The East Carolinian, September 14, 1983






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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 NoyT
Wednesday, September 14, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
'SO'?00 Deaths From Dramatic Starvation
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Nw� rdllor
A 1982 report released by the
I nited Nations claims that 50,000
people die each day from
'dramatic starvation Two
organizations have been actively
working to educate the Greenville
and ECU community about this
global tragedy.
The Greenville-ECU Hunger
( oalition and the Greenville
Hunger Project have active
chapters on campus which are
working to educate students about
the hunger problem and ways to
On The Road
combat it both at home and t
underdeveloped countries.
Both groups conduct various
educational events and other pro-
jects designed to involve ECU
students in a problem they believe
can be solved. "Hunger is existing
in a world that has enough bounty
to feed everyone claims Jen-
nifer Baughan, an ECU graduate
student and local coordinator of
the Hunger Project, an interna-
tional organization working on
the problem of hunger through its
local affiliates. "We're not realiz-
ing our responsibility to the coun-
tries whose economic straits are
such that they can't afford to feed
the majority of their people
Baughan said the figure of
50,000 deaths per day is only an
estimate and that actual figures
would be impossible to obtain
It's very diffecult to get a body
count Baughan said, because
many hunger-related deaths occur
in rural village in underdeveloped
countries which are often inac-
cessible by vehicle and without
means of communication.
Tekle Tomlinson, a senior
United Nations World Food Pro-
gram liaison officer, agrees with
Baughan's analysis of the hunger
problem. Reached Monday by
telephone at his New York office
Tomlinson said transportation
and distribution were major fac-
tors in the battle against hunger.
"We know there is food available
to feed every man, women and
child who's hungry Tomlinson
said. "It is really essentially the
problem of making the food
available in a form that can be
utilized by people at the center
of need
Baughan and her husband Dr.
David Baughan, director of
ECU's predoctral program in
family medicine, conduct what
they call "hunger briefings" for
different groups. A briefing is a
five-hour hunger education pro-
gram designed by the Hunger Pro-
ject's national office. At the con-
clusion of each briefing par-
ticipants are asked to make a
pledge in writing to take specific-
action in the fight against hunger.
Several times last year the
Hunger Project joined forces with
the Hunger Coalition for specific
events. The groups will be work-
ing together on a series of events
slated for U.N. proclaimed World
Food Day next month.
The Hunger Coalition is sup-
ported primarily by ECU students
and holds weekly meetings to plan
projects and invite guest speakers
to discuss hunger-related topics.
Besides World Food Day
events, the Hunger Coalition also
sponsors a fast in November and a
hunger walk in the spring.
During next month's activities
the two groups plan to perform a
street theatre skit in front of the
student supply store to dramatize
the hunger problem.
Both Baughan and Tomlinson
say it's hard for people in
See STARVATION, Page 5.
New Buses Ready To Roll
B TINA MAROSCHAK
Suff Writer
The SGA Transit Authority
received three new Thomas Built
buses Thursday which Transit
Manager Bill Hilliard said will
reduce operating expenses $50,000
per year.
According to Hilliard, each bus
cost S60.000. The transit authori-
ty has $60,000 of the money and
will borrow the remaining
$120,000 from the bank that of-
fers the lowest interest rate. The
loan will be repaid during the next
four years.
"We would have had to raise,
in the next five years, student fees
to cover more than a $150,000
loss Hilliard said about keeping
the old buses. "This way we pro-
ject that we'll be operating at a
savings of $50,000 a year
The 1983 models average 7
miles per gallon and will last
about 10 years; the old buses
averaged 3.3 miles per gallon and
have a life expectancy of 3-4
years.
At present, two buses run each
route. Because the new models
hold 100 people � approximately
30 more than the old buses � only-
one bus will be needed per route.
The new engines each have a
warranty for 350,000 miles. The
old engines are warranted up to
12,000 miles or 12 months.
Hilliard said the new buses will
be used later this week or the
beginning of next week. The three
older buses will be used as back-
ups and charters.

