The East Carolinian, September 22, 1983






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2toe
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Thursday, September 22,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
ECU Circuit Failure
Brings Power Outage;
Inconvenience Caused
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
A Monday night and Tuesday
morning power failure inconve-
nienced many ECU students,
faculty and administrators, shut-
ting down Joyner Library and
stopping air conditioning in many
classroom buildings.
ECU Plant Engineer Larry
Snyder said the Monday night cir-
cuit failure put one of the campus'
two electrical feeders out of ser-
vice, forcing the entire power load
on the remaining feeder. "The
electrical demand was just too
much for the remaining feeder
he said. "To reduce the load, we
have the air conditioning off in
the academic buildings
The Tuesday power failure,
which lasted more than an hour,
leave Joyner Library Monday
when all lights went out for
several minutes about 10:35 p.m.
Director of Academic Library
Services Ruth Katz said heat caus-
ed a big inconvenience Tuesday in
the library. "The building had no
air conditioning and there is no
way to ventilate it. The staff was
hot and the students were hot
Anne Dunn, a reference
librarian, also said many of the
computer services had to be per-
formed by employees.
ECU student Tiffany Davis said
the lunch she was served in Jones
Cafeteria Tuesday was limited to
cold sandwiches because of the
power failure.
"I was in the library and had a
lot of research to do ECU stu-
dent Ouida Horton said. "There
involved all buildings on central, was another power failure and the
east and west campus. "Only the library had to close early. It was a
very out-lying buildings would not big problem for me because 1 had
have been covered by it Snyder planned on spending the whole
said.
Computer Operations Manager
Barry Wester said "if the power
outage extends beyond 20
minutes, all service to our users is
suspended till power is restored
Wester said the outage caused a
backup at the hospital by leaving
staff members inable to perform
patient inquiries and lab reports.
Many students were forced
day in the library
"We haven't had a failure like
this, but we've come close to (it)
before Snyder said. He couldn't
promise that another failure
wouldn't occur, but said they
were trying to correct the pro-
blem. Long range plans include
the purchase of a third electrical
power feeder, he said.
Disagreement Cuts
Bus Service To
Oakmont Square
Ready, Aim, Fire!
"Flesh" Williams takes a beer bong as a kamikaze pilot invades a
campus party.
By LYNETTE FARRELL
Staff Writer
Student Government Associa-
tion transit bus service to Oak-
mont Square Apartments was
cancelled last week after nine
years of service and will not be
started again, according to SGA
transit manager Bill Hilliard.
The apartments, located on Red
Banks Road, are managed by Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Smith. Between
12 and 20 students use the bus ser-
vice everyday, with the number in-
creasing in bad weather, accor-
ding to Smith. He estimated that
20 of his residents were dependent
on the service to get to campus.
Hilliard said that for several
years Smith has been causing pro-
blems by stopping buses and com-
plaining about the noise.
"The problem at Oakmont has
been going on for years Hilliard
said. The two transit managers
before Hilliard also had problems
according to Hilliard. "Smith
kept on stopping buses and chew-
ing the drivers out for making too
much noise
Monday, Sept. 12, Hilliard was
teaching a driver how to drive one
of the new flat-nosed buses in the
Oakmont area. Smith said the
Hilliard
driver was "accelerating the
engine" and he stopped the bus to
ask the drivers why they were
making so much noise.
According
to Smith,
Hilliard
responded.
"If you don't
like it, I'll take
the bus out of
here As of
this week, that
is just what he
did.
"In nine
years I have
accosted drivers only four times
Smith said, for being fast and
wreckless. "We didn't ban the bus
and are concerned for our
residents
"The bus service was why a lot
of students moved here in the first
place said Mrs. Smith.
"Students are entitled to have the
bus come out here, and we want it
out here for the students' sake
The Smiths found out about
cancellation of the route from
students' complaints. They have
also received calls from upset
See ECU, Page 5
Condominiums Offering Variety Of Choices
By MILLIE WHITE
Ammkitmml Nm Krfilor
Condominiums are rapidly ap-
pearing on the Greenville real
estate market and many parents
of ECU students are buying them
for their children.
According to Joe Ward of
Moore and Sauter Associates of
Greenville, buying a con-
dominium is a good investment
for both the student and his
parents.
One attraction for parents buy-
ing condominiums is a new tax
law which permits deductions on
rental property occupied by their
children as well as any other rental
investments.
Because of this new law, stu-
dent's parents are buying housing
instead of paying for dorm rooms
or renting apartments.
Greenville property value is ris-
ing at approximately 10 percent a
year, Ward said. The resale value
and rent accumulated from the
student's roommates make buying
a condominium an attractive in-
vestment for many parents.
According to Ward, when
parents decide to sell the unit,
they can make a profit and recoup
the student's educational ex-
penses.
Moore and Sauter Associates
handle two condiminium com-
plexes frequented by students,
Cannon Court and Twin Oaks.
Both are townhouse-style con-
dominiums.
Cannon Court is located on
Greenville Boulevard; each two-
bedroom unit sells for $40,500.
The down payment is $2,125 with
a monthly payment of $250.
Twin Oaks is located near 14th
Street. The two-bedroom units
sell for $45,500; the three
bedroom units sell for $51,000.
Moore and Sauter offer a
shared equity financing program
to their clients. Under this pro-
gram, after three years the
owneroccupant has the option of
buying out the investor at a
predetermined price. At the end
of five years, the owneroccupant
can either buy out the investor, let
the investor buy him out or go in
with the investor to sell the unit
and split the net appreciation. He
can also keep the unit.
Another innovative concept in
student housing is being offered
by Bob Latimer of Unicon (short
for university condominiums) in
Greenville. The condominiums,
called Kingston Place, will be
available for occupancy in fall
1984.
Each Kingston Place
townhouse and one-level unit in-
cludes all standard accessories and
comes completely furnished in-
cluding pots, pans and sheets.
"The units are furnished right
down to moQ and broom
Latimer said. "The students can
pack their clothes, go to school
and walk into a brand new unit
The two-bedroom units sell for
$59,900. A clubhouse, laundry-
facilities and swimming pool are
also provided. Each unit ac-
comodates four people; the
average rent is $150 a month.
A private dormitory being built
on Reed Circle behind Margaux
Restaurant will be opening at the
end of December. Pirate's Lan-
ding is being managed by Clark-
Branch Realtors of Greenville.
"We're trying to offer something
a little bit nicer than the dorms
realtor Connally Branch said.
Pirate's Landing is made up of
24 suites, each containing four
private rooms. The suites have
two baths and a small kitchen
with a microwave oven.
Refrigerators, desks and beds are
provided in each room and laun-
dry facilities are available. Each
room has a private entrance. Rent
at Pirate's Landing is Si50 per
month; the utility bill is divided
among the suite's four occupants.
"From the student's stand-
point, it's very smart to shop
around and get the best deal they
can get Ward said.
Greenville Nightlife Changed By Safe Roads Act
S
Tom Haines
more private clubs
Bv ANDREA MARKELLO
Staff Writer
Local law enforcement officials
and convenience store owners
don't expect much change in
polices when the Safe Roads Act
takes effect next week at 12:01
a.m. Oct. 1. However, downtown
nightclub life is expected to
undergo some changes such as an
increase in the number of private
clubs, according to one club
employee Wednesday.
"The next two years may see a
double or tripling in the number
of private clubs opening in not on-
ly downtown Greenville, but in all
of North Carolina comments
Tom Haines, head of The Attic
nightclub. "Three clubs in Green-
ville have already applied for
private licenses
Haines said Greenville's reputa-
tion as an entertainment center is
diminishing. Because of stricter
laws under the new statute, out-
of-town residents will stay in their
home towns rather than come to
Greenville for nightlife, according
to Haines.
The night prior to the law tak-
ing effect could bring many
18-year-olds to downtown Green-
ville. According to Haines, The
Attic was planning a final blastoff
for the 18-year-olds but decided it
would be counter-productive, and
the event was cancelled.
Haines said he tought the event
would be inappropriate because it
would invite 18-year-olds to drink
for one night and then not permit
it again. He also said the event
would be create a situation focus-
ing only to the youngest age group
involved in Greenville night club
life, which polls reveal to be a very
small percentage of the total
nightlife crowd. Surveys showed
the majority were over 21 years of
age.
"The Attic will cooperate with
the law and continue to check IDs
closely. The Attic already main-
tains a strict policy and won't
undergo considerable change
Haines said.
Local convenience stores are
also not drastically changing
polices. Kroger Sav-On employee
Susan Breezer said cashiers will
check IDs more closely.
"We aren't really changing
anything said Kevin Lamm of
The Pirate's Chest store. "We
know most of our customers by
face and card anyone who comes
in we don't know The store
plans to put up a sign when the act
takes effect asking that IDs be
ready when purchasing alcohol.
Government and local law of-
ficials also aren't making major
changes in relation to the law tak-
ing effect. Deputy Secretary to
Gov. James Hunt, Brent
Hackney, said Hunt may hold a
press conference on the matter.
"We will keep operating in the
same manner said Capt. John
Briley of the Greenville police
department. "Our officers are at-
tending classes concerning the
new law, and we expect to sec less
drinking and driving
Check-System Employed A t ECU
To Guarantee Legal Alcohol Sales
By GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
Students will find it more dif-
ficult to be served an alcoholic
beverage on campus after Sept. 30
if university policy remains un-
changed. Rules regarding
alcoholic beverages were revised
in a meeting Wednesday of
university and student leaders to
require an "adequate check
system" to insure students under
19 do not consume alcohol while
attending on-campus functions.
According to Elmer E. Meyer
Jr vice chancellor for student
life, anyone serving alcoholic
beverages will need to see proof of
age before serving any student.
"The keg-tender would be guilty
of committing a crime if he served
alcohol to someone under 19 he
said. Those who serve underage
persons can be fined $2,000 and
be imprisoned for two years.
In the meeting Wednesday it
was not clear what would be a suf-
ficient check system. "We do
need some clarificaiton regarding
our ID check
system
Meyer said.
SGA Presi-
dent Paul
Naso sug-
gested
students be
issued hospital
bracelets upon
proof of age,
and Hope
Meyer Root,
Panhellenic Council president
recommended a hand stamp
system.
The policy now states "There
shall be an adequate 'check'
system at all (campus) events
where alcohol is served. Even
though an organization has a
check-in system at the door, it is
still necessary for the server to
identify those who may be served
alcoholic beverages The new
rules are in conjuction with the
N.C. Safe Roads Act.
In addition to a check system,
faculty or staff advisors or their
representatives must be present at
any function serving alcohol.
They will not be responsible for
enforcing the new policy.
Associate Dean of Student Life
James B. Mallory said the new
check-in system may cause pro-
blems. "If there were a few hun-
dred students at a function, it
could take longer for every stu-
dent to be served he said.
Mallory added that a ticket or
stamp system would provide the
server proof of age.
"Unless we get some word the
policy can change, it will remain
as is Meyer said.
What Next?
Ton Goobby and Kim Strong work on the Marching
ECL-Southwestern Lonfafawn football game on Oct. S
Pirates fealf.oat taow to be
at the
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i





