The East Carolinian, September 16, 1983






I
?
5e
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No
Friday, September 16,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Students Voice Ideas
By PATRICK O'NEILL
rwi Editor
More than a dozen people,
most of them ECU students, got
on a soap box Thursday during
the third edition of the ECU
Soapbox forum.
Crowds of several dozen people
gathered on the street outside the
Student Supply Store to listen to
speakers discuss topics ranging
from Central America to the
drinking age in North Carolina.
The program lasted for more
than an hour as different people
took 5-minute turns speaking into
a public address system.
The soapbox was organized by
students last spring to set up a
forum for public disscussion of
current issues. The Catholic
Newman Center has been spon-
soring the forum.
Speaking about the situation in
Nicaragua student Gordon Ipock
said if Nicaragua's leaders wanted
to have a government "indepen-
dent from the Soviet Union
then they should be allowed to.
"We can't let all of Central
America become Marxist Ipock
added.
"The United States needs to
respond to Central America in a
human waysaid student Jay
Stone. We need to support the
side that supports a humane way
of life
Stone also said U.S. citizens
need to study the Central
American issue with the same fer-
vor that has been exhibited in the
search for information regarding
the Korean jet that was shot down
by the Soviets.
"I think the root of the pro-
blems in El Salvador and Central
America is the long control by
repressive dictatorships who con-
trol the land and the wealth said
student Carl Jones. "The main
problem is unequal land distribu-
tion
Jeff Jones said both the left and
the right were wrong in Central
America and he disagreed with the
United States policy of sending
military aid to El Salvador.
Several other speakers took the
opportunity to speak during the
forum. Most students watching
the event were attentive and in-
terested. There were very few
hecklers.
No date has been announced
for the next edition of the soap-
box forum. But anyone wishing to
suggest a topic for discussion may
do so by calling Mickey Skidmore
at the Newman Center, 752-4216.
Dormitory Crime Rate Drops
By ANDREA MARKELLO
Suff Hnitf
Many students find it
troublesome to take a few minutes
to secure their valuables. But it
may be the only way to prevent
property theft.
Inez Fridley, ECU's area coor-
dinator for the College Hill sec-
tion of campus, said theft in
dorms is due more to student
carelessness than sneaky culprits.
Students leave their room for a
few minutes and a theft takes
place.
Studies show that most thefts
take 10-30 seconds.The thief
enters a room, takes anything
easily accessible (radios, t.v's,
jewelry) and quickly leaves.
"Some crimes appear to be
committed by high school
students passing through the
dorms in the afternoon Fridley
said. "The theives work fast and
don't leave obvious trails. They
will steal a purse, take just the
cash and throw the rest of the con-
tents in the nearest trashcan.
Other items will end up in a local
pawn shop where they are easily
sold
According to Fridley, crime in
the dorms has decreased in the
past year. Records show 143
break-ins on College Hill in 1982,
with 44 occuring in unlocked
rooms. The 1983 record lists 112
break-ins. Seventeen were com-
mitted in unlocked rooms.
Posters hung in all the dorms
encourage students to protect
their valuables. If their dorm
room is robbed, students should
immediately report it to a
residence advisor or campus
security.
"Strangers in the dorm do have
motives, "Fridley said. "Doors
and windows should be locked
when leaving the room
Francis Eddings, assistant
director of campus security con-
firmed the need for students to
take care of personal property.
"Valuables left on car seats are
prone to theft Eddings said.
ECU employs 19 uniformed
police and two investigators. As
one measure of prevention, cam-
pus police mark potential theft
hazards with small identification
cards, notifying the owner of the
hazard.
A film prevention program for
dorm residents has been created
by Rhonda Gurley, of the ECU
police.It consists of hypothetical
crime situations stressing how
easily students can be victims of
crime.
Students need to understand the
criminal's point of view Gurley
said. "Criminals view the univer-
sity setting as a rich and careless
community, giving them an ad-
vantage over the student
Students need to develop a state
of awareness when walking
around campus alone, at night.
They need to be aware of their
surroundings and not preoccupied
with other thoughts. They need to
learn to detect strangers and
report them, Gurley warns. If
crimes occur on campus, security
phones are available which give
automatic connection to campus
security.
Gurley urges students not to
wait to report crimes. The sooner
crimes are reported, the better.
ECU Student Claims Discrimination
By KIM RICE
and GLENN MALGHAN
Staff Writers
A controversy surrounding a
student denied in-state residency
status for tuition purposes will
soon be heard by a campus ap-
peals committee.
Kathy Davis, an ECU art ma-
jor, claims she has resided in
North Carolina since September
1979 but was forced to pay out-of-
state tuition rates to enroll at ECU
this fall.
Davis said she received and
completed the necessary forms
regarding residency status and
was later mailed a bill that
reflected her tuition costs at the
in-state rate. "I thought this
meant I was considered an in-state
student she said.
After paying her fees, Davis
received another letter signed by
ECU Business Manager Julian
Vainright, congratulating her on
being declared a legal resident of
North Carolina but denying her
in-state classification for tuition
purposes.
"I think it's because my hus-
band didn't fill out DDDefense
Department) form 2058 until
April of this year that caused the
problem Davis said.
Vainwright, who makes the in-
itial decision regarding student
residency status, claimed the form
which military personnel Fill out
for state tax purposes may have
been a factor.
Davis said the reason for the
denial was because her husband,
Staff Sgt Al Davis Jr USMC,
was on duty in Beirut, Lebanon
and he neglected to File the form
within the allowable time limit.
"He had a lot of other things on
his mind; he was being shot at
Davis added.
Although the 30-day time
period for appeals has run out,
Davis said she will go ahead and
appeal anyway. "I was intially
discouraged from appealing by
Vainwright. He told me there was
no way, it wouldn't do me any
good to appeal and that military
dependents have tried that trick
before of back dating taxes she
said.
C. G. More, vice-chancellor for
business affairs, said hundreds of
these cases are acted upon each
year. "This sort of problem goes
on all the time he said.
Vainwright could not recall the
specifics surrounding Davis' case.
"Each case, and there are
numerous ones, must be judged
on its own merits he said.
STANLBV LBAHY -
Participants is Tuesday's "Fast For Life" vigil wore white shirts awl green arm buds. The fast ended
Thursday. Vigiiers pictured left to right are: ECU students Sue Menius aad Wanda Shaffer, Carroll Web-
ber, ECU students Suzanne Darwin and Theresa Dubki, Charlotte Purrington and Sr. Helen Shonddl.
hi foreground left Is student Mary Daniel who stopped to talk with the group.
Rain, Rain Go A way
Wednesday's rain brought with it a much needed break from the hot
weather. ECU students protect themselves from the harsh elements.
Peat Causes Debate
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Suff w rilrr
One of North Carolina's largest
natural resources is peat and cur-
rent plans to mine the substance is
creating controversy.
Peat is organic matter which
has decomposed due to the
absence of oxygen. It is between
80 and 95 percent water and is
mined by the remoral of the sur-
face soil. The peat is then left to
dry in the sun until its water con-
tent reaches 40 percent.
After being mined, peat is con-
verted to methanol, or wood
alcohol. Methanol can be used as
a fuel by itself or combined with
gasoline to produce gas-a-hol.
"Available petroleum resources
are limitd and will run out ECU
chemistry professor Donald
Clemens said. Oil has been too
cheap in the past to necessitate
developing peat as a fuel, but peat
is a good source of potential
energy, claims Clemens.
Questions have been raised
regarding the effects of peat min-
ing on the environment. Accor-
ding to S. Henri Johnson, an at-
torney representing the N.C.
Fisheries Association, a major
concern of his industry is the
possibility of mercury poisoning
of fish as result of peat mining.
Peat contains a substantial
amount of mercury. Johnson said
scientists believe mercury is bond-
ed to peat and the bonds are
released when the peat is sun
dried. There is a possibility of this
mercury affecting fish in the in-
land waters.
"Fish tissue concentrates mer-
cury to a greater extent and will be
present in larger amounts as it
Forty Days Later
goes up the food chain Johnson
said.
Manley Fuller, a biologist with
the Carolina Wetlands Project
said research has shown higher
mercury levels in some, but not
all, instances.
Clemens said mercury has been
present in the fields for hundreds
of years with water constantly
running through it and has not
created a problem. He also
doesn't think there are enough
facts on either side to know what
the outcome will be.
Another concern of en-
vironmentalists is the large
amount of fresh water which will
be produced by peat mining
See FISHERMEN, Page 5
Volunteer
Notetakers
Offer Help
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
suff Vt riur
Although there are many hear-
ing impaired students in North
Carolina, ECU is the only school
in the UNC system with a pro-
gram specifically designed for
hearing impaired students.
Tony Schreiber directs the pro-
gram which serves 25 students.
The program provides inter-
preters, counseling, tutors and a
wide range of other aids.
Interpreters are often a necessi-
ty for hearing impaired students.
Their services are available for
a variety of student needs in-
cluding in the classroom, at cam-
pus sponsored events such as
plays and lectures, club meetings
and any other activities the
students wish to attend.
Kathy Beetham, coordinator of
ECU's interpretation program
claims that students and pro-
fessors have been very accepting
of the interpreters in classroom
situations.
But, Sue Menius, an English
major who is hearing impaired
said she was dropped from an
English class because the professor
found her interpreter to be a
distraction. Menius said incidents
such as this are "more common
than people realize
Grayson Melvin, a hearing im-
paired junior said he has not had
any problems such as the kind
mentioned by Menius and the at-
titudes of his professors have been
very good.
Another service hearing im-
paired students often need is
notetaking; a service provided by
student volunteers enrolled in the
hearing impaired students'
classes.
The sign language club is a
social club open to all ECU
students. Membership in the club
is not limited to hearing impaired
students. The club has approx-
imately 35 members and sponsors
events such as captioned movies
and weekly silent dinners at area
restaurants. This year the club
plans to sponsor several trips
United Way Sets Goals
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Suff Writer
Wednesday afternoon the Pitt
County United Way kicked off
it's 1983 fund drive. The cam-
paign will involve all of Pitt
County, including ECU.
Nancy Ball, ECU Co-op coor-
dinator and United Way vice-
chairman for student participa-
tion said, "I would like to see stu-
dent participation in the United
Way campaign
Ball said she hopes to see all
ECU organizations involved;
fraternities, sororities, pro-
fessioanl and service clubs,
residence halls, and other in-
terested parties.
Dr. Frederick Broadhurst, cam-
pus committee chairman, said
ECU hopes to raise $30,000 for
the United Way. Pitt County's
goal is $585,000.
"The United Way is a worthy
organization supporting causes
that deserve our support said
ECU Chancellor John Howell.
"In many ways there has been a
good interaction between the
university and community. This
project is another one of those in-
teractions
The Pitt County United Way
has over 300 volunteers who
donate time and money to insure
that various service organizations
receive adequate support to
operate.
"Our university motto is 'to
serve I can't think of a better
way for the university to get in-
volved than to serve said ECU
Vice-Chancellor for Academic
Affairs Angelo Volpe.
Fasters For Life End Ordeal
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Newi Editor
Participants in the Interna-
tional Fast for Life have decided
to end their fast after 40 days
without food.
The group of 13 people from six
nations had been fasting on water-
only since Aug 6. They vowed to
continue their fast until there was
"a break in the momentum of the
nuclear arms race
Several of the fasters had lost
30 to 40 pounds and were beginn-
ing to show signs of irreversible
physical damage. The group in-
cluded four people from France,
two Americans, three Canadians,
two Germans and one person each
from Japan and Spain.
"We would like to end the fast
together to preserve our spirit of
solidarity and unity said the
four fasters in Oakland, Calif, in
an official statement released
Tuesday. "We are ending our fast
in answer to the response of peo-
ple all over the world who have
taken up the appeal of the fast,
that is to work harder for disar-
mament now.
"In the past week we have been
receiving day-by-day appeals
from government leaders,
organizations and supporters in
West Germany who are in
solidarity with the aims of the
fast said the statement.
According to Kathy Daniel, a
spokesperson for the fast, positive
events in West Germany led to the
decision to end the fast. "It
wasn't an offer that the West Ger-
man's made as a government
Daniel said. "There are a bunch
of things happening there that
altogether made the fasters decide
significant movement had been
happening
Daniel said that 20 members of
the Bundestag, West Germany's
Parliament, have begun a relay
fast schedualed to tost a week for
each participant. "Willy Brandt
(former West German
Chancellor) committed himself to
moving the time line up for pursu-
ing the stopping of deployment of
See FAST, Page 5
Editor's Note
The East Carolinian regrets
the inconsistancy of its produc-
tion schedule over the last two
weeks. Production problems
forced the last three issues to be
delivered one day late.
Numerous mechanical pro-
blems forced the staff to travel
to Tarboro for each edition to
produce the paper. We deeply
regret any inconvenience to
readers and advertisers. Nor-
mal production should resume
next week. Also, we thank The
Daily Southerner and the Tar-
boro Printing Cafor the use of
their facilities.
f