STANLEY LEAKY � rDMO La�
ECU fullback Earnest Byner joins the referees in signaling the game-
winning touchdown in Saturday night's 22-16 victory over N.C. State.
Black Joins Race
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Suff Writer
A former Greensboro educator,
Robert L. Hannon,announced his
Candida:y for governor Friday.
Hannon is the first black seeking
the 1984 democratic nomination.
"Based on the major issues,
I'm the best qualified candidate
Hannon said. "I stand for, and
will support, all policies and pro-
grams designed to improve the
quality of life for blacks, the
poor, and our society as a
whole Hannon said he would
work for expanded and equal job
opportunities for all North
Carolinians if he is elected.
Hannon said his candidacy
would also focus on several issues
including better housing, reducing
crime, expanded health care with
stable social security, pension and
retirement plans and improved
public education. "The No. 1
issue is education Hannon said
in a recent interview. "When a
black teacher retires they ought to
be replaced by black teachers
Hannon claims that "75 per-
cent of the time" a retiring
teacher is replaced by a white, ad-
ding that race discrimination is a
problem in the N.C. school
system. Hannon vows to
work to eliminate this problem.
Hannon said he would also
work on environmental issues ad-
ding that his training in en-
vironmental science will give him
an edge over other candidates. He
said the PCB hazardous waste
landfill in Warren County was a
poor environmental decision.
Hannon said he would support
a nuclear freeze provided that all
nations follow the same pattern.
Hannon is a former professor
at N.C. A&T State University, a
former director of development
and university relations at Fayet-
teville State University and a
former school principal in Halifax
county. He ran unsuccessfully for
lieutenant governor in 1972 and
the U.S. Senate in 1974.
Beginning Oct. 1, buses will run
downtown on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday nights. One will
follow the purple route, running
down 10th Street and circling the
campus. The other will run
through central campus and the
surrounding areas.
When bars close at 2 a.m
buses will run until 2:30 a.m
they will operate until 1:30 a.m!
when bars start to close at 1 a.m.
Hilliard said the Student
Government Association is fun-
ding the night transit program.
Approximately $8,000 will be
transferred from the SGA
refrigerator rentals account into
an account for the night transit.
The service is operating on a trial
basis and will be re-evaluated in
December.
New Buses Arrive
ROB POOLE - PtMte Lab
2K�� � 'nrgb�ufTexp,uw�rby ,he TransH Au,horu �The - � �����
National Audience Views Pirate Victory
U. 1 V. r�V Of B A C: A v-w-f
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Hporti Editor
Along with the national publici-
ty, the Pirates have especially en-
joyed the increasing fan loyalty.
Last year, the Bucs would watch
as the stands would empty at
Ficklen Stadium during a home
game. That's why the Pirates
always enjoyed heading for
Florida State or Missouri where
they could play in front of a pack-
ed house.
N.C. State Coach Tom Reed
said the noise of the 57,700 fans
bothered his team's play Saturday
night. "We had tremendous dif-
ficulty with communication
because of the crowd noise
Reed said. "It wasn't a player's
mistake. It was a c ching
mistake. We just couldn't hear
Emory, however, would much
rather have to worry with a fan
problem than not. "They're his
(Reed's) fans Emory said. "It's
a situation that you have to get us-
ed to. We only had one problem.
When we got down to the goal line
before we scored a touchdown in
the fourth quarter, the fans really
felt like spurring the team on.
"They (fans) just have to know
when to stop cheering. You don't
do it when the quarterback is try-
ing to call a snap number because
he can't hear.
"It was a problem, but I'd
rather have a problem playing in
front of 57,700 people. I hope we
have that problem here this week
with 35,000 people in Ficklen
The Bucs will take on Murray
State this Saturday at 7 p.m. After
playing powerhouse teams like
FSU and N.C. State, the Bucs
might tend to take their next op-
ponent rather lightly. Emory says
that won't happen.
"One of our goals is to win
See HUNDREDS, Page 9.
Group Opposes Military Intervention
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
SUff Writer
September 15 is the 162nd an-
niversary of Central America's in-
dependence from Spain. This day
has been designated as a National
Day of Action for peace in
Nicaragua and Central America.
During the week of September
11-18 a variety of activities will
take place throughout the state to
demonstrate opposition to what
organizers call "U.S. intervention
in Nicaragua and Central
America
Activities will also be taking
place on a national level. The
Carolina Interfaith Task Force on
Central America is directing the
North Carolina activities.
Gail Phares, directer of CIT-
CA, said, "Unless he is stopped
by Congress, Ronald Reagan
could plunge this country into the
most unwanted, unconscionable,
unnecessary and unwinnable war
in its history, not excepting Viet-
nam
Plans for this week's activities
were formulated in July after a
group of 157 Americans from 31
states visited Nicaragua. They
presented the American am-
bassador in Managua an official
letter of protest and also held a
peace vigil with Nicaraguans on
the nation's northern border with
Honduras. Following their trip,
the group decided to plan ac-
tivities to make more Americans
aware of conditions in Central
America.
Different activities are planned
at various locations in the state.
During the week, purple ribbons
will be displayed throughout the
Triangle Area to signify mourning
as well as to demonstrate op-
positon to the current U. S. policy
ofdeath and destruction
Phares said.
Also planned are teach-ins,
forums, films and lectures.
Delegations from different cities
plan to visit Sen. Jesse Helms
(R-N.C.)to expressing their op-
position to his continued support
of oppressive regimes in
Guatemala and Nicaragua, said
C1TCA Assistant Director Joe
Moran.
The week's most important ac-
tivity is a peace vigil in Raleigh on
Sept. 15. The vigil will be held
from noon to 2:00 p.m. outside
the state capital, Moran said.
Through the use of a variety of art
forms, participants hope to repre-
sent a positive theme emphasizing
the social gains made by
Nicaraguans during the last
decade. CITCA's purpose in
planning these activities is to in-
crease public awareness of the ef-
fects of American involvement in
Central America with hopes that
citizens will pressure Congress to
discontinue support of the Presi-
dent's policies. Phares said the ac-
tions are more timelv now due to
U.S. military activity.
Music Dean Resigns.
Colleagues Shocked'
By MILLIE WHITE
Aidstaat Newt Editor
Effective July 1, Dr. Charles F.
Schwartz will regisn as dean of the
ECU School of Music. Schwartz
will stay on the school's faculty as
a tenured professor.
Formerly dean of the school of
Fine Arts at California State
University, Schwartz became dean
of the ECU School of Music in
July 1981.
Schwartz was elected to the
board of directors of the National
Association of Schools of Music
in December 1981.
One member of the ECU
School of Music faculty said
"everyone was every surprised, it
(the resignation) came as a total
surprise and a big shock The
source added faculty members are
upset and "a little confused as to
why it took place
Vice Chancellor for Acedemic
Affairs, Dr. Angelo A. Volpe,
said plans to conduct a search for
a successor to Schwartz would be
announced later.
"I have accepted Dr.
Schwartz's resignation with
regret Volpe said. "I respect his
decision and understand his desire
to return to full-time teaching and
creative activity Volpe ad-
ded he is "pleased that Dr.
Schwartz will continue as a
member of the faculty in our fine
School of Music. I wish him
every success for the future
Volpe said.
Several attempts were made by
The East Carolinian to reach
Schwartz. An official contacted in
his office said Schwartz had "no
comment" on the matter.
Dr. Charles F. SchwaiH
Soap Box Forum Back
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
Staff Writer
The ECU Soap Box Forum
will return to campus this
Thursday. Student organizers
of the open-mike forum are in-
viting students and faculty
members to discuss the United
States' Central America
policy.
Organized last April, the
Soap Box Forum was designed
to give people an opportunity
to openly debate current
issues. The event is sponsored
by the ECU Catholic Newman
Center.
Mickey Skidmore, a
spokesperson for the center,
coordinates the selection of
topics for the forum. Anyone
with a topic sugestion can con-
tact Skidmore at the center.
A person wishing to express
an opinion may speak from
the podium for up to five
minutes. Speakers may also re-
quest rebuttal time.
The forum is scheduled to
begin at noon in front of the
ECU Student Supply Store.
-� - -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SPETEMBER 14, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
I you or your organization
would like to nave an item
or.nted in the announcement
column please type if on an an
nouncement torm ana send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
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available at the East Carolinian
Oft ce n the Publications
d KJ fivers ana handwnt
i m ocd sized paper can
hen s no i " an
� , nents but s, i is often
v Therefore we cannot
�' vour announte
�. as long as vou
� � s s' i' �ou ao not
l rhis � ,mn tor
ie f 01 an
ents is 3 p.m Monday
esday papei anc 3
.�� h the Thurs
. i � . ementj
iffei these deadlines
i � � �
labie to all
and
SCUBA DIVING
,e the Grand Caymans
�sgiving Vacation 8 days
ghts S8�l 00 from Raleigh. 3
eals, lodging and unlimited
�g $100 deposit
Tive B'mii in The Bahamas
hi sas vacation Dec 27 30 4
lays 3 n,ghts J350 00 "om Ft
aderdaie, 3 meals, lodging
i even dives RSVP $100 deposit
. ept 15th
For information and reserva
� ons call Ray Scharf, Dir ot
It cs at 757 6441 or 756 9339
SAB
The Student Athletic Board
will meet Wednesday evening
September 14, 1983 at 5 00 in
room 248 In Mendenhall
GEOLOGY CLUB
A Geology Club meeting will
be held Thursday Sept 17 at 8 00
p m m Graham 301 A slide
show on this past summer's field
camp will be presented Light
refreshments will be provided
Plans tor tail activities will be
discussed All interested per
sons are invitee!
REBEL
The REBEL is still in need of
an Art Editor if you are in
teresteo in this position, come
by the REBEL ottice located on
the second floor ot the publica
tions building MWF, 3 4 00 or
call 757 6502 and leave a
message
FIELD HOCKEY
Attention anyone interested in
playing club Field Hockey
there s a mandatory meeting
Wednesday Sept 21st at 5 00 in
Rm 102 of the Memorial Gvm
Please attend this meeting if you
want to play if you can t make
� t call Cory at 758 8985
SURFING CLUB
There wili be a surfing club
meeting Thursday evening Sept
15 at 7 00 in the all purpose room
m Mendenhall Surfers please
bring your ten dollar member
tees to this meeting Anyone who
enioys surfing including girls,
teel tree to attend this meeting
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
'he international Language
� ja-i'zaton w.M be meeting on
vednesday September 14, '983
The meeting will be held in
BC 301 at 2 30 p m Everybody
s weico-e to iOm the interna
a language Organization
do no' nave to be a Foreign
a"guage maior or minor to
n
EPSILON
PI TAU
- .ra Tech Honor Socie
� � v � rs- "iwiing this yr
�'� cookout
� - were fleeted
. Pres Vfl"
kmm Recorder Charles
(her Next meeting will be
"�ceo
CHEMISTRY
SEMINAR
v Gover Ever r Llniver
� . insas a cesent a
. . titled Binding of Ca
r . asa'0aA A
- � i � . por, Effects Or
nargi fcnd Solvent
a- r � - � '� oer 9.
� . i c .magan
AMERICAN
MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
The American Marketing
Assosc:ation is having an
organizational meeting Thurs
aay September 15 at 4 00 p m
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 244 All interested persons
ae welcome
If ?:0 pn
ting Roonr 201
�foments will De serveo in
! 204 toiiowng 'he semnar
GAMMA
BETA PHI
The next general meeting of
Gamma Beta Phi will be held on
Thursday Sept 15. 1983 at 7 00
p m m Jenkins Art Auditorium
Please bring local membership
dues of tour dollars We are look
ing forward to seeing all Ot yOu
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers ot P kappa Phi
fraternity would like to thank
the Sisters and Pledges of the
Alpha Xi Delta sorority for mak
ing Pret night an unforgettable
one Let's do it again' We also
want to remind everyone ot the
Miller Pi k aop Beach Musk
Fest val coming Sept 18
Featured are Chairman of the
Board' Breeze and North
Tower Advanced tickets are
$7 00 from any Pi Kappa Plv
Brother This rr.aior tnrow down
will be held at the new Pitt Coun
ty Fair Grounds Don t miss it!
CONGRATULATIONS
ALPHA PHI
PLEDGES
The sisters wish to welcome
their new pledges into the sorori
ty! Congratulations to all greeks
on Rush Thanks Sig Eps for a
great time Pref night
AMBASSADORS
All Ambassadors are remind
ed that there will be a general
meeting on Wed Sept wth, at
5 00 p m m the Mendenhall
Multi Purpose room All
members are encouraged to at
tend
STUDYING FOR
TESTS?
.ant to know when your body is
' oadv to learn? Try NCSL s pt-r
sonaiized biorythms Your com
plete Inner cycle tor the entire
semester at the incredibly low
cost of $1 The sale starts at 9 00
Wed Sept U in the Lobby of the
Student Store NCSL We make a
difference
ZBT LITTLE
SISTERS
The ZBT Little Sisters would
like to congratulate the brothers
on a successful rush We also
want to congratulate the new of
ficers of Little Sisters We re
mmd the sisters of the meeting
Thursday September 15. 1983 at
5pm at the Mendenhall Cot
feehouse Please be there and
remember the dues deadline is
October 1, 1983
Little Sisters are reminded of
the meeting tonight at 5 p m in
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse
Please remember your dues
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Com
muntiy will have its first
meeting of the year Monday.
Sept 19 The meeting is :hedul
