The East Carolinian, September 20, 1983








�he !East Carulmian
f
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No
Tuesday, September 20,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Budget Cuts Force Professors To Move On
From Suff �nd CPS Reports
With universities and colleges in
parts of the nation undergoing
severe budget cuts the last three
vears, professors have been keep-
ing their eyes on the want-ads for
Ob prospects. Most educators are
moving form depressed economic
areas, such as the Detroit area, to
the Sunbelt.
Angelo Volpe, vice chancellor
for academic affairs, said ECU is
not experiencing trouble keeping
faculty members and believes the
school is benefiting from the
faculty exodus in other parts of
the country. "We have had no
large turnover he said, "and ap-
plicants for positions have in-
creased in number and quality
No one knows exactly how
many teachers are moving.
Estimates range from 30,000 to
100,000. Most likely to move are
the 100,000 non-tenured teachers
now working on U.S. campuses,
said Irving Spitzberg, retiring
head of the American Association
of University Professors, the third
biggest college teachers' union.
Young teachers in non-tenured
track positions make up a majori-
ty of the faculty who leave ECU,
according to Volpe.
Spitzberg said he can't estimate
how many tenured professors are
preparing to leave.
"I don't think anybody can
give you a number adds Victor
Stone, AAUP president in Illinois
and a law professor at the Univer-
sity of Illinois. "I do know the
numbers are large
Faculty members, says Spitz-
berg, are simply "tired of hard
times on campus Those hard
times often translate into salary
freezes, increased workloads and
even prohibitions from cash-short
schools against buying needed
materials for class work.
A salary freeze in Nevada
means a significant brain drain,
said Allen Mori, chairman of the
University of Nevada-Las Vegas'
Faculty Senate.
At West Virginia, the faculty
vacancy rate is four times higher
than ever before, mourns Dr.
Herman Mertins, vice president of
university administration. Conse-
quently, the school has cut the
number of course sections it is of-
fering this fall.
Some faculty members are
retaliating. West Virginia Pro-
fessor Thomas Cady, for exam-
ple, sued Gov. Rockefeller for
"malevolent evisceration of
higher education" this summer.
The suit asks the court to restore
$2.5 million in budget cuts to the
school.
In August, 32 University of
Wisconsin-Stevens Point teachers
advertised their services en masse
to schools with more commitment
to education and, not coinciden-
tally, no salary freezes. University
of Wisconsin at Madison faculty
members quickly disassociated
themselves with their peers in
Stevens Point.
Last week, Colorado State
University English instructors
wrote letters to students' parents
complaining that CSU's treatment
of liberal arts programs had caus-
ed a "severe loss of morale" that,
in turn, could damage students'
educations.
Volpe said the recent cuts at
UNC schools have not soured
professors on North Carolina's
commitment to higher education.
He said the system's record has
encouraged many to stay at ECU,
even during the recent budget
cuts.
Giving It His All
STANLEY LEARY - Phot Lab
RALEIGH (UPI) � The North
Carolina Utilities Commission
Monday approved an 8.22 per-
cent, $91 million rate increase for
Carolina Power & Light Co far
short of the utility's $165 million
request.
CP&L had requested a 14.92
percent rate increase, but the com-
mission said the company's poor
management of its nuclear
facilities argued against granting
the full request.
The approved increase will raise
the bill of an average residential
customer to $71 per month from
$65. Those figures are based on
usage of 1,000 kilowatt hours per
month.
William E. Graham Jr
CP&L's executive vice president,
said the company was disap-
pointed it did not receive its entire
rate request.
"We believe the evidence ful-
ly supported the entire request
and are disappointed the commis-
sion reduced it substantially
Graham said in a news release.
"When considered with the last
commission order (in September
1982), it means the company has
been allowed to increase its rates a
total of only about 9 percent on
those rates based largely on 1980
costs
The commission said the 8.22
percent increase would allow
CP&L to earn an 11.38 percent
rate of return on its property if it
uses sound management practices.
CP&L had sought rates that
would allow the utility to earn an
11.74 percent rate of return on the
Women Voters Meet
GMYUfc-Pitt County League of Women Voters President Rbea
SlSk. TT or�Mi�t� �t a meeting which took place Sun-
day night at V.M p.�. mt the First Presbyterian Church on the comer of
El" and Hth Streets.
original cost of its property and a
15.5 percent rate of return to its
stockholders.
The commission's order said
CP&L's history of poor plant per-
formance and its "imprudence"
in managing nuclear plants war-
ranted only a 14.55 percent return
upon stockholders' equity.
The commission also denied
CP&L's request to include in the
rate request debts stemming from
the abandoned Cherokee nuclear
project in South Carolina. The
commission said its refusal to
recognize those costs would make
it harder for CP&L to earn the
rate of return the commission ap-
proved.
The commission continued a
rate penalty imposed on CP&L at
the company's Sept. 24, 1982, rate
hike, but reduced the penalty to
.75 percent from 1 percent.
The penalty was originally im-
posed because of CP&L's
management of its nuclear
facilities, the commission said,
and was reduced becuase of in-
itiatives taken by CP&L to
reorganize management over-
sights at the Brunswick nuclear
plant.
The commission said a major
factor behind the approved rate
hike was commercial operation of
the Mayo Unit No. 1 nuclear
plant, which began in March. The
commission said increased costs
associated with bringing the unit
on line were approximately $41
million of the approved $91
million increase.
Total cost of the Mayo unit was
approximately $488 million.
In its order, the commission
directed the company to attempt
to improve customer participation
in efforts to reduce its system's
peak demand.
� jf -
ECU isn't the only one getting a
glut of applications. The Universi-
ty of Oklahoma had 350 people
for three administrators' openings
during the summer.
"Teachers are probably moving
in the direction of the Sun Belt
states says David Poisson of the
National Educatin Association in
Washington, D.C.
West Virginia, Michigan, Ohio,
Illinois, Oregon, Idaho and Mon-
tana are having the hardest times
holding onto college teachers, said
Perry Robinson of the American
Federation of Teachers.
The reason that faculty are
moving, some experts say, is low
salaries.
During 1982-83, independent
college faculty members earned an
average $28,680, compared to
$27,860 at public schools, the
AAUP says. Professors at ECU
make an average of $33,273.

