The East Carolinian, September 9, 1983






�he SaHt Carolinian
A
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No
Friday, September 9, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
PIRG Funding Plan Axed
By GREG RIDEOUT
Politicalormpo�nl
A recent letter to Vice
Chancellor of Student Life Elmer
Meyer from UNC system Presi-
ent William Friday's office has
abeled the funding mechanism
ought by the organizers of a
ublic Interest Research Group
ii campus inconsi.ttnt with state
policy.
The fee method in question
uould have all students pay $2 or
S4 to the organization. Students
not wanting to contribute to
PIRG would then have the oppor-
tunity to get a refund. PIRG
organizer Jay Stone sr'd he still
plans to work toward this
"negative check-off" system
while trying to install the PIRG at
ECU.
Efforts to start a PIRG on cam-
pus began after Ralph Nader, a
consumer activist and one of the
group's founders, visited ECU
last spring. PIRGs work in
various ways to influence public College Republicans, feels the let-
policy, such as printing pamphlets ter will definitely sway undecided
on bike trails in town or testing
chemical company wastes for il-
legal toxins.
For the group to be established
on campus under the negative
check-off system, the SGA
Legislature must first approve
holding a campus-wide referen-
dum. The referendum must then
be passed by the students in the
manner proscribed by the SGA. If
this is accomplished, the
chancellor will consider the matter
and decide if the measure should
be brought to the attention of the
Board of Governors. The Board
then has the right to approve or
legislators when the measure is
voted on sometime in October.
Stone, however, feels the group
will get over the SGA hurdle by
having PIRG supporters run for
Freedom's Defense, a paper put
out on campus by members of the
N.C. College Republicans, ran a
story calling for the defeat of
PIRG at ECU. One of the
author's, Juliet Sadd from Duke,
main arguments against the
� o � -��-� �"�yy�-� �� - -�� v� ilium uig,umviivj �� ��
seats in the Legislature. He plans research group was the funding
on countering Kilcoyne and com
pany's argument by pointing out
the benefits of PIRG to students.
The funding mechanism, he
points out, would be the same
type as that of The East Caroli-
nian or The Buccaneer, except a
refund would be available.
Stone's main argument is that
the Board of Governors have no
legal right to deny ECU a PIRG if
disapprove the group and its fun- the students have democratically
ding method
With the Board of Governors'
indication that they would not ap-
prove a PIRG in this form, op-
position to the PIRG is sure the
fight will be over in the SGA.
Dennis Kilcoyne. chairman of the
chosen to have one, regardless of
the type of funding mechanism.
Stone said he doesn't plan on
compromising the wordingof the
referendum unless it is absolutely
necessary.
Thursday's edition of
No Exceptions Made
Student Claims Fees
Unfair
By PATRICK O'NEILL
f�( tutor
An ECU graduate student
enrolled in an independent study
course this fall claims she was
discriminated against because she
was required to pay a $28.50 stu-
dent activity fee.
Donna Guarino. a home
economics education graduate
student living in Wilmington.
N.C, is enrolled in a course that
does not require her to be on cam-
pus on a regular basis.
When she paid her fee, Guarino
wab charged $103 tuition for the
3-hour course, an Sfc.SO health
services fee and S28.50 in "other
university fees After inquiring,
Guarino said she was told by ECU
Business Manager Julian
Vainnght, that the $28.50 charge
is used to provide students with
free tickets to football games, free
movies in Mendenhall Student
Center, "upkeep of the campus"
and a transportation system.
Vainright told her the fee is man-
datory for all ECU students.
"I don't think I should have to
pay Guarino told The East
Carolinian. "I'm not even going
to be on campus this semester.
There's no way I would drive 125
miles to see a free movie
Vainwright told Guarino that
similar fees are charged to
students at other universities and
he thought the policy was fair.
Guarino disagreed. "I'm not go-
ing to be able to use the stuff I'm
paying for Guarino said.
Guarino, who works full-time
as a school teacher, said she also
objects to the student health ser-
vices fee because her job offers
her complete medical insurance
coverage. "If 1 got sick 1 would go
to the hospital Guarino said. "I
wouldn't go to the infirmary
ECU Vice-Chancellor for
Business Affairs C. G. Moore said
that "all students, part-time or
full-time" are required to pay stu-
dent fees. He said it didn't matter
it the student lives on or off cam-
pus or out of town, they are still
required to pay the fees.
Moore said allowing students to
selectively pay their fees would
result in an administrative burden
for the university. "It's just not
practical, it would take too long
to collect student fees if each one
could pick and choose Moore
added.
Moore noted that the student
fees are used in part for "debt ser-
vices" on campus buildings. He
mentioned Minges Coliseum and
Ficklen football stadium as two
buildings still in debt. Moore said
the fees are also used to fund the
Student Government Association,
the transit system, the campus
media and athletics.
Moore said 30 percent of the
student activity fee goes into the a
general fund to support ECU
athletic programs.
According to Moore the student
acivity fee is based on a sliding
scale. Guarino's charge was the
lowest fee on that scale. A student
attending classes full-time is re-
quired to pay a fee of $113.50.
Nine hours is considered full-time
for graduate students.
Moore said student fees were
necessary and that serious con-
sideration has never been given to
the possibility of waving the fee
and not issuing the student an ac-
tivity card. "Operationally its just
not very practical Moore said
adding that it would be impossible
to accurately determine If students
were or were not using free cam-
pus services.
method. He quoted Thomas Jef
ferson; "to compel a man to fur-
nish funds for the propagation of
ideas he disbelieves and abhors is
sinful and tyrannical
A former PIRG organizer
working for Ralph Nader's
organization in Washington,
D.C doesn't share Stone's
rigidityt on the funding issue.
John Richard said getting an ef-
fective PIRG organization started
is more important than
establishing specific funding.
Richard feels funding through
the SGA would be acceptable.
The letter from the UNC system
office mentioned the SGA fun-
ding method as acceptable. SGA
regulations forbid funding a
politically oriented group. Kil-
coyne defines PIRG as a political
organization.
Stone is considering legal action
if the Board does deny PIRG fun-
ding.
Pictured is the anchor of the USS Monitor which was recovered by
ECU divers and scientists. One of the directors of the recovery
operations, Dr. Gordon Watts, is standing to the right of the an-
chor.
�I
ECU Underwater Researchers
) Studv Vessels With Grant
By STUART MORGAN
Suff W rtter
The Maritime Preservation
Grants Program of the National
Trust for Historic Preservation
has awarded a $1,500 grant to
ECU's Maritime History and
Underwatei Research program.
The grant is to be used by the
graduate program to conduct an
underwater archaeological survey
of two eighteenth century vessels
located in the vicinity of
Blossom's Ferry on the Northeast
Cape Fear River near Wilm-
ington, N.C. Four students will
ferry service on the Northeast
Cape Fear existed with virtually
no interruption from around 1733
to the establishment of a perma-
nent bridge there in 1925.
In October, 1981, Watts and
graduate students from the ECU
program conducted a two-day
preliminary reconnaissance of the
area to confirm the existence of a
wreck at the site. After relocating
the first vcwt confirmed in July.
1981. the ECU te�n located m mm-
cond previously unknown vessel.
The fragile but well-preserved
hulls of both ferries were found
resting upright on the Castle
piticipate. in the four-week pro- Hayne marTriver bouorn
it scheduled from September
12 to October 12, under the direc-
tion of Gordon P. Watts, director
of underwater research for the
program.
The Blossom's Ferry vessels are
the first such craft to be located
and scientifically investigated, ac-
cording to Watts
Differences in the design and
construction of the two rec-
tangular vessels, each about
35-feet long and 11-feet wide, in-
dicate that the two vessels were
probably constructed during dif-
ferent periods. While one may
have been built as early as 1750,
the other may have been built
linK lO vau ,r j io-�c
The staff and students of the later, between 1775 and 1825.
FCU Program in Maritime For over 200 years, ferry service
History and Underwater Research provided instrumental links in the
ECGC Begins Seventh Year
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Sen Editor
The East Carolina Gay Com-
munity (ECGC) will kick off its
seventh year of service to hCU s
gay students with a September
19th planning meeting to be
followed by a social.
According to ECGC president
Gary Faircloth, the groups of-
ficers have already met for an ex-
ecutive planning meeting to
discuss some of the plans for this
years agenda.
"Our primary function, accor-
ding to our constitution, is as a
support group for students with
lifestvles Faircloth community and an atmosphere of
alternative
said.
Faircloth, an ECU drama stu-
dent, said the ECGC was also
committed to "clearing up some
of the myths regarding homosex-
uality" and more accurately in-
forming people about the
have been pursuing research
associated with the Blossom's
Ferry wrecks for the past two
years Watts said. "The two
vessels located at the Northeast
Cape Fear River site are of con-
siderable historical significance,
understanding between people of as they preserve concrete infonna-
different affectational orienta
tions
Faircloth said that many new
gay students come to ECU from
small towns and have never been
exposed to gay lifestyles. The
tion about the design and con
struction of early ferries
Historical records indicate that
network of American transporta-
tion, particularly in North
Carolina with its extensive inland
waterways.
Until the late 1800s, such
vessels (simple scows, flats, and
flat-bottomed boats) facilitated
communication, travel and trade
over the waterways and along the
poorly developed roadways in the
state.
Considerable documentary
evidence concerning the licensing
and regulating of ferries survives;
however, references concerning
the architectural and construction
details of the various types of fer-
ries used during the colonial and
federal periods of American
history arc vague.
"Continued investigation of the
Blossom's Ferry wrecks v. ill pro
vide historian with insight into
transportation that is not preserv-
ed in archival sources Watts
said.
The ECU group will utilize
"black water" surveying techni-
ques and closed-circuit television
to document the two vessels. Ad-
jacent land areas will be examined
for evidence of docking structures
or landings.
A modified mechanized landing
craft called Murphy Base will
serve as a research platform, and
a 25-foot Privateer will operate as
a survey vessel during the project.
Data will be collected, and ar-
tifacts and other material in and
around both ferries will be analyz-
ed, catalogued and preserved for
public display.
The Blossom's Ferry project is
the first of two projects scheduled
for the fall semester by the ECU
program. In October, students in
the program will be working in
conjunction with the Bermuda
Maritime Museum.
iESr J-S?�
women.
"The East Carolina Gay Com-
munity is working to break the cy-
cle to eradicate the misconcep-
tions and to eliminate the need for
hiding states an ECGC infor
go more smoothly for these in-
dividuals, Faircloth added.
The ECGC brochure quotes a
Kinsey Institute for Sex Research
estimate that there 20 million gay
adults living in the U.S yet only
Historic� icwiw? ��
North Carolina Student Legislature
Contributes Ideas To Lawmcikm
mational brochure. "The ECGC one-percent of these people are
promotes a sense of self-
awareness from within the gay
See GAY, Page 6
By MILLIE WHITE
AuistMt New Editor
Founded in 1937, ECU's North
Carolina Student Legislature is
the oldest active student
legislature in the country.
The NCSL gives students the
opportunity to learn about the
legislative process and practical
problems affecting state govern
nor, compiled into a compendium
and presented to the General
Assembly and state leaders for
their consideration.
"Forty-seven percent ot legisla-
tion we've passed in annual ses-
sion has become law in North
Carolina, Shelly said.
Past issues addressed by the
NCSL include child custody, ERA
problems a�7h . and public education. This year
ment. Currently, there are J i coi nu f , , � m pr0pose a
ieges and universes parucpaung .he ECU dg� '��
in the NCbL.
ECU student Kirk Shelley, the
NCSL district chairperson, said
each campus' delegation may
write bills and resolutions for
presentation and debate
throughout the academic year.
Once a month, the 31 delegations
meet for an "interium council
pass on a sexually transmitted
diesease.
Shelley said the organization is
non-partisan; members range
from conservative to Marxist.
Joining the NCSL "is a good
way to learn about issues that are
affecting the state of North
Carolina Shelley said. "We do
make a difference
Members of the organization
must be full-time undergraduate
students and maintain a 2.0
overall grade point average.
ECU Freshman Raped
By GLENN MAUGHAN
S�IWit�
was used in the attack, but the vic-
tim was told to cooperate or she
No More Beer
w -i� . fllft A new Uw iocs Into effect Oct 1,raising the legal
A 17 year-old ECU freshman would be killed. After the attack,
'Sntenum council was sexually assualted early Satur- she walked to Darryrs Restaurant
m!Ct � H,ha?e resoTut'ons and day morning in the vicinity of where she was aided in contacting
where they debate resolutions ana -�� w fm
hear speeches. Capt ,onn Brjieyt acting minor injuries and released from
m March the NCSL holds its Greenville chief of police said the Pitt County Memorial Hospital
In March �� �. . walking alone at ap- The victim told police she could
annuaj session wMAfawtupgw SSmS 12:45 a.m. when the not see her attacker but believes
2�Sto-�ffi SSolk place. The victim was hetassaUant left.on foot Briley
SWi ow ranitolbuildina tabbed from behind and the said no one is believed to have
at SnelSy 2fWl3i"li� ESS covered the victim's face witnessed the,crime �d police
rJses bothhouses at the session, during the assault. have no description of the at-
uTsed b? the student gover- According to police, no weapon tacker.