ea for 7pm at the Newman
House 953 E 10th St The first
part of the meeting will be tor
planning events for the coming
year Afterwards there will be a
social Bring your favorite
beverage and get acquainted
All interested persons are cor
dially invited
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Wednesday at 6 30 in Jenkins
Auditorium (Art Building). Paul
Leary will speak on Evangelism
as a lifestyle Come torn us and
learn more about what it means
to be a chnstian
ALPHA PHI
ALPHA CAR WASH
"ht. brothers ot Alpha Phi
Alpha will sponsor a car wash
Saturday Sept 17th in the park
ng lot of McDonald s located on
the corner of 10th and Charles A
percentage of the proceeds will
be donated to AID in the f.ght
against Sickle Cell
SOCIOLOGY AND
ANTHROPOLOGY
Sociology and Anthropology
majors, minors, and interested
students, A get acquainted party
for students and faculty, Thurs
day September 15, 5 30 7 30, 310
Meade Street Eat, drink, and be
merry
SIGMA
SIGMA SIGMA
The sister of Sigma Sigma
Sigma would like to con
gradulate their new fall pledge
class Lmda Lore. Dawn Dicker
son, Dallas Brown, Noel
Shaughnessy. Jennifer Wallace,
Kelly Manning, Mary vonne
Draper, Tracy Cole, Sarah Rod
wick. Jill White, Tracy Lawson,
Connie Briley, Kimla Byerly,
Lynne Siewers, Sue Sellers,
Kyle Humbert. Susan Evans,
Gussle Eggert, Bevery Shannon.
Denise Mulligan. Haley
Stephens, Melanie Huth, and
Amy Kopas.
Sigma Sigma Sigma, will be
holding a yardsale Saturday
September 17. 1983 at 803 East
5th Street
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ is
sponsoring "Prime Time" this
Thursday at 7 p m In the Nurs
ing Building Rm 101 Please
join us for tun, fellowship, and
Bible study We are looking for
ward to meeting you
AED
Alpha Epsilon Delta, pre
medical honor society, will have
its first meeting ot the semester
on Tuesday. September 13, in
Flanagan 307 at 7 30 p m Dr
Wayne Ayers, ECU Chemistry
Dept ana AED advisor, will
speak n the CaribDean Medical
School with a slide presentation
All members and guests are en
couraged to attend There will
be an executive meeting at 7.00
p.m, in the conference
SIGN LANGUAGE
CLASS
The ECU Program for Hear
mg Impaired Students and Sign
Language Club announce a non
credit introductory Sign
Language class, beginning 6
p m Wednesday, Sept 14 m
Brewster B Wing 203 For those
that have already taken the m
troductory course an in
termediate course will be of
fered on Tuesday nights starting
Sept 13 at 6 p m m Brewster
B Wing 205 There is no registra
tion required and no age hmit
instructor for the course will be
Michael Cotter
WZMB
Tune in to WZMB s Contem
DOrary gospel show every Sun
day mornmg from 6 10 p m ,
featuring artists like Keith
Green. Phil Keaggy. Amy Grant
and Leon Patillo. Comedians
like Mike Warnke and Isaac Air
Freight, and our regularly
scheduled program. ' Light n
Up " On WZMB. 91 j FM
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All ads must be prepatd. Enclose
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ALPHA
PHI ALPHA
Help the brothers of Alpha Phi
Alpha lick Sickle Cell Anemia by
making a minimal donation of 25
cents and receive a lollipop A
table will be set up in the soda
shop Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday
CADP
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro
gram on Tuesday, Sept 13, at 4
p m in room 210 Erwm Hall
CADP is a student operated ser
vice If you wish to become in
volved as a member of CADP
and help us promote responsible
decisions regarding chemical
use. please attend this meeting
All interested persons are in
vi ted
KAPPA
ALPHA PSI
An informal smoker will be
held tor all interested men on
September 13, 1983 at 8 30 p m
m the Coffee House located on
the lower level of Mendenhall
Student Center
SGA ELECTIONS
The Student Government an
nounces their Fall elections The
filing dates are from Monday.
Sept 12 to Friday, Sept 16 The
mandantory meeting date for all
candidates is Monday Sept 19
at 7 p m Application tor can
didates may be picked up m 228
Mendenhall from 8 5 Positions
available 25 day student
representatives. 25 dorm reps
president and vce president of
all undergraduate and graduate
classes and
Secretary Treasurer lor Senior
Class
ROXY MUSIC
ARTSCENTER
The Ro�y Muse Arts Center
to Regroup Wednesday
September 14 at 7 30 p m in the
Community Building on Greene
Street. Greenville For informa
tion contact Bill Shepherd
752 5713
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be an organ za
tional meeting on Thursday.
Sept 15 at 5 p.m in room 212
Mendenhall All members are
urged to attend to discuss future
Tlans for the club
That's-ight Albert Long the
second and last athlete in the
University of North Carolina's
history to letter in four sports
(football, basketball, baseball
and track) will be speaking at
Jarvis Memorial United
Methodist Church, September
11 14 Sunday through Wednes
day � every night at 7 30 p m
In definitely a modern day ap
proach, Albert talks, not
preaches, about Jesus and the
Bible m relation to apathy, self
centeredness. sex, peer
pressure, hypocrisy, alcohol and
drugs Albert Long is a dynamic
and motivating person you can
not afford to miss Albert Long,
nightly at 7 30, September 11 14
at Jarvis Church near campus
EPISCOPAL
SERVICE
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday evening
Sept 13, in the chapel of St
Paul's Episcopal Church, 406 4th
St (one block from Garrett
dorm) The service will be at
5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev BH Hadden,
celebrating
BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Every Tuesday and Thursday
night we will have a Bible
fellowship at our house We
strive to teach the Bible so peo
pie can understand how to apply
Godly principles m their lives
Why? Because God wants us to
have a full and enioyable life
John 10 10. i Timothy 6 I7J
Come by ano check us out
i Tuesday and Thursday, 7 30
p m , at 112 Rotary Ave )
HONORS SEMINAR
Current Honors students and
all faculty are reminded of the
opportunity to propose Honors
Seminars tor spring 1984 See
pp 87 88 of the catalogue for
categories Seminars are ideally
generaiist, infer disciplinary,
and team taught
To be considered proposals
must be submitted in writing to
Dr David Sanders. Coordinator
of the Honors Program, co
English Department For fjr
ther details, call 6373
LACROSSE CLUB
If you play lacrosse or iust
want to learn, come down to the
bottom of College Hill at 2 00 on
Tuesday September 13 We need
every one interested to attend
LAW SOCIETY
Orgainnationai meeting
Thursday evening. September
15. 7pm. Mendenhall Student
Center, room 212 information,
Diane Jones, 756 6556
BINGOICE
CREAM PARTY
The Department of university
Unions is sponsorng a
Bmgo'ice Cream Party on Tues
day. September 13. 1983 at 7 p m
m the Multi Purpose Room The
admission is 50 cents and �ou get
to eat all the delioous 'Ce cream
you like All ECU students,
faculty staff their dependents
and guest are welcome The
flavors of ice cream are Rocky
Road. Pralines and Oeam.
Chocolate Chip ano But'e
pecan Come out and eat
delicious ice cream arta trrWk
prizes, and enioy the tun Bring
a friend'
FAST FOR
LIFE
At the FAST FOR LIFE
enter Into its 6th wee a group
o� ECU students and Greenville
residents continues their Sat
morning vigJIs in support of the
tasters 7 51 4906
WEIGHTTRAINING
Do you want to get into'
weight training but are in
timidated by the weight Room'5
Don't be' Women and men
who have had little or no ex
penence with lifting weiohts as
part of an overall Ninas pro
gram are invited to idn us a'
intramural Rec Services for a
course m Beginning Weigh'
Training You will learn to use
the Universal machines, sta
tions, and light free wegh's cor
rectly and efficiently so mat you
will feel confident when tranng
on your own Methods taught
wilt include introductions to elf
cuit framing progressive
resistance exercise (PRE anc
proper warm up COOl down pro
cedures come add we gh'
training to your fitness pro
gram Firm up increase ear
body mass, get stronger and
have tun1 Bring (or check out! a
towel, wear hght weight com
fortable clothing shor's and
T shctsi and a support.ve
athletic shoe with flexible m d
sole f running shoes wth ar ng
heels and or varus wedge are
not recommended
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers ot Kappa S.gma
would like to welcome, and cor
gradulate our new pledges Ge�
i-eadv for me �ime ot your i.te a
the Murray State aa"�e
NIH
A representative from the Na
'iOn�i ins 'utes of Heai'h
Bethesda MD will be on cam
pus Octooer 5 7 to er. �
students who would i.ke to be
health research assis'an's
their Normal Volunteer pro
gra beginning Spr ng 1984
Students wiii par'cipa n ?�
perimenfs ano resear regar-
ding d'Sease control ano Mw
human body Will receive $12 50
per oav s' pend plus free room
and board anc transportation
paid to ano rnm nih Students
n me health natural sciences
computer science and Ousness
f.eids who mar be nteres'ec
should contac' the Co op Ott ce
313 Rawi. immedatei. 'o s g-
up far an ntervew
NURSING
STUDENTS
In order So receive
,ng pin by Decempe' .
orders must be piaer: -�
dent Supply Store A-
Building no later
Sep'ember 23 '98;
should be placed at the �
Counter orders mos1 te z : -
fun when the oroe sola
WOMEN'S
SOCCER CLUB
The ECU Wome" s SCCCEC
sport c uc s nc: "5 the r -
organizational meeting vv�-c-es
day Septemoer 14 '933 s?6p rr
n Room 102 of Meo' a Bytr
Aomen nfefes'er; - .
socce' during ;3 84 ,et'
shou'd attenc s ��� ng
Practices are sc"ec. ?c to -
ne'd on T jescavs and vca.s
at the bonom -y �-� �
Minges Coles ir -
oas 'r Wemor a 0 .� -
the- intoimat n ��- - ;�c'
Fox. Spor Put
ROO" 13JA
The Fast Carolinian
- ��
ind � �
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� �
Subscr pt.on 9i
The Eas' CiroiM
are oca'ec - ft
Buildmq
ECU G � �V
Te
3J6.3 Sjfi
Overtoil's
Finest Western
Sirloin Steaks lb. $2.19
T-Bone Steaks lb. $2.29
CfWcdUteu
k J OF SMIT Hf I HO J
Gwaltney Franks
12 OZ. PKG. 99
Duncan Hines All Types
Cookie Mix 17 oz. box
99C
Overton s
Supermarket, lnc
Coca-Cola each
2 Liter Bottle 89
Limit 4 with $10.00
or more food order.
Additional Cokes each 99�.
Sealtest Assorted Flavors
Ice Cream
12 gallon carton
$1.69
.attest
aN5�Rj�SSS
(���(& V
Maola milk
Old South Orange Juice
112 gallon paper carton
each OO �
Anheuser Busch
Natual Light Beer
6-pack
12 oz. can
$1.99
fl
ltuiai
LVlr
5 Discount Coupon
5 Discount
with $10.00 GROCERY ORDER
(Excluding Keg Beer)
Grade 'A' Brown
Large Eggs
dozen 78C
Limit 2 dozen
at this price.
Name
ADDRESS
ID NO.
AMT. PURCHASE
NOT VALID IN CONJUNCTION
WITH ANY OTHER DISCOUNT
Expires 9-28-83.
Golden
Bananas
4lbs.$1.00
Fresh California
Broccoli
bunch
68
OVERTON'S SALUTES
THE PIRATES! SAVE WITH
US ON PRE-GAME
PARTY SUPPLIES.
Video
B VK.HOGGARD
vtt �ni�
Video games are
part of an ECU pro-
fessor's experiment to
educate the mentally
retarded. Jean Ann
Golden, assistant pro-
fessor and head of the
mental retardation
program in the
Psychology Depart-
ment and Cory
Medlin, a psychology
graduate student.
have designed a video
game to entertain and
teach people who
need round-the-clock
care.
"We're �� ery uni-
que. Nobody else is
doing this kind of
thing Golden said.
"Video games for the
lightl retarded hae
already been
developed, but game
for the
profoui
have m
temptec
The
has a 1(
retardec
an 10
Me
this
physical
that rec
superv
often
simph
Go
I
on a
ope i
bai:
each s
trc
colon
pi a
to
Women
By GLENN1
MAIGHAN
i1 �ra�saic j
mo:
Women mav soon
need to register�j
the draft if propc;
legislation prepapre:
by the Pentagonanc i
becomes lav InRe :
event of war. Depart-
ment of Defense of-j
ficials saida
militarv would
short about 30,000i
health-care piMc
sionals. To prevent a-
Nhortage, Presidentg, ii
Reagan ma ordei
women in health
fields to registerrgi
the draft.
Reaction to the pro-Bee- !
posal drew mixedMc
responses from ECU,
students, facultv� :
others in the health-
care field. Tw
associate professors in1
the ECU Schr"
Nursing labeled the idea discriminatory.S t u CC. 1
and others rearedwouli
would scare women!
awav from health careHe i
professions.c
"I'm not or
?
PIRGs
MINNEAPOLIS. '
MN (CPS) � In a
move that may auger its car
a new kind of assault mou
on campus Public In-
terest Groups P1R
(PIRGs) nationwide. 1
a group of censer- syndi
vative students have Max
tried to infiltrate and
change the policies of At
the statewide Min- time,
nesota PIRG board. Ur. ej
Though the conser- nesc
vatives failed in their man
summer attempt, the trol o
have alreadv succeed- api
ed in gaining control lea
over the smaller Twin ec
Cities PIRG chapter.
Their activities a gr�
closely resemble tac- to
tics for disrupting themsl
PRIGs outlined in a one I
reported College says
Republican National heac
Committee memo PIRG
distributed last spr- Ml
ing. amon
Both the national state
College Republicans countl
and the local conser- quest!
vative insurgents deny stituti
any attempt to la
destroy PIRGs or any finari
coordinated efforts m plicai
Minnesota. the
But PIRGs � the befo
national network of Supn
some 160 campus- Gaj
based consumer ad- the TJ
vocacy groups found- beinj
ed by Ralph Nader in Repul
the early seventies � out tl
have long been targets of adl
of some conservative Bui
groups. co-ci
The Mid-Atlantic Twin
Legal Foundation, a one
Philadelphia-based vativ
conservative advocacy
group, has sued the
New Jersey PIRG
over its method of
collecting student
fees.
Last spring, the col-
lege Republicans,
which is largely fund-
ed by the Republican
National Committee,

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Phone.
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NG
NURSING
STUDENTS
ei eive your riurs
:Vv ember 2. W83
M P'aced mthestu
� St�T� Wright
�'? than
!�83 Orders
�.ec at the Jewelry
-s mos, bepa.d m
mt order s Dlaced
WOMEN'S
SOCCER CLUB
n-e" 5 SOCCER
� ig their 1983 84
ee'mg Wedn�
� '�83at6pm
- Memor.al Gym
�� I" playing
- "83 84 ,ear
this meeting
I eduied to be
' Wi Tfursdays
� hill at
and on Sun
iytn Por fur
n'act Robert
b Coordinator
� MM
I he Fast Carolinian
� every Tuesday
' o me
ltd every

� ��o East
, i�- twned ��d for
� fcast
' ptlWI�" yearly
aroli"ijn offices
-c a tedn the Old South
1 Buildinq onthecampus of
1 ECUGreenvilleN C
� ad
��r�e East
eenviiie.
T("I'phon1 T�36 6367,
630�
Flavors