Angelo Volpe
applications increasing
$24,100 Pledged To Date
Hans Haas seems to play with delight as the purple pride shows in his face. The horn line for The Marching
Pirates supported the Pirates to a victory over Murray State Saturday night.
CP&L Given Rate Increase
By N. C. Utilities Commission
ECU Alumni Raise Funds
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
The ECU National Alumni
Telefund has raised $24,100,
almost half its goal, in the first
week of its annual fund raising
drive, Vice Chancellor for Institu-
tional Advancement James L.
Lanier said Monday.
The alumni relations depart-
ment kicked off the telephone
drive Monday, Sept. 12. The fund
raiser is conducted by the ECU
Ambassadors and seeks support
from university alumni who live
outside areas in which alumni
chapters are organized.
Lanier said this year's goal is
$55,000 � $14,000 above last
year' and $10,000 above the 1983
total receipts for the campaign.
"After the first week, we are
significantly ahead (of our goal)
said Lanier. "This is a result of
the enthusiastic work of student
volunteers. Their efforts are pay-
ing direct dividends in our ability
to offer additional scholarships
and enhance the quality of our
academic program he said.
Lanier estimated that 150
students would be involved in
solicting contributions from
alumni before it is completed.
Any student may volunteer to
work with the drive, but the am-
bassadors are coordinating stu-
dent efforts.
The gifts will be disbursed
throughout the university for
departmental activities and facul-
ty research. The money will also
provide 100 merit-based scholar-
ships, which are given by the
alumni department each year to
outstanding students.
Lanier said the number of
scholarships could increase next
year if the fund raising drive ex-
ceeds its goal.
The telephone fund raiser held
each fall is part of the alumni
center's year-long fund raising ef-
forts. A drive is held each Spring
to solict funds from former
students who are active in alumni
chapters, mostly within North
Carolina. The center raises ap-
proximately $250,000 a vear.
SGA Presidents Hold Meeting
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Staff Writer
"The ECU Student Govern-
ment is in much better condition
than a lot of the other student
governments SGA President
Paul Naso said Monday after at-
tending a meeting of the Universi-
ty of North Carolina Association
of Student Governments.
The UNCASG consists of stu-
dent government presidents from
each of the sixteen universities in
the UNC system. At this year's
first meeting, guidelines were laid
out and policies and methods of
dealing with the presidents'
responsibilities were discussed.
"We all ran into the same pro-
blems Naso said.
A major issue discussed was the
raising of the drinking age. Naso
said the group was opposed to the
law itself and would continue to
fight it.
The association discussed
various ways that the SGA can
work with campus security and
administration officials to help
protect the students and prevent
them from violating the new law,
Naso said.
The group also proposed an
SGA hotline. Through the
hotline, communications between
all the student governments could
be made more efficient, Naso
said. The hotline would allow stu-
dent governments access to the
documents of other schools so
that information could be shared.
At the meeting, Naso gave in-
formation about the Pirate Walk
escort service to other SGA
presidents. Currently only UNC,
N.C. State and ECU have escort
services.
Being an SGA president is an
"awesome responsibility Naso
said. He said the UNCASG
"wants to get information out
and let people know we are the
voice of the students
Pauf Naso
Legislatures Provide Funding
After two years of dramatic cuts in the amount
of money they've been giving colleges, state
legislatures are being more generous this year.
Of the first 35 states reporting to Illinois State
University researcher M.M. Chambers, who
tracks state appropriations to schools, only six cut
or froze funding from last year.
The 35 averaged increases of 6 percent, thanks
largely to large new tax hikes imposed recently.
Of the six who cut or froze funds, five granted
big increases in 1982. Only South Dakota has cut
funds two years in a row.
The N.C. General Assembly has doubled its
per-student appropriations to UNC schools since
1977.
Teacher Requirements Debated
The New Jersey state education board will vote
on the plan to let all B.A.s teach in the state, with
or without a teacher's certificate.
The plan was meant to meet criticisms that
teacher education programs emphasize teaching
methods at the expense of the substance of sub-
jects like reading and math.
But the state National Education Association
chapter says the plan would put unqualifid
teachers in the classroom, and create so many
teachers that salaries for education majors would
be driven downward.
Computer Gender Gap
Stanford researchers say boys are more likely to
have and use computers than girls, and that most
computer games are perceived to be largely male-
oriented.
Dating Violence Frequent
One of five college students may be victims of
physcial and psychological "premartial abuse
say two Murray State University psychologists.
Rosemarie Bogal-Allbritten and Bill Allbritten
say their survey found 19 percent of the students
they asked had been involved in violent incidents
with the people they'd been dating.
The incidents were mostly "pushing and shov-
ing and the victims were mostly female.
Ban Wanted On Game Ads
The National Coalition on T.V. Violence wants
to ban ads for a stalking game similar to the cam-
pus "K.A.O.S craze of two years ago.
This version, called "The Survival Game
gives participants guns that fire paint pellets and
puts them in woods instead of on campus.
University of Illinois' Dr. Thomas Radecki
wants ads for it banned from TV because the
game, like K.A.O.S. before it, "reduces your sen-
sitivity to and abhorrence of violence
Video Revenge
The University of Texas' Arcade games now de-
mand an apology from Andropov if students lose
in "Joust and lets players shoot at "aggressive
Soviet ships" in "Stargate
It's a way to "get our 2 cents in said co-owner
Todd Bowe.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SPETEMBER 20. 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organisation
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care ot
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office m the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd sized paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
Publicity
The deadline for an
ouncements is 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
d m Wednesday for the Thurs
day paper No announcements
rpce.ved after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to all
tampus organizations ana
departments
PLANT SALE
Biology Club will sponsor a
oiant sale on Thurs . Sept 29th
and Friday, Sept 30th between
' 30 am and 1 00 p m at the
Biology Greenhouse Room
S ill (p s � biology club
volunteers are needed to help
w'h this sale if interested con
tac the dub between 9 00 a m
and 12 00 a m.)
COOP
An area industrial plant is
looking to place approximately
40 students to work in an m
dustr.ai setting Students will be
interviewed and hired within the
next 7 3 weeks These are entry
level iobs in the plant which re
quire low level skills Students
will be required to work 20 hours
a weex on 4 p m to midnight and
m dmght to 8 a m shifts Salarv
w " be approximately $110 each
week interested students
should contact the Co-op Office
311 Rawl immediately!
ECUHILLEL
Will be holding its first annual
Lox and Bagel Brunch. Sunday,
Sept 25th from 1 00 3 00 p m in
Mendenhall's all purpose room
All you can eat lox, bagels, and
eggs, plus all the side kicks
Members $2 00 Non membes
S3 00 Everyone is welcome Be
there or be square
PIRATE WALK
Beginning Sept 25, Pirate
Walk will be m full operation
The service will run Sun thru
Thurs from 6 p m to midnight
Ap;tions are being taken for
escorts and operators Applied
tions can be picked up from 300
to 5 00 p m Mon thru Thurs in
room 224 of Mendenhall or the
S G A office
CHRISTIAN ROCK
CONCERT
On Saturday Sept.24, at 7 30
there will be a contemporary
Christian rock concert by
CROSS at immanuel Baptist
Church This concert is open to
the public and is tree of charge
Refreshments will be served
during intermission
PRE PHYSICAL
THERAPY STUDENTS
Deadline for 1984 admission to
professional phase is October 19,
1983 All general college and
physical therapy credits must
be complc,ed by end of Spring
1984 Allied Health Professions
Admissions Test must be taken
n November lapply prior to Oc
tober 14) Application and inter
view appointments are to be
made in the Physical Therapy
Department Office iBelk
Building Annex 3 757 6961 ext
261)
REPUBLICANS
All who are interested in ioin
mg the College Republicans,
please be at Roomm 248,
Mendenhall, on Tuesday Sept
20 at 7 30 Upcoming plans and
oroiects will be discussed
PRISON
MINISTRY
Yolkfellow Prison Ministry: A
visitation team from ECU,
which is sponsored by the
Wesley Foundation, leaves each
Thursday evening from the
Methodist Student Center to
visit inmates at the Maury
Prison For more information
call 758 2030
SNOW SKI XMAS
BREAK
There will be a meeting of all
persons interested in snow ski
ing on Tuesday October 25 at
4:30 p.m. in Memorial Gym 108
A trip to Snowshoe W Va for
January 16 has been scheduled.
Reservations for slopeside ac
comodations will be taken at this
meeting Slides and movies will
be shown Classes are available
for all levels of skiers � Novice
thru super advanced racers
There is limited space available
this year so get your group
together early to assure your
space on the ECU Christmas Ski
Trip to Snowshoe, W Va For
further information contact Ms.
Jo Saunders, 205 Memorial Gym
or call 757 6000.
YOUNG
DEMOCRATS
A meeting of all persons in
terested in revitalizing the ECU
chapter of the EAST
CAROLINA YOUNG
DEMOCRATS will be held in
room 242 Mendenhall at 7.00
p.m , Tuesday Sept 20th The
purpose is two fold; to provide a
forum for discussion of ac
tivities of our government and
its policies, and also to decide on
a second meeting to address
organization of the ECYD!
Copies of our constitution will be
provided
BAKE SALE
Alpha Xi Delta will be having
a Bake Sale in front of the Stu
dent Store on Sept 20th from 9
a m 2 p m Come get some
goodies!
GENERAL
COLLEGE
STUDENTS
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS SHOULD CON
TACT THEIR ADVISORS THE
WEEK PRIOR TO OCTOBER 3
TO ARRANGE FOR PRE
REGISTRATION.
NEW GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS (STUDENTS WHO
ENTERED DURING THE
SUMMER OF FALL OF '83)
SHOULD PICK UP CUR
RICULUM SUPPLEMENTS TO
THE 198284 CATALOGUE IN
THE GENERAL COLLEGE
OFFICE SEPTEMBER 26-30.
FIELD DAY
Sunday. Septemer 25 from 1
p.m. until. Central Campus will
sponsor a field day on the mall.
Enjoy your favorite food and
beverage Activities include: a
scavenger hunt, relays, and
field day fun. Admission is free!
PHI BETA
LAMBDA
The Omicron Chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda will hold its next
meeting Wednesday, September
21, at 4 p.m in Rawl 341
Membership is still open to all
persons majoring in business
and business education.
WATER SKIING
Be a part of the new ECU
Sport Club Students interested
in water skiing should attend the
organizational meeting Monday,
September 26. 1983 at 7:00 p.m.
in Room 102 of Memorial Gym
nasium
WRESTLING
The ECU Wrestling Sport Club
is holding its second organiza
tional meeting Tuesday.
September 20. 1983 at 5:00 p.m
in Room 102 of Memorial Gym
nasium The club is practicing
Tuesday and Thursday evenings
at 9:30 pm in Room 108 of
Memorial Gym.
The East Carolinian is now
Accepting Applications For
News Writers and Editors
Apply in person at The East Carolinian offices on
the second floor of the Publications Building,
across from the entrance of Joyner Library.
Walk Director Appointed;
Karate Club Offers Help
Bv DENNIS
KILCOYNE
Staff Writer
Mike Pitts was
named the new direc-
tor of Pirate Walk
Thursday for the
1983-84 school year.
Pitts hopes to im-
prove the image and
effectiveness of the
escort service.
Pirate Walk, which
just completed its first
year, provides male
escorts to female
students who must
walk alone at night.
Escorts can be
scheduled in advance
by calling Pirate Walk
at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
The governing
board of Pirate Walk,
chaired by SGA Vice-
President Lindsey
Williams, chose Pitts
over four other ap-
plicants. "Everything
about Mike impressed
me Williams said.
Pitts, a sophomore
drama and speech ma-
jor, will receive a
salary of $150 per
semester. He said he
wants to emphasize
punctuality and com-
petence among this
year's escorts. Such
emphasis, he said, will
improve the service's
image and lead to
greater usage by
female students.
To improve the ser-
vice's image, Pitts ac-
cepted a proposal by
the Karate Club offer-
ing its members as
escorts. "The
stereotype of guys in
karate � macho,
muscular, good-
looking � should be a
big help in getting
girls to take advan-
tage of it (Pirate
Walk) Pitts said.
He hopes the influx of
club members will in-
crease the prestige of
Pirate Walk and at-
tract more and better
escort applicants.
Pitts expressed con-
cern that despite the
rapes and assaults on
and near campus
many co-eds are not!
using the escort ser-
vice. "It's necessaryI
to make the girls feel
and be secure hej
said.
Pitts appointedl
Tommy Sherbert as
Pirate Walk assistant
director and Wes
Draper asl
secretarytreasurer.
Pitts thinks manyl
female students, who
are fearful about
walking alone at
night, still fail to take
advantage of Pirate
Walk. He said women
should not have to
feel afraid since Pirate!
Walk is available.
Support businesses that support ECU
shop with The East Carolinian
For the best deals in town!
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SIGN UP DEADLINE
SEPTEMBER 23 19831
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RACQUETBALL
CLUB
Are you interested in
guaranteed times for playing
racquetfoall What about clinics
for learning the finer points of
the game Would you like to
travel as a team to tournaments
throughout the area and state
The ECU Racquet bail Sport
Club is holding its first 1983 84
meeting Wednesday, September
28, 1983 at 7 00 p m in Room 102
of Memorial Gymnasium
SPORT CLUB
COUNCIL
The first Sport Club Council
Meeting for 1983 84 will be held
Wednesday, September 21, 1983
at 4:00 p m in Room 105B of
Memorial Gymnasium Active
sport clubs are required to have
a representative in attendance.
Persons or groups interested in
forming a new sport club should
send a representative to the
meeting Sport clubs should
have ready for the meeting the
following completed informa
tion Fall Schedule, Fall prac
tice Times, Days and Locations,
Facility Requests, Recognition
Forms. Student Organization
Forms. 1983 84 Club Officers,
ana Off Campus Accounts The
Executive Council for the Sport
Club Council will be elected at
this meeting Weds Sept 21.
1983 3 30 p m Rm 105B, Mem
Gym
FELLOWSHIP
DINNER
Wednesday Night Fellowship
Dinner at 5:30 at the Methodist
Student Center Please call in
advance for reservations
(758 2030) The cost is S2
I.V.C.F.
Inter Varsity is having a
special night for prayer and
sharing There will be a slide
show and people will be felling
everyone how the Lord is work
ing in their lives Come join us at
6 30, Wenesday in Jenkins
Auditorium (Art Building) This
will be something you will not
want to miss.
RUGBY TEAM
The East Carolina Rugby
Team will begin its fall schedule
this Saturday with a match
against the University of Rich
mond. The match starts at 1:00
p.m behind the Allied Health
Bldg on the intramural fields
The match will be followed by a
party All spectators at the
match will be given free admis
sion to the party.
ALPHA XI DELTA
The sisters of Alpha Xi Delta
would like to congratulate our
new fall pledges. They are
Beverly Barrett, Pamela Bed
sole, Laura Bermont, Suzanne
Britt, Carolyn Clark, Angie
Daniels, Kelly Davis, Lis
Dwyer. Jennifer Evans. Tara
Faircloth, Ann Hawkinson,
Sarah Jenkins. Ellen Jones,
Rebecca Lanier, Sharon Lewis.
Tracy McBrady, Darlene
Milles, JIM Reynolds. Ann Scar
borough, Theresa Sconce, Lou
Simmons, Rhonda Smith, Bar
bie Stirrup, Lisa Vedsey, and
Sharon Walton Also, con
gratulations to Lisa Wilioughby
on her imtation.
THANK YOU
The sisters and pledges of
Alpha Xi Delta would like to
thank the brothers and pledges
of Pi Kappa Phi for the Pref
Night Social Also, we would like
to thank all the fraternities for
their support on the mall
CHESS
BACKGAMMON
CLUB
All ECU students, faculty,
staff who are interested In join
mg a chess or backgammon club
should report to the Mendenhall
Student Center Billiards Room
on Tuesday. September 20th at
6 00 p m Any student who plans
to compete in the ACU l Campus
Chess or Backgammon Tour
naments should consider joining
these clubs tor preliminary com
petition practice and use of the
Doubling Cube in Backgammon
There are no dues, just fun! Call
757 6611 ext 260 for further in
formation
BIKE
MATINTENANCE,
REPAIR
Your 10 speed need some
repairs Tired of walking and
want to buy a bike, but don't
know which kind? The Depart
ment of University unions is
sponsoring a Mini Course on
Bicycle Maintenance and
Repair with consumer tips on
purchasing a bicycle The class
will meet on the following dates
from 7 8 30 p m in the
Mendenhall Student Center Cof
feehouse Thursdays, Ocf 6, 13.
20. 27 and Nov 3 All ECU
students, faculty, staff, their
dependents, and guests are
welcome to register Monday
thru Friday from 10 4 at the
MSC Central Ticket Office The
cost is $10 00 ia lot less than gas
or repair costs!)
For further information call
the Crafts and Recreation Of
fice, 757 6611 ext 260 or the
Ticket Office, ext 266
SEMINAR
Dr Robert S B'y of the
Univesfiy of South Carolina win
present a seminar entitled
"Competitive Hydrogen
Abstraction and Redox
Catalyzed Migratory Carbonyl
Insertion in Iron Alkyl Com
plexes" on Friday. September
23. 1983 at 2 00 p m , Flanaoan
Building Room joi
Refreshments will be served in
room 204 following the seminar
CPR
The American Red Cross Car
diopulmonary Resusitation
Basic Lite Support classes are
now being offered by the Depart
ment of University Unions Two
classes are scheduled to begin
the first week m October The
cost is tl 00 and enrollment is
limited Class I Tuesdays, Oct
4, 11. 25. Nov 1, 8 or Class ii
Thursdays, Oct 6, 13, 27, Nov 3,
10.
Register now at the Central
Ticket Office Mondays thru Fir
days 1�4. For further informa
tion call the Crafts and Recrea
tion Office at 757 6611 ext 260 or
the Central Ticket Office at ext
266.
Health
sec ona
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH
ALLIANCE
The Preprofessionai
Alliance will hold its
meeting on Thursday
September 22 in the Ledon.a
Wright Cultural Center at 5 30
p m
faculty, staff ana their aepen
dants m accordance with the
schedules provided by the IRS
department Programs current
ly offered m informal activities
include Recreational Swimm
mg, Gmnasium free play
Weight lifting framing, Gm
nasties on Tues and Thurs
nights from 7 40 to 9 00 p m
Racquetoall Handball Tenn;s
Courts ana Outaoor Activity
Areas
ECU LAW
SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society meets
regularly on the thira Thursday
of each month at 7 30 p m in
Mendemhali roon 212 and
anyone interested s inv.tea to
attend University attorney Dr
Da via B Stevens wilt, as n oast
years, be serving as facult. aa
visor to the ECU La Society
BOWLING
LEAGUES
The Dept ot Un �
Unions Mnea Doubles Boa, ng
Leagues are now under a.
Because of the gre amrx.nt of
interest a Tuesday night league
'S now Demg formed All fhose
interested m bowling on Tues
day nights should Sign up with
Linda Barkand Crafts ana
Recreation Director on the bot
torn floor ot Menoenhaii S'udent
Center by Fnaay Septemrjer 23
An organizational meet ng will
De held Tues Sept 27 at 5 00
p m Handicaps will be deter
mined that night so come
prepared to bowl Teams will
consist of 2 men ana 2 omen
Individuals are encouraged to
sign up as we will help organize
teams
LThere is still room on me
Monday night league for six
women If interested, call Linda
Barkand at 757 6611 ext 260
RECREATIONAL
EQUIPMENT
CHECK OUT
Students faculty �i-�
ma utilize the ego :
chec out serv.ee prov �
the IRS department Tr
charge for this (��
however fees are rmpoa
late lost or damaaec
men' With rnc appropr rt'e oe"
tif ication one may secure a ,a e
ty ot sports related 'w -
equipment in aad'or- -
service 'S provaed o
pany use ot the locxer -
areai and the pool
FAMILY CHILD
ASSOCIATION
The Fam ly Ch.io Asssx -�
will hoia a members rjr
September 21 ana 22 fror� �
p m on second floor at Mo
Ec Duiidmg Fees are SS � �
year or J2 50 a semesV' - Def
sons nterestec -n a - � �-
nature are invitee to ��.
first meeting will ce -�
September 17 at 5 0B p rr -
room 143 of the -
bu'ld'ng
The r asl (arolinian