2 THE
EAST CAROLINIAN PFTpmdfrjj, 13

-L-
ANNOUNCEMENTS
I you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
'he production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
�en copy on odd sued paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesday tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
Announcements
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The Preprotessionai Health
Alliance will hold its second
meeting on Thursday.
September 22, in the Ledoma
Wright Cultural Center at 5:30
o m
The purpose of the meeting
will be to designate various com
mittees and chairpersons for up
coming activities The club
calendar will also be discussed
All officers and members are
asked to attend
INTER-VARSITY
I know you have all been
thmkinq that Inter Varsity is a
C"jb tor athletes It's not. Inter
Varsity is a Christian fellowship
which meets on Wednesdays to
P'vse and glorify God in Jesus
Christ Come sing your praise to
the Lord at 6:30 in Jenkins
Auditorium (Art Building)
EC. SCOTA
MEETING
The Occupational Therapy
Student Club holds meeting
every other Wednesday at 5:30
p m The next meeting is
September 28th All interested or
prespective O T students are in
vited to attend
MEDITATION
SEMINAR
A meo.idtion course, based on
the Tibetan tradition of mental
development, is designed to
assist the individual tap into
hisher enormous human poten
tial. The course is sponsored by
'he Department of University
Unions and will be held in
Mendenahll Student Center on
Wednesday nights Register at
the Central Ticket Office Mon
day through Friday from 10 4.
The cost tor the seminar is $15 00
and all ECU students, faculty,
staff, their dependents and
guests are welcome to enroll
For further information, call the
Crafts and Recreation Office at
757 6411 ext 260 or The Central
Ticket Office at Ext 266
CLOGGING
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a Clogging
Mini Course to begin September
2Vth The class will be held on
Thursday nights from 7 8 30
P m. tor five weeks All ECU
students, faculty, staff, their
dependents and guest are
welcome to enroll The cost of
the class is $10 00 per person and
enrollment is limited Register
now at the MSC Central Ticket
Office Monday through Friday
from 10 am to 4 p.m. For fur
ther information call the Crafts
and Recreation Office at
757 6611 ext. 260 or the Central
Ticket Office at ext 26A
YARD SALE
Yes Alpha Omicron Pi has
cleaned the attic for a huge yard
sale Saturday September 24,
1983 we are holding a sale from
the hours of 800 until 3 00
There will be numerous items,
good bargins. and a ham will be
raffled (you don't have to be pre
sent to winRemember 805
Johnston Street Saturday
CONGRATS PI
KAPPPLEDGES
The Brothers of Pi Kappa Phi
Fraternity would like to con
gratulate the Fall Pledges. The
are: David Bass, James Briley,
Rusty Carter, Hank Core, Ed
Dennis, John Paul H Lyons,
William Mann, Kevin Manning.
Jim Rackley, Chris Sanns. Bob
Schultz, Lee Whitaker, and Ron
Woods Keep up the good work
Fellows! Also congratulations to
the Pi Kapp B" Football team
for their opening winner
WZMB
WZMB has this areas only
heavy metal show. The Electric
Rainbow Radio Show hosted by
Keith Mitchell, 12 midnight to 4
a.m. Fridays and 2 a.m. to 6
am Saturday nights. This
weeks album specials are: Frl. 2
am Trance Power Infusion and
Sat. 4 am Virgin Steel I. Enjoy
the blistering sounds of high
energy rock every weekend on
the jammingest 91 3 WZMB.
SURFINGCLUB
There is a mandatory surfing
club meeting Thursday evening
at 7 p m in the coffee house
downstairs in Mendenhall
Please try to attend this meeting
so we can make plans for fall
break
KYF
First Thessalonians will be the
Bible study topic at the next
King Youth Fellowship meeting
Everyone is Invited for learning,
Christian fellowship, and
refreshments at 8 p.m Thurs-
day, September 22 in MSC room
247
ECU MARAUDERS
The Department of MVitary
Science Invites you to pr
ticipate in the ECV
MARAUDERS, an organization
oriented toward leadership
development thru adventure
training, military tactics and
other outdoor activities.
All students are welcome. Our
next meeting will be held on
Monday 26 September at 7 p.m
in room 221, Mendenhall Student
Center. For more information
contact CPT Liivak, at 757 6967
CENTRAL AMERICA
DISCUSSION
Campus Ministers invite
anyone interested in discussion
and action regarding u.S Policy
in Central America to the
Newman Center Thursday,
Sept 29th The discussion will
last from noon to 130. Bring a
sandwich, beverages provided
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may utt ft form �t right or
um a soporott shoot of popor if
you nood moro linos. Thoro ere �
unit por lino. Each lotior, punc
tuafion mark and word space
counts as one unit. CapitaliM and
nyphonato words properly. Leave
P�ce at end of lino If word
doesn't tit. No ads win bo ac-
cepted over the phone Wo
resorve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Endow
75 per line or fraction of a lint.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
tower case letters
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p.m. the day beore
publication.
Name
City State.
No Hues.
Zip.
. at Tic per line S.
.No.
HUNGER
COALITION
Come to the meetings Thurs
day nights at 7:30 p.m. at the
Newman Center. We are work
ing on the Oct. 16th World Food
Day and Nov. 17th Fast For A
World Harvest.
ECUHILLEL
Will be holding its first annual
lox and Bagel Brunch, Sunday,
Sept 25th from 1 00 3 00 pm in
Mendenhalls all purpose
room All you can eat lox, bagel,
and eggs Plus all the side Kicks
Members $2 00 non members
S3 00 Everyone is Welcome Be
there or be square
ZBT LITTLE
SISTER RUSH
Come out and meet the
brothers of Zefa Beta Tau at
Mendenhall (basement) Rush
will be held from 8 to 11 p m. on
September 26 and 27 Beverage
provided Come on down and see
us for a while if your in
Mendenhall.
Don't forget the Little Sisters
meeting Thursday at J p.m. at
Mendenhall Coffeehouse Please
bring your dues and remember
the cut system goes into effect
PIRATE WALK
Beginning Sept 25, Pirate
Walk will be in full operation
The service will run Sun. thru
Thurs from 6 p.m to midnight
Applications are being taken for
escorts and operators Applies
tions can be picked up from 3
p.m. to 5 p.m. Mon. thru Thurs.
in room 224 of Mendenhall or the
S.G.A. office
INFORMAL
BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Come as you are to our house,
where we teach the bible in a
relaxed atmosphere BYOB (Br
ing your own bible). (Acts
28:28.30.31) Every Tuesday and
Thursday at 730 pm. at 112
Rotary Street (4 blocks from
campus) Questions? Call
752 0424
SPEAKING
IN TONGUES
Sound weird, doesn't it what
does the Bible Say Read Acts,
(chapters 2, 10, and 19) and I
Corinthians (chapters 12, 13, and
14) If you read this, and unders
tand, you will see that it is God's
will for all born again Christians
to speak in tongues. Why
Because it is good for you For
answers to these and other ques
tions about the Bible and how to
read it. come by the booth on the
first floor of Mendenhall Student
Center, Friday. September 23rd.
Between 6 00 and 11 30 p.m.
T T j 1 1 1 1 1�111�4
The East Carolinian is now
Accepting Applications For
News Writers and Editors
Apply in person at The East Carolinian offices on
the second floor of the Publications Building,
across from the entrance of Joyner Library.
Football
America loves the foot-
ball season. Crisp autumn
days, tailgate picnics, ex-
citing television games,
brass bands and the roar
of the crowd.
Now you can add the de-
licious, convenience of
Domino's Pizza to the list
Call Domino's Pizza while
you're enjoying the game
on TV and you won't miss
a single exciting play
We're at your door with
free delivery in only
30 minutes
Thousands of times
everyday American's rely
on the real pizza gener-
ous toppings and free
delivery You can rely
on us, too.
This football season, enjoy
some "football foocT. Lunch,
dinner or late night
Domino's Pizza Delivers
Hours:
11AM-1AM Monday-Thurs
11AM-2AM Fn-Sunday
At ECU call:
758-6660
In Qr�nvlllm call:
752-6996
Domino's
Pizza
Delivers.
Limited delivery areas
1983 Domino's Pizza, Inc.
COFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
"the place to be'
DATE: FRIDAY, SEPT. 23,1983
LAST CHANCE TO AUDITION
TIME: 8:00 PM
coll 757-6611 Ext. 210
for more info.
NCSL
For those who art interested
in government, politics, or those
who are students concerned
about the future The North
Carolina Student Legislature o
fers students an opportunity to
get involved in the legislative
process, express their opinions
Interested undergraduate
students are invited to our
meetings, Mondays 7 p.m.
Room 221 Mendenhall
EMERGENCY
MEDICINE
Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED)
will have its next meeting on
Sept 27 in Flanagen 307 The
guest speaker will be Dr Jack
Allison, chief of Emergency
Medicine at ECU School of
Medicine The topic will be
Emergency Medicine in eastern
North Carolina. The meeting
will begin at 7:30 All members
and interested guest are en-
couraged to attend
CHI OMEGA
The sisters of Chi Omega
would like to welcome all of our
pledges Delores Beck, Lee Car
son, Lisa Briggs, Analise Craig,
Tiffany Davis, Carol Dykstra,
Lisa Faulkner, Kelly Fulbright,
Mary Garbett, Ashley Graves,
Karin Kanouse, Tina
Maroschak, Vivian Means. Kim
Murray, Michelle Pridgen,
Yardley Raper, Margaret
Sydner, Cindy Sleeper. Ginny
Smith, Jill Taylor, Amie Um
phiett, Kellie Yeasey, Kitt
Viessman, Mary Charles Ward
and Vanessa Weaver How'Bout
Them Beta Gammas!
COUNSELING
CENTER
The University Counseling
Center will be offering a two
part mini series The first series
will be held Monday. September
24, 4 5 p m . and the topic will be
How to Succeed in College and
Still Have Fun The second
series will be held on Tuesday,
September 27, 3 4 p.m and the
topic will be "How to Avoid Test
Anxiety " Both sessions will be
conducted in room 305, Wright
; Annex, and no advance registra
1 tion is necessary For further in
formation call the Counseling
Center at 757 6661
HUNGER COALITION
The ECU Hunger Coalition in
vites all students to its Thursday
night meeting at 7 pm Call
752 4216 for more info.
CADP
There will be a training ses
siort held by the Campus Alcohol
and Drug program on Monday.
September 26, 19t3, at 4 p.m in
room 210 Erwln Hall. This will
be the first in a series of nine
training sessions on peer
counseling Help promote
responsible decisions concern
Ing drugs and alcohol Become a
trained student volunteer
CADP is a student operated ser
vice.
NARCOTICS
ANONYMOUS
There will be a meeting of
Narcotics Anonymous on Fri
day, September 23. 1V83. at 8
p.m. in room 23 of Mendenhall
Student Center Narcotics
Anonymous is a fellowship of
men and women who share their
experience, strength and hope
with each other that they may
solve their common problem
and help others to recover from
drug addiction or drug abuse
USHERS NEEDED
Sign up to usher and stay to
see Superstar free Only 12 need
ed per night, so sign up now in
the Messik Building Show
nights are Oct 3, 5, 6, 7, 8 and
10
RACQUETBALL
CLUB
Are you interested in
guaranteed times for playing
racquetbali What about clinics
for learning the finer points of
the game Would you like to
travel as a team to tournaments
throughout the area and state
The ECU Racquetbali Sport
Club is holding its first 1983 14
meeting Wednesday. September
28. 1983 at 7.00 p.m m Room 102
of Memorial Gymnasium
PLANT SALE
Biology Club will sponsor a
plant sale on Thurs Sept 29th
and Friday, Sept 30th between
7 30 am and 1 00 pm at the
Biology Greenhouse Room
5-111. (p.s.� biology club
volunteers are needed to help
with this sale, if interested, con
tact the club between 9 00 am
and 12 00 am.)
GENERAL
COLLEGE
STUDENTS
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS SHOULD CON
TACT THEIR ADVISORS THE
WEEK PRIOR TO OCTOBER 3
TO ARRANGE FOR PRE
REGISTRATION
NEW GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS (STUDENTS WHO
ENTERED DURING THE
SUMMER OF FALL OF 83)
SHOULD PICK UP CUR
RICULUM SUPPLEMENTS TO
THE 19�2 84 CATALOGUE IN
THE GENERAL COLLEGE
OFFICE SEPTEMBER 26 X
CPR
The American Red Cross Car
diopulmonary Resusitation
Basic Life Support classes are
now being offered by the Depart
ment of University Unions Two
classes are scheduled to begin
the first week in October The
cost is Jl 00 and enrollment is
limited Class l Tuesdays. Oct
4, 11, 25. Nov 1, 8 or Class II
Thursdays. Oct 6. 13. 27. Nov 3
10
Register now at the Central
Ticket Office Mondays thru Fir
days 1&4 For further informa
tion call the Crafts and Recrea
tion Office at 757 6611 ext 260 Or
the Central Ticket Office at ext
266
FIELD DAY
Sunday Septemer 25 from 1
p m until. Central Campus w-n
sponsor a field day on the ma"
Enjoy your favorite food and
beverage Activities include a
scavenger hunt relays, and
field day fun Admission is free'
SIGN LANGUAGE
CLUBMEETING
The Sign Language Club w.M
be having their meeting on Mon
day September 26th at 6 30 p m
Activities for the fear will be
discussed Cot .e join us. we are
open ro any ioeas mat you may
have to offer we are planning
on a year foil of activities and
fun!
BIKE
MATINTENANCE,
REPAIR
Your 10 speed need some
repairs Tired of walking aw
want to buy a bike, but oPn't
know which kind? The Depart
ment of University unions is
sponsoring a MUM Course on
Bicycle Maintenance aria
Repair with consumer tips on
purchasing a bicycle The class
will meet on the following dates
from 7 8 30 p m in the
Mendenhall Student Center Cof
feehouse Thursdays. Oct 6. 13.
20, 27 and Nov 3 All ECU
students, faculty staff their
dependents, and guests are
register Monday
from 10 4 at the
Ticket OM.ce The
a lot less 'nan gas
WATER SKIING
Be a par' of the new EC
Sport Club Students interest
n water skiing should a"enc Mm
organizational mee'ing Mor3a,
September 26 1983 at 7 00 p �
m Room 102 of Memorial Gym-
nasium
SEMINAR
Dr Robert S Bly Of MM
Univestiy of Soum Carol na
present a seminar e' I - -
"Competitive H�droge-
Abstract.on ano Rea:�
Catalyzed Mgratorr Cerhon,
insertion m iron Alkyl Com-
plexes" on Friday. Sep'eoe'
23, 1983 at 2 00 p m . Fianaga-
Builomg Room 201
Refreshments will be servec -
roorr 204 following The se � - -
welcome to
thru Friday
MSC Central
cost is 810 00
or repair costs
For further nforma�'On call
the Crafts ano Rec-eafion Of
fice. 757611 ext 260 or the
Ticket Office ext 266
The East Carolinian
Sen qtfAroaaejna "�
�Me 1923
Pobi'Shed ever 'jese.
and Tnyrsca. 9wf "5 �
academy year anc eve
Wednesday 3urng m
Mae
The Eas' Caro1 n.an s we
offic ai neW5Mt)er of Eas.
Caroi.ra UMvarsity. Omneti
opea'ec. ano PuCi shed tor
and by the stude's M Eas'
Carohna University
Subscription Rate $20 ye
The East Carolinian of es
are located m the Old Scufh
Building on the campus &
ECU. Greenville. h.C.
POSTMASTER Sena ac
dress changes to The Ea;
Caroiin.an. 010 S: � -
Building ECU G-ee 1 -
NC 27834
�J0�
Telephone 7S7-434. �37
V V V X N N. N.
XS X XXXXXXXNN.V X X, x"
v- V X X X X X
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ALECIA ,
HOLTZMAN
21 AND LEGAL fe
oaootssaaaaa ff
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Singing messengers needed, male I
or female. Must have car.
1
(
752-1411
1011 CHARLES STREET
HUCKLEBERRY'S
Introducing the New
Huckleberry's Afternoon
Delights
Biscuits
Buy any Biscuit
and get the next one of similar value
Free
Ribs,
Buy a Rib Special at regular price
and get an extra rib for only a QUARTER!
Chicken
Buy any Two-Pc. Chicken Dinner
and get the second one FREE
Hot Dogs
TWO FOR ONE SALE
Get two of our
Great Dogs tor the
Price of One
Delight Specials Good 3 P.M. thru 8 rM
ff rttdoy
�� �
dl
a
Pi
.
st
bl
Grom
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
mmmmm
When the United
Nations General
Assembly opened its
38th session Tuesday
it did so without the
presence of Soviet
Foreign Minister An-
drei A. Gromyko
The Soviet govern-
ment cancelled
Gromyko's trip to the
New York meeting
after the governors of
New York and New
Jersey refused ro per-
mit Gromyko's plane.
a special Aeroflot jet,
from landing at
civilian airport
their states Grorr .
was absent from the
assembly for the first
time since he be.
ECU Of
U.S. Re
B PATRICK
O'NEILI
xtaft Wnirr
ECU Chancellor
John M. Hew ell, a
former political
science professor, and
Tinsley Yarbrough.
chairman of
Department
PoLtical Science, both
gave opinions
on United States bar-
ring Soviet Foreign
Minister Andre;
Gromyko from lan-
ding at a civilian air-
port in order to attend
Tuesday's opening
session of the Un
Nations General
Assembly. Both
Howell and Yar-
brough were no: in
favor of the United
Nations being moved
to another host coun-
try.
Yarbtoujh caUed
the decision to limit
Gromyko's landing
rights a "symbolic ac-
tion" which the
Reagan administra-
tion may have needed
to satisfy many
Americans who
believe the United
States is not
ding harshly
to the Soviet downing
of a Korean passenger
airliner.
"In some wavs I
think it's better foi a
president to resporc
in those symbolic
ways rather than in
ways that might create
more dire conse-
quences international-
ly Yarbrough said.
"I think what you
have to keep in mind
is that the American
people expect
responses, and pro-
bablv it's much
LI
al
� 1
CM
pi
respon-
enough
01
a:
UNC Sc
Lost In
CHAPEL HILL
(UPI) � A:
cheologists at the
University of North
Carolina at Chapel
Hill said Wednesday
they believe they have
discovered the lost In-
dian village of Oc-
caneechi near
Hillsborough.
The once pro-
sperous village, first
described by explorer
and botanist John
Lawson in 1701, had
disappeared by 1754
when Hillsborough
was laid out.
Dr. Roy S.
Dickens, director of
the university's
Research
Laboratories of An-
thropology, said a
rum bottle made in
England between 1680
and 1700 and other
colonial artifacts have
been found.
"If we have't found
Occaneechi, we are
very close, because we
have been able to date
P
S
di
Ii
a
tr
ct
q
ol
w
hi
dj
sil
m � ?