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IHB EAST CAROLINIAN
SPETEMBER9. 1983
Announcements
Marine
FREEWILL
BAPTIST
FELLOWSHIP
All students are Invited to the
organizational meeting of the
Free Will Baptist Fellowship on
Montis September 12. 7p m at
First PWB Church. 2600 S
Charles St If anyone needs a
ride, call Harry Grubbs at
756 6600 or 756 8585
ELECTRIC
UNBOW
RADIO SHOW
The Electric Rainbow Radio
Show is back Keith Mitchell
hosts the notorious radio-active
heavy metal show each weekend
on WZMB Friday night it kicks
oft at 12 midnight and continues
until 4am Saturday night the
rockets begin firing at 2 a m
and the bombardment continues
until 6 in the morning This week
album specials are to be an
nounced
RUSH PHI
KAPPATAU
The Brothers and Little
Sisters of Phi Kappa Tau
Fraternity Invite all ECU
students to rush this week at 409
Eiiiabeth Street For a ride or
more information call 752 4379
SIGMA TAU
GAMMA
We would like to thank
everyone for making our first
two nights of rush a success
Hooe to see you agam tonight at
9pm 7570127
SACK THE
PACK
Sigma Tau Gamma would like
�c invite everyone at ECU to at
tend an open house party on Fri
day Sept 9 at 4 p m Bus
transportation win be provided
from the dorms For iptorma
tion call 757 0127
2ETA PHI
BETA
Th� Lambda Mu Chapter of
7a Ph. Beta Soror.ty inc an
"vounces 'ts Fall Formal Rush to
fee held on Septemner 12 1983 at
' 30 pm in the Coffeehouse
located or the lower level of
Mendenhali Student Center
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH
ALLIANCE
"he PreproteSsionai Health
a I ance, an organization con
s sting ot minority students in
health related careers wishes tc
� nvite all interested students to
its first meeting of the fall
semester on Thursday, Sept 8
�t 5 30 p m in the Ledonia
Wright Cultural Center
"he guest speaker will be Vs
Etsel Mason D.rector of
Volunteer Services at Pitt
Vemoriai Hospital
AMERICAN
MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
There will be a Get
Together" at the Gazebo
(behind Rawli on Friday, Sept
9 19C3 It will begin at 3p m and
last until 6 p m There will be
tree hot dogs, beverages (ID.
required music and friendly
people All marketing students
ano facultv are welcome
FAST FOR
LIFE
As the FAST FOR LIFE
enters into its 6th week, a group
of ECU students and Greenville
residents continues their Sat.
morning vigils in support of the
tasters
We are trying to draw atten
tion to the fast in the hopes of
saving their lives They have
vowed to drink only water until
there is a "BREAK IN THE
MOMENTUM OF THE
NUCLEAR ARMS RACE "
Please join us at the 10th St
Post Office at 11 00 am for a
one hour vigil For more info
call 758 4906 PEACE
I.V.C.F.
inter varsity would like to in
vite you to learn more about us.
For info on our prayer groups
and bible studies, contact Steve
at 752 8776 or 752 1341
CADP
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro-
gram on Tuesday, Sept 13, at 4
p m m room 210 Erwin Hall.
CADP is a student operated ser
vice if you wish to become in
volved as a member of CADP
and help us promote responsible
decisions regarding chemical
use, please attend this meeting
All interested persons are in
vited
PSI CHI
There will be a covered dish
dinner on Monday, September 12
at 6 p.m. in Speight 202 We'll
have dinner, a short meeting,
and we'll clean up the library
Members please attend We
need your input! Call Trina Har
rison at 758 8552 and let us know
what you're bringing tor dinner
if you plan to be active m Psi
Chi this year, please come by
the Psi Chi library and fill out a
locator card If you would like to
volunteer to work in the Psi Chi
library this semester, call Sandy
Register at 355 6794 or Trina
Harrison at 758 8552, or come by
the library in Speight 202 If you
have not picked up your
membership certificates yet,
you may do so by coming by the
Psi Chi library
PI KAPPA PHI
RUSH
Come out to see why you
should be a member of the best
fraternity on campus The Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity has a lot to
offer you intramurals
Brotherhood, social lite, party
ing and women are lust a few
things offered Come out and
party with the Pi Kapps by the
lake and find out why we are the
Best fraternity on campus For
rides and more information call
'56 3540 The Miller Pi Kapp
Beach Music Festival iscommg
Sept 18 Get your tickets while
you can!
KAPPA
ALPHA PSI
An informal smoker will be
held for all interested men on
September 13, 1983 at 8 30 p m
in the Coffee House located on
the lower level of Mendenhali
Student Center
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be an organiza
tional meeting on Thursday,
Sept 5 at 5 p.m. in room 212
Mendenhali All members are
urged to attend to discuss future
plans for the club
FRISBEECLUB
When a ball dreams it dreams
it's a frisbee Come play
ultimate, bottom of College Hill
every Tues , Thurs and Sun. at
5 30
ALBERT LONG
IN GREENVILLE
That's right � Albert Long �
the second and last athlete in the
University of North Carolina's
history to letter in tour sports
ifootball basketball, baseball
and track) will be speaking at
Jarvis Memorial United
Methodist Church, September
11 14� Sunday through Wednes
day � every night at 730 p.m.
in definitely a modern day ap
proach, Albert talks, not
preaches, about Jesus and the
Bible in relation to apathy, self
centeredness, sex, peer
pressure, hypocrisy, alcohol and
drugs Albert Long is a dynamic
and motivating person you can
not afford to miss Albert Long,
nightly at 7 30. September 1114
at Jarvis Church near campus
UGLY MAN
ON CAMPUS
Applications are now being ac
cepted tor the 3rd annual Ugly
Man on Campus contest Hurry
and get your entry in now. For
more information can the AOII
house 757 0769
POLITICS
interested in learning how the
political system works while ac
ting as a voice for North
Carolina's students? Join the
North Carolina Student
Legislature, a non partisan
educational opportunity NCSL,
we make a difference
SIGN LANGUAGE
CLUB
The Sign Language Club will
have an organizational meeting
Monday, Sept. 12, at 6 p.m. in
room 221 in Mendenhali There
will be a covered dish dinner
preceding the meeting starting
at 5 p m Please come if you are
interested in sign language Ot
ficers will be elected at this
meeting
HONORS SEMINAR
Current Honors students and
all faculty are reminded of the
opportunity to propose Honors
Seminars for spring 1984 See
pp 87 88 of the catalogue for
categories Seminars are ideally
generahst. inter disciplinary,
and team taught
To be considered proposals
must be submitted m writing to
Dr David Sauders. Coordinator
of the Honors Program, c, o
English Department For fur
ther details, call 6373
COOP JOBS
USDA APHIS In Goldsboro
NC and Miami. FL has a co op
opening for a Plant Protection
Quarantine Aide Trainee Will
direct survey crews looking tor
gypsy moths, wtch weed, and
imported fire ants, applying
control and regulatory
measures Students who are
sophomores or iumors maiormg
m Biology. Entomology, or
Botany are urged to apply The
position will be available begin
ning Spring 19S4. Salary will be
at the GS 4 level (SU.949) and
requires two work periods In
terested students should contact
the Co op Office. 313 Rawl
NIH
A representative from the Na
tional Institutes of Health,
Bethesda, MD, will be on cam
pus October 5-7 to interview
students who would like to be
health research assistants in
their Normal Volunteer prey
gram beginning Spring 1984.
Students will participate in ex
perlments and research regar
ding disease control and the
human body Will receive $12.50
per day stipend plus free room
and board, and transportation
paid to and from NIH. Students
in the health, natural sciences,
computer science, and business
fields who may be interested
should contact the Co op Office,
313 Rawl, immediately to sign
up for an Interview
LACROSSE CLUB
If you play lacrosse, or just
want to learn, come down to the
bottom ot College Hill at 200 on
Tuesday September 13 We need
every one interested to attend
WEIGHTTRAINING
Do you want to 'get into'
weight training but are in
timidated by the Weight Room?
Don't be! Women and men
who have had little or no ex-
perience with lifting weights as
part of an overall fitness pro
gram are invited to loin us at
intramural Rec Services for a
course in Beginning Weight
Training. You will learn to use
the Universal machines, sta
tions, and light free weights cor
rectly and efficiently so that you
will feel confident when training
on your own. Methods taught
will Include Introductions to cir
cult training, progressive
resistance exercise (PRE) and
proper warm up cool down pro
cedures. come add weight
training to your fitness pro
gram Firm up, inc �oase lean
body mass, get stronger, and
have fun! Bring (or check out) a
towel, wear light weight, com
tortable clothing (shorts and
T shirts) and a supportive
athletic shoe with flexible mid
sole (running shoes with flaring
heels andor varus wedge are
not recommended )
LAW SOCIETY
Orga i n iza t iona I meeting
Thursday evening, September
15, 7 p.m Mendenhali Student
Center, room 212 information,
Diane Jones, 756 6556.
SGA ELECTIONS
The Student Government an
nounces their Fall elections The
filing dates are from Monday
Sept 12 to Friday, Sept 16 The
mandantory meeting date for all
candidates is Monday, Sept 19
at 7 p m Application for can
d'dates may be picked up m 228
Menoenhall from 8 5 Positions
available 25 day student
representatives, 25 dorm reps.
president and vice president of
all undergraduate and graduate
classes, and
SecretaryTreasurer for Senior
Class
BIBLE CLASS
Do you want to really know
God and his will for your life if
so, you need to know how to read
the Bible, and understand what
you have read (Acts 8 30 31)
This is the key to a dynamic
Christian life filled with power,
love and sound thoughts. (II
Timothy 1:7) We will Restarting
a class soon to teach interested
people how to understand the Bi
ble. Stop by Mendenhali Student
Center, Room 212, on Monday,
Sept. 12 between 5 and 5:30 pm
for more information.
BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP
Every Tuesday and Thursday
night we will have a Bible
fellowship at our house. We
strive to teach the Bible so peo
pie can understand how to apply
Godly principles in their lives.
Why Because God wants us to
have a full and enioyable life
(John 10 10, I Timothy 6:17)
Come by and check us out.
(Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30
p.m at 112 Rotary Ave )
OLD TESTAMENT
Beginning on Sept. 8, a course
on the Old Testament will meet
once a week during the 83 84
school year from 6:30-8 p.m.
each Thursday in Brewster
building, room 303-B. The class
is open to all students. The in
structor will be Bill Evenhuls of
the Church Education System of
the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints. Please come
and enjoy an excellent review of
the Old Testament
uzzzzaxaBznzzzzznzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz2222zzzzzszzzzszzzzzzzzszizzBZzazziaa
Student Government
Fall Elections
Filing Dates
Monday Sept. 12 � Friday Sept. 16
Applications can be picked in 228
Mendenhali From 8-5
Monday Sept. 19 at 7:00 in 221 Mendenhali
Election Day. Wednesday Sept. 28
Positions A vailable:
25 Day Student Reps
25 Dorm Reps
President and Vice President
of Undergraduate and Graduate Classes
Sec. - Treas. for Senior Class
7T7T7.
2UMtrrrn��MI?ffJJ�?ljIrn7TT�
ROXY MUSIC
ARTS CENTER
The Roxy Music Arts Center
to Regroup Wednesday
September 14 at 7X pm in the
Community Building on Greene
Street, Greenville For intorma
tion contact Bill Shepherd
752 5713.
EPISCOPAL
SERVICE
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday evening.
Sept. 13, in the chapel of St
Paul's Episcopal Church, 406 4th
St (one block from Garrett
dorm) The service will be at
5 30 pm with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev Bill Hadden.
celebrating
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COFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
"the place to be"
Dote: 12 and 13 SEPT83
Time: 7:00 �
Coffehouse
m
mm
STUOfNT UNION
I Ml 'iM'M UMllt'T'
Coll 757-6611 Ext. 210
for more info.
SENIORS
The Career Planning and
Placement Service will offer a
general program about their
services on Wednesday,
September 14. at 4 p m in
Mendenhali 244 You can get an
early start by finding out more
about registering and
establishing a place for recom
mendations from three factulty
references Some discussion of
employers who will come to
campus and employers who you
should contact directly will be
offered
WZMB
Tune in to WZMB's Contem
porary gospel show, every Sun
day morning from 6 10 p.m
featuring artists like Keith
Green, Phil Keaggy, Amy Grant
and Leon Patillo, Comedians
like Mike Warnke and Isaac Air
Freight; and our regularly
scheduled program, "Light 'n
Up On WZMB, 91 3 FM.
SOULS MEETING
The first SOULS meeting is
scheduled for Thursday Sept 8,
1983 at 7 p.m. in the coffee house
in Mendenhali Student Center
Everyone interested in becom
ing an active member of the
organization is urged to attend
Old members and new members
should be present for this
meeting YOUR SUPPORT IS
NEEDED!
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade tor Christ is
sponsoring Prime Time this
Thursday at 7 pm in the Nurs
ing Building Rm 101 Please join
us for fun, fellowship, and Bible
study We are looking forward to
meeting you.
DELTA SIGMA
THETA
The ladies of Delta Sigma
Theta will be having an "Above
the Knee Dance" on Saturday.
Sept. 10, from 10-2 pm Gals
with mini skirts 50 cents, guys
with shorts: 50 cents, other at
tire: 75 cents. Come on out and
show your legs.
FACULTYSTAFF
ADVISORS
The Department of
Intramural Recreational Ser
vices is requesting assistance in
the Sport Club Program Facul
ty or staff members are needed
to serve as advisors for the
following sports clubs Archery
Frisbee Disc, Lacrosse, Rac
quetball, Rugby Men, Rugby
Women, Soccer, Team Handball
Men, Team Handball Women
Water Polo, Field Hockey
Women and Surfing Interested
facultry or staff members
should contact the Intramural
Recreational Services Sport
Club Office in Room 105 A of
Memorial Gym, Robert Fox,
757 6064
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers. Little S.sters.
and Pledges of Kappa Sigma
would like to thank everyone
who came to RUSH
BIBLE READING
INFORMATION
Reading the Bible is basic to
living a dynamic Christian life
(Romans 8 37 and 12 2) Where
is the best place to start reading
the Bible What book m the Bible
is written directly to young
people Come by the booth on the
first floor of Mendenhali Student
Center Friday, Sept 9. between
6 U pm for answers to these
and other questions
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and
Placement Service in the Blox
ton House is offering the follow
ing one hour sessions to help you
prepare your own resume
September 12, Monday, 2 p m ,
September 20, Tuesday. 3pm,
September 28, Wednesday. 4
p m , October 6, Thursday, 3 30
p m Those seniors or graduate
students finishing this year and
planning to register with us are
urged to attend You may come
to the Bioxton House at any of
the above times
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and
Placement Service in the Blox
ton House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you in
developing better interviewing
skills for use m your job search
September 13, Tuesday. 2 p.m
September 19, Monday, 3 p m ,
September 29 Thursday, 4 p m ,
and October 5 Wednesday, 3 30
p m A film and discussion of in
terviewing through the Career
Planning and Placement Ser
vice will be shared
NURSING
STUDENTS
In order to receive your nurs
mg pm by December 2. 1983,
orders must be placed m the Stu
dent Supply Store, Wright
Building, no later than
September 23. 1983 Orders
should be placed at the Jewelry
Counter orders must be paid in
full when the order s placed
WOMEN'S
SOCCER CLUB
The ECU Women's SOCCER
sport ciub is holding their 1983 84
organizational meeting Wednes
oa, September 14. 1983 at 6 p m
m Room 102 of Memorial Gym
Women interested in playing
soccer during 1983 84 year
should attend this meeting
Practices are scheduled to be
held on Tue50S(S and Thursdays
at the Dottom of the hill at
Mmges ColeS'um and on Sun
days in Memorial Gym For tur
ther information contact Robert
Fox. Sport Club Coordinator
Room 105A 757 4064
SPORT CLUBS
Archery, Frisbee Disc
karate, lacrosse, Racquetban.
Rugb Men aro Women, Soccer
Women Surfing, Team Hand
ball men and Women, Badmm
ton Chess, Cycling. Fencing
Field Hockey. Gymnastics,
Outing. Snow Ski, Water Polo,
Water Ski. Wind Surfing, Wrestl
mg!i! If you are interested m
one of these sports or you want
to orgamze a group for a sport
contact the ECU Department of
intramural Recreatonal Ser
vices SPORT CUB PROGRAM
in Room '05A of Memorial Gym
nasium, 757 6064
LACROSSE CLUB
The ECU Lacrosse Sport Club
is inviting anyone interested in
playing the exciting game of
lacrosse to attend the organiza
tional meeting to be held
Wednesday September 14, 1983
at 5 pm in Room 102 of
Memorial Gym Playing ex
perience is not necessary
Rules, techniques and playing
strategy will be taught during
practice sessions to be held each
Tuesday and Thursday at the
College Hill fields at 3 30 p m
For further information contact
Robert Fox, Sport Club Coor
dinator. Room 105A, Memorial
Gym. 757 6064
CANOEING
LESSIONS
The American Red Cross and
ECU'S Department of
Intramural Recreational Ser
vices will be offering a course in
beginning canoeing beginning
Sept 16 Cost will be 12 dollars
and there will be approximately
12 hours of standardized instruc
tion Equipment and transporta
tion will be provided Groups,
halls clubs, etc are welcome
Classes will be held Sept 16.3 6
p m . Sept 17, 9 12 p m , Sept
23, 3 6 p m Sept 24 9 12 p m
Registration Deadline ;s
September 13 in the Outdoor Rec
Center 115 Memorial Gym at 4
p m All registrants must be
able to swim
SOFTBALL
Intramural Softball Registra
tion will be held September 12
and 13 in the iM Rec Offices
There will be a captains meeting
for all interested parties on
September 15 at 4 p m m
Brewser C 103 For more intor
mation iust call the intramural
Offices at 757 6387
PUTT PUTT
Team Putt Putt Registration
will be held September 12 ano 13
at the intramural Recreational
Services office in room 204
Memorial Gym A Captains
meeting for Putt Putt is schedul
ed for September 15 m Bioidogy
room 103
JOBOPENING
If you are interested m sports
photography then intramural
Recreational Services may
haves a part t.me job tor you
The hours are varied and the
work is fun If you're interested
iust go by the IM Rec offices m
room 204 Memor.ai Gym and ap
ply But hurry
GYMNASTICS
Don't let those s its waste
away1 if your gymnastically m
clineo. or iust need a little prac
tice for that methods class then
taxe advantage of the free use
periods of the ;�mnasfics room
n Memorial Gym The iRS
department is sponsoring a
supervsed period for recrea
tional use of the gymnastics
room on Tuesday and Thursday
nights from 740pm 900pm
BINGOICE
CREAM PARTY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a
Binoolce Cream Party on Tues
day. September 13, 1983 at 7pm
in the Multi Purpose Room The
admission is 50 cents and you get
to eat all the delicious ice cream
you like All ECU students
faculty, staff, their dependents
and guest are welcome The
flavors of ice cream are Roo y
Road. Pralines and Cream
Chocolate Chip and Butter
pecan Come out and eg'
delicious ice cream, win terntir
prizes, and enioy the fun Bring
a friend'
ECU MARAUDERS
The Department of Militar,
Science invites you to par
ticipate n the ECU Marauders
an organization oriented toward
leadership Development thru
adventure framing, military
tactics and other outdoor ac
tivities
All students art welcome
First meeting will be neio on
Monday 12 September 1983 at 7
p m in Room 221, Menoenna
Shjdent Center For more .ntor
mation contact CPT LUvak, at
757 6967
SIGN LANGUAGE
CLASS
The ECU Program for Hear
ng impaired Students ec S-gn
Language Club announce a non
credit Introductory S 01
Language class, beginning 6
p m Wednesday Sept U m
Brewster B ng 203 For those
that have already taken th� -
troductory course, an A
termediate course wi. be o�
fered on Tuesday nights starting
Sept 13 at 6 p m m Brews-er
B Wing 205 There is no regisfa
tion required and no age Hand
instructor for the course wilt be
Michael Cotter
RECREATION
CLUBS
The following Recreation
Clubs sponsored by tha Depa"
ment of university Unions MM
meet on the ground floor ot Man
danhali Student Center at the
following times Table Tennis
Club. Monday. Sop tern dot ISM
at 5 00 p m , ChassBack gam
mon Clubs. Tuesday, September
13th at 5 00 p m Meaor
ts. Spades Clubs. Wadnesdsr
September 14th at 5:00 p rr
Bridge Club, Thursaay
September 15th at 5 00 p m
All ECU students, faculty
staff and their guests a'e
welcome to 10m t�v� �;�
meetings are organ zaf or,
meetings only Time of play arv:
location of meetings wilt be
discussed
By GLENN
MALGHAN
Staff writer
An ECU professor
will be co-chainng a
marine resources con-
ference
San L -I
month.
ference
represent
the L i j
Me�
League
B ANDREAdis.
MARKELLO(Clt
Staff witterwide
j �
Members of thereg
Greenville-Pitt Coun-
ty LeagueA .
Women's VotersEamon
Tuesdav afternoon toegoi
begin a study on local-1 c a i
government. Spc
guest peaker was Dr
Tom Eamon of the
ECL political sciencehomoge
department. Eamon1
Student Opinion
Ship's
CIRCLE K
ECU Circle K Cluo invites you
to come out end loin �� tw com
ing and every Tuesday niejM at 7
pm m Mandannali room m for
tun ana socializing nope to saa
you there
CRAZY ZACK'S
We'd like to welcome ECU
to Raleigh Happy Hour
for East Carolina
� �
ri
Sat. 3:00 til gametime
25C draft $1.25 buckets
special post-game party