� -
ind ri
� � - s �.
Tlfr
���. � , situ
newspaper of tds-
' � owneo
' -vnts of fcasf
� � 'S
Subscription Rate J20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus Jf
ECU Green.iiij. s c
POSTMASTER
dress changes to 'ne Eas
Carolinian oio
Building eCl Greenv
NC 27834
4309
Telephone 757 jjm 47
American Greetings Caid
generate
a chuckle
can
add sunshine to
someone's day
inspire a
fresh outlook
make the miles seem shorter
ease a troubled soul
take you
home for
the holidays
get
around
those
awkward
situations
express a difficult thought
American Greetings
does all this and
says it in beautiful
new ways. Reach for
American Greetings
the next time you've
celebrate life s special moments
let someone know
they're remembered
got something special to say.
extend congratulations
bring you closer to
those you care for
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r
Actr
PRINCETON
N.J. (CF-
Princeton Un
officials and student
have been offered
bribes and other in
ducements for helping
reporters photogi
or talk to
famous
freshman, a. tress
Brooke Shields
Several natic
magazines reportedK
offered as much
$500 for a candid
of Shields, the mode.
and star ol
moies like The Blut
Lagoon and Endless
Love, as she
through onen
Princeton last �� �
according to George
Eager, the
Bomb
B GLENN
MAI CHAN
Gov. Jame- B
Hunt is current
ing the U.S. De-
Department for u
explanation of
24-megaton nu.
weapon that came
close to detor.
over G o1d s b :
N.C in 1961
Two n u c 11
weapons were
from a B-52 bomber
that crashed near
Goldsboro or.
January 24, 1961. The
crash took the lives of
three of the c -
crewmen when
bomber lost a
during a training mis
sion.
The bomb would
have devastated the
area, according to
Let Your Opini
Write
Camp ul
All faculty. stu
ECU are invited
in the Campu;
editorial page
nian.
MA
Castr
CA
Free Draft
Free Admis!
Winner will
York City -pi
d
The KING Ol
contestants
Come try oui
Coming Sept
The Carolina Opry





. ctfc.lo�ed
ONAL
PMENT
K OUT
-
ATION
- �
! � �
arolinian

i
A
rare for
rHf I-AS IAKOI IM,W
m-pii mbi-k. :u
Becomes
PRINCETON
S J. (CPS) �
Princeton University
officials and students
have been offered
bribes and other in-
ducements for helping
reporters photograph
or talk to its most
famous new
treshman, actress
Brooke Shields.
Several national
magazines reportedly
ottered as much as
SOO for a candid shot
of Shields, the model
and star of teen
movies like The Blue
I agoon and Endless
I ove, as she went
through orientation at
Princeton last week,
according to George
Eager, the school's
communications
director.
One undergraduate
was reportedly told to
name his price if he
could get a picture of
the 18-year-old
celebrity naked.
But during orienta-
tion week, campus
security guards
managed to turn away
most of the hordes of
autograph seekers and
journalists who
descended on campus.
Princeton isn't the
only school conten-
ding with the unusual
problems of protec-
ting celebrity students
this fall.
Actresses J o d i
Foster and
Flashdance star Jen-
nifer Beals are both
back at Yale this
term, but the universi-
ty won't comment on
what, if any, extra
security arrangements
it has made for the
women, spokesman
Walter Littell says.
They present,
however, fairly new
problems.
"The kinds of
celebrity students we
have previously
(enrolled) have been
children of royal
families and children
of famous parents
Eager said. "You
could walk right by
them and never know
it
With students such
as Shields, Foster and
Beals, "the situation
is more complicated
because (they
are)stars in (their)
own right, and almost
instantly
recognizable
Recent Princeton
alumni include
members of the Saudi
royal family, actor
Gregory Peck's
daughter, and
daughter of Phillipine
President Ferdinand
Marcos.
John F. Kennedy
Jr son of the late
president, graduated
from Brown Universi-
ty last spring without
attracting much out-
side interest.
Getting them
through school suc-
cessfully means
"respecting the stu-
dent's privacy I it-
tell said.
Toward that end,
Princeton security
guards will be wat-
ching for journalists
even after the initial
weeks of school, will
screen Shields' mail,
and try to prevent
outsiders from gain-
ing access to the ac-
tress through her
roommates and
friends, Eager said.
"She just wants to
be a normal student
he adds, "and we will
do everything we can
to see that she has that
right
Bomb Incident Concerns Governor
By GLENN
MAIGHAN
Gov. James B.
Hunt is currently ask-
ing the U.S. Defense
Department for a full
explanation of a
24-megaton nuclear
weapon that came
close to detonating
over Goldsboro,
N.C in 1961.
Two nuclear
weapons were ejected
from a B-52 bomber
that crashed near
Goldsboro on
January 24, 1961. The
crash took the lives of
three of the eight
crewmen when their
bomber lost a wing
during a training mis-
sion.
The bomb would
have devastated the
area, according to
James Gaiser, an
assistant professor in
the physics depart-
ment. "Ground zero
would have extended
in a 5-mile radius
from the explosion,
with serious damage
appearing 30 miles
from the blast
Gaiser said.
Ground zero refers
to the area of total
destruction when a
nuclear weapon ex-
plodes.
Hunt plans to ask
the Department of
Defense for a full ex-
planation of the inci-
dent which almost
caused the detonation
of a nuclear weapon.
Hunt received a
reply from Col. A.F.
Hausmann, U.S. Air
Force, on Feb. 10,
1981. that stated.
"There was never any
danger the safety
devices on the
weapons worked as
intended However,
former Secretary of
Defense Robert S.
McNamara recently-
told reporters that one
of the weapons went
through five of the
six safety switches
which prevent detona-
tion.
Brent Hackney,
spokesman for the
governor, said Hunt is
asking Defense
Secretary Caspar
Weinberger for a
complete and final
report on the incident.
'The governor wants
reassurances that
preventive steps have
been taken and that
there is no danger to
the public he said.
There are reports
that the weapons in-
volved in the 1961
crash have never been
recovered and that
nuclear weapons are
still stockpiled at
Goldsboro's Seymour
Johnson Air Force
Base. "The governor
would probably want
to know about that in-
formation Hackney
added.
Pentagon officials
have continued to
downplay the acci-
dent � One uniden-
tified defense
spokesman said that
McNamara over em-
phasized the problem.
P
A
P
A

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ECU are invited to express opinions
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editorial page of The East Caroli-
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TELE RENT TV
I Phone: 758-9102
2905 East 10th Street in Gree
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560 Evans Street
Greenville. N.C.27834
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MALPASS AUTO PARTS
SPECIAL
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Anti-freeze $3.99 per gallon
Castrol D.O.T.4 Brake fluid $1.89per qt.
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DAILY SPECIALS AT
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208E. 5 thSt. 758-7979
MON.
SNAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA)
& CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2 09
TUES.
SNAK ROAST BEEF BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
SODA FOR $2 09
WED.
?NAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $159
THURS.
SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.89
FRI.
SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND
A SMALL SODA FOR $2 39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
� HARD DAYS NIGHT �
Every Thursday at the
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
Free Draft and Horsd'oeuvres 8:30-1000
Free Admission ALL Night
Thursday, Sept. 22
The Second Round of the
TWIST CONTEST
Winner will receive an All Expense Paid Trip To New
York City -plus $1000.00 cash.
Thursday, Oct. 6
CHUBBY CHECKER
The KING OF THE TWIST will judge the final twist
contestants Oct. 6.
Come try our NEW BREATH ANALYSIS machine.
coming Sept. 23 & 24 Super Grit Cowboy Band
The Carolina Opry House is a private club for members and quests.
752 7303
ATTIC
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W,rd Hump N.f. M)� cam AN
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Thur C 011.9. N.if SO cam
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t C U i�.
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0
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MIKE EDWARDS
LADIES MGHT
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S2.1S 5-9
lain
cna
752-3997
WITHIN
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StVIS HOME-STYU FOOD
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MATURES DART SPECIALS
HAS TAKEOUTS
��� �M AOC nrm,l,