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as
li.oo
California
Iccoli

UTES
E WITH
ME
IES.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 14. 1983
Video Games Educate lHARD days night
By N.K. HOGGARD
SUff Writer
Video games are
part of an ECU pro-
fessor's experiment to
educate the mentally
retarded. Jean Ann
Golden, assistant pro-
fessor and head of the
mental retardation
program in the
Psychology Depart-
ment and Cory
Medlin, a psychology
graduate student,
have designed a video
game to entertain and
teach people who
need round-the-clock
care.
"We're very uni-
que. Nobody else is
doing this kind of
thing Golden said.
"Video games for the
lightly retarded have
already been
developed, but games
for the severely and
profoundly retarded
have never been at-
tempted
The average person
has a 100 IQ. Severely
retarded people have
an IQ less than 31.
Most of the people in
this category have
physical handicapps
that require constant
supervision; they
often can't do even
simple tasks.
Golden's video game
is designed for them.
The game has a joy
stick controlling a ball
on a screen. The
operator can move the
ball left or right. On
each side of the con-
trol ball are shapes,
colors, letters, or
numbers. When the
player moves the ball
toward the correct
side, a musical tune,
or other pleasurable
reinforcer, will
reward the game
player.
Golden said some
of the retarded people
playing the game have
trouble connecting the
movement of the stick
and the motion on the
screen. "But she
saidif this connec-
tion is taught, then
some basic
discrimination skills
may be possible
The skill learned can
help motivate a per-
son or prevent self in-
jury.
Golden hopes to
make the game pro-
gram affordable to
mental health centers
with small budgets.
The program is
designed for home
computers. The pro-
gram was developed
on Medlin's own com-
puter. The cost is ex-
pected to be below
$100.
Golden and Medlin
spent the entire sum-
mer perfecting the
program; they must
now wait for approval
from governing agen-
cies that insure
humane testing pro-
cedures. Golden ex-
pects final approval
soon.
The system will first
be used with Adult
Developmental Ac-
tivity Program
residents in Green-
ville. Carl Rothrock,
director of ADAP,
expressed optimism
for the video game on
Friday, but tempered
his optimism with
caution. "It is just too
new a concept to be
certain of results
Golden recently
contacted the O Berry
Center in Goldsboro,
N.C to expand her
project. The O'Berry
Center, with residents
averaging 12 on IQ
tests, has the most
severely retarded peo-
ple in North Carolina.
The director, Robert
Dively, devised a
panel for home com-
puters which will use
pressure switches
rather than a joy
stick. This device will
enable residents
unable to manipulate
a joy stick the oppor-
tunity to play the
game.
"Our purpose is to
teach the residents
how to interact with
their environment
Dively said.
5iS ��S2.AJ at thS Carolb� OP Houm
ISZZ.BEER and HaPPy Hour(8:30-10:00)
FREE ADMISSION ALL NIGHT '
The very best In solid gold Rock and Roll
with WTTN's Cre� All�
Beginning Sept. IS, 1983
-TWIST CONTEST-
AN ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP FOR 2 �f
TO NEW YORK CITY
-PLUS $1000 CASH!
MMMM�j � i� � mfnbr, and qu-t� only All ASC Nrmrr,
Women's Draft Proposed
By GLENN
MAUGHAN
Miff Writer
Women may soon
need to register for
the draft if proposed
legislation prepared
by the Pentagon
becomes law. In the
event of war, Depart-
ment of Defense of-
ficials said the
military would be
short about 30,000
health-care profes-
sionals. To prevent a
shortage, President
Reagan may order
women in health-care
fields to register for
the draft.
Reaction to the pro-
posal drew mixed
responses from ECU
students, faculty and
others in the health-
care field. Two
associate professors in
the ECU School of
Nursing labeled the
idea discriminatory,
and others feared it
would scare women
away from health care
professions.
"I'm not opposed
to a draft as long as
it's done equally
said Louise Sam-
mons, a nursing pro-
fessor.
Sister Rita Finnen,
M.S.N agreed the
proposal was unjust
and unequal. "The
Reagan administra-
tion is committing
political suicide; the
idea is ludicrous
Pamela Bedsole
and Melinda
McFayden, both
sophomores in nurs-
ing, differed in their
reaction to the draft
proposal. "I might try
to organize with other
nurses against it
Bedsole said.
McFayden disagreed,
saying, "It wouldn't
be fair to draft only
male nurses, and I
would register
Two health-care
professionals at the
Student Health
Center said they
would comply if
ordered but thought
the proposal was
discriminatory. "I'm
not opposed to serv-
ing, but the plan
should deal with
everyone on an equal
basis said Andrea
Brand, a doctor at the
center.
Jolene Jernigan,
R.N saidWe all
enjoy the security this
country's military
provides us, so we
must all pitch in
Others claimed they
would not register at
all. Sister Edna
English, president of
the local chapter of
the American Nurse's
Association, said, "I
wouldn't comply;
women don't have
equal rights now, so
why should the
government single out
women?"
Col. Marion Leiner
of the U.S. Army
Nurse Corps Reserves
and associate nursing
professor, said the
proposal is nothing
new. "Legislation was
prepared prior to the
end of WWII to do
exactly the same
thing she said.
Leiner added it was
good policy to have
names available in the
event of war.
When asked if the
legislation would
cause second thoughts
about entering and
staying in health-care
fields, some thought
the proposed legisla-
tion might be harm-
ful. "This could
frighten people away.
People don't realize
nursing can be a
dangerous job Sam-
mons said. Jernigan
and English said it
might make some
nurses get out of the
profession.
Brand and Sam-
mons said they would
want to serve in areas
related to their exper-
tise and not in some
other capacity. Sam-
mons said some
military recruiters
renege on promises.
' 'The military often
does not deliver on
promises made to
women; incentives
should be the same
for women as they are
for men she said.
U
o
a
HAS A RING TO IT
n
PIRGs Being Infiltrated
MINNEAPOLIS,
MN (CPS) � In a
move that may auger
a new kind of assault
on campus Public In-
terest Groups
(PIRGs) nationwide,
a group of conser-
vative students have
tried to infiltrate and
change the policies of
the statewide Min-
nesota PIRG board.
Though the conser-
vatives failed in their
summer attempt, they
have already succeed-
ed in gaining control
over the smaller Twin
Cities PIRG chapter.
Their activities
closely resemble tac-
tics for disrupting
PRIGs outlined in a
reported College
Republican National
Committee memo
distributed last spr-
ing.
Both the national
College Republicans
and the local conser-
vative insurgents deny
any attempt to
destroy PIRGs or any
coordinated efforts in
Minnesota.
But PIRGs � the
national network of
some 160 campus-
based consumer ad-
vocacy groups found-
ed by Ralph Nader in
the early seventies �
have long been targets
of some conservative
groups.
The Mid-Atlantic
Legal Foundation, a
Philadelphia-based
conservative advocacy
group, has sued the
New Jersey PIRG
over its method of
collecting student
fees.
Last spring, the col-
lege Republicans,
which is largely fund-
ed by the Republican
National Committee,
reputedly issued a
lengthy memo call on
its campus chapters to
mount local
challenges to the
PIRG's funding
methods, according to
syndicated columnists
Maxwell Glen and
Cody Shearer.
At about the same
time, 13 conservative
University of Min-
nesota students
managed to gain con-
trol of the Twin Cities
Chapter. Chapter
leaders were surpris-
ed.
"We didn't expect
a group of opponents
to misrepresent
themselves and get on
one of our boards
says John Gastovich,
head of Minnesota
PIRG (MPIRG).
MPIRG has been
among the most active
state PIRGs in the
country. Its lawsuit
questioning the con-
stitutionality of the
law requiring male
financial aid ap-
plicants to register for
the draft is now
before the U.S.
Supreme Court.
Gastovich accuses
the Twin Cities 13 of
being College
Republicans' puppets
out to end that kind
of advocacy.
But Richard Clem,
co-chairman of the
Twin Cities PRIG and
one of the 13 conser-
vatives, denies it.
"Two of our
members are College
Republicans he
concedes, "but I'm
certainly not. And
I'm not out to destroy
PIRGs. I want to see
us all work together
on such things as en-
vironmental issues,
but I simply disagree
with the way the
group is funded and
with some of their
positions. "
In last spring's
"Project Inform"
memo to mobilize
campus conservatives
against PIRGs, Col-
lege Republicans
Chairman Jack
Abramoff supposedly
called for "stacking"
PIRG mettings to
disrupt the groups
and so "it doesn't
look like an attack on
the left by the right
Abramoff now says
the College
Republicans had
nothing to do with the
Twin Cities takeover.
Over the last two
years, PIRGs at the
University of
Massachusetts,
Mankato State, and
Washington Universi-
ty in St. Louis, among
others, have all lost
fee checkoff systems.
In most cases, regents
or trustees end the
system after cam-
paigns from conser-
vative students or
trustees.
w
SEE THE ENTIRE COLLECTION OF
HERFF JONES COLLEGE RINGS AT:
September 9:00am-
DATE: 7891213 TME: 4:00pm
PLACE: Student Stores
HERFF JONES
Division of Carnation Company
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
S P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
- I

?� tail �





��
QUr Safit (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, c,�.
Darryl Brown. �-�� ��-
Waverly Merritt. o,vo4rfvertUm, Cindy Pleasants. ��, &�
Hunter Fisher. ���� ��.��� Patrick Oneill. mm wo,
ALI AFRASHTEH, CrrtUi Merger GORDON IPOCK, Enurtimmen, Ed.lor
Geoff Hudson. o�. va. Lizanne Jennings, st &,�
Clay Thornton. r�w &v.w Todd Evans, product mow
SEPTEMBER 14, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Student Fees
Necessary For Complete University
A story in last week's East Caroli-
nian presented the objections some
students, graduate student Donna
Guarino in particular, about man-
datory activity and health fees.
Some part-time and off-campus
students claim they rarely use the
services and benefits offered, and
therefore should not be required to
pay for services they do not want or
need. Guarino in particular lives 125
miles from Greenville, and since she
rarely is required to be on campus
for classes, will never use campus
such facilities as Mendenhall and
the Student Health Center, though
she is paying for both.
Their arguments can certainly be
sympathized with. Guarino has free
health insurance from her
employer, and considers (as most of
us would) two hours traveling time
too long to drive to see, for exam-
ple, a free movie in Hendrix
Theater. Other students have
similar complaints. ECU has a high
percentage of non-traditonal
students, i.e. part-time students or
students older than average who
work full time. Undoubtably many
are do not or cannot take advantage
of all the opportunities paid for
with their fees.
Likewise, there must be full-time
students living in campus dor-
mitories who do not use many
facilities for which they have paid.
Students not interested in athletics
won't use the intramural program;
those who aren't football fans
aren't likely to use student Pirate
tickets; surely at least a few students
don't care enough for most
Mendenhall movies to take advan-
tage of free admission.
The point is, though everyone
won't use everything (and a few
won't use anything), it is impossible
to let everyone pay for only the ser-
vices they use and still provide the
quality of service now in existence.
Everyone must pay for the general
support of student activities, so that
everyone will have the option and
opportunity to use them. It would
be a logistical and administrative
burden on a university of 13,500
students to have individualized fees,
and it would lower the quality of
each service, and the overall quality
of ECU student life in general.
Universities provide more than
classroom hours for education.
ECU has an outstanding program
of recreational and extracurricular
services. These programs are an im-
portant part of college life and
education. The Student Health
Center is vital to the safety and well-
being of ECU students, and it could
not provide the same quality of ser-
vice on a budget funded by volun-
tary membership.
Likewise, fees go to support the
general upkeep and maintenance of
the univeristy, according to Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs C.
G. Moore. It is certainly in the best
interest of all students, on campus
or off, to have buildings in good
repair and out of debt. The physical
aspects of the campus must be
maintained for anything else to ex-
ist.
It is important to note that while
student fees are mandatory, they are
on a graduated scale that allows
students taking fewer courses to pay
less. To run a complete university, it
costs more than just paying faculty
salaries and course materials. ECU
could not operate if students selec-
tively paid for only aspects of the
school that interested them.
For those interested, there is at
ECU a University College, run by
the Division of Continuing Educa-
tion, that is designed specifically for
the non-traditional student and re-
quires no health or activities fee.
The curriculum is more limited than
in the general univerisity, but is of-
fers many of the same courses, by
the same instructors, for credit.
Thus, while one can sympathize
with individual cases, there is
justification for the mandatory stu-
dent fee. ECU cannot become a in-
stitution of only classrooms, or it
ceases to be a complete educational
institution and one desirable to
students. The student fees are not
excessive; the campus programs are
certainly worth it.
Leave Monitor Down Under
By PATRICK O'NEILL
"The dual between the iron-clads in-
troduced a new era of naval warfare. "
�Lt. Col. Mark Mayo Boatner III, U.S.
Army (from his book, The Civil War Dic-
tionary.)
Ah the glory! The C.S.S. Virginia
(formerly the Merrimac) versus the U.S.S.
Monitor. Two big hunks of iron uselessly
exhanging fire; one's armor impervious tc
the direct hits of the other; basically a side-
show for the crowds that gathered to watch
along the shoreline.
They called the Monitor "a cheesebox on
a raft" and "Ericsson's Folly" (after its
builder John Ericsson.) Twice the Monitor
came close to sinking on its maiden voyage
from New York Harbor to Hampton Bays.
The ensuing battle had little if any impact
on the outcome of the Civil War.
Sorry folks. I know you won't
like me for this, but I say leave the
Monitor, its gun turret and its anchor to
quietly rust at the bottom of the Atlantic.
No offense to ECU's technical wizards
who mastered the anchor's recovery. Their
exploits were far more exciting then
anything the Monitor accomplished while
afloat.
I also do not wish to demean or denigrate
the sacrifices of those men who fought in a
war they believed in. When the Monitor
sank in 1862, 16 men went down with it. As
is usually the case with war, I'm sure these
men died terrifying, painful deaths. The
Monitor's first commander, Lt. J. Lorimer
Worden, also lost his sight when metal
splinters hit him in the eyes during the
Hamption Bay's battle.
First, although the Monitor was basically
an ineffective war-fighting craft in its day,
it was still the crude predessor of today's
deadly warships. When adversaries realized
their bullets could not penetrate the iorn
shields of monitor's, they began to create
more powerful guns to do the job. Ship-
builders followed suit and built thicker-
walled vessels and so the madness con-
tinued.
Later we found ways to submerge our
crafts and soon submarine warfare was be-
ing used to sink the floating ships. Today
we have the Trident submarine; a ship
capable of firing more than 460 in-
dependently targetable nuclear warheads
� the true "suicide folly" of this era.
I find it hard to justify an expenditure of
$95,000 to raise the Monitor's anchor. I
don't see the value of preserving a 1,300
pound, 121-year-old anchor. Is this strickly
to prove it can be done, or to satisfy our
historical curiosity?
I'd rather see $95,000 spent to feed
malnourished Americans than to raise up a
historic relic from the sea's bottom. While
poverty and hunger abound, there is no
room to partake of the luxury of perserving
the past while those in the present are dy-
ing. It is a burden far too heavy to bear.
Furthermore, I view the Civil War era as
one of the low points in the history of our
nation. This so-called "war to free the
slaves" was fought at a time of great
disunity among Americans. A period when
racism and hatred abounded.
The 16 crew members who went down
with the ship have earned their rightful
place place of burial; the best monument is
to leave them to rest in peace in their iron-
clad grave.
The hope of the future is to have large
numbers of our instruments of war aban-
doned, forgotten and left to rust Let's
start with the Monitor.
Curriculum Revolution: Revising,
Renovating, Rejuvenating ECU
By DARRYL BROWN
People are usually resistant to change,
except when pushed by extreme cir-
cumstances; likewise, it is hard to get a
concensus on what changes should be
made. Such seems the case with cur-
riculum changes at ECU. For the past
several years, revisions of the General
College requirements have been mired in
disagreement among faculty about how
to improve the curriculum. The General
College Committee of the Faculty
Senate, which is responsible for in-
itiating the changes, has been unable to
pass even such minor alterations as a
decrease of one hour the social sciences
requirement, an increase of two hours in
the humanities area and the discontinua-
tion of the library science class. It is
unlikely, then, that any major overhaul,
especially proposed by a lowly student,
will ever take place. Nevertheless, for
your reading pleasure, here are a few
(drastic) changes I would like to sec in-
stituted at ECU:
� A major expansion of the adviser
system. A course or two taught on a one-
to-one basis with an adviser in the stu-
dent's major subject would give the ad-
vantage of the personal tutorial system,
such as is found in the ancient English
universities. Personal dialog between
professor and student would be the
perfect supplement to the standard lec-
ture method used ubiquitously at ECU.
It would give the student more oppor-
tunity to think, and he or she would real-
ly have to work, for you can't sleep
through a meeting with your adviser. It
would require more work by faculty, but
in many departments it could be
alleviated by using graduate students as
tutors. Two or three such courses in an
undergraduate career would be a major
improvement. It would be essentially a
required independent study course.
� An alternation between lecture and
discussion methods in the classroom.
This goes along with the tutorial system.
Many departments could benefit by in-
stituting, especially in upper level
courses, discussion seminars of the type
used by the ECU Honors Program. This
would go beyond the level of those pro-
fessors who are good at leading class
discussions. Again, it would force
students to read and think of their
course work, and the free exchange of
ideas would benefit the listener as well as
the speaker. It is not applicable to all
courses, such as some science labs or
skills classes, but you'd be surprised how
much discussion a good professor can
bring even into those courses.
a few (drastic)
changes I would
like to see
instituted at
ECU
r� Campus Forum
� More standardized exams given in-
dependently of the class professor. This
is again an idea borrowed from English
universities, where students master a
given body of knowledge in a field of
study, not one professor's idea of what
should be taught in a particular area.
This would prevent some teachers from
leaving out certain subjects or areas that
don't interest them, and would prevent
them from not finishing a syllabus,
though they could still give some extra
focus to their area of expertise. It would
also make students prepare harder in
each course, because they can't just get
to know their professor and study only
what they know he or she will ask a
standardized exam, written bv a faculty
group, would be more comprehensive of
the field studied. It should not be only
multiple choice, however, (except
perhaps in massive freshman survey
courses); it must include writing Again.
more work for professors; again, a more
thorough method of education
� More organized, specific General
College requirements (such as are
already drawn up in faculty proposals)
that include foreign language study, but
in an altered form. The present language
classes are frustrating for both faculty
and students. Grammar is quickly
forgotten by students who hate learning
it in the first place, but the real benefit
of studying a foreign language, of get-
ting to know a different culture and how
it is reflected in or affected b its
language, is an important part o a col-
lege education. Cultural comparisons
are more interesting to most students
and probably would be retained longer
This overall plan is one to bring a
more structured, but comprehensive,
education to students, fcc L jvwam
the educational plan of Nor.tv Cxqt
necessitates that it be able to K-
comodate many non-traditional students
who do not go through a full-time, four
year college program right alter high
school. Still, the curriculum should be
designed such that the majority of
students w ho do follow the usual pattern
will be given an education that is more
than the accumulation of credits, larger)
elected by the individual student (often
with little guidance or planning) within
the broad boundries of department re-
quirements. The courses in a student's
four years of college should have some
interdependence and progression, and a
goal not only of career or vocational
training, but also of a developmer: of
the mind and personal character.
News Coverage Neglected Massacre
This letter concerns the last two
issues of The East Carolinian. Like
Mr. Houston and and Mr. Admire,
I'm not laughing about the "evil em-
pire" concept of the Russians. But
then again, I never started laughing
from the beginning. The story concern-
ing the "Korean massacre" was only to
be found in the opinion section of the
paper. Why, when every other paper in
the world had it front page? Doesn't
our news editor want to write about his
"buddies" in Moscow? If our govern-
ment as much as sneezes wrong, Mr.
O'Neill is on the front page and, just
like the Russian MiG at the Korean
airliner, blasting away at it. Now that
the Russians have committed
"another" act that results in a massive
loss of life, Mr. O'NeiU's response has
been less than critical. On Tuesday
(6th), Mr. O'Neill said that
Andropov's "silence is his way of buy-
ing time for the purpose of finding the
best way to make an apology If he
does, I know of 269 souls plus the rest
of the world, minus Cuba and com-
munist rebels of Central America, who
would like to hear it. Before Friday's
(9th) issue, this is what transpired: 1.
Russia admitted shooting down the
airliner; 2. Tapes revealed that the pilot
was "ordered to terminate the flight
3. Russia's statement saying that the
same thing would happen again if its
airspace is "violated upon 4. A news
report stated that the Russian people
"generally accepted and agreed" to
their government's actions. It is
strange that none of this made our
paper. O'Neill said the "Andropov is
not Adolf Hitler But they do think
alike, and Hitler's objectives are now
being resurfaced by Andropov: kill to
gain the world. Why is Mr. O'Neill so
"non-critical" of the Russian govern-
ment and yet be so "non-supportive"
of ours? It makes one wonder where
his "heart" really is. This past sum-
mer, Mr. O'Neill wrote an article on
ECU's bathroom graffiti, and one
statement he wrote about concerned
him. Pat, I'm not laughing at that one
statement anymore, either.
Wes Draper
Senior, Computer Science
Editor's note: It is the policy and the
goal of The East Carolinian to focus its
new coverage on campus and local
events, covering national stories only
when we can add a different perspec-
tive from that found in larger, national
newspapers, i.e by having a reportc
at the event, or by tying the story in
with local involvement.
Disarmament
Every time the Soviets do something
uncivilized, a chorus is raised: "See!
We told you so! The Russians cannot
be trusted. All they understand is
force. You peace people, even you
freeze people are soft headed. We need
MX's, B-l bombers, more aircraft car-
riers, more
The fact is that weapons are intend-
ed to kill people and destroy property
when a nation or its interests are
threatened. The Soviets, like us, have
built billions of dollars worth of them.
I have yet to hear that the purpose of
shooting down that Korean plane is
anything but natinal defense.
Yet it was dearly an atrocity. And if
that is true, it must also be true that
planning a similar defense is next to an
atrocity. I'm thinking of what massive
retaliation could do to thousands of
equally innocent Soviet citizens after a
terrorist from somewhere else set off a
nuclear bomb in D.C. Many kinds of
atrocious errors are possible, from
either side.
The peace movement calls on world
governments to put less trust in their
ability to inflict damage on each other
and to give more effort to cooperation
Is that soft headed? The so-clled
realists are buying bombs and poisons
and transportation for them to add to
their already huge stocks. Is that sensi
ble?
Perhaps peace people absorbed
American ideas too well in school. We
want our country to lead the world
toward liberty and justice for all. We
have the intelligence, but it's being
diverted to destruction.
Edith Webber
Greenville Peace Committee
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library. v
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Utters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
2S� ml �� Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
fo one every five issues.
Guber
By ELIZABETH PAGE
� .�"
As Gov James B Hunt's t
comes to a close, the gul
natonai election draws nearer
The questions running thiOL,
every voter's mind are. Who'
running? Should I vote Democi
or Republican? Who will do .
best job0 To answer these qu
tions the voters must study '
platform of each of the
didates.
The East Carolinian was able!
interview several of the cadidal
who are considering running fj
Hunt's job.
Former ECL Chancellor
Jenkins is one of the m;
democratics who should be I
running on election dav. "1
quality education Jen�
"There should be more fed
funded da-care centers so
rich as well as the poor
attend "
"The major highways I
Carolina's port cities need to
improved Jenkins said.
Carolina also needs to repa
roads coming from its air j
This will increase indus- j
mg trucks to make more efl
deliveries
Democratic candidate J
gram plans to announce
didacy for governor in CK j
"I helped the people
household, and Im g
household word Ing-
adding that he has organized su
port in all 100 North Ca
counties.
Launch Faircloth. has alreai
Fasting
By GLENN
MALGHAN
Man Writer
A meeting planned
between a spokesper-
son for the Reagan
administration and
the International Fast
For life has been
cancelled. Dr. Paul
Seabury, appointed to
speak for the presi-
dent, did not meet
with the fasters due to
a
"misunderstarding
according to FFL
spokesperson Leslie
Brockelbank. "We
don't know if the
government will res-
pond to another
meeting. '
Brockelbank said
The fasters are now
in the th week of
their water-only fast
which they hope will
"break the momen-
tum of the nuclear
arms race
Doctors hav e begun
examining the four
California fasters on a
daily basis. In a state-
ment issued Mondav.
doctors have "in-
creasing concerns
about neurological
damage, exhaustion.
and a general weaken-
ing" in the conditions
of the fasters.
Two of the Europe-
based fasters have an-
nounced thev will stop
their fasts. Didier Ma-
inguy and Johanna
Jordan both issued
statements last week:
"I've recovered a
stn
-
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A
stude
the

