The East Carolinian, September 6, 1983






Bhe
(Eawltniatt
Vol.58 Nof

Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday September 6,1983
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Multicultural Education
Workshops Presented
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
An expert on the subject of
multicultural education spoke at
ECU on Thursday. During his
two lectures Dr. Dudley E. Flood,
associate state superintendent of
the State Department of Public
Instruction, told his audiences
that racism and racial stereotyp-
ing are often the result of social
conditioning.
Flood presented two lecture-
workshops to ECU teacher educa-
tion students, faculty and ad-
ministrators. The workshops were
the second in a series of programs
designed to expand the prospec-
tive teacher's knowledge of the
subject.
Dr. Clint Downing, associate
professor of admnistration and
supervision, and the chairman of
the Multicultural Education Com-
mittee, said, "It is recognized that
if we are to maintain a quality
teacher education program, we
must, in addition to looking at the
regular curriculum, provide a
means of making our prospective
teachers and administrators aware
of the cultural differences that ex-
ist in our pluralistic society, as
well as the differences in
behavior, language patterns and
language
The ECU School of Education
sponsored Flood's visit as part of
their efforts to gain reaccredita-
t i o n .
In his lectures, Flood stressed
the issue of racial stereotyping.
"People are not what you think
they are-they're not what they
think they arethey tend to
become what they think you think
they ought to be he said.
"Cultural diversity has almost
nothing to do with race unless we
generate that diversity as an op-
tion around which to center it
"Because each of us has been
conditioned to see race first, we're
promulgating a self-perpetuating
myth that says 'If you're not like
me, there's something wrong with
you Flood said.
Flood proposed the following
challenge to his audience. First,
learn all you can about those dif-
ferent from you; second, after
Local Churches Vary
i
Dr. Dudley E. Flood
you've learned all you can, con-
trast what you previously thought
with what you now know; third,
ask yourself, 'Do I accept what I
was socialized to believe and think
or do I trust my own informa-
tion? and fourth, accept what you
believe.
By ANDREA MARKELLO
Staff Writer
ECU offers a variety of locally
sponsored campus ministry pro-
grams. Seven denominations in-
cluding Baptist, Catholic,
Episcopal, Jewish, Luthern,
Methodist and Presbyterian com-
bined and Pentecostal, provide
student services.
Some services provided by the
programs include financial
assistance, community relations,
weekend camping retreats, weekly
meal and meeting programs,
counseling, and a source of group
identity which provides resources
for dealing with and sharing in-
dividual problems.
students and the medical student
organ transplant program in his
work. Hadden considers the
student-campus minister relation-
ship important. "Students should
have the opportunity to have a
chaplain at hand Hadden said.
Student representation on the
Greenville City Council resulted
from Hadden's work with the
ECU Student Government
Association. "The City Council
of Greenville is working with the
taining traditions.
"Students need to be able to
continue their home life on cam-
pus Resnick said. "We want
them to feel their roots haven't
been uprooted
There is a need to maintain a
tradition away from home
Resnick continued. "It is more
than a religion. We take pride
maintaining a tradition more than
5000 years old
As part of that tradition
SGA Hadden said. "The SGA Resnick urged ECU faculty to not
has appropriate opportunity for
input at City Council meetings
The motto of the Baptist Stu-
dent Union states that the BSU is
a place where "spiritual, intellec-
tual, social and ethical growth is
schedule examinations for
students on traditional Jewish
holidays.
The Catholic Newman Center
encourages students to use their
10th Street center for study, wor-
tor of the Methodist student
In regard to the education pro- center, said the purpose of the ser-
The Rev. Dan Earnhardt, direc- integrated Programs offered by ship, watching T.V listening to
cess, Flood said the biggest dif-
ference between people is in how
they perceive their ability. "Peo-
ple are more readily going to learn
facts that they perceive will be
useful to them he said.
"If you can accept the fact that
people are different, you will have
captured the spirit of mulit-
cultural education Flood said.
SGA Helps
Officers Fighting Apathy
By DENNIS KILCOVNE
Staff rltrr
The Student Government
Association's excutive officers,
elected last April, are prepared for
a year of increased SGA activities
which they hope will decrease stu-
dent apathy.
President Paul Naso, although
optimistic about the SGA's ex-
panded role, is not building �
rvope& eoieerrYiti luueiu reac-
tions to the new programs.
"Apathy will exist no matter how
good a student government is
Naso said.
Naso, thinks that greater ac-
cessability to the SGA and its
many services encourages students
to be more involved in managing
their campus affairs.
"You can bring a horse to
water, but you can't make him
drink Naso said of the student's
relationship to the SGA. "1 want
to bring the water to them, but
they have to want to drink
Among the programs planned
for the students are a leadership
conference for legislators, a cam-
pus organization hotline, an even-
ing transit system and a welfare
committee which will make
recommendations to the SGA on
student needs and problems.
Vice-President Lindsey
Williams did most of the legwork
on the proposed night transit
system. In addition to her role as
chairman of the Pirate Walk
Governing Board, she is con-
sidered the SGA's unofficial link
to the Greenville City Council.
Becky Talley, who is beginning
her second year as Treasurer,
believes siudeni ttucUt Urenc� to
the SGA results in students being
ignorant of SGA services.
"If (students) have a gripe
about the university, they can
come to SGA because we are the
link between them and the ad-
ministration Talley said.
"Students should care because
of the $7.50 we get from them
Secretary Sarah Coburn said.
"We've got to make students
aware they are directly effected,
but if they don't want to be
helptwt tney cut be. '
vices are not necessarily to pro-
vide answers but to create a
framework which creates ques-
tions that lead to personal
satisfaction and achievement.