.v�
St?e Eaat (Earolinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, cwm
Darryl Brown. ��� m,or
Waverly Merritt. i�mmAmmm Cindy Pleasants. i - m
HUNTER FISHER. �a Greg Rideout .
AL1 AFRASHTEH. o- �w GORDON IPOCK ,�
GEOFF HUDSON. c� ,��, LlZANNE JENNINGS. m�
Clay Thornton. r�, ToDD Evans. v� �w
September 20. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Pirate Walk
New Image Not Necessary
Pirate walk is back, and with it
comes a new director � Mike Pitts.
Paul SumrelPs shoes will be hard to
fill. But, if Pitts' recent expression
of dedication for the program car-
ries throughout the whole school
year, we are sure Pitts will get the
program back on its feet.
We do, however, encourage the
sophomore Drama and Speech ma-
jor to be cautious in his attempt to
improve the system. We are not
against using the Karate Club for
escorts, but promoting the
"stereotype of macho, muscular,
good-looking" is not the image that
will make girls take advantage of
the system. We do not agree with
Mr. Pitts' logic that the Karateers
will increase the prestige of Pirate
Walk and help to attract more and
better applicants. If anything, the
reverse will be true.
Guys who would have been
escorts in the past will feel less in-
clined to help out if their body and
skills don't measure up to macho
standards. Don't promote any im-
age except one of trustworthiness
and reliability. The guys, and conse-
quently the girls, will come around
if they know they are part of an
organization that is respected on
campus for these reasons � not the
ones you mentioned.
Some people will argue that
macho is needed in case an attacker
needs to be subdued. Although we
know a person with karate skills
would probably offer more protec-
tion, we thing each escort would be
dedicated to do his job properly.
We know Mr. Pitts is concerned;
we know he will do what is needed
to sustain and maintain the escort
service in true Pirate tradition. We
have only questioned the necessity
of one of his ideas, not his attitude
in general. His stressing the punc-
tuality and competence of his
volunteers is exactly what is needed.
This will be the Pirate Walk's se-
cond year, and when it starts back
up next week with Mr. Pitts at the
helm, women on campus should
take advantage of it. Whether you
get an escort who can throw a
lightning fast karate kick, or
whether you get one that can't, you
know the escort will be there to help
you as much as possible.
So, Mr. Pitts, we hope you will
heed our suggestions in good faith.
Students on campus should be pro-
ud, like we are, that you have the
willingness to continue a worthwhile
program. The Pirate Walk is good
for the students and the university.
Take care of it.
. . . No Landing
Last week the governors of New
Jersey and New York agreed to ban
the Soviet airplane carrying Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko from lan-
ding at civilian airports in their
states. Gromyko was to arrive
aboard an Aeroflot jet to attend the
Fall session of the United Nations.
State Department officials said
Gromyko's plane would have to
land at a U.S. military base and be
escorted to the U.Ns New York
headquarters.
Though the concern of New York
Gov. Mario Cuomo and New Jersey
Gov. Thomas Kean is certainly
understandable, the Soviets still
should be allowed to land at the
civilian airports. The governors fear
citizens would turn out in droves to
protest or even riot against the
Soviet foreign minister, and the
burden on local police and security
would be too much to ask. Never-
theless, the ban could be used by the
Russians as an excuse not to come
to the U.N. session � one in which
they would face hard questioning
and denunciation over the Korean
airline incident.
The U.S. should make it as easy
as possible to let the Soviets attend
the meeting, where they will face
harsh condemnation for their ir-
responsible action and subsequent
response. The U.N. is a place where
the whole world could put the
Soviet Union under the spotlight,
and the Soviets would have a hard
time answering for an inexcusable
incident.
The airport ban does not
technically violate international
law, under which the United States,
as the host country, must provide
free access to the U.N. meetings.
Likewise, Gromyko's plane is not a
regular commercial flight of
Aeroflot, whose planes haven't
been allowed to land in the U.S.
since the invasion of Afghanistan.
Other Western nations temporarily
banned the airliner in response to
the Soviet attack on the Korean
airline.
The anger and logic that the
governors use to justify the airport
ban is understandable, but the
Soviets, in the larger view, will get a
much stronger reprimand in the
United Nations. Let's let them come
and get what's coming to them.
Congrats Vanessa!
Black leaders from New York to
Los Angeles are viewing the crown-
ing of Vanessa Williams as Miss
America as a sign that racism is
waning in the nation. Williams, the
first black ever to hold the honor,
began her reign Sunday annoyed by
the fact that so much attention is be-
ing focused on her race.
We do not echo the hopes of
former congresswoman Shirley
Chisholm when she said that racism
is diluting itself in America. As
much as most people wish that her
statement was a reality, the facts
point to a picture not quite so rosy.
Racism may no longer be as open as
it was before the 1960s, but its ugly
head is still reared in private. A lot
of white people practice selective
discriminiation: condemning black
people in general and then making
exceptions for those select few who
"act white
We, of course, do not condone
such activities. Miss Williams
should not hide from her color. She
should be proud that she is able to
make a statement for her race in
particular and people in general.
The Miss America pageant is an op-
timum forum to display the fact
that most of the country is commit-
ted to equality, not inequality.
Yet, those people who insist on
condemning people because of their
race are holding the country back.
We must strive for the equality that
Chisholm and other black leaders
say has arrived. Congratulations
Miss Vanessa Williams. Con-
gratulations America.
Conservatives Divorce Reagan Policies,
Might Fight Against Their Hero in '84
By GREG RIDEOUT
A once steamy love affair is slowly
ending. Ronald Reagan, the darling
of the New Right ever since Jerry
Faiwell became a holy household
word, has fallen from grace in the
conservative world over his handling
of the Korean jetliner incident. They
feel betrayed, and rightly so.
They have become activists over
the issue. Ronald didn't do what
Faiwell, Helms and company ex-
pected him to do when he had the
chance to replace rhetoric with deeds.
Conservatives have taken to the
streets and proclaimed the president
null and void for catering to the
pragmatists in the administration.
But, Richard Viguerie, the
moneymaking champion of the New
Right, is not convinced that James
Baker and other moderates in the
White House are the problem. He
believes Reagan himself is to blame;
he labels him a turncoat.
The administration is loving it.
They have convinced liberals and
moderates that he is not a trigger-
happy fool who will pull his nuclear
guns out of his atomic holster if given
a chance to evaporate the evil empire.
One official claimed that for every
vote Reagan lost from conservatives,
he gained two from the people who
worried about his reliability not to
press the big button.
But, the eventual divorce has been
a longtime brewing. New Right
leaders had been coming increasingly
disenchanted with his perceived slack
stance on economic and social issues.
Now, the main artery running
through the veins of all true conser-
vatives � anticommunism � was
slashed by their former hero. Reagan
broke rule number one of the red,
white and blue New Right creed:
Don't give an inch to the Soviets.
Reagan did.
With conservatives across the
country calling for massive and major
retaliation in the wake of the airliner
atrocity, Reagan is reaping the
political ill-gotten gains. But, is the
reality all an illusion. Richard
Viguerie told a Washington Post col-
umnist that hard-core conservative
support of the Republican candidate
in an election could influence the out-
come. They have money and fervor
when backing a "true" candidate.
They had it in 1980, but the zest, says
Viguerie, won't be there in 1984.
In fact, the last two hard fought
elections were lost by Republicans �
Nixon in 1960 and Ford in 1976. Mr.
Reagan better think twice while bask-
ing in his new moderate popularity. It
AFTER YEARS OF LIVING A UE,
PEAL1N6 WITH 5UIITANP SHAME,
AFRAIPOFSOMEOMEUNCOVERINQ
mav be good now. but with his
former supporters turning into his
current enemies, he better be on the
lookout.
Right wingers weren't hungrv for a
win in those years because of the
moderacy of the respective can-
didates. And as Viguerie savs, look a:
the results. But, Reagan and his men
are laughing at the New Right's threat
to vote elsewhere on Election Dav; as
they say, "these people have no place
to go
With the president rapidlv taking
the candidate's approach on current
issues, he finds himself in a odd posi-
tion of not having the support of
those who helped him in 1980. He
better not take lightly the threat of
less enthusiam from his :ormer hard-
core supporters. Or Fannie could
find himself out in c cod,
Washington streets come January
1985.
Campus Forum
Bible Belt Tight On Gays
A week ago in The East Carolinian
there was a front page article concern-
ing the ECGC, in which president Gary
Faircloth condoned and perpetuated
ideas and statements that we feel
deserve a corrective response. Our
quarrel is not with individuals of the
ECGC, Faircloth, or Sister Shondell
but with the concept that Christianity
and homosexuality are "intrical things
that can work together With this in
mind, our intent is not to judge (Mat-
thew 7:1), but to let God's Word,
which is the Bible, speak for itself
(Hebrews 4:12,13).
The Bible speaks clearly on
homosexuality. Leviticus 18:22 states
that ,4you shall not lie with a man as
with a woman, it is an abomination
Romans 1:18-27: "For the wrath of
God is revealed from heaven against all
ungodliness and unrighteousness of
men, who suppress the truth in
unrighteousness therefore God gave
them over in the lust of their hearts to
impurity the men abandoned the
natural function of the woman and
burned in their desire toward one
another, men with men committing in-
decent acts and receiving in their own
persons the due penalty of their error
(AIDS?)
According to his word, it's obvious
homosexuality is a sin. Let us em-
phasize that the sin of homosexuality is
no greater than any other sin. The
point is all sin separates us from God.
In the article, Sister Shondell states,
"The Christian message has always
been to provide support and love for
the outcasts of society the gays have
been outcasts in this community It is
true that Christ did "provide support
and love for the outcasts however,
he did not condone nor "support and
love" their lifestyles of immorality.
Again, let the Bible speak for itself.
(John 8:11) Christ, speaking to an out-
cast says: "Go and sin no more It is
inconsistent and contradictory for
Faircloth and Sister Shondell to main-
tain that one can continue practicing
homosexuality while claiming that it
does not conflict with Christianity. The
problem is that their Christianity is
totally contrary to biblical Christiani-
ty.
Anticipating rebuttal, it must be
stated and understood that the Bible is
the basis of Christianity and is not to
be twisted and distorted to appropriate
an individual's "alternative lifestyle"
Thanks be to God that He has given us
the "alternative lifestyle" (i.e. A brand
new life in Christ based on his love and
forgiveness).
Jeff Warren
Senior, Illustration
Keith Simmons
Senior Illustration
Rob Shive
Senior, Psychology
they're delivered and ball them up and
try throwing them in the trashcan. The
East Carolinian is well-suited for this
purpose. However, we do have some
complaints.
First, our games are being delaved
by the late delivery of your paper.
Also, the print from the copies keeps
getting on our hands, so if you would
be so kind please stop printing on the
copies you send to Slay Hall. Thank
you and please renew our subscription.
Mack Paul
Senior, History
Jim Johnson
Junior, Business
Greg Herrin
Sophomore, Business
Sandy Jarrell
Sophomore, Art
Juan J. Ansoategui
sophomore, Computer Science
Stu Long
Senior, Math
. Eric Tilley
Senior, Political Science
In Foul Trouble
Well, it's the start of another school
year. But it's more than that here at
Slay Hall. It's basketball season here at
Slay Hall, where we take all the copies
of the East Carolinian as soon as
Forum Rules
olinian welcomes letters
SouthuJ �� �ffict ' Old
Ubao f ' �CrOS5 fmm J�yner
Most
B ANDREA
MARKM.I O
MaffWnicr
Fifty one percent of
all rapes are commit-
ted b someone the
victim knew, and
three out of four
ra pes are not
reported at all, accor-
ding to Rhonda
Gurlev of the ECU
campus police. Guriey
made her comments
after attending the
N.C. Conference on
Sexual Assault m
Raleigh last week
Gruley said the in-
formation is impor-
tant to wOilege
students because the
age group that in-
cludes college
freshmi
sophom
20-years-
highes'
violent
Gui 1
� rr,
to report
stranger
meone s
kno
bofrien
Gui
follow
preventp
fror j
v
observe
char
atta .
alone at