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
H yov or your organization
-uki like to have an item
panted in the announcement
column please type II on an an
nouncement form ana send it to
Te East Carolinian in care of
rhe proauction manage'
Announcement forms are
available at trie East Carol.man
n the Publications
- iq Flyers ana banowr r
o mocM-s ted oaper . an
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CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
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SO cents a
3 5 Sunoav tbe 18th at
enter on lOtt! St Sun
nass n B-oiogy Room
TABLE
TENNISCLUB
v' tents l�cv nd
,r eresteo -
tat e tennis dirt) snoula
'enoennaii Student
" rca, September
ll S - the MSC
- Center
' - s .it- allows persons in
n able Tennis a
npete tor tun work
I ano piav a' a discount
� e s'jdenfs in
- peting In 'ne
'atf Tennis
� should check Ihe
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UGLY MAN
ON CAMPUS
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et s see
BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Every Tuesday and Thursday
night we will have a Bible
fellowship at our house We
strive to teach the Bible so peo
pie can understand how to apply
Godly principles in their lives
WHY Because God wants us to
have a full and enioyable life
ijohn 10 10. I Timothy 6 17)
come by and check us out Tues
day ano Thursday 8 p m , at 112
Rotary Ave
DYNAMIC
TEACHING
OF GOD'S WORD
Do you want to be your best
tor God Ae teach God's Word
accurately and boldly because
we know Goo s way is the only
8i to live the best hte now, and
n eternity (I Timothy 4 8. II
Peter 1 3.4) Come by and see
what you think, Monday
eptember 19, from 5 30 6 30
p m , m Mendenhall Student
Center in room 212 1 Next to the
music listening room)
BEACH MUSIC
FESTIVAL
The Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
would like to invite everyone to
the Miller Pi Kapp Beach Music
Festival it wiU be held at the
Sew Pitt County Fa rgrounds
this Sunday, Sept 18 The show
will go on RAIN or SHINE If it
rams it will be moved to the flea
market building beside the
fairgrounds Featured are
Chairman of the Board
Breeze ano North Tower
The gate opens at 11 00 a m
Tickets are $7 00 in advance and
$10 00 at trie gate For more m
formation call ?S6 3540 Don t
miss the week eno of your life!
SPORTSCLUBS
Archery Fnsbee D-sc
Karate Lacrosse Racquetbali,
Rugby Men and Women, Soccer
Women Surfing, Team Hand
bail Me- �nd Women Badmin
ton Cycling Fencing
Pe Hockey Gymnastics,
Outmg Snow Ski Water Polo
Water Ski Wind Surfing, Wrestl
rig II you are interested in
one of these sports or you want
o organize a group for a sport
contact 'he ECU Department of
�ntramurai Recreational Ser
.ces SPORT ClUB PROGRAM
n Room 105A of Memorial Gym
-3S l m '57 6064
GREENVILLE
PEACE
COMMITTEE
The brave participants in the
FAST FOR LIFE have ended
their fast, but the GREEN
VILLE PEACE COMMITTEE
continues to work for the goals
set by the tasters.
We continue to try to draw at
tention to the injustices in our
world, the thousands who die
from hunger while the world
spends $1 000.000 a minute on the
military
We support the primary goal
of the tasters to 'BREAK IN
THE MOMENTUM OF THE
NUCLEAR ARMS RACE
Please 10m us for our Friday
evening pot luck suppers and
followed by a meeting We begin
at 6 30 p m (610 S Elm StFor
more info call 758 4906 PEACE
M ANDMs
Do you love um We got um
Contact any AOII tor a SO cent
box
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to
declare physical education as a
major during change of major
week for the fall semester
should report to Minges Col
iseum at 12 p m on Wednesday
September 28 for a motor and
physical fitness test Satisfac
tory performance on this test is
required as a prerequisite tor
official admittance to the
physical education major pro
gram More detailed informa
tion cencerning the test is
available by calling 757 6441 or
6442
Any student with a medical
condition that would contrain
dicate participation in the
testing program should contact
Dr iseal at 757 6497 Examples
would include heart murmurs,
congenital heart disease,
respiratory disease, or signifi
cant muscuioskeletal problems
If you have any significant
medical conditions, please
notify Dr Israel if you plan to be
tested
AMBASSADORS
Any Ambassador who has not
attended the last 2 meetings
must come by the Alumni
Center by Friday, Sept 23rd to
fill ou' an index card in order to
be placed on the official roll
Also anyone interested in
becoming an Ambassador must
send m their applications by Fri
day Sept 23rd
SPORT CLUB
COUNCIL
The first Sport Club Council
Meeting for 193 84 will be held
Wednesday September 21, 19�3
at 3 30 p m in Room 105B of
Memorial Gymnasium Active
sport clubs are required to have
a representative In attendance
Persons or groups interested in
forming a new sport club should
send a representative to the
meeting Sport clubs should
have ready for the meeting In
the following completed intor
mation Fall Schedule, Fall
Practice Times, Days and Loca
tions, Facility Requests,
Recognition Forms, Student
Organizations Forms, 1983 84
Club Officers, and. Oft Campus
Accounts The Executive Coon
cil for the Sprot Club Council
will be elected at this
meeting Weds Sept 21, 1983,
3 30 pm Rm 105B Mem.Gym
PRIMETIME
Campus Cursade tor Christ is
sponsoring "Prime Time" this
Thursday at 7 pm in the Nurs
ing Building Rm 101 Please
join us for tun, fellowship, ano
Bible study We are looking for
ward to meeting you
CHI OMEGA
The sisters and pledges of Chi
Omega are holding a yard sale.
Sat 17 8 am 1pm located at
1501 E Fifth St. in the back
yard bunkbeds, dressers, lamps
and other furniture for sale
cheap For info call 752 7903
SILENT DINNER
The Sign Language Club will
be having a silent dinner Thurs
day the 15th The dinner will be
held at the New Deli (513 Cotan
chel at 6 30 The mode of com
munication will be limited to
finger spelling Please come join
us. everyone is welcome
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity will have its First
meeting Monday, Sept 19 The
meeting is scheduled for 7 p m
at the Newman House. 953 E
10th St The first part of the
meeting will be planning events
tor the coming year After
wards there will be a social So
bring your favorite beverage
and get acquainted All in
terested persons are cordially
invited
The East Carolinian is now
Accepting Applications For
News Writers and Editors
Apply in person at The East Carolinian offices on
the second floor of the Publications Building,
across from the entrance of Joyner Library.
�A wrote lot o� tun
TfajGHT7i?NE
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QUALITY
DECISION!
The Brothers of the XI Nu
Chapter of the Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity Inc will be having a
Formal Smoker on September
18, 1983 We want to challenge
those interested in being a part
of the most prestigious of frater
nai organizations to meet us in
the Multipurpose Room in
Mendenhall Student center at 7
p m Accept the challenge and
purpose to become a member of
the elite, PHI BETA SIGMA,
Inc
NARCOTICS
ANONYMOUS
There will be a meeting of
Narcotics Anonymous on Fri
day. September 16. 1983, at 8
p m in room 238 of Mendenhall
Student Center Narcotics
Anonymous is a fellowship of
men and women who share their
experience, strength and hope
with each other that they may
solve their common problem
and help others to recover from
drug addition or drug abuse
CADP
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro
gram on Tuesday, September
70, at 4 p m in room 210 Erwm
Hall Help promote responsible
decisions concerning drugs and
alcohol Become a trained stu
dent volunteer All interested
persons are invited to attend this
meeting CADP is a student
operated service
SOULS MEETING
The first scheduled meeting
for this semester will be on
Wednesday. September 21. 1983
m Mendenhall. room 248 at 7
p m
Anyone interested in holding an
office tor the Fall Semester and
the Spring Semester should be
present All Committee
Chairpersons and members are
asked to be present This is an
urgent meeting and your
presence is needed
MALE KOOMATC WANTED
Georgetown Apt 13 rent and
Ut. gMjjS.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
Langston Park close to campus
one half rent utli Call nights and
woekonds 758 J37J
IVCF
Inter varsity is an infer
denominational Christian
organization which can be found
on many college campuses
throughout the US. and in
several foreign countries. Come
join us on Wednesday nites at
630 in Jenkins Auditorium (Art
Building) to find out more about
how you can be a part of us
KACKEY CLUB
Ifs about time to give your
brain a rest and come out on the
Central Campus Mall and
educate your "Feet" Yes folks
Hackey" is "sweeping the na
tion" and ECU is ready to play
but, the game is Hackey
volleyball Come out and learn
at 6 p ID Sept 22
The plan is to start a Hackey
Club so lets come out and "hack
in"
FOREIGN STUDENTS
there will be a meeting of the
all new international students,
September 17 at 5 00 p m in the
international house, 306 E 9th
Street There will be food, fun
and lots of socialising as well as
some surprises
All foreign students, new and
old. as well as any other in
terested students and faculty,
are encouraged to attend
NIH
A representative from the Na
tional institutes of Health,
Bethesda, MD, will be on cam
pus October 5 7 to interview
students who would like to be
health research assistants in
their Normal Volunteer pro
gram beginning Spring 1984
Students will participate in ex
periments and research regar
ding disease control and me
human body Will receive S12 50
per day stipend plus free room
and board, and transportation
paid to and from NIH Students
in the health, natural sciences,
computer science, and business
fields who may be interested
should contact the Co op Office.
313 Rawl immediately to sign
up for an interview
HOT DATE
Impress that date on Saturday
with a sparkling clean car Phi
Mu Alpha Sinfonia professional
Music Fraternity will hald a car
wash from 10 am to 4 p m on
Saturday. September 17 at the
Pizza Hut on 10th St Price $2 00
While you're there make a
SI 00 donation toward a School of
Music scholarship and register
for a "Week in the Bahamas
ADVISORS NEEDED
The Department of
Intramural Recreational Ser
vices is requesting assistance in
the Sport Club Program Facul
ty or staff members are need to
serve as advisors for the follow
mg sport clubs: Archery,
Fresbee Disc, Lacrosse, Rac
quetball. Rugby men. Rugby
Women, Soccer, Team Handball
Men, Team Handball Women
Water Polo, Field Hockey
Women and Surfing Interested
faculty of staff members sould
contact the Intramural
Recreatiooal Services Sprot
Club Office in Room 105 A of
Memorial Gymnasium
INTRAMURALS
ECU Faculty and Staff
members now have an oppor
tunity to participate in the
Department of Intramural
Recreational services com
petitive program A separate
division will be established
strictly for faculty and staH
members Team sports to be m
eluded are Flag Football
Volleyball. Basketball, and Soft
ban Separate divisions will also
be established tor individual
and dual sports (Racquett�aii
Tennis and Golf) A minimum of
four (4) participants must be
entered in the individual or dual
sports come on out and enter it
no the fun Participate agamst,
socialize with and introduce
yourself to other ECU faculty
and staff members For further
information contact the Depart
menf of Intramural
Recreatioanl Services in Room
204 of Memorial Gymnasium.
757 6387
BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU Biology Club will
meet Mon , Sept 19, at 7 p m in
BN 102 Old business will be
summarized and ther will be a
speaker All members and m
terested persons are urged to at
ten
NURSING
STUDENTS
In order to receive your nurs
ing pm by December 2, 1983,
orders must be placed in the Stu
dent Supply Store. Wright
Building, no later than
September 23. 1983 Orders
should be placed at the Jewelry
Counter orders must be paid m
full when the order is placed
SCUBA DIVING
Dive the Grand Caimans
Thanksgiving Vacation. 8 days
7 nights Wl 00 from Raleigh. 3
meals, lodging and unlimited
diving $100 deposit
Dive Bimmi in The Bahamas
Christmas vacation Dec 27 30. 4
days, 3 nights. $350 00 from Ft
Lauderdale. 3 meals, lodging
eleven dives RSVP ilOO deposit
by Sept 15th
For information and reserve
tions call Ray Scharf Dir of
AqualiCS at 757 6441 or 756 �339
REBEL
The REBEL is still in need of
an Art Editor if you are in
terested m this position, come
by the REBEL office located on
the second floor of the pubiica
tions building MWF 3 4 00 or
call 757 6502 and leave a
message
FIELDHOCKEY
Attention anyone interested n
playing club Field Hocxer
there is a mandatory meeting
Wednesday Sept 2lsf at 5 00 In
Rm 102 of the Memorial Gym
Please attend this meeting if you
want to play, if you cant make
it call Cory at 758 8985
PRCMEETING
There will be a PRC meeting
of Sept 21 at 7 30 P m in
Mendenhall 221
SABMEETING
The Student Athletic Boj'o
will meet in room 248 n
Mendenhall on Monaa,
September 19, at 5 00
SGA ELECTIONS
Trie Student Government an-
nounces their Fall elections Tne
Ming dates art from Monc
Sept 12 to Fr.aay. Sep' 16 The
mandantory meeting oa'e fo' a
cand'dates is Monday. Sep� '
at 7 p m Application for ca-
didates may oe picked uc - �
Vendennall from 8 5 Pos I cms
available 25 day stuc"
representatives 25 oor reps
president and vice pres oe y
all undergraduate and graov.a
c lasses a- I
SecretaryTreasurer for Se- or
Class
WZMB
Tune in to WZMB s Con'tr
porary gospel snow ever, s-
dar mormng from 6 t0 p.tn
featuring artis's like Ke rh
Green. Phil keaggr Am, Gra
arc eon PeMio.
On WZMB 91 3 F �A
The Kast Carolinian
cr � ���. hi mm
- - �
PjD' s-ec: eve .esaa,
ano Thjrsca, dur ng tr-e
academic ,ear ano ever,
Wednesda, Jur -15 ?� s �
The Eas' Caro, n a s the
off'C a lespape1- o Eas'
Ci" na: Jn �n ownec
opera'ed and puO sed
and b� m� s'Joe of Eas'
Caroi-na 'jn,vf,iT(
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The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on Ht( campus of
ECU Green�ilie N C
POSTMASTER Se"C ad
dress changes ?o th, Eas'
Carolinian Old SOj'n
Building. ECU Gree e
NC 27834
63 W
Telephone 757-6344, 6347,
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
Sam's Lock
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757-0075
1804 Dickinsen A ve.
(across from Pepsi
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(24 Hours)
Complete
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(she was formerly
with Forrest Lock
and key for 9 years)
1
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Sat. Sept. 17th
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Fine Pic kin' and Grinin'
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9PM-until
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11 00 AM
9:00 PM
Friday
11.00 A.M. to
10:00 P.M.
Saturday
4:00 P M to
1000 PM
Barbecue
Oyster Bar
710 N. Greene St.
Greenville. N.C. 27834
752
0090
Take Outs
Welcome
Catering Specialists
Cater: Anything
Anywhere
Anytime
Picnic Lunch
Fried Chicken
Sandwich-Potato Chips
Raw Vegetables
HushPuppies
2.75 per person
Tailgate Specials1
Sandwich Tray
Assortment for 4 people
8.75
Cheese and
Cracker Tray
8.75
Whole chicken (8 pcs.)
12 hushpuppies
4.25
lib. B-B-Q . -
12 Hushpuppies 4.25
Shrimp Boat and QQ
Hushpuppies for 2 5.99
Buffalo Wings 2.99dz.
Pig Pickin Plate 3.99
Call In Now. Pick Up Saturday
Minoritie
NORTH
CHARLESTON,
S.C. (UPI) - Minori-
ty entrepreneurs still
face problems of
racism when seeking
loans for new business
ventures from
bankers, particularly
in the Southeast,
Reagan administi
tion official
Mondav
'The fmanci.
commum �1 tl
biggest roadbli �
said Stanle v Ta!s
Atlanta re
Former Star G
RALEIGH, NX.
(LPI) - Students
Against Drunk Driv-
ing have recruited
Steve Streater, a
former University of
North Carolina foot-
ball star paralyzed in
an auto accident, to
serve as their state
coordinator.
Streater began
work Sept. I. His task
is to help educate
young people about
the hazards i
ing and dr. .
as orga
statewide
on s t u d e n i i
drunken di
also must
SADD
countic
The 14
Sylva nai
defensive I . �
pur
Heeis w
signed a ,
Jetliner Shoo
Nathaniel
Linton
Bv THr
Ron N a
Busint
arah C obur
hole .
Liz Linton -
.
the
scl
les
Herman "vU
dent. Busine�
do. i a anf
imtimidat
abou:
L'mted S
w
wc �
da �
the
somciK .
STEAK HOUSE
Lunch Specials
Mon-Sat 11-2PM
Sept. 16th-17th-18th
4 1 2oz. Jr. Sirloin $2.19
8oz. Chopped Sirloin S2.49
Served with King Idaho Baked
Potato or FF and Texas Toast
Buy one 14oz. T-Bone
at reg. price $6.99
Get second 14oz. T-Bone
at 1 2 price S3.50
Sen ed with King Idaho Baked
Potato or FF and Texas Toast
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved Salad Bar
2 Locations to Better Serve . ou
500 W. Greenville Bhd 756-0040
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
LT
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ORGANIZATION
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VICES Tuotdayteturdav Abortion Appointm
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Pregnancy Tests-Very Early PregnancyTesti
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DAY OR NIGHT- Hearm care, counseling
education for women of all apes
THE FUMMfMG CENTER
Wj !� j