Phone.
riXKMd
�4
- -J�

Hj
K
"iiman
s needed, male!
i
�t nae car,
c� Greenville
752-3815.
�fciifc-iVBJwOBVJOfc'Jk�JkaVj(K
mi
and Saturday
Gromyko 's N. Y. Trip Cancelled
B PAIRKK
O'NEILL
When the United
Nations General
ssembly opened its
Sth session Tuesday
i! did so without the
presence o' Soviet
1 oreign Minister An-
drei A Gromyko.
The Soviet goern-
ent cancelled
?myko's trip to the
New York meeting
after the governors of
New York and New
lerse refused to per-
mit Gromyko's plane,
.�. special Aeroflot jet,
from landing at
civilian airports in
their slates. Gromyko
was absent from the
assembly for the first
time since he became
foreign minister in
1957.
The situation arose
when the United
States, along with
numerous other na-
tions, decided to deny
landing rights to
Soviet airlines in pro-
test of the Soviet
downing of a Korean
airliner on Sept. 1,
which resulted in the
deaths of 269
passengers aboard the
craft. The situation
became even more
sticky when U.S. Am-
bassador Charles M.
I ichenstein, respon-
ding to Soviet pro-
tests, said the United
Nations is welcome to
move its headquarters
to another nation if
member nations are
unhappy with its
hosts.
"We will put no im-
pediment in your
way Lichenstein
said Monday to the
U.N. Host Country
Relations Committee.
"The members of the
U.S. mission to the
United Nations will be
down at dockside
waving you a fond
farewell as you sail in-
to the sunset
U.S. officials have
since attempted to
downplay Linchens-
tein's remarks saying
his words were spoken
as a response to a
"deliberate provoca-
tion" from the Soviet
mission.
Another issue com-
plicating the situation
is a treaty the United
States has with the
ECU Officals Discuss
U.S. Restrictions, U.N.
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
Staff Writer
EC I Chancellor
John M. Howell, a
former political
science professor, and
Tinsle) Yarbrough.
chairman of the
Department of
Political Science, both
gave opinions
or. United States bar-
ring Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei
Gromyko from lan-
ding at a civilian air-
port in order to attend
Tuesday's opening
session of the United
Nationseneral
Assembly. Both
Howell and Var-
igh were not in
of the United
Nations being moved
another host coun-
Yarbrough called
'he decision to limit
Gromyko's landing
rights a "symbolic ac-
tion' which the
Reagan administra-
tion may have needed
to satisfy many
mericans who
believe the United
states is not respon-
ding harshly enough
to the Soviet downing
a Korean passenger
airliner.
"In some ways I
think it's better for a
president to respond
in those symbolic
ways rather than in
ways that might create
more dire conse-
quences international-
ly Yarbrough said.
"I think what you
have to keep in mind
is that the American
people expect
responses, and pro-
bably it's much
safer for the presi-
dent to respond in
these ways
Howell said it was
necessary to consider
two differnent mat-
ters regarding the
Gromyko situation.
"The United States
government has an
agreement with the
United Nations about
access to U.N. head-
quarters Howell
said. "We have an
agreement that allows
them (the Soviets) ac-
cess but it doesn't talk
about the mode of
transportation.
"So in a w av
Gromyko is saving we
won't let him come
because one method
of travel he would
prefer to use is not be-
ing made available to
him Howell said
Howell said
(ironivko us ikx be
ing denied access
because he could have
chosen to land at U.S.
military airport near
U.N. headquarters.
"It also may be in his
besi interest not to
come, and he's giving
some side excuse for
not coming Howell
said.
Several officials
have predicted
Gromyko would face
strong criticism for
the downing of the
Korean plane.
Howell didn't
think the United
States was making a
mistake in denying
Gromyko's plane ac-
cess because "the ban
on landing rights
arises directly out of
the Soviet Union's
shooting down that
aircraft Howell
said.
Howell
"Whenever a na-
tion shoots down an
unarmed plane with
people on it, it has
really done a great
deal of violence to its
obligations under in-
ternational law. This
stuff about how it was
a spy plane is pretty
tar fetched Howell
said.
"1 would not have
done that (restricted
Gromyko's landing),
but I'm not a person
who is trying to get
reelected to office in
1984 Yarbrough
said. "I have to sym-
pathize with him from
that perspective
"I think that the
United States acts ap-
propriately when it
takes an action that
emphsizes to the
Soviet Union that it
absolutely does not
condone th shooting
gown of an aircraft
over its territory
Howell said.
"I can understand
his postion as a politi-
cian Yarbrough
said "Ideally I
wouldn't agree with
the kind of tactic us-
ed In the abstract I
sav 'let's put this per-
son up to public opi-
nion reflected in the
United Nations and
see where the chips
fall
UNC Scientists Find
Lost Indian Village
U.N. in which the
United States agreed
not to impede access
to the national body
to any member na-
tion's delegation.
Although Gromyko
was granted landing
rights at a U.S.
military airport, the
Soviets still viewed the
actions of the two
governors as an im-
pediment. Gromyko
has been landing at
two major airports in
New York and New
Jersey for almost
three decades.
Some U.S. experts
on the Soviet Union
have said the restric-
tions placed on
Gromyko's access are
being viewed as an in-
sult to the Soviets.
Others claim t h e
restriction of landing
nights has provided a
timely opportunity
for the Soviets to keep
a key official ofl the
firing line at a time
when world leaders
would be asking
tough questions about
the Korean plane inci-
dent.
The U.N. has
already passed a
resolution denouncing
the Soviet attack. And
despite the estimated
$750 million the
United States spends
annually to support
the UN nearly as
much monej is
generated for the I .S
economy from spen-
ding by foreign
diplomats.
cinema f'2'3
PITT-PIAZA SHOPPING CENTER
SPECIAL
SAT. NIGHT 9:00P.M.
The feel-good
movie of 1983
The eight star actors deserve one
big Oscar (in) this funny and
ferociously smart movie
- Richard Corliss. TIME MAGAZINE
CHILL
In a cold world you need your
friends to keep you warm.
RISTfMCTtO SP
COME FOR 7PMSHOWING Ol "TOOTSli
AND STAY OVER I TOt HARGl
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REGULAR PRICES PRE Ml AT 9 PM.
( HAPEL HILL
(UPI) Ar-
cheologists at the
University of North
C arolma at Chapel
Hill said Wednesday
they believe they have
discovered the lost In-
dian village of Oc-
caneechi near
Hillsborough.
The once pro-
sperous village, first
described by explorer
and botanist John
Lawson in 1701, had
disappeared by 1754
when Hillsborough
was laid out.
Dr Roy S.
Dickens, director of
the university's
Research
Laboratories of An-
thropology, said a
rum bottle made in
England between 1680
and 1700 and other
colonial artifacts have
been found.
"If we have't found
Occaneechi, we are
very close, because we
have been able to date
trade goods found in
burial pits at the site
to the proper period,
Dickens said. "At the
very least, we have an
outlying settlement
Among the artifacts
found, in addition to
the rum bottle, are
scissors, copper
buckles, glass beads,
spoons, a rare pewter
pipe and lead shot.
Scientists said the
discoveries suggest the
Indians had more
contact with whites
than was previously
believed.
"This is an exciting
and very unusual
find, because the site
has never been looted
by relic collectors
said Dr. Trawick
Ward, senior staff ar
cheologist. "It is uni-
que in the Piedmont
of North Carolina,
where treasurer
hunters have virtually
destroyed some
sites
Dickens, Ward and
Steve Davis, another
staff archeologist,
directed excavations
in Hillsborough. In-
itially, the group was
working at a site, 'hat
was formerly believed
to be the Indian
village.
"People have been
searching for the
vilage since the 1930s,
but they have been
digging all around it,
and the things they
came up with weren't
quite right Dickens
said. "One of the sites
didn't have European
trade goods that we
would have
expected
Using a radiocar-
bon dating technique,
the scientists were
able to date the first
site at about 1500 to
1600.
Dickens said scien-
tists dug a series of
small holes this sum-
mer and came down
in a burial pit from
the later village.
Popcorn
Shrimp
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$5.99
� beach and pa � hith prices
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758-0327
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTf MB1 K 22. 1983
iimuiTiTTixiiiiiiimr
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Lunch Specials
Mon-Sat 11-2PM
i
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I hurs. 8-0 Sirloin $3.59
1

