI � -vance
�- its ll "e door You
"ec? not oe D'ese ' ��. the
Grand "f if mat's a?
Phare
ISA
� D -
ryer n
� Sept
I tti
E - . Plese or
-

lent a ��
Bers are welcome Por
tS7 �4C
CAMPUS MINISTRY
CONVENTION
Attc it � tents
- -
SO' -c; Campcs v n st� �
- if Emerald s c
tn. � .� -��� lent! � me
tioces4 Ei me beach, a ban
Oue' workshops and nteres!
oe- . � - n - ition
contact Th Newman Center �S3
E "e-�- SI 7S5 I
PLEASE DO
NOT RELY
TOTALLY UPON
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due to the increased par
tiopation n the announcements
column of The East Carolinian
we would like to stress agam
tha' we have limited space and
that we are trying to see that as
many announcements are
printed as possible A good
advertising campaign should m
elude AZWB posting flv- on
classroom building wa id
bulletin boards as well as the
announcements section We do
not have any sympathy for those
groups that rely totally on an
nouncements to get their
message to the student body
Please use the announcements
forms that are provided in The
East Carolinian office and
please type them out
SNOW SKI XMAS
BREAK
There will be a meeting of all
persons interested in snow Ski
mg on Tuesday October 25 at
4 30 p m m Memorial Gym 108
A trip to Snowshoe VV VA for
January 1 has been scheduled
Reservations tor slopeside ac
comodations will be 'alien at this
meeting Slides ano movies will
be shown Classes are available
for all levels of skiers Novice
thru super advanced racer
There is limited space available
this year so get your group
together early to assure your
space on the ECU Christmas Sk
Trip to Snowshoe rV V A for fur
ther information contact Ms Jo
Saunders 205 Memorial Gym or
call 757 6000
AED
Alpha Epsilon Delta ECU
pre medical honor society will
meet on Tuesday Sept 27 1983 in
Flanagan 307 at 7 30 p m Dr
Jack Alhson Chief of the Dep'
Of Emergency Medic me of ECU
School of Medicine will be the
speaker Ail mempers and
guests are encouraged to at
ten �
PRE �MEDT MAJORS
Pre 'eg s'ra' on �or all
students intending 'o maior m
Medical Technology win be heio
on Tuesday Oc'4 1983 at 7pm
in Brewster DH2 Students who
have a rjuiariy scheduled class
�e out of town should can
Mr Sabey at 757 �6' to mane
ate arrangements for pre
. sfration
nformal on and an necessary
ms lot ape � rtg to enter the
imenl - n Fa ot 1V84
a a so be attributed a' this
me 'he deadline 'or com
p eted .loo cations mciuomg
nter. ew s Fefc I 1984
SEMINAR
Dr Eugene Stanley Director
of Center tor Polymer Studies
Boston University will presen' a
se "ar en' �ied Mysterious
Behay or ot Supe' Cooled
A ate' Friday Sep' 30 1983 a'
2 p m n Flanagan bu Id r�g
room 201 Refreshments will be
served n room 204 following the
sem.nar
FACULTYSTAFF
INTRAMURALS
Intramural competition for
ECU Faculty'Staff members
will begin Monday October 10,
1983 Flag football is the activity
and sign up days to enter a team
are Monday Ocf 3 and Tuesday
Oct 4 from Sam to 4 p.m. in
room 105B of Memorial Gym
Teams play with six players on
the field and a maximum ot six
game substitutes Games are
played on the intramural fields
lust north of Ficklen Stadium
Teams can consist of members
of a department or of several
different departments However
the teams are constructed
loosen up the hands tor catching
and the legs for running Get a
team together and get with the
action
FRISBEE CLUB
Watch for the Natural Light
Ultimax Ultimate" Tourna
ment coming October 8 and 9 to
the East Carolina University
campus Top North Carolina
ultimate teams will compete
cast and prizes in this event
sponsored by the ECU Frisbee
Disc Sport Club The weekend
should prove to be ultimate The
I RATES practice every Tues
day Thursday and Sunday on
the College Hill fields at 5 p m
and prom.se to be one of the
favorites m the tournament All
interested disc duffers are en
couraged to attend the practices
and whip the disc The Frisbee
club will meet Tuesday Oct 2 at
8 30 p m m room 247 of
Mendenhall Join one of ECU'S
most exciting sport clubs Be
there or be octangular
AMA
The American Marketing
Association will be having a
meeting Thurs Sept 29 at 3 p m
m Mendenhall Student Center
room 241 All those who are in
terested are welcome
FRISBEE CLUB
Once agam ifs time tor the
Natural Light Ultimax Flying
Disc Tournament Play begins
Oct 8 12 and finals Oct 9 at 11
a m a' the Allied Health Field
For more information attend the
club meeting 8 30 p m room 248
Mendenhall tonight
DISCUSSION ON
U.S. POLICY IN
CENTRAL AMERICA
The Campus Ministers invite
anyone nvestedm discussion
ana ac'ion regarding u S Policy
in Central America to the
Catholic Newman Center Sept
29 from noon to 1 30 pm Bring a
sandwich beverages provided
AM3ASSADORS
ah Ambassadors are remind
ed tha' 'here will be a General
Meeting on Wed Sep' 28th at 5
p.m n 'he Mendenhall Muiti
Purpose room it you are in
'eresteo In sitting together as a
group a' 'he game on Oc' 8
please pr.ng your activity card
to the meeting All members
who have not attended a genera!
meeting this semester are asked
to s'op by 'he Alumni Center ano
Sign 'he offical roster
CO-OP
Northern Telecom, Research
Triangle Park, will be hiring co
op students beginning Spring
19�4 Students will be working in
Personnel Office Students In
terested in management, In
dustrial relations, or personnel
should apply Prefer
sophomores, but will consider
juniors Must have 3.0 GPA or
higher and be willing to work
three periods For more infor
mation, students should contact
the Co-op office. 313 Rawl
A representative from the
US General Accounting Office,
Virginia Beach, VA, will be on
campus Oct 25 to Interview co-op
students who would like to work
as a GAO Evaluator Business
students who have completed 75
semester hours and have a 2.9
GPA or higher should contact
the Co op office. 313 Rawl, to ar
range an interview immediate
ly
FREE MOVIES
Come join us at the Catholic
Newman Center on Oct 1. at 9
p.m for the showing of "Young
Frankenstein and Blazzing Sad
dies " Bring your favorite
beverages See ya there!
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
All who are interested in Oin
mg the CR's please gather on the
second floor lobby of
Mendenhall at A p m Tues from
where we will proceed to the
meeting place Fieldman school,
membership drive, and campus
canvass will be discussed
LITTLE
SISTER RUSH
The Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
will have little sister rush this
Wed light All interested ladies
are invited Come out and meet
all of the brothers and have a
good time
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Come to Jenkins Auditorium
this Wed night at 6 30 p m to
hear Bob Clyde speak on the
Holiness of God it will be a
great time to learn more about
our God
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
HONOR SOCIETY
The Foreign Language Honor
Society Phi Sigma iota, is
holding it's first meeting of the
year on Oct 4 m the Muiti
purpose room of Mendenhall
student Center The meeting will
start at 7 30 pm and Dr Harris
will speak on German Poetry
all members, faculty and in
terested persons are invited to
attend Regreshments will be
served
PEACE
COMMITTEE
Please iom us tor our Friday
evening pot luck suppers and
followed by a meeting We begin
at 6 30 p m (610 S Elm StFor
more info call 758 4906 PEACE
EaSawP A A0"1 a drfflcutt cteo
DEPEND ON. non tharfi mada easier by
the women eytfet-iemiryo Center Counselors are
cNX3Ote Xw orvJ rgrrf to supoorf and under
stand you Your safety cornfort and privacy are
assured Dy the carmg trotT of the Heming Center
SffeACfS � ijedoy - Scrhjrday ACorrton Ar
pomtmentj � 1st & 2nd Tnmeiter Abortioni up to
4� Weetts � free fmegrvjncv estj � very Early
?�oncjrvcv Tests � AM rncKisrve Fees � msuronce
Accepted � CAtl 7�i-5S0 DAY Ot NIGHT �
�"�eartri core, counjeany
and education tor wt
"r�en of gfl goes
THE FUMING
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
-Support-
the
Businesses
that
�support�
The
East
Carolinian


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rwnnaitigTtiinn. i nmrw mrw t� � " � units per line Each letter, punc- -s N i i t1M� r knr t Mr,eedoaed
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1,� b�iL.�i�L-