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16. 1983
L�
PHoar
(-I cmrtsmnt
H? - . �If�1��-�c�� �����
i�i�i '�4�.�i - -� � ��i �, �i -�, j� 1� � �-
SAB MEETING
-f� r) 'OO 24j n
on Monday
Mt - �� 5 00
SGA ELECTIONS
�� JCi�nm(dt an
� f�'V-ci fiections Trt�
�� ' from VAonoay
l Spt 16 The
� -r itg oa'e for a
a'rj s Moooay S�pt 19
itto �or can
� . �pc up n 228
' ' i PoSit.OOS
' � -�i s'udent
Menf ,es ;5 aorm repJ
f flflltlWII or
�T and j'aov,a
ana
� " 'eas r� or Sen,or
WZMB
� ID M ZMB s Contem
. ape sno every Sun
M1 10 p m
. irtistj m Keith
f�901 Am� Grant
eon fa I
Ihf rasi Carolinian
JfSOdy
rm
� � �-�a every
- -f lUITI
i s -he
� (paper of East
� ?hm
� � put) s-ea tor
" tas'
" Ba'e �?o yearly
�Si Carolinian offices
oatec - the Old Sourh
m -he campus of
N C
'?Orion 757 4344 4J47
OFT
'nts
it. 17th
1
LSKEY
and Grinin'
tate of NC
mtil
BARN
p-ews Drive
oonosaoas
J
(8 pcs.)
?pies
4.25
5.99
3.99
Minorities Still Face Problems of Racism
NORTH
CHARLESTON,
S.C. (UPI) - Minori-
ty entrepreneurs still
face problems of
racism when seeking
loans for new business
ventures from
bankers, particularly
in the Southeast, a
Reagan administra-
tion official said
Monday.
"The financial
community is still the
biggest roadblock
said Stanley W. Tate,
Atlanta regional
director of the
Minority Business
Development Agency.
"A minority en-
trepreneur will put up
his car, house and
savings, but the bank
often is not willing to
respond with its fair
- .e�i lcapvjuu wiui 115
Former Star Gets Job
RALEIGH, NC.
(UPI) � Students
Against Drunk Driv-
ing have recruited
Steve Streater, a
former University of
North Carolina foot-
ball star paralyzed in
an auto accident, to
serve as their state
coordinator.
Streater began
work Sept. 1. His task
is to help educate
young people about
the hazards ot drink-
ing and uriving as well
as organizing a
statewide conference
on students and
drunken driving. He
also must organize
SADD chapters in 35
counties.
The 24-year-old
Sylva native was a star
defensive back and
punter for the Tai
Heels who had jusi
signed a pro footbal'
contract in August
1981 when his car
overturned on a slip-
pery road near
Raleigh-Durham Air-
port.
The accident left
Streater paralyzed
from the chest down.
Since then, he has
undergone physical
rehabilitation and
taken on a variety of
football
jobs.
share
Tate commented in
an interview after
speaking to a
workshop organized
by Rep. Thomas F.
Hartnett, R-S.C, to
inform minority
businessmen how they
can obtain more
government contracts
and grants.
"We know that as
we go into financial
institutions we have to
go to the higher ups
Tate said. "It's
changing, but it's tak-
ing a long time
Tate said the upper
eschelon of the bank-
ing industry appears
to be more amenable
to loaning money to
die management.
"The racism is
generally at the
worker level he
said. "The loan of-
ficers have to check
with their higher ups.
We just have to get to
the top level
Compounding the
problem is the tradi-
tionally conservative
nature of bankers,
particularly those in
the South, he said.
"This is a tough
racket Tate said in
his luncheon address
to some 50 workshop
participants. "It's not
easy for those of us in
government or those
of us on the other side
of the table
He said the govern-
ment has started a
major effort toward
building minority
businesses through in-
creased purchases by
federal agencies.
A presidential
directive now requires
agencies with pur-
chasing or grantmak-
ing authority to have
minority business
enterprise develop-
ment plans which will
encourage prime con-
tractors or grant reci-
pients to use minority
businesses, he said.
The MBDA has
established more than
100 minority business
development centers
nationwide to provide
management,
marketing, financial
and technical
assistance to com-
panies, he said.
The centers helped
start 1,700 new
minority enterprises,
saved more than 900
others and expanded
2,000 businesses this
year, Tate said. The
centers have
generated $580
million in contracts.
New Parking Regulations Are Given
The following is a list of the
areas near the university which
are currently designated by the
City of Greenville as controlled
parking (two-hour parking bet-
Fourth
Street
Street from
to Student
ween 8 a.m.
enforced).
and 5 p.m towing
1. Jarvis Street between East
Third and East Fifth Street.
2. East
Summit
Street.
3. East Sixth Street from Maple
Street to Elm Street.
4. Lewis Street from East Third
Street to East Fifth Street.
5. West Rock Springs Road
from East Fourteenth Street to
Edgewood Circle.
minority business
coaching developers than some
of the lower and mid-
Bedsheets Lead To
Prisoner's Escape
Jetliner Shooting Questioned
Nathaniel
Lintoo
By THERESA DULSKI
Staff Writer
Students were asked their opi-
nion on the Soviet
shooting down of a Korean
passenger airliner.
Ron Nathaniel, Junior,
Business�
"It was outrageous that they
can do something like this and get
away with it. We need to improve
or have some kind of system to
prevent this from happening
again. I don't see how a Soviet
pilot could have mistaken it for a
military aircraft
Sarah Coburn, Senior. English�
"If they received orders from
the Kremlin, some kind of actions
should be taken. But if they did it
on their own, you can't really
hold all the Soviet people respon-
sible
Liz Linton, Senior, English�
"It was as much of a
misunderstanding on one side as
the other because it seems like it
was a set of unfortunate cir-
cumstances and actions on both
sides
Herman Mclntyre, Graduate Stu-
dent, Business�
"it was a pretty bad thing to
do. ltwas another formr)f Soviet
imtimidation. The bad thing
about it is the only thing the
United States can do about it is
create a war. Sanctions don't
work, as shown through Carter's
days. If they can't get it from us
they can get it indirectly from
somene else
ROB POOLE � Photo Lab
SANTA ANA,
CALIF. (UPI) � An
inmate wearing only
his underwear escaped
from his third-floor
cell by lowering
himself down a
75-foot rope of braid-
ed bed sheets.
Michael Gonzales,
a rape suspect who
had escaped from the
Los Angeles County
Jail three months ago,
lowered himself out
been housing them to
alleviate some of the
overcrowding in the
building.
Deputies noticed
Gonzales as the car
was driving away and
later found his orange
jail jumpsuit, said
Newport Beach Police
Officer Tom Little.
Gonzales was
awaiting a court ap-
pearance in which he
Coburn
of his Orange County is charged with rape,
jail cell Monday, robbery, burglary and
climbed into a waiting
car and fled.
At the time, 300 in-
mates were sleeping
on the roof of the jail
where deputies have
escape from Los
Angeles County Jail
last June where he
was serving time for a
drunken driving con-
viction, police said.
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518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE. NC 27834
752-0888
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Mclntyre
STEAK HOUSE
Lunch Specials
Mon-Sat 11-2PM
Sept. 16th-17th-18th
4 12oz. Jr. Sirloin $2.19
8oz. Chopped Sirloin $2.49
Served with King Idaho Baked
Potato or FF and Texas Toast
Buy one 14oz. T-Bone
at reg. price $6.99
Get second 14oz. T-Bone
at 12 price $3.50
Served with King Idaho Baked
Potato or FF and Texas Toast
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved Salad Bar
I
I
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs. Air Conditioners,
Stereos, guns, gold silver,
diamonds, cameras and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm siie on
ly), video games A car-
tridges, power tools,
musical instruments,
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles, and
anything else of value.
Southern Pawn Shop,
located 405 Evans Street,
downtown. 7S2-24&4.
Park lane
is
Coming With
Dance and
Exercise Wear
Thurs. Sept. 15th
at Aerobic
Workshop
8:00-9:00
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GREENVILLE
752-0688
N C 27834
L-
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500 W. Greenville Blvd 7564)040
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
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1st � 2nd Trimester Abortions up to 11 Weeks-Free
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L