Sept 23rd-24U25th
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Present
IN CONCERT
Pure Prairie League"
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
1
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Performing all their hits: - Amie. Boulder
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DOORS OPEN AT 7:00 AT THE GREENLEAF
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For Information Calb 757-3107


"COLLEGE NIGHT"
Thursday Sept. 22
Ladies Free
� Free Draft till 10:00 �
Doors open at 8:00
Band starts at 9:00
Hear the Rock-n-Roll sound
of "Altered States"

9





�te Ea0t (Haralinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, owManager
Darryl Brown, Kianagmg Ed.to,
WAVERLY MERRITT, Otae�r�M�rtftf� CINDY PLEASANTS, Sports Editor
HUNTER FISHER. Bus, Manager GREG RlDEOUT, Edttorutl Page Edttor
AL1 AFRASHTEH, CtofirMmvir GORDON IPOCK. Entertainment Ed.tor
GEOFF HUDSON, Crvulat.on Manager LlZANNE JENNINGS, Style Editor
CLAY THORNTON, Techn,cat Superior TODD EVANS, Producuon Manager
September 22. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Transit Ban
Decision Good For ECU
The Student Transit Authority
has axed the Oakmont Square
Apartment complex from its route.
At first glance, the action might
not be seen as in the interest of
students who live in the area and
depend on the buses to get them to
and from classes. But, the steps
taken by Transit Manager Bill
Hilliard this week against the
owners of the dwellings were called
for and justified in the wake of the
habitual harassment his drivers
have received over the past years.
The startling fact of the matter is
that Mr. and Mrs. Albert Smith,
the owners, had to make an agree-
ment with the Transit Authority in
order to have buses come to the
area; Hilliard said that the abuse
his drivers were subjected to
precipitated the contract. Now,
with the most recent incident in a
chain of many, Hilliard has stuck
up for ECU students by cutting the
Smiths' economic throat.
Smith, of course, denies chasing
the bus drivers down. He claims he
has only accosted four drivers over
a period of several years. But,
whether it was four or 40 isn't
significant. (Even though four is
bad enough.) The paramount con-
cern is that it is happening, and
Hilliard is not the only one com-
plaining. Seveial students have
voiced their outrage concerning the
way Mr. Smith runs his apart-
ments. One student questioned his
right to restrict the guests allowed
into individual places. This man
can't continue this treatment of
students and expect to survive in
the college apartment market.
Smith knows he needs students
to fill his complex, and, conse-
quently, he knows he needs the
buses to get those students to
school. Already parents of the 20
or so car-less renters who need to
get to campus are calling and com-
plaining to Smith. So, Smith has
tried to get the buses back � but to
no avail. Hilliard isn't and
shouldn't give in so easily.
Students rarely, if ever, have a
chance to exert their influence on
the merchants of Greenville. Often
merchants take advantage of the
real-world-of-business naivety of
the general student population.
But, just a glance at the numerous
amount of ads in The East Caroli-
nian will show a student how much
the Greenville businessman knows
he needs students. Not all are bad,
certainly the profilic amount of
discount coupons made especially
for students can attest to that, but
some are slow (right Oakmont?) in
realizing our power.
The uncommon way in which
our power is being asserted is not
without its hardships. The students
without a way to school are, of
course, caught in the middle. The
'80s are not a time of fighting for
your fellow man, but the 20 people
of Oakmont could help their
fellow students by walking the
three blocks to the Fast Fare where
the bus service is available.
Hilliard should let the owners
squirm until they see the error of
their ways. ECU students should
resist renting from Mr. Smith in
the future, and should discourage
their friends from living at Oak-
mont. The administration should
look into all cases of improper
treatment of students, and the
Greenville community should cen-
sor Mr. Smith in connection with
the bus incidents.
State Must Take Action
There are times when the
government must step in to protect
what it considers to be the best in-
terests of its citizens, even if its ac-
tions are against the will of a
citizen's family or the citizen
himself.
Such is true with the case of
Pamela Johnson, the 12-year-old
girl from east Tennessee who has a
fatal form of bone cancer. Her
father is a fundamentalist Chris-
tian preacher, and the family's
religious convictions necessitate
that Pamela refuse all medical
treatment for her cancer, Ewing's
sarcoma, and allow "the will of
God" to take its course.
Doctors give the girl a 50-50
chance of surviving with radiation
and chemotherapy treatment but
only six to nine months to live
without treatment. It must take in-
credible conviction for parents to
see their daughter die slowly and
painfully with a fatal disease and
not reach for every chance possible
to try to save her. No one doubts
the conviction of the Hamiltons,
but it is the duty of the state to do
everything within 7s power and
good judgment to help Pamela.
A juvenile court judge in
Jacksboro, Tenn has already rul-
ed that Pamela must accept the
treatment, but her parents appeal-
ed the ruling; it is now up to the
Tennessee Court of Appeals to set-
tle the issue. The court must
uphold the ruling and mandate
everthing within its power be done
to aid Pamela.
Paper Renews Purpose
By FIELDING MILLER
In the course of the operation of a
newspaper, whether it be one of general
or confined interests, situations arise
which necessitate a reassessment of
priorities.
In the last few weeks, The East Caroli-
nian has come under considerable fire
with regard to its policy on "newswor-
thiness Stories which (according to
our interpretation of the general feeling
of the student body) have little or no
direct impact on the ECU campus have
appeared in print on an all-too-regular
basis, while many other notable issues
have been ignored.
It is to this conflict that I address
myself � not in an effort to downplay
these problems, but rather in an attempt
to offer explanation. Since I took over
the position of general manager in May,
1982, The East Carolinian has ex-
perienced a tremendous turnover in
staff. In fact, of my original staff, only a
couple remain.
Of course, being that The East
Carolininan is a campus newspaper �
one run by and"for the students � such
turnover is just part of the game.
Likewise, certain transitions come easier
than others.
In recent months, for reasons varying
from grades to graduation, The East
Carolinian has lost several top staff
members; thus, we are now in the pro-
cess of yet another transition. This is in-
evitably a period of trial and error for
us, a time when mistakes are made and,
hopefully, learned from.
With this in mind, I would like to
reaffirm this newspaper's paramount
commitment to the ECU student body.
Inherent in this is a dedication only to
those stories and features representative
of the student body as a whole, not to in-
dividual interests, and to stories which
are of interest specifically to the campus
community. The East Carolinian does
not have the facilities nor the manpower
to cover national events, or even many
events outside the local area, fairly or
comprehensively, and it is for this
reason that we will re-emphasize our
focus on local events.
Just last week, however, we recieved
complaints concerning our lack of news
coverage on the Korean airline incident.
This is a perfect example of a national
story that is better covered by larger
newspapers. That particular incident oc-
curred on a Thursday, so The East
Carolinian could not have covered it un-
til the following Tuesday. We responded
to the incident in several pieces on the
editorial page, but the community's in-
terests is best served by The East Caroli-
nian concentrating on local events, and
leaving to larger newspapers the more
comprehensive coverage of world
events.
In a poll recently published bv Time
magazine, one of the things people most
disliked about newpapers was frequent
high visibility of stories about a small
group of people who generally do not
represent the opinions of the majority.
While some such events do constitute
legitimate news coverage. The East
Carolinian has probably been guilty of
an excess of such coverage.
On a more practical note, I would like
to apologize for the paper's sporadic
schedule of late. Due to a continuous
malfunction of our type-setting com-
puter, our entire staff has had to travel
to Tarboro, N.C to produce the last
four editions of the paper. Being about
40 miles away and working until 3 a.m.
in an unfamiliar setting has been ex-
tremely trying on the staff. The late
issues of the paper are as much of an in-
convenience to our staff as it is to our
readers and advertisers. So. please bear
with us in our attempt to get back, on
track. Again, with our technical pro-
blems worked out, we will be able to
concentrate on our renewed commit-
ment to East Carolina University.
PIRG Organizer Defends Group's Policies,
Calls Attacks Unfounded, Unfair, Untrue
By JAY STONE
Recently, there has been a veritable
spate of publicity surrounding the effort
to establish a Public Interest Research
Group on campus. This publicity has
ranged in its tenor from the obviously
biassed attack of the College
Republican's newspaper, Freedom's
Defense to the articles which appeared in
The East Carolinian under the
headlines: "PIRG Funding Plan Axed"
and "PIRGs Being Infiltrated
There are three primary issues raised
by the articles. Is PIRG an idealogically
biased organization? Is the so-called
"negative check-off" funding system
undemocratic, and is it the only funding
system available to PIRG? What is the
purpose of establishing a PIRG on a col-
lege campus?
To begin with, nothing should be
clearer than the fact that PIRGs are not
left-wing, nor do they have an
ideological agenda v. hich seeks to cir-
cumscribe the kind of projects PIRGs
work on. While a few PIRG chapters
have worked on controversial issues, like
nuclear energy and the arms race, most
of them conduct projects on broadly
supported issues, such as consumer pro-
tection or environmental preservation.
Of course it's true that some people con-
sider these projects left wing.
These are people who would be likely
to oppose the involvement of a PIRG in
preparing an environmental impact
study on the effects of a peat-methanol
facility on the Carolina coast. However,
the same people will have little to say if
professors here undertake the same
study. Yet, all PIRG projects are under-
taken with the cooperation of the faculty
called "negative check-off system of
funding which most PIRGs employ.
Under this system, a campus-wide
referendum is held which, if passed,
establishes a system of funding in which
all students would automatically pay $2
each semester to be used for funding
PIRGs. This fee would be paid at the
beginning of each semester along with
all of the other fees students normally
pay. Any student who does not wish to
Campus Forum
in various departments who give advice fund PIRG may obtain a refund bv go-
ing to the PIRG office within a few
weeks of paying the initial fee.
Three North Carolina schools employ
this method of revenue collection. They
are Duke, Elon and Davidson. At Duke,
PIRG has an agreement with the univer-
sity under which all refunds are to be
made within six weeks. Usually refunds
are made within four weeks. Students
are informed that refunds are available
to them through the student media and
by the distribution of flyers. There are
other funding methods available, and
those interested in finding out more
about them may contact the campus
PIRG organizing chapter.
(Editor's note: An opposing view will
be presented in next week's paper bv
Dennis Kilcoyne, a member of ECU's
College Republicans.)
and offer assistance in designing the pro
jects themselves. It seems strange that
PIRG would be called left wing for do-
ing the same work that the university
often carries out as part of its cur-
riculum.
Moreover, PIRGs are thoroughly
democratic in the sense that each PIRG
has a board of directors which is elected
by all PIRG members. (Those who elect
to pay the PIRG fee.) It is this board of
directors which chooses the issues PIRG
will work on from among project pro-
posals submitted by the students
themselves.
The election for PIRG's board of
directors is open to any student who
wishes to run.
Perhaps the issue which has received
more attention than any other is the so-
Other Christians Say Loosen Bible Belt On Local, All Gays
This is the "anticipated rebuttal" to
Mr. Warren's, Mr. Simmon's and Mr.
Shive's letter of Sept. 20 in the campus
forum.
The Old Testament (in particular
Leviticus 18:22) can be taken to mean
that homosexuality, as we know it to-
day, is a sin. But take into account that
Leviticus is concerned with the ancient
Hebrew rituals and laws. Furthermore,
why do many Christians treat the
references to homosexuality so literal-
ly, while at the same time interpret
biblical text on other topics with flex-
ibility and non-literalness.
If testing is mandatory, continue
reading in Leviticus, where you will
find in 19:19, "Do not wear clothing
woven of two different kinds of
material Christians do not concern
themselves with this as much as they do
with homosexuality.
We are pleased Sister Shondell and
others at the Catholic Newman Center
open their home to the gay community.
They may not understand completely
or condone the practices of homosex-
uality, but in a Christ-loving manner
they provide a non-judgemental home
for them. Perhaps this Christian en-
vironment can help them continue their
growth with God.
The subtle link in their letter between
AIDS and God's wrath, "men with
men committing indecent acts and
receiving in their own persons the due
penalty of their error is inap-
propriate. To infer AIDS is a punish-
ment for homosexuality is also to imp-
ly God does not punish justly. Con-
sider the homosexuals that do not have
the disease and the heterosexuals that
do have it. Furthermore, we feel it is il-
logical to believe Jthat a loving God
punishes through earthly matters.
Jesus himself realized that sickness was
not necessarily a result of sin (John
9:1-5).
In the New Testament we have no
record of any words from Jesus about
homosexuality. Jesus Christ is the
bearer of God's invitation to human
wholeness and communion. James B.
Nelson, professor of Christian Ethics
at United Theological Seminary,
writes: "You are accepted, the total
you you are accepted in those
moments of sexual fantasy which come
unbidden and which both delight and
disturb you. You are accepted in your
masculinity and your feminity, for you
have elements of both. You are ac-
cepted in your heterosexuality and in
your homosexuality, and you have
elements of both. Simply accept the
fact that you are accepted as a sexual
person. If that happens to you, you ex-
perience grace
By the grace of God we will be given
the ability to accept gays and love them
even if we do not understand or prefer
their lifestyle.
Ellen Moore
Sophomore, Art
David Harris
Sophomore, English
Maturity Praised
I am delighted with East Carolina
University's progress toward intellec-
tual maturity. The campus and com-
munity seem to be developing a wealth
of organizations concerned with the
human condition. A directory of such
organizations would be useful.
The newly established writing center
and the 2.5 gpa undergraduate en-
trance standard for the School of
Business are but two evidences of
evolving academic maturity. I want to
applaud these endeavors and en-
courage more. I particularly want
those faculty teaching English 1100
and 1200 as well as those faculty
teaching Mathematics 1065 to know
that my colleagues and I appreciate
and value your contribution. I believe
it is vital to maintain high standards in
these courses. Furthermore, I en-
courage the ECU Community to in-
stitute a writing proficiency require-
ment.
f
wn�ffinni� iiiwii
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Student Oph
Underwood
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SRA Sponsor:
Leadership styles,
group dynamics
organizational skills
are among the topics
to be discussed at a
leadership sponsored
by the Student
Residence Association
in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center this
weekend. Campus
leaders in the SRA
and Area Residence
Council as ell as
House Council of-
ficers are scheduled to