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panv
story
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cepc
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large
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I
liJLJASTCARQLlNIAN SEPTFMRPB ,4
1983

:�&�
JBl
's'
Massacre
etaliation could do to thousands of
f illy innocent Soviet citizens after a
F from somewhere else set off a
ear bomb in DC. Marv kinds of
3us errors are possible, from
Miner side
eace movement calls on world
ments to put less trust in their
'ty to mnict damage on each other
ind a g,ve more effort to cooperation
soft headed? The so-clled
i are buying bombs and poisons
fnd transportation for them to di to
jneiir already huge stocks. Is that sensi-
Pcrhaps peace people absorbed
American ideas too well in school We
i 1LolKCOuntry t0 ,ead tne wor,d
o�ard liberty and justice for all We
Jave the intelligence, but it's being
liverted to destruction. g
Edith Webber
Oreenv.lle Peace Committee
Forum Rules
wressJn010" Welc�mes
outh R Jy �Ur �ffice in Old
prary1 "� yner
I For PurPses of verification all let-
C m� include the name, mate and
hssificanon, address, phon7number
hd signature of the author(s) uuZs
t lTt�d t0 tWO '�"en Me?
h-spacedor neatly printed)
Vters are subject to editing for brevl
I, obscenity and libel ns-i urevi
hacks will h ' d no Personal
�itv anffP�rm'tted- ��
jcuity and staff writing letters for tZ
I one every five issues.
: Revising,
;ng ECU
he know, he or she will ask. A
stand d exam, written by a faculty
; more comprehensive of
vtudied It should not be only
tiple choice, however, (except
massive freshman survey
must include writing. Again
fessors; again, a more
gh method oi education.
ed, specific General
ncnts (such as are
in faculty proposals)
eign language study but
The present language
trating for both faculty
Grammar is quickly
jotten b students who hate learning
tee, but the real benefit
gn language, of get-
en t culture and how
in or affected by its
riant part of a col-
Cultural comparisons
intc g to most students
babl would be retained longer.
overall plan is one to bring a
-red, but comprehensive,
students. ECJposritonin
aJ rian of North Caiottn
that it be able to ac-
many non-traditional students
lot go through a full-time, four
liege program right after high
ill, the curriculum should be
h that the majority of
s who do follow the usual pattern
- given an education that is more
i accumulation of credits, largely
b the individual student (often
: guidance or planning) within
boundnes of department re-
The courses in a student's
of college should have some
endene and progression, and a
nly of career or vocational
- Jut also of a development of
ind and personal character.
J
ernat�rial Candidates Address
By ELIZABETH PAGE
Starr witic
As Gov. James B. Hunt's term
comes to a close, the guber-
natorial election draws nearer
The questions running through
every voter's mind are: Who is
running? Should I vote Democrat
or Republican? Who will do the
best job? . To answer these ques-
tions the voters must study the
platform of each of the can-
didates.
The East Carolinian was able to
interview several of the cadidates
who are considering running for
Hunt's job.
Former ECU Chancellor Leo
Jenkins is one of the many
democratics who should be in the
running on election day. "I'm for
quality education Jenkins said.
'There should be more federally
funded day-care centers so the
rich as well as the poor can
attend
"The major highways to North
Carolina's port cities need to be
improved Jenkins said. "North
Carolina also needs to repair the
roads coming from its airports.
This will increase industry allow-
ing trucks to make more efficient
deliveries.
5T5 !f AZneT'der,
gram plans to announce his can-
didacy for governor in October.
"I helped the people of the
household, and I'm going to be a
household word Ingram said
adding that he has organized sup-
port in all 100 North Carolina
counties.
Launch Faircloth, has already
announced his candidacy for the
states top post. "There are three
fundamental problems with state
government. The first and
foremost problem is jobs "
Faircloth said. "There is room for
more success in the industrial
eastern and western part of the
state.
"Education is another primary
concern, due to the fact that it
makes up 80 percent of North
Carolina's revenue budget " he
added.
"Fifteen to 20 years ago 25 per-
cent of all college students wanted
to be educators, today less than 4
percent want to be educators
Faircloth said. "The only way to
solve this problem is to raise the
salaries of our educators, and pay
them as the professionals they
are
Faircloth said the third problem
with state government is the need
for more efficient management of
social and educational programs.
"There need to be more programs
for the poverty stricken, the old
and those people who cannot take
care of themselves Faircloth
remarked.
Rufus Edmisten, is also running
for the gubernatorial position,
rusten, a democrat, has been
1974. NC- SinCC
"I believe in making real im-
provements in basic education
and practical training for tradi-
tional and developing job
markets Edmisten said. "I've
been a third grade teacher and
know I must provide resources
and assistance so that (the
J2?ifSiVe.m�Ie t,me and �" economy Edmisten said
better able to teach. Edmisten plans to
h d T '?� Pr!serv,n8 our statewide anti-crime campaign "I
habitat and quality of life; this in- have the experience to Zk effee
eludes the development of cost- tively with local law eXcemem
effective and safe programs of against violent crime and �
hazardous waste management
that meet the needs of our expan-
ding economy while at the same
time guarding and honoring the
stewardship of our land Ed-
misten said.
"We must preserve, promote
and enhance the roles of our tradi-
tional industries. We must never
rights for victims and witnesses
Edmisten said.
North Carolina State Senator
T. Cass Ballenger, a republican,
has been e.ected to the Senate four
times.
"I believe in merit pay for
teachers as well as removing the
ceiling pay from their salaries '
forget that textiles, small farms, Ballenger said. �T
Starvation Kills Thousands
font. Frnm Poo. t ��
Ballenger thinks the drinking
age should gradually be raised to
21. "This would considerably cut
down on the state's highway
fatalities he said.
"I feel that the bureaucracy is
well over-staffed Ballenger
said. " Every tax paying citizen
pays for this. The size of the
bureaucracy needs to be decreas-
ed.
"Environmental waste is a big
isue. We need to stop dumping
on the poor blacks of Warren
County Ballenger said.
Ballenger proposed an in-
terstate agreement with South
Carolina for a rotary kiln incen-
torator that would store the waste
above ground until N.C. has the
proper technology to dispose of
this waste.
Republican Rep. James G.
Martin was elected in 1972 to the
House of Representatives. He an-
nounced his candidacy for gover-
nor in August.
"Being a former educator, I
have a strong interest in educa-
tion said Martin, a former in-
structor of organic chernistrv.
Paul Jones, Martin's press
secretary, said: "Martin is the
most talked about candidate since
Jim Holshouser, and he has an in-
credible amount of support
Several other prospective can-
didates were not available for
comment but will be offered the
opportunity to comment again
Fasting Continues
By GLENN
MAUGHAN
Ufl Writer
A meeting planned
between a spokesper-
son for the Reagan
administration and
the International Fast
For life has been
cancelled. Dr. Paul
Seabury, appointed to
speak for the presi-
dent, did not meet
with the fasters due to
a
"misunderstanding
according to FFL
spokesperson Leslie
Brockelbank. "We
don't know if the
government will res-
pond to another
meeting
Brockelbank said.
The fasters are now
in the 7th week of
their water-only fast
which they hope will
"break the momen-
tum of the nuclear
arms race
Doctors have begun
examining the four
California fasters on a
daily basis. In a state-
ment issued Monday,
doctors have "in-
creasing concerns
about neurological
damage, exhaustion,
and a general weaken-
ing" in the conditions
of the fasters.
Two of the Europe-
based fasters have an-
nounced they will stop
their fasts. Didier Ma-
inguy and Johanna
Jordan both issued
statements last week;
"I've recovered a
strong desire for
life Mainguy said.
Jordan will quit
fasting on Sept. 14
which will mark the
40th day of the fast.
A Group of ECU
students supporting
the fast have an-
nounced plans to con-
duct vigils in front of
the Student Supply
Cont. From Page 1.
developed nations to
identify with a hunger
problem they are so
far removed from.
"So many times the
problem for in-
dividual citizens is
seeing themselves ef-
fectively associated
with this global issue
of hunger which
seems to be so remote
and so unrelated to
their life as they know
it Tomlinson said.
"The rest of the
world does not want
to hear of this
holocaust that's hap-
pening everyday
Baughan said. "I
think that the
developed countries
have maintained a
way of life that's
comfortable; produc-
ing an anistethic ef
gross national ro- wasn't there before
duct to purchase arms Baughan said. "I par-
leaving very little left ticularly would like to
for food and see us balance some of
agricultural needs.
Now, more than
ever before, the world
is showing signs of
hope because original
estimates of world
population growth
were over-estimates,
Baughan said.
"There's an ele-
ment of hope that
the 'gloom and doom'
with the idea that we
can accomplish
something
"The United Na-
tions, naturally, has
to encourage govern-
ments
to try to
reorder their priorities
so that by reducing, to
some extent, their ex- : ' �
penditures on ar-
maments and
reallocating (those
funds) for purposes of
improving the quality
of life in the rural
communities they
could in effect
guarantee longer term
stability and well-
being for their
people Tomlinson
said.
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$5.99
Nearine 5 Billion
Population Increases
0 ?&$ c Shrimp L o vers
' v�s�Vx ' W hy travel 100 miles to the
Store every Tuesday r"8 � mstethlc �-
at noon until he fast fCCt theJr ability t0
ends. consider the plight of
Organizers are ask-
ing participants to
wear white clothing
and green arm bands
during the vigils.
It's Miller Time
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
On Friday, the
Miller Brewing Com-
pany conducted their
program on
marketing strategy.
The presentation,
sponsored by the
American Marketing
Association, was held
in ECU's Jenkins
Auditorium.
Mary Ann Hadzor,
a representative of the
Miller Brewing Com-
pany presented the
story of how Phillip
Morris applied tex-
tbook marketing con-
cepts to Miller bring-
ing it to where it is to-
day; the second
largest selling beer in
the country.
Approximately 300
students attended the
multi-media presenta-
tion, which was
delayed by minor
technical difficulties.
Dr. James Lemley,
faculty adviser to the
AMA, called the
event a "memorable
experience
One reason for the
presentation was to
show students actual
uses of basic business
concepts taught in
their classes, Lemley
said. A party featur-
ing Miller beer and
hot dogs followed the
prevention.
other countries
"I think we
(Americans) often
have an attitude that
we were a self-made
country and if they
want to do better they
can do it; they just
have to muster the
resources Baughan
continued. Tomlinson
said the U.N. is trying
to educate govern-
ments about some of
the root causes of
hunger. In particular
Tomlinson noted that
countries often spend
large amounts of their
(UPI) - Earth's
population reached
the 4.7 billion mark in
June after the greatest
yearly increase in
history, the Census
Bureau reports.
Despite the leap,
the annual growth
rate remained basical-
ly steady at 1.75 per-
cent for 1982-83, the
Census Bureau said
Tuesday.
The world popula-
tion stood at 3.7
billion in 1970 and
was officially
estimated at 4.7
billion at the end of
June, up more than
800 million from the
1972-73 figure. In
1980, the global
population was just
less than 4.5 bilion; it
was 3.1 billion in
1960.
The rate of increase
peaked at 2.2 percent
in 1964-65 amid
widespread fears of a
"population explo-
sion P-t the rate
declined aiowly over
the next five years and
sharply in the follow-
ing five, the Bureau
said. The rate since
has fluctuated around
1.7 percent to 1.8 per-
cent a year.
The five greatest
contributors to the
1982-83 increase were
India with 15.5
million, China with 15
million, Indonesia
with 3.3 milion, Brazil
with 3 million and
Bangladesh with 2.9
million, the Com-
merce Department
Agency said.
For the United
States, the growth
cent, with the popula-
tion rising from just
more than 232 million
to nearly 234.2
million.
But the gain in the rate for the 12-month
12 months that ended period has 0 9 per-
June 30 was the
greatest numerical
leap in history.
Five nations ac-
count for just more
than half the world's
population. Fifty-two
percent of the people
are in China, India,
The Soviet Union, the
United States and In-
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(2 Blocks W. of Boy's Dorms)
We Specialize in Home Cooked Food
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 14. 1983 Page 6
The Verdict Is In
On Paul Newman
By GORDON IPOCK
IMnMMHI tdllor
The Verdict is different from all
Paul Newman's previous films �
it doesn't rely on his looks. In fact
the lighting is deliberately harsh to
make Newman look the part of
the haggard, alcoholic Frank
Galvin. This is strange stuff in-
deed. For 25 years Newman has
been known around the world for
his handsome facehis literally
impeccable features.
Although still handsome, look
closely at Newman in his earlier
films when he was still in his 30s
or 40s. In them his nose is straight
and perfectly formed. His lips are
not too full, not too thin and
taper into a sexy cruel curl at their
corners. His jaw is strong enough
to give manly character without
dominating the rest of his face;
likewise, his cheekbones are just
prominent enough. His forehead
is classically straight and runs into
mild, intelligent brows that frame
the most striking blue eyes any
mortal ever possessed. His a:e
perfect features in perfect har-
mony. With that face he could
never have been just an actor �
superstar was inevitable.
However, Newman's acting
ability has often been over-
shadowed by his good looks.
Perhaps talent wasnt't expected.
Warner Brothers hyped Newman
as the "second Brando" when he
first hit the screens in the mid-50s.
But his first Films were definitely
"sub-Brando In 1958 with
William Faulkner's The Long
Hot Summer, Newman began to
find his own style as an actor. His
sharp acting was well suited to the
character Ben Quick, who is the
ten-year-old boy in Faulkner's
famous short story Barn Burning
grown into a young man. By the
early 60s, with James Dean dead
and Brando's career an enigma,
Newman was Hollywood's hottest
leading man and most potent sex
symbol.
Three 60s films established
Newman as a superstar and won
him critical acclaim as an
actor: The Hustler (61), Hud (63),
and Cool Hand Luke (67). The
anti-heroes Newman played in
these films have become a part of
modern American folklore.
As Fast Eddie in The Hustler,
Newman plays a small-time pool-
room con man. He generates raw
machismo in the Brando style,
often wearing a rolled-up T-shirt
with biceps flaring as he haunts
smoke-filled pool rooms. A
cigarette habitually dangles from
his lower lip in the cool tradition
of Bogart. But unlike Brando and
Dean's often blunt, inarticulate
characters who are unable to ex-
press their raw, seething passions,
Newman's Fast Eddie is sharper,
quicker, more intelligent and
more verbal. There is also a
boyishness in his sexuality, an in-
trinsic part of his good looks.
Newman as the drunken, wen-
ching Hud Bannon in Hud, again
compels the audience's sympathy
for another anti-hero. An impor-
tant film, Hud deals with the
demise of the American West and
the end of the cowboy era. Hud,
"the man with the barbed-wire
soul is a cowboy who slams
head on into industrial America
and finds he has no place to go.
Corrupt and rotten, Hud tries to
have his father declared incompe-
tent so he can sell the ranch to oil
men. This is Newman's most
macho role. Hud is a more virile,
broad-shouldered character than
Fast Eddie, and Newman
somehow looks two sizes bigger.
Newman brings back the
boyish charm in Cool Hand Luke.
A sensitive drifter, Luke wants
but one thing from life �
freedom. As a drunken prank, he
lops the heads off a row of park-
ing meters with a pipe cutter and
winds up on a Georgia chain
gang. Too stubborn to conform to
the prison system, Luke, who
escapes three times, becomes the
unbroken symbol of rebellion for
the rest of the prisoners. The
prison command cannot tolerate
the charismatic rebel Luke. His
unbridled wit doesn't charm the
warden. Luke's mimicing
tauntWhat we have here is a
failure to communicateproves
to be his epilogue. The warden
orders Luke shot down like a dog
and allows him to bleed to death.
In his 40-odd Films Newman
has relied on his superstar looks
� especially when the plot or his
acting weren't strong. He possess-
ed the same can't-miss sex appeal
with women that once made Liz
Taylor a sure box-office draw to
men.
But unlike Liz, Newman hasn't
let himself go. Newman was 33
when he acted in The Long Hot
Summer but looked 22. At 42 in
Cool Hand Luke he looked 28.
Today without makeup he looks
like a man in his mid-40s � he's
57. But even Newman realizes his
days as an international sex sym-
bol are about over, especially with
younger audiences. He obviously
See NEWMAN, Page 8
Paul Newman was the '60s hottest male sex symbol. Is be now beaded for tbe White House?
Cruise Makes 'Risky Business' Cynical Fun
By MICK LASALLE
Surf Writer
Risky Business, now playing at
the Plitt Theatre in Greenville,
presents an interesting combina-
tion of a coming of age film (eg.
Summer of y42) and an adolescent
sex comedy (eg.Animal House). It
traces our young hero's transition
from a nervous, sexually inex-
perienced teen-ager to a man of
the world on the pathway to suc-
cess. Yet, while the film may not
be as funny as one might have ex-
pected from the trailer � for in-
stance, the segment in which the
$40,000 Porsche rolls into Lake
Michigan is funny in the coming
attractions but is not played for
laughs in the film � the movie is a
comedy, and intentionally so.
The film's hero, Joel Goodson
(Good son-get it?), played by
Tom Cruise, is a 17-year-old high
school senior with a fear of sex.
We see the nature of this fear in
two dream sequences. In one, he
is diverted by a beautiful naked
woman into missing his college
boards. In another, he and a girl
his own age are interrupted before
they can make love, by a police
dragnet, and by Joel's mother
pleading through a bullhorn,
"Stop, Joel! Don't throw your
life away
That the film doesn't go any
further in trying to explain Joel's
fear is to its credit, since the fear
itself is absurd and serves no pur-
pose but as a weak argument to be
shot down later by Joel's big
realization that the daring re-
quired to be happy and successful
in relationships with the opposite
sex is the same daring required in
order to be happy and successful
in life. That realization is essen-
tially the film's message.
The extreme seriousness with
which Joel's first sexual ex-
perience is treated is typical of
coming of age films and bears no
relation to the kind of treatment
similar subjects have gotten in
movies like Porky's and Animal
House. There is nothing funny
about the entrance of the call girl,
Lana, into Joel's darkened house.
This is "enter the woman of
mystery" who knows � who em-
bodies � the secrets to be reveal-
ed to the young man.
In the dark we try to catch a
glimpse of her face, as Joel does.
He touches her and the music
becomes surreal. The director
unabashedly tells us that this
event is meant to signify the boy's
becoming a man by having the
camera pan over a series of pic-
tures of Joel from infancy to
adolescence.
The point of view is
characteristically male. Success in
sex doen't signify success in love
but marks the completion of the
first hurdle towards success in
life. The first partner isn't "just
some girl but is elevated to the
mystical. What is simply not
understood beomes "un-
fathomable Though Lana gets
considerable screen time, she re-
mains the film's unknown entity.
Joel questions her about her past
but finds out next to nothing.
Towards the end of the film
Joel is robbed. He asks her if she
set him up. She says no. But she
says so unconvincingly, and we
are left unsure.
Even the film's effects conspire
to heighten Lana's mystery, to
suggest a sort of "Eternal
Feminine At one point Joel
returns to her after drowning the
Porsche. The film has her ap-
proach Joel in slow motion,
heightening the significance of the
mothering gesture she makes once
she gets to him.
Joel realizes the immorality of
the system which he's tried to
enter by moral means. He realizes
that it's Lana who is the "perfect
capitalist lacking "fear and
guilt flaws which Joel says are
his "specialties He has played it
safe, yet the good-boy statistics he
has compiled still don't add up to
his getting what he's wanted.
The Princeton admissions
man, Rutherford, walks into
Joel's house in the middle of a
party in which the house has been
transformed into a brothel for the
sake of raising money to restore
the Porsche. We suspect the set-
ting for this interview will spoil
Joel's chances of admission. The
Princeton man reads off a set of
statistics (1150 SAT. B aerage
which are good but are "clearly
not Ivy League Joel neve' had a
chance anyway.
The twist at the end is that as a
result of what he sees at the party.
Rutherford recommends Joel for
acceptance to Princeton. Com-
edies usually have happy endings.
But we shouldn't confuse this en-
ding with the kind we get in
Animal House in which we are
told that John Belushi's character
eventually becomes a senator. The
fact is, at the end of the film Joei
BELONGS in Princeton. Who
more deserves a crack at being a
business major at an Ivy League
school than a 17-vear-oId who
made $8,000 in one night? Joel's
friends in The Young Enterprisers
(the equivalent of Junior Achieve-
ment) can only claim an $800 pro-
fit over the course of a semester.
It's a cynical ending to a basically
cvnical film.
As entertainment, the film
works. Leaving the theatre, I
heard some claim that the story
wasn't realistic. But realism is on-
ly important when realism is the
goal. The film is emotionalN
realistic; that's all. Tom Cruise
proves that he can do more than
just play the homicidal lunatic he
played in "Taps It is, in fact.
Cruise's believability, more than
any other single factor, that
makes this odd comedy suc-
cessful.


A hot mixture of mask was beard la and around
Greenville tab past weekend. Among others, the
Tarns were at the Collard Festival la Ayden oa Satur-
day, Mike Cross played at the Carottaa Opry Hoase
oa Saaday, aad the Niththawks were at the Attic oa
Sunday. The Nighthawks, pktared above, stirred ap
Jjcrowd with nek favorites as "Got My Mojo
WorkiaV Tai a Ma "Sixteen Toas "Hoocbie
CoocbJe Maa" aad "Too Tal to Mambo This
haad, always a favorite tat Greeavtte, has grown
aahHer with tiase, saai thear readitfoas of the Maes can
oaly he kaowa as classic.
Cancellation
Due to a breakdown in con-
tract negotiations between
management and musi-
cians, the North Carolina
Symphony Orchestra con-
cert scheduled for Wednes-
day evening in Wright
Auditorium has been
cancelled.







� ' . ���
� -
�� ' 'wi0mtmt
Hard
NASHVILLE, 1ENN - Mu,
dustry executives are dancl
their suites to a new wave o
fits brought on by somethinj
ed New Music.
It's been a long time sin,
record industry has been at,
pop champagne corks. Earil
year, major companies laJ
hundreds of workers, drd
dozens of artists and close
fices to trim expenses al
record sales slump that begl
1979 continued its strangled
profits.
Pac-Man was gobblir
entertainment quarters,
sumers were taping recorc
home, the price of an albur.
proached $10, popular musk
old hat, radio stations were hi
and the economy was a mess
pie just weren't buying red
liice they used to
As 1982 closed, the
began to change. Pace-Man
its fever, the economy stabil
Poetry Fori
Constructs
ByMIKEHAMLR
The ECU Poetrv
Forum will hold its
first meeting of the
semester this coming
Thursday at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall 248 The
Forum is open to
anyone who would
like an appreciative
but critical audience
for hisher poetry.
Those attending are
asked to bring 6-8
copies of work to be
read and discussed.
The poetry Forum
is a student organiza-
tion which is also
of tl
men
Fori
da
the si
A.
M a A
I
I
the
cntu
si on.
prec
poe:
invin
do n
atten
l?l :
FILM
I
I

I

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I
I
I
I
I
Kodak fam
24 Hoi
FILM
$1.00 01
Expo;
50 OFF
50COFF
$1.00 OFF Any 8)
Oft CQacj
5t8 SOUTH CXT
GR�ENVItlE
752-0688
Limit one coupon p
COLL
GRE
Thurs
FREE DR.
Dance
THE
4Guysa
Doing Yo
ROCK ANDI
F
THE
CLAYT
SWEA
Hear the cli
5 Grammy A
15 mill
Doors
THEG
'The Stars Showplj
(across from the
For more inl
Sopt.23PUI
Open Nigh
AVv�t�yV��;