BUSINESS SCHOOL
SCHOLARSHIPS
AVAILABLE
Thirteen scholarships for ap
proximately 15,700 are available
for School of Business majors
Students interested in making
application should secure forms
from the Financial Aid Office or
one of the following deparment
offices Finance R343. Manage
ment R137. Marketing R233
All applications must be sub
miffed to Ruth Jones (Rawl
334), Chairman of School of
Business Scholarship Commit
tee. by Oct 21, 1983 A student
may apply for one or more
scholarships
Final selection will be made
by the ECU Student Scholar
ships, Fellowships, and Fman
cial Aid committee upon recom
mendation of the Dean of the
School of Business The Dean's
recommendation will be made
from candidates selected by the
School of Business Scholarship
Committee
Ma R JOyner tuition and fees
for in state student scholarship
and citzenship
University Book Exchange
$500 Academic merit
NCNB (4), 12 tuition ana fees
for m state student academic
merit
The Travelers Si 000.
Academic excellence, citizen
ship, and need Applicant must
express an interest in insurance
as a possible career obiective on
the appln ation form
J Fred Hamblen J250
Academic excellence In
business law course ano good
citizenship
Credit Women internationl
S200 financial need, scholar
ship, and citizenship Recipient
must have graduated from
public or pnvate high school m
Pitt County
ACCOUNTING MAJORS ONLY
iatrey W Piftard Memorial
annual earnings of established
corpus, scholarship, citizenship,
and need Permanent residence
of a candidate for this scholar
ship must be in Eastern North
Carolina (East of Highway I 95)
or any county west of Highway
I 95 in which Piftard and Perry,
Inc , maintains an office
Raleigh Durham Chapter In
stitute of internal Auditors,
$350, recipient must have at
least 3 0 GPA, must have com
pleted at least 12 semester hours
of accounting, and must have
expressed strong interest in in
ternal auditing profession
DECISION SCIENCE MAJORS
ONLY
Grant for Decision Science Ma
lOrs, $125 scholarship, need
and citizenship
FINANCE MAJOR ONLY
Archie R Burnette $500
academic excellence and
citizenship
RACOUETBALL
CLUB
Are you interested in
guaranteed times for playing
Racquetball? What about clinics
for learning the finer points of
the game' Would like to travel
as a team to tournaments
throughout the area and state'
The ECU Rcquetbali Sport Club
is holding it's first 1983 84
meeting Wednesday Sept 28
1983 at 7 p m m room 102 of
Memorial Gymnasium
SGA
ORGANIZATIONS
All organizations registered
with the SGA should submit a
list of their officers and ad
visors along with their ad
dresses and telephone numbers
to the SGA office as soon as
possible
LITTLE SISTER
RUSH
kappa Sigma will be holding
Little Sister Rush on October 4
5. and 6 All interested ladies are
mvited to come out ano meet the
kappa Sig Brothers and Little
Sisters Hey "Flounder' lets
party
ASPA
The American Society for Per
sonnel Administration will be
holding its' next meeting
Wednesday Oct 5 at 3 In Rawl
room 205 Throughout the year
we will have guest speakers
from business organizations in
and around the Greenville area
Wednesday's speaker is Mike
Lemmons, PersonnelSafety
Director from West Point Pep
perelle in Clinton, NC Everyone
is welcome Fees will be col
lected from new members See
you then I
BASKETRY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a Basketry
workshop The course will be
held on Wednesdays Oct 5. 12
19, 26, Nov 2 from 6 30 9 30
p m m the Mendenhall Student
Center Crafts Center In this
beginner's class, the student will
be shown how to construct
baskets using two methods
weaving and twinning The
beautiful hand made baskets
make wonderful Christmas
gifts! The cost of supplies will be
kept low interested persons
should register at the Crafts
Center on the bottom floor of
Mendenhall Monday Friday
from 3 10 p m or on Saturdar
from 12 5pm Remember
enrollment is limited so
register early The cost is $15 00
PHOTOGRAPHY
The Mendenhall Student
Center Crafts Workshops are in
eluding Photography ana
Darkroom Techniques courses
this fan The cost is $15 00 or
FREE to Crafts Center
Members Enrollment is
limited so register now1 For
further information, can L "fla
Barxand Crafts and Recreation
Director at 757 6611 e�t 26C
�after 5 pm call the Crat�s
Center at e�t 27!
PHOTOGRAPHY
Wednesdays Ocf 5 12. 19 26
Nov 2
7 10 p m
instructor Peter Pooeszwa
DARKROOM TECHNIQUES
Mondays Oct 3 10 24 3' Nov t
6 30 9 30 p m
instructor Gary Paf'erson
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE ORGAN
The International Language
Organization will be meeting on
Wednesday Sept 28. 1983 The
meeting will be held at 3 p m m
BC 301 The meeting will con
cern the upcoming Octoberfest
You do not have to be a Foreign
Language maior or minor to at
tend our meetings
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Espiscooal service
of Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday evening
Sept 27 in the chapel of St
Paul's Episcopal Church, 406 art!
ST (one block from Garrett
Dorm) The service will be at
5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chaplain the Rev Bill Hadden
celebrating
DANTE IN
AMERICA
A special topics senmmar wll
be offered Spring 1984 Semester
on Dante's Divine Comedy m
Engi'Sh and American transla
tions and interpretations in
terested Junior and Senior
students, regardless of maior or
minor are mvited to pre
register for this one time otter
mg Graduate students may
audit The semmar will be of
tered by Dr Douglas McMillan
as Engsh 4530 VWF at 12 P m .
Sprmg Semester The semmar
will explore Amer ran react ons
to the grea' medieval 'taiian
Poet For further information
contact Dr McMillan. Austin
315 ext 6516
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Chr st s
sponsormg Pr,rne Time lt�js
Thurs at 7 p m m the Nursing
Buiidmg room 101 Please iom
us tor fun fellowship, ana Bible
stuay We are looking for-wara to
meeting you
SOULS ELECTIONS
Elect i"s , be held on Wed
Sept 28 1983 from 9 to 4 p m An
-s'aat.on "iwtng will be heia
-n Aea nigh'at 8 m Menoenha
EAST CAROLINA
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
The response to Our
preliminary meeting was very
encouraging Our next me�t,ng
wll be on Tuesday Sept 27 at I
p m m the multipurpose r-oo
in Mendenhall Your attendance
is crucial as we will ratify
constitution and elect officers
ACCOUNTING
SOCIETY
MEETING
The Acrountmg Society
meet Tuesday Oct 4 at 4 c it -
room 244 Mendenhall Dor
Siagie and Doug Sm.tf
representatives from Ernst anc
Whinney. will discuss interview
mg and working for a Bg
Eight' public accounting � rn
All member and prosper1
members are urged to attend
BAKE SALE
Bake Saie Am Sept 28 rt
front of the Student Store Socv-
sored by De'ta Ze'a
WORLD FOOD DAY
The ECU Hunger
Coalition will be conduc
ting a series of events on
Oct.13 and 14 in conjunc
tion with U.N proclaim
ed World Pood Day
Volunteers are needed
to help with the protect
A skit will be held in
front of the Student Sup
ply Store � WE NEED
ACTORS AND AC
TRESSES FOR
SEVERAL PARTS If
you're interested come
to our weekly meeting
on Thursday at 7:30
pm at the Catholic
Newman Center Call
752-4216 for more infor
mation.
t
brings you a
HARD DAYS NIGHT
Every Thursday
Free Draft and Horsd'oeuvres 8:30-10:00
Free Admission ALL Night
Thursday, Sept. 29
The thirdround of the
TWIST CONTEST
Winner will receive an All Expense Paid Trip To HEW YORK CITY
PLUS$1,000.00 CASH
ThursdayOct. 6
The finals of the TWIST CONTEST
with
CHUBBY CHECKER
The KING OF THE TWIST will judge the final contestants
COMING SOON:
Oct. 2 CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD
Oct. 6 CHUBBY CHECKER
Oct. 7 NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND
Oct. 8 DELBERT McCLINTON with STEVE BASSETT
Oct. 28 JERRY LEE LEWIS
PURCHASE A CAROUNA OPRY HOUSE MEMBERSHIP
AT THE REGULAR PRICE OF $10.00 AND RECEIVE
ONE TICKET OF YOUR CHOICE TO SEE EITHER-
CHUBBY CHECKER, NITTY GRITTY DIRT BAND OR
DELBERT McCLINTON with STEVE BASSETT '
The Carolina Opry House is a private club for members and quests. ALL ABC Permi
Freshmen Say
Plan To Stock
B N.K. HOGGARI)
Sun Writer
Not surprisingly,
most ECU freshman
consider the new
drinking age lav� set to
take effect this week
unfair, injust or inap-
propriate. Starting
Oct. 1, the lega:
drinking age in North
Carolina will be raised
to 19, affecting most
ECU freshmen The
East Carolinian
surveyed -o m e
18-year-old freshman
on their views of the
new law.
Erik Ojokaar said
that the law should
have been im-
plemented, like a
similar law in New
Jersey, with a "grand-
father clause This
clause exempts per-
sons who turned 18
before the effe.
date of the law "In
this wav, nobody
would have their
drinkine privilege
taken
Ojokaar
freshman ai
Some
though
of the law
but they di
the seel
choi
19-vear-old
age Duane
ed to thi
he can be
can
old enougl
drafted.
enoug'
Webb
Gene Si
the la
propr: i
war- :
enft
Nationwide Attemp
Women
B PATRICK
O'NEILl
suf� nitf
The Pitt C
chapter of the Lea:
of Women Voters is
currently involved in a
study of natio
security issues in an
attempt to reach con-
census regarding U v
military policv
The local studv is
one of 6"5 being con-
ducted by LVv
chapters throughc
the nation. If the
various groups are
able to reach an agree-
ment, a policy state-
mem will tee released
by ih natiM.ai LWV
as a body
"If we get a const -
sus, it'll give us a posi-
tion from which to
lobby, said Rhea
Markello, president
of the Pitt County
chapter. Markello
graduated from ECU
with a degree in
political science.
The local charter
T:
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anj
mon D t
M
Read
cKed arvci
the. mLsc
Hughev.
Tb
hig I
stuc:
the r
under
US.
militan i
11 o n - M
Lunch B
You i '
still he s
pia in town 1 -
voui pick ;� '
selection
dietti Eai I
hearts content r
Its .ill yours, f ft
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EAST CAROLINA
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
e 'o our
- -�' meeting
.v seo' Z7 at 7
rhe im�M cu-po� room,
�- - fenaance
i m a ratify our
� e �c1 officar
, ACCOUNTING
SOCIETY
MEETING
" ng Society will
� ' �' 4 0 m in
" ve"nar Don
. Smith.
- Ernst ana
Nj ss nterview
- � tor a Big
.Ount.rtg f,rm
member sc P'ospectrve
l � 5c t0 attend
BAKE SALE
iaie a� Sect m ,n
me Student sore Soon
� De la ;���
AORLD FOOD DAY
The ECU Hunger
Coalition will be conduc-
ing a ser.es of events on
Oct 13 and 14 in conjunc-
tion with UN proclaim-
ed Worid Pood Day.
volunteers are needed
-eip with the project.
A skit will be held in
front of the Student Sup-
di. Store � WE NEED
ACTORS AND AC-
TRESSES FOR
SEvfcRAL PARTS. If
you re interested come
our weekly meeting
on Thursday at 7:30
pm at the Catholic
Newman Center. Call
752-4216 for more infor-
mation
YORK CITY
SHIP
IE
OR
RMITS
Freshmen Say Law Unjust,
Plan To Stock Up On Beer
THE EAST CAROIJNjAN SEPTEMBER 27, 1983 3
By N.K. HOGGARD
Staff Writar
Not surprisingly,
most ECU freshman
consider the new
drinking age law set to
take effect this week
unfair, injust or inap-
propriate. Starting
Oct. l, the legal
drinking age in North
Carolina will be raised
to 19, affecting most
ECU freshmen. The
East Carolinian
surveyed some
18-year-old freshman
on their views of the
new law.
Erik Ojokaar said
that the law should
have been im-
plemented, like a
similar law in New
Jersey, with a "grand-
father clause This
clause exempts per-
sons who turned 18
before the effective
date of the law. "In
this way, nobody
would have their
drinking privilege
taken away
Ojokaar said. Other
freshman agreed.
Some freshmen
thought the concept
of the law was valid,
but they didn't agree
with the seemingly ar-
bitrary choice of the
19-year-old drinking
age. Duane Webb ob-
jected to the fact that
he can be drafted in
case of war, but he
can't drink. "If I'm
old enough to get
drafted, I'm old
enough to drink
Webb said.
Gene Stevens said
the law was inap-
propriate: "If they
want to stop highway
deaths, they should
enforce seat belt laws.
And if they really
want to stop drinking
while driving, they
should have raised the
age to 21, not 19
Emanuel Manigault
does not think the
new law will stop
18-year-olds from
Nationwide Attempt
drinking. "Most
18-year-old freshmen
have friends and
roomates that are of
age; nobody is going
to sit around and
watch their friends
drink without par-
ticipating he said.
Jill Taylor also
thinks the law will be
ineffective. "It won't
stop anybody she
said, "they just won't
be able to go
downtown anymore
All the freshmen
questioned said they
plan to stock up on
beer before Oct. 1.
Stevens joked he was
going to have a wine
cellar built beneath
his dorm room. One
freshman said she
planned to buy 10
cases of beer on Sept.
30. Webb and
Manigault both said
they would buy 10 A total power failure hit the ECU campus last wk �hr, - tA �
the bars Thursday and ZH Thu �L t. , V ,be �"�J� "� �ent on as
Friday nigh ' Mt'�?" COned ��
Student Store Display
Features Black Writers
By SUSAN DARWIN
Staff Writer
A window display
titled "Contemporary
Black Novelists" is
currently on view in
the Student Supply
Store. The display
was initiated by Dr.
Joyce Pettis, ECU
assistant professor of
English department.
"Unfortunately,
books by Black
novelists do not have
high visibility Pettis
said. "They do not
line the display
counters or windows
of book stores unless
they have won the
Pulitzer Prize or
achieved some other
form of notoriety.
"Many of the
novelists are ap-
proaching their sub-
jects with innovative,
narrative techniques,
like using myths and
folk beliefs she
said. They are writing
about problems that
have not been written
about previously, pro-
blems and experiences
that in many cases are
unique to the Black
woman in America
Featured authors
include Paule Mar-
shall, winner of the
American Book
Award this year for
her first novel The
Women of Brewster
Place, Toni
Morrison's Song Of
Solomon; and Alice
Walker's The Color
Purple.
Debra Page, who
assisted Pettis in
organizing the
display, coordinates
the tradebook section
of the Student Supply
Store. "A lot of peo-
ple have come and
asked for books by
the authors on display
and it has been up two
days she said.
Special order books
can be here in one to
two weeks
"Students and pro-
fessionals who con-
sider themselves
educated or informed
know little or nothing
about Black writers
Pettis said.
Courses pertaining
to Black culture have
been in many cur-
riculums since the six-
ties, yet the ignorance
of too much of the
population about
Black novelists per-
sists Pettis said.
The display is in-
tendended to suggest
the productivcity of
Black novelists, to
give them campus
visibility for a few
weeks
Women Study National Security
TypK has alreadv hplH rm fnrm.r cru w.i � .
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
SUflV�rilr
has already held one
meeting to study and
discuss the security
The Pitt County issue. The Sept. 18
chapter of the League meeting was designed
of Women Voters is to give both a historic
p�romf:rSsoErCUCar10U ?&�, M� 'hoa' �m
board director Kay Su us as human beings in VMmJ'Zn ?ZUP
Hon, respectively, this world �"?" 2 for
gave presentations in Webber quoted The Topic iVbf'
, , . " " f UVJin stone gave presentati
currently involved in a and present day over- the three areas
study of national view of United States MarkHIn caJH tu
security issues in an and Sov.et �� deST'To "have a 9W ,���"�? 3
mihtary pohcy. The format of the -TS tZ&cZZZ
from a private defense ' 'The fWt �
Studv rrnvWr-H ;� ri�f i �f?r Arms
Control: Why and
How" Markello
said she is optimistic
The local study is meeting followed an
one of 675 being con- outline prepared by
ducted by LWV the LWV's Educa-
chapters throughout tionai Fund. "Pro-
the nation. If the viding for trie Corn-
various groups are mon Defense: A
able to reach an agree- Military Policy
ment, a policy state- Reader, " was resear-
ment va.iJ he released ched and written by
asabody. tionai relations
"If we get aconsen- specialist, Alice
sus, it'll give us a posi- Hughey.
tion from which to The reader
lobby, said Rhea highlights three major
Markello, president study areas: lessons of
of the Pitt County the past, theories
chapter. Markello underlying current
graduated from ECU U.S. and Soviet
with a degree in military policies and
political science. impact on world rela-
. e local chapter tions. Markello.
last
?"� �'� "�'��� budge, decslon
the Pitt Co�
chapter will reach
The East Carolinian is now
Accepting Applications For
News Writers and Editors
Apply in person at The East Carolinian offices on
the second floor of the Publications Building
-Vote For
Amy Merrell
Al Smith v
Kevin Winsteod

TV,
SGA
Day Representative
d. 28th19-6J
�a across from the entrance of Joyner Library.
Sophomores
VOTE �
Seniors
-Vote
Lunch Buffet Lovers. Take Your
Pick Of
The Pizzas
At Gatti's.
SOPH. CLASS
PRESIDENT
LISA
ROBERTS
Senior Class
President
&
Day Representative


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ATTENTION
SENIORS
-VOTE-
� N N V V S
- NNXN.SVs
JUNIORS
-VOTE-
Your favorite lunch buffet is
still here. Still serving the best
pizza in town. Honest. Take
your pick from our great daily
selection of pizza and spa-
ghetti. E�at to your
heart"s content
It's all yours.
The lunch buffet:
Altthe pizza ami fktglkta vtm tun rut
$2.99
DAILY
11AM TO 2PM
DINNER BUFFET
All the pizza
spaghetti and salad
you can eat
�!�
UG
HAMILTON
David Brown
CLASS PRESIDENT
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
JUNIOR CLASS
PRES.
�VN.NVVVVVNNX.
752 7303
$3.09
MON. and TUES.
5PM TO 8PM
corner of Cotanche and 10th St.
The best pixxa in town, fhftl
Phone 759-6121
-ATTIC
All G.n C�,m, I r�l ah Y
A �
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LllINJSRYSl"
12CM1N ADMISSION
THUR.
FRl7"
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Ask Aayotw!
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Pur� B��f Ground Fresh.
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Bring tkh o�-10 OFF
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rwn a7sc.r.Niec
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wMf H 909TS
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COMING SEPT. 27
G.G.G.0
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open 7days week
A PWVATf CLUt NOT OKN
TO THi SEMIRAIFVMJC
Across from UIE
513 Cofancht St.
7SI00M
HAPPY HOUR
EVERYDAY
4:00 - 7:00
SUPER NAPPY HOURS
WED. and FRI.
4:00 � 5:00 25C DRAFT
9 00 Tit 2:00