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22, 1983
Jf -
A1
i
PROGRAM,
se
t I he Easl C aroli-
- m local events, and
. wspapers the more
age of world
: b Time
: things people most
apers was frequent
stories about a small
who generally, do not
inions of the majority.
h events do constitute
�verage, The East
robabl been guilty of
h coverage.
a) note, I would like
r the paper's sporadic
. Due to a continuous
t type-setting com-
as had to travel
produce the last
paper. Being about
working until 3 a.m.
r netting has been ex-
on the staff. The late
er are as much of an in-
our staff as it is to our
s.stUsers. So, pease bear
attempt tO get ba;k on
echnical pro-
out II be able to
. d commit-
tersity.
Policies,
, Untrue
le check-off system of
moM PIRGs employ.
ivstem, a campus-wide
held which, if passed,
rstem of funding in which
uld automatically pay $2
to be used for funding
fee would be paid at the
:h semester along with
idents normally
i ho does not wish to
ain a refund by go-
RG office within a few
nitiaJ fee.
iina schools employ
revenue collection. They
and Davidson. At Duke,
Agreement with the univer-
ch all refunds are to be
weec ' -ually refunds
weeks. Students
that refunds are available
g11 the student media and
tion of flyers. There are
methods available, and
in finding out more
:ontact the campus
ing chapter.
te: An opposing view will
tin next week's paper by
ne. a member of ECU'S
11 wans.)
fouid be useful.
tablished writing center
pa undergraduate en-
for the School of
ut two evidences of
nc maturity. I want to
endeavors and en-
I particularly want
teaching English 1100
ell as those faculty
rmatics 1065 to know
tues and I appreciate
contribution. 1 beUeve
ntain high standards in
Eurthermore, I en-
XJ Community to in-
g proficiency require-
Robert Schellenberger
issor, Decision Sciences
&r
Student Opinion
To Land Or Not To Land
By THERESA DULSKI
Staff Writer
On Tuesday the United Nations General Assembly
opened its thirty-eighth session. Because of landing
restrictons placed on Soviet aircraft in New York,
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko was ab-
sent from the assembly for the first time since 1957.
Students where asked if the United States made the
right decision by permiting Gromyko's plane to land
only at a military airport.
Erik Underwood, Political Science, Junior � "If a
Russian diplomat wanted to attend the U.N he could
have made arrangements with another country for a
flight to the U.S. � other diplomats did. If they don't
feel welcome, let them have the U.N. some where
else
Kathleen Mylett, General College, Freshman �
"They had to do something because the Russians shot
down the airplane, but I don't know that was
necessarily what they should have done. I don't have
any suggestions of what they could have done. The
U.S. is contradicting the U.N. policy by restricting the
foreign minister from coming into this country
Walter Parker, Driver Education, Senior � "Why do
they want to keep the foreign minister out of the
U.S.? He might have something to say to aid us in
solving the problem. There has always got to be an ex-
ception to the rule. Don't move the U.N. because
other countries might have the same problem
Marilyn Johnson, Drama, SophomoreThe simple
thing to do is to hold the U.N. somewhere else
because the U.S. is contradicting itself and the U.N.
policy by restricting the foreign minister from the
U.N
ROB POOLE � Photo Lab
ECU Transit Ends Route
Underwood
Mylett
Cont. From Page 1
parents. Students and
parents have called
and complained to
Hilliard also. "They
are mad with the
management he
said.
Hilliard, Smith and
the owner of Oak-
mont met to discuss
the possibility of star-
ting the service again.
Smith said that
Hilliard refused.
Hilliard said that in
the past the Smiths
"wanted to make an
agreement to keep the
bus out there The
conditions of the
agreement were that
Smith never harrass
drivers again and if he
had a complaint he
would call the transit
office so they could
handle the drivers.
"Twice since the
agreement he stopped
the bus Hilliard
said. "Smith has
broken the agreement
for the last time
Hilliard will not
change his decision,
he said. "We've bent
over backwards.
They're the ones who
broke the
agreement
"We have done all
that we can do
Smith said. He fears
that the reasoning
behind the issue is
related to a "per-
sonality conflict" bet-
ween Hilliard and
himself.
Mike Duvall, a stu-
dent living at Oak-
mont, verified the
story. After last Mon-
day's incident, the
route was changed
because Hilliard
"can't trust Mr.
Smith Duvall said.
Oakmont residents
can still catch the bus
by walking one block
to a Fast Fare store.
Starting next week,
students can catch the
bus at Hargate Drugs
which has a shelter for
bad weather condi-
tions and is only half
a block away from
where they were cat-
ching it at Oakmont.
Hilliard believes the
new route serves more
people and other
apartment comlexes.
"The route is more
central now, for new
complexes
Parker
Johnson
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SRA Sponsors Conference
Leadership styles,
group dynamics
organizational skills
are among the topics
to be discussed at a
leadership sponsored
by the Student
Residence Association
in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center this
weekend. Campus
leaders in the SRA
and Area Residence
Council as well as
House Council of-
ficers are scheduled to
participate in the
event.
"The SRA leader-
ship conference is
designed to expose its
participants to the
vital skills required to
provide leadership in
a dynamic organiza-
tion said SRA Vice
President Mark
N i e w a 1 d.
The SRA's goal is
to provide a centraliz-
ed self-government
which concerns itself
with all aspects of
campus residential
life.
"We have alot of
input into different
aspects of campus
life Niewald told
The East Carolinian.
The SRA was in-
strumental in getting
some dormitories on
campus converted to
co-ed housing this
year, and its represen-
tatives are involved
on campus.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 22, 1983 P�g� 6
Get Pantanasized! Memberships Going Fast
�OB POOLE
Lab
Anyone Home?
Although there is no line now, Pantanas packs them in every weekend.
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
Style Editor
Hey, all you Pantana fans!
Time to get the membership to en-
sure you're spot by the bar. Pan-
tana Bobs is going strickly
membership only.
"Pantana Bobs is not a bar
overwhelmed by locals, preppies
or businessmen. It is a bar con-
sisting of school orientated people
who keep coming back to the
same atmosphere said Bill
Spital, owner of Pantanas.
If dealing out the bucks for a
membership doesn't sound too
enticing, Pantanas' memberships
offer quite a few benefits.
A Regular membership is good
for one year. Members are permit-
ted to participate in club spon-
sored activities and to use all in-
house facilities. The cost is $10. A
Lifetime membership is good for
life. Members are entitled the
same privileges of a regular
member, and receive a free
T-shirt, one free guest and check
cashing up to $5 per night. The
cost is $25. The Express Card
membership consists of all
privledges of the Lifetime
member. But, this member is
allowed check cashing up to $10
per night, two free guests and
never waits in line. The cost is
$50. All memberships are dis-
counted $5 before Oct. 1.
A pay period of 30 days will be
allowed for those seeking
memberships. After Oct.l,
18-year-olds may fill out an ap-
plication that will be kept on file
until the individual reaches
19-years-old A 30-day waiting
period will go into effect after this
date for all applicants.
Pantanas offers a special for
organizations with 30 or more in-
terested individuals. If the
organization buys their member-
ships on the same dav, a free keg
will be awarded. Advance notice
will be appreciated.
The organizations that follow
through with the special have the
opportunity to conduct fund
raisers on specified dates
throughout the course of the year.
Pantanas' clientele have
basically the same interests. Spital
encourages members to interact
with the various activities
available . Whether you spectate
or participate, Pantanas is a bar
that makes sports a main attrac-
tion. Monday Night Football,
surf club slides and the crazy an-
tics of the rugby club make Pan-
tanas a bar filled with fun and en-
I"
'4
thusiasm.
Spital also insists the members
have some degree of education.
"A student presently enrolled or
with at least one year of education
following high school is
required said Spital. "This is to
form a common bond between the
crowd and make for good com-
munication he added.
Spital wants his members to
walk into the bar and know prac-
tically everyone. "We have a lot
of people who come into the bar,
not knowing a soul, and just make
for a too crowded bar. We don't
want our members staying home
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
nights because Pantanas is too
crowded said Spital.
Pantanas has also done some
renovating in the last three mon-
ths. A gazebo in the rear of the
bar makes for a quiet, private sec
tion. "At first customers asked
me 'why a gazebo? but it's a
great place for someone who
doesn't want to be in the crowd
and just sit back and watch said
Spital. "It's also a good place to
sit and talk with a date
A shelf-bar was installed runn-
ing along the left side wall of the
bar. Bar stools are randomly plac-
ed for the more relaxed crew.
Future members can have their
picture membership made right
inside Pantanas. Don't be left
out, Pantanas fine reputation will
be one worth experiencing.
���:
tilGhif- I
;
Pantana Bobs, a popular bar, is soon to go membership only, next month.
OB POOL - Phote Lab
Colorful Sounds Come From 'Moody Blues'
The fact thatTie Moody Blues
have sold in excess of thirty
million albums worldwide since
their inception, that they have
more platinum albums than any
other surviving super-group, and
that their last release. Long
DiQtance Voyager, was number
one in the American charts, still
comes as something of a surprise
to U.K. critics with a limited at-
tention span.
Well here they come again in
their own sweet time (approx-
imately once every two years) with
another top quality album, The
Present, on Justin Hayward
hallmark, "Blue World which
will only go to prove yet again
that good melodic structure
within a rock framework and an
individual sound is what showers
platinum on the level heads of
John Lodge (bass), Justin
Hayward (guitar), Graeme Edge
(drums), Ray Thomas (flute), and
Patrick Moraz (keyboards). The
Moodies are to undertake another
massive world tour begining in
America in night. They'll be retur-
ning to the U.K. in the Autumn
for concerts at prestigious venues
(the last Albert Hall concert in 481
sold out in five hours). Within the
limited confines of the hard core
musical press it is almost in-
evitable that the blinkered brigade
of the "Flavor Of The Month"
school will treat the proven
popularity and international
public recognition of the Moody
Blues with homegrown contempt
they certainly don't deserve. For
the more discerning media-music
critics it would be well to
remember that nothing succeeds
like success and two decades of
sustained, unprecedented public
recognition is one of the best tests
of lasting musical value. In
America the group's musical
recognition and following has
never wavered and for months
ahead of their proposed ap-
pearances their fanatical fans can
be spotted camped outside
auditoria displaying placards of
portentious import like "The
Rock Gods Are Coming From On
High - 176 Days To Go
Backstage at concerts it has not
been unheard of for misguided
but touchingly loyal fans to dress
as nuns, monks and even a Pope
to receive blessings and ask awed
questions to their idols like Ray
Thomas - "what's the answer to
the cosmos, man?" To which our
worthy, earthy flautist has been
known to shake his head in
disbelief and dispatch them to a
member of their long suffering
road crew with the reply, "they
know all the answers
The peripheral fanatical ele-
ment who are in reality in the
minority have always been kindly,
tolerantly and faintly amusedly
treated by the band since all kinds
of individual interpretations were
attributed to their first classic M
Days of Future Passed" and
"Nights In White Satin" released
back in the heady days of flower
power and acid "drops They
are somewhat bemused by
Justin's gentle reproach that his
classic single was written for a
girlfriend or Ray's more numbing
revelation that he received the
devine inspiration for "Legend Of
The Mind" while planting some
"daffs" in the window box of the
tiny flat he rented at the time.
Moody Blues are, in point of fact,
as "pretentious" as roast beef.
They are simply a unique blend of
romance, fantasy and fact put to
rock 'n' roll melodies.
One of the qualities which is so
often admired and envied by their
contemporaries is of course the
Moody Blues' remarkable sustain-
ed consistency over two decades
which really began with the
phenomenal "Nights In White
Satin" which six years after its
original chart success was re-
released in the U.S. with "Days
Of Future Passed" and topped
the singles and album charts
respectively. During 1972 in the
same month their new album
Seventh Sojourn was released and
ran in to the number 2 spot giving
the group an unprecedented one
and two in the U.S. album charts.
That classic single has already re-
visited the U.K. charts on three
separate occasions on re-release,
making the top 20 each time. It's
also covered an average of once a
month by another recording artist
- most recently by Elkie Brooks,
who put her version into the U.K.
charts earlier this year. There was
even a punk version of "Nights"
by the Dickies. But Justin's
favorite interpretation fa by Eric
Burden and War.
As platinum album followed
platinum album, On The
Threshold Of A Dream (1969), To
Our Children's Children, (1970).
A Question Of Balance (1970) .
Every Good Boy Deserves Favour
(1971) Seventh Sojourn (1972).
another phenomenon developed
See Moody, page 7
Take A Deep Breath
i
Scratch-and-SniffTakesPopcorn9s Placet
By GORDON IPOCK
Ealeriaiuaaeal Kdiior
Friday's midnight movie,
Polyester, is loaded with the ab-
surd and the outrageous, in-
cluding Odorama. Not only do
I you get to see the lunatic antics of
a 300-pound transvestite and her
wacko kids and degenerate hus-
band, but you also get to smell
them.
Scratch-and-sniff cards will be
handed to the audience on their
way into Hendrix Theatre. During
N.C. Symphony Dispute
Still Makes No Sounds
By ROBIN AYERS
Staff Writer
Monday evening the Artist
Series Committee met again to
discuss whether or not to replace
the North Carolina Symphony.
Mr. Rudolph Alexander, commit-
tee chairman, said a final decision
on the symphony will be reached
by mid-October. "A good bit of
discussion took place concerning
replacing the North Carolina
Symphony and some other attrac-
tions were considered, Alexander
said
Alexander said the North
Carolina Symphony is still under
consideration but management
and musicians will have to have
their differences resolved.
The committee decided to delay
making a decision until Alexander
returns from the Southern Arts
Federation meeting in Atlanta,
GA September 30 through Oc-
tober 2. Artist managements from
all over the United States will be
in attendance. Alexander said he,
"will have the opportunity to talk
with artists and ensembles that
might have open dates. I will
return from this meeting with as
much information as I can get on
attraction that the committee
might want to consider in their
discussions concerning filling the
slot we have in the Artist Series.
"When the North Carolina
Symphony cancelled, I was too
late to book an artist or ensemble
for October so the committee is
working to book an attraction in
January Alexander said.
"There's not a great deal of
urgency for making a quick deci-
sion because we have an artist per-
forming in November, he added