v
GOODL UCK
PIRA TES!
Hillsboro Street
across from Meredith College
DAT
PLA
T
�! im mf$m�mmmvtf �-�
�- . ,
,4"
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 9, 1983
Marine Resource Conference To Be Held
IE
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on Tues
lil'pm
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By GLENN
MAUGHAN
Staff Vtfttcc
An ECU professor
will be co-chairing a
marine resources con-
ference to be held in
San Diego later this
month. The con-
ference will include
representatives from
the United States and
Mexico.
Dr. Michael K. Or-
bach, an ECU
associate professor of
Sociology, An-
thropology and
Economics, said the
conference would be a
landmark for
U.SMexican rela-
tions. Orbach will be
chairing the con-
ference during a
discussion on U.
SMexican relations
regarding marine
resources and
domestic policies.
"This will be the
first time scientists,
government policy-
makers and marine
League Of Women Voters Meet
GE
� S,0n
' ' v ;
' ItlOM
S Of
i s'art.ng
�'ev�ver
� eg
cje � rr �
� Cvt
By ANDREA
MARKELLO
Staff WrIUf
Members of the
Greenville-Pitt Coun-
ty League of
Women's Voters met
Tuesday afternoon to
egin a study on local
government. Special
kiuest speaker was Dr.
Tom Eamon of the
ECU political science
department. Eamon
discussed district
(city-wide or county-
wide) vs. at-large (in-
dividual geographic
region) electoral
systems.
According to
Eamon Greenville is
categorized as a
typical at-large
system. "The at-large
system does well, pro-
ducing a
homogeneous coun-
cil Eamon said.
"The nature of the
system, however,
varies from place to
place
"The at-large
system lacks true
democratic
sameness Eamon
said. "Minorities are
-uled out or fewer
minorities are
represented.
Minorities have a bet-
ter chance with a
district system
Authority to set
election policy is
granted to Greenville
through the state con-
stitution with a
government that in-
cludes a City Council
composed of six coun-
cil members, a mayor,
and an appointed City
Manager.
Williams' ECU Rep
businesspeople have
all sat down together
to hear all the issues
Orbach said. The con-
ference will focus on
three topics;
U.SMexican in-
volvement with the re-
cent Law of the Sea
Convention, domestic
realtions concerning
marine resources and
specific problems
regarding the manage-
ment of tuna.
Attending the con-
ference will be U.S.
State Department of-
ficials, and Mexican
government officials,
involved in shaping
marine policies.
Former Mexican
president Luis
Echeverria Alverez is
also scheduled to
speak.
Orbach said no for-
mal changes in policy
will be made at the
conference, but he
does expect the
meeting to have an
impact on future deci-
sions. "Everyone will
hear all the viewpoints
from all sides he ad-
ded.
Because current
Mexican law prohibits
the harvesting of
selected marine
species, North
Carolina's fishing in-
dustry will be indirect-
ly discussed, Orback
said. "Those boats
which might fish in
Mexican waters have
come to North
Carolina's coast, con-
tributing to the over-
harvesting
problems he added.
U.S. law also
prevents Mexico from
harvesting tuna in this
country.
Orback said he
hopes the informal
tone of the conference
will ease tensions bet-
ween the two nations.
"This won't be people
stating their country's
position at one end of
a big mahogany
table Orback add-
ed
Advertise
with
The East
Carolinian
Lindsey Williams,
is ECU'S student
representative
on the Greenville City
Council. "The coun-
Student Opinion
r op� �
Of 0 M.r
� � m�
POt�f&r
x�lflr
feiev?�
-C 0 rr
ll I5�.
?Cult
e abov
�i :�� mi
Dlay anc
� D
Ship's Anchor Discussed
kepple
By THERESA DULSKI
SUM Wrtief
Students were asked if they
view the recovery of the Monitor's
anchor as a significant event or as
one that is receiving too much
publicity.
Jim Kepple, Computer Science,
Sophmore �
"1 think it is worth it. It has
historic value as being one of the
first ironclads
David Driver, Marketing, Junior
"I don't think that it was that
significant of an event to receive
so much publicity. It's not like its
from medieval times or earlier
Donna Lynch, Computer Science,
Senior �
"1 thought the article in The
East Carolinian about the local
TV evangelist was more in-
teresting than the article on the
Monitor's anchor
Desiree Bryan. Nursing,
Freshman �
"No, I feel it hasn't had a lot of
publicity because up until today I
didn't know anything about an
anchor
Driver
cil members are easy
to work with and have
recently allowed the
opportunity for a se-
cond (ECU) represen-
tative said Williams
who is also vice-
president of the Stu-
dent Government
Association.
"Though the students
have no formal vote
on the council, they
have opportunity to
speak for the universi-
ty Williams added.
According to
Williams issues
discussed at a recent
council meeting in-
cluded the newly ap-
proved noise or-
dinance, car stickers
for parking on side
streets near campus,
and construction of
highway signs giving
directions to campus.
Williams said stu-
dent representation
on the City Council is
important. Presenting
campus problems to
city officials will help
students, Williams ad-
ded.
f
Lynch
Bryan
Classifieds
Work For
YOU
Special Low Prices
HAS A RING TO IT.
r.
�K
Ji
.
StJ
7

1r
SEE THE ENTIRE COLLECTION OF
HERFF JONES COLLEGE RINGS AT:
September
DATE: 712'13 TIME:
Student Stores
9:00am-
4:00pm
PLACE:
HEKFF SOMES
Division of Carnation Company
SEX
Now that we hove your
attention, lef s you and I talk
about working at the Buccaneer,
the student yearbook.
Come to an introductory staff meeting on
WHEN: Monday Sept. 12
or
Tuesday Sept 13
at 6:30
WHERE: The Buccaneer, Old
South Building across from
Joyner Library.
i
jc - � - m





QUre Eaat (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mil ler. centralManager
Darryl Brown, Haw! �,�
WAVERLY MERRITT. tortctor of Advtrtmng ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports Editor
Hunter Fisher, bus, Manager Patrick O'neill. mm Editor
ALl AFRASHTEH. CrrdH Manager CARLYN EBERT, Enttrtamment Editor
Geoff Hudson, emulation Manager Lizanne Jennings, siykwto.
Clay Thornton, m supervisor Todd Evans, products Manager
September 9, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Fund Raising
Ambassadors Fill Vital Need
The alumni relations department,
in conjunction with the Office of In-
stitutional Advancement and Plann-
ing and the ECU Ambassadors, this
month is conducting their annual
telephone drive to raise money from
university alumni. The ambassadors
and student volunteers spend three
hours a night, Monday through
Thursday, for the next few weeks
calling alumni across the country in
a effort to supplement university
coffers with former students' dona-
tions.
The effort is important and in-
creasingly irreplaceable. Colleges
across the state and country are us-
ing the almuni solicitation techni-
que, with varying results, more and
more out of necessity to supplement
dwindling state appropriations and
federal student aid, as well as to
develop university programs and at-
tract better students through more
lucrative scholarships. N.C. State,
UNC at Chapel Hill, Charlotte and
Greensboro, and Duke University
are among nearby schools that use
the method.
The money raised by the
telephone effort, which ad-
ministrators hope will reach
$55,000, is set to go not only for 100
merit-based scholarships, but also
also for assistance to faculty in the
form of research grants or travel ex-
penses. Money will also be donated
to deans' discretionary funds, for
the university's various schools to
do with as they please.
This makes the funds vitally im-
portant for the growth of ECU,
both in size and respect. As ECU
tries to change its focus from a
primarily service-oriented school
(an idea springing from its origins as
a teacher's college) to a more
research-oriented university with
publishing scholars, more funding is
needed to allow professors the time
and facilities to do research and
publish articles. Likewise, attractive
scholarship packages, tied to am-
bitious recruitment efforts, go a
long way toward bringing more pro-
mising students to ECU. Both of
these projects enhance the reputa-
tion of ECU and the quaility of
education is gives; it is also precisely
in these areas of institutional ad-
vancement, that state and federal
funds are lacking the most.
Students need to support the ef-
forts of the fund raising drive, and
it is not without rewards. Those
who volunteer to give three hours
on one or more nights this month
will get a free dinner, a complimen-
tary long distance phone call and
the chance to draw for other prizes.
There is also the added dimension
of helping the university that will
stay with one, on job applications
and on the diploma, throughout
life.
Students should support the
university in the current effort, and
the similar drive in the Spring and,
perhaps most importantly, not
forget to support ECU after gadua-
tion. Every student, present and
former, benefits by a better ECU,
and the telephone drive is one step
toward achieving that.
In The Land Of Oz, Women
Hope Reagan Will Get A Heart
Sorry
The East Carolinian deeply regrets
the publication delay of Thursday's
edition. Production was halted until
Friday because of irrepairable
equipment failure. We regret any in-
convenience to The East Carolinian
readers and advertisers. Normal
production should resume next
week.
By GREG HIDEOUT
In the land of Oz, Dorothy was the
heroine. She doused the Wicked Witch
from the West with water as her three
male counterparts, one without a brain,
one without courage and one without a
heart, stood idly by. Now, in a world not
so different from Frank Baum's, the
place we call Washington, another
female is trying to melt a man she says
"doesn't give a damn" about women's
issues.
Sound too whimsical? Well, if you
read all the hoopla surrounding the
resignation of Barbara Honegger, a
minor Justice Department political ap-
pointee, you would be thinking about
how to get back to Kansas, too. She ac-
cused President Reagan, her
Washington Wizard, of not working
hard enough on eradicating sex bias in
state and federal laws. White House of-
ficials are reeling from the blow.
The publicity given Honegger's
charges, which many high-level ad-
ministration officials privately say are
true, has prompted fresh debate on how
candidate Reagan should deal with the
so-called gender gap. Officials at first
dealt out more gaffes in an effort to play
down the affair. Justice Department
spokesman Thomas DeCair called her a
"low-level munchkin and Deputy
White House Press Secretary Larry
Speakes reminded reporters, offhanded-
ly and falsely, that she played the easter
bunny at the White House Easter Egg
Roll.
President Reagan, if all this isn't
enough, is priveleged to be the first
modern president markedly less popular
among women than men. The image
makers at the White House just can't
seem to find a solution to this very sore
spot on the Reagan body politic. Yet,
with all their statements claiming a com-
mittment to helping women, the record
shows very little action and hardly any
female support of the administration.
Thirdly, Reagan's views on women's
issues like abortion and availability of
contraceptives hit to close to home for
most politically active women They see
his effort to amend the Constitution to
forbid a choice on abortion as an affront
to their hardfought freedom.
Reagan has consistently opposed the Equal
Rights Amendment, resulting in an aliena-
tion of most women. Those who stuck
around saw his alternative, the promise to
purge biased laws, receive only minor atten-
tion. In fact, none have been changed since
January, 1981.
Firstly, Reagan (and the Republican
Party) have consistently opposed the
Equal Rights Amendment, resulting in
an alienation of most women. Those
who stuck around saw his alternative,
the promise to purge biased laws, receive
only minor attention. In fact, none have
been changed since January, 1981.
Secondly, support has been lacking
because many cuts in welfare programs
effect women more than men. These in-
clude such slashed programs as Aid to
Families with Dependent Children, food
stamps and federally subsidized legal aid
programs. The president counters these
charges by claiming lowered inflation
will help everyone, including women.
But most feminist groups aren't buying
it.
Something Missing In Super Powers' Dialog
A
By DARRYL BROWN
The Soviet Union's recent shooting
down of a Korean passenger jet with 269
civilians aboard has caused the United
States, and the world, to re-evaluate its
attitude toward and relationship with
that nation. The tragic incident shocked
the world, but what is certainly just as
incredible is the Soviet's handling of the
incident in the week following the event.
Only Tuesday, five days after the at-
tack on the airliner, did the Soviet's ad-
mit they actually shot down the plane (in
their words, "stopped the flight").
Their actions and attitudes throughout
the last week have been callous and com-
pletely without compassion or apology.
Never have they regretted or mourned
the loss of 269 innocent civilians. They
only insist they would do the same thing
again if another plane enters their air
space, and they assert (somehow) the
U.S. bears "entire responsibility" for
the tragedy.
The last week has caused citizens and
government officials throughout the
Western world to re-examine its basic
beliefs about Soviet policy, thought and
behavior. How can a nation be so cold?
Are they really so ruthless?
One reaction, that taken by the
Reagan adminstration, is to reconfirm
the conception of the Soviet Union as an
"evil empire one that must be oppos-
ed with all the military might one can
muster, and one that we can make no ac-
comodation to. This shows, they say,
the Soviets are less than civilized, and we
must dig in our heels, accept the bless-
ings of God, and fight them until one
side or the other is defeated.
The opposite reaction, one assumed
by many staunch anti-nuclear activists,
is that, though the incident is tragic and
the Soviets clearly at fault, we must con-
tinue to seek disarmament, to create a
world where there are no weapons at all,
so people cannot destroy each other.
After all, they say, Russian and
American bodies both die from bombs
and nuclear radiation, and both coun-
tries want peace, so don't let this stop us
from disarming and living in peaceful
brotherhood.
The trouble is, neither idea is really
practical or feasible. So what happens if
we build up a super-arsenal capable of
forcing the Soviets to reduce weapons or
be destroyed: can we really beat the
Soviets in war, no matter what weapons
we have, and not be so injured by the
struggle that we live in a world free of
communism happily ever after? Does
the airliner incident really call for us to
redouble our defense efforts because
these Communists are inhuman, and the
only way to survive is to get them before
they get us?
Likewise, the throw-out-all-the-
weapons point of view is not realistic. It
assumes what Time magazine called
plural solipsism, the idea that deep
down, everyone is really just like us;
since Soviets and Americans both want
to live in peace, and since both die from
guns, let's just stop fighting and start
talking and living peacefully. Surely we
can get along if we just get the
belligerent politicians out of the way.
The trouble is, life isn't usually logical
and people are not "all just alike Our
biological hearts may pump the same
beats per minute, but our consciences,
filled with mostly learned conceptions
and attitudes, make our behavior and
even some beliefs of justice or right and
wrong completely different. Behavioral
psychologists Watkins and Skinner long
ago showed that many "instinctual"
behaviors are learned; much less are
ideas of what is a peaceful, just society
universal. Thus, while Americans and
Soviets both want peace, they won't ac-
cept it on the same terms. What seems
clear and logical to one is grossly injust
or incorrect to the other. It is a basic
conflict of perspectives or points-of-
view.
We cannot deal peacefully with the
Soviets while operating on a completely
different set of attitudes and values and
not acknowledge theirs. But neither is
does it seem the best alternative to build
bigger guns and hide behind them, living
in ignorance of those we is opposed to,
waiting until we can get rid of them or
they come around to our way of tinking.
There is a fundamental difference in
the Soviet consciousness, its values and
ideas, and that of Americans. The two
countries must understand each other to
peacefully coexist. Conservatives don't
try to understand them; Liberals think
they already do. Most Americans know
little more about the Soviet Union than
the ideas of communism they were rais-
ed on; certainly Russians, with less than
a free exchange of ideas, know little
more about Americans than Tass and
Pravda news reports.
The United States must, while dealing
with current issues, attempt to gain, over
a long term, a better understanding of
the Soviet mind-set. Their reasoning,
their rationale, must not seem foreign
and inconceivable to us, even though we
must disagree with it. One can't bring
changes with the other side until one
understands not only what they do, but
how and why.
It is also hard for Americans to
understand the belief that if one pulls
out a knife in anger, it is more honorable
to draw blood than to re-sheath the
blade peacefully; yet that is a traditional
conviction in areas of Asia minor.
The Russians are not just like us. They
are an asian country with only limited
historical connection with the West and
its values. The history that has formed
their national consciousness is vastly dif-
ferent from our own. There is a reason
within the Soviet psyche that they fed
justified in shooting down a civilian
plane over their airspace; though we
cannot and should not accept it, it is
urgent that we figure out how they could
hold such a ruthless attitude. Only by a
thorough understanding of Soviet
culture, through more than just politics,
will we be able to deal with the Soviet
Union effectively. This is more than
diplomacy-by-cxchange-student; it is the
r-Campus Forum
only way either side will understand wny
the other acts and reacts, not just how.
It is probably the only way to realistical-
ly and practically coexist. We must hold
fast to our condemnation of the airplane
attack, but it should be a signal that we
are leagues apart with the Soviet Union,
and something must be done to bridge
that gap, before reclacitrant conflict
does us all in.
Tougher Line Called For
I write in reply to Patrick O'Neill's
column in the latest issue of The East
Carolinian. I want to say that the basic
thrust of his article is erroneous, in my
view.
Mr. O'Neill's claim that, "until we
begin to make an effort toward peace
by changing our own policies, it is
unlikely that the Soviets will make
changes (in their own policies)" simply
ignores more than sixty years of our
modern history. Again and again, the
United States and its allies have chang-
ed their policies in order to increase the
possibility of peace with the U.S.S.R,
but the Kremlin has never wavered in
practice from its aim of bringing the
world under its imperialist dominion.
Making weak excuses such as "An-
dropov is not Adolf Hitler" ignores the
bloody record of that gentleman, who
headed the infamous KGB for many
years before ascending to his present
post and played a leading part in the
crushing of the Hungarian revolution
in 1956, and his associates.
As to Mr. O'Neill's protestation that
there are still many areas that need
clarification, he may be right. But it
has already been proved to my satisfac-
tion, and that of millions of others,
that the Soviet Air Force did, knowing
that the plane in question was an
unarmed Korean Air Lines 747, shoot
it down with the resultant loss of all
269 passengers, including a member of
the U.S. Congress (who, perhaps not
coincidentally, was one of the formeost
anti-Communists in that body)
Nothing that the supporters of ap-
peasemnt and unilateral disarmament
say can disguise that simple fact, or the
fact that the Soviet Union is, ultimate-
ly, indeed an "evil empire Like
Johnathan Houston, I am not laughina
any more. e
Joseph A. Admire
Junior, Political Science
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop Jhem by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library. w
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
are limited to two typewritten pages
double-spaced or neatly printedAU
letters are subject to editing.
But, the most important reason most
women tend to shy away from Mr. i
Reagan is because he is out of touch with' I
the changed role of women in modem
soceity. As someone who has always
longed for the days-gone-by of simple
America, and as a person who sees
himself as a nice guy, President Reagan
and his staff should heed Munchkin
Honegger's charges and begin bridging
the gender gap with measurable planks,
not conservative rhetoric.
So, with Republican polls in present-
day Oz showing Reagan minus a heart
with women, and with the public think-
ing his spokesmen don't have a brain
amongst them, most women are hoping
he will finally be awarded some courage
to help solve the issues of women.
Coun
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
Interpersonal reia-
tionships, although a
part of everyday hfc
can also be a source of
conflict. If you are
having problems
relationship witr
spouse, boyfriend or
girlfriend, ECl
Marriage Counseling
Program may be -
to help.
Intenratio
Doctor Sav
By GLENN
MALGHAN
As the Inter
tional Fast For I -
participants enter the
6th week of the
water-only fast.c
tors with the g:
are saying the i
one to two weeks wU
be "a critical to a
stage" for the faster
Dorothy Granada,52
was hospitalized
San Francisco. Ac.
ding to Kath Dar. �
spokesperson for
r
CO
75 5982
TO ALL MY COUJ
THERE: THANKS
GREAT RESPONSI
PREVIOUS ADS. I'l
PROVIDE YOU W
MORE COUPOI
CONCENTRATE
DYING. WE'LL
COOKING. ANI
DELIVER IT T
ROOM.
i 3c : ;etf �
gt ft OF lAft&t - - b
� - � - "X MK1W
ISN'T IT Nl
Beat State!
(Fri. Sept G
wil
h Yd
'Home
FOi
Th� Greed
(Across fr
Gre�nvilU
ri