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 14, IVfli
Page 6
The Verdict Is In
On Paul Newman
B GORDON IPOCK
f nifrtn'nmfni dmr
The erdict is different from all
Paul Newman's previous films �
it doesn't relj on his looks, in fact
the lighting is deliberately harsh to
make Newman look the part of
the haggard, alcoholic Frank
Galvin. This is strange stuff in-
deed. For 25 years Newman has
been known around the world for
his handsome facehis literally
impeccable features.
Although still handsome, look
closely at Newman in his earlier
films when he was still in his 30s
or 40s. In them his nose is straight
and perfectly formed. His lips are
not too full, not too thin and
taper into a sexy cruel curl at their
. .rners His jaw is strong enough
to give manly character without
dominating the rest of his face;
likewise, his cheekbones are just
prominent enough. His forehead
is classically straight and runs into
mild, intelligent brows that frame
the most striking blue eyes any
mortal ever possessed. His are
perfect features in perfect har-
mony. With that face he could
never have been just an actor
super;tar was inevitable.
However, Newman's acting
ability has often been over-
shadowed by his good looks.
Perhaps talent wasnr't expected.
Warner Brothers hyped Newman
the 'second Brando" when he
first hit the screens in the mid-50s.
But his first films were definitelv
"sub-Brando " In 1958 with
William Faulkner's The Long
Hot Summer, Newman began to
find his own style as an actor. His
sharp acting was well suited to the
character Ben Quick, who is the
ten-year-old boy in Faulkner's
famous short story Barn Burning
grown into a young man. By the
early 60s, with James Dean dead
and Brando's career an enigma,
Newman was Hollywood's hottest
leading man and most potent sex
symbol.
Three 60s films established
Newman as a superstar and won
him critical acclaim as an
actor: The Hustler (61). Hud (63),
and Cool Hand Luke (67). The
anti-heroes Newman played in
these films have become a part of
modern American folklore.
As Fast Eddie in The Hustler,
Newman plays a small-time pool-
room con man. He generates raw
machismo in the Brando style,
often wearing a rolled-up T-shirt
with biceps flaring as he haunts
smoke-filled pool rooms. A
cigarette habitually dangles from
his lower lip in the cool tradition
of Bogart. But unlike Brando and
Dean's often blunt, inarticulate
characters who are unable to ex-
press their raw, seething passions,
Newman's Fast Eddie is sharper,
quicker, more intelligent and
more verbal. There is also a
boyishness in his sexuality, an in-
trinsic part of his good looks.
Newman as the drunken, wen-
ching Hud Bannon in Hud, again
compels the audience's sympathy
for another anti-hero. An impor-
tant film, Hud deals with the
demise of the American West and
the end of the cowboy era. Hud.
"the man with the barbed-wire
soul is a cowboy who slams
head on into industrial America
and finds he has no place to go.
Corrupt and rotten, Hud tries to
have his father declared incompe-
tent so he can sell the ranch to oil
men. This is Newman's most
macho role. Hud is a more virile,
broad-shouldered character than
Fast Eddie, and Newman
somehow looks two sizes bigger.
Newman brings back the
boyish charm in Cool Hand Luke.
A sensitive drifter, Luke wants
but one thing from life �
freedom. As a drunken prank, he
lops the heads off a row of park-
ing meters with a pipe cutter and
winds up on a Georgia chain
gang. Too stubborn to conform to
the prison system, Luke, who
escapes three times, becomes the
unbroken symbol of rebellion for
the rest of the prisoners. The
prison command cannot tolerate
the charismatic rebel Luke. His
unbridled wit doesn't charm the
warden. Luke's mimicing
tauntWhat we have here is a
failure to communicateproves
to be his epilogue. The warden
orders Luke shot down like a dog
and allows him to bleed to death.
In his 40-odd films Newman
has relied on his superstar looks
� especially when the plot or his
acting weren't strong. He possess-
ed the same can't-miss sex appeal
with women that once made Liz
Taylor a sure box-office draw to
men.
But unlike Liz, Newman hasn't
let himself go. Newman was 33
when he acted in The long Hot
Summer but looked 22. At 42 in
Cool Hand Luke he looked 28.
Today without makeup he looks
like a man in his mid-40s � he's
57. But even Newman realizes his
days as an international sex sym-
bol are about over, especially with
younger audiences. He obviously
See NEWMAN, Page 8
Paul Newman was the '60s hottest male sex symbol. Is be now headed for the V hite Hou
se.
Cruise Makes Risky Business' Cynical Fun
By MICK LASALLF
SUff W riter
Risky Business, now playing at
the Plitt Theatre in Greenville,
presents an interesting combina-
tion of a coming of age film (eg.
Summer of '42) and an adolescent
sex comedy (eg.Animal House). It
traces our young hero's transition
from a nervous, sexually inex-
perienced teen-ager to a man of
the world on the pathway to suc-
cess. Yet, while the film may not
be as funny as one might have ex-
pected from the trailer � for in-
stance, the segment in which the
$40,000 Porsche rolls into Lake
Michigan is funny in the coming
attractions but is not played for
laughs in the film � the movie is a
comedy, and intentionally so.
The film's hero, Joel Goodson
(Good son-get it?), played by
Tom Cruise, is a 17-year-old high
school senior with a fear of sex.
We see the nature of this fear in
two dream sequences. In one, he
is diverted by a beautiful naked
woman into missing his college
boards. In another, he and a girl
his own age are interrupted before
they can make love, by a police
dragnet, and by Joel's mother
pleading through a bullhorn,
"Stop, Joel! Don't throw your
life away
That the film doesn't go any-
further in trying to explain Joel's
fear is to its credit, since the fear
itself is absurd and serves no pur-
pose but as a weak argument to be
shot down later by Joel's big
realization that the daring re-
quired to be happy and successful
in relationships with the opposite
sex is the same daring required in
order to be happy and successful
in life. That realization is essen-
tially the film's message.
The extreme seriousness with
which Joel's first sexual ex-
perience is treated is typical of
coming of age films and bears no
relation to the kind of treatment
similar subjects have gotten in
movies like Porky s and Animal
House. There is nothing funny
about the entrance of the call girl,
Lana, into Joel's darkened house.
This is "enter the woman of
mystery" who knows � who em-
bodies � the secrets to be reveal-
ed to the young man.
In the dark we try to catch a
glimpse of her face, as Joel does.
He touches her and the music
becomes surreal. The director
unabashedly tells us that this
event is meant to signify the boy's
becoming a man by having the
camera pan over a series of pic-
tures of Joel from infancy to
adolescence.
The point of view is
characteristically male. Success in
sex doen't signify success in love
but marks the completion of the
first hurdle towards success in
life. The first partner isn't "just
some girl but is elevated to the
mystical. What is sirnpK not
understood beomes "un-
fathomable Though Lana gets
considerable screen time, she re-
mains the film's unknown entity.
Joel questions her about her past
but finds out next to nothing.
Towards the end of the film
Joel is robbed. He asks her if she
set him up. She says no. But she
says so unconvincinglv, and we
are left unsure.
Even the film's effects conspire
to heighten Lana's mystery, to
suggest a sort of "Eternal
Feminine At one point Joel
returns to her after drowning the
Porsche. The film has her ap-
proach Joel in slow motion
heightening the significance of the
mothering gesture she makes once
she gets to him.
Joel realizes the immoralitv of
the system which he's tried to
enter by moral means. He realizes
that it's Lana who is the "perfect
capitalist lacking "fear and
guilt flaws which Joel savs are
his "specialties He has played it
safe, yet the good-boy statistics he
has compiled still don't add up to
his getting what he's wanted.
The Princeton admissions
man, Rutherford, walks into
Joel's house in the middle of a
party in which the house has been
transformed into a brothel for the
sake of raising money to restore
the Porsche. We suspect the set-
ting for this interview will spoil
Joel's chances of admission. The
Princeton man reads of!
statistics (1 150 SAT. B
which are good but are
not h League " Joel no
chance anyway.
The twist at the end -
result of what he sees al
Rutherford recommends
acceptance to Princeton
edies usuallv have happv e
But we shouldn't confuse I �
ding with the kind we
Animal House in which w�
told that John Behishi's . net
eventually becomes a senator The
fact is, at the end of the I i
BELONGS in Princeton V
more deserves a crack at being a
business major at an Ivy League
school than a 17-year-old -
made 58,000 in one night? Joe -
friends in The Young Enterprisers
(the equivalent of Junior Achieve-
ment) can onlv claim an SS �
fit over the course of a semester
It's a cynical ending to a bask
cvnical film.
As entertainment, the I I
works. Leaving the theatre. I
heard some claim that the st
wasn't realistic. But realism is
ly important when realism is the
goal The film is emotion
realistic; that's all. Tom Cn
proves that he can do more than
just plav the homicidal lunatic he
played in "Taps it is. in fact.
Cruise's believabihty, more than
any other single factor, that
makes this odd comedv suc-
cessful.
A hot mixture of musk was heard in and around
Greenville this past weekend. Among others, the
Tarns were at the Collard Festival in Ayden on Satur-
day, Mike Cross played at the Carotins Opry House
on Sunday, and the Nlghthawks were at the Attic on
Sunday. The Nlghthawks, pictured above, stirred up
the crowd with such favorites as "Got My Mojo
WotktaV 'Tm a Man "Sixteen Tons "Hoochie
Coochle Man" and "Too Tall to Mambo This
hand, always a favorite In Greenville, has grown
suhtler with time, and their renditions of the blues can
only he known as classic
�Jfct�JiL
Cancellation
Due to a breakdown in con-
tract negotiations between
management and musi-
cians, the North Carolina
Symphony Orchestra con-
cert scheduled for Wednes-
day evening in Wright
Auditorium has been
cancelled.







Hard
NASHVII 1
dustry executives are
their suites to a new ave
fits brought or,
ed rn Music
It's been a long
record indu
pop champagne
ear, major :ompa
hundreds of vi ,
dozens of a-
fices to trim e �
record sales slump
199 continued
profits
Pa V
entertammr
sumers ere
home, the price
proachec I
old hat. radi
and the econonr. -
pie just wer-
like the jse !
As 19
began tc
its fevej
Poetry Fon
Constructiv
B MIIU HAMEM
The E '
Forum a
first meeting
semester
Thursdav a
Mendenha 24
Forum
anyone w
like ar. a
but -
for
Those atti
asked to brinj
copies of work I
read and d
The poetrv ;
is a
tion which
WITH
nr
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�Srr





Page t
the White Houve?

Fun
off a set of
" " , B average)
are "clearly
Joel never had a
iy.
ie end is that as a
- sees at the party,
recommends Joel for
Princeton. Corn-
have happy endings.
� confuse this en-
the kind we get in
imal House in vshich we are
elushi's character
mes a senator. The
id of the film Joel
BH ONGS in Princeton. Who
'rve a crack at being a
najor at an Ivy League
a 17-year-old who
� in one night? Joel's
The Young Enterprisers
valent of Junior Achieve-
nl claim an $800 pro-
trse of a semester.
vnding to a basically
I m.
Ttertainment, the film
leaving the theatre, 1
e claim that the story
realistic. But realism is on-
Tiportant when realism is the
The film is emotionally
tic; that's all. Tom Cruise
oves that he can do more than
t play the homicidal lunatic he
played m 'Taps It is, in fact,
C ruise's believability, more than
any other single factor, that
makes this odd comedy suc-
-essful.
����
ation
lown in con-
ns between
and musi-
th Carolina
hestra con-
for Wednes-
n Wright
has been










t



i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 14. 198)
Hard Rock Sinks As New Wave Rolls
NASHVILLE, TENN-Music
dustry executives are dancing fo
their su,t� to a new wave of ?ro
fits brought on by something call-
ed New Music.
It's been a long time since the
record industry has been able to
pop champagne corks. Early last
year, major companies laid off
hundreds of workers, dropped
dozens of artists and closed of-
fices to trim expenses as the
record sales slump that began in
1979 continued its stranglehold on
profits.
Pac-Man was gobbling up
entertainment quarters, con-
sumers were taping records at
home, the price of an album ap-
proached $10, popular music was
old hat, radio stations were boring
and the economy was a mess. Peo-
ple just weren't buying records
like they used to.
As 1982 closed, the scenario
began to change. Pace-Man lost
its fever, the economy stabilized,
video music forced radio out of
the doldrums and the music in-
dustry was on a red-hot roll. In
1983, there's a downright party
going on.
"This will be our best year since
1979 said Rob Altshuler, vice
president of press and public in-
formation at CBS Records
Group. "There's no question
about it. We now have returned to
an upper curve
CBS reported its profits
through June are triple what they
were during the same six-month
period in 1982. Revenue should be
up about 10 percent over last year.
Another giant in the industry,
RCA Records, experienced
"gratifying" profits in the first
and second quarter of 1983.
"RCA is fully participating in
the record industry's upturn,
which we attribute to both the
positive effect of the economic
upturn and a renewed interest in
music said Robbin Ahrold,
division vice president of com-
munications at RCA Records.
"We're seeing a return to the
level of sales that we traditionally
achieved in the mid-70s, which is
great he said.
One of the reasons for the in-
creased profits is rock 'n' roll has
broken out of a decade-long rut.
Rock began in the 1950s, matured
in the '60s, turned hallucinogenic
in the early '70s and stagnated in
the '80s. Some performers return-
ed to the early days of rock while
others ventured into virgin ter-
ritory � punk, new wave, heavy
metal, techno-pop and even reg-
gae. This year, rock has
finally found a new home, a
musical milkshake of styles with a
whipcrack beat called New Music.
The synthesized blend of rock,
soul, reggae and disco has kids
dancing and buying again.
Groups like Men At Work,
Duran Duran, The Police,
Human League, Eddy Grant,
Madness, Adam Ant, Prince, Ka-
jagoogoo, Culture Club, Romeo
Void, Missing Persons, Men
Without Hats, The Call, Oingo
Boingo, Talking Heads, REM,
Marshall Crenshaw, Eurythmics,
Tears For Fears, The Fixx, A
Flock of Seaguls and Haircut 100
are moving into the forefront of
popular music. Rock holdouts
like The Who, The Grateful
Dead, Pink Floyd, Queen, Iron
Butterfly, Peter Frampton, Alice
Cooper, Bad Company, Boston,
Grand Funk and the Allman
Brothers quietly retired to rock's
hall of fame.
"You're finding a lot of newer
groups reaching sales plateaus
that almost used to be
impossible explained Audrey
Strahl, spokeswoman for the
Rcording Industry Association of
America, a New York firm that
tracks record sales for the in-
dustry. "There is a rebound in
terms of New Music. That's a very
healthy sign
"New Music is becoming
mainstream music she said.
"It's good for new artists because
people are buying a vaster assort-
ment of music
Altshuler agrees that variety is
the spice of music company pro-
fits.
"We see all kinds of music in-
fluences that are being used in im-
aginative and intelligent ways
he said. "There are more varied
kinds of music. We see a wave of
creativity in music being released
now
But if radio wasn't playing the
stuff, how did people find out
about the new groups? The
answer is Music Television, the
Poetry Forum Provides Student Writers
Constructive Criticism For Their Work
By MIKE HAMER
oittaac Katertaiaaarat hrflirv
The ECU Poetry
Forum will hold its
first meeting of the
semester this coming
Thursday at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall 248. The
Forum is open to
anyone who would
like an appreciative
but critical audience
for hisher poetry.
Those attending are
asked to bring 6-8
copies of work to be
read and discussed.
The poetry Forum
is a student organiza-
tion which is also
under the sponsorship
of the English Depart-
ment. The Poetry
Forum meets on the
first and third Thurs-
day of each month of
the school year.
According to Peter
Makuck, who is
moderator of the
forum, the purpose of
the meeting is to pro-
vide a forum for
criticism and discus-
sion, as well as ap-
preciation of local
poetry. Everyone is
invited, and persons
do not have to read to
attend the meeting.
Speaking of the
forum, Makuck
saidThere is room
in the forum for
beginning writers.
We've had people
who have just come in
off the street. I think
they have to find it
helpful. For begin-
ners, the forum is
longer on encourage-
ment.
Don Ball, a poet
and graduate student
at ECU, had this to
say about the poetry
forum, "The forum
gives me a chance to
display a working
I
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COLLEGE NIGHT
AT THE
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Thursday Night
FREE DRAFT TILL 10:00
Dance to the Sounds of
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4 Guys and 2 Sexy Ladies
Doing Your Favorite Top 40
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Doors Open of 7:00
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(across from the Airport) Greenville, N.C.
For more information, call 757-3107
Sopt. 23 PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE
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Open Nightly Wed. thru Sat.
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poem, and I generally
get some very good
criticism about it. It
gives the writer a
chance to see what
others are doing,and
there are several really
good writers in Green-
ville. Sometimes you
bounce off other
poets' techniques, and
sometimes you get in-
structed. It's also a
lot of fun Ball went
on to say, "I would
encourage young
writers to listen and to
see what it's like; it's a
very professional at-
mosphere
Pirate Special
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video music channel on your cable
TV dial. Seven days a week, 24
hours a day, MTV beams
videotaped rock V roll clips into
14.5 million American homes.
"Various parts of the country
were getting exposed to bands
they have not seen on network TV
or heard on radio Ms. Strahl
said. "MTV and other video
outlets have a great deal to do
with it
RCA's Ahrold said MTV great
ly compressed the time it takes for
a new group to become known to
the public � "something that
would have had to be achieved
over a much longer period of time
by touring in the 1970s
ANNOUNCING . . .
SATURDAY OFFICE
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r or our i nnvniit-iicc vr will ! �� i �
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�.