"It'll lift you up where you belong
AND A
GENTLEMAN
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS
A UXUMAK-MARTm ELfAND PHODUCTON
A TAYLOR HACUTJRD FILM
REHARD GERE DEBRA WINGER
AN amCM AND A GENTLEMAN
Alao tuning Dm KEITH and LOUB G06SETT JR as -Pok-y
Original Muafc by JACK NITZSCHE Written bv DOUGLAS DAY STEWART
ProduDed by MARTIN HAND Directed by TAYLOR HACXPORD
�p I ����� 4 A PARAMOUNT PCTURE
M
O
V
I
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S
the movie when a number flashes
onto the screen, scratch the cor-
responding card number and
you'll smell what Francine
Fishpaw, the heroine er, hero
� whatever, smells.
Students who have seen the film
give strong comments: hilarious,
say some; disgusting, say others.
It depends on your sensibilities,
but everyone agrees the film is
outrageous.
Polyester is the story of a
suburban, polyester-loving
housewife, played by the
transvestite Divine, and her
demented family. Her husband
runs a movie house that shows
kiddie porn. Her son, a glue-
sniffing angel-dust freak, gets his
kicks by stomping women's feet
down at the shopping mall. Her
disco-crazed daughter runs with a
punk, Stiv Bators, who makes
Johnny Rotten look like an altar
boy.
Then Tab Hunter � yes. Tab
Hunter � turns up as Tod Tom-
morrow, Francine's unlikely
lover. Talk about nauseating sex
scenes. Edith Massey is even more
outrageous as Francine's
toothless, bloated neighbor Cud-
dles. Things are so depraved
around the Fishpaw house that
the family dog hangs himself.
Don't ask what smells are on
the scratch-and-sniff cards, but
they're probably as nauseating as
the rest of this rude farce,
Polyester.
Of course the main feature this
weekend is An Officer and a
Gentleman, one of the finest and
most realistic love stories of the
'80s. If you've seen it, see it again.
It's that good. If by some chance
you haven't � GO!
Just when
you thought
it was safe to
breathe again
v"M4�;���
9mm- Polyester
R
RESTRICTED
Sm-DIVINE .m.l TAB HI NTER WfrWfcm ft utou 4 �I PfcaiLj h KHIN MATERS
AftMUIIM USI -MA PRODI (.TION cn-wcI-
���� . ' r
iCat WCMIll
An Officer And A Gentleman' appears tonight, Friday and Saturday niglit at 6 and 9:30 p.m. 'Polyester b tke Friday night midnight
������������������a
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'TheM
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'The Moody Blues' make a big coi

BUYING - j
LOANS AUTO
TVs. Air Conditioners
Stereos guns gold A Silver !
diamonds cameras ana jlj
equipment, typewriters j 6'0Gr�J
kerosene heaters ?'
refrigerators idorm sue on � H'Jmz
ly). video games & car
tridges. power tools musical instrumentspl
m.crov��v� o�tnt. �6o
recorders bicycles and24 hour
anything else of value
Southern Pawn ShopU-Hd
located 05 Evans Street
downtown FB-MMaJ