lW8r-
o

n
eart
iev.v on women s
iailability of
e to home for
lien They see
tion to
is a: affront
ed the Equal
i an aliena-
who stuck
e promise to
minor atten-
hanged since
Is; important reason most
lto shy away from Mr.
use he is out of touch with
ie of women in modern
ne who ha.s always
gone-by of simple
- a person who sees
:e gu. President Reagan
lid heed Munchkin
ges and begin bridging
ith measurable planks,
'hetonc.
)ubhcan polls in present-
g Reagan minus a heart
d with the public think-
nen don't have a brain
Jmost women are hoping
fe awarded some courage
es of women.
alog
�side will understand wny
Ind reacts, not just how.
le only way to realistical-
ly coexist. We must hold
jemnation of the airplane
lould be a signal that we
h with the Soviet Union,
must be done to bridge
' reclacitrant conflict
d For
Air Lines 747, shoot
: resultant loss of all
Including a member of
ps (who, perhaps not
las one of the formeost
ts in that body).
ie supporters of ap-
nilateral disarmament
(that simple fact, or the
liet Union is, ultimate-
r'evil empire Like
Iton, 1 am not laughing
Joseph A. Admire
mior, Political Science
m Rules
linian welcomes letters
�tnts of view. Afay or
office in the Old
across from Joyner
f verification, all let-
' the name, major and
fdress, phone number
the author(s). Letters
o typewritten pages,
F ne�tly printed. All
yt to editing.
�!?Ilse,ing Available For Married
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 9. jgg 5
B JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
Interpersonal rela-
tionships, although a
part of everyday life,
can also be a source of
conflict If you are
having problems in a
relationship with a
boyfriend or
Socio.Partmcnt of
sociology, A
EconS�-08y and
jcononucs, is not
signed exclusively
2 mInitd co"P�es.
fording to David
Kr�ox, professor of
spouse, .ovfriend or oflSPmdHrect�
girlfriend. ECU's spec LaiLP0gram' il
Marriage Counseling SSS ,
Program may be able rSIi � love' mar
tohelp. "iff �r sex �" jt
Elates to two people
"&s gjrsst EStrars siesm; �a�
assisled in evaluating then taken to change te chan.ed "if tfS ause they are at a
�oJorit'i0nShiP and W-vta.3 artnerTave the go whe'n V may
exploring areas not savs Amt"tmUm u �� . 6. 1,CI incy may
graduate intern m
marriage counseling.
To provide high-
quality care, all
counseling is done
under intensive super-
vision. Services are
free to all ECU
students. There is a
minimal charge for
non-students.
Premarital counsel-
ing is one of the ser-
exploring areas not
obvious during court-
ship. This allows the
couple to become bet-
ter acquainted with
different aspects of
the other person's
behavior.
In a problem rela-
tionship, specific
behaviors which are
says that "feeling bet-
ter about each other is
the goal of most part-
of a continued rela-
tionship
"Counseling is
be
meeting future mates,
Knox said. Learning
to successfully
negotiate conflict is Health Center and the
important in all rela- Student Health
tionships. Cenler if funher
Appropriate counseling is deemed
reterals will also be necessary
made to the Pitt Interested students
Mental should contact Knox
Math, Science Teachers Needed
w �, pcopie. ing is one of the ser- behaviors which
International Fasters Enter 6th Week;
D��?lSays Next Two Weeks Critical
By GLENN
MAICHAN
SUfi � rtler
As the Interna-
tiona! Past For Life
part pants enter the
6th week of their
water-only fast .doc-
tors with the group
are saying the next
one to two weeks will
be "a critical to crisis
stage" for the fasters.
Dorothy Granada,52,
as hospitalized in
San Francisco. Accor
Oakland, Calif,
group, Granada need-
ed her fluids and elec-
trolytes balanced.
Daniel described
the faster's physical
condition as serious.
'They are suffering
from dehydration and
their effort until there
is a "break in the
momentum of the
nuclear arms race
In Toronto,
Canada, two other
fasters Brian Burch
and Karen Harrison
have each lost over 20
vnamin deficiency; pounds in a similar
SvJT �r tWO fast they both ban
iney could experience on Aug. 6. "I've had
kidney failures or a couple of bad
saattaCkSDaniel dayssom severe
p . . � cramps, fainting
hav? i ,hefasters speIls� and contant
ding to Kathv DanTei imat-lv n 3PPr� hcadaches off and
spokesperson for the Tht 1t T ?' Burch said-
I hey row to continue Canadian peace ac-
r
tivists including Burch
will meet later next
week with member's
of Canada's Parlia-
ment to discuss the
fast and their
demands to end cruise
missile testing.
Each of the fasters
has refused to end
their vigil although
the recent downing of
a Korean jetliner by
Soviet forces has
detracted media atten-
tion away from the
fast, possibly jeopar-
dizing the fasters
lives.
COUSIN'S pizzeria"
' v 5982 321 E. 10th ST. Greenville 758-5616
TO ALL MY COUSINS OUT
THERE: THANKS FOR THE
GREAT RESPONSE IN OUR
PREVIOUS ADS. I'D LIKE TO
PROVIDE YOU WITH SOME
MORE COUPONS. YOU
CONCENTRATE ON STU-
DYING. WE'LL DO THE
COOKING. AND WE'LL
DELIVER IT TO YOUR
ROOM.
SUNDAY SPECIALS
Eat-in Only
Sm. Pixia w one topping
of choice & one pitcher
of Beer $4.99
COUPON
ONLY FOB DELIVERIES
One Dollar Off Small Pizza
Specify On The Phone
COUPON
ONirro DELIVERIES
Two Dollars Off Large Pizza
Specify On The Phone
II 00 O" AMI MMTTI
j ooo" CHeES��vioi.i
CMIHfl. ���0 - I. AC
- 00 OFF l��CE HEAT Mil. S.I
I' X OFF ON CHIFS SALAD
� 1 oo orr A LASAOMA
� l 00 Or r A CHEf M HAHICOTTI
� 1 00 OFF A0�fEHSALA0
M.v�. �1T� MAI 'ft SHI
� 1 00 OFF ON A
HOT PASTRAMI SUS
LARGE
ISN'T IT NICE TO HAVE A COUSIN IN TOWN?
The Green Leaf
Presents'
-
Beat state! Presents Beat State!
(Fri.Sept.9) (Fri. Sept. 9)
The Beat State Party'
with Billy Scott and The Georgia Prophets
the 1982 Beach Music Entertainer
of the year.
Free Draft till 10:00
Ladies � price
Admission $3.00
Come join the Greenleaf in
the 1983 ' Beat State Party '
Buffet and Dinner Available
And coming in September:
John Clayton Thomas and Blood, Sweat, and Tears
Pure Prarie League r Coolidge
b v
The Greenleaf
'Home of the Big Name Entertainment'
FOR INFORMATION CALL 757-3107
The GrcenLcaf, 1104 N. Memorial Dr.
(Across from the Airport)
Greenville, North Carolina
(UPI) - The
North Carolina Board
of Science and
Technology said the
shortage of Math and
Science teachers in the
state's public schools
is critical.
In 1980-81, 167
math teachers
graduated in the state
while the anticipated
need was 620, the
board said.
In the same two
years, 218 science
teachers graduated
while the anticipated
need was 310.
in 1980-81 were not
certified in these
fields, the board said.
The board said 59
percent of the junior
An high math teachers
Some 40 percent of and 48 percent of the
the teachers who junior high science
taught one or more teachers in the state
math classes and 29 during the two-year
percent of the period were improper-
teachers who taught ly certified,
one or more science
classes in grades 7-12
the math
teachers in grades
7-12, the board said
only 23 percent held a
master's degree or
higher. Only 24 per-
cent of the science
teachers in the same
grades held a master's
degree or higher. The
national average in
each field was 50 per-
cent, the board said.
UNC-Chapel Hill
Chancellor
Christopher Fordham
said there is clearly a
need to improve the
teaching of math and
science in the state's
public schools.
"I think the data
are pretty clear that
we have a shortage of
quality math and
science teachers
Fordham said.
!
STEAK HOUSE
September 9th, 10th, 11th
Daily Specials 11 A.M10 P.M.
Buy one 11-oz. Sirloin at Reg. Price $5.79
Get Second 11-oz. Sirloin at 12 Price $2 90
Served with King Idiho Potato or F.F. & Teias Toast
i
i
i
i
f Served with King Idaho Potato or F.F. it Texas Toast
A Serving Prime Rib every Friday and Saturday Night
Banquet & Party Facilities seating up to 100 people
i
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
8-oz chopped Sirloin
Beef Tips
Beef Ribs
8-oz Sirloin
i
i
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved Veg. Bar
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd
1 2903 E. 10th St.
tf
Bikini Contest September 14th
Wednesday Night!
$75 First Prize
$35 Second Prize
SUPER SPECIALS
Every Friday - SUPER HAPPY HOUR
4:00-9:00 25 DroftlOC Increase Each Hour
SATURDAY - PENNY DRAFT NIGHT
pb.v iT??�LAY,NG JO?-� AND 0A�CE MUSIC
PRIVATE CLUB - MEMBERSHIW ONLY $1.00 WITH ECU ID
� �nH 7 "�HTS A WEEK
75J-14V3 All ABC P�n,iH 200 W. T�th Stet
You
w
fc
Saturday Sept. 17th
ECU vs. Murray St. 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Sept. 18th The Biggest Beach Concert
Greenville & ECU has ever seen
A

fa
AlAtTAr�y
rfi
fiffawfe,
QtJCto
J0V NOORf Of VbKQ
Co-Sponsors
S W SEPTIC TANKS
WRQR WSfl
Rain or Shine!
f�ATURIN
CHAIRMEN OF
TIiE BOARDS!
Coolers Welcome
No Bottles, Please
ALSO
H BREEZE �
NORTH TOWER
SUNDAY
SEPT. 18th
1:00-7:30 p.m.
Gate Opens
11:00 a.m.
AT THE
NEW PITT COUNTY
FAIRGROUNDS
GRCfNVIUE n.c.
SHOW TIMES
1:00 2:00
2:15-3:15
3:305:00
5:15-6:15
6:30 7:30
Breeze
north Tower
Cof B
North Tower
Breeze
WELCOMEv
toWUer'ilme
JJLlJt,
m
Wuf waJ
Look -for ffi(
S i.qns
� i
MAP
a
C3
C.��htf y
�m � hi -w-
ilZ
ADVANCED
TICKET LOCATIONS
GREENVILLE: UBE. Bonds fr H.L.
Hodges Sporting Goods and
any Pi Kapp Brother.
ANY RECORD BAR LOCATIONS
IN: Greenville, New Bern,
Jacksonville, Rocky Mount.
House of Records - Morehead
City.
ADMISSION
$7.00
hi Advance
$10.00
at Gate
Welcome to Miller time

B
feMaMMMSNntaRMMMrtMnni
mm
����
? �'���Jin�'ii�i�wH���"�
���pvM)

r.