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YES, PANTANA'S
IS GOING
PRIVATE,
MEMBERSHIPS
WILL BE
DISCOUNTED
TIL OCT. 1,1983
HT
TUESSEPT27
MILES COST1N FORTUES
LADIES NIGHT
WED. SALAD BAR
SoactalAJYeaCMbt
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HAS raOM BAKED BttAD
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HASTAKfOUTS
'M' �� � �-� -
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QUje �aat QTarfllitrtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller. 0����
Darryl Brown. - , rrr
Waverly Merritt, ihrtc,oj hi tkin Cindy Pleasants, spommtor
Hunter Fisher, s ii � Greg Rideout, Eduorud PaV Editor
ALl AFRASHTEH. Cred.t Manafer GORDON IPOCK, Entertainment Editor
Geoff Hudson. or�te,o� Mor Lizanne Jennings, style Eduor
Michael Mayo, �&���, Todd Evans, rmeam Manager
September 27, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Commencement
Let's Change The Day Now
With the university calendar
finalized for next semester, the last
item placed on the schedule is the
commencement ceremony on Fri-
day, May 4, 1984. Friday? Didn't
the planners of the event iearn
from the hullaballou concerning
last year's graduation ceremony
that most students and their
families do not want the ceremony
held on Friday, when relatives
must take off work and skip school
to attend?
Every year, the Faculty Senate
ratifies the schedule that includes
the commencement date, on the
recommendation of its calendar
committee. It seems a simple
enough task to schedule the event
one day later, on Saturday. Many
universities hold their graduation
ceremonies several days or even a
couple of weeks after the end of
exams; most ECU seniors would
not mind (or may even want) to
wait one day between the final
classroom trial and the final walk
down the aisle.
A Saturday ceremony would
permit out-of-town family and
friends to leave their homes Friday
evening or early Saturday morning
to attend the event, thereby not
having to miss work or school.
Last year, students had to fight
like crazy just to get the event out
of Minges and into Ficklen
Stadium where all their family
could see the pomp and cir-
cumstance, and it was too late to
change the date of the event.
But, let's not forget that only an
over-crowded agenda at its last
meeting prevented the SGA
Legislature from passing a resolu-
tion endorsing a Saturday
ceremony for next year. Students
and everyone else involved need to
know the date of commencement
well ahead of time, so there should
be little delay in changing the date
of the event. It should be changed
soon � in fact, this semester � for
the convenience of all involved.
Carolina Errs
A recent front-page article in
The Daily Tarheel that supposedly
links UNC-System President
William C. Friday with FBI under-
cover operations at North Carolina
Universities has brought into ques-
tion the paper's journalistic discre-
tion. The story, appearing under
the sensationalist headline
"Documents link UNC president
with FBI was not consistent with
the story content. In fact, the stop'
content itself barely, if even, sup-
ports the charges made by the
writer, Alex Charns, a UNC law
school graduate.
Like all university heads during
the turbulent '60s and early '70s,
Friday had some dealings with the
establishment's law-and-order
branches. Friday readily admits
that he served as a character
witness for several students who
had applied for government jobs,
but he said his interest was in
"protecting young people not
hurting them. Nevertheless,
Charns and the DTH try to imply
in the story through conjecture and
vague statements by former FBI
and campus police officials that
Friday was an intricate cog in the
FBI's radical round-up wheel in
the late '60s.
The whole story is not in. We
may never know the truth. But, the
facts Carolina's paper is trying to
pawn off as supporting their's and
Charns' accusations don't hold
water. More thorough digging on
the story was necessary, and still is.
DTH Editor Kerry DeRochi told
an East Carolinian writer she firm-
ly stands behind her paper's story.
She has made an error � that is
bad. She has now refused to admit
she made an error � that is worse.
We are not claiming that the
story was not newsworthy. A short
story stating the facts at hand,
without innuendo, and giving Fri-
day's comments would have been
more appropriate. Then, as more
information became known, the
story could evolve its own conclu-
sions � not those of the writer.
The story itself was much too
long, and after the lead paragraph
stated the alleged connection of
Friday and the FBI, Charns went
on to describe in detail a tangential
fact about the Black Student
Movement at UNC-Chapel Hill in
the '60s. Only at the end of the
story did the writer come back to
his lead.
The two sides have squared up;
each claiming their story is true.
But, the known information on the
story is decidedly in Friday's
favor. We don't know if he's guilty
of Charns' accusations, and even if
he is we don't think the rap is as
bad as the DTH claims it is, but we
do know that the paper should
have practiced a bit of journalistic
valor and been more discretionary.
Monday was the big race day.
The Aussies and Americans both
had a role to play. So, off their
Yachts went, each America's-Cup
bent. But, the Aussies were better
because of their rudder. And now
the New York Yacht Club is spent.
Marines Must Stay For The Duration
Presence Will Prevent Disaster
By GREG RIDEOUT
A marine corporal dressed in battle
fatigues takes another drag on his
Marlboro. Sitting with his back leaning
against a wall of dusty sandbags, he lifts
his head, turns it slightly and peers
above the freshly dug bunker. He sees
nothing new, nothing he hasn't seen the
other thousands of times he has looked;
there is destruction, the type of ruinous
decay and chaos that can only be
described by someone who has actually
seen it. "So, this is Lebanon he muses
to himself. "I wish I were home
He has been there more than four
months, and his buddies longer than
that. Four of his fellow serviceman have
been killed. Yet, he can't go home, and
the reasons why are, of course, beyond
his limited horizon. The man in
Washington, the young marine's
commander-in-chief, has sent he and the
the other 1,199 marines to this far-off,
war-torn corner of the earth to keep the
peace. I wish he could come home, but
for now, the America he loves and is
willing to defend must be relegated to a
treasured memory. He must stay.
President Reagan sent the ships carry-
ing marines to Beirut, Lebanon more
than a year ago. Back then, the mission
seemed somewhat simpler: We, along
with the French, Italians and British,
were to insure stability while the Israeli
Army, which had marched its way into
Beirut in search of the PLO, and the
Syrians, who were invited in at one point
to fight the Israelis, withdrew from
Lebanon. No such thing has happened.
Lebanon itself is in shambles. Now
that all the political factions that for
years had only fought with words have
guns, downtown Beirut, and the sur-
rounding hills, is a multi-faceted war
zone. There are so many different
groups that it is hard to even count
them. The two main groups fighting
each other, the Christian-dominated
Gemayel government coalition and the
Druze and Muslim rebel opposition,
have repeatedly failed to reach a com-
promise during U.Sinspired negotia-
tions.
Somehow an agreement must be
reached. The United States is caught bet-
ween the proverbial roek-and a-hard
place. We don't want to slowly be pulled
into a full-scale war, but we can't leave,
for leaving would assure the fall of the
democratic Gemayel government and
lead to Soviet control of the area.
Russian-backed Syria is just waiting for
the marines to go, and then the, along
with the Muslims and Druze, would be
in the perfect position to take control of
the tattered country.
So, the marine corporal and his bud-
dies stay on; the central pawns in a game
of international chess. And although
some prominent senators and represen-
tatives have called for their withdrawal,
the majority of congressmen know they
must stay. We can't turn tail and run
everytime the fire gets hot. President
Reagan is giving the marines the go
ahead to use every available means of
protection at their disposal. And
although the leathernecks'situation is
not the best, they must hold on if the
United States is to remain influential in
the Middle East, an important sphere of
influence.
The corporal has placed his M-16
aside. With a heavy sigh, he begins to
write a letter home to his sweetheart.
"Dear Jane he begins. "I miss you. I
miss decent food and a warm bed at
night. I don't want to be here, hut I ani
prepared to fight. I don't Quite unders-
tand what I am doing, but I know
somehow it is right
The United States has a superpower
role to play, and the Marines are part of
it. We must stav.
Campus Forum
Naso Discusses Safe Roads Act
As you are all aware, the Safe Roads
Act goes into effect on Oct. 1. The bot-
tom line on this law is more than V of
our student population will be pro-
hibited to drink alcoholic beverages.
However, that does not mean they
won't. The problem here is that many
of us don't fully realize the implica-
tions of this law; the Safe Roads Act
does not affect those below the age of
19 alone. The law will directly affect
each and every one of us, as well as the
character of the university itself.
It is essential that each of us discuss
this matter together so that we the
students can better understand the law
and better protect ourselves and our
friends. No one wants to see anyone
punished, but we must realize that the
N.C. General Assembly passed this bill
and the Governor is determined to en-
force it. We should remember that a
university is an ideal environment for
such enforcement to take place.
A prime way for us to educate
ourselves about this matter is to have a
forum. We have planned such an event
to be on Thursday at 4 p.m. in Room
244 of Mendenhail Student Center.
This forum is being sponsored by the
combined efforts of the SGA, SRA,
IFC and Panhellenic. Don Murray,
director of the Alcohol Law Enforce-
ment Agency, will be here to explain
this law in explicit terms.
I urge you to attend this meeting,
and your questions will be welcomed.
It is important that we understand this
new law so we can avoid unpleasant in-
cidents from occurring.
I look forward to seeing you.
Paul Naso
SGA President
Music Silenced
Here at N.C. State, we have a co-ed
honorary music fraternity, Mu Beta
Psi. Each year our pledges are assigned
a project benefitting either the fraterni-
ty or the music department.
On Sept. 10, we displayed this ban-
ner on the grass below the fieldhouse
during the ECU-State football game.
During the excitement after the ECU
victory, our banner disappeared. We
have reason to believe some ECU fans
may have taken it.
From the amount of time and effort
put into the project and from display-
ing it more than three years, this ban-
ner has come to hold a great deal of
pride for our fraternity. The disap-
pearance of the banner brought much
concern and disappointment from our
members. We appeal to the ECU stu-
dent body to aid us in locating this ban-
ner and returning it to the music
department here at N.C. State.
Lorrie Link
President, Mu Beta Psi
Purple At Carolina
A Chapel Hill coed left this note on
Assistant Athletic Director Pam Holt's
windsheild when the ECU volleyball
team played UNC on Sept. 22, 1983.
Hey,
I really love all this Pirate "Gold A
Purple So you 're an ECU backer, so
am I! I'm from Greenville, and I've liv-
ed there all my life. It's like I only go to
"Carolina" to study! Go Pirates!
An ECU Fan all the way,
Beth 308 Whitehead
PS. It's like they say "There's only
one 'Carolina' that's East Carolina
Pam Holt
Asst. Athletic Director
t
Hilliard Praised
The Student Transit Authority and
Transit Manager Bill Hilliard deserve
nothing but praise in their decision to
ban bus service to Oakmont Square
apartments.
The decision was not only "good"
for ECU but one of landmark propor-
tions in showing Greenville apartment
complexes the power students have, as
your editorial stated. It is evident Mr.
Smith is guilty of improper treatment
to students. I am not a resident of Oak-
mont Square, nor do I want to be;
however, personal interest requires me
to frequent the "Silence Complex"
every day.
The truth of the matter is that Mr.
Smith is not the least bit flexible in his
views and understanding of his renting
population, as I have experienced
myself on a first-hand basis. If Mr.
Smith was interested in the student's
welfare, he would be more lenient, but
apparently that is not the case. It is too
bad that one person can cause so much
inconvenience for so many people
when in actuality those are the people
doing him a favor. It's about time Mr.
Smith took his blinders off.
With the Student Transit Authority
setting a precedent, in the future
students can do their part by thinking
twice about their choice of apartments,
unless, of course, one likes a dictator-
ship.
Randy Mizelle
Junior, Psychology
Karate Chopped
I'm writing in response to the
editorial of Sept. 20, titled "New Im-
age Not Necessary 1 agree that Pirate
Walk doesn't need a new image. As a
member of the karate team, and as the
one who suggested we be involved in
the Pirate Walk, I would like to explain
that our purpose in volunteering was
not to promote the macho,
muscular, and good-looking man" im-
age. We consider our team a very
responsible and caring organization.
As for macho images, we have several
females on the karate team who wish to
participate. Speaking for the karate
team, we are proud to be Pirates and
think that this is a good way of show-
ing our love for our fellow students.
We aren't trying to give them a "new
image we just want to be a part of
the original idea.
Ronnie Lanley
Junior, Industrial Technology
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs).

To All Students
This is tht
fairs ail over the
Caroline. The-
them the gvp j
nival huckster,
change slightK
year, or takr
ings, but
mams the same
much mone
short tirm
With such inn(
football, cat thr
tie throw
mouthed by
huckster j
strong appe i
nothing, there i
ty in finding �
Some of the gj
pie and
slow hi
milk bot-
game. The
is to knoci
ties off -
balls Th
� we'll sa
pounds.
To prr�
operator ha
light bot! �
heavy ones on tc
tie encourageme
prizes � ar
tional a-
� the
heavy bof
on the bo:
bottles .
pyramid.
More
are
ones inv
number of
marbles or.
numbered hole'
displav
giving eacl
point value. I
to eight. F I
victim is g
make tei
0,
Sep
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27, 1983
IK
n
it Disaster
mar. and then they, along
the Muslims and Druze, would be
!�e perfect position to take control of
. country.
e marine corporal and his bud-
s a on; the central pawns in a game
international chess. And although
ominent senators and represen-
ts have called for their withdrawal.
� congressmen know they
We can't turn tail and run
the fire gets hot. President
giving the marines the go
e eer available means of
their disposal. And
leathernecks'situation is
best, they must hold on if the
nited States is to remain influential in
e M iddk East, an important sphere of
corpora has placed his M-16
ide With a hea sigh, he becins to
:a
me
:
t letter home to his sweetheart.
)ear Jane he begins. "1 miss you. I
decent food and a warm bed at
iHt. I don't want to be here. kit I am
pepa-tJ to fight. 1 don't quitv unders-
id what 1 am doing, but 1 know
mehow it is right
United States has a superpower
II pla. and the Marines are part of
�Ve must stav.
ads A ct
yself on a first-hand basis. If Mr.
nth was interested in the student's
elfare. he would be more lenient, but
jparently that is not the case. It is too
id that one person can cause so much
convenience for so many people
hen in actuality those are the people
)ing him a favor. It's about time Mr.
tith took his blinders off.
h the Student Transit Authority
btting a precedent, in the future
udents can do their part by thinking
e about their choice of apartments,
nless, of course, one likes a dictator-
lip
Randy Mizelle
Junior, Psychology
Karate Chopped
'm writing in response to the
litonal of Sept. 20, titled "New Im-
je Not Necessary I agree that Pirate
Jalk doesn't need a new image. As a
lember of the karate team, and as the
he who suggested we be involved in
le Pirate Walk, I would like to explain
lat our purpose in volunteering was
bt to promote the macho,
luscular, and good-looking man" im-
le. We consider our team a very
Isponsible and caring organization.
k for macho images, we have several
Imales on the karate team who wish to
Ttrticipate. Speaking for the karate
lam, we are proud to be Pirates and
link that this is a good way of show-
Ig our love for our fellow students.
Te aren't trying to give them a "new
hage we just want to be a part of
e original idea.
Ronnie Lanley
Junior, Industrial Technology
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
pressing all points of view. Mail or
op them by our office in the Old
vuth Building, across from Joyner
wbrary.
For purposes of verification, all let-
must include the name, major and
stfication, address, phone number
d signature of the authorfs).
Letter Of Caution
To All Students:
This is the season for county
fairs all over the state of North
Carolina. They bring with
them the gyp-artist � the car-
nival huckster. His game may
change slightly from year to
year, or take on new trimm-
ings, but its basic purpose re-
mains the same � to make as
much money as possible in the
short time available.
With such innocent titles as
football, cat throw, milk bot-
tle throws and dish games,
mouthed by a fast-talking
huckster capitalizing on the
strong appeal of something for
nothing, there is little difficul-
ty in finding enough suckers.
Some of the games are sim-
ple and produce income at a
slow but steady rate. The old
milk bottle throw is such a
game. The object of the game
is to knock a pyramid of bot-
tles off the stand with two
balls. The bottles are weighted
� we'll say one, two and six
pounds.
To produce a winner, all the
operator has to do is place the
light bottles on the bottom and
heavy ones on top. After a lit-
tle encouragement with lesser
prizes � and perhaps the addi-
tional attraction of a side bet
� the fleecing begins. The
heavy bottles are now placed
on the bottom and the light
bottles end up on top of the
pyramid.
More complicated games
are the big money-makers;
ones involving rolling a
number of small balls or
marbles on the board with
numbered holes. A chart
displays all the possible totals,
giving each total a specific
point value, usually from zero
to eight. For one dollar, the
victim is given three rolls to
make ten points and win a
prize. His first three rolls add
up to twenty-one. Upon
checking the chart, he sees that
his point value is four. He rolls
again and comes up with a
nineteen, which draws a point
value of two. Now he is in-
formed that he has hit the
"jack-pot and if he is will-
ing to put up $2.50 and roll
again for ten points, he has a
chance to win not only the
prize, but $25 to boot.
Now, under the rules of the
"new game the victim "can-
not lose" unless he quits, but
now each roll will cost him an
additional $2.50. Every time
he rolls the "jack-pot"
number, it will cost him dou-
ble for the next roll � and the
"jack-pot" also doubles. The
victim's first roll of the new
game produces a point value
for which the house pays dou-
ble what the victim paid for a
roll. On his next roll, the
player draws nineteen; the
"jack-pot" jumps to $50 and
the cost per roll doubles.
Another roll turns up a
"bonus number" for which
the house adds $25 to the
"jack-pot The process con-
tinues until the "jack-pot"
stands at $250 and each roll is
costing the victim $10. With
the stakes high, quick retriev-
ing of the balls, rapid and "in-
accurate" adding and an
abundance of distracting chat-
ter by the operator, the ac-
cumulation of points becomes
more and more difficult.
Before long the victim is forc-
ed to quit, but not until he has
exhausted all his funds and
probably a substantial amount
borrowed from his buddies.
Go to the County Fair, enjoy
the rides, stay away from the
games.
Sincerely,
Joseph Calder,
ECU director of Public Safety
PHI
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Little
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ronday and Tuesday
Sept. 26th and 27th
9:00-until
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Underwater Researchers Uncover
Torpedo From Cape Fear River
STUABT MORGAN
Gordon Watts measures the cast
iron (ropedo after the artifact is
positioned on the deck of the
boat Murhy Base. At 24 inches
high and 12 inches in diameter,
the artifact equals Confederate
torpedos described in Civil War
records.
Cont. From Page 1
to attach it to a fram or piling,
Watts said. "To destroy an enemy
vessel he said, "it would be
submerged just beneath the
water's surface on a frame or pil-
ing so that the detonator would
come in contact with the hull of
the vessel operating in a river or
channel. Contact with the enemy
vessel's hull would smash the
detonator and explode the
torpedo
Historical records and ar-
chaeological evidence indicate
that ferry service existed on the
Northeast Cape Fear River with
virtually no interruption from
around 1735 to the establishment
of a permanent bridge there in
1925. Such evidence suggests that
the Confederate Navy may have
been assembling framed
torpedoes � such as the one
found � in the vicinity of
Blossum's Ferry during the Civil
m0l(f�-
War.
The torpedo may have been lost
while being transported across the
northeast branch of the river dur-
ing the war.
"The torpedo was found im-
mediately northwest of the west
ferry and within the corridor
traditionally used by ferries
operating at the site Watts said.
"Since the Blossum's Ferry site
has been so badly disturbed by
looting, recovery of the torpedo
was the only way assure that is is
going to be preserved and
documented hs said.
The ECU underwater ar-
chaeological team has just com-
pleted two weeks of a four-week
study at Blossum's Ferry.
"It's interesting, diverse and
enjoyable siad Rick Herron,
one of four graduate students par-
ticipating in the project.
"So far, we've concentrated on
the east vessel Herron said.
"Primarily, we've been conduc-
ting underwater archaeological
mapping and collected artifacts
associated with the two wrecks,
such as ceramic fragments, ar-
ticles of various ordinance, etc
According to Herron. the EC U
research group will spend two
more weeks at the Blossum's
Ferry site beginning Monda.
"Mapping and a thorough in-
vestigation for possible artifact
distribution will be conducted on
the west vessel during that
period Herron added.
"The east vessel is apparc
much older because of its prca
fragility and construction
features Herron explained
"Such evidence may indicate that
it was constructed much earlier
than the west vessel
Graduate students participating
m the project are Wes Hall, Kim
Elmore, Rick Herron and Stuart
Morgan.
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The men
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invite the women
of ECU to a social
Wed. Sept. 28,1983
at the Elbo - time 7-9
254-admID required
'sAfjSe-JkxA- � � to))�nfri-is�-�





THF EAST CAROL 1NIAN
SEPTEMBER 27, 1983


Georgia, S. C. Produce Lowest SA T Scores
(UPI) � Georgia
and South Carolina
officials are concern-
ed � but not alarmed
� that their students
scored 49th and 50th
in the nation on the
Scholastic Aptitude
Test, one of the most
widely accepted
measures of the
abilities of entering
college freshmen
The College Board,
which administers the
test each year, recent-
ly released figures
showing Georgia
students ranked 49th
in the nation with a
erbal score of 390
and a mathematics
score of 428. Only
South Carolina fared
worse with scores of
383 verbal and 415
math.
On a national
average, the scores
were 415 on verbal
abilities, down one
point from 1982, and
468 for mathematics,
up one point from last
year.
Iowa and South
Dakota were the
states with the highest
SAT scores in the na-
tion. Only 3 percent
of Iowa's graduating
seniors are required to
take the SAT, while
all graduating seniors
in Georgia are re-
quired to take the test.
The highest score
possible on the SAT is
800; the lowest is 200.
Although South
Carolina students
raised their SAT
scores an average of
eight points this year,
they were still the
worst in the nation.
Nursing Official
Opposing Ousting
"I'm encouraged
but not surprised
said Terry Peterson,
an adviser on educa-
tion to South
Carolina Gov. Dick
Riley.
"We're going to
need bold new action.
That's what we've
been trying to
said.
"We're going to
have to move much
faster or we will simp-
ly end up again in last
place he said.
"We're competing
against a moving
target because other
states are working to
improve
Like Georgia,
South Carolina tests a
higher percentage of
students than some
other states.
"We do test a
greater percentage of
students than other
states do said Peter-
son. "So you'd expect
our scores to be
somewhat lower.
"But still, we're
very concerned with
low SAT scores. Not
only money, but we
need tougher stan-
dards, more rigorous
requirements and the
new money has to be
put in areas where we
know it would make a
difference
Georgia school of-
ficials seemed less
than encouraged by
their state's
penultimate ranking
in SAT average
scores.
"I'm not happy
with it said Charles
M c D a n i e 1 ,
superintendent of
Georgia schools
"We are disap-
pointed that SAT
scores for Georgia
students dropped this
year, and we certainly
will try to determine
the reasons
McDaniel said.
"However, I must
point out that 50 per-
cent of Georgia's
68,263 high school
seniors took the SAT.
Many of these
students were not
really prepared for
college but took the
SAT because it is re-
quired by all Georgia
colleges, even junior
colleges
Georgia Gov. Joe
Frank Harris said the
SAT scores were im-
portant, but stressed
they were only one in-
dication of student
ability.
Harris said Georgia
has raised reading
scores for the 4th, 8th
and 10th grade
students up to the na-
tional average after
being among the
lowest in the nation
for several years.
"I think a lot more
alarm is being ex-
pressed over
something that does
not have any
significance and more
praise ought to be
given to the fact that
we have met the 4th,
8th and 10th grade na-
tional average, which
has been a struggle
and is showing some
improvement in the
school system Har-
ris said.
The argument that
the smaller the
number of students
tested the higher the
state will rank in SAT
scores suffered a re-
cent setback.
Georgia State Sen.
John Foster asked the
Senate Research Of-
fice to rank just those
nine states where 50
percent or more took
the SAT during the
1982 test period.
Of the nine states
included in the com-
parison, based on last
year's SAT scores,
Georgia students did
not finish next to last.
They came in last with
a combined verbal-
math score of 823.
Tennessee scored
highest on the 1982
scores of those states
that tested 50 percent
of their graduating
seniors, with a com-
bined score of 999.
"I'm very pleased
by the scores said
Tennessee Education
Commissioner Robert
McElrath. "But you
find among the
highest 10 percent of
students in Tennessee
taking that test, so it
doesn't give a typical
picture
UNC President Calls
Headline 'Misleading'
Cont. From Page 1
Durham law firm of
Loflin and Loflin,
called the headline on
his story "somewhat
misleading but
basically accurate. "It
sensationalized the
story, but 1 think it's
true Charns said.
Headlines for
newspaper stories are
written by editors, not
the stories' writers.
The 700 pages of in-
formation received by
Charns was less than
half of the actual 1500
pages of information
about UNC-Chapel
Hill in the FBI's files.
The additional 800
pages remain
classified. "I think
there's a lot there that
we may never know
Charns said.
Charns asked Fri-
day to wave his
privacy act rights
regarding his personal
government files.
"He (Friday) declined
for personal
reasons Charns
said. "If he's not hap-
py with the story, let's
see what's there (in
the files)
DeRochi said the
Daily Tar Heel has
since printed two let-
ters it has received
supporting Frida
Those are the onl
two letters the paper
has received thus far
on the issue. "If he's
(Friday) been abusec
he's only been abusec
by people's inter
pretations (of the
story)" DeRochi saic
"I stand firrnU
behind the paper "
By ANDREA
MARKFI IO
M�ff Wnler
Until a firm reason
is given, Mrs.
Elizabeth Trought,
vice president of nurs-
ing at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital,
refuses to resign her
position, despite the
fact that she was ask-
ed to quit and was
suspended from her
job on Wednesdav,
Sept. 21.
"1 am confused
about the suspension
and fear indications
relate to control of
nursing or the ad-
ministrative staff
Trought said. "I v.ih
to know wh I'm be-
ing released and
believe this to be both
a personal and profes-
sional crisis, not only
in Pitt County, but
also in all of North
Carolina Trought
was suspended for 30
days and asked to
resign by the hospital
administration.
"I believe the
suspension is a
political hatchet con-
cerning medical staff
and members of the
community she
said. Hospital ad-
ministration officials
did not return phone
calls Mondav and
Office Services Unlimit
aoe N Tkrtoro Straat PO Bo 1M WUaon. N C 27803(910)237-
IS YOUR PROFESSOR PARTICULAR?
implications LRE Y0U ALL THUMBS AT TH� TYPEWRITER1
could not be reached
for comment.
Trought said she
believes there are
grave
concerning
hospital and ECU
nursing students.
"We are trying to
create an atmosphere
which is adversly af-
fected by the suspen-
sion Trought said.
Hosptial officials who
asked to remain
anonymous said there
may be problems with
the'PCMH-ECU rela-
tionship. Trought said
she had considered
the relationship a
positive one.
A Chapel Hill at-
torney representing
the N.C. Board of
Nursing has been
hired by Trought to
investigate the situa-
tion. Trought will
wait for the lawyer's
findings before mak-
ing a final decision
concerning resigna-
tion.
Emilie Henning,
Dean of ECU School
of Nursing, said ECU
utilizes the PCMH
facility as clinical
practice for the
undergraduate and
graduate nursing
students. Henning
said she doesn't have
enough information
to make a statement
at present.
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'
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$1545 meals)
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Serving Hone Style Food at
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Lunch Bald dinner
Specials Dnily
ll:00am-9:00pm Dairy
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For your nn� niriu � will b ujhii
lor examination and upiual services
every Saturday Irom M(x .1 in hi 1 on
p.m Allorcl.iblt u t s quick, an ui.tic
service. Convenient Hours. Sm . is
EJrf icrtnci
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Mon-Sst II-2PM
t
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Thursday 802 Sirloin
Meals served with King Idaho Baked 1
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(24 Hours)
Complete
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(she was formerly
with Forrest I ock
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with the
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t � a 1 H1 � �i i! i h paSBSWM
L16367070D
Pi Kappa Phi Brothers and
would like to announce
GREENVILLE ATHLETIC CLUB
WHY SETTLE FOR LESS WHEN
YOU CAN HAVE IT ALL!
Little Sister Rush
Tues: meet the Pi Kapps at
200 West 9 PM-until
Wed: open campus rush 9-until
Thurs: A request you back party
9-until
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GROUP OF 3-5 people $40.00
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140 OAKMONT DRIVE-756-9175 P�,W'
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ores
eased highest 10 percent of
said students in Tennessee
ication taking that test, so it
1 obert doesn't give a typical
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the
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see what's there (in
the files)
DeRochi said the
Daily Tar Heel has
since printed two let-
ters it has received
supporting Friday.
Those are the only
:ho letters the paper
has received thus far
on the issue. "If he's
(Friday) been abused,
he's only been abused
by people's inter-
pretations (of the
story)" DeRochi said.
'I stand firmly
behind the paper
res
lOLE
ASS
NT
I �
HOUSE
tch Specials
i-Sat 11-2PM
Jr. Sirloin $2.19
lop Sirloin $2.49
ilsllA.MlOP.M.
Beef Tips $1.99
iv Beef Ribs $3.49
lay 8oz Sirloin
ith King Idaho Baked1
FT & Texas Toast
r New Fruit Bar
iroved Salad Bar
I and l4oz. T-Bone
to Belter Serve Yoy
iville Blvd 7544040
iSt. 7341712
CLUB
EN
DENT HOURS!
TE $45.00
�pie $40.00
lore $35.00
IER OF STUDENT
VAILABLE-
ITNESS
fer Expires Oct.7
1175
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 27. 1983
Page7
Mick LaSalle:
Flashdance Works
By MICK LASALLE
Staff Wrtlrr
That broad in Flashdance
deserved a good kick in the ass.
Cagney wouldve slapped her with
a grapefruit. Bogie would've rap-
ped her in the teeth. But Mick
LaSalle's gotta go with the old
kick in the ass.
Alex, played by Jennifer Beals.
is the kind of girl that drives guys
crazy. She's absolutely beautiful
� but totally insecure. A guv
can't relax with her. Instead, he's
gotta be constantly on his guard
watching out for her next game.
Anybody who tells vou
Flashdance is a feminist film is in
dreamland. Alex, despite the
boyish name and her job as a
welder, just doesn't make it as a
cool, in-control woman. Instead,
she's a little girl a beautiful con-
fused little girl � the kind that
drives you nuts.
Nick Hurley, played by Michael
Nouri, is her boyfriend. In a
movie where every other male
character is either a slob, a sicko
or a loser. Hurley shows touches
of nerdiness as well. In fact,
despite the 15 years he has on
Alex, the Porsche he drives, the
mansion he lives in and the hun-
dred dollar bills he's got hanging
out of every pocket, the guy
almost blows it. He saves himself
in the end by telling Alex she
needs a kick in the ass. Which is
almost as good as what I would've
done.
Let's check out the mistakes
Hurley makes in this picture.
Then I '11 tell you how Mick
LaSalle would've handled it. If
you have less than a million
bucks, these are mistakes you
can't afford.
MISTAKE NUMBER ONE: "Hi.
I'm Jerry Nice
When they meet, Hurley is too
careful. He's too much into trying
to come off as Jerry Nice-n-
Sensitive. Maybe the girl is so
gorgeous it scares him. Who
knows? But at the end of their
first meeting, she's looking at him
with that half-smile women usual-
ly save for that special kind of
nice fellow they'd rather jump off
a cliff than be seen with.
The thing is, a beautiful woman
is used to nice guys. Every guy is
nice to her � and unless she's
stupid or under 12, she knows
why. What a beautiful woman
secretly wants is a guy who can
look past her skin (without
sweating) and realize she's a jerk,
yet like her anyway.
MISTAKE NUMBER TWO: He
should've taken a cab.
Hurley and Alex are walking.
She starts running � for no
reason � and he follows. She
knows who she's dealing with.
He's playing her game. She's 18
and got legs. He's 30-something
and got the bucks. He should've
let her run and hailed a cab for
himself � preferably back to his
place. Then, at least, she'd have
known not to run away anymore.
Remember, never plav her game.
MISTAKE NUMBER THREE:
She throws a rock, but he looks
stupid.
She goes to a ballet with this old
lady that you know has gotta
croak by the end of the flick and
sure enough does. Hurley is there
with this blonde and Alex sees
them. So Alex goes to Hurley's
house and pitches a rock through
his window.
The next day Alex curses
Hurley out in front of his
workers. He stands there trying to
get a word in, trying to explain
that the blonde was only his ex-
wife. He's in the right, but he
looks too desperate. Alex is in the
wrong, but she comes off looking
good. Don't be desperate to ex-
plain yourself.
MISTAKE NUMBER FOUR:
She's talking phone booths and
he's sitting there like a clown.
The sexiest thing Jennifer Beals
does in the whole movie � don't
forget, a stand-in does the danc-
ing � is eat lobster. And while
she's gnawing and slurping and in
general eating her lobster, she
teases Hurley. She dares him to
make it with her in a phone booth.