are
woodec A
Honest Wage
STEVENS POINT
WIS. (CPS) - "We
had nothing left
lose remar.
University of
Wisconsin-St e �
Point facultv member
Pete Kelley. regarding
a controversial id
which he and :
fellow instructors
recentlv ran in the
Wall Street Journal.
After "trying ail
summer to get
people's attention"
for a new system-wide
salary, Kelley and his
colleagues decided to
make their anger
public. Thev chipped
in SI50 for the Aiuj
3 1 ad in the
nation
bu
The
si
"SituatH
on
hea
sors,
"Many i
all
disc
av a ab
honest i
sities -
mer
educa' i
departmei
the I
W i s c o
campuses
L' n i e i
minist: . i
i$15.
I jood with 1
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THEEAST CAROLINIANSEPTEMBER 20, 198?
?7 Policies,
ero in '84
with his
ning into his
better be on the
hungry for a
ius of the
pcctive can-
ays, look at
-ind his men
Right's threat
'ion Day; as
ave no place
dly taking
on current
in a odd posi-
upport of
in 1980. He
the threat of
'ormer hard-
�tonnie could
m the cold,
.ome lanuarv
Gays
ball th-m up and
he trashcan. The
ted for this
e do have some
being delayed
' our paper.
3m the copies keeps
r hands, so if you would
aNe vtop printing on the
nd to Slav Hall. Thank
rene-A our subscription.
Mack Paul
Senior. History
Jim Johnson
Junior, Business
Greg Herrin
Sophomore, Business
Sandy Jarrell
Sophomore, Art
Juan J. Ansoategui
Sophomore, Computer Science
Stu Long
Senior, Math
Eric Tilley
Senior, Political Science
Forum Rules
I f-ast Carolinian welcomes letters
puig all poinis of view. Mail or
im,y our �fice ,n th Old
Building, across from Joyner
Most Rapes Go Unrep
B ANDREA
MARKEI.LO
freshmen inj
sophomores, 16- to
20-years-olds, has the
Fifty one percent of highest percentage of
I rapes are commit- violent sexual assault.
ted by someone the
victim knew, and
three out of four
a pes are not
reported at all, accor-
ding to Rhonda
Gurlcy of the ECU
campus police. Gurley
trade her comments
after attending the
N.C. Conference on
Sexual Assault in
Raleigh last week.
Gruley said the in-
tormation is impor-
tant to college
students because the
age group that in-
cudes college
Gurley also said a
victim is more likely
to report a rape by a
stranger than by so-
meone she has met or
knows, such as an ex-
boyfriend.
Gurley compiled the
following list of
preventive measures
from the conference
that women can
observe to reduce the
chances of a violent
attack: never walk
alone at night on cam-
pus; travel in well-lit
areas and avoid
wooded areas; carrv a
flashlight or whistle in
hand where it is easily
accessible don't pick
up hitchhikers; check
backseats before
entering vehicles;
don't jog alone � br-
ing a dog for protec-
tion; don't open
doors in residence
halls until the caller
has given proper iden-
tification; never enter
a dorm elevator with a
suspicious-looking
person; be aware of
the emergency blue-
light phones on cam-
pus and use them.
An FBI cast study
has devised five
categories of rapists:
The power-
reassurance rapist
Honest Wage For Professors
whose acts are
premeditated and uses
minimal force on the
victim; the power
assertive rapist who
enjoys "putting the
female in her place
the anger-retaliate
rapist who is a spon-
taneous attacker and
likes to punish
women; the anger-
excitation rapist who
will torture the victim
and take ten years to
plan a crime; and the
opportunity-rapist of
which little is known.
Statistics on forci-
ble rape in North
Carolina list 1,300
reported in 1982 with
708 arrests made.
June was listed as the
most frequent month,
Saturday the most fre-
quent day, and a
black female the most
frequent victim. The
victim's home was
listed as the most fre-
quent place of occur-
rence.
Because of severe
beating, 314 rape vic-
tims in 1982 required
medical treatment,
whereas 986 attained
no injury. Twenty
percent of the victims
were under the in-
fluence of drugs or
alcohol at the time the
offense occurred, and
18 percent of the of-
fenders were under
the influence of
the crime
mitted.
was com
One forcible rape
was reported on ECU
campus in 1982.
"Each attack presents
its own cir-
cumstances. Potential
victims need to be
alert and develop a
mental awareness of
their surroundings.
Rape is increasing
more than any other
violent crime in the
U.S. The victim is
constantly made
aware of her
vulnerability and the
physical, social and
psychological trauma
may take years to
alcohol or drugs when heal Gurley said
STEVENS POINT
WIS. (CPS) - "We
had nothing left to
lose remarked
University of
Wisconsin-Stevens
Point faculty member
Pete Kelley, regarding
a controversial ad
which he and 31
fellow instructors
recently ran in the
U'all Street Journal.
After "trying all
summer to get
people's attention"
for a new system-wide
salary, Kelley and his
colleagues decided to
make their anger
public. They chipped
in $150 for the Aug.
31 ad in the
Ad Causes Controversy
University Calendar
October 3-14:
October 6:
October 10-14:
October 17-18:
November 23:
November 28:
December T
December 8:
December 9:
Change of Major
Last day to drop a course or
withdraw from school
Preregistration for Spring Semester
Fall Break
Last day to remove incomplete given
during Spring andor Summer terms
1982
12:00 Noon � Thanksgiving Holidav
begins
8:00 a.m. � Classes resume
Classes end
Reading Day
Exams begin
WITH THIS COUPON
nationally-circulated
business daily.
The two-sentence
ad. which ran in the
"Situations Wanted"
section of the Jour-
nal's classifieds, was
headlined "Pro-
fessors and read:
"Many professors in
all academic
disciplines are
available for an
honest wage at univer-
sities with a commit-
ment to quality higher
education. Contact
department chairs at
the University of
Wisconsin
campuses
University ad-
ministrators, needless
to say, "were not
pleased with the ad
said Steve
Schumacher,
spokesman for the
13-campus Wisconsin
system.
And the Executive
Faculty Committee at
the main Madison
campus chastised the
Stevens Point instruc-
tors for claiming to
speak for the faculty
members on all cam-
puses.
"Our own view is
that the advertisement
is inappropriate and
self-defeating the
committee said in a
letter to the Board of
Regents. "We do not
�i
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believe most faculty
members are prepared
to write off the future
of their university as
readily as the ad im-
plies
But Kelley, who is
also president of the
Stevens Point cahpter
the The Association
of University of
Wisconsin Faculty,
said he and many
other instructors were
serious about looking
elsewhere for employ-
ment.
"We have hun-
dreds and hundreds of
angry faculty
members in this
state he said.
With minimal 5-
and 3-percent raises
over the last several
years, Kelley said,
"this year's freeze
represents insult on
top of injury
Kelley said he plac-
ed the ad "because we
wanted to speak to a
national audience and
voice our concern that
if there's not a cons-
tant commitment to
quality education,
faculty will begin to
leave "
Association of
University Professors'
Committee on Tenure
and Collective
Bargaining. Finkin
thought the ad was "a
little silly
But that doesn't
faze Kelley, who said
the ad at least brought
the anger into the
open. "There are
times to do
outrageous, even silly
things to get atten-
tion he said.
"Pressure is the
���WE LL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
"But has it gotten currency in which you
them any money?" conduct politics, and I
asked Matthew know we have at least
Finkin, chairman of brought pressure
the American on the issue
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THE E-ASTt'AROt INI A
Entertainment
SI I'l EMBI R 20 Paj �
Attention Whimps, Nerds, Whiners
Like Gere, You Too Can Be A Stud
B MICkl Avl LE
si�ff �r��
sav, "f-h. Mick How can
1 score with women the way you
1 tellem. "Go see An Of-
ficer and a dentleman.
There's lots of basket cases
walking around this campus, guvs
21 sears-old. who might have
ri all right had this flick been
around a few vears ago. Richard
Gere has got the moves down.
Now all vou hae to do is sit back
and take it all in.
Richard Gere otters what
amounts to a course in
manipulating the fairer sex. And
am gu who tells vou he's not in-
sted in manipulating women is
either a liar or a three-dollar bill
else he's a gu like Phil
Oonahue Vou know, the kmd
who tries to manipulate women by
saving he doesn't want to.
You don't have to be an officer
and you don't have to be a
gentleman You don't have to be
great shape, like Richard Gere,
talk with a take-charge-
Brookiyn accent � though let's
e it, these things help. All you
have to do is see An Officer and a
(tentleman this week and learn
-e tew important tips Then
. too van score like Richard
Gere and ves, I admit it � Mick
LaSalle.
RULE ONK: hither touch her
or don't touch her, but if ou're
gonna touch her. touch her.
I was driving through
downtown las: week, and 1 saw a
guy and a girl leaving the Elbo
Room They were about to cross
Street. The girl was drunk
and happy. The guy was drunk
and nervous. He wanted to touch
her His hand edged cautiously up
back I think the girl was em-
.massed for him.
I see :he opposite all the time
too. I'll be in a place like
Pantana's or Rafters. A guy'll
make believe he's a helluva lot
drunker than he really is so he can
grab a girl as hard as he can.
Both guys are nerds. Both guys
are working from the assumption
that the last thing any girl wants is
to be touched by ihem. So nerd
number one touches her hoping
she won't notice, and nerd
number two grabs her so hard she
can't run away.
Now check out Richard Gere.
He meets Deborah Winger.
They walk across the dance floor,
and right there he puts his hand
fiat against her lower back. He
assumes he has the right to � and
so he does. His touch is firm, but
gentle. If she wanted to run away,
she could. But why should she?
She knows she's not with a nerd.
RULE TWO: Every woman wants
to be kissed by a guy who knows
every woman wants to be kissed.
Somewhere into their first
dance, Richard Gere looks at
Deborah Winger, lifts up her chin
and kisses her � and good. He
assumes she wants to be kissed,
and he knows he's the man.
What a change from some of
these clowns you see trying to turn
being scared into some kind of
1'm-shy-hesi tat ion-doncha-think-
l'm-cute routine. Cute ain't sexy.
Cute is nice. And when a woman
says, "You're so nice that's a
sure sign you'll never see her with
her clothes off.
Gere, on the other hand, moves
fast. But his hands mnove slow.
He's not anxious because he
knows the woman won't stop
him. So she doesn't.
RULE THREE: If ou have to,
tell her vou were stationed in
Moscow
If you just got back from a date
and think you really did good
because you talked about yourself
all night � hang it up, Clyde. The
next time you call her she'll be
washing her hair. The time after
that she'll have a test the next
morning. The time after that a
guy'll answer.
Richard Gere and Deborah
Winger talk. She tells him the
story of her life. He stays cool.
When she presses him, he tells her
he was stationed in Moscow.
Since when does the United States
have a Navy base in Moscow,
right? She realizes this, and it's a
big laugh. But still, he hasn't said
anything. He's held something
back, and so she comes away
figuring he's interesting.
RULE FOUR: Don't answer
i
Richard Gere is a man's man, and Deborah Winger is his luck
woman. Girls, is your guy like Gere, or is he a whining whimp or a
nerd. Mick I aSalle gives the advice (storv), and Gert gives the ex-
ample in AN OFFICER AND GKN 11 EM AN
stupid questions.
Deborah Winger asks, "Zack.
how do you get rid of a girl when
you get rid of her0" Richard Gere
doesn't answer the question. A
question like that is a set-up. Any
way you answer, you lose. She's
trying to get him to play her game
Richard Gere knows not to pla
those games; Mick LaSalle knows
not to play those games and now
you know too.
RULE FIVE: Try not to tell her
the worst thing that ever happen-
ed to ou until vou know her more
than 15 minutes.
So many guvs want a woman
they can cry on. If the have a
girl's attention for 15 minutes,
they start telling her how this
other girl hurt them, or how the)
got locked in the closet lor a
month once when they were a kid.
Girls are usually polite, but thev
don't want to hear it. rhey're
looking for a good time, not a
whimp.
Evervhody's got some bad
things in his or her past. Richard
Gere's character. Zack, goi
ioozey. His mother killed hei
when he was a kid. But Gere
doesn't lav this on his woman un-
til she really is his woman H
looking for understan I .
sympathy. When he tells her, he
Hist lets her know without
shoving the weight on her. He's a
man about it, not a whinei
It vou learn these
you'll gel from :
took kms like Wt Y,�:v. v'a.x
years to figure
what makv
me. And you'll . a
Richard Gere Rich �.
guv hke Phil Doi .
t
hin. v. hen a v
See I SA1 I E, p. 7
Young, Vaughn, Stray Cats
Inspired By Elvis, Jerry Lee
Mlk� Cradle � Photo Lab
Phi Beta Sigma Pumps The Best
hi Beta Sigma brothers let ECU know they are for real in a recent step show on Mendenhall's courtyard.
The Boomers Rock Greenville
With Up-Beat Boogie Sound
By ROBIN AYERS
Staff W rltcr
Dancing shoes was the rule Fri-
day and Saturday nights when
The Boomers stepped onto the
New Deli stage with music
guaranteed to inspire the body in-
to rhythmic motion.
I was there Saturday to hear
this Raleigh-based trio play sets
that featured original tunes by
such diverse names as Waylon
Jennings, Willie Nelson, The
Clash, Stray Cats and Rockpile.
Vince Brooks, drummer,
bassist Craig Dittmar and
guitarist Bill Painter are an
energetic group who played two
long sets for an appreciative
crowd. The Boomers prefer long
sets and short breaks as opposed
to groups who like it the other
way around.
It seems that a band, or any
organized group, has a spokesper-
son who stands out and takes the
wheel. Bill Painter Fills this posi-
tion well. Vince Brooks is rather
calm as drummers go. Craig Ditt-
mar is "the quiet one Craig
said, "They call me Mr.
Sunshine chuckles the ox
Ah, the strong silent type.
The band has a three-phase
plan for putting an audience
under their spell. Before is the
phase in which the band builds up
a feverish momentum. During,
phase two, is an effort to maintain
the momentum. After, phase
three, is a slow down for the au-
dience because it's time you "got-
ta rent a room
"The Official Dance Band of
the 1984 Olympics" began the
night with "Ain't Living Long
Like This by Waylon Jennings.
Elvis Presley's "That's Alright
Mamma" and Eddie
See BOOMERS, p. 7
B MIKE HAMFR
VsUsUnl r nirrtainmrnl rdllor
When Elvis Presley made his
first recordings with Scotty Moore
and Bill Black for Sun Records
back in 1954, he created a stir in
the pop music culture that hasn't
died down yet. Presley, as well as
Carl Perkins, Johnny Burnette,
and Jerry Lee Lewis, were among
the first white artists to combine
the black, "race" sound of the
blues and rhythm and blues with
the white sound of country music.
That synthesis gave us rockabilly
music � the roots of rock n' roll
� and it took the nation by
storm. Two generations later
while musicians are still playing
rock and roll in every style from
new wave to hard rock, we are
hearing a revival of that simple,
brash early rock and roll sound.
In Everybody's Rockinby Neil
Young and the Shocking Pinks on
Geffen Records, we find Young
bouncing back from his techno-
pop release of this past winter to a
smooth rendering of some
original tunes that sound like they
were written back in the days of
Dwight D. Eisenhower and James
Dean. Young covers tunes by
Elvis, Jimmy Reed and James
Moore, but I'd recommend the
original versions in each case.
The problem with this record is
that it's too smooth. If we have
ever needed some of Young's
jangling lead guitar work, we need
it on this record, and it is con-
spicuously missing. Perhaps these
California players are so used to
playing in a laid-back style that
they can't cut the rough edge
needed for this early rock and roll
music.
Not one of the cuts on this
record is bad; there just isn't the
edge or the sadness that we've
come to expect from an artist of
Young's stature. Onlv one song,
"Wonderin 's up to Young's
usual high standards.
In the tradition of such Texas
based guitar players as I Bone
Walker, Gatemouth Brown and
Johnny Winter, we now have
another Texas blues guitarist to
add to the list � Stevie Rav
Vaughn. The listener can hear the
echoes of the great blues guitarists
in V aughn's playing
some echoes ol Jimi Hei d
With Texas Flood on
Vaughn, with drummei
I avion and bassist romrm s
non, has succeeded in putting
an album of solid tunes that
primarily as a vehicle f
guitar work. There are no
See ALBUMS, p. 7
N.C. Art Museum
Shows Old Masters
In New Galleries
By RENE MEYER
Staff Wnlrr
Last August the doors to the
North Carolina Museum of Art in
downtown Raleigh closed. Lhe
paintings were packed and the
move began to the museum's new
location on Blue Ridge Road.
In April the new museum open-
ed amid a fanfare of parties and
special events. The galleries con-
taining 20th century American
works and ancient art were the
featured exhibits. The treasured
European collection remained
under wraps awaiting its turn. It
finally came two weekends ago.
Once again the museum
celebrated with parties, tours, lec-
tures, concerts and educational
films. Works by Botticelli,
Raphael, Rubens, Gainsborough
and Monet were among the 150
paintings from the old masters
collection chosen for exhibit � a
mere third of the total. The inten-
tion is to avoid the crowding of
by country and chronolog)
through the ten galleries, a log
and harmonious arrangerru
The museum's 18 foot ceilings re-
create the spaciousness of
churches and halls that the pa
tings were originally located in
Gallery walls, painted soft pinks,
grays and blues, provide a plea-
ing but neutral background v
viewing the works. The large
gallery rooms, covering 16,000
square feet, allow children to
scamper about without disturbing
their deeply involved parents
The new museum is designed
with the non-museum goer in
mind. Helpful explanations are at
every corner giving such tips as
why the acid on your fingers can
damage the art work. Guided and
recorded tours can be rented for
special exhibits.
The North Carolina Museum of
Art's painting collection is con-
See MUSEUM, p. 8
An agin� Nui v, unv an(j S
reviewed this w.
Album
( on! tr�m Pa;

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lead
well i
gres �
w ea � "
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thr
LaSalle On C
Cont. from Paj

"Come
aren't .
Instead
for a guv sfie can t p u :
plav games
who �
1 ��
Mri
STEAK JTOUS-
i
r
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i
i
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Lunch Spec
Mon-Sat 11-2P1
41 2o Jr. Sirl
80 (hop sirl
Oailv Specials 11A.M.
luesdai Beef 11p-
Wednesdav Beef Rib
I bursdsn 801
Meals served with K
Potato or r r A
i
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and Improved alatl
Sen ing a
2 I ocations 10 Bett x
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2903 r. 10th SI
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Wed. and Fri. 4:00-
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Tuesday - Am Hei
Wednesday - Cocknev S.
Thursday - Sprout Special
Fnday - Tossed Salad
Saturday - Pastrami PUaup
NtWDiUMSTAURAWT
4J
IHTltTi





ners
Stud
and (rtre gives the ex-
M V
these five points,
iis movie what it
c nto their teen-age
out. You'll learn
- like me guys like
fll learn what makes
Richard Gere.
I help but like a
. Donahue. But she
she could like
r a woman shuts
SA1 1 E, p. 7
Cats
rv Lee
placing � and even
mi Hendrix.
Texas Hood on CBS,
� drummer Chris
. sis! Tommy Shan-
eeded in putting out
m of solid tunes that serve
i vehicle for his
There are no
Bl Ms. p. 7
useum
Masters
leries
I 3untry and chronology
igh the ten galleries, a logical
harmonious arrangement,
museum's 18-foot ceilings re-
le the spaciousness of the
:hes and halls that the pain-
were originally located in.
srv walls, painted soft pinks,
and blues, provide a pleas-
il neutral background for
ling the works. The large
Irv rooms, covering 16,000
Ire feet, allow children to
per about without disturbing
deeply involved parents.
e new museum is designed
the non-museum goer in
Helpful explanations are at
corner givmg such tips as
He avui on your fingers caw
�ge the art work. Guided and
rded tours can be rented for
lal exhibits.
V North Carolina Museum of
painting collection is coo-


THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20. 1983
Boomers Love To Boogie Hard
M Vn ff f sn� Dana f
Cont. from Page 6
Cochran's "20 Flight months, all the night did indeed
Rock" followed in members are original, sound fresh and were
swift succession. Prior to the Boomers, enthusiastically
The personality of a Craig, Vince and Bill played. The group
An aging Neil Young and Stevie Ray Vaughn are two of the recording artists bdng
reviewed this week. �"����
band is reflected in
the music it plays, and
this is true of The
Boomers. In "I'm
Trying to Decide
they wail, "One's too
played in The Real
Gone Cats, a band
who played Greenville
during their time
together. The Cats
played a lot of Buddy
Albums Reviewed
many and a hundred's Holly and the Beatles,
as well as original
songs.
Cont. from Page 6
new blues lyrics here-
just some fair rendi-
tions of several blues
cliches. But if you're a
fan of hot guitar
leads, you'll like this
record. Vaughn plays
well and he plays ag-
gressively; he squeezes
a myriad of textures
out of his instrument.
In fact, I would say
that his main
weakness is his
tendency to play too
much.
"Dirty Pool" is an
example of a song
where Vaughn lets it
all out; he's giving his
ex-lover the third
degree, and he flails
away at the guitar
throughout. This ag-
gressiveness works,
but the song would
have been even more
kick back and let his
guitar rest in various
places in the song.
Vaughn will likely
get the most mileage
out of "Pride and
Joy It's a good song
and has been released
as a single, but it's not
my favorite on the
record. My favorite is
an instrumental called
"LennyThis song
has more soul�more
feeling, than any
other tune here. The
title track, "Texas
Flood is also wor-
thy of mention.
The Stray Cats
don't only rant and
rave on their second
release, (Rant n'
Rave.EMl) they also
growl, strut, and
purr. The best thing
about these cats is
that you can't help
but believe them.
the looseness about
early rock and roll
that reminds me of
the way the Rolling
Stones approach the
blues.
Guitarist Brian
Setzer wrote all of the
songs on the album,
with the exception of
a couple of songs on
which he collaborated
with bassist Lee
Drucker and drum-
mer Jim McDonnel.
Setzer writes within
the rockabilly genre,
but he writes with
authority and authen-
ticity and thus avoids
the cliches that Neil
powerful had Vaughn They have the
allowed himself to primitive feeling and
LaSalle On Gere
Cont. from Page 6
shuts the light and
closes her eyes, I can
promise you she's not
secretly wishing that a
guy'll run in with a
microphone saying,
"Come on, gals,
aren't guys awful?"
Instead, she's wishing
for a &iy she can't
play games with and
can't walk over, a guy
who knows her needs
without having to ask,
and who knows how
to fulfill those needs
without saying please.
If you don't believe
me, check out how
many more women
there are than men at
Hendrix Theatre this
weekend. See An Of-
ficer and a
Gentleman, and then
put what you've
learned into action!
Thank-you, Mick.
STEAK HOUSE
Lunch Specials
Mon-Sat 11-2PM
i
i
412ozJr. Sirloin $2.19
8oz Chop Sirloin $2.49
I
I5 Daily Specials 11A.M10P.M.
Tuesday Beef Tips $1.99 I
Wednesday Beef Ribs $3.49 1
I Thursday 8oz Sirloin I
I Meals served with King Idaho Baked I
, Potato or FF & Texas Toast
!Try our New Fruit Bar
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Serving a 10 and 14oz. T-Bone
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HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4:00-8:00
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NKW 0�J BOT AINLAMT
are "She's Sexy and
17 a celebration of
the joys of rebellion
and of
adolescent love and
"Too Hip, Gotta
Go a song about
cutting free from the
bonds of a commit-
ment to explore the
fast world of rock and
roll.
With all of the
technology that is
available to musicians
these days, it's com-
forting to know that a
group can put out
such a solid sound us-
Young has fallen into, ing only one guitar, a
have some string bass, and a bare
favorites on this
record. "Look at that
Cadillac in which
Setzer celebrates every
young man's longing
for that big ride, is a
classic. The addition
of Mel Collins' horn
work shows Dave Ed-
munds' production
expertise. If the Stray
Cats can keep Ed-
munds as their pro-
ducer, they should be
assured of continuing
success.
The ballad "I
Won't Stand in Your
Way shows Setzer's
versatility as a writer.
This is the only slow
song on the record,
but it works just fine;
it shows off some
brilliant guitar sound
from Setzer's old
Gretsch.
Two other favorites
not enough
Guitar solos were
prominent. Bill
Painter, who studied
music two years at
North Texas State
University, plays his
instrument well. A
good musician knows
his limit, and Bill
seems aware of his.
On "Is It You Bang-
ing On the Front
Door a slow, bluesy
song, Bill is careful
with the solo bridge
when the pace
quickens. His playing
is clear, and nothing is
lost.
Craig Dittmar is
well versed on bass,
complimenting the
guitar and standing
out on his own.
Drummer Vince
Brooks makes the
drums a part of the
music, and he doesn't
use them for filler or
over-extended solos.
The Boomers are a
tight ensemble who go
Although most of
strengthens its playing they'll
ability by arranging, and,
A good example is
Vince and Bill's ar-
rangement of "Just
Like Romeo and
Juliet
With more original
songs in the works,
Bill said with his
ing a part of it.
The band says it is
hard to find songs for
three instruments, but
the program consisted tongue planted in his
of songs by establish- cheek, "We knew we
ed writers, The had to write some
Boomers are working
on their own songs.
Vince said it is hard to
be original, "for the
sake of originality
"What More Can I
Do" is an original
composition of The
Boomers, and its
quality is as good as
any of the songs by
more renowned ar-
tists. Of the songs
they play, Bill said
they, "Adapt (the
songs) to our own
songs with heavy
commercial
potential his tongue
planted in his cheek.
"Basically Vince
said, "the whole point
of the band is to have
funAdd more
always for variety
The Boomers' at-
titude shows in their
music and in their ex-
uberance in playing.
The band and the
dancers shared the
floor, and it was easy
try anything
"Anything
anyone wants to
dogotta take some
chances once in
awhile
When asked whose
music they grew up
on, Bill said, "It's
hard to saywe draw
from so many
sounds The sounds
inspiring The
Boomers range from
The Fabulous
Thunderbirds of
Texas to Prince and
The Time (Prince's
proteges) of Min-
neapolis.
The band said,
"We think there's a
lot of discrimination
on radio They were
referring to black ar- our clothes ripped off
tists not getting as last time. Greenville's
bench is small.
To keep the music
fresh, The Boomers
like to practice a lot
but their best practice
is playing gigs. At
home the band keeps
their music and wit
nimble at Cafe Deja
Nu, P.C. Goodtimes,
and Grinderswitch in
Durham.
The Boomers goals
include having 200
song by this time next
year to help maintain
the freshness of the
band. They are also
looking for a
manager. Bill said,
"If there's any bud-
ding managers, dance
on over
When asked about
Pirate Country, Bill
said, "We really like
Greenville, but we got
style The songs per- to get caught up in the
formed by The music because there
Boomers Saturday was the feeling of be-
much airplay as they
should. The most
heard from seems to
be Prince and Michael
Jackson. The field is
large but the playing
got some radical peo-
ple. I've been to 14
bars tonight and
everybody's crazy. 1
dare not say
anymore
bones drum set.
Simplicity comes
through again.
If you like this early for a group effort.
rockabillyrock n'roll Each of the trio
music, it would sings and takes turns
behoove you to check taking the lead. Craig
Office Services Unlimited
20eN1Xrboro3lreBlPOBox 158 Wilson N C 27893(919)237 8438
IS YOUR PROFESSOR PARTICULAR?
ARE YOU ALL THUMBS AT THE TYPEWRITER?
into some of the re-
issues that are
available these days.
The classic one is
Elvis' The Sun Ses-
sions on RCA. I
would also highly
recommend any of
Carl Perkins' early
releases on Sun
Records. You may
also want to try
Johnny Burnette's
The Rock n' Roll Trio
on Solid Smoke. The
Best of Jerry Lee
Lewis is still available,
as are good re-issues
of Eddie Cochran and
Gene Vincent
material.
was featured in "It's
All in the Papers a
lively dance song with
a staccato-like tempo
that gives a twist to
the rock rhythm.
Vince sang out on
"You Can't Make Up
Your Mind It is
especially difficult for
a drummer to sing
melody while trying to
maintain consistent
rhythm, but Vince
held his own.
Commenting on the
fast pace of their live-
ly repertoire, Vince
said, "We wear out
dancers a lot
Together about 18
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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23

$2.00 off
any 16 inch
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expira 106-83
��j
J Performing all their hits: - Amie, Boulder �
� Skies, Falling In and Out of Love, That'll Be
I The Day, Angel and many more
Advance tickets available in from of Student ADVANCE TICKETS $5.00
Supply Slore. or from anv Pni Tail. .
AT THE DOOR $7 00 ,
i idJTSS �PEN AT 7:0� AT THE GREENLEAF
1104 N. Memorial Drive (Across from the Airport). Greenville. N.C.
For Information Calk 757-3107

� "COLLEGE NIGHT"�
Thursday Sept. 22
Ladies Free
Free Draft till 10:00
Doors ope. at 8:00
Band starts at 9:00
Hear the Rock-n-Roll sound
of "Altered States"

tmm
� ��'jf it t ilia nan
���
� �HJ"JH





Sports

Ticket
Powerful Pirates Glide Past Racers
Sale

A
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M
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On
Hanks
tck K
I w.
the
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Baker Worried Over
Punishing Missouri
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he
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��all
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leir
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B .
-
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Pir a
Ba k lid i
lefmitely in
�� 1 would be inted il
in the top 2� it
�un Bakci said
igh being ranked would
i I I totball
grai has already
'iii; the na
Over the last three
t-anie- the Bu iveraged
aits per game
ed with
tic, but explains the
her should even be higher
"We've had several field g
and blocked and a
un IS I thai v�.as
I K . "
'( ne ol the main reasons foi
ring success is the "Men
sive Baker added " 1 hey
set- BAKER, PaKe 10
bad crc soon d
when Pirate flanker He n
w illiams took the Racei kickoff
and raed himself 93 vards for a
hdown
I ess than a minute later, defen-
sive tackle Handy Watts recovered
ahuck Cummings fumble at the
MSU 23, setting up the B .
cond touchdown for the half
Once again, it was Ingram on a
keeper, running to his left for the
score and raising the third quarter
tallv, 40-6
At that point, mop. took In-
�m out of the game The
Philadelphia native, who received
the SI000 King of the Gridiron
award, scored tw uchdowi
and passed for two more
"Kem has had three fanta-
games Emory said. "I just
think he's getting better eve
week He does so many things
that you don't coo
One. plav he's j � ght and
reverses left and goes 20
That's just athletic abilil
Replacing Ingram was ��
lohn Williams The Easlev, S (
native, along with sever :
im starters played the resi I
ne With the score 4
Murray States offense was al
to tain a drive, ma 49
i I m five plays for a A
a o-point c was a.
ssful, boosting the score,
40-14
good defensive showing
the Race: ed a Pirate punt
with 6:53 remaining. MSU'
Moore fumbled on his own 15
yard line, and Williams moved the
bail down to the 10. where ;
Heath booted his second field
goal of he nigh: making
43-14
MSI ansv ith a