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBERS 1983

Gay Students Getting Support From ECGC
Cont. From Page 1.
"out of the closet" or
openly gay.
Faircloth believes
the reason most gays
remain anonymous is
to avoid the negative
social attitudes
associated with a gay
lifestyle. "There's so
much more to us than
just our sexuality
Faircloth said.
In past years many
of ECU's gay students
have been subjected
to ridicule because of
their sexuality. One of
the groups former
presidents once
received a telephone
death threat after his
name was published
in an East Carolinian
article.
"It is difficult �
sometimes even
dangerous � to be
openly gay, even with
your family and your
closest friends
ECU Chemistry Professors
Conduct Special Research
By SUZANNE
DARWIN
Stan WrMcr
Three ECU
chemistry professors
are doing highly
specialized research
while visiting exotic
places.
Dr. Donald
Clemens, who recent-
ly returned from the
Patent Examiners
Board in Washington,
DC, hopes to get a
fuel patent for peat.
"If we can market
this fuel, it can be us-
ed in the boilers on
campus, in diesel
engines and in home
heating Clemens
SC�3SS!
said.
Fuel prices are
down and the
likelihood for using
peat as an alternative
source are slim,
Clemons added.
However,when
other natural
resources are gone,
peat, and Clemens'
technique, could
become viable alter-
natives.
Dr. Frank Etzler
has been working on
the interactions of
surface water. The
research may be
helpful in growing
plants in space and
could give some clues
on how tumors
develop.
"Water affects our
daily lives and by stu-
dying its
characteristics near
the surface, we can
learn its effects on
biological systems
Etzler said.
Another ECU
chemist will travel to
Italy in September to
attend a two-week
conference on
chemometrics. Dr.
David Lunney said
the meeting offers
him the chance to
hear the latest
developments on ap-
plying mathematics to
complex chemical
data with the aid of
computers.
Sponsored in part
by NATO, Lunney
and 100 other scien-
tists will be at the
University of Callbria
in Casenza, Italy.
Lunney said the
seminar would also
enhance the lines of
informal communica-
tion among scientists.
"We usually don't tell
our students that a lot
of chemistry gets done
over a cup of coffee
(and) on the
telephone; not just in
the lab Lunney
said, adding that
many of the western
world's experts will
attend.
� presents �
�Back By Popular Demand
LEON RUSSELL
LEON RUSSELL
!
Advance Tickets: $8.00
f Door: $9.00
Ticket Locations: ,
: Apple Records, Gotcha Covered
Record Bar (Pitt Plaza)
y (-or t-urther Information. Caii S 5570
The Carolina Opryhouse is a
Private CLubor members and guests only
i All ABC Permits
1, A
Friday, Sept. 16
Coming Soon: Super Grit Cowboy Band
Jerry Lee Lewis, Delbert McClinton
S�S525S-�a-
Monday Night FOOTBALL
on our BIG-SCREEN TV $3.09
Tackle
A Pizza
At Gatti's
A great way to have a
great time. With all that
honest to Gatti's goodness
and our Happy Hour Specials
you already know who
You, with
your favorite Gatti's
Plus Dinner buffet
S p.m. to 8 p.m All the
pizza, spaghetti and salad
you can eel.
Corner of Cotanche and 10th
The best pizza in town -�"
. ��� �����
states the brochure.
"This is why most of
these 20 million peo-
ple hide their affec-
tional orientation
Faircloth said the
group will also be
working to
"build-up" its
Speakers Bureau this
year, hopefully by at-
tracting more students
who would be willing
to speak publically
about their homosex-
uality.
The Speakers
Bureau provides
speakers to lead
discussions about gay
lifestyles at meetings
or in the classroom.
Faircloth said the
group has already
contacted the ECU
departments of
sociology,
psychology, medicine
and health education
to let them know that
speakers are
available.
After Sept. 19th,
the group will meet
regularly on the first
and third Mondays of
each month at 7:00
p.m. The meetings are
held at the Catholic
Newman Center on
10th street.
Faircloth praised
Catholic campus
minister Sister Helen
Shondell for allowing
the group to meet at
the center. "She
(Shondell) helped me
accept my Christiani-
ty and my homosex-
uality as intrical
things that can work
together Faircloth
said.
For a long time the
ECGC was unable to
obtain a meeting loca-
tion, until Shondell
agreed to provide
space for the group.
During last
Sunday's Catholic
service, Shondell told
students that part of
her ministry to
students included her
work with the ECGC.
"They asked for our
ministry Shondell
said Wednesday.
"The Christian
message has always
been to provide sup-
port and love for the
outcasts of
societythe gays
have been outcasts in
this community
Faircloth said the
group plans to invite a
speaker to discuss the
disease AIDS, which
is affecting the gay
community, and
another to discuss
drug and alcohol
rehabilitation for
gays. The meetings
are open to the public
Any student s
welcome to attend.
Faircloth said.
A student does not
have to be gay to at
tend the ECGC
meetings. According
to Faircloth, any ECU
student or faculty
member is welcome
Ti
esh
!

XXXXXXXXX X.X X X X X X X X X XXXX X X X X X X X X X X X X N X NX x X X X X X X X X X V � y �. � X X x X X X x x X X X X x
THE ENDLESS SUMMER
With
CALENDAR PRINTS
(From Your Slides & Negatives)
Suitable for Framing
Your photography (color or B&W)
handsomely
displayed on on 8x10 or 11 xl 4 wall
calendar,
at this remarkable price, you'll love them,
calendars from negs have block numbers
on white background
calendars from slides � white numbers
on black background
(10-14 day delivery)
Price If Mounted
8k10 Calendar w5-l4x8 picture $6.00 -$1.50
11x14 Calendar w 7x 11 picture $9.00 -$2.00
1983 or 1984 Calendar (Your Choice)
Please Read
Negatives and Slides will be handled with all reasonable care
Liability for loss or damage limited to cost of film before exposure
1983
Name
Address
Order Form
City, State, Zip.
Neg. No Qty.
Sub Total
DescriptA mount
Shipping - 10
NCResTax4
Total Due
L
aaaaaaoooo
Mail Check To:
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(919)355-2136
xxxxxxxxxxxxx
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Hwmw
752-1411
1011 CHARLES STREET
HUCKLEBERRY'S
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Huckleberry's Afternoon
Delights
Biscuits
Buy any Biscuit
and get the next one of similar value
Free
Ribs,
Buy a Rib Special at regular price
and get an extra rib for only a QUARTER!
Chicken
Buy any Two-Pc. Chicken Dinner
and get the second one FREE
Hot Dogs
TWO FOR ONE SALE
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Great Dogs for the
Price of One
Olight Specials Good 3 PM. rtieu � EML torn Tkiny rJ
"All educ$
last, go to.
� Em
In the sgare a c.
students tenng a ur: .
beach or eight have .
local Mc pending
decide to I You m j
and see i 23 con
takes a ft. You tnigh
burger pafeet up or.
before tnever the
but the 31s o.hIc.
worth it. You
The If has a
ming s neu - .
known i(New r
exciting has penned a
cient cos of the
images ithout a Joubt I'd
the Friat school
tanes fc. it's the same
culminT'
Heathipue his tea j
I his first booi.
a self-help tone for
itaJ viewpoint. C
V jem$ hat parentv
J chose to write 1
Con
ia
weat
the
sigr
"H
scic
maj
wen
pat
dri
i
GER
Conduch
4 STOP
(UPI) � Not-Safe, a Californial
organization whose stated goal hi
to "protect everyone froml
everything at any cost has ex
panded its field of anxieties to in
elude subliminal messages.
According to Dale Lowdermilk.
the head paranoid, Not-Safe sup
ports legislation to require that
the public be warned whenl
subliminal messages are used in
-j.m.miafinfK media, such as
on bumper stickers.
Subhmination, as all of u Ner-
vous Nellies know, occurs below
the level of conscious perception
When a message produces a
psychological change so slight asj
not to effect the consciousness, itj
is said to be subliminal.





�i
ll

i
im
Fndov and Saturday
N
Style
SI el i Mm v i �
Freshmen Learn To Cope With College Daze

!
� brothei' my attitude was
this bul sinc you probably will
do it right
�i: Brown's conversational writing style is
il point ol the book (particularly in the
Dorm Pranks" and "A
il should be noted that "College
. tes much valid information foi the
tud lg the subjects broached
iggesting couises ol sti
lid; surviving the ins-and-out ol
g the pros au cons ol fi a
; finding indent jobs; and.
I related depression
� sed in the ti ibulal
I ersitv ol
-
Van H
i
(, Browns new book How To Survive Your College Daze ives wist advis Freshmen now
nions Art ists Scriess imittec
nts
? Jewelry, Weaving
1 Time To Be Crafty

GERHARDT ZIMMERMAN
CHARLES TREGER
Guest Soloist. Violin
Wednesday, September 14, 1983
8:00 P.M. Wright Auditorium
ECU Campus Greenville
i h
for ECL Students . . $7.50 foi ECU Faculty
Staff, and Public
i i. riCKETS ARE $7.50 AT THE DOOR
Tickets Available:
Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, ECU
Greenville 757-6611
Open Monday - Friday, 10:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.
B (ARLYN EBER1"
h-ittrnammrnt (diio'
Got a hankering to
calculator-weary finger-
darkroom chemicals? Want
pretend your major is ba
weaving? Did you get closed
of the art class you wanted t
� just for fun � that teache
throwing pottery on a wheel?
You can indulge your art!
cravings and hidden talents al the
Department of University Unions'
Crafts Center. Six different
workshops, all beginning the
week in October, ofler basic in-
struction and hands-on practice
basketry, photograph;
making, darkroom techni .
floor loom weaving and pottery
"Our objective is to provide i
leisure activity where staff, facul-
ty and students can be creative
without the pressure o taking an
art course said Linda Barkand,
(rafts and Recreation Direct
Crafts Center members ma
take one crafts workshop per
semester tree of charge. Center
membership is SI 5 for the
semester, although a second fee
will be charged members wishing
to enroll in a second workshop
The S15 fee entitles members to
use the Crafts Center's resource
materials � books, magazines,
etc. � and its equipment, such a.s
hand tools for woodworking.
Barkand pointed out that the
Crafts Center wants to provide a
mines at as low an expense as
possible. Many craft supplies are
purchased in bulk to keep the -ap-
ply cost to members down
Workshop space is on a fi
pay basis, and sign-up is already
in progress at the Crafts (enter,
located on the bottom floor of
Mendenhall behind the vending
machine area. The Center
operates from 3 to 10 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday and 12 to 5
p.m. on Saturday. Members sign-
ing up for crafts workshops
should bring their membership
cards.
According to Barkand, interest
in some classes usually exceeds the
spaces available. "Some classes
are always popular, like our
photography class and our potter
class she said. "On many
courses, 1 will run a second course
later in the semester if there's
enough interest But Barkand
adds that since enrollment is on a
first-pay basis, interested students
should sign up as soon as possible
I
BASkr1R
� !
In this beg
. -
-
shap
appi
PHOTOGRAPHY:
5. 12
2
: !
camera and to ba
teel , Metering, depth
field, shutter speed, aperafiir-
control, filters, ele
and types of film w
ed.
Participants w red t
shoot film and ha e it process
for review during t lass I me S
participant- mu have a ?5n
single- or twin-lens reflex camt
to use during the t
JEWELRY MAKING
4, 11. 25, Nov. I
JO p.m Instructor Pa
Hamilton.
Basic fabrication and m
techniques will be .nT
student will work on
metals such as low-pric
and brass , as sih
ticipants can expect to ma�
tional jewelry pieces such as rings
pins and bracelets
DARKROOM rECHNTQl -
Mondays, Oct. 3, 10, 24. 31, Ni
7; 6:30-9:30 r m. Instructor
Patterson
This woi kshop ill p ov ids
struction in developing black i
white film, contact printing
enlarging techniques, use
filters, types of paper ask
photographic techniques Pat
ticipants must have a 35mm
120mm camara to use for the
duration of the workshop.
FLOOR LOOM WEAVING
Thursdays, Oci 6, 13, 2 No
10; 6:30 30 p m Instruct.
Susan Wyre Rho,
This course, designed
beginner, will cover all the ba
See Craft, p H
'STOPV'POTS' Creating Subliminal Stirs

there was con-
adv ei
.
the
� � �

the ievc! � :M
�s � �4 I
. �. hange
t the coos
��ell
Acrs
' . � uslv
n w hen
-d Brand

� . �
Jermiik s new rusade are the
BS seen at traffic in
ind at numerous other
i our busv
rho- . ires
Because ST� spelled
I Pi TS der
milk argues that these signs
subliminal!) promote drug abuce
And he ma be right Certainly
something is responsible foi in
ed marijua nsumption
wdern I
htghw
ment is unwittingly promoaing
"erratic behavior' through 'hyp
none programming
I'm not sure what the
replacement for "STOP should
be �'
"l il I I)" obvioust) won't Jo
ough i II I D spelled
� ards is pure gibberish, the
h � is veritably crawling with
subliminal messages
"A lid u want vour children
borrowing our ar tor date it
thev knew thev ere going
messantb Tied bv signs
urging then III I)1' I sure
wouldn't
I'd rather take a chance on
them reading "STOP'
-Miminai
�ntain many
diabolical, ambiguous, subversive
x � Aitd communkatkHM that
muM be stricth regulated
Perhaps thev should I'm wonder
however, whether subhmina
tion couldn't also be a force for
lJ(�d
Specifically, it occurred to me
that subliminal message on street
signs might abet the current na
tional campaign against drunk
driving
. pi we, I or example, an intov
�� Mgn��. p9
H





I I HI j AM i RO ISUS NJPIIM
HI K 9 !WI
'Porky V appears
tonight at
Mendenhall's
ix Theatre.
Admission is by
Student Activity
Card and I.D.
Country Takes On Pop Scene
Thirtv years ago.
The (rand Old Oprv
'd a harmless
g mailed "My
Buckets Got A Hole
It Hank
- planned to
te number, but
ofl cials balked
uhen the realized
the piece included
the word "beer
Hank could sing the
song, they decided,
the "beer" had to
Hank obliged,
tituted "butter-
milk" for "beer" and
?d away with
M Bucket's Got A
In It. Can't Buv
No Buttermilk And
the crowd, familiar
with Hank's ways and
with the song as well,
loved it. That same
Opry fired Williams a
year or so later.
That's how straight
country music has
been. Songs need to
be about coon dogs,
sopping biscuits, hard
work, old time
religion or trains. The
audience was clean
cut, well scrubbed
family. And it could
stand in line for a day
in front of the ticket
windows at Ryman
Auditorium without
Craft Center Begins
In Mendenhall,
On October 1
l ont'd from page 7
jues of weav-
ng. Students vm'JJ
work on rwo-eolor
i i piers, and
hi to warp
ress a
harness, counter-
nce floor loom.
timentals to be
nclude warp
:dage calcula-
tion, pattern drafting,
problem solving and
finishing techniques.
POTTERY: Mon
days, Oct. 3, 10, 24,
31, N � 7; 6:30-9:30
p.m. Instructor: Paul
Hamilton.
Using a potter's
wheel, participants
will Jearn the fun-
damentals of wheel
throwing including
types of clay, clay
preparation, center-
ing, opening, forming
a cylinder and lifting
from the wheel. Glaz-
ing and firing pro-
cesses will be covered,
as well as hand-
building techniques.
Participants can ex-
pect to have com-
pleted ceramic pieces
by the end of the
workshop.
Shrimp lovers
Why travel 100 miles
to the beach and pay
high prices for
fresh shrimp?
Popcorn
Shrimp