"I bet you're the kind who only
does it in bed she says.
What can Hurley do?
I asked myself this question the
first time I saw the picture. If he
takes her back to his bed, he loses.
If he takes her to a phone booth,
he loses again because he's play-
ing her game.
By talking like this, Alex shows
Hurley she thinks he's a dud. So
Hurley's gotta do something �
and quick. If he wants to regain
lost ground, there's only one thing
he can do. He's got to throw her
down on the floor of the
restaurant, crawl on top of her
and hope she backs down before
they both get thrown in jail. If
you can't keep a woman guessing,
you ain 't gonna keep her.
By rights, Flashdance should
suck.
�Much of the dialogue is nothing
but filler. For instance, there's a
girl whining through the first half
of the movie about this guy not
calling her. Then we never hear
about the guy again.
�There's a character named
Richie Blazek, a cook who think's
he's a comedian. If I ever meet
him, I'm gonna put him out of his
misery. He's the most annoying,
pathetic, useless guy on record.
Yet, the script has him going with
this beautiful waitress.
�Marine Jahan's doubling for
Jennifer Beals in the dance se-
quences is incredibly obvious, or
at least it's obvious once you
know.
�There's a song in the sound-
track called "Seduce Me
Tonight I just think about it
and get pissed off.
Yet, despite all the problems, I
like this movie. In fact, I saw it
this weekend for the third time. A
gorgeous girl with a great smile
goes a long way with Mick LaSalle
� in the movies and in real life.
But there's more to it than that.
Jennifer Beals plays the kind of
girl I've dealt with many a time.
As Alex, she's a character who
has zero faith in herself about
anything except her own looks.
Because of her beauty, she has her
social skills down pat. But when
you get into a relationship with
her � goodnight nurse! She'll
give you games, jealousy and tan-
trums. She'll keep you so confus-
ed, you'll have no time to notice
she has no idea who she is.
Aside from the ridiculous thing
of her being a welder, Alex is the
most accurate picture of an
18-year-old girl living in the '80s
that I've seen in a movie yet.
But there's something that's
good about this movie that's
harder to pin down. There's an at-
titude of youth about it. At her
audition when Alex dances to
"What A Feeling what comes
H�W,dVOU haBdl� � Psycho-mamma like Jennifer Bemls? Mick
LaSalle has the answers.
across is not only sex or sexiness
or sex appeal, but exhilaration.
The movie is telling you that you
too can have it all. And not only
that, it gives you that feeling.
Now, how can you dislike a movie
that does that for you?
Years from now young people
are gonna look at Flashdance and
think it was probably great to be
young in the '80s, just like we
might look at A Hard Day's Sight
and feel the same way about the
'60s. Or we might look at Fred
and Ginger and feel that way
about the '30s.
The best musicals are the ones
written for young people. The old
people musicals, the Rogers and
Hammerstein stuff, just don't cut
the cheese. They were written by
geniuses, sure. But they don't
have sex and excitement and the
kind of hope that goes with being
young.
Flashdance works. Yeah, yeah,
you can tell me it shouldn't. But it
does.
The Animals. T-Bone Burnette Rock In '80s
The Animals are back on the prowl.
There's no free ride in T-Bone Burnette's world.
Murphy Debuts In 48 HRS.
Predictable as a blasting cap, Eddie Murphy debuts in 48 HRS. He
joins Nick Nolte in a blistering chase through redneck bars and
back alleys in this action-filled screamer.
Jack Cates has been on the
force for 15 years. He's a shop-
worn cop who sticks to himself,
never makes the big busts, but
gets the job done. Reggie Ham-
mond is a ghetto con man who's
been in trouble all his life. He's
got a knack for smooth-talking
ladies � and now he's behind
bars.
This is the story of two men
who grew up on opposite sides of
the tracks and make their livings
on opposite sides of the law, but
suddenly find their lives united in
a common cause for an intense
fleeting period of just 48 HRS.
Under the direction of Walter Hill
(The Warriors, Southern Com-
fort), the film creates a spine-
tingling scenario of raw action,
street politics and inner-city ten-
sion.
Cates and Hammond (Nolte
and Saturday Night Live star
Murphy in his first major role) are
the unlikely partners in Hill's
latest urban thriller. After a con-
vict escapes in a daring, bloody
jailbreak, Cates springs Ham-
mond for 48 hours and enlists his
services to stake out his back-
street hangouts and lure his old
gang members out of hiding.
What follows is an explosive cops-
and-robbers adventure that pits
the skills of an experienced street
cop and a street-wise hustler
against a desperate gang of killers
The plot, intense at times, still
has its lighter moments, scenes
that allow Murphy to demonstrate
he is indeed one of the brightest
and freshest comic actors on the
screen today. In the redneck bar
scene � a screamer � his talents
are superbly displayed with gutsy
acting that is a display of controll-
ed cockiness as dangerous and
daring as chewing on a blasting
cap.
48 HRS. is one of the few
Hollywood films of recent years
to make successful use of major
black talent. In addition to Mur-
phy's memorable debut, the film
features a stellar cast of black
movie veterans and newcomers in-
cluding the Busboys, the chart-
hitting rock group. A stylized,
high-action piece, 48 HRS. takes
to the city streets with blistering
force, intriguing plot twists and
the refreshing exuberance of Mur-
phy's comedic talent.
Admission to Hendrix Theatre
this Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day for showings of 48HRS. is
free for all students with student
I.D. and activity cards.
BvALMAGINNES
Staff Writer
The Animals: Ark
Back in the mid-60s, just after
the Beatles came to these shores,
America was deluged with bands
from England hoping to cash in
on the craze for anything British.
Most of these bands burned out
before the end of the decade,
fading into rock and roll obscuri-
ty.
The Animals were part of this
British invasion. Best known for
their hits "House of the Rising
Sun "It's My Life" and "We
Got to Get Out Of This Place
the Animals split up before 1970
and went their separate ways.
Now the original members have
regrouped and recorded a new
album Ark.
Things start off with a bang on
side one with "Loose Change
These guys may be 40, but they
still know how to rock. "Love Is
For All Time" is a lovely song
that unfortunately suffers from
overproduction with echo
chambers distorting Eric
Burdon's voice.
Eric Burdon is one of rock's
great vocalists, but sadly his voice
here doesn't match its former
power. In fact, the whole band
never captures the intensity of the
old days. When Burdon screams
"No escape" on "Prisoner of the
Light he doesn't have nearly the
desperation he did back when he
told us "We got to get out of this
place
The Animals are at their best
playing straight ahead, unadorned
rock and roll. The best cuts "Try-
ing To Get To You and "Just
Can't Get Enough" are a pair of
soul ravers that let Burdon cut
loose. Hilton Valentine's guitar
and Alan Price's tasteful
keyboards are also a treat.
While the entire album is com-
petent and well executed, there is
little real excitement. Still, if you
have fond memories of mid-60s
British rock, check this one out.
These guys are survivors.
T'Bone BurnettProof Through
The Night
T-Bone Burnett first came to
public attention in 1976 as a
member of Bob Dylan's Rolling
Thunder Review. Since then he
has pursued a solo career that has
garnered him a fair amount of
critical acclaim but few record
sales. If there is any justice,
Burnett's new album should earn
him the public attention he
deserves.
Burnett has some high-powered
help. Pete Townshend, Mick Ron-
son (another Rolling Thunder
veteran), Ry Cooder and Richard
Thompson all lend a hand. But
the real star of the show is Burnett
himself.
These are serious songs. There
are no sloppy love songs here or
mindless exhortations to party.
The lyrics are meditations on suc-
cess and the American dream.
There is no free ride in Burnette's
world. If you want to dance you
pay the band.
Record
Review
Three of the songs on side one
"Fatally Beautiful "After All
These Years" and "Baby Fall
Down" could be about the same
woman, the doomed, star-crossed
Marilyn Monroe-like starlet we
love and hate at the same time.
The final cut on side one, "The
Sixties is about a fellow who
"bagan his rebellion late He
buys a camper and even gets to
sleep with one of the hippie girls
he has fantasized about. "But it
made me feel awful recites
Burnett, "because 1 had to pay
her $50 and it was 20 for anyone
else
"Hefner and Disney" is a spoof
of two men who had as much to
do with shaping the American
dream as anyone who ever lived.
"Hula Hoop" is a sharp edged
view of what one has to do to
"make it 3urnett is not op-
timistic, neither is he resigned. He
knows we are living in a confused
time, but he is determined to deal
with it.
The final cut on the album
shows his philosophy clearly.
Over "Shut It Tight's" sprightly
folk tune, Burnett enumerates the
many confusions of modern day
man who doesn't know "wrong
from right The ambiguties of
the world around him plague this
fellow, but he keeps on trying to
cope. In the song's last two lines,
Burnett tells us "I ain't gonna
quit until I'm laid into my
tombAnd even then they better
shut it tight
What can I say but "amen
Do yourself a favor and listen to
this album.
, . -
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I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Hitchcock Thrillers ToBe Shown Wednesday
Wednesday even-
ing's free flicks on
campus will feature
two Alfred Hitchcock
classics � The 39
Steps and Spellbound.
The films will be
shown at 7 and 9.
The 39 Steps was
released in 1935 and
was loosely based on
the John Buchan
novel of the same
name. It stars Robert
Donat as Richard
Hannay and
Madeleine Carroll as
Pamela.
The story
revolves ab out
Richard Hannay, who
finds he must escape
from his London flat
after he discovers that
the mysterious
woman to whom he
had given refu ge the
night before has been
murdered. The killers
are now after him,
although he really isn't
sure why, and he
flees, following a
single clue, to
Scotland. Eluding his
pursuers by jumping
from the train on
Forth Bridge, Han-
nay makes his way to
the home of Professor
Jordan who,
unknown to him, is
the masterm ind
behind the spy ring.
Again he is almost
trapped,but he
manages to escape to
the heather moors
with the girl he met on
the train, Pamaela
(Madeleine Carroll),
to whom he is hand-
cuffed by the spies
masquerading as
police. The couple
make it to a theater,
where they find Mr.
Memory, whom the
spies use to transmit
government secrets.
Hitchcock rated
The 39 Steps as one of
his favorite films,
because he felt that its
tempo was perfect.
Hitchcock once
saidIf I did The 39
Steps again, I would
stick to the formula,
but it really takes a lot
of work. You have to
use one idea after
another, and with
such rapidity
With Spellbound,
released in 1945, Hit-
chcock created a
Freudian masterpiece
that was also lushly
romantic, with a
haunting Academy
Award Miklos Rozsa
score and the pairing
of Gregory Peck and
Ingrid Bergman, with
suppporting roles by
Jean Acker, Rhonda
Fleming, Donald Cur-
tis and John Emery.
The story is full of
complications. Based
on a novel by Francis
Beeding, The House
of Dr. Edwardes, the
Ben Hecht screenplay
begins as the staff of a
mental hospital awaits
its new director, Dr.
Edwardes (Gregory
Peck). Dr. Constance
Peterson (Ingrid
Bergman) takes im-
mediately to the new
doctor and falls in
love with him. Soon,
though, she realizes
that he is really a men-
tal patient who has
assumed the role of
Dr. Edwardes. Her
lover now becomes
her patient, and he
finally is convinced
that he must have kill-
ed the real Dr. Ed-
wardes, with the
amnesia as the result
of the shock of his
violent act. She hides
The chase begins for Robert Donat when he discovers his guest murdered in The 39 Steps.
him from the police
wilth her former pro-
fessor who im-
mediately analyzes
"Dr. EdwardesV
dreams. The reason
for his guilt complex
is revealed and quick-
ly after, it becomes
evident who the real
killer is.
These are two films
that avid filmgoers
Roll Dice For Divorce Game
PITTSFIELD,
MASS. (UPI) � Not
everybody loses in a
divorce � it all
depends on how you
roll the dice.
At least that's the
case in a new board
game invented by
divorce attorney
will not want to miss.
Dorothy Green.
Ms. Green calls her
game "Divorce of
Course
The object of Ms.
Green's game is to be
the first player to suc-
cessfully get a divorce
� accomplished by
rolling dice and mov-
ing a marker around
the board until
reaching "Freedom
The challenge is
that each space
presents the players
with a variety of
perilous challenges in-
volving alimony and
child support
payments and fights
CoUHTRV CoOKIMG
Ingrid Bergman as Dr. Peterson falls in love with Gregory Peck, a
loonev masquerading as a fellow shrink in Hitchcock's Spellbound.
Trip Planned