SHj �aat (Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, lw.i����
Darryl Brown, ��.�, Ed,tor
WAVERLY MERRITT. Mreclor of Advtrtistng ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports Ednor
Hunter Fisher, b,� Manager Patrick O'neill. News t.i�o,
ALI AFRASHTEH, Credit Manager GORDON IPOCK, Entertamment Edttor
Geoff Hudson. oMriMM Lizanne Jennings. &&&�
Clay Thornton, Tnhmcai sur�� Todd Evans, product,� Manager
Stptcmbtr 16, 198?
Opinion
Page 4
College Funding
State Has Greater Commitment
According to statistics compiled
by the ECU Office of Institutional
Research, state government ap-
propriations per student to ECU
have doubled over the last six years,
while the federal government ap-
propriation has increased
substantially less, by only about 35
percent.
In a report compiled last week,
the research office said the per-ECU
student funding from North
Carolina increased from $2,040 in
1977 to $4,090 in 1982 (the last year
for which figures are available),
while federal funds went from $197
to $252 over the same period.
Perhaps even more significantly, the
federal appropriation decreased
from 1981, when it was $278, to
1982 under the direction of the
Reagan administration.
Now, granted, the funding for
state colleges is primarily the job of
the state, and not the federal
government. However, the figures
represent the relative commitment
of each to higher education. The
size of the figures alone indicate
that the state carries the primary
responsibility for funding; its ap-
propriations are ten to 15 times that
of the national government. The im-
balance is seen in the rate of in-
REMANS
SOLUTION
F0RU.S.
SCHOOLS
crease. While the Hunt administra-
tion and the General Assembly have
more than outpaced inflation with
state budget appropriations, the
Carter administration barely match-
ed it at the national level, and the
Reagan administration cut funding
from 1981 to 1982 (while the Pen-
tagon bought nylon stool leg caps
for $1,100 each).
It seems that Gov. James Hunt
can make a good case for himself as
a "pro-education" governor, for he
has pushed for the increased fun-
ding every year, even when budgets
were tight and state employees'
salaries were frozen for a year. The
Reagan administration, however,
thought it best to cut the education
budget, which is already small,
while continuing to increase defense
spending. It seems illogical to look
for savings in an appropriation of
$278 per student, while completely
ignoring the waste of the defense
budget. One can support stronger
defense and still admit the Pentagon
is not perfect, and that its budget
management can be much improv-
ed.
The federal government carries
precious little of the cost of college
funding as it is � there is no
justification for cuts; there is good
reason for increases.
a��x�ff�;&4rua4&cv
Feldstein Has Answers
How come only one Reagan ad-
ministration official is talking about
the federal budget deficit? And
when he does, he gets attacked by
White House officials who want to
keep their jobs after 1984. Well, it
seems that Martin H. Feldstein,
chairman of the president's Council
of Economic Advisors, has again
berated the president's unwill-
ingness to deal with the politically
hot issue. And he has once again
been slapped in public by a cabinet
official � this time Treasury
Secretary Donald Regan.
Feldstein commented before a
meeting of the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce that huge budget deficits
caused by Reagan's slash and burn
economic policy is "doing substan-
tial damage" to the nation's in-
dustrial base. Regan, without men-
tioning Feldstein's name, practically
called him a liar.
Come on Mr. Regan, let's not be
a baby. Feldstein is right. The Presi-
dent definitely needs to address the
budget deficit issue. Put politics
aside at the White House. Do we
want to keep spending and spending
and cutting and cutting until we are
so far in debt that we begin to
resemble Brazil, Mexico and other
bankrupt countries? Well, if
Reagan, Regan and the rest of the
politicos in the White House don't
heed their advisor's advice, it could
happen.
President Reagan, a man born of
Proposition 13, must increase taxes.
If he believes a strong defense is
needed, he better have the cash on
hand to pay for his tanks and
planes. Likewise, if Democrats in
the House believe benevolent social
programs are in order, they better
get ready to raise 'em to.
With the risk of interest rates go-
ing up as the deficit increases, and
with major industries such as con-
struction affected by the high price
of money, Reagan had better listen
to Mr. Feldstein.
�&&PA
THff NEW W FROM ISRAEL OUST ANNEXED 15HUFFIB0ARP
COURT
Cops, Cans And Rambling Profs
By GREG RIDEOUT
Please permit me to ramble. I have no
world problems I wish to write about,
and thus you'll be spared my words of
wisdom. But (isn't there always a
"but"), there are a few things about our
wonderful campus I � and I'm sure
many others � get ticked about. Some
are easy to fix; others aren't. So let's
have a go at it, shall we?
First and foremost on my mind, and
everyone else's, is the ticket happy cop.
Now don't get me wrong; I know tickets
are useful and appropriate tools when
used properly, and everyone
understands that they must be tucked
behind wiper blades every so often. But,
gee wiz, there's one little man in par-
ticular who gets a gleamish, sinister
smile on his face each time he copies
down a license number.
Now you would think these public
safety officers (safety officer?) would
have a little heart with the parking pro-
blem on campus. Some do. But, it
should be institutionalized. Just a se-
cond, gotta go. My car's in a meter
space (the only space on the west end of
campus besides the Hardees' parking
lot).
I'm back, and wouldn't you know I
got a ticket. Which brings us to our next
problem. Now that I have the �'?&
cop's ticket, there isn't a trashcan within
walking distance to drop it in.
Most nice, ordinary, like-to-be
studious types at ECU don't wish to
throw their wrappers and empty coke
cups (or unwarranted tickets) on the
beautiful grounds of our beloved cam
pus. But, it seems like whoever the dim
wit was that planned the placement of
garbage cans on campus wasn't playing
with a full dumpster. You just can't
finish a Fudgesicle in front of Flanagan
and expect to throw the wrapper away in
the near future. No, unless you deviate
substantially from your path, you won't
be able to chuck it until you gel to
Mendenhall. Much too long a time to
hold a drippy wrapper.
The serious student, having just got
ten out of class and having walked com
pletely out of his way to dump his wrap-
per on Labor Day, is approaching the
library at 5:30 p.m. (Yes, this is the next
thing on my list.) But, low and behold.
Joyner and crew have closed up shop I
the dav. On the Sunday before Labor
Day, thev had been open to 12 p.m
that Mondav. a school day tor all of us.
they went home early Prem stupid for
a librar. huh�
You w ould think that a university that
made students go to school on a national
hohdav would at least Keep all the
facilities open and the stafl people work-
ing. But, thev didrt U
My final rambling tl g � ,es. for
those of you who tun ed thrc is
this far, this is it � teachers. I
think anyone who ha been here at
two semester, ot seven like 1 hae. has
run into at leas! ne Now, I don't mean
these profess - don't know hat thev
are teaching ! rig 1 � teach
it. 1 know ol one ?r, s .rrosedlyan
expert on s g, who can't even do
the work - and has students
correct her nonetheless.
7 wish 1 ki � a hat could be done
about all of tl fl I'm not even sure
there is ai fof most of these
things m the a - bureaucracy. Oh
yeah, does am
Left Must Take Stronger Stance
By JAY STONE
There are ramifications to the Korean
airline tragedy of two weeks ago which
go far beyond the event itself and which
have resulted in a political reaction that
has shaken the foundation of East-West
relations. The political right in the
United States has been able to capitalize
on the event by pointing to it as an ex-
ample of Soviet brutality and blatant
disregard for human rights. As a result,
public opinion has swung heavily in
favor of everything from funding the
MX and the B-l bomber to continuing
U.S. involvement in Central America.
Meanwhile, the left has largely either re-
mained silent about the incident or ap-
peared to act as an apologist for the
Soviets.
The left's position has served to
alienate Americans from it and,
possibly, from much of its political
agenda, such as the nuclear freeze. The
"Campus Forum
reaction appears to be ideologicallv flat-
footed because many leftist thinkers
have criticized the Soviet Union for be-
ing a brutal totalitarian regime.
In addition, the new left broke with
the old left on supporting the USSR.
Why, then, do we find the left seeking to
avoid viewing the downing of the
Korean jet as an atrocity committed in a
malicious manner by a brutal govern-
ment?
The facts do not make the soviet ex-
planation � that the airliner was
mistaken for a spy plane � seem plausi-
ble. The Soviets say, for instance, that
the plane was flying without lights.
However, according to the tape of the
Soviet pilot, he saw the plane's blinking
lights.
It should not be impossible to believe
that the Soviets might deliberately shoot
down a civilian aircraft. They'did it
before � in 1978. Moreover, an
authoritarian society frequently adopts a
reactionarv posture to other countries
Leftists should be more keenlv aware
of this than anvone; obviously m a
democracy this could not happen. The
left should also be consistent in its
ideology and condemn all violations of
human rights everywhere. Arms control.
after all, was never intended to be under-
taken in a spirit of blind trust except by
the most fanatical, who advocated
unilateral disarmament. The MX and
V. e B-l were not opposed because the
Soviets were felt to be docile and
peaceloving, but because it was felt that
the U.S. military deterrent is alreadv
sufficient, and opting for an MX that is
not absolutely necessarv while people
starve is immoral
The left should condemn the Soviet
action just as vocally as the right At the
same time it should be stressed that in-
cidents of comparable scope take place
frequently, sometimes with U.S. par
ticipation.
Hunger Story Brings Mixed Reactions
Is The East Carolinian a student
newspaper focusing on campus and
local events or is it a forum for Patrick
O'Neill, news editor of The East
Carolinian, to express his personal and
political opinions? I resent the fact that
The East Carolinian is being used in
this manner by O'Neill.
I agree with O'Neill that world
hunger is a major concern and that a
world free of nuclear arms would be a
better place in which to live. But
enough is enough. Must all of his ar-
ticles be on the same subjects? Surely
the job of a news editor does not in-
clude choosing a few pet issues and
reporting on them continuously.
I hope that The East Carolinian will
act to correct this problem. The
credibility of this newspaper is not be-
ing helped by the policies of its news
editor.
Jeff Quinn
Senior, History
"50,000 Deaths From Dramatic
Starvation" was the full-page, top
headline on page one of Wednesday's
The East Carolinian. There has, I am
told, been opposition to reporting
world hunger in this way in our campus
newspaper. Tentatively accepting that
this opposition exists, I feel an obliga-
tion to write my opinion.
My opinion is that the story is the
most important one of the Wednesdav
issue and that, since the reporter con
nects it with campus groups, it is ap-
propriately published by The East
Carolinian. It is important because,
although there are up to 200,000 deaths
from all causes daily, most of them are
not traceable to a single avoidable
cause. If 50,000 deaths per day can be
avoided by merely distributing
available food stocks and processing it
into culturally acceptable forms,
another page one story is needed to ex-
plain why this isn't done: for there are
reasons! Let the investigation con-
tinue, probed by your best reporters, to
the limits of your phone budget. If
earlier stroies on hunger had received
page one prominence, perhaps we
would be further along in uncovering
the institutional roots of this daily
tragedy, so that East Carolina Univer-
sity students seeking moral rooting for
their life's work could consider their
own talents and pick a major accor-
dingly.
If most ECU students don't care to
read about this subject, you face a cer-
tain necessary constraint. But fine
journalism, in the Pulitzer tradition,
entails leadership, not mere reflection
of an uninformed public.
Carroll Webber
The gall of your paper is appalling!
First, you barely cover one of the most
critical international incidents in recent
memory, and then you sav that you
didn't cover it because it is "the goal of
The East Carolinian to focus its news
coverage on campus and local events
Yet, on the next page is another article
on the International Fast For Life.
Funny, but I don't remember hearing
that the fast was occuring on campus
or in the Greenville area. So what was
the purpose of the article? To let peo-
ple know that there will be a vigil in
front of the Student Supply Store for
the fasters? Why couldn't this be put in
the "announcements" section bet-
ween the ZBT Little Sisters announce-
ment and the ECGC announcement. I
say, that if the Korean Massacre is not
worthy of The East Carolinian, then
neither is the International Fast For
Life.
David R. Payne
Sophomore, Drama

Fast En
Coot. from Pane 1
the Euromissiles
Daniel &a
Euromissiie
term used to describe
cruise and Pershing II
missiles which the
U.S. plans to deploy
in Western
later this year
On Tuesday, a
group � EC I
students, fa J 11 y
members and some
Greenville residents
participated in a silent
vigil in support of the
fasters in front of the
ECU Student Supply
Store The par-
ticipants dressed in
white shirts and -
green arm bands, a
symbol of life.
Fed
a dramat
to
pec;
I I
SI
a pan
Dan.
talk nvitl
. �
W�
hurt
Somei

Officals Cd
NORFOLK. A
(UPI) � A national
women's pv
group criticized Sen
John Warner. R- a
and President Re
for their res. rd
appointmei
women to the rederai
bench.
Demitra Lambr s
spokeswomai - the
National Wom
Political Cauc .
Washington, said the
NWPC sent a letu
Warner to "ej
serious concern"
"he probable appoint-

Fe
-
-
a
-
it c
1
f
i
Your choi�
Super Blen
Anti-freezI
CastTol D.O.T.4
261
Mondav Nil
on our BIG-
K great way to have
great time. With all thi
honest to Gitti's goodi
and our Happ Hour S
you already know �h
the winner is.
Corner
The be�
- M