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 14, 1983
Art Show Opens
Paul Newman plays loser Frank Galvin, an aging whisky-breathed lawyer with one chance to become a winner, in
THE VERDICT.
Newman Is Anti-Nuke,
Salad Dressing King
Cont. from Page 6
can't compete with
the nes crop of male
idols like John
Travolta and Richard
Gere.
So what does an ag-
ing superstar do? He
can switch to roles
that no longer de-
mand good looks �
just good acting.
Newman does this in
The Verdict. Or he
can give up acting for
other pursuits.
For the past ten
years Newman has
-pent more time rac-
ing cars than making
movies. Starting in his
late 40s � when most
race-car drivers are
retiring � Newman
has become a world-
class sports car driver
with tvo national
class championships
to his credit. He's as
highly regarded in
racing circles as he is
in Hollywood. But his
racing days must soon
be over too what
then?
Some say he should
run for president, or
at least enter politics.
Newman has been a
life-long liberal active
in civil rights marches
in 1963 and presently-
active in the nuclear
disarmament move-
ment. He and wife
Joanne Woodward
often speak at rallies.
He debated
Hollywood conser-
vative Charlton
Heston a while back
on ABC's Nightline.
In 1978 President
Carter appointed
Newman a delegate to
a United Nations ses-
sion on disarmament.
As proof of his
liberal credentials,
Newman often cites
that he was number 19
on President Nixon's
enemies list. Con-
sidering the shortage
of electable
Democratic con-
tenders, the idea of
nominating Newman
as the party's
presidential can-
didate, perhaps in the
future, might not be
such a bad idea. Actor
Reagan made it to the
White House.
Despite his
superstar status,
Newman doesn't
glory in it. He refuses
to sign autographs
saying that the majes-
ty of the act offends
him. He also rejects
many other superstar
trappings, such as
limosines. For years
Newman drove a
series of Volkswagon
Beetles with hopped-
up engines.
Newman has even
questioned the impor-
tance of acting. Like
Brando he seems
more concerned with
social and political
issues than making
films. His last two
films, Absence of
Malice and The Ver-
dict, have incor-
porated social and
political themes.
These films may mark
a transition from ac-
ting to politics.
Barring acting or
politcis, Newman can
continue to market his
own brand of salad
dressing. It's called
"Paul Newman's
Own Olive Oil and
Vinegar Dressing
(Apellation Newman
Controllee). It has a
sketch of Paul grinn-
ing-from the label and
is sold in finer food
stores everywhere.
Known for his passion
for popcorn, Newman
is also considering
marketing his own
gourmet
brand. . .perhaps
challenging Orville
Reddenbacher.
No matter what
direction the re-
mainder of Paul
Newman's career
takes, he'll be
remembered as a fine
actor receiving six
Acadamev Award
nominations but so
far no Oscar. But
mostly he'll be
remembered as the
idol of millions of
womenthe man
with the perfect
features and the
bluest eyes to ever hit
the silver screen
Three art shows will
open in the Gray Art
Gallery, Jenkins Fine
Arts Center, here at
ECU on Thursday.
The shows will open
at 7:30; a reception
for the public and the
artists will be held at
that time.
The three shows to
go on view are: "Clay
Tapestries"by Rinda
Metz; Bette Bates'
"MFA Thesis Works
in Printmaking and
"Works in
Progresspieces by
ECU graduate
students.
Ms. Metz, currently
a faculty member at
Ohio Weslyan Univer-
sity, taught ceramics
and directed the art
gallery at Chowan
College in Mur-
freesboro from 1979
to 1982. Originally
from New Haven,
Conn she holds a
degree in biology
from Indiana Univer-
sity and the M.F.A.
degree in ceramics
from Tulane Universi-
ty. The artist is a per-
son of diversified in-
terests - symphonic
music, horse riding,
canoeing and or-
nithology. She is a
member of the Tri-
State Sculptors, and
has been active in ad-
vancing the status of
women artists in the
South. Her show
closes Oct. 23.
Her "Tapestries"
are created by weav-
ing hand-rolled col-
ored coils of clay into
a chicken wire grid.
The pieces are
displayed by being
suspended in space.
Bette Bates, an
M.F.A. candidate at
the ECU School of
Art. is currentlv living
in northern Califor-
nia, where her hus-
band, Robert Dick, is
professor of painting
at Humbolt State
University, Arcata.
Her work consists of
seven color
lithographs, and
reflects the theme of
"transformation
the positive negative
effect of image rever-
sal and juxtaposition
Ms. Bates' show will
be up through
September 30.
"Works in Pro-
gress" is a selection
from the current work
ot several ECL
graduafe art students.
Chosen from a variety
of media, this show
will give the public an
idea of current trends
and methods being
employed by ECL
graduate students.
This show will last un-
til September 30.
Sex Perverts Lured
Into Eating Raoul
What happens
when a staid middle-
class couple takes up
murder as a cottage
industry0 The result is
Eating Raoul � an
outrageous spoof of
sex and violence.
Director Paul
Bartel (Death Race
2000) takes a clever,
satirical look at sex,
greed and modern
times in this clever,
offbeat black com-
edy. Bartel and Mary
Woronov (both star-
red in Rock V'Roll
High School) are a
married couple who
� C
stumble upon a
scheme to raise
enough money to
open their own
restaurant. It's sim-
ple. They just lure
wealthy perverts (via
newspaper ads) to
their apartment, bonk
them on the head with
a deadly frying pan
and steal their cash.
Delightfully crazy
Raoul (Robert
Beltran) is a rip-off
artist who discovers
two of this enterpris-
ing couple's victims in
garbage bags and
wants a niece of the
action. They let Raoul
in, and the plot
thickens when he falls
for Mary
The cast is terrific
� Bartel and
Woronov have just
the right deadpan ap-
proach to their roles
and Beltran is a pistol
as the most charming
psychopath you'll
ever want to meet
Eating Raoul is
destined to win a
place in cinema
history. Don't miss
this one!
I$l 5.00 OFF ANY COMPLETE I
PAIR OF EYEGLASSES1
� Null Ke�ni coupon �irh ofde? �m liv n n
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12
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SOFT QO�
CONTACTS W
s . KSMD
as: :r k '
The
� OPTICAL
Phone
756-4204
PALACE
703 Green.Ill 3Ud Acro�� From Pitt Plaa Ne�t To f R A Real

Gr M Hinit Licen�ed Optic tan
Open 9 30 a m :o b p m Mon
SEE LEON RUSSELL FREE!
N
N
PAPA KATZ
J zziznti
Juit Jot z� JadJEi:
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( (1 ti�i itaiy, JifittimULi 14th.
r facial tncHulnq L. JLin.ae.xLe.
7 (ni.tnvLU
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fat atl �cuLu fxam 'Jokn Otoxnt floox
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- 7 OO
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10th St Lxt At
RiverhtuH Kd
Papa KaU Is A Private Club
For Members & Guests
We Have All ABC Permits Where the Htght corner L ile
txxxxtmLl
afl I
Sept. 16,1983
Buy a Carolina Opry House membership for the
regular price of $10.00 and recieve 1 ticket to
see LEON RUSSELL absolutely FREE!
Regular Membership: $10.00
Leon Russell ticket: 8.00
Total: $18.00
You Pay: 10.00
You Save: $8.00
You must purchase your membership before 7 00pm
FrL, Sept. 16,1983.
Don 7 miss our Fall lineup:
TWIST CONTEST Winner wi� receive
an all expense paid trip for 2 to NEW YORK CITY
plus $1,000.00 CASH!
EMBERS, SUPERGRIT COWBOY BAND, NITTY GRITTY
DIRT BAND, CHUBBY CHECKER
DELBERTMcCLINTON, JERRY LEE LEWIS
and many more!
L
For further info call 758-5570
The Carolina Opry House is a private club for
members and guests. All ABC permits.
?
Pira
hem sweet
ftei �
Carter
head
Ed Era
15 poii
bring home 12 -
victor)
Car
v, -
citizen
Em or.
' 1 wa
er-
g
r
ipirii �
li kc w
.
three
back
d -
poini
at
q artei
Ke.
iru ; I
Byner
ba
powei
With 4:29
ran i
N.C Stati
The '��
ma
Wat sa '
Esp
Fol. - g
Esp Pad pu
ECl -
Byr.e: and Bali
ed for :
put the Bws on E
hne. One p - � a
for a 27-ya
rush ol r E! .
a series:
Byner and
wood V ir.r.
One of sever
Yann had a few -
the hue: .
five vaiv! foi
Hundre
Continued From Pj
eer- hoa c ga
"If you
then you're . �
gooo seas: d
front of your fa
Emory said
fans � ntinue
the Hues here c
"1 th
we've gotta eer I
ded fuel
"Err
and I thin)
oe: to this -eeK
x hen the P
Green-
game, fans greet
eer
Ma � M ra thai
pie �.e:e gathered
and hundreds ol per
the p.aers a: Beik Dor
that does
-rsec and
what thev've dc
said, nothing �,
If the heaj coat
ing to rr.ee- some
he'll need all the
get Aoc �� Emc
Pirates have the
become poss riy the be
in the oountr)
"ECU has the
eiaied head foocba. 1
the of pack
?
-�





pens
positive negative
;ct ot image reer
and juxtaposition
Bate show will
up through
tember 30.
in Pro
- a selection
the current work
01 several ECU
graduafe art students.
Chosen from a varietv
of media, this show
will give the public an
idea of current trends
and methods being
employed bv ECU
graduate students.
This show will last un-
til September 30.
verts Lured
ting Raoul
a
i i a
The s lure
apartment, bonk
id with
an
(Robert
� a
discovers
s enterpris-
- victims in
is e baas and
wants a piece of the
action. Thev let Raoul
in, and the plot
thickens when he falls
Mar.
The cast is terrific
Bart el and
Woronov have just
the right deadpan ap-
ach to their roles
and Beltran is a pistol
as the most charming
psychopath you'll
ever want to meet.
Fating Raoul is
destined to win a
place in cinema
history. Don't miss
this one!
5.00 OFF ANY COMPLETE I
PAIR OF EYEGLASSES!
�'?�?rtt coupon ith oror- f
K -the? �j.r-Ti�c: �p �
12
Ptici
SOFT QOH
CONTACTS 97
s . ?fsjCD,i
AS. i K �
�t
Phone
7 56-4204
PALACE
m N�t To tRA Realu

pn 9 30 m tofepm Mon In
lership for the
ve 1 ticket to
tely FREE!
0.00
efore 7:00pm
inner will receive
V YORK CITY
JD, NITTY GRITTY
tY LEE LEWIS
on House is a private club for
i guests. All ABC permits
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Pirates Win Finest Victory Of All
By CINDY PLEASANTS
�SJKWtl JxlitO,
WolfpackOh,
Beating the
how sweet it is.
After three years of leaving
Carter-Finley Stadium with their
heads hanging low, ECU coach
Ed Emory and the Pirates scored
15 points in the final quarter to
bring home a, 22-16, long-awaited
victory over rivalry North
Carolina State.
'We've been second-class
citizens for so many years now
Emory said following the game.
"It was a must win for us, and it's
very, very sweet. I just thank the
good Lord for giving me the op-
portunity to be there and feel the
spirit of winning. There's nothing
like winning
Scoring just seven points in
three quarters, the Bucs came
back in the final period to nail
down two touchdowns and a two-
point conversion. Trailing, 16-7,
at the beginning of the fourth
quarter, the Pirates' quarterback
Kevin Ingram and top runn-
mgbacks Tony Baker and Earnest
Byner joined forces to move the
ball against the Wolfpack's
powerful defense.
With 14:29 remaining, Baker
ran six yards to the endzone to cut
N.C. State's lead to two, 16-14.
The Wolf pack then began its
march, but linebacker Randy
Watts sacked State's Tim
Esposito for a five-yard loss.
Following an incomplete pass by
Esposito, the Pack punted to
ECU'S 17-yard line.
Byner and Baker then combin-
ed for 30 yards on five carries to
put the Bucs on ECU's 47-yard
line. One play later, Ingram kept
for a 27-yard run�his longest
rush of the night. That run set up
I a series of consecutive carries by
Byner and one by tightend Nor-
wood Vann.
One of seven seniors on offense,
rann had a few words to say in
le huddle right before Byner ran
ve yards for the Pirates' winning
touchdown. "I told'em we had
been together so long, and we had
come too far to give up now
Vann said. "Right then, we need-
ed senior leadership. That was our
time
After Byner's burst into the
endzone, Ingram followed with a defense) minds, they thought we
and-six situation on the 10-yard
line.
The ECU defense then returned
to the field, and Emory became a
little leery about how the players
1:17 remaining, Ingram zipped a
pass to Adams. Adams then
fumbled and Vann recovered in
the endzone to score, giving the
Bucs a 7-3 lead. That play, Emory
would react to returning to the said most assuredly, was not in
field so quickly. "In their (the
counter-option for a two-point
conversion. The Pirates went for
he extra two points in case the
W olfpack scored again, and a
missed extra-point kick by State
wor' have given the Bucs the
Lead.
But that wasn't to happen. The
Pirates' offense finally came
together. "We got back to our
game Emory said. "They were
taking the pitch away from our
option, and they were trying to
take Kevin (Ingram) out of the
way
"That's why they called that
option he continued. "They
might take the fullback away,
they might take the quarterback
away, and they might take the
pitch away, but they can't take all
three away if we do what we're
suppose to do
The experienced offensive line
told Coach Emory what they
wanted to do. "They said to me,
'Coach, we'll move the football.
Just let us run at them, and we
decided to do that Emory said.
"I think they (State) were run
down some in the third quarter.
The fourth quarter was ours.
Thank goodness for strength and
conditioning and for guys with a
bunch of character
The Wolfpack made a valiant
attempt to score with tailback Joe
Mclntosh carrying the ball five
times. On ECU's 27-yard line,
State tailback Mike Miller carried
twice, but fumbled on the 10-yard
line. Pirate free safety Clint Har-
ris recovered with almost three
minutes remaining in the game.
The Pirates began heading the
other way, but Byner was stripped
of the ball while going down the
middle and fumbled in a second-
had won the football game
Emory said. "When we (ECU)
fumbled, the players had to go
back on the field. That's what we
call a "sudden change By sud-
den change, they could have said
'this is the same old fairy tale
the playbooks. "That's not in the
playbooks, but I can guarantee
you it's in the playbooks to stay
alert at all times he said.
"Calvin Adams made a great
catch and the ball got knocked
loose when he came down. Nor-
wood (Vann) was just being alert.
"Sometimes good things can
again. We're gonna lose by one happen if you're at the right place
noint he etmtinnmA "Knt th�� -� tU. �w� �;� �
point he continued, "but they
went in and stopped them and
won the game. They wanted it
very badly, and I'm glad they
brought it home
On the Pack's last play,
Esposito pitched to fullback Vince
Evans, who was stopped by junior
cornerback Calvin Adams. Accor-
ding to Esposito, the Bucs made a
defensive adjustment and moved
Adams on the last play. Emory
said that wasn't the case. "He
wasn't out of position he said.
"He did exactly what we told him
to do. We anticipated a certain set
and certain play, but we certainly
weren't expecting the option
The Pirates also had a few sur-
prises in the first half. According
to Emory, the Bucs had to made a
few adjustments. "They came out
and mixed it up. It took us a while
to get a read on exactly what they
were doing. We got impatient and
started throwing the ball too early
in the first half.
"We didn't establish our trap
option he continued. "We were
concerned with trying to finesse
them instead of coming out and
playing fundamental football
With eight minutes in the first
quarter, State placekicker Mike
Cofer booted a 34-yard field goal
to put the Wolfpack on the
scoreboard first, 3-0.
The Bucs soon followed,
however, with a 67-yard scoring
drive late in the first quarter. With
at the right time.
In the second quarter, the
Pirates went scoreless while the
Wolfpack added 10 more points.
State's Miller ran one yard with
11:24 left to score a touchdown.
Cofer followed with 34- and
24-yard field goals to give the
Wolfpack a 13-7 lead at halftime.
At that point, Emory said he
knew what to tell his players in the
locker room. "I said, 'Men,
you've worked too hard to let
somebody take it away from you.
If you want it, it's out there for
you to take it. We've worked too
hard and too long, and we should
win it more than anybody else, so
just don't give it away
The Pirates didn't give it away
Instead, they earned their first
tory since 1977 and their fourth
win over the Wolfpack in 14
years.
For Emory and the senior
payers, the win meant satisfac-
tion. After three years, thev knew
how it felt to beat the Wolfpack
According to Clint Harris, it felt
pretty good too. "Won't ever be a
game bigger than this one he
said. "We lost a very tough game
at Florida State. We just weren't
ready to lose another one
Hundreds Meet Bucs On Return
Continued From Page 1
every home game he said.
"If you win every home game,
then you're assured of a pretty
good season, especially in
front of your home people
Emory said he hopes Pirate
fans will continue to support
the Bucs wherever they may
play. "I think the enthusiasm
we've gotten has been like ad-
ded fuel to the tank he said.
"Enthusiasm is contagious,
and I think it should carry
over to this week
When the Pirates arrived in
Greenville after the N.C. State
game, fans greeted them at
every turn, including the
Mayor. More than 2,000 peo-
ple were gathered downtown,
and hundreds of people met
the players at Belk Dorm. "If
that doesn't make the kids feel
special and appreciated for
what they've done Emory
said, "nothing will
If the head coach is plann-
ing to meet some of his goals,
he'll need all the fans he can
get. According to Emory, the
Pirates have the potential to
become possibly the best team
in the country.
"ECU has the makings to
win a national
championship he said.
"This is a great team and a
great university
The East Carolina Pirates
had the pleasure of defeating
the N.C. State Wolfpack
Saturday night in front of
57,700 people � the largest
crowd ever to watch a football
game in the state of North
Ca
i-wiuing to Emory, the
Bucs convinced quite a few
spectators that East Carolina
is a university to be reckoned
with. "I think it proved that
we've come a long way
Emory said. "We've made a
commitment to big-time foot-
ball, anil we're here to stay.
We want to play with the best
teams in the country
The Pirates would like to
compete with some of the best
teams in North Carolina, but
other schools haven't been too
cooperative. "We ought to be
claimed the N.C. State cham-
pions because nobody else will
play us Emory said.
The win over the Wolfpack
should help in-state recruiting.
"The recruits can go anywhere
in North Carolina, but theyll
never experience the excite-
ment and the thrill of winning
like they will at East
Carolina
After a 47-46 loss to Florida
State, the Pirates were even
more eager to take another
shot at the Wolfpack. In fact,
in Saturday's Raleigh Times,
the Pirates were described as
being cocky and over-
confident about playing N.C.
State. Emory' disagreed de-
fiantly. "If they (players)
didn't worry, their coach wor-
ried enough for all of them
he said.
"We want them to have
confidence because that's
something we've been lacking
here he continued. "Senior
maturity gives confidence, and
I think our kids are confident,
but they're not cocky
The near upset over Florida
State may have caused a few
swelled heads, but it also
brought about a wave of
worldwide recogni-
tion. The game stirred so much
interest that Atlanta cable sta-
tion WTBS decided to telecast
the ECU-N.C. State game.
That exposure marked the
largest television coverage in
ECU's history.
bili$Ulk
tm
Winning Form
OAKY PATTHSOW
ECU defensive end Kenny Phillips waist tackles N.C. State's Vince Evans during the Pirates' tniimph over
rival North Carolina State. ECU head football coach Ed Emory said the Bucs played with the intensity and
enthusiasm they lacked at FSU. "Right now, we've got four strong line backers, and our conrnerbacks are
playing the best I've seen them play at ECU Emory said.
Byner Leads Steady
Pirate Ground Attack
ECU's dated head football coach celebrates with the players hi N.C. State's locker room after their 22-1 vie-
torjwer the Wolfpack.
By KEN BOLTON
Mutual Sports Kdllof
When it got down to the nitty-
gritty in Saturday night's slugfest
with N.C. State, the Pirate of-
fense turned to their "bread and
butter" � the ground game.
On ECU's two late scoring
drives, the Pirates ran the ball 17
times while only passing the ball
twice.
Leading the way for the Pirate
ground attack was fullback
Earnest Byner. The 5-10,
230-pound senior rushed for 97
yards on 17 carries, an average of
5.7 yards per carry.
For his efforts, Byner was nam-
ed the WTBS Most Valuable
Player for ECU after the nation-
wide telecast. A $1,000 scholar-
ship will be given to the ECU
general scholarship fund in
Byner's name.
With Byner picking up 32 yards
in the fourth quarter, the Pirate
running game pounded the
Wolfpack defense in the final seg-
ment.
"We just decided we weren't
going to lose said Byner, who
was also named honorable men-
tion EC AC player of the week.
"In the second half, we started
picking up what their defense was
doing
The N.C. State defensed did a
good job all night of containing
ECU's dangerous option, so the
Pirates began running up the mid-
dle with regularity in the second
half.
With Terry Long and Co.
bulldozing through the State
defensive line, Byner and tailback
Tony Baker took advantage of the
openings to pull off many big
gains.
As far as Byner is concerned, he
wouldn't trade his offensive line
for any other one in the country.
"I depend on those guys for so
much Byner stated. "I know
what they can do and they know
what I can do. We have a great
deal of mutual trust
A perfect example of the power
of the Pirate offensive line occur-
red on the game-winning
touchdown.
The entire left side of the Pirate
front � from center Tim Mitchell
to tight end Norwood Vann �
pushed the Wolfpack defenders
backwards.
"When we watched the films,
you could see that the whole State
line was drilled back into the end
zone said Byner.
After the first two games of the
'83 season, Byner has rushed for
147 yards and two touchdowns.
With 1334 career yards, he needs
just 339 more yards to finish
among ECU's all-time top-ten
rushers.
With two highly-emotional
games already under their belt,
the Pirates will have to avoid an
emotional letdown in Saturday's
game with visiting Murray State.
But Byner doesn't anticipate
any sort of letdown.
"We're the type of team that
knows what we've got to do he
said. "We want to go 10-1, so we
can't afford to take anyone light-
ly
And based on Byner's perfor-
mance Saturday night in Raleigh,
the rest of ECU's '83 opponents
won't take the 230-pound
fullback too tightly