I
The Student Union
Travel Committee is
sponsoring a fall
break trip to
Philadelphia and the
Pennsylvania Dutch
Country. This trip in-
cludes the following:
the ECU vs. Temple
football game; tours
of historical national
monuments in
Philadelphia; tours of
Pennsylvania Dutch
Country, the Amish
Village and Get-
tysburg; and, a
delicious buffet
Dutch-style dinner.
An afternoon shopp-
ing spree in Lan-
caster's famous
Outlet City is also
planned.
The trip takes place
October 14-18 and in-
cludes round-trip
transportation, all
hotel accomodations,
a football ticket and
the free guided tours
mentioned above. The
price is $109 per per-
son.
For further infor-
mation and reserva-
tions, contact the cen-
tral ticket office at
Mendenhall Student
Center 757-6611, ext.
266.
512 E. Nth St.
(2 Blocks W. of Boy's Dorms)
Come talk
to Sammy
about a meal plan.
We Specialize In Home Cooked Food
Coupon
$1.00 off
every two regular plates
(1 meat, 2 vegs, bread, Tea)
served 11-2
Popcorn
Shrimp
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$4.99
Shrimp Lovers
&� Wnytravel 10� miles to tne
� beach and pay high prices
"amily Restaurants for fresh shrimp
0
Coupon expires Sept. 30
Open
11:00 to8:00
7 days
a week
l
said.
Some spots order
the players to pick one
of three sets of cards
entitled "Dirty
i.ks "Consult
Your Lawyer" or
"Court Order any
of which might set the
player back, she said.
M OFFICE SUPPLIES, SCHOOL
INC.
with spouses, she
�a
t
SUPPLIES
SOCIAL STATIONERY. GIFTS. GREETING CARDS
422 Aritnct�i Blvd. OppM� FM Pitt)
7�-4Z24
GREENVILLE. N.C.
MON-SAT
9:30-6:00
JftgJftg�gfrg
phone
752-3172
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
Cliffs
Seafood
Specials�
Monday thru Thursday
The GreenLeaf
presents in concert
TOta Goolidge
AWHALEOFAMEAL
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
popcorn shrimp dinner
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$4.99
TUESWEDTHURS.
Banquet Facilities Available
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
SRAll Time High
Wednesday, September 28, 1983
The GreenLeaf 1104 N. Memorial Drive
Greenville, N.C. (Across from the Airport)
(The Stars Showplace)
FOR INFORMATION CALL 757-3107
758-0327
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted for slaw 5s- extra
Thursday Night is College Night
at the Greenleaf This Thursday the
Greenleaf presents "Talk of the Town"
Ladies Free
Free Draft til 1�:M
Doors ones at 8:00
t111
edPn
French horn virtuoso Dark
LOANS
TVi, Air Conditioners
Stored, tuns, told 4 si Ivor
diamonds cameras and
equipment typewriters
� erosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm sue on
ly), video tames 4 car
tridtes power tools,
musical instruments
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles, and
anythint else ot value
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INC.
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8, 1983
1 Drive
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Free
m tilt 10:00
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27, 1983
Horn Recital Set
For ECU Campus
Thanks to a grant
from the National En-
dowment for the Arts,
Solo Recitalists Pro-
gram, The ECU
School of Music will
be bringing two na-
tionally recognized
young artists, David
Jolley, French horn
player,and Stephanie
Chase, violinist, to
the ECU campus.
The first of the two
artists to be featured
in the festival will be
David Jolley, who will
present a recital on
Sunday, Oct. 2 at 8
p.m. at the A. J. Flet-
cher Recital Hall on
the East Carolina
University campus on
East Tenth Street.
On Monday, Oct.
3, Jolley will present
two master classes,
one from 10a.m.until
noon, the other from
2 to 4 p.m.
The recital and the
classes are both open
to the public without
charge.
Compositions
Jolley will perform in-
clude a BachBusoni
choral prelude,
"Come, Savior of the
World Beethoven's
"Sonata for Horn
and Piano, Opus 17
an adagio and allegro
by Schumann; a work
each by four Russian
composers, Dukas'
"Villanelle and
Poulenc's 'Elegie in
memory of Dennis
Brain.
I IE!
rm�ocuiM mur roacf
Jolley has perform-
ed extensively in the
U.S Europe and the
Near East. He is win-
ner of a Concert Ar-
tists Guild's Recital
Award and the
Heldenleben Interna-
tional Horn Competi-
tion in Cleveland. In
1982 he was the first
hornist to ever be
chosen for the Af-
filiate Artists Residen-
cy Program and under
that auspices per-
formed over 100
recitals nationally.
A native of Califor-
nia, Jolley received
undergraduate and
graduate degrees from
the Juilliard School in
New York. He has
made a solo recording
titled "Romantic
Music for the Horn
In his Sunday
recital, Jolley will be
accompaniesd by
pianist Jonathan
Feldman.
Pianist Feldman is
an active recitalist
throughout the U.S.
and Canada, Europe,
Africa, the USSR and
the Far East. He has
performed as soloist
with the Boston Pops,
the St. Louis Little
Symphony and other
orchestras. Feldman
has also recorded for
Columbia Master-
works, RCA Red
Seal, Titanic, and
Philo Records.
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PHILADELPHIA FOR FALL BREAK '83
OCTOBER 14 OCTOBER 18
t ss s $
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� . . . .
French horn virtuoso David Jolley performs at A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall on October 2nd.
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Thru Sat. Oct. 1. 1983
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THE EAST CAROi INI AN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 27. 1983
11
Pirates Ready For Improved Tigers
ECU offensive guard Terry Long, who has had three outstanding
games in 1983, is questionable for ECU's contest with Missouri this
weekend. The player touted as the strongest football player in
America is suffering from a bruised shoulder.
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Spam Editor
After a relaxing weekend off,
the ECU football team will again
clash with Missouri this Saturday
for their second meeting ever.
Last year, the Pirates scored
just three field goals against the
Tigers, finishing up with a 28-9
loss.
ECU Head football coach Ed
Emory, however, doesn't believe
this season's match-up should be
anything like last year.
"We're going with the purpose
of winning Emory said. "We're
expecting to win
Emory named several factors
that will make this year's game
different. "First of all, they are a
much better football team than
they were last year he said.
"Offensively, they have twice the
team they have previously. They
just have a great offensive line.
Second of all, we can't go up
there and slip up on them. We're
going in with a 2-1 record, and
they'll know who we are
Missouri also has a 2-1 record.
The Tigers beat Illinois, 28-18, in
their opening game and then fell
to Wisconsin, 21-20. "They just
threw that game away Emory
said.
Missouri led the Wisconsin
Badgers, 14-7, at halftime, but
three fatal mistakes cost the
Tigers the game.
Freshman tailback Ron Floyd
muffed two straight punts by
Badger George Winslow and the
Big Ten team quickly converted
them into a 21-14 lead.
Wisconsin recovered the first
Floyd fumble on Mizzou's 13 and
scored in two plays. Center Dan
Turk covered the second one in
the endzone.
The Tigers bounced back this
past weekend by beating Utah
State, 17-10. But the win wasn't
quite as convincing as some had
thought it would be. "I thought it
(Missouri win over USU) would
be different Emory said, "and
Missouri did too, but I'm sure
glad they won it.
"We wanted'em to be
undefeated when we went there
he said. "That would have meant
a bigger crowd for us
In fact, Atlanta cablestation
WTBS wanted to carry the
Missouri-ECU game at night, but
Missouri doesn't have lights. The
game will be shown on WITN
(channel 7). The delayed telecast
will begin at 10:30 p.m. on Satur-
day.
Meanwhile, the Pirates have
come back from their short vaca-
tion ready to play, Emory said.
"We just had a great practice
yesterday (Sunday) he said.
"They had a little break, and
they've come back strong both of-
fensively and defensively
In last week's press conference,
Emory said the Pirates would
have to be more physical in prac-
tice. "That doesn't mean scrim-
maging he said. "Not 11 on
11 (players), but more one on one
and two on two. We've got to be
ready. They're gonna brack us
right in our teeth
The play of the offensive line,
Emory said, will be a crucial deci-
sion in the game's outcome. "It's
gonna be the biggest challenge in
the world for us to move the foot-
ball on them he said. "Our of-
fense is best rushing, while the
Missouri defense is best against
rushing Missouri has been rank-
ed fifth in the nation in both
rushing and total offense.
Offensively, the Tigers are led
by offensive coordinator Larry
Beightol. Someone Emory has a
great deal of respect for.
"Beightol is tough he said.
"He's taught them to run an
I-formation with a good play-off
action play, and they run the op-
tion some too.
"Overall, Missouri just has
awesome personnel. Along with
Florida, Missouri has the best per-
sonnel we will face all season
Last week, Emory was concern-
ed about injuries, but most of the
sideline players are now back in
action, with a few exceptions.
"We're still concerned about
Terry Long's (offensive guard)
bruised shoulder and Norman
Quick (injured ankle)
Junior College transfer Ricky
Hilburn will have his knee scoped
and will probably be out for the
remainder of the season. The of-
fensive guard will more than likely
be redshirted.
Center John Floyd, after
undergoing an appendectomy a
few weeks ago, is practicing this
week and is expected to play on
Saturday.
Missouri, on the other hand,
hasn't suffered any major in-
juries. According to Emory, their
lineup is as solid as steel. "Their
guys are so big and tall. They
average 260 or so he said.
"We're concerned about our
short receivers against them
Joining Drain is Missouri's
number one tailback Santio Bar-
bosa and freshmen Cameron
Riley and Ron Floyd.
Other heralded players are of-
fensive guard Cameron Goode,
who leads what Emory describes
as the one of the most "potent,
powerful backfields around
Emory cited quite a few
Missouri players who will be
definite threats on Saturday. "
Marlon Adler (quarterback) is
just a winner he said. "They
have two quarterbacks (also Brad
Perry) who can play.
"In the fullback position, Eric
Drain will be the top fullback
we'll face this season Dram
scored two last-minute
touchdowns against the Pirates
last season, and carried for a
22-yard touchdown last week
against Utah State.
Missouri may have two number
one draft picks in defensive end
Bobby Bell and free safety Reco
Hawkins, Emory said.
Bell is son of ex-Minnesota ail-
American Bobby Bell.
Since the Tigers will open their
Big Eight conference schedule
following the ECU game, Emory
knows Mizzou will be thirsty for a
win before heading for Colorado.
"They'll want to come of a
non-conference schedule with a
3-1 record Emory said, "but
that's okay. We want it just as
bad.
"We do know that we've got to
play great to play on the field with
them
Andruzzi Faces Tough Season
ECU women's basketball coach
Cathy Andruzzi may have faced
challenges before, but this year
should prove to be her biggest.
With the loss of all-America
forward Mary Denkler, Darlene
Chaney and several other promi-
nent players, Andruzzi will have
the youngest squad in her six
seasons at the ECU helm.
"Obviously, we're a very young
team this season Andruzzi said.
"Our experience could show in
the early portion of the season,
but at the same time, we are very
excited about the challenge that
lies ahead for our players and
coaches.
"There is no doubt that we will
miss the services of our graduates,
especially Mary (Denkler); she
was not only a super athlete but a
fine person and a leader for our
program
Last year, the Pirates finished
with a 14-12 record even after
having lost three starters at mid-
season due to injuries. This
season, however, the Lady Rats
won't have Denkler's inside
moves to fall back on.
'The complexion of our squad
will undoubtedly change An-
druzzi said. "Instead of one in-
dividual dominating our offense
as Mary did wtih 22 points (and
7.8 rebounds per game), we look
for a more efficient, balanced at-
tack from our offense
standpoint
The Lady Pirates return four
players who gained experience
from last year's squad. While
three of them are sophomores,
they are considered the team's
veterans in terms of experience,
Andruzzi said.
I eading the way for ECU will
be sophomore Sylvia Bragg, a 5-8
guard from Richmond, Va who
is the top returning scorer from
last season. Bragg averaged 9.5
points per game and 2.8 rebounds
per contest as a freshman, playing
in all 26 games.
She received the high honor this
past summer of being the only col-
legiate player from the state of
North Carolina to be selected for
the National Sports Festival
games in Colorado Springs, Co.
Bragg was named the co-captain
of the East squad and helped lead
the team to a bronze medal.
Delphine Mabry (7.3 points per
game and 3.6 rebounds per game),
a sophomore from Rocky Mount,
returns as the shooting guard. The
5-4 Mabry was a pleasant surprise
last season, starting 10 games and
performing very well before suf-
fering a season-ending hand in-
jury.
The other key returnees are 5-9
forward Lisa Squirewell, who
averaged 5.6 points and 4.3 re-
bounds last season, and Darlene
Hedges, a 6-2 center from
Centereach, N.Y who saw
limited action last season.
The key for the Lady Pirates
will be the play of the strong corps
of newcomers and how they
blendwith the returnees. Annette
Phillips, a 5-10 forward, and
Anita nderson, a 6-1 forward-
center, are two junior college
recruits who Andruzzi feels will
add maturity and depth to the
squad.
Two incoming freshmen also
will play important roles in their
first season. Lynn Nance, a 6-0
forward from Asheboro, and
Jody Rodriguez, a 5-9 guard from
Fayetteville, have a chance to see
immediate action this year.
"As always we will stress strict
fundamentals both offensively
and defensively in our preseason
practices Andruzzi said. "We
are going to be small, and we'll
need to execute intelligently and
aggressively.
"We're not hesitant to send out
returning sophomores back into
the battle because they're fine
players. We just need to keep in
mind that they are sophomores.
As for the large number of
newcomers, we'll have to work
hard in acclamating them to our
system
The forward position should be
the Lady Pirates strong suit in
1983. Squirewell, Anderson,
Phillips and Nance give ECU
good size and experience, and
more importantly for Andruzzi,
they are phsyically strong players.
The point guard spot will
belong to Bragg. Although she
can play one of three positions,
her services are now aimed toward
this position. Mabry will anchor
the shooting guard slot with
Rodriguez and freshman Tcrri
Sutton as backups.
The center spot is the biggest
question mark for the Lady
Pirates. Senior Darlene Hedges
should hold down the starting role
with backup help from 6-1
freshman Jan Bethea.
"This season excites me
possibly more than any other
season since I've been at ECU
Andruzzi said. "With a great
player like Mary Denkler, your
job as a coach is much easier, but
we've got to mold a team now,
and the girls are so eager to prove
themselves that we really look for
a productive year.
"This season is almost like star-
ting at the beginning
Sylvia Bragg
Conference Tourney In Minges
Booters Split Weekend Games
With the announcement that
the first-ever ECAC-South
Conference women's basketball
tournament will be held in
ECU's Minges Coliseum, the
Lady Pirate can boast possibly
the finest home schedule ever.
The post-season tournament
will include all of the ECAC-
South schools�James
Madison, George Mason,
William & Mary, Richmond
and ECU�except Navy, which
is Division II in women's
basketball.
"The inception of this tour-
nament is tremendous for the
future of the ECAC-South
said ECU women's coach Cathy
Andruzzi. "We're very excited
about the steps being made in
making this one of the Finest
women's basketball conferences
in the country
The remainder of the home
slate will be highlighted by a
Jan. 5 contest against Notre
Dame and the Converse Lady
Pirate Classic, which includes
ECU, Cheyney State, Marshall
and Fairfield.
Cincinatti, Georgia Tech and
South Carolina also invade
Minges this season, along with
James Madison, East Tennessee
State and Richmond, among
others in the 16-game home
schedule.
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU soccer team split mat-
ches in New Jersey this weekend,
defeating Monmouth College,
2-0, and falling to Rutgers, 4-1.
The Pirates' victory over Mon-
mouth was their first shut-out in
20 games. Goalkeepers Grant
Pearson and George Fodgorney
each saw action for ECU. Both
players, as well as the rest of the
team, played well, according to
Coach Robbie Church.
"This was our best game of the
year Church said. "The entire
team put forth a tremendous
amount of effort, and we got a
chance to play everybody who
made the trip
The Pirate goals were scored by
David Skeffington and Brian Col-
gan, with assists coming from Bil-
ly Merwin and Alan Smith.
Church said freshman Billy
Anastanio also had a good game,
while Doug Patmore was the
outstanding defensive player.
In the loss to Rutgers, the
Pirates were never really in the
game. "They (Rutgers) scored
within the first minute of play,
and I think that shook our kids
up Church said.
Losing 3-0 at halftime, the
Pirates came out and played
Rutgers evenly the rest of the way,
with each team scoring one goal
apiece.
The lone Pirate goal was scored
by Scott Gibbs, and assisted by
Merwin. Although ECU showed
some life in the second half,
Church was not pleased with his
team's performance.
"We went to New Jersey look-
ing for two wins he said. "We
weren't prepared for our game
with Rutgers, and I felt we should
have played a lot better
The Pirates' next game will be
at 3 p.m. this afternoon (Tuesday)
against nationally-ranked Old
Dominion.
Netiers Defeat G WU
With just one match behind
them, the ECU volleyball team
faced five of the toughest teams
they will see all year last weekend.
The Pirates opened their road-
trip against highly-touted North
Carolina, losing three straight
games 15-9, 15-7 and 15-9.
"We played a lot better then we
did in our first match against
N.C. State she said.
On Friday and Saturday, the
Pirates participated in the N.C.
State Invitational. Although ECU
dropped three-game matches to
Clemson, Duke and Western
Carolina, the Pirates saved their
best performance for George
Washington, one of the most
powerful teams in the tourna-
ment.
"George Washington is one of
the best teams in Virginia
Turner said. "If we had played
. against everybody else like we did
against them, we would have won
the tournament
Date
Nov. 20
Nov. 26
Nov. 27
Dec. 1
Dec. 4
Dec. 10
Dec. 17
Dec. 19
Dec. 30-
31
Dec. 30
Dec. 31
Jan. 5
Jan. 8
Jan. 15
Jan. 18
Jan. 22
Jan. 23
Jan. 28
Feb. 1
Feb. 4
Feb. 5
Feb. 9
Feb. 11
Feb. 12
Feb. 17-
18
Feb. 21
Feb. 25
Mar. 2-
4
Opponent
GEORGE WASHINGTON
St. Peter's College
Iona
Fayetteville State
UNC CHARLOTTE
JAMES MADISON
CINCINATTI
APPALACHIAN STATE
City of Dogwood Classic
East Carolina vs. N.C. State
Va. Tech vs. North Carolina
N.C. State vs. Va. Tech
East Carolina vs. UNC
NOTRE DAME
FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON
GEORGE MASON
UNC-WILMINGTON
UNC Charlotte
Appalachian State
South Carolina
William & Mary
EAST TENNESSEE STATE
GEORGIA TECH
Old Dominion
American University
George Mason
LADY PIRATE CLASSIC
(ECU, Cheyney State, Fairfield
and Marshall)
RICHMOND
SOUTH CAROLINA
ECAC-SOUTH TOURNAMENT
Location
GREENVILLE
Jersey City, NJ
New Rochelle, NY
Fayetteville
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
Fayetteville
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
Charlotte
Boone
Columbia, SC
Williamsburg, VA
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
Norfolk, VA
Washington, DC
Fairfax, VA
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
GREENVILLE
Time
3:00
3:00
3:00
7:00
3:00
7:30
3:00
7:30
7:00
9:00
2:00
4:00
7:30
7:30
3:00
7:30
3:00
5:15
TBA
7:30
3:00
3:00
7:35
2:00
2:00
6:00
8:00
7:30
7:30
TBA
��
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12
THr- I AS I C AROl INIAN
SI PI I MBER 27, 1983
Tennis Season Opens With
Split In Weekend Action
By RANDY MEWS
Aulttaat Sporti Milor
The ECU tennis
teams opened their
seasons this weekend
with the men captur-
ing the UNC-
Wilmington Invita-
tional Tournament
and the women falling
to powerful UNC-
Greensboro.
The men's tourna-
ment championship
came down to the
number two doubles
match where Bill
O'Donnell and Paul
Owen defeated Tom-
my Goldman and
Waller Koch 4-6, 6-3,
6-3 to lift the Pirates
to a 27-26 team vic-
tory.
"Our victory was a
total team effort
Coach Pat Sherman
said. "All the men
played exceptionally
well throughout the
entire tournament
The Pirates lost
their match to Coastal
Carolina 7-5 but fared
better against the
other teams to take
the tournament title.
ECU defeated both
Campbell and UNC-
Wilmington 11-1.
Individually, David
Creech and Greg
Lloyd won all of their
matches, while
O'Donnell-Owen was
the only doubles team
to go undefeated.
The women had a
tougher time of it, los-
ing to UNC-
Greensboro 7-2.
ECU returns only
two players from last
year's team, while
UNC-G entered the
match with a 4-0
record.
"We had four
freshmen playing
college-level tennis for
the first time in their
lives, and they were
obviously nervous
Sherman said. "Janet
Russell played excep-
tionally well in both
singles and doubles
and was the only one
who played up to her
potential
In singles. Arm
Brown (UNC-G) d
Catherine Tolson,
6-7, 6-3, 6-3, Janet
Russell (ECU) d. Lisa
Zimmerman 6-3, 6-1;
Barbera Bailer (I (
G) d. Miriam Beck
6-0, 6-2; Maureen
Kimtis (UNC-G) d
Ann Manderfield 6-0
6-1; Shellv Albright
(UNC-G) d. Cisi
Bolton 6-2, 6 2. I aura
Barnette (I N G) d
Lynn Wallace
6-0.
In doubles. ToK i
Russell (EC1 d
BrownZimmerman
6 1, 6 3; Bailer-Karen
Paice (UNC-G) d
Manderfield-Bolton
3-6, 6-3, 6 1; and
KimtisAlbright
(1 G) d B �
Wallace 6-3, 7-5
The women's r �
match will be Sept 26
against ACC, while
the men pia Campbel
at home on Sept 2 -
COMPLETE
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Pirate defensive lineman Curtis WaU makes the hit against a Murra State opponent in ECU'S last
game.
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more convenient than ever
THE
AUTOMATIC
NIKON FE
WITH NIKON
50mm 11 8
SERIES r I ENS
ONLY
$299.9$
SimpK sensational a light compact auto-exposure
35mm sir with the precision and versatility that only
Nikrm ran offer The Nikon FE gives you automate
tkp�sur� d. c uracy with any of nearly 60 famous Nikkor
fuses piui easy-to-use features for creative
pnotoyraphv Theres also a special Nikon automatic
He� tronir flash that actually progiams the FE shutter.
and a compact motor drive for up to 3 5 shcti per
sfconu Try it voursen "ome in today!
art i camera hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE H. C 27834
7 52-0088