OUT Eaat Qlarnlittian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, General Manage,
Darryl Brown, Managing Editor
Waverly Merritt, arrcor of mmu� Cindy Pleasants, sport, Editor
Hunter Fisher. �� Manager Patrick O'neill, mm Editor
ALI AFRASHTEH. Credit Manager GORDON IPOCK, Enltamment Editor
Geoff Hudson, om ��� Lizanne Jennings, � Eduor
Clay Thornton, mum su.� Todd Evans, product,� Manager
September 16, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
College Funding
State Has Greater Commitment
According to statistics compiled
by the ECU Office of Institutional
Research, state government ap-
propriations per student to ECU
have doubled over the last six years,
while the federal government ap-
propriation has increased
substantially less, by only about 35
percent.
In a report compiled last week,
the research office said the per-ECU
student funding from North
Carolina increased from $2,040 in
1977 to $4,090 in 1982 (the last year
for which figures are available),
while federal funds went from $197
to $252 over the same period.
Perhaps even more significantly, the
federal appropriation decreased
from 1981, when it was $278, to
1982 under the direction of the
Reagan administration.
Now, granted, the funding for
state colleges is primarily the job of
the state, and not the federal
government. However, the figures
represent the relative commitment
of each to higher education. The
size of the figures alone indicate
that the state carries the primary
responsibility for funding; its ap-
propriations are ten to 15 times that
of the national government. The im-
balance is seen in the rate of in-
REMANS
SOLUTION
F0RU.S.
SCHOOLS
crease. While the Hunt administra-
tion and the General Assembly have
more than outpaced inflation with
state budget appropriations, the
Carter administration barely match-
ed it at the national level, and the
Reagan administration cut funding
from 1981 to 1982 (while the Pen-
tagon bought nylon stool leg caps
for $1,100 each).
It seems that Gov. James Hunt
can make a good case for himself as
a "pro-education" governor, for he
has pushed for the increased fun-
ding every year, even when budgets
were tight and state employees'
salaries were frozen for a year. The
Reagan administration, however,
thought it best to cut the education
budget, which is already small,
while continuing to increase defense
spending. It seems illogical to lor k
for savings in an appropriation of
$278 per student, while completely
ignoring the waste of the defense
budget. One can support stronger
defense and still admit the Pentagon
is not perfect, and that its budget
management can be much improv-
ed.
The federal government carries
precious little of the cost of college
funding as it is � there is no
justification for cuts; there is good
reason for increases.
Feldstein Has Answers
How come only one Reagan ad-
ministration official is talking about
the federal budget deficit? And
when he does, he gets attacked by
White House officials who want to
keep their jobs after 1984. Well, it
seems that Martin H. Feldstein,
chairman of the president's Council
of Economic Advisors, has again
berated the president's unwill-
ingness to deal with the politically
hot issue. And he has once again
been slapped in public by a cabinet
official � this time Treasury
Secretary Donald Regan.
Feldstein commented before a
meeting of the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce that huge budget deficits
caused by Reagan's slash and burn
economic policy is "doing substan-
tial damage" to the nation's in-
dustrial base. Regan, without men-
tioning Feldstein's name, practically
called him a liar.
Come on Mr. Regan, let's not be
a baby. Feldstein is right. The Presi-
dent definitely needs to address the
budget deficit issue. Put politics
aside at the White House. Do we
want to keep spending and spending
and cutting and cutting until we are
so far in debt that we begin to
resemble Brazil, Mexico and other
bankrupt countries? Well, if
Reagan, Regan and the rest of the
politicos in the White House don't
heed their advisor's advice, it could
happen.
President Reagan, a man born of
Proposition 13, must increase taxes.
If he believes a strong defense is
needed, he better have the cash on
hand to pay for his tanks and
planes. Likewise, if Democrats in
the House believe benevolent social
programs are in order, they better
get ready to raise 'em to.
With the risk of interest rates go-
ing up as the deficit increases, and
with major industries such as con-
struction affected by the high price
of money, Reagan had better listen
to Mr. Feldstein.
�X�B3J
W! NEW W FROM ISRAEL UU5TANNEXEP THE 5HUFFLEB0ARP
COURT
Cops, Cans And Rambling Profs
By GREG RIDEOUT
Please permit me to ramble. I have no
world problems I wish to write about,
and thus you'll be spared my words of
wisdom. But (isn't there always a
"but"), there are a few things about our
wonderful campus I � and I'm sure
many others � get ticked about. Some
are easy to fix; others aren't. So let's
have a go at it, shall we?
First and foremost on my mind, and
everyone else's, is the ticket happy cop.
Now don't get me wrong; I know tickets
are useful and appropriate tools when
used properly, and everyone
understands that they must be tucked
behind wiper blades every so often. But,
gee wiz, there's one little man in par-
ticular who gets a gleamish, sinister
smile on his face each time he copies
down a license number.
Now you would think these public
safety officers (safety officer?) would
have a little heart with the parking pro-
blem on campus. Some do. But, it
should be institutionalized. Just a se-
cond, gotta go. My car's in a meter
space (the only space on the west end of
campus besides the Hardees' parking
lot).
I'm back, and wouldn't you know I
got a ticket. Which brings us to our next
problem. Now that I have the ��?&
cop's ticket, there isn't a trashcan within
walking distance to drop it in.
Most nice, ordinary, like-to-be-
studious types at ECU don't wish to
throw their wrappers and empty coke
cups (or unwarranted tickets) on the
beautiful grounds of our beloved cam
pus. But, it seems like whoever the dim-
wit was that planned the placement of
garbage cans on campus wasn't playing
with a full dumpster. You just can't
finish a Fudgesicle in front of Flanagan
and expect to throw the wrapper away in
the near future. No, unless you deviate
substantially from your path, you won't
be able to chuck it until you get to
Mendenhall. Much too long a time to
hold a drippy wrapper.
The serious student, having just got
ten out of class and having walked com-
pletely out of his way to dump his wrap-
per on Labor Day, is approaching the
library at 5:30 p.m. (Yes, this is the next
thing on my list.) But, low and behold.
Joyner and crew have closed up shop for
the day. On the Sunday before Labor
Day, they had been open to 12 p.m but
that Monday, a school day for all of us.
they went home early. Pretty stupid for
a library, huh?
You would think that a university that
made students go to school on a national
holiday would at least keep all the
facilities open and the staff people work-
ing. But. they didn't Why?
My final rambling thought � yes, for
those of you who hae struggled through
this far, this is it � js on bad teachers. I
think anyone who has been here at least
two semesters, or seen like 1 hae, has
run into at least one. Now, 1 don't mean
these professor don't know what they
are teaching I'm saying they can't teach
it. I know ot one teacher, supposedly an
expert on something, uho can't even do
the work correctly � and has students
correct her nonetheless.
Twish 1 kneu what could be done
about all ot this stuff. I'm not even sure
there is an answer for most of these
things in the school's bureaucracy. Oh
yeah, does anybod) care.
Left Must Take Stronger Stance
By JAY STONE
There are ramifications to the Korean
airline tragedy of two weeks ago which
go far beyond the event itself and which
have resulted in a political reaction that
has shaken the foundation of East-West
relations. The political right in the
United States has been able to capitalize
on the event by pointing to it as an ex-
ample of Soviet brutality and blatant
disregard for human rights. As a result,
public opinion has swung heavily in
favor of everything from funding the
MX and the B-l bomber to continuing
U.S. involvement in Central America.
Meanwhile, the left has largely either re-
mained silent about the incident or ap-
peared to act as an apologist for the
Soviets.
The left's position has served to
alienate Americans from it and,
possibly, from much of its political
agenda, such as the nuclear freeze. The
Campus Forum
reaction appears to be ideologically flat-
footed because many leftist thinkers
have criticized the Soviet Union for be-
ing a brutal totalitarian regime.
In addition, the new left broke with
the old left on supporting the USSR.
Why, then, do we find the left seeking to
avoid viewing the downing of the
Korean jet as an atrocity committed in a
malicious manner by a brutal govern-
ment?
The facts do not make the soviet ex-
planation � that the airliner was
mistaken for a spy plane � seem plausi-
ble. The Soviets say, for instance, that
the plane was flying without lights
However, according to the tape of the
Soviet pilot, he saw the plane's blinking
lights.
It should not be impossible to believe
that the Soviets might deliberately shoot
down a civilian aircraft. They did it
before � in 1978. Moreover, an
authoritarian society frequently adopts a
reactionary posture to other countries.
Leftists should be more keenly aware
of this than anyone; obviously in a
democracy this could not happen. The
left shouid also be consistent in irs
ideology and condemn all violations of
human rights everywhere. Arms control,
after all, was never intended to be under-
taken in a spirit of blind trust except by
the most fanatical, who advocated
unilateral disarmament. The MX and
the B-l were not opposed because the
Soviets were felt to be docile and
peaceloving, but because it was felt that
the U.S. military deterrent is already
sufficient, and opting for an MX that is
not absolutely necessary while people
starve is immoral.
The left should condemn the Soviet
action just as vocally as the right. At the
same time it should be stressed that in-
cidents of comparable scope take place
frequently, sometimes with U.S. par-
ticipation.
Hunger Story Brings Mixed Reactions
Is The East Carolinian a student
newspaper focusing on campus and
local events or is it a forum for Patrick
O'Neill, news editor of The East
Carolinian, to express his personal and
political opinions? I resent the fact that
The East Carolinian is being used in
this manner by O'Neill.
I agree with O'Neill that world
hunger is a major concern and that a
world free of nuclear arms would be a
better place in which to live. But
enough is enough. Must all of his ar-
ticles be on the same subjects? Surely
the job of a news editor does not in-
clude choosing a few pet issues and
reporting on them continuously.
I hope that The East Carolinian will
act to correct this problem. The
credibility of this newspaper is not be-
ing helped by the policies of its news
editor.
Jeff Quinn
Senior, History
"50,000 Deaths From Dramatic
Starvation" was the full-page, top
headline on page one of Wednesday's
The East Carolinian. There has, I am
told, been opposition to reporting
world hunger in this way in our campus
newspaper. Tentatively accepting that
this opposition exists, I feel an obliga-
tion to write my opinion.
My opinion is that the story is the
most important one of the Wednesday
issue and that, since the reporter con-
nects it with campus groups, it is ap-
propriately published by The East
Carolinian. It is important because,
although there are up to 200,000 deaths
from all causes daily, most of them are
not traceable to a single avoidable
cause. If 50,000 deaths per day can be
avoided by merely distributing
available food stocks and processing it
into culturally acceptable forms,
another page one story is needed to ex-
plain why this isn't done: for there are
reasons! Let the investigation con-
tinue, probed by your best reporters, to
the limits of your phone budget. If
earlier stroies on hunger had received
page one prominence, perhaps we
would be further along in uncovering
the institutional roots of this daily
tragedy, so that East Carolina Univer-
sity students seeking moral rooting for
their life's work could consider their
own talents and pick a major accor-
dingly.
If most ECU students don't care to
read about this subject, you face a cer-
tain necessary constraint. But fine
journalism, in the Pulitzer tradition,
entails leadership, not mere reflection
of an uninformed public.
Carroll Webber
The gall of your paper is appalling!
First, you barely cover one of the most
critical international incidents in recent
memory, and then you say that you
didn't cover it because it is "the goal of
The East Carolinian to focus its news
coverage on campus and local events
Yet, on the next page is another article
on the International Fast For Life.
Funny, but I don't remember hearing
that the fast was occuring on campus
or in the Greenville area. So what was
the purpose of the article? To let peo-
ple know that there will be a vigil in
front of the Student Supply Store for
the fasters? Why couldn't this be put in
the "announcements" section, bet-
ween the ZBT Little Sisters announce-
ment and the ECGC announcement. I
say, that if the Korean Massacre is not
worthy of The East Carolinian, then
neither is the International Fast For
Life.
David R. Payne
Sophomore, Drama
1
Fast En
Coat. From Page 1
the Euromissiles
Daniel said
Euromissiles is the
term used to describe
cruise and Pershing II
missiles which the
U.S. plans to deploy
in Western Europe
later this year
On Tuesda .
group of EC L
students, faculty
members and some
Greenville residents
participated in a silent
vigil in support of the
fasters ifi front of the
ECU Student Supr
Store. The par-
ticipants dressed in
white shirts and wore
green arm banu
symbol of life, the
d
tat) a dramatl
tion to
people's h-
ECU C a
js mn
Sister Heie
a participa
gil.
Dame! stopped
- I aith the
I thii
Hhe
D
the
s 1 a u .
hun
Son .
DC
St . . 1

group
Officals Cr
NORFOLK, A
(L'PI) � A national
women's political
group criticized Sen.
John Warner. R-Ya .
and President Reagan
for their records oi
appointments o:
women to the federal
bench.
Demitra Lamb:
spokeswoman for the
National Women's
Political Caucus in
Washington, said the
NWPC sent a letter to
Warner to "express
serious concern" over
the probable appoint-
ment of J.
WilK ii
can
The
Sept. v ar .
� th v
Warner houk
sure thai a
woman" an
Wilk
the cou
The w
als, I

mir.
u considers a
Your choi(
Super Blerv
Anti-freezl
Costrol D.O.T.4
261
Monday Ni
on our BIG-Sl
jmgZ&
W Si
A great way to have
great time. With all thi
honest to Gatti's goodn
and our Happy Hour S
you already know wh
the winner is.
Corner
The bestl

mmmp
-
. iViiOv ifi
m mmmm
mtmmmr
i wmn n�i





"V
?
5KUFFLEB0ARP
g Profs
osed up shop for
laj before Labor
�n to 12 p.m but
Jay for all of us,
Pretty stupid for
ai a university that
' school on a nationaJ
east keep all the
'aff people work-
' Why?
B thought � yes, for
' struggled through
is on bad teachers. I
has been here at least
even like I have, has
one. Now, I don't mean
lon'l know what they
ng they can't teach
ne teacher, supposedly an
nothing, who can't even do
� and has students
ir nonetheless.
w what could be done
stuff. I'm not even sure
�er tor most of these
school's bureaucracy. Oh
care.
It
tance
ture to other countries.
i be more keenly aware
nyone; obviously in a
iuld not happen. The
consistent in its
ndemn all violations of
��here Arms control,
;ver intended to be under-
t of blind trust except by
who advocated
.ament. The MX and
ot opposed because the
to be docile and
a use it was felt that
deterrent is already
opting for an MX that is
necessary while people
morah
should condemn the Soviet
-ally as the right. At the
.hould be stressed that in-
Tiparable scope take place
sometimes with U.S. par-
eactions
in the Pulitzer tradition,
a -hip, not mere reflection
iformed public.
Carroll Webber
t your paper is appalling!
barely cover one of the most
ernational incidents in recent
Pnd tnen you say that you
r it because it is "the goal of
arohnian to focus its news
n campus and local events
next page is another article
ternational Fast For Life.
I don't remember hearing
: was occuring on campus
reenville area. So what was
f of the article? To let peo-
Itnat there will be a vigil in
7 Student Supply Store for
Why couldn't this be put in
uncements" section, bet-
BT Little Sisters announce-
he ECGC announcement. I
the Korean Massacre is not
The East Carolinian, then
the International Fast For
I-
David R. Payne
Sophomore, Drama