FIGHT
Lose Any
Weight Desires
From 5lbi
(does not include
355
F
SPE
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IN 5!
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done some w mon-of the ate sec asked . but it's a who 1 the crvwd " said place to
unn-
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Pftai t�b
ties'
� 'Nights"
But Justin's
tation is by Eric
� M lowed
On The
lream 0969), To
hildren, (190),
Balance (1970) .
Deserves Favour
Sojourn (1972).
developed
pajje
's Place
an altar
yes. Tab
; KJ lom-
unlikely
eating ex
� en more
a n c i n e s
. I b r C ud-
depraved
a house that
. � mself.
smells are on
. ards, but
nauseating as
rude farce,
� e main feature this
An Officer and a
� of the finest and
love stories of the
e seen it. see it again.
If by orne chance
i
Just when
ou thought
is safe to
sathe again
ster
rida night midnight show
��������
���������������������
THfc EAST C AROLINIAN
SfcPTfcMBfcR 22. 1983
'The Moody Blues'Come Back With NewLP
Cont'd from p. 6
in the U.S. whereby
on the release of each
new album the
previous releases
came back into the
U.S. Hot 100. At one
time they had as many
as five albums in the
charts together.
By 1974 the Moody
Blues reached by
mutual agreement a
time to take stock and
look to their own in-
dividual potentials.
Ray Thomas has
produced two solo
albums in this period.
From Mighty Oaks,
which hit number 14
in the U.K. top twen-
ty, and Hopes Wishes
and Dreams, in bet-
ween fanatical bouts
of angling and achiev-
ing a life-long ambi-
tion by being featured
in the Fisherman's bi-
ble, The Angling
Times. John Lodge's
Natural Avenue and
Justin Hay ward's
Songwriter LP
followed in 1977 and
Justin's work with
Jeff Wayne on War
Of The Worlds pro-
ject and in particular
the single "Forever
Autumn gained
massive worldwide
top ten success. Dur-
ing this period their
founder-member
keyboard player Mike
Pinder announced his
decision not to per-
form live again and
after producing his
own solo venture, The
Promise, he disap-
peared in the general
direction of Califor-
nia.
The Moody Blues
returned to their
group format with the
addition of a new
keyboard player,
Patrick Moraz who
had previously replac-
ed Rick Wakeman in
Yes The Octave
album released in
1978 cruised into the
top twenty proving
that their legions of
loyal tans were still
there, despite the
almost five year
absence. one
Distance Voyager
followed in 1981. tak-
ing them back into the
top five in the U.K.
with "Gemini
Dream" and "The
Voice They became
top five's in the U.S.
and the IP went no. 1
platinum here. Now
The Present should
follow that quick
route to the top.
If there is a key to
the Woody Blues un-
precedented success
over the past twenty
years it probably lies
in the decision earlv
on to look after their
own business affairs
without a manager
and in a co-operative
manner, resist temp
tation to commit
themselves to soul-
destroying recording
scheduals simply for
the monev and make
the music thev like
rather than being side
tracked into the
following trends. This
facet of the group's
collective policy has
proven almost vi
sionarv a- their often
imitated but never
equalled sound has
continued to attract
record sales which
even their contem-
poraries and superstai
peers envy. Respected
and acclaimed b
their fellow p:
sionals and critics
throughout the world
it onlv rem for the
prophets to be
recognized for their
true worth in their
own land
Read
The
Classifieds
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
The Moodv Blues' make a big comeback with their new IP 'The Present
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs Air Conditioners
Stereos guns gold & Silver
diamonds cameras and
egutpment. typewriters
kerosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm size on
ly video games & car
tridges poer tools
muscai instruments
mKrOMUv ovon. vicfeo
'ecortfers bicvclfl and
anything else of value
Southern Pawn Shop
.cxated 405 Evans Street
downtown 75? j�4
COMPUTE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610Gre�nvilleBlvd
rst-atu � m m�s.
24 hour Towing Service
U-HquI Rentals
Available
FIGHT HUNGER
Lose Any Amount Of
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From 5lbs to 200lbs 1
(does not include nutri system foods)
355-2470
Copvngnt 1985
xroger sav on
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None soid To Dealers
items and Prices
Effective Trim Sat
Sept. 24, 1983
J
P Humphry
FALL
SPECIAL
I LOST 57 LBS.
IN 55 DAYS
ka.s Z- -� re Nun Systan '
-S3 -c tttw r�i�d yOL co.��: v�
12 Price
SPECIAL !
Begin 9-26 ,
Expires 9-30
I HAVE KEPT MY
WEIGHT OFF MOW FOR
Vh YEARS
P�t Mf I lac o�n m- � ig�" o� 4 o"
aunng "M�i o� r, lit �w I toura �jl"
Stu �M o�i J8 sxunj� � corn K"
j�to3�v'

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Mil TOMY FM FREE NO 0IUC1TI0N CONSULTlTMN
355-2470
nutri system
4n
weight loss medical centers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
CKXiCY
Each of These aover
tised items is re
Quired to Be reaonv
available for saie In
eacn Kroger Sav on
enceot as soeciftcai
iv noted m this ad if
we do run out of an
item we win offer
you vour enctee of a
comparaoie item
wnen avanaDie
reflecting tne same
savings or a rain
cneck which win en
title you to purchase
tne advertised item
at tne advertised
price within $0 days
Limit one manufac
turers coupon per
item
BATHRCX)M
Delsey
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DIET COKE
TABOR
Coca cola
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N.R.
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COBLE FUDGE
ROYALE OR NEOPOLITAN
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$2"
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REGULAR OR LIGHT
Budweiser Beer
$29
0.
16-02
Cans
KROGER
WHITE OR WHEAT
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NABISCO
24-Oz.
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Nilla wafers
$109
12-Oz. pj
BULK PACKAGED
COUNTRY STYLE
Sliced
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LO.
�ass
3 Lbs. Or More

v.
vtW
-4
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IN STORE BAKED
Sugar cookies
DOZ.
DOUGHTIES
Roast Beef
.$3"





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1983
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ByCIND PIEAJ
Coming off a I I
September, the Eas
Pirates are looking
month of Octobt- i �
ticipation.
"We plav some
teams in October
Ed Emory said I
know a lot abou
November rolls arounl
Pirate head coach B
physical at Missouri
bOJs �r� laMtr and t
r$ caks he said.
Hea
Comfortable Win
50-25 victory ova v
Saturday was a big
especially for Place
Heath. Heath hankl
N.C. State, and
shaky since � that
Saturday. Heath hoc
goals against the Rac
"That game wa
confidence Heath
State, 1 felt
everybody down. '
should just alwayj
and strive for pa
What About n
Coach Emory sa d
liked open dates
break continuity, b I
thinks the two-week
in handy. Offensive!
Art Baker and Tom
ton both agree
"It come� at a gcj
us Baker said.
work out some cobffl
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THE EASTC AROl INI AN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 22. 1983 Page 9
mory Anticipates Eventful October
By CINDY PLEASANTS
SporttUllor
Coming off a 2-1 record in
September, the East Carolina
Pirates are looking toward the
month of October with much an-
ticipation.
"We play some great, great
teams in October ECU coach
Ed Emory said Tuesday. "We'll
know a lot about this team when
November rolls around
The Pirates will play Missouri,
Southwestern Louisiana, Temple
and Florida in October. Emory
hoped the Pirates would have a
better record at this point, but
he's not complaining.
"We're disappointed we're not
3-0 he said, "but I guess we
came as close as we possibly
could
After a one-point loss (47-46) to
Florida State and a 22-16 win over
N.C. State, the Pirates enjoyed a
comfortable 50-25 win over Mur-
ray State.
"We probably could have
prevented the score from being
50-25 Emory said, "but we
didn't want to keep the first string
in. I'd rather have the morale of
the football team than a 40-6
score
Emory will have two weeks to
get his team's morale up for
Missouri. The Pirates have an
open date this weekend. "We're
gonna play open date and beat the
heck out of them Emory said
with a laugh. "I never liked open
dates too much, but I think this
one comes at a good time for us.
We just need to regroup and read-
just for October
The Pirates will also need time
to heal. All-America candidates
Tery Long, an offensive guard,
and Steve Hamilton, a defensive
tackle, are sidlined with injuries,
but both are expected to practice
next week. Defensive linemen
Maury Banks and Larry Berry
and cornerback Rally Caperas are
also on the injured list. Offensive-
ly, both running backs, Tony
Baker and Jimmy Walden, have
bruised knees.
"We need some people to
heal Emory said. "They just
can't stay healthy every moment
of the day
After a 28-9 defeat last year in
Colombia, Mo the Pirates know
what the Tigers are capable of.
"We'll have to fight for good
field position Emory said, "and
our special teams and defense
have got to have great games.
"Missouri is giving up only 48
yards rushing this year and we're
15th in the nation (in rushing).
We're got to run the football to
beat them. The best passing team
(Illinois) they played, they beat,
so we sure as hell can't expect to
beat them on that
Missouri, 1-1, plays Utah State
on Saturday.
One player Emory will be coun-
ting on is placekicker Jeff Heath.
Last year, Heath kicked three
field goals at Missouri to score the
Pirates' only points.but Heath
doesn't think he'll be needed as
much this time. "We're a dif-
ferent team on offense this year
he said, "so I don't think I'll be
depended on as much
According to Emory, Missouri
is a different team as well.
"They've gone back to basic Big
Eight football. They knock you
down and run over you. Their
guys are taller and bigger than us;
they're like running into red oaks.
We've got to get some anchors in
there and try to anchor them
down
Meanwhile, Emory is enjoying
the Pirates' bit of national
recognition and a record that
evens his overall mark at ECU to
18-18. "We dug ourselves down in
the well, and it's hard digging
yourself out he said. "I sure
hope we'll be in the upper part of
the well from now on
Emory said the Pirates are go-
ing to treat Missouri and every
other contest as if it were a bowl
game. "Why do we want to wait
and play one in December0" he
said. "We've got five games to tell
us whether or not we'll go
somewhere in December or
January. We'll just have to wait
and see
Czaja Puts Dream On Hold,
Aims For Tournament Title
LOU CLEMMONS � Ptvote Lafe
Pirate bead coach Ed Emory said the Pirates will need to be more
physical at Missouri in order to win. According to Emory, the Big Eight
b9fs are taller and larger. They're (Missouri players) like running into
red oaks he said.
By RANDY MEWS
SUff Writer
Chris Czaja has a dream of be-
ing a professional golfer, but for
right now he's content as the
number one player on the ECU
golf team.
Czaja led the Pirates last year as
he was named the team's most
valuable player. He had the best
overall average score for the year
and is considered by his coach,
Jerry Lee, to be the most consis-
tent person on the team.
"Chris is our steadiest player
Lee said. "You can always count
on him to shoot a round of 70-75,
and that's where his leadership
comes in
Czaja agrees that his scores
don't vary much, but he doesn't
consider himself a steady player.
"My scores are based on the fact
that 1 don't do well on several
holes Czaja explained
"I have a problem concen-
trating he said, "and I always
make several mental errors. It's
very frustrating, but if I can
eliminate those errors, then I'll
really be able to help out the
team
Czaja said his lack of concen-
tration was made evident in the
Pirates' season-opening tourna-
ment when he shot rounds of 80
and 76, the worst two- day total of
his career.
"I was really disappointed with
my performance Czaja said.
"The whole team thought we were
going to win the tournament, and
I think over-confidence is what
got to us all
Coach Lee admitted the Pirates
should have won their first tour-
nament, and said the team score
should have been at least 10
strokes higher. "Everyone could
have done better Lee said, "but
the problem with Chris was he
had trouble with his driver both
days
Czaja feels confident the
Pirates will do better in their up-
coming tournaments, and he
believes they will be able to com-
pete with any of their opponents.
"We're a very young team
Czaja said, "but by spring time
we should have three freshmen
that will be playing in the top six.
"How you perform in the spr-
ing determines whether you go to
the NCAA's Czaja added, "so
if we have a really good fall, then
we'll be ready to dive into the spr-
ing season
One thing Czaja wants to do
before spring rolls around is win a
tournament, something he has yet
to do in his collegiate career. "My
main concern is for the team to do
well, but winning a tournament is
one of the personal goals I have
set for myself
Winning tournaments is
something Czaja became ac-
custommed to in Greenich, Conn,
when his high school won two
consecutive state tournaments.
Czaja was also named all-state for
two consecutive years, and in his
senior year was state player of the
year.
Upon graduating from high
school, Czaja decided to attend
ECU because of the schedule they
play. "I liked the campus a lot,
but the main reason I came was
because the competition in the
southeast is as tough as anywhere
in the country
And it's that competition that
Czaja hopes will one day prepare
him for the professional tour.
Heath Gains Confidence Back
Comfortable Win: The Pirates'
50-25 victory over Murray State
Saturday was a big morale boost,
especially for Placekicker Jeff
Heath. Heath shanked a ball at
N.C. State, and he's been a little
shaky since � that is, until �
Saturday. Heath booted two field
goals against the Racers.
'That game was good for my
confidence Heath said. "After
State, I felt like I had let
everybody down. I guess you
should just always hang in there
and strive for perfection
What About An Open Date?:
Coach Emory said he never has
liked open dates because they
break continuity, but this year he
thinks the two-week break comes
in handy. Offensive coordinator
Art Baker and Tom Throckmor-
ton both agree.
"It comes at a good time for
us Baker said. "We need to
work out some cobwebs from the
offense
Says Throckmorton, "We've
worked about seven weeks now
and after the open date, we have
seven weeks to go, so it's like hav-
ing a perfect split between one
season and a second season he
said. "We all need some time to
correct a few things, get some in-
jured players back and be ready
for part two
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
The Pirates were originially
scheduled to play Miami on Sept.
24, but the date was switched so
Miami could play Notre Dame on
national television.
Missouri Loses Close One: The
Tigers dropped a one-point deci-
sion to Wisconsin last Saturday,
21-20, with four crucial turnovers
being committed by the Tigers.
That, however, should be no in-
dication of Missouri's strength.
The Tigers play Utah State on
Saturday. "They'll go out there
and beat Utah State Emory
said. "That loss (to Wisconsin)
will definitely have a
psychological effect on them.
They just gave it away. If they're
gonna give one away, I wish they
had waited around and given one
away to us
ECU and Missouri have played
only once. Losing 28-9 last year,
the Pirates were only trailing 14-9
with nine minutes to play. The
Tigers, however, scored two quick
TD's to move away.
50 points almost sets mark:
Saturday night's 50-25 win is the
second highest point total for an
Ed Emory-coached team. The
highest total thus far is 66 points.
That record was set in 1981
against East Tennessee State.
Ingram Moving Up: ECU
quarterback Kevin Ingram moved
to sixth on the career pass comple-
tion list Saturday, with his seven
completions against Murray
State. Ingram now has 78 career
completions, moving him ahead
of both Mike Weaver (75,
1973-76) and George Richardson
(76, 1963-65).
Williams One Of Hottest In Na-
tion: Following a 93-yard kickoff
return for a touchdown, Williams
continues as the nation's second
leading kickoff return man. His
average is now 40.4 yards, just
behind the top mark of 42.7.
Bucs Make Rankings: The
Pirates are tied for sixth in seoring
average with 39.3 points per
game. ECU is eighth in kickoff
returns with a 29.6 team average.
Also, the Pirates are 15th in
rushing with 239 yards per game.
ECU'S leading golfer, Chris Czaja, thought over-confidence was the
reason why the Pirates did poorly at their first tournament of the season.
Pirates Lose To Ranked UNCC
LOU CL.BMMOMS �
la a rtcent practice, the Pirate football squad works oa the running game ia preparation for aext Saturday's
(Oct. 1) meeting with Missouri. ECU's ground game will be strongly tested by the Tiger defense which has
allowed only 49 yards rushing per game ia '83.
The ECU soccer team dropped
their third game of the season
Tuesday, losing to powerful UNC
Charlotte, 2-1.
The 49ers, who improved their
record to 4-1-1, were ranked ninth
in the South going into the game.
Charlotte dominated the first
half scoring two quick goals play-
ing a ball control game. "It seems
like it always takes us a half
before we really start playing
said Pirate coach Robbie Church.
In the second half ECU came
out playing with greater intensity
and quickly narrowed the score,
2-1. Freshman Alan Smith scored
the Pirate goal, and Mark Hardy
was credited with the assist. ECU
had several chances to knot the
score but was unable to get the
ball in the net.
"We played with poise and
character Church said, "but we
were just unable to score that se-
cond goal.
"A newspaper in Charlotte said
we had one of the youngest teams
in the country Church added,
"and that's a good example of
how much heart this team has
The Pirates have only one
senior, and almost the entire star-
ting line-up is composed of
freshmen and sophmores.
ECU travels to Rutgers and
Marmouth College this weekend
for what Church calls the most
important road trip of the season.
"It's important for us to win both
of these games, because New
Jersey is where we do a large por-
tion of our recruiting
Golfers Finish Second
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU golf team returned
home Tuesday night after placing
second among 21 teams at the
Methodist College Invitational
Golf Tournament.
The tournament was held at the
Cyprus Lakes Country Club and
was the Pirates first of the season.
Although ECU finished higher
in this tournament then in any last
year, head coach Jerry Lee was
not pleased with his team's per-
formance.
"I definitely felt that we should
have won the tournament he
said. "We did not play well as a
team, because I was looking for us
to score around a 590
Host Methodist College won
the tournament with a team total
of 597 strokes. ECU's total was
601, while Virginia Com-
monwealth finished third with 602
and Campbell took fourth place
with 606.
Individual, the Pirates were
led by Fresh:r.tn Mike Bradley.
He had rounds of 77 and 73 for a
two day total of 149.
David Dooley and Don
Sweeting each finished with 150,
Kelly Stimart came in with 154
and Chris Czaja had 156.
The Pirates will face tougher
competition next week, when they
face such teams as North
Carolina, Wake Forest and Duke
in the N.C. State Invitational.
�afi�aii�j)iiu �aanM'��
. , - -
u