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� �
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t
ATTENTION
SENIORS
VOTE
DOUG
HAMILTON

CLASS PRESIDENT
��?�����?.� ��4i.��
?�??�?�?���
l$15.00 OFF ANY COMPLETE I
PAIR OF EYE GLASSES!
� Mm! p��I coupon �lt o�der tor dl�ou�l Not
I food At ofc�i dvrrtu�d �f .� �
Dotignor From�s
12
Price
OPTICAL
SOFT fiQ
CONTACTS Q7
l��CLLDCSMD�l r.t �iv"tt
AOCAJU kit
3b 4204
PALACE

703 Gr��nvllle Blvd Acro�� From Pitt PUa S��t To �R A R��t
GaryM Harris Lic�n�ed Optician Op�n 9 30 � m to 6 p m Nor ,
Pharo 's Pizza
� Served After 4:00PM �
Located 521 Cotanche St. Across from
Git Is Dorms in Georgetown Shoppes

$2.00 off$2.00 off
any 16 inchany 16 inch
Large PizzaLarge Pizza
with 2 or morewith 2 or more
Toppin&iToppings
expires 10-6 H3expires 10-6-83
$1.00 off$1.00 off
any 12 inchany 12 inch
Med. PizzaMed. Pizza
with 2 orwith 2 or
more toppingsmore toppings
expires 10-6-83expires 10-6-83
MENDENHALL
SNACK BAR
���������
salad bar
Hot sandwiches
daily specials
conveniently located
continuous service
1- 30am- 7'30pm
east Carolina
COUSIN'S PIZZERIA
758-5982 321 E 10th ST Greenville 758-5616
�1 00 Of f IN S��G� "
I' X 0" A CtfSt MA�.
I - . H �� �,
t'00OffOfcAC�f�SSL�C
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I "A IVIOM
1 SMA1 I PI A WITH 1 TOPPING,
OFtOl R CHOICE iFXTRAf HIFsr
IS ALREADY ON)
PI US I PITCHER OF BF IKHIM
� v- $4.99
ON MONDAY A U) D
: MNU OTII OINNlRs
: sl ls
RI If BRt DS - - -
IPIKHUKUBHRMIRC-J �)
ON TIESDA5� THl RSDAts
ZLASAGNA TOPPED WITH
MELTED MOZZAREl S CHE� sj
2SALADS
2 GARLIC BREADS �� ' �� -
I PITCHER OF BEER FOR $7 49
ON FRIDMs
o�nnf'rMTI 1MM,M1
H.KHIH BRt PITf HIR
�)l Brf I
�Mm
S7.49
A
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PirBtf
Monm"
Voluntt
Verbal.
By Spo
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Ter-
nessee
Ma
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ncss
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for ar
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EVERY
ITAII
5P.N
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�LASA
�SPAGI
Choice
l!K U

ALL-�Ol-CAi
FLOUND1
OpmFn. mmd
3
Breakfast
$&





rm-l-ASI c AROIINIAN SEPTEMBER 27, 1983 13
Opens With
id Action
2 6-2; I aura
e 11 e (U N( G) d
V allace t o.
In doubles, 1 olson
(ECU) d
m m erma n
f ; Bailer Karen
N G) d.
Bolt on
; 6 I md
w ; . c h t
Bee k
I " 5
nen's nexi
. Sept. 2r
CC, while
� Campbel
S pi 28
MPLETE
IQTIVF
KJR V I vJl
H � )
MINIS.
-AZA SHELL.
ir Towing Service.
iaul Rentals
Available
siy
Ptrit Special
� ICO U�
Ribeye plus
i Cm Eat Salad Bar
no Free Dessert
757097
$4.99
Banquet Room
up your Student
icount Card from Mmm$er
f
� fev WMi �� ha Ate aaataa I
TION


JG
iLTON
RESIDENT






oupo artta f�arr tor d
ir itmuK aawclaJa
amount N
12 "
j I
00 OFF ANY COMPLETI I �
PAIR OF EYEGLASSES' !
i �
JJ
i
i
I

i
i
i
i
I
I
t
f
I
f
1C
SOFT gQ�f
CONTACTS Q7
MS SB DA �Btf
and .
Pllllllf
756 4204
PALACE

ERA Rc.lt
� "� 10. m ,o6p m Mon Fr.
PIZZERIA
Grf- 758-5616
f
WANH MI ri DINNf Wx
- (is
' �IH i HKr -
HIH MI Hllk FOD CT 4Q
MH�ANs � ����Bala
P.HIM! 4 MI MB,Ms
: "Vi vfs
I ' 11 l BHI ! PIK HIH
1 r Hr rH
S7.49
�'4
��
.MUf
Pirate soccer coach Robbie Church (right) saw his team lose to Rutgers over the weekend but bounced back to defeat
Monmouth C ollege 2-0.
Volunteers' Majors
Verbally Attacked
By Sports Writers
KRULL
Paladin Drive-In
(Formerly Tice) $5.00 carload
located next to Pitt Community College
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED Sot Oct I. AT A&P in Cmk.cIIc
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALER'
DOUBLE COUPONS
c FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEMD, WE WILL DOUBLE
D MANUFACTURER'S C0UP0MS, EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS. $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE'
Betmrnm now and Oci 1 �� will radaarr national
manutacturar a canta-orr coupona up to SO 'or
Ooobta tn�MF vatoa Oflar good on national manu
facturar oants-otf coupona only (Foofl -alaika
coupon not accaptacCustomar mutt purcnasa
coupon product in apactttaO sia Eipirad coupon
will not ba hooorad Ona coupon par cuatomar pa'
Itam Mo coupona accaptad tor fraa marcnandiaa
Ottar doa not apply to kkP or otnar atora coupons
wnwthar manufacturar 1a manttonad or not Whan
tha valua ot tha coupon aioaada 5C o Mm raaa
of tha Itam. thla otfar la umitad to tha 'ataii pnea
Satmas are Great with A&P s
DOUBLE SAVINGS COUPOHS
COUPON A
COUPON B
COUPON C
COUPON D
WITH THIS COUPON
KNOWN 1 E ,
Tenn. (I PI) � Ten-
nessee Coach Johnny
Majors has been the
brunt of frequent fan
barbs since his
ballyhooed return six
years ago but for the
first time ever Mon-
day sportsriters
from across the state
joined in a chorus of
criticism
Most seemed to
agree that with Ten-
nessee's 37-14 loss to
�uburn Saturday, the
Vots appear headed
for another mediocre
season, and they ques-
tioned why that is
possible when
millions of dollars
have been spent to
make Tennessee's
football program one
of the nation's best.
Some of their com-
ments:
"The Tennessee
Vols can't seem to get
their football machine
cranked up wrote
George Lapides of the
Memphis Press-
Scimitar.
"But the Vols
should not be judged
too harshl. Thev
aren't bad. They just
aren't good either.
This already has the
look oi what's
become a typical IT
season: average
I apides wrote.
�'It was the same
old story and the same
old result �
squandered oppor-
tunities equal another
'big game' loss for the
1-2 Vols wrote Kent
H e i t h o 11 of t ne
Nashville Banner. "It
also triggered another
annual occurrence at
L'T � the Vols having
to dig out of an early
season hole, while
their fans claim they
have seen enough and
jump off the ship
lor the 14th
censecutive year, it
appears Tennessee
won't hae a cham-
pionship team Mar-
vin West of The
Knoxville News-
Sentinel wrote Sun-
day. 'There was no
reason to think this
group would be great,
but it had a chance to
be better than
ususal
see MAJORS, p. 14
WELL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENTTOCOLORCRAFT
j$1.0fl OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50c OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50c OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargement
$1.00 OFF Any 8x10, 8x12, 11x14 Color Enlargement
ort '� cotjcro hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE. N. C 27834
7 52 -O088
Limit one coupon per order- coupon expires 6-1-84
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

I
I
I
I
I
SAVE $1.02 LB.
SAVE 31
Whole Sirloin Tip
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
9-12 lb.
avg.
lb.
Fryer Leg Qtrs.
U.S.DA. INSPECTED
�2�USAe
ECU Sports Info.
needs students for
basic reporting
Call 757-6491
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
5P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
DAILY SPECIALS AT
3UBd(Sl
208 E. 5 th St. 758-7979
MON.
SNAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA)
& CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2.09
TUES.
SNAK ROAST BEEF BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
SODA FOR $2.09
WED.
�HAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODi
FOR $1.59
THURS.
SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.89
FRI.
SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND
A SMALL SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
�iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii
$3.99
�LASAGNA
�SPAGHETTI
(Choice of 3 Sauces)
with Garlic Bread
iailyo emm tmtttmpmrimJbW $499
a
s.V
1
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii
Intramural Top
Team Poll
MEN
WOMEN
KvnvnuDAv
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
1 FLOUNDER DINNER
3.99
awOjMNFit and Sol.
�fetes mtdmitHi J a.m.
Breakfast Bar open 6:00am.
SHOWS
1 KAPPA SIGMA "A"
2 KAPPA ALPHA "A"
3 THIRD REGIMENT II
4 UNTOUCHABLES
5 SCOTT PLAYBOYS
6 CORRUPTERS
7 PSYCHOKILLERS
8 ZEUS'S LOVE BROKERS
9 SCOTT SACK ATTACK
10 SIGMA PHI EPSILON "B"
1 HEARTBREAKERS
2T.A'S
3 WHITES RAIDERS
4 SLAY STALLIONS
"B"
5 ALPHA
DELTA PI
Co-sponsored by CO.Tankard Co. and
Miller Brewing Co.
lllllltlMltlinillflllllllllllHtilllllllltlltillllllllllllllllltlilltlillfliltiiliiltlltllilflllillftllllllttlSItltllllilllllflllllllfl
SAVE 31�
SAVE 20
Seedless Grapes Red Ripe Tomatoes
CALIFORNIA RED OR THOMPSON
QOc
FAMILY PACK
I �
SAVE 20
Savings yA
26 02
pkg.
� I
SAVE 21�
Flav-0-Rich Milk
HOMOGENIZED � LOWFAT
Large Eggs
i A&P GRADE A
LIMIT
ONE
dozen
only
LIMIT
TWO
SAVE 70
Instant Coffee
MAXWELL HOUSE
10 oz.
jar
3
29
LIMIT
ONE
Cheese Food
8 oz.
pkg
SAVE 21
Star-Kist Tuna
SAVE 67�
Star-KV
TUN
6V2 OZ.
Tide Detergent
IN OIL IN WATER'
LIMIT
TWO
25 OFF LABEL
fouPay
Only
49 OZ.
box
LIMIT
NowSave A&P Gold Register Tapes for
great savings on quality
Stainless Steel Cookware
With $200 Worth
A&P Gold
register tapes
KTAInch S
Op� �� 18 8 Stainless Steel
Pry Pan Av aWaaWkmf with 3 layer tn-plv
1 � J � �� � 'M9W 9MU - mw bottom for better cooking
Uses 8 qt. stock
potccw HERE'S HOW IT WORKS
Save your valuable A&P gold register tapes
When you have the amount of A&P gold register tapes needed, redeem them at
the A&P Check Stand
� Naturally, you can start saving more A&P gold register tapes for the next cookware
item you plan to select
� And remember, all items are on sale for the duration of this program This offer is
scheduled to end Saturday. December 17, 1983
c
Greenviiie Square Shopping Center
703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N.C.