Fast Ended By Participants
( unt From Pao 1 ca ���
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 16. 1983
r-l
Cont. From Page 1
the Euromissiles
Daniel said.
Euromissiles is the
term used to describe
cruise and Pershing II
missiles which the
U.S. plans to deploy
in Western Europe
later this year.
On Tuesday, a
group of ECU
students, faculty
members and some
Greenville residents
participated in a silent
vigil in support of the
fasters in front of the
said
fast)
tion
peopl
ECU
I feel it's (the fasting were on "too
dramatic ac-
to change
's hearts said
Catholic
small a scale to do
anything
I
campus minister
Sister Helen Shondell,
a participant in the
vigil.
ECU student Mary
Daniel stopped by to
talk with the people
vigiling. "I think it's
(the fast) a good
idea Daniel said.
"We are very close to
the wholesale
slaughter of the
human race.
be
guess
everybody's got their them back. We've got
own point of view to get them before
student Scott Bailey they get us
said. "But we've got Student Jay Morris
to have some kind of said the people vigil-
defense. If they blow ing were wasting their
us, we've got to blow time, "Actually I sup-
port Ronald Reagan
and the defense
budget Morris said.
"They've (the fasters)
got a juvenilistic view
of life. They're (the
Russians) not going to
stop just because we
do.
Fishermen Upset About Peat
Cnnt Wftm d� � � �
Cont. From Page 1 capable of living only
operations. Fresh in saltwater. A large
water from the peat amount of freshwater
would flow into the would adversely effect
inland waterways and these species.
ECU Student Supply Something has to
Store. The par- done
ticipants dressed in Student Ronald
white shirts and wore Hall said the fast was
green arm bands, a a good idea, but the
symbol of life, they group of people
NORFOLK, VA.
(UPI) � A national
women's political
group criticized Sen.
John Warner, R-Va
and President Reagan
for their records of
appointments of
women to the federal
bench.
Demitra Lambros,
spokeswoman for the
National Women's
Political Caucus in
Washington, said the
NWPC sent a letter to
Warner to "express
serious concern" over
the probable appoint-
ment of J. Harvie
Wilkinson III to a va-
cant seat on the
Federal Appellate
Court.
The letter, dated
Sept. 9 and signed by
NWPC Chairwoman
Kathy Wilson, said
Warner should make
sure that a "qualified
woman" and not
Wilkinson is named to
the court.
The NWPC letter
also criticized Warner
and the Reagan Ad-
ministration for what
it considers a poor
eventually into the
Pamlico and
Albemarle Sounds.
According to
Johnson, this would
constitute a problem
because inland water-
ways are crucial to the
reproduction of some
seafood species
record in appointing
women to the federal
bench.
In July, Warner
said the White House
was going to
nominate Wilkinson,
38, to the seat on the
court, which hears
cases from Virginia,
Maryland, West
Virginia, North
Carolina, South
Carolina and
Delaware.
Wilkinson is being
considered for the
economy.
"Peat is not
economically feasible
as a fuel Johnson
said. The methanol
produced by this pro-
ject would only be
sufficient to keep the
country running for
two days, she added.

�K
Both the mercury r rr u'
and the freshwater iUtMemity HOUSC Robbed
problems are
a con
cern of the fishing in-
dustry, Johnson said,
adding that the
fishing industry is
responsible for a $1
billion addition to the
North Carolina
An early Sunday morning theft was
reported by two members of the Lambda
Chi Alpha fraternity to Greenville police.
"It appears someone walked in and took
some things said fraternity president Ran-
dy Tyler. The stolen property included a
push button telephone, an AMFM receiver
and $15.
4
S?
iy
OWa
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JohnR3; by iJudge, 8radua� from law
John Butzner Jr. of school, he has never
ly Women's
Virginia. Traditional- praticted law and has
ly, a vacating judge is been involved in legal
replaced by a person matters for only
from the same state. about eight years
Wilkinson, a Ms. Wilson's letter
staunch conservative, said Wilkinson's legal
is on leave from the experience "falls
University of Virginia
to the Justice Depart-
ment as a top-ranking
civil-rights lawyer.
"Mr. Wilkinson's
lack of experience in
the legal arena is well
known Wilson's let-
ter said. "In the
1-12 years since
SH0NEY&
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short of the minimum
12 years experience
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The NWPC gave
the Justice Depart-
ment the names and
resumes of four
women for the 4th
Circuit seat, Ms.
Wilson's letter said,
and "and any one
would be an ad-
mirable choice for the
position under con-
sideration
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) S v kil IN1AN
Style
t PTI
Brian
Cruise Over Greenville In A Big Balloon
Take It Away'
n McKenzie's 'grape escape" prepare to take off into the
skies advertising this commercial banner.
N.C. Symphony
Negotiate Their
Contract Disputes
Bv FII7ABFTH JENNINGS
Do you ever get the urge to
travel around Greenville? Well, it
that doesn't sound too exciting.
how about drinking champagne
and getting high around Green
ville. I mean, literally high!
Balloons Aloft of Greenville.
Inc on the corner of Twelfth and
Evans St offers balloon rides foi
a fee of $75 per person. This mav
be a little expensive for your
budget, so EGG students recievc a
discount.
"The serenity 1 feel up there is
hard to express, aid Ivanson
McKenzie. licensed balloon pilot
and President oi Balloons Alofl
McKenzie started his business in
July and has been serving the
Greenville community and vain
pus since
McKenzie owns two balloons,
both 70 feet tall and 60 feel wide,
each almost two sears old. I
balloon is multicolored I ate
use, and a purple balloon,
nicknamed the "grape escape .
used for advertising and riders v
the end o the month, McKenzie
will buy another multk
balloon for commercial
Along with treating
with this high adventure, McKen-
zie also teaches people
"1 never know how long m
rides last, said McKenzie. "After
I'm up in the air the wind is in
control, 1 itist have the power to
go up and down Although these
rides are estimated to be an hour
long, some have lasted up to two
hours. McKenzie prefers to stay
just above treetop levelIt's
more fun that way because y
can talk to people as you go bv
The balloon basket holds three
adults and a pilot lake off is
usually at King's across from Pitt
Plaza, but landing is a different
storv "We'll land in a field or a
parking lot, we never know
Putting a balloon up in the air is
not a one ma-n ordeal. A ballo
team consists oi four people
nv persons who are interested
in affiliating themselves with the
hot ail balloon in encouraged to
come out and join us Pi
licenses are not necessary foi a
member ol a balloon team.
rking with the I i �uld
help in getting a license. A per
on a balloon
e tak(
ding, and eventually ride the
basl '� icense
lividual would keep a
hours . n in the baskei
incidental needs ten I
air time '� ertified
ense
McKenzie's bal
two flights a W r, 'V
up in the earlv n
late afternoon said Mcf
'The reason being tl
more calm than in the middle I
the day
"According
Aviation Asm . the
hot air balloon is tl
aviation ' -
"Although an
has some deg
only torn,
m interfering �
but McKenzie
is very
i �
e r.
"P- �
� ; '
I
the
i
n I he
tting the
iannec
at all
ail gan �
m the
I air
for
j with
a balloon
other top
far
-alloon
ames
� I
- ears of
e to rr

: C IS
uit must
? - -
n The
i
i
.
nclude
n of

-
Bv ROBIN KR
- itn
rth Carolina Symphony,
eduled to perform Sept. 14,
s cancelled because of a con-
betwe s mphony
.
-

the
sym-
. - en m

t ol em
g theii
I Mr. Rudolf Alex-
tin � mittee
nted
ed
"doubly disappointing" because
the symphony performance was to
have opened the artist series pro-
gram at ECU. Having a cancella-
tion at the start, and such a major
me, is getting the series oft on the
wrong foot.
"All oi the reports in various
-spapers the last several weeks
concerning difficulties between
igenment and musicians has
negative effect on season
kei sales Alexander said.
The Artists Series Commitee
.�d two dates for a possi
ble rescheduling by the symphony
fice. One of those dates is "out
the question according to
VJexander who says that Wright
Auditorium is already booked for
the East Carolina Symphony.
"We assure all artist series
patrons and those interested, that
the symphony will be rescheduled
or the committee will book an
outstanding ensemble to replace
-aid Alexander.
'Big Country' Debut Can Move Mountains
When Big Country 's "field Of
lire" soared into the U.K. top 10
in March 1983 it marked the se
cond coming of the electric guitar
as the sound to ring the changes in
contemporary music. "Fields Of
Fire" is a classic single; a whirl-
wind of crashing, slashing guitar
lines married to a manic Scots jig
with a hard headlong beat behind.
With it Big Country cut a broad
and bloody swathe through the
soft synthe pop and faked-up
funk that dominates the airwaves
of late. When "Fields Of Fire"
burst upon the charts it gave he to
the notion that guitar music is
dead and buried along with the
music of the seventies.
The song was written by Stuart
Adamson, whose guitar first cane
to prominence in The Skids � a
British group whose wild and
reckless career lasted four years
During that time they released
three great British albums and had
a string of definite English hit
singles like "Into The Valley
"Masquerade and "Working
For The Yankee Dollar " But
Stuart's departure in Spring 1981
(deeply disappointed that the
band's youthful vigor had faded
into the fashion show of futurism)
signalled the beginning of the end
for Scotland's premier punk com-
bo. Singer Richard Jobson re-
mained in London to try his hand
at acting while Adamson returned
to his wife and family in
Dunermline to put in the ground-
work on a band that would be
called Big C ou
The first recruit nvai another
tarist, 22-years-oid Bruce v
son � a biker, barfly and punk
afficianado who needed no en-
couragement to leave a job scrub-
bing out nuclear submarines
docked in the Firth of Forth. The
memory of his boots glowing
radioactive green in a disco still
raises uneasy laughter. Bruce and
Stuart immediatelv began to map
out the Big Country guitar sje
"Even before The Skids, when 1
was playing danehalls in
Scotland in 19"6, 1 alwavs said 1
wanted to do things with guitars
nobody has ever done
beforesays Stuart in an accent
as thick as porridge. "I wanted to
use them as integral, even or-
chestrated, elements within a
song. Not just rythm and lead
guitars. I almost got it right with
The Skids, only the enjoyment
went out of it after our second
album, Days In Europe After we
split 1 felt the pressure on me to
get a singles deal immediately and
trade on whatever reputation 1
had. But I felt that would onlv
cheapen what Bruce and 1 were
trying to achieve So I preferred to
wait until Bruce and 1 had
something which could be ac-
cepted on its own terms
Big Country's early career suf
fered a number of setbacks and
false starts before it really got
underway. The most notable be
ing a thankfully underpubhcised
tour, supporting horror-rock star
Alice Cooper on the Spring of
$2
1 i eai Vdamson ana
'earned up with
1 ondon's brightest musi
s, 25-years-old Tons Butier
id Mark Brzezicki
� who were already the en-
vy of rhvthm sections many sears
their senioi Fresh from studio
stints with Pete Townshend and
the Pr- c two shared
- pioneering spirit
but also brought real skill and ex-
pertise to flesh out the inspiration
Sadly the band's real splendor
15 hardK appreciated on their
first British single for Mercurv.
the Chris Thomas-produced
"Harvest Home' Released in
tober 1982 it onlv struggled in-
to the top 100 and was largely ig-
nored bv all but the band's staun-
ches; fans But with new wave
wonderbov Steve I illywhite at the
controls, the next single "Fields
Of Fire" smashed into the charts
at 69, peaking at number 10 five
weeks later Big Country's name
was nude, and the ghost of The
Skids was laid to rest forever.
Now wnhBig Country's Mer-
curv PolyGram debut it looks
like the band are shaping up as the
son of outfit who'll defy
categories and make history. "Big
Country are not punk, new wave,
heavy metal, progressive or
pop, "says Adamson. "If you
realls want me to tell you what
we're about, then I'd say Big
Coutry Pia stirring, spirited
stuff Music to move mountains
bv
r.
Bntn Huski
Greenvi
Now B
M o s t d e 11
true qua
delivery costs
PIZZA INN ha
all that
We set
pizzas ai
No Surd
give FR
our iaraj
pizzas
CALL 7S8-26
I
I
I
I
I
L