0� AALL YOL CAN EA
$5.99
�c
Family Restaurants
AWHAlECFAMEAL
'y
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
popcorn shrimp dinner
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$5.99
TUESWEDTHURS.
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327
even thinking about
breaking into a riot.
The female per-
formers here gingham
wholesome; and if the
male singers and
pickers drank a bit or
caroused with a snuff
queen or two, they did
so out of sight.
Obviously, the
scene is changing.
Maybe the influence
has come from rock
'n roll which has
always drifted toward
the lecherous. Rock
bands get famous for
their misbehavior,
and their songs get at-
tention for their in-
nuendo, much of it
sex andor drug
related.
Country seems to
be taking that cue.
Willie Nelson can sing
"Wiskey River
Waylon Jennings can
go on about honky-
tonk wine and women
out in Texas and
Hank Williams Jr.
does a tune that
goes: 1 Get Stoned,
I'm just carrying on
an old family tradi-
tion.
The opry would
have given Hank Sr. a
free ride out of
Nashville for that
one.
The songs, then,
are getting raunchier;
the entertainers are
looser and take some
pride in being called
"outlaws" and in
referring regularly to
grass, booze and loose
women' and the au-
diences keep the pace
� a crowd at a Hank
Williams Jr. concert
in Niles, 111 last year
rioted, and the UPI
report called them
"drunk and unruly
Ryman Auditorium,
formerly a church
you'll remember,
never saw the likes of
that.
But country, for all
its eagerness to cross
over into the pop
scene and into pop
money, is not yet so
easy about
misbehavior, especial-
ly the sexual sort. The
subject gets plenty of
mention, no doubt.
Ruby did take her
love to town. Dolly
hasbecome something
of a sex symbol, a
truck driver's dream.
Helen and Jim Ed
sing of spreading the
blanket on the
ground. And Waylon
and Jessie have reviv-
ed a fine old duet, "It
Wasn't God Who
Made Honky Tonk
Angels about what
makes good girls do
wrong.
I'd still claim,
though, that Nashville
is not quite ready for
the casual sex of pop's
'Afternoon
Delight that the
Opry probably won't
be billing the Sex
Pistols or ACDC any
time soon.
The point is that
country still has
morality, even if it is
fading fast.
If we look carefully
at Dolly Parton,
which is inevitable,
we'll find that a
woman who looks a
bit vampish really
seems capable of
believing that babies
are found under cab-
bage leaves � I guess
it's the giggles and the
taffeta. Whatever, the
point remains that
country usually
punishes bad
behavior, and it
usually goes to some
trouble to justify what
may at first appear to
be bad behavior.
RESTAURANTS
IVs GREEK to me
Subs, Sandwiches Pizza
Homemade Greek Pastries
752-0326
560 Evans Street
Greenville. N.C.27834
mteitattft&tfl
V"
I BREAKFAST BAR OFFERINQSI
� Fr��hly Scrambled Egg. � Homtmadc Buttermilk Biscuits � Bacon
� Country Milk Qrdvy � Homo Fried Potato � Southern Stylo Orris �
Homemade Muffin � Link and Patty Sauaag o A Choico of
"Shonay" Own Spoclal Fruit Topping � Oratad American Chaoaa �
PLUS Tha Fruit Bar featuring a variety of freh fruN and tomatoe
SHONEYS
205 Greenville Blvd.
MONDAY FRIDAY
�OOAM-netAM
SATUftDAV-aUNDAV
ft HOLIDAYS
� 0 AMI PM.
G
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
sale at or below the advertised price m each A&P Store except as
specifically noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED. SAT 10 AT A&P IN GREENVIILI
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND, WE WILL DOUBLE
5 MANUFACTURER'S COUPONS EXAMPLE: S10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS. $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
Between now and Sept 10 wa will 'edeem national
manufacturer a cents-ofi coupons up to 50 tor
double their value Otter good on national manu
fadurera centa-oft coupons only (Food tetailei
coupons not acceptedCustomer must purchase
coupon product in specified size Eiplred coupons
will not be honored One coupon per customer per
Item No coupons accepted for free merchandise
Otter does not apply to A&P or other store coupons
whether manufacturer is mentioned or not When
the value of the coupon exceeds 50 or the retail
of the Item, this otter is limited to the retail price
Savings are Great with ASPs DOUBLE SAVINGS COUPONS'
DM
COUPON A25-25' SO-
COUPON B18'18- 36-
COUPON cSO'SO- $1 00
COUPON D75'25- $' 00
SAVE 2
HOT DOG OR
Hamburger Rolls
JANE PARKER
n Tea Bags
Upton
2-11 nun u. size
FAMILY SIZE
8ct.
Limit
Two
Limit
One
NT"TTTI
SAVE 71
Charcoal Briquets
A&P BRAND
SAVE 20
Ann Page Cola
REGULAR & DIET
101b.
bag
Limit
One
2ltr.
bti.
Limit
Two
NowSave A&P GoldRegisteTTapesfoT
great savings on quality
Stainless Steel Cook ware
1Qt.
Open
Saucepan
With $200 Worth
A&P Gold
register tapes
18 8 Stainless Steel
with 3 layer tri-ply
bottom for better cooking
HERE'S HOW IT WORKS
�Save your valuable A&P gold reqistertaDes martini c a V
� When you have the amount of A&P qoid,stP?S aX 9USt 28th
A&P check stand 9 eg,s,er ,apes needed, redeem them at the
� Naturally you can start saving more A&P oold rector .� ,
item you plan to select. u � & gold register tapes for the next cookware
And remember, all items are on sale for thP rinrat,� j .u
scheduled to end Sat. Dec 17. 1983 � th,S Pro9ra� This offer ,s
GrniJii j
r� h TODP r
703 Greenville Blvd. G
L enter
reenville, N.C
Tired
B fUr MhKr
"All educated Amencuns, �
last, x to Europe.
� h.merson
In the imn �
students sit hom
beach or push hambc .
loca. M Donalds,
decide to take
and ec th �
take
burger pushing a-
before the audie-
but the adjust-
worn, it m the
The .ear; a
ming hole,
kno
exciting on
cier �
ima'
the f rei
tanes ar
culminate
Hea
Sublimin
Con't from pae
icated
weaving hi - �
the '
sign
"KM RD
sciously.
makes no
would i
pau-
drive
PILOT'S I. AM
A New Mudent Housing I j
Will ho asailahle in la
Kadeir
Reasonable Pnc
Other Amenity loo
Management Ask for k
WOMEN'S HEALTH
rj?EvouCAN uovrtoM
DEPEND ON
?m� e
- - 3ta - -
- - . iota
StBViCfS � I esoo�
povntmenrsl '52
�- ,see�s � -ee P9Q
rvegnono "?�'� k
AC -ec'eo � CA. '�' 55!
necr- :aw � s �
o,v GOjc&xy 'or �o
THE
A Taco Bell
and Bean
Jus
i.
Ofdc ooi Tc
if ri e�tro large
cor" i-? pkrt ouf
Burr to ana you '�
$1.79 ' I one � f1!
baraa.ns you e"t
3t9l
.It
TBCOA
i





ead'iy available fcf
aa,p Store except as
Alt DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
OUPONS
� ftiil DOUBLE
0 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS
URCHASE 50 C0UPOHS.
CE VALUE!
t Great wtti ASP s
miKGS counts-
SAVE $1.50
III
SAVE 30 LB.
iicious Apples
ERN GOLDEN
bag
SAVE UP TO 50
pton Tea Bags
1 FAMILY SIZE
4ct
Limit
One
SAVE $1.10
Sealtest lce
AlL flavors
Cream
Limit
One
SAVE 20
ton Page Cola
REGULAR & DIET
I
I
Limit
Two
ister Tapes for
juality
'ookware
With $200 Worth
A&PGoid
register tapes
9 8StamiessSteei
ith3layertn-piv
bottom for better cook.ng
IRKS
Sunday August 28th
es needed, redeem them at the
lertaP�s for the next cookware
of this program This offer ,s
'�nter
He, N.C
Tired Of School? Take The
Bv HI- Vl m . o- . .
THCEASTCAKOUNIAN SEPTEMMl-a 9 1983 9
By RENE MEYER
Staff Wrtr
U educated Americans Hrm nr
Vast, go to Europe. " J �r
� Emerson
In the summer, while most lazy
tudents s,t home, lounge at the
.each or push hambergers at the
ocal Mc Donalds, some others
klec.de to take the "Great Escape"
ind see the world. Of coursfit
ikes a few previous summers of
urger pushing and serious savin
tefote the audience is affordable
ut the adjusted priorities are well
vorth it in the end.
The leap across the local swim-
�ng hole, more commonly
mown as the Atlantic, is truly an
txatmg one. Ah. Europe, that an-
cient continent of culture All the
images collected from photos in
the French book, TV documen-
tary and romantic movies
rulmmate in a smooth landing art
Heathrow in London.
ubliminal Signs
on't from page 7
icated motorist
reaving his way down
Ihe street came to a
ign that said
KNLRD Con-
Iciously, the sign
lakes no sense. But
ould it not give a
ause to a tipsy
Irier?
Would not the blot-
tertongue behind the
wheel try to clear
away his alcoholic
haze long enough to
figure would what the
sign meant, perhaps
even backing up to
make sure he had read
it right?
I think so. I'm con-
vinced that encounter-
Briskly through the customs likHv i� -�
you are overcome bv a feHno nf y end up as P�1 of the
relief, as well Ta losLf dTrJefion SETS !�TC yOU reach th
and, of course, slee The �Cx" aSL?" H " �f L�ndon'to
thing to do, after you have found "??. !� bc J0" fun-
the way to the nearest wSh . Aftcr a w n the Queen's ci-
hostel (or park benchTthe'c & "fr WeStmJnster Aey.
may be), is decide where you w hrLfPhamCnt' Big Ben Md
to go first To Te ysomeofthemagnificant
EVERYTHING; that is u" is time t0 mov "�
understood, but where to start. unKL F " ParJS-
London is a unique citv Since it � Llcd blg EuroPean cities
is somewhat dirt?, just b sure n iZJ?" " SUnny days in
you buy your postcards from in u�l LLT Sf" y�U
side the store, otherwise thev tend L? En�land, be prepared to kiss
to be rather polLTon speckled SS "fVC Jangua�e �oodbye
black. Traffic Another mhlim USC ff�m hcrc on out il is sir
to be confronted Just to � Hi? P ' SCntCnCCS and Iittle co
ferent fmJ, �tk i " vcrsat�on with the natives
tSriSinE,SteS" pWiLh�UL P"c���y P-fect
onies still drive orthHeftsL of ZT? !L2? y�U Can � t0
the road. Take you tunecrossin etfS " ' realm �f t0urists-
the street, it's a verVTfck? SS COUrse' is sP�ken in
business It is usually necessary to" l'SSsTmT Md
stop and think before you even Inf �" Unfortunately, not
take the first step near a crLhT f g�S m ,n English'so without
If you are not ZmSSZ 5S2r " " " t0 fed
After seeing the typical tourist
places, pop into the Centre de
Georges Pompidou. The new art
and culture centrum is a real treat
for all. Everywhere in Paris these
days are the junk sellers. Now
ing such a sign would there are people from the French
a sobering ex- colonies who sell purses, wallets
Great
and other small articles to easily
suckered tourists. The night life in
the student quarter is no myth
nothing is untrue about Paris.
Fashion on the streets, at least
this summer, tends to be very fif-
ties, complete with crinolins, big
skirts and red, red lipstick. When
you start feeling fat because you
have eaten too many baguettes
then you know its time to go south
and get away from museums and
tourist attractions.
Nice, Cannes or Monte Carlo
take your pick, they are all a hop
skip and a jump from each other
Any time in these parts is a time
well wasted. If you come early
enough to Cannes you could be
discovered during the film
festival. Watch out for nice old
men with big yacts who will want
!� take you for more than a ride
When you have enough of the
beaches and mint avec d'eau, take
the next trip eastward.
Italy is a great next choice, "ft
left a fierce memory of sunlight
on the sands and cool marble in-
teriors said Charles Ryder �
Bndeshead Refisited. OOO la la'
If couldn't be more true. Not a
car to be seen, only water and
boats. If you decide to walk, you
find yourself meandering through
the driver's brain,
marking his
subliminally aware
that he had conscious-
ly downed a few too
many.
PILOT'S LANDING
A New Student Housing Development
ill be available in late December, off
Reade Circle close to Campus
Reasonably Priced with Private rooms
Other Amenities too. Call Clark, Branch
Management. Ask for Kathy, 756-6336
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
�lS 90 r�
CV T�t
lm�n MlniMtiM call
tn-aSU (Toll Ft-M Nunktr
�Mill ISM) MN� � AM
an- M WaMOayt.
� ALCIOHS WOMINS
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�a�-��. HC
Now Nikon makes fine
photography easier and
more convenient than ever
THE
AUTOMATIC
NIKON FE
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd
m-an-MNM.
PLAZA SHEL
24 hour Towing Service
U-Houl Rentals
Available
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
mall cracks between the buildings
and only relieving closterphobia
by going into a church. Be wary of
Pickpockets. One girl reportedly
lost all her money and passport
when a really sneaky pickpocket
penetrated through zippers on her
bag.
Gondolas and gondoliers are
usually expensive but something
not to be missed. The best attrac-
tion in Venice are the cats. They
live on the little squares around
town and all the fat, old Italian
ladies waddle out to feed them
every day.
A short trip through the Alps
and you can land in Austria or
Switzerland, both filled with old
world charm. In fact, in
Switzerland, the old country
villages are even more charming
than the new ones. Each one com-
plete with "gasthaus" and plenty
of flower boxes to go around. For
those who ski, summer skiing in
the Alps is also a real treat. A few
days in these mountains and it all
gets too beautiful. Time to bo
north. 8
Holland, West Germany and
Scandinavia are yet to be seen
Amsterdam is the largest drug
trafficking center in Europe, so a
visit here tends to be more
depressing than enjoyable. West
Germany in itself is interesting,
but a trip to Berlin is the real cross
cultural experience. West Ger-
many is unofficially divided into
the North and the South (called
Bavaria), and the rivalry between
the two can easily be compared to
our country's north and south
rivalry. In the south they have a
different accent (or vice versa),
their own colloquialisms as well as
different customs.
Last but not least, Scandinavia
Scandinavia includes Denmark
Norway and Sweden, but not
Finland as commonly assumed
Sweden, the land of tall skinny
blonds, and often topless beaches.
You see, Swedes must have
perfect tans, visiting a beach in
Sweden without having become
nicely tan in a solarium first is
risking your life.
You will never regret the Euro-
pean experience, if you decide to
indulge. With the strength of the
dollar and special plane fares
traveling to the other side is
becoming more and more affor-
dable. A two month trip could
cost as much as a term at ECU, if
you live on campus. Maybe next
summer more students will choose
the better education.
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.�?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
r�M�iWM�weM9
SEPTEMBER 9. 1983 Page 10
Pirates Hope To Bounce Right Back
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sporu Mltot
The ECU Pirates may have had
an offensive war with FSU (47-46)
last weekend, but Saturday's
came with N.C. State should pro-
ve to be even more of a brawl.
"The only way to get over the
pain of losing to Florida State is
to beat N.C. State Emory said
Tuesdav at his weekly press con-
ference. "We don't have time for
depression
Emory, in fact, said a win over
State Saturday in Raleigh is a
must. "If we lose, people might
think we're just a fluke team, but
I can guarantee you we're not
he said. "It's more than just a
game. It's state pride and state
recruiting. If we beat N.C. State,
ve'll be the best team in North
Carolina
The EClState game will be
telewsed nationally on Atlanta
cable station VVTBS. The
v overage will provide ECU's
ugevt exposure in the school's
history.
"We want to win on national
TV Emory said. "That's the
mi1 wa we will reach our goals
tnd possibly get a bowl bid
After the near upset at Florida
�ate. the Pirates have received an
dndance o( praise from across
he countr. particularly from
Wolf pack Coach Tom Reed. But
ory's apparently a little leery
the sincerity of Reed's
i on.
"What he said about us was all
flowers, but he doen't really
. eve that said Emory, who
Jed that he's heard a few other
larks he aid Reed made
cently. "He aid down in Dunn
it he gonna beat East
t arolina. and (that) he's tired of
.iring about us Emory said.
On the other hand, Emory said
he'd like to know a little more
ut Reed, especially the State
coach's game plan. The Pirates
have looked at film of Reed's
teams at Miami of Ohio.
"We haven't seem them play
like they've seen us Emory said.
"They've scouted us so closely
that they they probably know our
toothpaste brand and shoe size by
now.
"We just don't know what to
expect he continued, "but we'll
be as ready as we can for them
The Bucs will again carry their
strong offense into the game, with
quarterback Kevin Ingram leading
the way. "We can move the ball
better than anybody. We've prov-
ed that Emory said. "I thought
Ingram played the best game I've
had a quarterback plav since I've
been at ECU
Opposite Ingram Saturday
night will be the Wolfpack's Tim
Esposito, a junior college transfer
who has never played in a college
game. Emory, however, said
Esposito is no slouch.
"They've been crying down
there, but Esposito can throw the
football Emory said. "He was
the leading passer in California. 1
know because we recruited some
junior college kids out there.
When I saw him, I felt like he
could throw the ball equal to Kelly
Low rev at Florida State
Emory said that he's also wary
of N.C. State's defense, which he
said has more depth than Florida
State's. "(N.C.) State's defense is
100 percent better than FSU's
he said.
He added that the outcome of
Saturday's game will depend on
defense and the punting and kick-
ing. Against FSU, the Pirates
never punted but did have an ex-
tra point and a field goal try
blocked.
"We should have have four
more points Emory said.
"There's rno excuse in college
football for a blocked kick. We'll
get (Jeff) Heath protection. Those
mistakes must have been errors by
our coaching staff, but we'll get it
straightened out.
On defense, Emory said the
Pirates will have to play more ef-
N.C.State coach Tom
iuli trying to stop the
Reed knows his
powerful Pirate
Wolf pack will have their hands
attack.
fectively at State than they did at
Florida State.
"We're were disappointed with
the team's lack of intensity and
enthusiasm he said, "but Kelly
Lowrey might have had
something to do with that. Our
long pass defense was good, but
we probably gave up too much
cushion in respect of their speed
on shorter routes
Injury-wise, the Pirates suf-
fered a major loss this week. Star-
ting Center John Floyd, a senior
from Fairmont, came down with
appendicitis and underwent an ap-
pendectomy Tuesday night. He is
expected to be back in three
weeks.
Unfortunately, Floyd will miss
the chance to play against State
one more time. Another senior,
free safety Clint Harris, an All-
America honorable mention last
season, said getting pumped up
for N.C. State won't be too dif-
ficult for him and his teammates.
"We haven't beaten N.C. State
in three years, so this game means
a lot to the senior players the
Chesapeake, VA native said.
"We've only got one more shot,
so we're going to make it our best
one
ECU AT STATL
GEORGIA TECH AT
CLEMSON AT bOs:
MEMPHIS STAT
MARY -WD AT VAJ
DUKE AI !Mja
NAV AT VIRG1 !
WAKE fOREST
FLORIDA
FLORIDA AT S
TEMPI I M
SOUTHERN M
NOTRE DAM 1
OKLAHOMA
OREGON �


I
�1v
ECU head coach
would be just the
Ed Emory has suggested that a win over N.C. State
remedy the Pirates need to get over the shock of the
OARY PATTERSON � ECU �!� L�6
FSU game. The Pirates will get that chance Saturday at 8 p.m. in
Raleigh's Carter-Finley Stadium.
Reed Ready To Open Season
By KEN BOLTON
Antatmal Sport fAiXor
Newly-hired N.C. State head
coach Tom Reed will be thrown
head-first into the fire this
weekend when the Wolfpack
plays host to ECU.
Reed will have to open his
Wolfpack coaching career Satur-
day night against the Pirates, a
team � and student body �
which always looks at the mat-
chup as the biggest rivalry on the
schedule.
And to add to the emotion this
year, Reed's debut will be televis-
ed nationally by Ted Turner's
WTBS-Ch. 17, along with an ex-
pected 55,000-plus fans at Carter-
Finley Stadium.
"I guess you'd describe the
game as a back-yard
neighborhood brawl Reed said
concerning this weekend's mat-
chup. "We've got a tough assign-
ment
The contest will be of even
greater interest considering the
Pirates' awesome offensive show-
ing against Florida State.
"They moved the ball with ex-
treme consistency and were never
really stopped Reed com-
mented. "I'm not sure anybody
can completely contain them, but
I hope we'll Find some way to slow
them down
The series between the two
intra-state rivals, which began in
1970, has included many exciting
games, including the Wolfpack's
33-26 victory last season.
N.C. State leads the overall
series 10-3, with the last Pirate
victory being a 28-23 win in 1978.
The battle for the starting
quarterback position gained most
of the attention during State's spr-
ing and pre-season practices.
Tim Esposito (6-1, 182, Jr.) has
been chosen by Reed out of a
group of inexperienced hopefuls.
None of the Wolfpack QBs, in-
cluding Esposito, have played in a
game for State.
Leading the way for the '83
season will be a pair of pre-season
all-star selections in starter Joe
Mclntosh (5-11, 188, Jr.) at
tailback and Andy Hendel (6-1,
220, Sr.) at inside linebacker.
Mclntosh has totalled 1,970
yards in two seasons to rank fifth
on State's all-time career rushing
list. He needs 573 yards to move
into second place this year.
Hendel came to State as a
lacrosse player before trying out
for football and earning a scholar-
ship. He finished second on the
team in total tackles last year
(161), while leading the team in
solo tackles (37), tackles for losses
(10) and caused fumbles (6).
Other standouts for the
Wolfpack include linebacker
Vaughan Johnson (6-3, 226, Sr.)
who teams with Hendel to form
one of the best linebacking
tandems in the country.
Safeties Dwayne Greene (6-1,
195, Jr.) and Don Wilson (6-2,
187, Sr.), running backs Mike
Miller (6-1, 208, So.) and Vince
Evans (5-11, 202, So.) and offen-
sive tackle Joe Milinichik (6-5,
275, So.) will add power to the
Wolfpack arsenal.
One of State's biggest obstacles
this year will be to overcome a
lack of experience. Seven seniors
will be starting for the Wolfpack
against the Pirates.
On the other hand, ECU will
start eight seniors on defense
alone.
In the trenches, the Wolfpack
will be out-weighed by ECU's
contingent. On the offensive line,
the Pirates out-average State
261-247 pounds.
On the defensive front, ECU
averages 239 pounds per man,
while State stands in at 228
pounds apiece.
In all, Reed is looking forward
to the game, but he knows it will
be a tough opening assignment.
"They're big and they're fast
the former Miami of Ohio coach
said. "In a nutshell, East Carolina
is an experienced, explosive,
physical football team
And if the Pirates unleash
another explosion like they did
against the Seminoles, Reed will
be hard-pressed in his quest for
opening-game victory.
Pirate Fans Flipping Over Williams
By CINDY PLEASANTS
SyofHEcUtor
No one had ever heard too
much about ECU flanker Henry
Williams until Saturday night.
You know, the guy who did a flip
in the endzone after running back
a 56-yard kickoff return against
rsu.
The 6-0, 160-pound flash then
followed by gliding right through
the Seminoles' defense to score on
a 99-yard kickoff return.
The run was a long one, even
for an athlete who runs a 40-yard
dash in 4.3 seconds. "I was
tired Williams said about his
lengthy sprint.
That isn't the first time
Williams has ran from one end-
zone to the other. At Northwest
Junior College in Mississippi,
Williams ran back a 100-yard
kickoff return in his First college
football game.
The only difference for
Williams Saturday night was be-
ing surrounded by such a large
crowd. "That was one of my big-
gest games he said. "I've never
played in front of that many peo-
ple before. It was very exciting
Coming from a school that won
the junior college national cham-
pionship, Williams has had quite
a few big games. During his two-
year stint at Northwest, Williams
was named junior college all-
America and a member of the
JUCO national all-star team. His
coach, Bobby Ray Franklin said
Williams was the most coor-
dinated and by far the best special
teams player he had ever coached.
During his freshman year, he
scored nine touchdowns�seven
by pass receptions. In 1981, he
was named all-Mississippi Con-
ference JUCO second-team. Dur-
ing his sophomore season,
Williams caught 14 passes for 268
yards and three touchdowns. He
Finished at Northwest with a
17-yard average per punt return.
Raised in "unica, Miss along
with nine children, Williams is the
only accomplished athlete in his
family. And his family has a lot to
be proud of.
In track, Williams holds the
Mississippi state junior college
record in the 220 with a time of
21.6 seconds. He placed third in
the nationals in the 200 with a
time of 20.9.
In high school, Williams was a
member of the Explorers swimm-
ing club and won two Olympic
gold medals in the 100-meter
freestyle and a breaststroke event.
When asked about his sport
preference, Williams was quick to
respond. "I've played football all
of my life he said. "Everything
else just Fit in. Track was for
speed, and I just developed this
acrobatic ability which helped in
other things
Williams began showing off his
gymnastic skill at Northwest after
he did a flip at football practice
one day. "My wide receiver coach
threw a ball to me in the
endzone Williams said, "and I
did a flip. He couldn't believe it at
First. Then he called over the other
coaches, and he asked me to do it
again
Later on, Williams asked his
coach if he could do anything in
the endzone. His coach said he
could do anything but spike the
ball. The rest was history.
After Williams performed his
flip against FSU, Head Football
Coach Ed Emory told Williams
not to do another one because of a
possible penalty call. "Official
See WILLIAMS, page 11
Junior college transfer Tin Esposito will get the startiat BOd
Saturday night's contest in Raleigh.
�tQBln
There was plenty r high-steppij
end of a 1-0 score.
S . . �
V � .

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irtTj imiaum





SICK
he too dif-
teammates
v state
�lame means
ayers the
. said
shot,
oui bcsl
m
ifurda ai p m. in
ason
EC
� c .
ECU
� man,
ruard
as it will
menc
c fast
coach
r 'hna
�plosive,
unleash
e did
ed vmII
. lest for
7
starting nod at QB in
�;
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
' Y'S?sss
SEPTEMBER 9. 1983
11
�WWWSJSSSSSWS SWW�v�W, .
Fearless Forecast
ECU AT N.C. STATE
CLEMsA1 AT AI-ABAMA
C LhMSON AT BOSTON COI I Fr.P
DUKEATWD"lANAJgDERBILT
NAVY AT VIRGINIA
VSEES&gEFTECH
rtSipl.DcAAT SOUTHER CAL
TEMPLE AT PITT
N?,TRFEnRANMPIf1!SS1PPI AT AlJBURN
NOTRE DAME AT PURDUE
OKLAHOMA AT STANFORD
OREGON AT OHIO STATE
CINDY PLEASANTS
ECU
Alabama
Clemson
North Carolina
Maryland
Duke
Virginia
Virginia Tech
Florida State
Florida
Pitt
Auburn
Notre Dame
Oklahoma
Ohio State
KEN BOLTON
ECU
Alabama
Clemson
North Carolina
Maryland
Duke
Virginia
Virginia Tech
Florida State
Florida
Pitt
Auburn
Notre Dame
Oklahoma
Ohio State
JIM K1RCHMAN
ECU
Alabama
Clemson
North Carolina
Maryland
Duke
Navy
Virginia Tech
LSU
Southern Cal
Pitt
Auburn
Notre Dame
Oklahoma
Ohio State
TODD EVANS
ECU
Alabama
Clemson
North Carolina
Maryland
Indiana
Navy
Virginia Tech
Florida State
Southern Cal
Pitt
Auburn
Notre Dame
Oklahoma
Ohio State
PATRICK O'NEILL
ECU
Georgia Tech
Boston College
North Carolina
Maryland
Duke
Navy
Virginia Tech
Florida State
Southern Cal
Temple
Auburn
Notre Dame
Oklahoma
Ohio State
"��" ��y�
Tigers Aware Of Flutie
(UPI) � Boston
College quarterback
Doug Flutie is ranked
as one of the top
passers in the nation
and you won't get any
argument out of
Clemson coaches who
learned about him the
hard way.
"Most of the time,
I don't like to admire
my oppenent, but I
have to in Doug
Flutie said Tiger
defensive back coach
Don Denning, whose
team flattened
Western Carolina
44-10 last Saturday.
"This is a horse of a
different color. This
kid is really
something
Flutie made ad-
mirers out of the
Clemson staff last
season when the
� i��
i
vWstri-wrf- -
1tv, v
�-���
.TJ.
I �5l- " � �c"�n �"����� � ��" tmm. B.t in pJ�vj�i:rP;rihnjo�
end of a 1-0 score.
BUYING
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Southern Pawn Shop,
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downtown. ?52 244
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Tigers escaped with a
17-17 tie on their
home field. He passed
for 242 yards, com-
pleting 18 of 35
passes, including a
15-yard fourth
quarter scoring toss.
Denning said he
saw signs last Satur-
day the Tiger secon-
dary may be the
strongest part of the
Clemson defense, but
getting a good pass
rush against Flutie
may be the key to
shutting down third-
year coach Jack
Bicknell's team,
which returned 24
starters from last
year's 8-2-1 team.
"The best thing,
about Doug is his
ability to unload the
football when there
isn't anything there
said Denning. "His
(completion) percen-
tages may not be that
high, but you can't
catch him behind the
line of scrimmage
very often
The Tar Heels
opened the season
with a 24-8 win over
South Carolina.
Williams Ready To Go
cont'd from page 10
don't like that
Emory said. 'They
told us a week ago
that they wouldn't
call anything on that,
but I told him not to
do it the last time
When asked if he
will perform another
one of his perfect for-
ward flips, Williams
pondered for a mo-
ment and said, "I
probably will
Although Williams
did bruise his knee at
FSU, he said he will
definetely be ready
for the Wolfpack
Saturday. "I think
this game is going to
be bigger than FSU
he said. "I don't
know too much about
State. I'd never heard
of them until I came
here
"But from what
everybody has said
about it, it's going to
be tough
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' ir0�m0mfiw0 m





12
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 9, 1983
(UPI) � Few new
football coaches have
as much to prove as
Alabama's Ray
Perkins.
When touring
sportswriters landed
at Tuscaloosa, Ala
recently, the
stewardess announc-
ed: "Welcome to
Bryant Country
The group then went
to Bryant Hall to in-
terview Perkins, the
successor to Paul
Bear" Bryant as
head football coach
of the Alabama Crim-
son Tide.
Bryant left an
awesome legacy �
323 victories in 38
years as a head coach,
and, during his 25
seasons at Alabama,
the best record
(232-46-9) in the na-
Perkins Facing Pressure
tion, including four
national champion-
ships and 13
Southeastern Con-
ference champion-
ships.
Perkins, who
resigned as coach of
the New York Giants
to return last winter to
Alabama where he
was a star receiver
under Bryant in the
mid-60s, knows he's
on the spot.
"For the most part,
coaches that have
followed legends have
not had success said
Perkins. "That's the
track record. But
there will be only one
coach to follow the
greatest coach of all
time and I consider it
a great honor to be
that coach. 1 truly
look forward to the
challenge
Alabama's schedule
should help Perkins.
After opening Satur-
day in Birmingham,
Ala as an 18-point
favorite over Georgia
Tech, Alabama plays
Ole Miss, Vanderbilt
and Memphis State
before getting its first
real test on Oct. 8 at
defending national
champion Penn State.
"I'm confident
we'll have a good
football team, but it's
going to take a little
time said Perkins.
"It depends on how
our younger players
come through. We'll
have a far better idea
of how good we are
after we've gotten a
few games under our
belt
Perkins wasted no
time in establishing
his own program at
Alabama. He replac-
ed eight of Bryant's
12 assistants and
scrapped the
wishbone offense for
"a multiple pro set
"The wishbone was
becoming a libility
said fullback Ricky
Moore, Alabama's
leading rusher the
past two seasons.
"More and more
teams were learning
how to defense it.
Several did such a
good job last year,
they really threw us
off. They kept swit-
ching their defenses
on us, making them
difficult to read. The
attack we had used so
well for so long was
beginning to die
down
Perkins also
brought a new
outlook to Alabama
The Crimson Tide
had been on top so
long it developed an
attitude of invincibili-
ty.
"We were
businesslike said
senior defensive
tackle Randy Ed-
wards. "Our job was
to go out there and
win, not make a big to
do about it There
wasn't a lot of emo-
tion involved
"We'll need more
intensity this year
because we don't have
as much talent said
Edwards. "We had
great talent last year
and it didn't carrv
us
Lowest TV Rental
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J Phone: 758-9102
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All New Exercise Facility in Downtown
Greenville
All Olympic weights and
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programs available
Hours: Monday-Saturday- 9:00a.m9:00p.m.
Sunday 1:00-9:0Op.m.
g Monthly Memberships � $30.00 per month
Semester Membership - $100.00
Group Rates3 person mm.) $70.00 a semester
J�V Located In the Downtown Mall
next to the Aerobic Workshop
GYM I" additional Info call 758 2826
WITH THIS COUPON )�
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consultation tor ECU Student!
Can ?s� OOO
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
camput include experienced
pro)etiion�l work Proof
reading ipeihng and gram
matical correct.om J5S �74i
atter 5 M
SAVE ON TOYOTA service at
Bells Fork Garage Eipenenced
Toyota mecnamc. 4 cyl tune
speoal � " O0.�cyivalveadiust
ment �0 TSe J7�
STOLEN FROM my art locker
IV lenkms an supplies Please
Please return at least the
teuton Call HMMt
NOTICE Please return the
ttirow pillow, green velvet with
fringe, taken off the bike parked
at Joyner Call Til 63S5
HOLY ROSARY � Our Lady of
Fatene weekly Can 7M-MH
and leave name and phone
number tor Barbara
NEED A BABYSITTER? Call
Sally at 7S21713. Here every
weekend till Christmas I have
years of eiperience. inctudeing
handycapped childern.
HOUSEKEEPING AND
babysitting Monday thuough
WE'LL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
FOR SALE Clarinet excellent
cond Call Lori 752 431S �7J 00
FOR SALE Water skis Obrien
Competitor, with competitor
case 11SO. New Connelly wide
track trick ski. with, pro wrap
front bintfings see C
tean I slalon ski S1S0. Scuba
gear fins, tank reg wt belt,
wet suit top Booties BC knife
SSSO Motorcycle Yamaha IT
175 l7t 1300 miles 5700 Call
7Se 4731
FOR SALE 10 speed bike by
Soma Only ridden twice New
1230 00 will sell tor S'OO 00 call
75a 3401 day and 75 5147 night
Ask tor Jo Campbell
PERSONAL
CRACKER Surprise. Surprise.
Surprise How could I 4get 2
wish U a happy birthday? Hope
Yesterday was tilled with lots of
laughter and good times lust
like the times you ve shared
with me Enoy Love ya Empty
HEY CINDERELLA If you fit
those tiny red panties you step-
WANTED
MALE ROOMATE WANTED
Georgetown Apt 13 rent and Ut
7S��40
REGIONAL AND LOCAL
REPS wanted to distribute
posters on collage campuses
Pan t.me or more work. Re-
quires no sales. Commission
plus piece work Average earn-
ings WOO � per hour. Contact
American Passage, S00 Thiro
Avenue West. Seattle. WA nil
ATTN: Network 20 M2 1111
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED MS a month rent and
one third utilities. Private room.
River Bluff 754 2344
I
I
I
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENT TO COLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50c OFF Developing Any roltslide film
50C OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargement
S1.00OFF Any 8x10, 8x12, 11x14 Color Enlargement
art H. comCi a hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE. M.C 27834
752-0888 � .
Limit one coupon per order- coupon expires 6-1-84
I
I
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G
I
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I
I
I
I
I
I
B
I
I
I
I
I
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
GH OUCH 05
ians
ATTIC ATTIC
Thur.
! X-Ravesl
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
a
Ladies FREE Till 1.00 55 H.H. Til 11:00
Friday and Saturday
W
B
'The ECU-NC State football game
will be shown at ATTICS 7TV
nm SUNDAY
MGHTHAWH!
SEPTEMBER 11th