R
M
guided the B.
e, highlight!
keeper
and
garni
The P
M�i�
Morri. St�l
� �' arattu
Bucs Battle Bruises
After Murray State
;f itf fcr-
K I flanker Henry Williams sprinted down the righ
93-ard kickoff return, fter scoring a touchdown,
formt'd his notorious forward flip in the endone.
t EAHY
t sidel
Willi
ine for a
ams per-
After two tough games on the
roAd, the Pirates enjoyed a com-
fortable win over the Murray
State Racers Saturday night at
Ficklen Stadium.
The Bucs got off to a slow start
in the first quarter, but came I
to score 50 points in front of
thousands of screaming fans.
"The fans were really fired
up Head Coach Ed Emory said.
"That made us fired up, and once
we felt all the enthusiasm, we
picked up on our defense in the se-
cond half "
Emory was disappointed with
the Pirates' defense in the first
half. "On defense, I thought they
placed like their feet were in ce-
ment he said. "We just had no
intensitv
Cindy Pleasants
4 Look Inside
Walden Shakes Off Setback
Bv kt N BOI ION
,Mtetsa p� Krfii'
Bel re the tan I a l � a
Pirate speedster Jimmv Walden
dli set to be E I 's starting
i � ack
fter all. Walden was coming
fl ,���� :ting freshman season in
when he was named the
most outstanding offensive
freshman after rushing for 1
yards and reeling off MS vards
worth of kickoff and punt
returns
But a preseason knee injury
forced Williams to miss six games
last year and the Greensboro
native had to settle for watching
teammate Tony Baker play most
of the time
Although Walden was
frustrated by the injury, his at-
titude remained positive
"I decided I was just going to
help the team out any wa 1 could,
even if that meant just a couple of
plays per game said Walden,
who finished '82 with 155 yards
rushing "1 was only placing up to
tolerance
But this season. Walden is
healths and has teamed up with
Baker to give the Pirates explosive
depth in the back field.
�tter the first three games this
vear, the 1 I offense is averag-
ing almost 40 points per game,
due in large part to a potent
gnmnd attack.
The tailback position with
Walden and Baker splitting play
ing time is one of the main
reasons why 1(1 runners are
averaging more than five yards
per carrv
"It keeps both of us fresh
Walden said, referring to the use
of two tailbacks "We know we
can go full speed every play, and it
also cuts down on injuries
W hen Walden came to ECU, he
was used to being the headline
grabber After his senior season at
Greensboro's Northeast Guilford
High School, Walden was named
all state and vvas selected to play
in the Shrine Bowl as well as the
last W esl all star game
He also made Sports li
lustrated's "Faces In rh rowd"
section aftei a game against Rich
mondounty in which he ran tor
411 vards and five rDs on only 11
can ics
But then came colleg football
"Everybody (in college) is so
much more physical Walden
commented "I found out that I
)ust couldn't turn the cornel and
outrun everybody like I did in
high school
One person who seems to be
able to outrun anyone on the
planet is Pirate return specialist
Henry Williams Williams, who
teams with Walden deep on
kickoffs. has already run back
two kickoffs and one punt for
touchdowns
While he is confident that he
can run back kicks as well as
anyone, Walden enjoys just being
on the held with Williams. "I just
like watching him run
W hen the Pirates travel to
Missouri next weekend (Oct. 1),
I I will be looking to gain a
measure of revenge after losing to
the I igers 28 9 last season.
1 ast year's contest was the first
game that Walden was reads to
play in after the knee injury, but
the Pirates were held to only 120
vards rushing on 50 carries
I he Missouri had a little fun at
E I I's expense in last year's game
with buttons printed up saying
"Where in the hell is East
( arolina?"
lor Walden, beating the Big
I ightouterence member would
be a big step in an exciting season.
"We know we can play with
them Walden said when asked
about the Pirates' chances. "And
after last year, they know they'll
have to come out and play
The head coach had been wor
ried about whether or not the
team would suffer from a lack of
intensity against Murray State.
"I've been ill all week because
the weather was bad all the first of
the week, and 1 wasn't sure if our
coaches were transmitting their in-
tensity .
"I felt like maybe I didn't have
that much intensity, but 1 felt in
side that I had more nervousness
than I've had in the last two
weeks
Now that the Murray State
game is over, Emory has another
concern. Injuries. "We had more
bruised and bumps in this game
than any we've played Emory
said. "Both Tony Baker and Jim
my W alden have bruised knees, so
we're concerned about that
Along with ECU's two top run-
ningbacks is also the Pirates top
offensive guard Terry Long. Long
has a bruised shoulder. Another
offensive guard Norman Quick,
defensive tackle Steve Hamilton
and junior cornerback Rally
Caperas are also on the injured
"l! -
the be' health we've b-
Emory
some people well They c
up every mome
The Pirates have an
this weekend bel
Missouri on Oct I "W
play open date, ana we
:he heck out of th
Em v
-
A' one point, En
Bucs didn'i have ai
ECU was gina
play Miami on Se.
.hanged th
they could pia
Dame on telev
Emory believes
break will be a definite a
for the Pirates "1 neve
open dates too much, but I
this one comes at a g
us he said "W isi need
regroup and readjust
"We plav some great
teams during that month
continued "We'll know a gi
deal about this team bv th
November rolls around
Once again, Emory believes in-
tensity is the kev to a greai f
ball team "We have a philosophv
here called the five second explo
sion he said "We feel like a
ball game is made up of 70 five
second explosions n average
play averages fve seconds, and an
offensive plaver must explode
"If you don't feel like vou can
go all out and just explode tot five
seconds, you ought to raise vour
hand, and we'll send somebodv
else in We want 11 guys ex
ploding for five seconds on everv
plaN "
Top athletes, E:morv said, are
just like separating the men from
the boys "The difference bet
ween a man and a bov is a bov
doesn't know when to work and
play, and a man is suppose to
know when to do those things
he said
"The difference in being a good
or an average football player is
whether or not you have a high
level of intensitv all of the time "
Muse
With








V'VsC
L�
A R�
Pope
Shrir
All VOl
sir
Tarlanding s
is offering a
popcorn shrim
ALL YOU CA
TUESWED II
Banquet Facilities Av
758-0327
I







THE EASTCARPI IM ,s
SEPIIMBIK.V. IW

�0
U
acers
point i
pped ;hf v, ; 4 j
. n on I Cl 's secCMld pla
om then own IS, Williams
rumbled to Racer Tom Woodie,
uho recovered at the MSI 13
Three plays later, 1 ancaster kick
ed a 52 vard chip shot, giving
MSU its last three points
The final score of the game,
however, came when Williams
guided the Bucs on an 80-vard
drive, highlighted by a 35-yard
keeper bv the senior signal caller
and a 20vard scoring pass to
freshman split end Amos Adams.
Emorv praised Murrav State
such a fine showing in the
game's final moments. This is
probabl) the most physical team
we've played up front Emorv
'Thev knocked our butts off
the option and on the trap
The Pirates have an open date
his Saturdav, but thev will be
travelling to Colombia. Mo. next
weekend to meet the Missouri
Tigers on Oct. 1.
u
4arn. simtt
I Yard
I �-a-
-
t arnliaa
II
51-208
116
IS
sis
0 J 19 15
- le 14 10 50
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FC Heatk
MS ana -
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Hcatk kick
�" s it eesi W Letta
Ma �- r
� � r been So (Sat pas
- - - i;
� " � Williams iHea:h
ixliMduii stats
v ' � - la : I mrrn4 )
"� � ��' (-3 ECU - In
� '� � � �� Bakd 6-20 Bncr
- a i Speed s n!i i l
i M ray State � Sak 22-44
ECt - Injrr J J.J (
Marshall
William
i �
� i murrey stale - Warfanj J ;4. Rrinon
' maiaj I U. ota 4 37
�� . Kiat �4j 1 .r � -4
�Jd� � Bia.� 1 I J. Pope ,�. v��� J J�, S
' A AJam� 20
I
le Bruises
rray State
"It we're real smart and have
good practices, we should be in
the best health we've been in yet
Emorv said. "We do need to get
some people well. They can't stay
up every moment of the dav
The Pirates have an open date
this weekend before heading to
Missouri on Oct. 1. "We're gonna
play open date, and we're gonna
beat the heck out of them
Emory said with a laugh. "We're
gonna take that win
At one point, Emory said the
Bucs didn't have an open date.
ECU was originally scheduled to
play Miami on Sept. 24, but
ami changed their schedule so
thev could play against Notre
Dame on television.
Emory believes the two-week
break will be a definite advantage
for the Pirates. "1 never liked
open dates too much, but I think
this one comes at a good time for
he said. "We just need to
regroup and readjust for October.
"We play some great, great
'earns during that month " he
continued "We'll know a great
deal about this team by the time
November rolls around "
Once again, Emory believes in-
tensity is the key to a great foot-
ball team. "We have a philosophy
here called the five-second explo-
sion he said "We feel like a
ball game is made up of 70 five-
second explosions. An average
play averages fve seconds, and an
offensive player must explode
"If you don't feel like you can
go all out and just explode for five
seconds, you ought to raise your
hand, and we'll send somebody
else in. We want H guys cx
ploding for Tive seconds on everv
play '
Top athletes, Emory said, are
just hke separating the men from
the boys. "The difference bet-
ween a man and a boy is a boy
doesn t know when to work and
Play, and a man is suppose to
know when to do those thincs "
he said. '
"The difference in being a good
or an average football player is
whether or not you have a high
level of intensity all of the time "
ickets On
ale Now
Season tickets hae
ne on sale for the
test Carolina
Hav house produc
ons of musicals,
amas and dance to
presented on the
lain stage of McGin-
ns Theatre on the
CV campus in
ireenville. According
p Playhouse General
Manager Scott
'arker, "We're going
lo run the gamut of
jheatrical variety this
fear ranging from a
fock-opera spectacle,
(he latest in contem-
iorary theatre,
hrough traditional
��allet, modern and
jazz dance, to one of
America's most
opular and longest
running dramas, us-
mg some of the most
sophisticated equip-
ment available. This is
a season for every
theatrical palate
Slated to open the
season on October 5
with additional per-
j formances on October
6-8 and 10, is JESUS
CHRIST
SUPERSTAR, which
will be produced in
conjunction with the
ECU School of
Music.
AI BUM follows as
the next main stajze
production on
December . 5 and
6. This Off Broadwav'
hit of 1980 is a rueful,
perceptive comedy
about coming-of-age
in the turbulent early
10's. Beginning in1
1963, when the inno-
cent, sunny sounds of I
the Beach Boys
bacame the anthems
of youth, ALBUM
follows the matura-
tion of four typical
teenagers through
their high school'
years.
On February 9-11,1
13 and 14, the)
Playhouse will present
TOBACCO ROAD,
the record-breaking
play that ran eight
years on Broadway. It
is the earthy story of a
backwoods Georgia
family that has
become the rnost
famous rural comedv
since UNCLE TOM'Si
CABIN. The play
centers around the ag-
ing, toothless Jeeterl
Lester, who lives with
his bickering family in
a dilapidated shack on
a dusty tract of once-1
rich farm land.
Museum Filled
With Top Art

Cont. from Page 6
considered by critics
to be among the top
20 such collections in
the country. How did
it get so good?
In 1928, Robert F.
Phifer left a
7 5-painting collection
and an endowment
worth $1.65 million.
The endowment
mables the museum
:o purchase $100,000
worth of new pain-
tings yearly. Another
onation of 71
talian, Dutch and
Flemish works came
from the Samuel H.
Kress Foundation.
The final con-
tributing factor is a
North Carolina
phenomenon. In
1947, the N.C.
General Assembly
voted to allocate state
money for the pur-
chase of art, the first
state in the nation to
do so. After the war)
the state went on a
one-million-dollar
shopping spree and
bought 139 paintings
to add to the already'
well-founded collec-
tion.
There are a numberl
of areas yet to be I
opened in the new
museum complex, in-
cluding the Judaical
section and thel
galleries for thel
African, Oceanic and
New World works.
For those interested
the museum offers al
variety of worthwhile!
things to see in a new
and pleasing struc-
ture.
i
Popcorn
Shrimp
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$5.99
c
Shrimp Lovers
Why travel 100 miles to the
beach and pay high prices
Family Restaurants f0r fresh shrimp
AWHALEOFAMEAL
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
popcorn shrimp dinner
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$5.99
TUESWEDTHURS.
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327
Frith Cut
Wlioli Or Rib Half
These trices good thru
Saturday, September 24, 1983
VoVftS
14-17 lbs. A�tr�t
Slietd FREE!
Lb.
USDA Choice Full Cut - Boneless
Round
Steak
Lb,
USDA Choice Beef Roued - Bottom
Round
Roast
Lb
Thompson
Seedless
Grapes
2 liter
ftft.tf4-fltt.eaMtef.aU
Schlitz
Pk. of 12 - 12 Oi. Cim
Milwuakec
$239
Pk tU-12 0i. Cm�R.s. an.
BudirVeiser
Quart
6.5 Oi. L� CbuakTuaa I.Oil
Why Pay M.29
fH Sea
Why Pay M 09
119 Sheets 2 Ply
So-Dri
Towels
Why Pay 59
SOORI
SU-URI
SO DK!
I'Q-
Half ftallaa - White Haita
Apple Juice
VhihHuoi
KalKa
389
14 Oi. De� Faai � ebe�ee teef liter ft ftaaf
KalKan
399
1 Lb. � Marjariae Quartan
Shedd's Spread
49 0t. - W Sefte.er
Fab Detergent
4 Paai � 1 Plf
Page Toilet Tissue
Half mIIm � S0� Off
liquid Wisk
194 Oi. Fabria lafrtMr � SO Off
Do�fny
279
U 0i. - Fraaab C�t
W Htoa Oraaa Baaa
DOfelO
Ai
� To
lunce

XJU
�jr v
� To
Half Gallon
Donald Duck
Orange Juice
QrjW JuCt
Del Monte
�. s.
��?- -
VVVy Pay 19
Why P 1 29