$1
Gion





V

n
ected to cheer on the
colors dotting the
e originally planned to
purple balloon at all
home football games,
administrator pro-
he balloon from the
wise a hot air
io! class) enough for
nie explained with
words that a balloon
enough for other top
North Carolina. As far
knows his balloon
e present ai our games.
ate pilot the appli-
be at least 16 years of
be able to read,
d understand the English
x medical certificate is
the applicant must
he has no known
that makes him
iloi a free balloon. The
ass a written test
V Also, theappli-
e at least 10 hours in
which must include
under the supervision of
These pilot instruc-
ed b McKenzie.
ie is very enthused
business and his
He urges any balloon
ome and learn how to
ong for the ride.
the case.
ling is one of the finest
-cenes ever filmed, anc
ids superbly as th
aging lawyer, Galvin.
erdict appears at
Hendrix Theatrt
id tomorrow night.
tains
�hat year Adamson and
Tinally teamed up with
london's brightest musi-
l-years-old Tony Butler
ind Mark Brzezicki
imo were already the en-
fchm sections many years
lor. Fresh from studio
h Pete Townshend and
triers, there two shared
Ury's pioneering spirit
Jrought real skill and ex-
flesh out the inspiration.
ie band's real splendor
Jly appreciated on their
Ish single for Mercury,
lis Thomas-produced
Home Released in
982 it only struggled in-
100 and was largely ig-
1 but the band's staun-
But with new wave
ly Steve Lillywhite at the
I' ie next single "Fields
jsmashed into the charts
kking at number 10 five
k Big Country's name
, and the ghost of The
I laid to rest forever.
hthBig Country's Mer-
Gram debut it looks
id are shaping up as the
outfit who'll defy
and make history. "Big
re not punk, new wave,
etal, progressive or
' Adamson. "If you
Jt me to tell you what
ut, then I'd say Big
May stirring, spirited
sic to move mountains
Brian Huskey Performs
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 16. I9J3
Brian Huskey, a Charlotte, N.C.
singersongwriterguitaristhum-
orist, will perform at Mendenhall
Student Center, on the patio Fri-
day, Sept. 16 at 9 p.m. Admission
is free. Brian, one of the hardest
working entertainers in the college
and club market is in the midst of
another one of his lengthy and
hectic tours.
Brian Huskey began his musical
career in London, England, learn-
ing guitar from some of the finest
street musicians in the world. He
soon graduated to the ranks of the
regular subway station per-
formers, perfecting his musical
style and projection, as well as ad-
ding some zany humor and
theatrics which are an intergral
part of the current show. From his
experiences as a roving singer for
a year in England, he retained a
wealth of stories and memories
and he's always relating one or
two of them during the course of a
performance.
The music itself has a down-
home pace and flavor to it �
touching on folk, bluegrass, and
country-rock, it apppeals to a
wide variety of listners. In addi-
tion to his own original tunes,
Brian performs songs by a diver-
sified list of writers such as Arlo
Guthrie, Jerry Jeff Walker, John
Prine and Jackson Browne. A
good portion of the show is
humor-oriented; with songs,
stories, and commentary on a
wide and varied list of subjects
such as college life, road travel,
and, as Brian puts it, "everyday
life in the left-turn lane
Brian has released two recor-
dings to date; one album, The
Road Fever Rag, which was
critically acclaimed amongst folk
contemporary reviewers alike;
and an EP, Fine Pickin' and Grin-
nin' from the State of N.C. Com-
bined sales to date total over
10,000 copies with national
distribution. Brian produced and
.

-2s�
Brian Huskey will perform tonight on the Mendenhall patio at 9 p.m.
jBHNrvm
Szechunn Gmrden
) C9
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for lunch and dinner.
Daily Luncheon Specials
Only $2.45
Dinner Combination Platters
Sunday Buffet
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Open:
MonThursl 1:30-9:30
Fridayll:30-10:30
Saturday- 5:00-10:30
Sunday-12:00-9:30
100 East Tenth St. Call for Take-Out
Greenville N.C. 27834 Phone 757-1818
Pizza inn
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marketed both projects. In recent
years, he has toured with and
opened concerts for such major
acts as Juice Newton, Leon
Russell, Arlo Guthrie, Roger
McGuinn and Pure Prarie
League. Lawrence Levy, road
manager for Juice Newton, said
of Brian: "He is undoubtedly the
hardest working singer on his cir-
cuit today, and certainly one of
the most talented
Don't miss the show, presented
by The Student Union Cof-
feehouse Committee in conjunc-
tion with Gold Hill Productions.
Come early for good seats � the
show promises to be wild and
wonderful.
V


Got some free time? Take a balloon ride from Balloons Aloft of Greenville, Inc.
.� � � Vtaj

$
M
n
I
H
m
��

?X�.
���;�:�;
C'Kl
PET VILLAGE

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W0000000000004000000000000000000000000040t000400t00440000S00004t
10 GALLON STARTER KITS
$17.00
INCLUDES
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512 E. Nth St.
(2 Blocks W. of Boy's Dorms)
We Specialize in Home Cooked Food
All You Can Eat Vegetables
on Large Plate $3.85-tax
(1 meat. 3 veg bread and tea)
Daily Specials
$1.99 plus tax and drink served 11-2
(1 meat, 2 veg. and bread)
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Fried Chicken or Bar-B-Q Chicken
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take out
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items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Sept 17, 1983.
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
AOVEmSEO ITEM
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Each of these adver
tised items Is re-
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available for sate in
each Kroger sav-on
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you your choice of a
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Limit one manufac-
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KROGER PLAIN OR
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$459
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24-Oz.
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a.






THF FASTC AROI INIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 16, 1983
Page 8
Rejoicing Pirates Still Flying High
B, CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports titilof
Although days have passed
since the Pirates beat top rival
N c State 22-16, ECU head
coach Ed Emory is still flying
high.
"Words cannot describe my
feelings Emory said earlier this
week. 'That was probably the
greatest thrill in my life
Since the Pirates play only one
in-state school, the meeting bet-
ween I CU and N.C. State has
become one of the most fierce
rivalries in the South.
During the past few years, East
Carolina has been eliminated
from the schedules of neighboring
universities. The Pirates haven't
played Duke or UNC-Chapel Hill
since 1981, and their last game
with Wake Forest was in 1979.
When Emory was asked if he
thought the Wolfpack might also
want to exclude ECU from future
schedules, he didn't hesitate to
answer. "1 sure hope not he
said. "If State had won, then they
would have enjoyed the thrill of
winning as much as ECU did.
What take that away0
"N.C. State has become a great
rival and great competition; that's
what college football is all
about
Emory believes the Wolfpack
won't follow in the footsteps of
their ACC colleagues. "N.C.
State is more mature and more
business-minded Emory said.
"It would really surprise me if
something like that happened
Emory, in fact, is hoping for
just the opposite. He would like to
see the Wolfpack travel to ECU's
Ficklen Stadium. "I only express
what 1 would like to see he said,
"but my players and my
recruiting come first. It's not
good for us to go up there every
year. It's not good for the team's
morale. I would like to see
negotiations in the future
Following the Pirates' win over
State, Emory said ECU had the
makings to win a national cham-
pionship. He said he didn't make
that remark Saturday just because
of all the excitement. "If we can
get the total support of the ad-
ministration and the fans, we've
got the chemistry to do so he
said. "A great deal will be told in
October
The Pirates will play such teams
as Missouri, Southwestern Loui-
siana and Florida during that
month.
ECU, however, may not con-
front another defense as powerd-
ful as the Wolfpack's this season,
Emory said. "I was greatly im-
pressed with N.C. State he said.
"They did a beautiful job prepar-
ing for their first game. They have
a greatkicking game and a sound
defense. If they stay healthy,
they'll (State) win eight or nine
games this year
Statistic-wise, the Wolfpack
beat the Pirates in several
categories. In total offense, the
Bucs had 315 yards to State's 398.
In yards passing, the Pirates had
only 58 yards to the Wolfpack's
146. But Emory isn't concerned
about the statistic sheets at this
point. "We won all the statistics
last year, but we didn't win the
game he said. "Statistics are in-
teresting to read, but I wanted
that winning score
At halftime, the Bucs weren't
quite sure they were going to get
it. N.C. State led 13-7 at the end
of the second period. That's when
Emory decided to make a few ad-
justments.
"We just got impatient in the
first half he said. "We were
passing too quickly, so we had to
slow things down. State came out
and mixed things up. It took us a
while to get a read on exactly what
they were doing
The Pirates did move the ball
better, but not until the fourth
quarter. Trailing 16-7, ECU
scored 15 points in the final
period.
"I told them before the fourth
quarter that if they would just get
it close, we would win the football
game Emory said. "If they
wanted it, it was there to take, so
don't let anybody take it from
you
The Pirates reacted by scoring
two touchdowns and a two-point
conversion. "The fourth quarter
was ours Emory said. "I think
N.C. State was run down some
after the third quarter. I just
thank the good Lord for strength
and conditioning and guys with a
bunch of character
Now 1-1, the Pirates will take
on Murray State Saturday at 7
p.m in Ficklen Stadium.
Although the Kentucky school
may not be as renowned as FSL
or N.C. State, Emory isn't coun-
ting on his first home opponent to
be a pushover.
"They've got three of the finest
receivers we will face he said. "I
think they'll come in here just like
when we went to Florida State.
They have nothing to lose, and it's
their biggest game of the year
The Bucs, on the other hand,
would have everything to lose,
Emory said. "If we lost this game,
then beating N.C. State would be
for nothing. One of our goals is to
win every home game, so this one
is very important
Emory said the Pirates will try
to correct some of the errors thev
made at N.C. State. One of those
errors was time possession. The
Pirates only had the ball 23
minutes to the Pack's 36. "We'll
work on killing the clock on of-
fense Emory said.
After two fumbles at State, the
Bucs will also concentrate on
keeping the ball on offense In
the last few minutes of play
against State, a critical fumble
was made by Earnest Byner when
a Wolfpack player stripped the
ball from him. One of verv few
fumbles in Byner's career.
"I trust him carrying that foot-
ball more than anvbodv Emory
said. "I don't know how that hap-
pened, but it did. He still had a
great game
After looking at film, Emorv
praised several players for having
an outstanding game This week-
offensive players are John
Robertson, Norwood Vann and
Terry Long. On defense, Calvin
Adams and Hal Stephens were
selected. Special teams' players
were punter Jeff Bolch and
Tyrone Johnson.
"All of these players were so
confident Emory said. "Thev
do feel like we're a good football
team. If we execute the way we've
been practicing, we will be good
Against Murrav State, an Ohio
Valley conference member, the
Pirates can expect a team that's
"gonna throw the ball and try to
pick us Emory said.
"They are a team verv much
like Furman in comparing them to
someone in our area that folks can
relate to
Emory believes Murray S
will be a hard team to move the
ball against because of their type
of defense. "They run the �
tackle six which has always given
us trouble he said.
The Pirates mav have had a lot
to prove at N.C State, but Em
thinks the Bucs need to make
presence known against Mun
State as well. "A we ached
football team like Murray State is
good enough to beat you if you
don't play good he said. "We
never play as good against the
teams we're favored to beat he
said.
"If we're a class outfit, we'll
play good everv week '
Ticket Sales Going
Faster Than Ever
OAKY PATTERSON
ECU Photo Lab
MclntoTh during ipIT S aS WoPaai'ba J with 15 �� said �"er the game that there won't be a bigger con-
� i.iusn aunng the 22-16 Pirate victory. Hams, who led the Pirates test on this year's schedule.
By RANDY MEWS
SUf f W rlut
The ECU volleyball team open-
ed their season Tuesday night,
dropping three straight games to a
much taller and more experienced
North Carolina State squad.
The Wolfpack's height was a
major factor as half their team
measured 6-0 or taller, compared
to ECU's tallest player at 5-9. But
according to ECU coach Imogene
Turner, the height differential
didn't decide the outcome.
"We're capable of playing a lot
better she said. "We didn't ex-
ecute the basic fundamentals, and
often times we had players out of
position. I think it was mostly a
case of season-opening jitters
The early-season nervousness
was most evident in the first game
as State rolled to a 15-2 victory.
The Pirates hit many serves into
the net and allowed the Wolfpack
to control the tempo of the game.
The second game started much
in the same way as NCSU built the
score to 13-2 before ECU was
finally able to win the service
back. At that point, senior co-
captain Diane Lloyd almost
single-handedly brought the Bucs
back.
Lloyd reeled off six straight
serves � two for aces � as ECU
pulled to within two points.The
Pirates immediately won back ser-
vice and tied the score at ten
apiece before State's consistent
play took over and led them to a
15-10 victory.
After their comeback was
thwarted, the Pirates lost their in-
tensity in the third game. State
played flawlessly and went on to
capture the best-out-of-five tour-
nament with a 15-5 triumph in the
final game.
Statistically, Lita Lamas led the
Pirates with six "kills" while
Loraine Foster finished with four.
Lloyd ended up with three service
aces and Lamas contributed two.
The crowd, which was
estimated at over 200 people, was
the largest crowd in ECU history
to watch a volleyball game in
Minges Coliseum.
One ECU student in the crowd
was Elizabeth Manning and she
expressed her feelings after the
match: "It was a really exciting
match and I had fun watching it
even though we lost
Another interested spectator
was N.C. State head coach Judy
Martino, who proved herself a
gracious winner.
"They (ECU) are very com-
petitive and scrappy Martino
said. "Thy will always be on our
schedule because they always give
us a good game
The next match for the ECU
netters is tonight (7:00) in Minges
when Appalachian State comes to
town. Then the Pirates travel to
Chapel Hill to face UNC next
Thursday, with the N.C. State In-
vitational taking place next
weekend in Raleigh.
Match
The State tourney will feature
UNC and Duke along with ECU
and the host Wolfpack squad.
Even though the teams will be
tough, Turner is looking forward
to the opportunity. "It will be ex-
cellent competition and it will give
us a lot of competition Turner
responded.
Charter Bus
Headed To
Fla. Game
A charter bus will be headed for
Gainesville, Fla on Oct. 21 for
ECU's game with the University
of Florida on Oct. 22.
The bus will leave Greenville at
8 a.m. from Minges Coliseum and
will arrive at Jacksonville Beach
at approximately 11 p.m.
On the following day, the
charter bus will then travel to
Gainesville and should arrive at 12
p.m. Gametime begins at 1:30
p.m.
After the game, the bus will
return to Jacksonville. The bus
will head for Greenville the next
morning at 8 a.m.
A single room costs $86.00, and
a double room is priced at $99.00.
Deadline for the trip is Mon-
day, Sept 19. For more informa-
tion, call Pam Holt at 757-6448.
PIRATE FEVER
Catch It!
Football ticket sales have
been better than usual this
week, according to Ticket
Manager Brenda Edwards.
After Saturday's 22-16 win
over North Carolina State,
Pirates fans were waiting m line
Monday morning at 8 a.m.
In my six years as ticket
manager, I've never seen a
Monday like that Edwards
said. "The phones were just
unreal in addition to the win-
dow business
More season tickets have
already been sold for the 1983
season than were sold during
any of the last three seasons.
Students sitting in groups
have their pickup on Mondav.
and more groups picked up
Monday than at any previous
home game at ECU
"It looks as if we are going to
have a very large attendance for
Saturday night Edwards said.
"I would suggest fans buv their
tickets as soon as possible this
week
The Economy plan, which is
five season tickets purchased
together in a special section for
half price, remain on sale onlv
until game time Saturdav night.
After that, all seats are $10.00
ECU volleyball player Sandra Gideons
day night's action in Minges.
"AIH.BV LBAav - tcu �
watches as one of N.C. State s taller players rttmrm a Tolley i.
Toes
fl