10
THE l-AST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1983
Fearless Forecast
WEST VIRGINIA at BOSTON COLLEGE
PITTSBURGH at MARYLAND
PENN STATE at TEMPLE
II I INOIS at MICHIGAN STATE
OHIO STATE at IOWA
MICHIGAN at WISCONSIN
UCLA at NFBRASKA
NOTRE DAME at MIAMI
VANDERBILT at ALABAMA
AUBURN at TENNESSEE
GEORGIA TECH at CLEMSON
II OR1DA at MISSISSIPPI ST.
Will I AM & MARY at UNC
VIRGINIA AT N.C. STATE
SOUTH CAROLINA at GEORGIA
CINDY PLEASANTS
West Virginia
Pittsburgh
Penn State
Michigan State
Ohio State
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Florida
UNC
N.C. State
Georgia
KEN BOLTON
Boston College
Maryland
Penn State
Michigan State
Ohio State
Michigan
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Florida
UNC
N.C. State
Georgia
FIELDING MILLER
Boston College
Pittsburgh
Penn State
Michigan State
Iowa
Michigan
UCLA
Notre Dame
Alabama
Tennessee
Clemson
Florida
William & Mary
N.C. State
Georgia
JIM KIRCHMAN
West Virginia
Maryland
Penn State
Michigan State
Ohio State
Michigan
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Florida
UNC
N.C. State
Georgia
TODD EVANS
West Virginia
Maryland
Penn State
Michigan State
Ohio State
Michigan
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Alabama
Auburn
Clemson
Florida
UNC
N.C. State
Georgia
i tlu-
VDU
pan
all 1.
Spring Intramurals In High Gear
Now that the rain
has abated a litrle and
Flab Football and
Team Putt-Putt hae
been able to get
underway, we finally
have the opportunity
to give you the results
ot some of the things
going on in In-
t r a m u r a N this
semester.
Alread) a record
has been broken in
Flag Football by the
Heartbreakers, an in-
dependent team that
is burning up the
fields. In their game
this week against the
Zeta Beta Tau Little
Sisters they scored a
record 78 points! The
old record was set by
the Tyler Heart-
breakers (basically the
same team, except
now independent) in
1980 and stood at 76
points. Yovanne
Williams scored 32
points. Captain and
quarterback Ginger
Rothermel scored 14
points and Leslie
Bunn scored 12
points.
Unfortunately, and
embarrassingly for
the ZBT's the final
score in the game was
Heartbreakers 78,
Zeta Beta Tau 0.
Almost Anything!
Goes Registration will
be from September!
26-29, also in the IM-
Rec offices. Thej
teams captains)
meeting will be held
on October 5 at 7 pm
in Brewster C-103.
Sports Writers
Needed
I Apply at The East
Carolinian office
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST CAT 7 v��r$ old, whitt.
fluffy, blue ey and l green eye
Last seen on Jarvis Street Call
757 SIM REWARD OFFERED
MISC.
LEGAL HASSLES? Call
Howard J Cummings attorney
at Law No charge tor initial
consultation tor ECU Students
Call 7St 0004
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campul' include experienced
professional work. Pro-
ofreading, spelling and gram-
matical corrections 355741
after 5 30
PROFESSINAL TYPING ser
vice. Proofreading, spelling.
and grammatical corrections
Specialize in theses. 751 304 I
a.m. to I pm
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SIONAL TYPING Julia Blood
worth. 75-7174
EXPERIENCED PROFES
SIONAL TYPING of
manuscripts, thesis, etc
Reasonable rates Proofreading
and spelling corrections Call
daily 757 544 after 5 JO pm
7S-mt. Ask for Eva
TYPING AND WORD PRO
CESSING see the professional at
Word for Word in Georgetown
shop Call 754 4�U
PART TIME MORNING help
needed Must be available Mon .
Wed , Fri 10-7 Apply in person
at Leather n Wood, Carolina
East Mall No phone calls
please.
FREE TO A GOOD HOME t
week old black kitten, (w)
yi2 7377.
IF YOU HAVE INITIATIVE
and are seriously interested in
making money, working part
time, on your own please call
757-52(7 between t an I p.m.
SALE
FOR SALE 170 VW Fasfback.
Rebuilt engine New clutch, bat
tery, brakes. Good condition
use Call 75 0143 after t p m
PERSONAL
TO THE ANGEL who came to I
my rescue, t 20-M. pm Thanks.
you're terrific Love me
P.S. Don't let the green-eyed
monster get ya! Fight it
HAPPY 71st birthday Alecia H
Love, Rik.
LYN L ENJOY your last day of
being a teen, but put all of what
you ve got into your 70 s Happy
70th birthday. Love Steph.
LAIDOUT ARTIST NEEDED!
AT THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ON MONDAY NIGHTS. APPLY
WITH "MY MAN THE CLAY
MAN
Mow Nikon makes fine
photography easier and
more convenient than ever
THE
AUTOMATIC
NIKON FE
klfl NIKON
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OLV
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ittona : � mpact uto-exposure
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� " ' - '���'� rheresalsi a special Nikon automatic
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-opart motor d"ve for up to 3 5 sho. per
I Try rt ours i i mc m today'
art �� coetcro hop
b'H SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE NC 27831
"52 0688
PHI
KAPPA
TAU
Lit tie
Sister Rush
Monday and Tuesday
Sept. 26th and 27th
9:00-until
409 Elizabeth St.
Phone 752-4379
W
EVERYDAY
LOW PRICES
Haircut
Shampoo & Set
$�00
$4.00
$coo
Shampoo & Blow Dry 3
All Services
Performed Exclusively
By Students
Pitt Plaza
Shopping Center
Nexxus
756-3050
A Taco BeilGrande
A Taco Light
and Bean Burrito
Just
and Bean Burrito
Just
Order our Taco BeilGrande
with its extra large crisp,
corn shell plus our Bean
Burrito and you'll pay ust
$1.89 l's one of the best
barqams you'll ever taste.
319E G��e�viiUlrvd
TBCOdfeBEliU
A: DV9QP�D '�� Ofer �xpw-M 10 7X&3
Order our Taco Light, with
its targe, fioky Hour sMI
plus our Bean Burrito and
you'll pay jusl .89 lr's
one of the best bargains
youII ever taste
319 E Gre�T�IU BUd
TBCOABIlili
- 9VXCO"C 'MkrN Kv ' Ml V
Monday Night FOOTBALL
on our BIG-SCREEN TV $3.09
Tackle
A Pizza
At Gatti's
�V.
A great way to have a
great time. With all that
honest to Gatti's goodness
and our Happy Hour Specials
you already know who
the winner is.
You, with
your favorite Gatti's
Plus Dinner buffet
5 p.m. to 8 p.m All the
Pizza, spaghetti and salad
you can eat.
Corner of Cotanche and 10th
The best ptzxa in town. T"
itti'

" mm mnp)M
. , .





HI I v
I i
flticer, you could be in charge of a Mach
vertical take-off Harrier or our oi our
helicopters. And you could do ii It
ii (akc a special commitment on your
aders ai
on to be
simian or
hout our
Go farther
undergraduate officer commissioning programs. I!
you're a junior, check out our graduate p
Starting salaries are from $17,000 to v !3.000 nd vou
can count on going fartherfaster.
Mm be you can ht oik at us.
Hit Fen.
Ilic Ihoud.
Ilit Marint h
1
pif" -





HTHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22, 1983

Mead
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ONLY ECU I.DS QUALIFY FOR 10 DISCOUNT
DISCOUNT DOES NOT APPLY TO ALCOHOL,
TOBACCO OR FILM PRODUCTS.
Also, check-out Revco's low, everyday
discount prices on all these items
Biro
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I





Title
The East Carolinian, September 22, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 22, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.288
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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