�� 11
��






I
10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1
983

ACC Players Picked
GREENSBORO
(UPI) � North
Carolina State
linebacker Vaughan
Johnson and Virginia
safety Lester Lyles
were named Atlantic
Coast Conference
defensive players of-
the-week today.
Johnson, a senior
from Morehead City,
was named the
league's outstanding
defensive lineman for
the second straight
week after making
four solo tackles and
four assists in the
Wolfpack's 45-0
shutout of the
Citadel.
Johnson also made
a second-quarter in-
terception in the game
and broke up three
pass attempts.
"Vaughan had an
excellent overall
game North
Carolina State coach
Tom Reed said.
Lyles, a junior
from Washington, set
up the Cavalier's win-
ning drive against
James Madison when
he intercepted a pass
in Virginia's end zone
with the score tied
14-14. Following the
interception, Virginia
drove 76 yards to
score and ice the
game, 21-14.
Lyles made seven
solo tackles and three
assists against James
Madison.
Baker Praises Unity
Cont'd From Page 9
have been executing
their plays to near
perfection, and this
has enabled us to run
the ball so well
Another factor that
has contributed great-
ly to the Pirates' scor-
ing average is
speedster Henry
Williams. In just his
first year at ECU,
Williams has returned
two kickoffs and a
punt for touchdowns.
There are many
reasons for the
Pirates' success offen-
sively, but Baker lists
team unity as the big-
gest. "We don't have
one or two superstars
on offense he said.
"We have 11 good
players who do their
job for the sake of the
team. I think ihe
closeness of this
group is best ex-
emplified when after
scoring a touchdown,
the entire team hud-
dles in the end zone
and congratulates
each other
When speaking of
the goals for his of-
fensive unit. Baker
doesn't have an.
"My only goals are
for the team he
said. "I just want
everybody to take one
game at a time, and if
we can't do that,
there's no telling how
far this team will go
The ECU soccer team improved their record to 1-2 last Thursday with a 3-2 victory over Atlantic n.r.H -
Brian Colgin, a transfer student from Prince George, Md scored all three goals C�Uegt
UTS PRACTICE WHAT WE PREACH
HRE PREVENTION
Mil to !�� �� -
8.99 list on sale for 5.99
TheFlxx
ACDC
Asia
Moody Blocs
Cheap Trick
Heart
Men at Work
Billy Joel
NefYoafit
Special �W
Billy Joel
H Cw. ' Qoeensrycae ,
New Shipment of cat oat L.Pi expected this week.
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Gfoonvifta Blvd.
7S-�2324M�S.
PLAZA 8H�L
24 hour Towing Service
U-Houl Rentals
Available
COUSIN'S PIZZERIA
758-5982 � E. 10th ST. Graanvilla 758-5616
II 00 OFF ANY SPAGHETTI
� i- �� � �' 0�Mnf
Si 00 OFF A CHEESC MANtCOTTl
OwWatB ISM �'�� MA�
SI M OFF A LAIKU MEAT ALL Sut
WTTN �� -n MflvOvOM CMflf M
WOMEN'S HEALTH CARE
YOU CAN DEPEND ON
ABORTION: a difficult decision that's made easier
by the women of the Fleming Center. Counselors are
available day and night to support and understand
you. Your safety, comfort and privacy are assured
by the caring staff a? the Fleming Center. SER-
VICES Tuesday-Saturday Abortion Appointments
1st 2nd Trimester Abortions up to it Weeks-Free
Pregnancy Tests-Very Early PregnancyTests-AII
Inclusive Fees- Insurance Accepted- CALL 711 5550
DAY OR NIGHT- Health care, counseling and
education for women of all ages.
THE FLEMMJNG CENTER
f 1 00 OFF ON CHf F'S SALAO
with � CH4X1 o nnumn
i m orr aaaai mum
1 SMALL PIZZA WITH 1 TOPPING OF YOUR CHOICE (EXTRA CHEESE IS ALREADY ON) PLUS 1 PITCHER OF BEER FOR Hrmg 'At� oupum A AAON MONDAYS WED. 2 MANICOTTI DINNERS 2 SALADS 2 GARLIC BREADS �� 1 PITCHER OF BEER FOR $7 49
ON TUESDAYS A THURSDAYS
2 LASAGNA TOPPED WITH
MELTED MOZZAREUS CHEESE
2 SALADS
2 GARLIC BREADS ���
1 PITCHER OF BEER FOR $7 49
ON FRIDAYS
2 SPAGHETTI A MEATBALLS
DINNER
2 SALADS
2 GARLIC BREAD I PITCHER
OF BEER
Inai mn (
$7.49
Sra
Tuesday Night
is
Draft Night
$1.25 Adm.
lOCDraft All Night
Doors Open At 9:00
Bikini contest postponed until
next Tuesday.
Lunch Buffet Lovers, Take Your

ANNOUNCING . . .
SATURDAY OFFICE
HOURS
For your convrniciu u ut- will be �;� n
lor examination and optical srrvirts
every Saturday from VHX) a m u 1 oo
p.m. Allord.iblc lues, quick. UMiii.ur
service. Convenient Hours. Secin is
HclU'iinq
i)l I'KTKK W MOM IS
onoMcnuc
C� CAW 0EKICR
OO.M
ANNEX 22t GREEN VILU 1LVD.
756-9404
$
20
Any Complete Prescription
Eyeglasses Or Contact Lens
Fitting
OrF Must Be Presented At
Time Ot Of tier
Other Discounts Or Coupons
Oo Not Apply
Coupon Expires Oct. 31, 193
PickOf
Ihe Pizzas
At Gatti's.
Your favorite lunch buffet is
still here. Still serving the best
pizza in town. Honest. Take
your piek from our great daily
selection of pizza and spa-
ghetti. Eat to your
hearts content.
Its all yours.
Hie lunch buffet:
All the pizza ami tpagkem tt tan -�.
$2.99
DAILY
HAM TO 2PM
DINNER BUFFET
All the pizza
spaghetti mod salad
you can eat
$3.09
MON.andTUES.
5PM TO SPM
comer of Cotaache awl 10th St.
The best pizsa in town. 7a"?

� �
IKUli mZNmmmWmmmm
. .��
mm

I
r
�'&� vafc t
� 3
-j
iw -Maajp; s s5ajiNhift
ECL quarterback
over Murra Matt
Allis
D A TON d
BEACH. Fla.
� Bobh 1 j
third consecuhe
tory, a come-fi
behind victor)
Geoff Bod int.
Dover 400, pi
him into a 101-d
lead in the Grand
tional point si
dings, accordingj
eekU A
Mac
GREENSBO
N.C. (LTD - C
son fullback K
Mack and N
Carolina flari
Mark Smith
named Atlantic u
Conference offel
players-of-the
Monda.
Mack, a I
from Kings M
tain, carried the
15 times for 91 i
in the Tiger's
stalemate
Georgia. Curn
Clas
MISC.
LEGAL HASSLES?
Haward J Cumm.i�9i �
�t Law No chttg tor L
caasutlattan tar ECU Stl
caa gaaaaj.
LOWEST TYPING BA1
campus intiuOc ax par
prafatxianai ward
a�ra�Mtf. isHn� anal
matical carracttam II
aaajf s:3�.
PKOFESSINAL TYPImJ
�tca Naalaaaaaaai
� arammaticai c�
Spactaltu �� 1
am la � p.m.
ACADEMIC and ph
SIOMAL TYFIMG Jahaf
mmrm. Tla-TaT.
PaOPESSIOHAL -
SEEvtCE mnmwim
warm iim Sat
Typawritar C�a L�mt
gMsst.
QUALITY TYPING
�S





t
icked
!v tO
.
ieven
'
.
i
L nit
-
BaL

ight111
vom,
Nipfit
f 9:00
stponeduntil
as
is.
h buffet
$2.99
DAII i
kM If) 2PM
INKk Bl Hr i
Vll the pia
uMghetti and salad
u tan eat
S3.09
k N.nndllh
?PM F0 8PM
Phone 75S-6 21
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEF TI MB! K 20, 1983 1
Sportswriters Needed
Please Apply In Person At The East Carolinian
Experience Not Necessary, But Preferred
The East Carolinian offices are located on the second floor of the Publications building located
diagonally across from the entrance of Joyner Library. Come by in the afternoon Monday
through Thursday.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
5 P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
KKSKAKC'H PAPKKS
M t,
, raj
�LASAGNA
�SPAGHETTI
$3.99
(Choice of 3 Sauces)
ith Garlic Bread
WHk all you can eat soup and salad $4.99
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs. Air Conditioners.
Stereos, guns gold & silver
diamonds, cimim and
equipment, typewriters.
kerosene heaters.
refrigerators (dorm size on
iV' video jimn A car
tridges. power tools,
musical instruments
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles, and
anything else of value
Southern Pawn Shop,
located 405 Evans Street
downtown 752 344
EVEIY rUDAV -
ALL-YOL-CAN-EAT J
FLOUNDER DINNER
I also Open tn. and
nights midnight- t
Sat
�rtCU ID
Ribtye plus
Ail You Can Eat Salad Bar
Bev. and Free Dessert
756-7097
$4.99
Banquet Room
Pick up your Student
Discount Card from Manager
to w� we !��� , fct
r MrrlV MCa�eKeln 'nram 43 afdS � " Saturd� �W �j
Breakfast Bar open6:00arn
6H0NEYS
205
�KtL
Allison Grabs Lead ICk F
DAYTON A
'�-�� H I la (I PI)
Bobb Allison's
onsecutive vic-
tory, a come-from -
nd victor over
" Bodine in the
� 400, propelled
into a 101-poinl
. in the (irand Na
jI point stan-
i ording to
N A S R
statistics released
Monda)
Allison's victory
Sunday gives him
3,733 points to 3,632
to Darrell Waltrip,
who finished fifth at
Dor.
Ironically, Allison
held a 101-point lead
over Waltrip at the
same time last year.
Waltrip managed to
catch Allison in the
final races of 1982
and captured the
point championship.
Bill Elliott holds
third place with 3,411
points. vhile Richard
Petty is fourth with
3,317 points and
H a r r v G a n t with
3,218 is fifth.
CountrvComm
Mack, Smith Chosen
RI ENSBORO,
N (UPI) Clem-
fullback Kevin
Mack and North
r o 1 i n a flanker
Mark Smith were
i ed Atlantic Coast
( inference offensive
players-of-the week
Monday.
Mack, a senior
Kings Moun-
tain, arned the ball
15 nines for 91 yards
m the Tiger's 16-16
11 a I e m a t e with
Georgia. Currently
the ACC's sixth
leading rusher, Mack
has earned more than
90 yards for two
straight weeks
Smith, a senior
from Fayetteville,
hauled in six passes
for 121 yards and
three touchdowns in
North Carolina's
48-17 drubbing of
Miami of Ohio.
Smith's three
touchdown receptions
tied a North Carolina
school record set in
1974 bv Charles Wad-
dell.
Smith's efforts also
made him the fourth
North Carolina plaver
to hit the 1,000-yard
mark in pass recep-
tion.
Smith and Mack
were chosen as offen-
sive players-of-the-
week by a special
committee of the
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference Sportswriters
Association.


.




�.



.


�.

.
ii




-�
�.
:
.
.
512 E. Nth St.
(2 Blocks H. of Boy's Dorms)
C ome talk
to Sammy
about a meal plan.
We Specialize In Home Cooked Food
A11 You Can Eat Vegetables
on Large Plate $3.85 tax
(1 meat, 3 veg.9 bread and tea)
Pizza
Transit
Authority
WANTED
IMMEDIA TEL Y:
757-1955
Pizza Makers and
Pizza Drivers
Beginning Pay $3.50 hr.
and milage reinbursement.
Apply between 2:00-4:00
corner 14th and Charles
L ocated 1 mile pas t fi
Hastings Ford on I
10th St. Ext.
Daily Specials
5. . 99 plus tax and drink
Open (1 meat, 2 veg. and bread)
ll:00to8:00
7 days
a week
�����
SI
i!

.
.
served 11-2
Classifieds
MISC.
LEGAL HASSLES? Call
Howard j Cummings attorney
at Law No charge for initial
consultation (or ECU Students
Call 7� 000
LOWEST Typing RATES on
campus .nciude experienced
Professional work Pro
otreadmg speii.no. and gram
ma�ical corrections 355 6741
atter 5 JO
pBOEESSlNAL TYPING ser
"ce Proofreading spelling
and grammatical corrections
Special.ie m theses ?5� 104 I
a tn to p m
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SlONAL Typing Julia Blood
worth ?s 7�74
pBOFESSlONAL TYPING
SERVICE experience, quality
or IBM Selectric
T,pewr,ter Call Lame Shive
7 51 5301
QUALITY TYPING IBM
T.pewnter 15 yearJ 0 �
penence Full time typing tor
� acuity and students Call
75� 3�AC
EXPERIENCED PROFES
SlONAL TYPING ot
manuscripts, thesis, etc
Reasonable rates Proofreading
and spelling corrections Call
daily 753 SMt after 5 30 p m
7541 m� Ash tor Eva
TYPING AND WORD PRO
CESSING see the professional at
Word for Word 531 Cotanche 2nd
floor Call 7S� 4M
PART TIME MORNING help
needed Must be available Mon
Wed 1 Fri 10 3 Apply in person
at Leather n Wood. Carolina
East Mall No phone calls
please
WANTING TO SUBLET my
2 bedroom apt at Eastbrook
5250 deposit Begin Oct 1 Call
Linda 754 SMO
FREE TO A GOOD HOME �
week old black kitten (wl
754254 (h) 752 5377
HOMECOMING PORTRAIT
SPECIAL 1 roil B and W film
shot with contact sheet and 3
1x10 prints of your pick 520 00
call Gary 753 0435
SALE
FOR SALE Large dorm refrig
Good cond S125 Call 3SS-MS0
FOR SALE 175 Mercury Mar
o,uis auto air 4 dr 3000 original
miles must see to believe � steal
at $1275 758 304.
FOR SALE wo vw Fastback,
Rebuilt engine New clutch, bat
lory, brakes. Good condition
M50 Call 7S!43 after pm
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST CAT 2 years old, white,
fluffy, blue eye and 1 green eye.
Last seen on Jarvis Street. Call
7S2-S0S. REWARD OFFERED
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12 l AM C AH
'I 111 MH! k i
nun gel in on the ground Hour in our undergraduate officer
commissioning program. Vou could start planning on a career like th
men in tins ad have ml also tiave some great advantages like:
� learning SKX) a month during the sch(X)l vear
� Vs a hvshman or sophomore, you could complete onr basic
training during two six week summer
sessions and ram more than SIKH)
during i ach session
� Juniors earn more tlian ShHH) dur
eek summer session
� Vou can take Iree Chilian (lying lessoas
� You're commissioned u)on graduation
II you're lxking to move up quickly, IhK into die Marine (q)s
under'aduale officer commissioning program You could start oil
making more than $r.(XX) a ear
Want to move
up quickly?
Mm be you can be (me of us.

- $&& -
theen. c
ThePhmL
The Marines.
See your Officer Selection Officer, Captain John Robinson at the Book Store on
September 26-28 1983 or call 1-800-662-7312
I





Title
The East Carolinian, September 20, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 20, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.287
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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