Pirate tailb� �
on five can
Classi
MISC.
EDITOR B - E s�Er
job h�b:
(E. it.E CKM E � A L
PEC�f �-� :e
call ?� fcSi
pt� :�
LEGAw �SS.ES'
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COUSIN s
PRESENT
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SPECIAL
DAY 4 SI
1SMALI PI
ofvoi a CM
IS ALREADY
PLIS1 PITt
ONTl'ESD.
2 LAS At, NM
MELTFDM
2 SALADS
2 GARLIC B
1 PITCHER
ON MONDAI
2 MANICO
2 SALADS
2 GARLIC B
1 PITCHER
ONFRIDAV
2 SPAGHE
DINNER
2 SALADS
2 GARLIC Bl
OF BEER
Bring I

� in MiajTa�TTii�rii -






I

i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 16, 1983 9
1983
PageS
igh
errors was time possession. The
Pirates onl had the ball 23
minutes to the Pack's 36. "We'll
work on killing the clock on of-
fense Emory said.
After two fumbles at State, the
Bucs will also concentrate on
keeping the ball on offense. In
the last few minutes of play
against State, a critical fumble
has made by Earnest Byner when
a Wolfpack player stripped the
ball from him. One of very few
"ambles in Byner's career.
"1 trust him carrying that foot-
rail more than anybody Emory
-aid "1 don't know how that hap-
pened, but it did. He still had a
ai game
After looking at film, Emory
praised several players for having
outstanding game. This week's
sive players are John
Robertson, Norwood Vann and
Terry Long. On defense, Calvin
dams and Hal Stephens were
-ted. Special teams' players
a ere punter Jeff Bolch and
Tyrone Johnson.
oi these players were so
confident Emory said. "They
feel like we're a good football
earn. If we execute the way we've
�een practicing, we will be good
gainst Murray State, an Ohio
Valley conference member, the
ates can expect a team that's
"gonna throw the ball and try to
ick us Emory said.
'They are a team very much
ke Furman in comparing them to
omeone in our area that folks can
elate to
Emory believes Murray State
be a hard team to move the
against because of their type
defense "They run the wide
ickle six which has always given
rouble he said.
The Pirates may have had a lot
-rove at N.C State, but Emory
links the Bucs need to make their
presence known against Murray-
State as well. "A well-coached
football team like Murray Slate is
ood enough to beat you if you
don't play good he said. "We
never pay as good against the
reams we're favored to beat he
aid.
"If we're a class outfit, we'll
lay good eery week
es Going
n Ever
Students sitting in groups
have their pickup on Monday,
and more groups picked up
Monday than at anv previous
home game at ECU.
"It looks as if we are going to
have a very large attendance for
Saturday night Edwards said.
I 'I would suggest fans buy their
Rickets as soon as possible this
�" eek
The Economy plan, which is
season tickets purchased
(together in a special section for
lhalf price, remain on sale only
until game time Saturday night.
(After that, all seats are $10.00.
s
' i
$TAsLBv LI A. r - ,c� ,
players returns a volley in Tiea-
m
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
IJiCA?VrhK-i�ad.Kert,Sed temi ,s reu"el to be read.ly ava.labl
SiSlZSlfStSPi6 P"Ce in eaCh A4P S ��pt
2KfiEFFECT1VE �RU Sf ' St7 AT A&P IN Greenville, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
C FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND, WE WILL DOUBLE
5 UwA,0TrUMR.cc'S C?"�S EXAMPlE: $1� WMIUSE 5 C0UP0KS.
lR5E5ASE 10 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE?
)
Bateaan now and Sapt 17, �� win radaam nations
manuracturar s canta-off coupons up to SO for
Jtoubta thatr value Offer good on national manu-
facturers canta-off coupons onry. (Food rstaMar
coupons not acoaptsd.) Customar must purchaaa
252�0m, �ta�- �" coupons
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ttam. Mo coupons accaptad for fraa marchandiss
Ofdoas not apply to AP or othar stors coupons
whatttar manufacturar la mantionad or not Whan
thsi valua of tha coupon excaaos 50 or tha rataii
of tha Ham. this offar la Hmltad to tha rataii prica
Saunas an Gnat witn A&Ps
DOUBLE SJVmGS COUPimS!
MT-C S
COU�
COUPON A
COUPON B
COUPON c
coupokj
CtMTS 0��
25�
18�
SO-
75�
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c�rs o��
25'
18�
SO-
25�
AT MAP
50-
36'
$100
$100
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Bottom & Eye wh0ie
20-26 lb. avg.
rxrrmmy wMra n"B �"�ndd��b,� - -� nc- �-� w� zzzzzzzz.
Classifieds
SAVE 1.00 LB.
Rib Eye Steak
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
399
Boneless
SAVE 80 LB.
Center Cut Pork Chop
FRESH LEAN COUNTRY FARM
Rib
lb.
lb.
MISC.
UNEMPLOYED NEWS
EDITORWRITER NEED
JOB. HARD WORKER,
RELIABLE, GENERALLY
PEACEFUL. ANY IDEAST
CALL 7J1-S7J4 ASK FOR
PATRICK.
LEGAL HASSLES Call
Howard J. Cummings. attorney
at Law. No charge for initial
consultation for ECU Students
Call 75
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campus includa experienced
professional work. Pro-
ofreading, spaflina. and gram
matlcsl corrections JSS-t7��
�fttr 5 JO
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SIONAL TYPING. Julia Blood
worth. 754-7874.
IF YOU HAVE INITIATIVE
and are eeriausly Intarastad in
making monay working part-
tima, on your own ptsasa call
7ji SW batwaaw s and I p.m.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE axpariance, quality
work. IBM Salactric
Typewriter Call Lania Shiva
7Sa S3�l.
QUALITY TYPING IBM
Typawritar 1$ years of ax
penance Full time typing for
faculty and students. Call
ruum
PROFESSINAL TYPING sac-
vice. Proofreading, spading,
� nd grammatical corrections
Speosiiie in mesas 7M-MM �
�nv to 1 p.m.
EXPERIENCED PROFES
SIONAL TYflMO at
manuscripts, thesis, ate.
Reasonable ratas. Proofreading
and spelling corrections. Call
daily 7S2-Seea, attar 5 M p.m.
Ti$ im Ask for Eva.
TYPING AND WORD PRO-
CESSING see the professional at
Word for Word 321 Cotanche-2nd
floor. Call IjMjjB.
PART TIME MORNING help
naadad. Must ba available Mon
Wad Frl 10-J Apply in parson
at Leather n Wood, Carolina
East Mall. No phone calls
please.
WANTED TjVViTdcagalor
small parrot. Call 7Ss-le7lo after
s.Mpwi.
WANTING TOSUBLET my
: bedroom apt. at Eastbrook.
S2S0 deposit Begin Oct. 1. Call
Linda 7St-SBW.
FREE - ROAD TRIP TO San-
Francisco during fall break, Oct
14 - U. Am moving and need so-
meone to drive U-Haul truck.
Will pay all expenses and air
faro back to Kins ton Call
HUMS.
FOR SALE: Large dorm refrlg.
Good cond. si 13 Call MMMB.
FOR SALE: Green, six cushion
couch. 1 �oo, call Kathy at
757035
FOR SAI E: 2 tickets to Lover-
boy concert in Raleigh on Sapt.
25, itaj. $12.50 each. Call
J35-21J.
FOR SALE: W$ Mercury Mar-
quis auto air 4 dr. MOM original
miles must saa to believe a steal
�1 31273 7Se-2t04.
YARD SALE: Bunkbed,
dressers, lamps and other
assorted furniture. Sat. 17, a
a.m. 1 p.m. 1501 E. 5th St. In tha
backyard of tha Chi Omega
Sorority house. For into. Call
752 ma.
SALE
PERSONAL
on campus for friendship, etc
Confidentiality assured. P.O.
Box 4271 Greenville, NC.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST CAT - 2 years old; white,
fluffy, blue eye and 1 green eye.
Last seen on Jarvis Street. Call
752-3830.
WANTED
MALI ROOMATE WANTED
Georgetown Apt. 11 rant and
IN.
fmfA
SWEET & JUICY
Cantaloupe
Bananas
large
size
WHITE GAY male seeks similar
ROOMMATE WANTED:
Langston Park close to campus
if half rant util. Call nights and
weekends 7sa-S37S
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
N.C. GROWN RED

A
3 lbs.
only
COUSIN'S PIZZERIA
75b-5982 321 E. 10th ST. Greenville 758-5616
COUSIN'S IS HAPPY TO
PRESENT YOU THE "BR-
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SPECIAL" EVERY SATUR-
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1 SMALL PIZZA WITH 1 TOPPING
OF YOUR CHOICE (EXTRA CHEESE
IS ALREADY ON)
PLUS 1 PITCHER OF BEER FOR
Bring this Coupon tjf QQ
mmmwmmmmmwmwmmmiLmmmmmmiwmmmwmwmnmt'
ON TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS
2 LASAGN A TOPPED WITH
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2 SALADS
2 GARLIC BREADS BrintMs Coupon
1 PITCHER OF BEER FOR $7 49
ON MONDAYS & WED.
2 MANICOTTI DINNERS
2 SALADS
2 GARLIC BREADS Bring this coupon
1 pitcher of beer for $7 49
onfrSSays1
2 SPAGHETTI & MEAT BALLS
DINNER
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SAVEQE
Tomato Ketchup
Delicious Apples
100 lQa
Savings Kk
11
SO COUSINS, COME ON
DOWN AND BRING A
DATE OR A FRIEND, WE
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OUR COUSIN'S FRIENDS
HUNTS
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k btl.
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Limit
One
ON OUR VIDEO GAMES
TOP THE SCORE FOR THE
WEEK AND GET 2 PIT-
CHERS OF BEER.
SAVE 3D
Corn Flakes
$1.00 OFF ON A CHEF'S SALAD
WITH YOUR CHOICE OF OBSSSIWQ
'Om 0�uv�� n� �
COUPON
31.00 OFF A GREEK SALAD
SERVED WITH REAL FSTA CHEESE
BBS �� is� saw
POST TOASTIES
18 oz.
Pkg
SAVE at
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MAXWELL HOUSE
Vac fesuwtu oi. �

w Limit OneNUSTER SUE MO 13 OZ. baa
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COUPON
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WITH MELTED PNOVOLONE CHEESE
�moaiivtaTOMtT
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OtNNf N SERVED WITH SALA0
IHMlMelnM
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ii
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188 Stainless Steel
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� Save your valuable A4P gold register tapes
' F?c!edsam0Un, � P �" '89iS,8f n6eded' deem them at
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i
ifiii'aai. m.
��Hi
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f
1
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER It, 1983
Cee'
You
Saturday Sept. 17th
ECU vs. Murray St. 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 18th The Biggest Beach Concert
j��L Greenville & ECU has ever seen
J� NooRE of iWQ
FSATHRMQ
Co-Sponsors
S 8f W SEPTIC TANKS
WRQR WSFL
Rain or Shine!
Coolers Welcome
No Bottles, Please
CHAIRMEN
THE BOARDS
ALSO
BREEZE �j-
NORTH TOWER
?
SUNDAY
SEPT. 18 th
1:00-7:30 p.m
Gate Opens
11:00 a.m.
AT THE
NEW PITT COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
GREENVILLE, NX.
SHOW TINES
1:00-2:00
2:15-3:15
3:30-5:00
5:15-6:15
6:30-7:30
Breeze
North Tower
Cof B
North Tower
Breeze
WELCOME
to Wter'ilm
26H A PM
IS5K3SS
t
UJfW- Cjfus
Look -�r ifcj
��M J
Dou�n TTXe
MAP
�M
C��-ocU .
ADVANCED
TICKET LOCATIONS
GREENVILLE: UBE. Bonds fir H.L.
Hodges Sporting Goods and
any Pi Kapp Brother.
ANY RECORD BAR LOCATIONS
IN: Greenville, New Bern,
Jacksonville, Rocky Mount
House of Records � Norehead
City.
ADMISSION
S7.00
in Advance
$10.00
at Gate
f!





Title
The East Carolinian, September 16, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 16, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.286
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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