ijfci axi8�lr"i� MWNH
.
i





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 14, 1983
Statistics
First Down
Passing Yards
Passing Yards
Return Yard
Pasj�
Punting
Kum hies-Lost
Penalties
7 3 0 IS - 22
J 10 3 0-16
Scoring
NCS - FG Cofer 34
ECU � Vann, recovered fumhle in end one (Heath
kick)
NCS � Miller. I run
NCS - FG Cofer 34
NCS - FG Cofer 24
ECU � Baker, 6 run (Heath kick)
ECU � Byner. 5 run (Ingram run)
Individual Statistics
Rushing � ECU Byner 17-97, Ingram 16 H4, Walden
$-31. Baker 10-3 Branch Hi, NC S 1 vposito 419).
Mclntosh 2I-IIV0. Evans 12-32. Isom 3-6. Brothers I J),
Miller 14-79, J Greene 1(1)
Passing � ECU: Ingram (�asR-(W). NC S Espossto
26-13 146-0-0
Receiving � K I' ann 15. Adams 2 25. Walden
1-6. Nichols 1-12. Baker I 10. NCS Brothers 3-40. Miller
28, S Davis 2 32. Evans 2 18. Foster I J, Mclntojh
1-20. Brown 13
Alt 57.700
ECU Slated To Play
Gamecocks In 1984
East Carolina
University will play
the University of
South Carolina
Gamecocks in foot-
ball for five con-
secutive seasons,
beginning in 1984, ac-
cording to the
schools' two athletic
directors.
The Pirates will
travel to Columbia,
S.C in 1984 to start
the series. The 1985
game will be played in
East Carolina's
Ficklen Stadium,
while the 1986, 1987
and 1988 games will
all be played in Col-
umbia.
"We are just elated
to sign this five-year
contract with South
Carolina said ECU
Director of Athletics
Dr. Ken Karr. "It is
very important to our
program to have
regional competition
with major state
universities such as
South Carolina.
"The proximity of
the game will afford
our fans the oppor
tunity to be in atten
dance on the road,
which likewise is er
important to our pro-
gram
The two schooU
have met only once to
play football, in 197"7
in Columbia. The
game was regionally
televised b ABC.
with the Gamecocks
completing a sue
cessful rally in the
final two minutes to
win 19-16.
fc'p 4dp
Support The Pirates
i
i
mm
Daily Specials 11a.m10p.m.
Mon. 8oz. Chopped Sirloin $2.99
Tues. Beef Tips $1.99
Wed. Beef Ribs $3.49
Specials served with King Idaho
Potato or French Fries and Texas Toast
758-7979
208 E. Fifth Street
Greenville, N.C.
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved V eg. Bar
Serving a 10 and 14 oz. T-Bone
i
i
i
����. i
Part of the 57,700 fans at Carter-Finley Stadium pour onto the field following the Pirates' emo-
tional win Saturday night.
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd
2903 E. 10th St.
Join
The Pirate Attack
Buy a foot long
Pirate Special and
get a bag of chips and
a small drink for free!
good Sept. 13th thru Sept. 20th
Pirate head coach Ed Emi
much happier mood after
BUYING -
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Tvs A- Co,3er5
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Southern Pamr SKop
located 405 E�ans Stree'
4ov.ntov -s: 2a
You
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ep
Saturday Sept. 17th r6-
ECU vs. Murray St. 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 18th The Biggest Beach Concert
Greenville & ECU has ever seen
A
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SEPT. 18th
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AT THE
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GREENVILLE: LBE Bonds ML.
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IN: Greenville. New Bern.
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House of Records - Morehead
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at Gate
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1
J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 14, 1983
11
Play
984
the game will afford
our fans the oppor
tunity to be in atten
dance on the road.
hich likewise is ver
important to our pro-
gram
The two schools
have met onl once to
play football, in 1977
in Columbia. The
game was regionalK
televised by ABC,
with the Gamecock-
completing a suc-
cessful rally in the
final two minute to
win 19-16.
irates
ifth Street ?
ville, N.C. J
ack i
nd J
and i
reel j
ept. 20th J
Netters Ready To Roll
With Hot New Recruits
By RANDY MEWS
Despite returning
only six players from
the entire men's and
women's tennis
teams, ECU head
coach Pat Sherman is
looking forward to a
very successful year.
"I'm really op-
timistic about the up-
coming season
Sherman said.
"We've landed some
great recruits who
should provide us
with greater depth
then we had last
year
Leading the way for
the men's team will be
Junior Galen Treble.
Co-captain of this
year's squad, Treble is
the number-one-
ranked player for
ECU. "Galen is our
most consistent player
who plays a very solid
all-around game
Sherman said.
Playing at number
two is senior Paul
Owen. Owen is a serve
and volley player who
is expected to
challenge Treble for
the top spot the entire
year.
Sophomore David
Creech is the other
captain of the team
and plays the number
three position. Accor-
ding to Sherman,
Creech is the most im-
proved of the return-
ing players.
The final retrunee
for the men is Barry
Moran. Although in
his second year,
Moran has been in-
jured since he arrived
at ECU, and it is not
known when he is ex-
pected back into ac-
tion.
The top newcomer
for the Pirates is Bill
O' Donnell from
Newport News, Va.
O' Donnell posted an
unbelievable 64-0
mark in high school
and is currently rank-
ed fifth in the state of
Virginia.
Doug Otto is
another strong
freshman who hails
from Long Island,
N.Y. Otto has nine
years of tournament
experience and posted
a 21-1 record as a
senior at Sayville
High School.
The other freshman
expected to round out
the top six is Greg
Loyd of Raleigh. He
finished with a 15-2
record in singles and
doubles last year,
utilizing a consistent
baseline game.
Other first year
players for the Pirates
include freshmen
Davis Bagley, Dan
Lamont, David
Turner, Greg Willis,
sophomore John An-
thony and juinor Tom
Vail.
For the women, on-
ly two players return.
They are captains
Catherine Tolson and
Janet Russell. Both
hold the top two spots
on the team and are
expected to do so all
year long.
"Catherine and
Janet are both playing
extremely well
Sherman said. "They
each have greater pa-
tience and concentra-
tion, which makes
them much improved
over last year
The top freshman
for the women will be
Miriam Beck of
Fayetteville. "Miriam
is ranked 11th in
North Carolina in
singles and should
also be a dominant
force in doubles com-
petition Sherman
said.
Ann Manderfield
and Laura Conway
are two other top
recruits that are both
ranked by the Mid-
Atlantic Tennis
Association. Mander-
field ranks second in
mixed doubles, while
Conway makes the
top 40 in singles.
Cisi Bolton, Lynn
Wallace and Laura
Jaloudik are the re-
maining players who
are expected to fight
for the sixth spot,
which will enable
them to participate in
matches against other
schools.
Although the first-
year players out-
number those return-
ing on each team,
Sherman is eager for
the season to begin.
"Once the freshmen
get some experience, I
see no reason why we
can't be a stronger
team then we were last
year she said.
The women will get
all the experience they
can handle, facing
four nationally rank-
ed teams in their first
severn matches. "This
schedule is tougher
than any I've ever
seen while I've been at
ECU Sherman said,
"but I'm really look-
ing forward to it
"The men's and
women's teams are
both loaded with
talent Sherman ad-
ded, "and if we work
as hard as we can and
play to our upmost
potential, the ECU
tennis teams will have
very successful
ears
The men's team
opens their season
Sept. 23 at the Wilm-
ington Invitational
Tournament, while
the women host UNC-
Greensboro on Sept.
24 at 2 p.m.
Pirate head coach Ed Emory contemplates the game minutes before kickoff. Emory was in a
much happier mood after the victory over N.C. State.
Read
The
Classifieds
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Student Government
Fall Elections
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Monday Sept. 12 � Friday Sept. 16
Applications can be picked in 228
Mendenhall From 8-5
There is a manditory meeting for all canditates
StPT. 13) -9oo-i:oO-ADU tl.oo
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Monday Sept. 19 at 7:00 in 221 Mendenhall
Election Day. Wednesday Sept. 28
Positions A vailable:
25 Day Student Reps
25 Dorm Reps
President and Vice President
of Undergraduate and Graduate Classes
Sec. - Treas. for Senior Class
phone
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art j( cQoCfQ hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE.
7 52-0688
NX. 27834
Monday thru Thursday
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted for slaw 33- extra
Lunch Buffet Lovers, Take Your
PfckOf
The Pizzas
AtGattfe.
Your favorite lunch buffet is
still here. Still serving the best
pizza in town. Honest. Take
your pick from our great daily
selection of pizza and spa-
ghetti. Eat to your
heart's content
Its all yours.
The lunch buffet:
Ml the iii unit fnn:hc(ii vim nm rat.
j w Vj$2.99
DAILY 11AM TO 2PM DINNER BUFFET All the pizza spaghetti and salad you can eat
Hf$3.09
MON.aadTUES. 5PMTOSPM
lttfcSt.
in town. Htpnar
75S-4121
� � �





?
Classifieds
SALE
MISC.
FOR SALE: Clarinet excellent
cond Call Lori 7S2-4J1S. $75 00
PERSONAL
HAPPY list BIRTHDAY LISA
STOVE Rll
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST Tan cobra skin wallet
Great sentimental value.
Reward ottered Call 7M-14M
alter S 00 p.m.
WANTED
MALE ROOMATE WANTED
Georgetown Apt 13 rent and
Ut 7S4440
LEGAL HASSLES? Call
Howard J. Cummingt. attorney
at Law. No chart tor Initial
consultation tor ECU Students
Call 7SS-eses.
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campus include experienced
professional work. Pro-
ofreading, spelling and gram-
matical corrections S5-t74S
aHor S:30.
HOUSEKEEPING AND
babysitting: Monday though
Friday. ISNpm Call 7S�40
altar 4 p.m.
PROFESSINAL TYPING tar-
vice. Proofreading, spelling,
and grammatical corrections.
Specialize in theses 7Si-J404 �
a.m. to � p.m.
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SIONAL TYPING. Julia Blood
worth. 7S4-7S74.
IF YOU HAVE INITIATIVE
and are seriously interested in
making money working part-
time, on your own please call
75I-SM7 between j and I p.m.
ENDING THAT RELATION-
SHIP? Want to know when is the
best timer NCSL biorythems
may hold the answerl Find out
Wed in the student store.
Production Delay
Production problems caused
delays in the publication of The East
Carolinian again this week. Equip-
ment failure will force the paper to be
published on Wednesday and Friday
this week. Hopefully, normal pro-
duction will resume next week. We
regret any inconvenience
Seashore
Trailways
Go The Way The
Pirates Go
Call for all your
Travel Needs
1-800-682-4312
Specialized
Personalized Charters
and Packaged Tours
Office Services Unlimited
20 N tetoorc St.r�w. POBoi 1E� Wilson �j c 2"TS�3(SiB�2�7 8436
PROFESSOR PARTICULAR?
fRE YOU ALL THUMBS AT THE TYPEWRITER'
PROVIDES PROMPT, PROFESSIONAL TYPING
AT REASONABLE RATES
CALL US AT
(919) 237-8428
CXMFLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd.
7$V3t� - U Mftt.
24 hour Towing Service
U-houl Rentals
Available
ABORTIONStJP
TO 1 2th WEEK
Of PREGNANCY
sivs.oo �n�cy Teat, eyn�
Ceatrel. aetd P-reMee). -
Preenaacy Caaenlll. Mr
vi �i HMemtatiee ceil
13? esis (T�H Free Hitiear
�oa-in -ism) ketweee t am
and S P.M. Weekdayt
RALKIOHS WOMINi
HEALTH
OfieAMIZATIOM
�I7 Wet Meet�fc.
ftnU�pti HC
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABoanofi: a difficult dec
DEPEND ON. son mat's made ecB�t
� e women of the Hemtng Center. Counselors are
ovatta&ie day and night to support and under-
stand you Your safety, comfort ond privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Remlng Center.
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pomtmentsel 1st ft 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � insurance
Accepted � CAU 701-C4S0 DAY Of NIOMf �
Heatmcomcxxjn-ing THE FLEMING
CENTER
and �ducotton for wo-
menof oHoaes.
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
US0A Choice
FOOD LION
These Prices good thru
Saturday, September 17,1983
USOA
CHOICE
USDA Choice
USOA Choice Family Pack
T-Bone
Steaks
Thompson
Steak
Seedless
Grapes
Fk. of 12 12 Oz. Cans
Milwaukee
PW�. of o - 12 Ox. Ciittt�. ft U.
Budweiser
Beer
$229
Pk. of 6 12 Or Cant
Miller
Lite
22 0z. � Dishwashing
Dermassage j
Detergent �
Why Pay M 19
279
16 Oz. - Frteeh Cut
Del Monte Preen Beans
$129
Half eslloe Whit Heite
Apple Juice
99
110i. - Met i
Luncheon Meat
3109
1 Lb. - Fm4 lie.
89
4 fat -1 rif
Eden Toilet Tissue
$2
94 Oi. - Fabric $eft�Mr
Downy
$
IS Lb. �1.00 Off Label - �eef �ry �e Fees'
AIM
89
Qaart
JFC Mayonnaise
ajaaflwew
i Hm00immH0m
a





Title
The East Carolinian, September 14, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 14, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.285
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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