4
4
4
4
i
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riiiiiniimiinimmnnmii
5
Invites Students to a
Post-game party!
E. C. U. Sept. 10th
Come see Our Great Selection of:
Greeting cards for all occasions
Out-of-town newspapers
New and Used Books
Magazines
RALEIGHs NEWEST
NIGHT-SPOT
ECU
vs
NCSU
Western Blvd Next to Amedeo's
GO PIRA TES
BELTLINE UNION 76
CONVENIENCE MART
BEER, ICE, MIXERS, GAS
On the Way to Carter
Stadium, Next to Crabtree
Valley Howard Johnsons
1.00 off any case of beer
wECU Student LD.
4320 Glenwood Ave.
Raleigh, N.C. 27612
EVANS NEW AND USED BOOKS
321 Evans St. Mall
Open 7 days a week 9:00AM-6:00PM
752-3333
99? tW.T �TTe�W���� e5 ?� i&, �Wi �W� iT�5!��S� �?5 �?9 �T5T� �?5N ,?5 ,?� ,7?, ,Vi 'T�J
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12 Price
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1 Thurs Fri. and Sat. R
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12
THE EASTCAROI IN1AN
SEPTEMBER 9, ls8
Perkins Facing Pressure
(UPI) � Few new
football coaches have
as much to prove as
Alabama's Ray
Perkins.
When touring
sportswnters landed
at Tuscaloosa, Ala
recently, the
stewardess announc-
ed: "Welcome to
Bryant Country
The group then went
to Bryant Hall to in-
terview Perkins, the
successor to Paul
"Bear" Bryant as
head football coach
of the Alabama Crim-
son Tide.
Bryant left an
awesome legacy �
323 victories in 38
years as a head coach,
and, during his 25
seasons at Alabama,
the best record
(2326-9) in the na-
tion, including four
national champion-
ships and 13
Southeastern Con-
ference champion-
ships.
Perkins, who
resigned as coach ot
the New York Giants
to return last winter to
Alabama where he
was a star receiver
under Bryant in the
mid-60s, knows he's
on the spot.
"For the most part,
coaches that have
followed legends have
not had success said
Perkins. "That's the
track record. But
there will be only one
coach to follow the
greatest coach of all
time and I consider it
a great honor to be
that coach. I truly
look forward to the
challenge
Alabama's schedule
should help Perkins
After opening Satur
day in Birmingham,
Ala as an 18-point
favorite over Georgia
Tech, Alabama plays
Ole Miss, Vanderbilt
and Memphis State
before getting its first
real test on Oct. 8 at
defending national
champion Penn State.
"I'm confident
we'll have a good
football team, but it's
going to take a little
time said Perkins
"It depends on how
our younger player-
come through. We'll
have a far better idea
of how good we are
after we"ve gotten a
few games under our
belt
Perkins waited no
time in establishing
his own program at
Alabama He replac-
ed eight of Bryant's
12 assistants and
scrapped the
wishbone oftense for
"a multiple pro set "
"The wishbone was
becoming a libilnv
said fullback Ricky
Moore, Alabama's
leading rusher the
past two seasons.
��More and more
teams were learning
how to defense it
Several did such a
good job last vear,
they really threw us
off They kept swit-
ching their defenses
on us, making them
difficult to read. The
attack we had used so
well for so long was
beginning to die
down
Perkins ai
brought a new
outlook to Alabama
The Crimson Tide-
had been on top SO
long it developed an
altitude of invincibili-
ty
"Wi were
businesslil
senior f e n s i v�
tackle Rand
wards "Our job wa
to go out there and
win, not mak�
do about There
wasn't a l I emo
tion invoh
"We'll
intensity
because
as muc
Edwai
great talen
and it d

y c a i
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!

Pirate forward Mark Hardy prove that he can play soccer even with his eyes shut
OARY PATTERSON - ECU PKoto Lab
TELE.RENTTV
e: 75&-9102
2905 East 10th Street in Gree
All New Exercise Facility in Downtown
Greenville
All Olympic weights a
machines, nutritional p
grams and supervised wo �
programs available
Hours: Monday-Saturday- 9:00a.m9:00p.m.
Sunday 1:00-9:00p.m.
f� Monthly Memberships - $30.00 per month
Semester Memberships - $100.00
Group Rates3 person mln.$70.00 a semester
Jf Located In the Downtown Mall
next to the Aerobic Workshop
GYM for additional Info call 758-2826
Classifieds
WITH THIS COUPON
MISC.
F � .da. 3 S 3C
after 6 p ft1
.EGA. HASSLES' Ca
Howiro J Cjmmmji attorney
�� l� No crarg� (or mil
conjugation lor ECU Sturjr"
t '� 0OO4
.OWEST TYPING RATES or
campus include experienced
P'O'titionil work Proot
'��ding ipHing and gram
m��lc�l corr�cf�oni 3S5 474
a�ter 5 M
SAVE ON TOYOTA ser.ice at
Bens Fork Garage E�penenced
Tovo'a mechanic cyl tune
so, a S' y. � c. .a.eadiusf
rrr JJOC t S 3794
STOLEN FROM m. art IOCk�
�n� ns a suppnes Pease
"ease '�igm at least the
s ssors CaM 753 4355
NOTICE Please return the
throv piuow green vei.et t
fringe taken off the bike parked
� ' Jovner Call 753 4355
HOLY ROSARY � Our Lady of
nvr, weekly Call 7SI 4SU
and i�a.t nam� and phone
numb�r tor Bartara
NEED A BABYSITTER' Call
Sally at 752713 Here e.ery
weekend till Christmas I ha.e
vears o' ��penence includemg
nandycapped childern
HOUSEKEEPING AND
BaOvS t'ng Monday thuough
SALE
FOR SALE Clarinet eiceilen'
cond Call Lon 752 �3!5 �75 00
FOR SALE Water skis Obr.cn
Competitor with competitor
case 50 New Connelly wide
track trick ski with pro wrap
bindings S'M� Connetly
lean i siaton ski t! 50 Scuba
gear fins tank reg wt belt
wet suit top Booties BC knife
S550 Motorcyce Yamaha IT
� �9 J0C mts S-�C Cali
'5 4238
FOR SALE IS spefd bike by
Soma Only - idden twice New
1230 30 will sen tor '00 00 call
'54 340 day and 75 5147 night
Ask for Jo Campbell
PERSONAL
CRACKER Surprise Surprise
Surprise How could I 4get 2
wish U a happy birthday' Hope
Yesterday was filled with lots ot
laughter and good times lust
like the times you ye shared
with me Enioy Love ya Empty
HEY CINDERELLA If you tit
those tmy red panties you step
ped out of during ttne panty raid
Sunday night come show your
prince charming how well they
tit ano I li be yours for��er
�5� ISM
LOST AND
FOUND
FOUND Ai 3rd and Elm Street
calico kitten approximately 3
months old with flea collar.
Please call 752 �07 for more in
o r m a f i on
WANTED
MALE ROOMATE WANTED
Georgetown Apt I 3 rent and Ut
7 5a 40
REGIONAL AND LOCAL
REPS wanted to distribute
posters on collage campuses
Part time or more work Re
quires no sales Commission
plus piece work Average tarn
mgs la 00 per hour Contact
American Passage SOO Thiro
Avenue West Seattle. WA I119
ATTN Network 204 212 111 I
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED ��5 a monrh rent and
one third utilities Private room
River Bluff 75a 2344
mumWmWm lar-L
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
3
fl
a

a
i
a
B

a
i
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENT TO COLOR C RAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50C OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50C OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargement
$1.00 OFF Any 8x10, 8x12, 11x14 Color Enlargement
art cQwCfo hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE. N-C 27834
752-0688 . , "
Limit one coupon per oraer coupon expires 6-1-84
C
1
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B
B
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B
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WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
GHOUCHO'S
Invites Students to a
Post-game party!
DsjUE. C. U. Sept. 10th
RALEIGH's NEWEST LCU
ians
ATTIC ATTIC
i X-Raves i
LJ
Lodies FREE Til 11:00 55C H.H Til 11:00
Friday and Saturday
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4
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4
4
4
4
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The ECU-NC State football game
will be shown at ATTIC'S 7TV
fnm � SUNDAY
NHMYH4WH1
SEPTEMBER 11th
rfriiimiiniiiimriyifumiiTTr
Come see Our Great Selection of:
Greeting cards for all occasions
Out-of-town newspapers
New and Used Books:
Magazines
NIGHT-SPOT
Western Bld Next to Amedeo's
vs
NCSU
GO PIRA TES
BELTLINE UNION 76
CONVENIENCE MART
BEER, ICE, MIXERS, GAS
On the Way to Carter
Stadium, Next to Crabtree
Valley Howard Johnsons
1.00 off any case of beer
w ECU Student LD.
4320 Glenwood Ave.
Raleigh, N.C. 27612
EVANS NEW AND USED BOOKS
321 Evans St. Mall
Open 7days a week 9:00AM-6:OOPM
752-3333
1 R
?
k
I
:?:
H
n
y
u
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1
m
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PET VILLAGE
Freshwater
12 Price
Fish Sale
Thurs.y FrL and Sat.
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W&& �tt. i"� ��4 �?� �T� ?T.�v.� v� .9.?, ,r, ,�r. ,�r, �v, .�r v v. .t, ?. K
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1

THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBERS 1983 13
ressure
establishing
program at
He repkac-
�f Bryant's
itants and
:d the
offense tor
pro set
jw .shhone a
g a libility
tck Rick
1 a b a m a' s
� u�her the
seasons
more
�re learning
de tense it.
d -
threv us
� kept swit-
i
i
,
�a
Perkins �ls0
brought a ne
outlook to Alabama
The Crimson Tide
had been on top so
long it developed an
attitude of invincibili-
ty-
��We wr
businesslike sa '�
senior defensive
sackle Randy Ed
wards. "Our job as
10 go out there and
vun, not make a big
do about it. There
wasn't a lot of emo
non involved.
We'll need moic
nsitv this yea
because we don't ha t
a- much talent said
Ed wards. "We had
greal talent last year
and it didn't cam
Facility in Downtown
Greenville
All Olympic weights and
machines, nutritional pro-
rams and supervised workout
programs available
Saturday- 9:00a.m9:00p.m.
pnday l:00-9:00p.m.
iberahlpa � $30.00 par month
. Membership - $100.00
oeraon mm.) $70.00 a aemeate-
lad In the Downtown Mall
c tha Aerobic Workahop
nal Info call 758-2826
nmnmoHanq
ATTIC
hur.
RavesT
iOO 55C H.H.Tin 1:00
and Saturday
t
C State football game
n at ATTICS 7'TV
-
SUNDAY
kWKS
SEPTEMBER 11th
iimimiiiiimm
BOND'S 'H.L. HODGES CO.
a X'
� mnuS Badweiser beer We knowoTniT-
"7c ���� fa K,wer which costs so much to I brQ"D7
"� SSKod Aaetru, proves a &�� anfigfa
bMJasivKlitw wouw.K find m nojother beeta��� �"
a
r
'c.
H
A The World
9 Henownep
Q
SB
UDWEISER
ImgerBeer �.
iBeeii
3RD
aU BUDWEISER� ECU
PEP
RMIY
THURSDAY SFPrg,983 7-00-8-30 PM.
FICKLIN
5TADIUM
FREE ADMISSION TO ALL
ATTENDING �
� COACH ED EMORy
� ECU FOOTBALL TEAM
� ECU MARCH IN& BAND
� ECU CHEERLEADERS
OVER 1000 WORTH OP FREE
PRIZES TO BE GIVEN AWAY
BY: BUDWEISER

BLOU NT HARVEY WESTERN SI ZZU N'
SNoory fox JERRYS sweet shop
udweiser

KING OF BEERS
9
mtmmimtmmfmi �'�nnr '
m m i
"JS!W'





14 THE EAST CAROLON1AN SEPTEMBER 9, 1983

Z
J

k

.
�e
Get an Extra 10 Off with your Student I.D. Card
MasterCard
(ONLY E.C.U. STUDENT I.D. S QUALIFY FOR 10 DISCOUNT)
Also, check-out Revco's low, everyday
discount prices on all these items
Revco
Oral
Mouthwash
Mint or Red
24 fi. or
Alka-
Seltzer
Revco's low. everyday
discount price of $1.55 ea.
.o- usn STOMACH
� Mf�0�CMl ��
Alka-Seltzer
Foil Wrapped. 72s
Revco's low. everyday
discount price of $4.19
Murine
Eye
Drops
Regular
or Plus
.5 fl. 07.
Murine
Revco's low, everyday
discount price of $1.29 ea.
nnrnr
Revco
CTM
Vitamins
Bonus Pack,
150's
Revco's low, everyday
discount price
o
Allercreme
Hypo-
Allergenic
Hair Spray
8 fl. 02.
Sutnrrv
Clairol
Kindness
Body Wave Kit
Natural or Color Treated
Revco's low, everyday
discount price of 99c
Nature's
Organics
Plus
Shampoo
Or Conditioner
�ti
V"n
��� � �,
M
16 fl. oz.
Revco's low, everyday
discount price of $5.99 ea.
Mead
Typing
Tablet
8.5" x 11"
Reg. price 89c
Revco's low. everyday
discount price
Fluoride Toothpaste
Regular. Mint. Blue
or Green Gel. 6.4 oz.
REVCO COUPON � SAVE $3.00
Hamilton
Beach
Mini Drip
Coffeemaker
$ooo
OOFF
Mode
784
OFF
Revco's low, everyday
discount price of $1.05 ea.
w
Schick �r
Disposable Razors
5 Pack
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Mead
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Reg. price 36c
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Brothers
Stick Pens
10 Pack
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Facial Tissues
100's
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loxi Shields
Revco
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Revco's low. everyday
discount price of $15.99
WITH THIS COUPON & I.D.
LIMIT ONE PER COUPON
CoupOfl -�r -es 9.1&83 a:
3'ee � -� � � ' �
REVCO COUPON � SAVE $5.00
Gran Prix
Cassette
Recorder
With
AMFM Radio
$coo
ilOFF
Revco's low, everyday
discount price of $29.99
WITH THIS COUPON I.D.
LlMIT ONE PER COUPON
Coupon eE"es 9 'flrU at the
Green;ie Re�co store only
Model
705
REVCO COUPON � SAVE SOC
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Energizer
Batteries
AA. 4 Pack
Fuji Film
Any Type
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Revco's low, everyday
discount price of $3.29
WITH THIS COUPON & I.D.
LIMIT ONE PER COUPON
Coupon e�pires �i&3 at the
Greenville Revco store only
GREENVILLE
South Park Shopping center
115 E. Red Banks Rd.
756-9502
DISCOUNT DRUG CBOTERS
COPYRIGHT 1983 BY REVCO D.S INC.
Items available while quantities last.
Revcoi
thertghttolimrt quantHia
k
i.�MM
�� �Euan
I





Title
The East Carolinian, September 9, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 09, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.284
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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