1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 27, 1983 13
Opens With
id Action
11 played excep-
I) well in both
s and doubles
is the only one
l aved up to her
i' al "
.ingles, Ann
, (UNC-G) d
i ne Tolson,
If J, 6-3; Janet
;i (ECU) d I isa
lerman 6-3, 6-1;
a Bailer (UNC-
Minam Beck
S-2; Maureen
(UNC-G) d.
anderfield 6-0.
hell Albright
- G) d C i s i
Bolton 6-2, 6-2; Laura
Barnette (UNC-G) d.
Lvnn Wallace 6-0,
6-0.
In doubles, Tolson-
Russell (ECU) d.
Brown-Zimmerman
6-1, 6-3, Bailer-Karen
Paice (UNC-G) d.
Manderfield-Bolton
3-6. 6-3, 6-1; and
Kimtis-Albright
(UNC-G) d. Beck-
Wallace 6-3. 7-5.
The women's next
match will be Sept. 26
against ACC, while
the men play Campbel
at home on Sept. 28.
C Gre�nille Blvd.
- JW3 - 14 MBS.
ILAZA SH4EL
ur Towing Service
-Houl Rentals
Available
Pinu Special
Ribeye plat
HI Vou Caa Eat Salad Bar
Bev.aad Free Dessert
75-7�7
$4.99
Banquet Room
Rick up your Student
Discount Card from Mmnmgar
NTION
IORS
IOTE
UG
ILTON
RESIDENT
�i













L ?? ??????�
.00 OFF ANY COMPLETE I
PAIR OF EYE GLASSES J
�t (iwh.� �M oto�t (or di�couai 0t
12
Price
SOFT QQ
CONTACTS OT
.tf7
IHCLUOtS SO DAY GCAftdtQ
AADCAHHUT
I'huiM-
-�, 1ZU4
PALACE
M From Put Pl�a N��tToERAR�v,
Op� � JO � m to 6 p m Moa F�.
PIZZERIA
ST Greenville 758-5616

f
4
I
I
t
I
I
I
I

t

f


4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
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-IfS MA
�� �0� A -��Of ��aT�Al, sui
� �
�' 00 Of t a .ASAOHA
ON MOSD.s a V.JD
IMANKOfTiniNNFRS
2SAI AI)s
M.AKIKBRIADN ��i c�,
1 PITiKRol BEERIOR $7.49
ON FRIDAYS
inKS?�1 MEAr�ALL
2SALAD
2 OAR! K BREAD I PITCHER
Of BIER
4

-� $
I
fe�M
aaaj
4
.� jj.
s. �
Pirate soccer coach Robbie Church (right) saw his team lose to Rutgers over the weekend but bounced back to defeat
Monmouth College 2-0.
Each ot these advertised items is required to be readily available for
sale at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store except as
specifically noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED. Sot. Oct. 1, AT A&P IN Gr��iwille
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
- FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEN0, WE WILL DOUBLE
D MANUFACTURER'S COUPONS, EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS.
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
Mm now and Oct. 1. �w win mSamm national
manufacturer s oanta-ofl coupon up to SO1 tor
douMa thatr vatua. Offer good on national manu-
facturer canta-off coupona only. (Food rataUar
1.) Cuatomar muat purchaaa
coupon product In apacMlad atza. Expfrad coupona
w� not ba honorad. Ona coupon par cuatomar par
Had tor fraa marchandiaa
Orlar doaa not apply to AAP or ottwr atora coupona
whathar manutacturai la manttonad or not. Whan
tha vaiua of tha coupon �� SO or tha ratal!
of tna Nam, thta offar la Hmftad to tha rataii prica
Sarinas are Brest mitH ASF's
SJHBSf COUPOHS!
Sarmasi
oouki
�res
COu��
COUPON A
COUPON B
COUPON C
COUPON D
CMTo��
��� oocc
CtKTS orr
Volunteers' Majors
Verbally Attacked
By Sports Writers
KRULL
Paladin Drive-in
(Formerly Tice) $5.00 carload
located next to Pitt Community College

KNOX VILLE,
Tenn. (UPI) � Ten-
nessee Coach Johnny
Majors has been the
brunt of frequent fan
barbs since his
ballyhooed return six
years ago but for the
first time ever Mon-
day sportswriters
from across the state
joined in a chorus of
criticism.
Most seemed to
agree that with Ten-
nessee's 37-14 loss to
Auburn Saturday, the
Vols appear headed
for another mediocre
season, and they ques-
tioned why that is
possible when
millions of dollars
have been spent to
make Tennessee's
football program one
of the nation's best.
Some of their com-
ments:
"The Tennessee
Vols can't seem to get
their football machine
cranked up wrote
George Lapides of the
Memphis Press-
Scimitar.
"But the Vols
should not be judged
too harshly. They
aren't bad. They just
aren't good either.
This already has the
look of what's
become a typical UT
season: average
Lapides wrote.
"It was the same
old story and the same
old result �
squandered oppor-
tunities equal another
'big game' loss for the
1-2 Vols wrote Kent
Heitholt of the
Nashville Banner. "It
also triggered another
annual occurrence at
UT � the Vols having
to dig out of an early
season hole, while
their fans claim they
have seen enough and
jump off the ship
"For the 14th
censecutive year, it
appears Tennesseel
won't have a cham-
pionship team Mar-
vin West of Thel
Knoxville News
Sentinel wrote Sun-I
day. "There was no
reason to think this
group would be great,
but it had a chance to I
be better thanl
ususal
see MAJORS, p. 14
WITH THIS COUPON
WE'LL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILMSENTTOCOLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50c OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50C OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargement
$1.00 OFF Any 8x10,8x12,11x14 Color Enlargement
ort j( coacro hop
51 SOUTH COTAMCHC STHCEr
GftEENVILtiE. N.C 27834
7S2-068B
Limit one coupon per order- coupon expires 6-1-84
As
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
ECU Sports Info.
needs students for
basic reporting
Call 757-6491
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
5P-MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
�LASAGNA e tm
�SPAGHETTI J.TT
(Choice of 3 Sauces)
with Garlic Bread
w yom cam tmt tmrnt mtmtmmm aw�2r7
DAILY SPECIALS AT
.SUBIIISRP
208E. 5th St. 758-7979
MON.
SNAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA)
& CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2.09
TUES.
1 RrOAST BEEF BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
SODA FOR $2 09
WED.
NAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODi
FOR SI.59
THURS.
SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.89
FRI.
SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND
A SMALL SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
k
-���
KvnvrwAv 1 QQ
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT �J�3F
FLOUNDEK DINNER
FrtamdSsi-
mam
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii
iiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiimim
Intramural Top
Team Poll
MEN
iBreakf ast Bar open 6:00am,
SHOWS
1 KAPPA SIGMA "A"
2 KAPPA ALPHA "A"
3 THIRD REGIMENT II
4 UNTOUCHABLES
5 SCOTT PLAYBOYS
6 CORRUPTERS
7 PSYCHOHLLERS
8 ZEUS'S LOVE BROKERS
9 SCOTT SACK ATTACK
10 SIGMA PHI EPSILON "B"
Co-sponsored by CO.Tankard Co. and
Miller Brewing Co.
mmmmmmmTMmmmsMmWsmsmmmmmwm
WOMEN
1 HE ARTBREAKERS
2 T. A'S
3 WHITES RAIDERS
4 SLAY STALLIONS
"B"
5 ALPHA
DELTA PI
SAVE 31
Seedless Grapes
CALIFORNIA RED OR THOMPSON
88
SAVE 20
Red Ripe Tomatoes
FAMILY PACK
I I
26 oz.
SAVE 20
Savings yA
SAVE 21
Flav-0-Rich Milk
HOMOGENIZED � LOWFAT
w� &
Large Eggs
A&P GRADE A
LIMIT
ONE
dozen
only
iTi
TWO

SAVE 70
Instant Coffee
MAXWELL HOUSE
Aaxv
LIMIT
ONE
SAVE 50
Cheese Food Slices1
CHED-O-BIT
LIMIT
TWO
SAVE 21
Star-Kist Tuna
SAVE 67
Tide Detergent
Star-Kjft
Tu MA
6y2QZ.
IN OIL � IN WATER
LIMIT
TWO
25' OFF LABEL
lYou Pay
Only
49 02.
box
LIMIT
ONE
NowSave A&P Gold Register Tapes for
great savings on quality
StaMess Steei Coot ware
sg
With $200 Worth
A&P Gold
register tapes.
18 8 Stainless Steei
with 3 layer tri-pty
bottom for better cooking
10 V4 Inch
Open
Fry Pan
(��2?) HERE'S HOW IT WORKS
� Save your valuable A&P gold register tapes.
� WlP.�u.Ahave J?6 �" Ap 9oW register tapes needed, redeem them at
the A&P Check Stand.
� Naturally, you can start saving more A& P goki register tapes for the next cookware
item you plan to select.
� And remember, ail Hems are on sale for the duration of this program. This offer is
scheduled to end Saturday, December 17, 1963.
C
Greenville Square Shopping Center
703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, NX.
� BJBJ

�mwh i aw �
�.�" - a 3fc 4aV i
�i mm9�im'v0rw'mvm 'n �





4THE EAST CAROLONIAN SEPTEMBER 27. 1983
Jackets Martin
Stays Encouraged
ATLANTA (UPI)
� Mike Martin says
his four years at
Georgia Tech have
been discouraging, so
far as the Yellow
Jackets won-loss
record is concerned,
but he quickly adds he
wouldn't have wanted
to have been
anywhere else.
The Yellow Jackets
went 1-9-1 and 1-10 in
Martin's first two
seasons, broke into
the black last year
with a 6-5 mark, but
are off to an 0-3 start
this fall � losing to
Alabama, Furman
and Clemson.
'I definitely
thought we turned the
corner last year said
the senior linebacker.
"Sure, it's been
discouraging. But I
feel like I've been a
part of what is going
to be a better tomor-
row in football at
Georgia Tech. This is
a young team, still
making the mistakes
that a young team
makes, but we're get-
ting better
Martin, out of
western North
Carolina, chose
Georgia Tech because
he was interested in
architecture, but swit-
ched to civil engineer-
ing.
"As far as I am
concerned, there's a
lot more to college
than just football
he said. "I don't
think I would have
been happy at a
school that had foot-
ball out of propor-
tion. I'm not knock-
ing any other school,
but I like the perspec-
tive around here
where acadmics is
every bit as impor-
tant.
Majors Under Fire
cont. from p. 13
"Majors is an em-
battled coach, no
doubt about that
wrote Ben Byrd of
The Knoxville Jour-
nal. "It has reached
that point in his
tenure where the com-
bined weight of many
disappointments
threatens to overcome
the great wave of per-
sonal popularity that
brought him to UT in
the first place
"Losing important
games produces lots
of questions and Ma-
jors is going to be ask-
ed more and more if
he can't beat
somebody other than
New Mexico and The
Citadel, this week's
foe in a game to be
played in Memphis
wrote F.M. Williams
of The Tennessean in
Nashville.
"Saturday, as the
situation deteriorated
in the third and fourth
quarters, boos could
be heard flowing
down from the
stadium heights
wrote Wirt Gammon
Jr. of The Chat-
tanooga Times.
"These fans,
possibly the most
loyal bunch in the na-
tion, want to know
why, in the seventh
season of the reign of
Johnny Majors, do
they have to sit in
Neyland Stadium and
watch their team get
blitzed by 23 points?
"These boos are
rooted in frustration,
pure and simple.
What the guys and the
gals in the stands want
to know is, 'What is
the matter?" Better
yet, 'Who's doing
what about it?
Gammon wrote.
Majors came to
Tennessee in 1977
after leading Pitt-
sburgh to the national
championship the
year before. An Ail-
American tailback in
the 1950s, Majors
was awaited with
breathless anticipa-
tion from the 95,000
fans who fill up
Nevland Stadium on
Saturdays and the
thousands more who
follow the games on
John Ward's radio
broadcasts.
But he has failed to
produce the winner
Tennessee fans want
so desperately. His
overall Volunteer
record is 36-34-2, with
yearly records of 4-7,
5-5-1, 7-5, 5-6, 8-4
and 6-5-1.
This year's version
is 1-2, with a loss to
Pittsburgh and
Auburn and a win
over unheralded New
Mexico. Looming
ahead in the next
three games are The
Citadel, LSU in
Knoxville and
Alabama in Birm-
ingham.
Majors said he
knew there would be
talk of "Doomsday"
if the Vols lost to
Auburn but he
believes his team
could be the best one
he's had at Tennessee.
"I still think we
have the makings of a
better team than we
have had here before.
We have an uphill
course, but it is not a
mission that can't be
accomplished. It's up
to the players and the
coaches what kind of
season we have he
said.
Classifieds
SALE
FOR SALE: Larga
desk, twin bad and box springs,
chest of drawers, whicker chair
and table, lamps, guitar Call
7 it.
FOR SALE: S.anchi bridal
gown, alancon lace, scoop neck,
perfect condition, sue , tied.
Call f7S-3434.
PERSONAL
JUNIORS: Take me time and
vote - David Brown far yaw
Junior class President, man
yaw.
SENIORS: Make tare yaw take
time to vote Wednesday far Lisa
Roberts Sartar class President.
Thank yaw.
DELTA ZETA: Pledges, vow art
terrific! Get psyched far fhat
road trip Friday I
The Sisters
LOST AND
FOUND
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMATE wanted
Georgetown apts, tally fwrn, ex-
cept bedroom One black form
campus.
FNARO RESTAURANT
employing daytime Help from it
a.m. 'Mil I p.m. Came attar 1
p.m. MeaFrl. S11 Cetanche No
call accepted.
FEMALE ROOMATE
WANTED: aryton Hills Apts an
River Matt Rd. Fully turn ex
rept bdrm S1I7.M par month �
aaa half phone and utu Call
7S11J41.
MISC.
LOST CAT - 2 yaars aid;
(lutfy beaa eye and ! i
Last seen a Jarvis Straat. Call
7S�-SaSe. REWARD OFFERED
LOST DOG Slack - tap debar
ma a pappy 12 weeks at. Ears
recently crapped. Name Thar
Reward offered Call 7Sa-ee43
(baa) 7S7 24tl (a).
LEGAL NASSLEST Call
Howard J. Cummmas, attorney
at Law. M charge far initial
consultation far ECU Stadsats.
Call tU Mea.
LOWEST TYPING RATES an
campus include experienced
prafasslaaal wark. Pre-
cfreading, spelling and gram
matical corrections lSS-e74s
after S:8�.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
�jMtjj
PROFESSIONAL TYPING sar-
vice - experience, aaality wark,
IBM salatlrtt lyaaatrttai. CaM
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QUALITY
tVgWWsjTltf .
TYPING IBM
IS yaars a ��
Call
lacalty and stadaats
7Se-tea�
USDA Choice - Bitf Rib
Rib-Eye
Steak
USOA
CHOICE
Blue Ridge
Bacon
Seedless
Grapes
95
1 littr
Pepsi
Cola
$2�
Pk�. of 6 12 Oz. Cl.t
Miller
Beer
$29 42
Pk.lU-uOt.et�i tit.
Budweiser
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 27, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 27, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.289
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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