"Campus ministries are a con-
tinuation of church life in accor-
dance with higher education
Earnhardt said. "People have a
better life if education includes
growth within one's own faith
"Students need to have a pro-
per level of maturity to adequately
deal with the real world Ear-
nhardt said. "They have to have
their own understanding of faith,
not what their parents want them
to have
Episcopal chaplain the Rev. Bill
Hadden includes the international
the union include interactions
with local historical families and
neighborhood teas with area
senior citizens.
The Rev. Bob Clyde, chaplain
of the Baptist Student Union, said
he liked the diversity of campus
ministries and the unification and
cooperation among these
ministries.
"There is a journey inward and
outward Clyde said with the
outward being a caring ministry in
the community
The Jewish Hillel group sup-
ports the elimination of world
hunger and freedom for all peo-
ple, said Hillel advisor Dr. Bramy
Resnick. The group offers
speakers for both the Jewish and
Christian religions, and has fund
raisers for furthering and main-
records or to just relax. Newman
is a setting for students to reflect
on their goals, values, and rela-
tionships with others, said
Catholic Campus Minister Sister
Helen Shondell.
The Newman Center offers
Mass on Wednesday and Sunday,
a Tuesday night group discussion
and provides speakers on
numerous topics.
"When doubts come up in
students' lives they should have
other people to share the doubts
Shondell said. "Students should
have their own sense of religious
and moral values
One student who participates in
the Newman program said,
"Newman is a place to get away
and relate with other people who
share a common faith
ECU Archaeologists Finish
Excavation Of Indian Village
SGA Announces Plans
Here are some of the SGA's
planned programs for this fall:
� A leadership conference on
the Wednesday following SGA
elections for student
legislators. The purpose of the
conference is to educate the
legislators on how to be respon-
sible and effective in their
work.
� A student organization
hothne to inform students on
various campus groups and
their activities.
� A night transit system
which will join the major apart-
ment complexes and cololege
hill to downtown in a round-
trip service.
� Welfare committee which
will lighten the heavy workload
of the SGA Welfare Commit-
tee. The student committee,
which will represent the student
body cross-sectionally, will
report to the SGA Welfare
Committee on specific needs
and problems of students.
Why's Everyone In A Rush?
By MILLIE WHITE
Ajafctnt Nrws Editor
At the end of this week, many
ECU students will be making a big
decision: whether or not to join a
fraternity or sorority.
Sorority rush began Monday
and continues through Friday.
According to Panhellenic Presi-
dent Hope Root, campus
Great Going!
STMUVUMff
ECU flanker Henry Williamsmiddlereturned a kkk-off aid
a put for touchdowns in Saturday night's loss to Florida State.
sororities are optimistic about
rush. Approximately 337 women
have signed up to go through rush
this fall.
"Rush is a special week for
everyone Root said. "It is pro-
bably our most important week of
the year
"There's a place for everyone
and it's not necessarily in the big-
ger houses Root said. " Women
should go where they feel comfor-
table, where they can talk to girls
the easiest
Not all women will want to join
a sorority A lot of girls go
through rush to meet people
Root said. "It's a good way to
meet people, we encourage that
very much
Fraternity rush will also be tak-
ing place this week. In the past,
ECU buses have taken men to
each of the houses. This year,
however, each fraternity will pro-
vide its own bus. Each bus will
travel through campus and to the
men's dorms to pick up anyone
interested in participating in rush.
Off-campus students needing
rides can call telephone numbers
listed on rush ads.
Bobby Pierce, Inter-Fraternity
Council president, advises men to
"go to as many nouses as possi-
ble, be selective and take their
time
Pierce warned about drinking
and driving to the houses, adding
that drinking can impair a stu-
dent's decision concerning which
house to join. "It's hard to make
the right decision if you drink
Pierce said.
ivn k. ho(arh
A team of archeologists and
students from ECU recently com-
pleted excavation of an Indian
village in Hertford county, N. C.
The excavation marked the begin-
ning of a four-year project to
study the life-style and organiza-
tional structure of the native
Americans living on the coastal
plain of North Carolina before
and during English colonization
of the area.
Dr. David Phelps, ECU
sociology and anthropology pro-
fessor and project director, said
the research was designed to gain
an understanding of the pre-
colonial culture and the changes
in that culture during coloniza-
tion. The strategy is to find and
excavate Indian villages which
were known of, or visited by,
English explorers, Phelps said.
The first village excavated was
the capital of the Chowanoke
"tribe" of the Carolina
Algonkian Indians. Subsequent
exploration will include the Dare
county area and the islands of
Body, Hatteras and Roanoke.
These sites were chosen because
of their inclusion on a map made
by John White, explorer and
governor of the 1587 Roanoke
colony.
The research grant for the pro-
ject is part of the America's 400
Anniversary Committee project
under the Department of Federal
Resources Funding Agency. Fun-
ding for this past summer's work
came from the Z. Smith Reynolds
Foundation.
The Chowanoke site, located
on the west bank of the Chowan
river (named after the Chowanoke
Indians) near Harrelsville, has
been occupied by one group or
other since 12,000 B.C but ECU
researchers are interested primari-
ly in the Collington Phase of the
Late Woodland Period (800-1850
A.D.).
Each stratified layer of soil at
the site had to be dug up and
sifted through to get to the rem-
nants of village life researchers
were examining.
Assisting Phelps in the excava-
tion were six staff members: ECU
instructors Paul Green (Assistant
to Project Director), Kenneth
Hartsell (Archeologist), and
Loretta Lautzenheisser (Assistant
Archeologist); graduate assistants
Julie Melton (ArtistDraftsper-
son) and P.J.F. Westlake (Ar-
cheological Assistant); and
undergraduate assistant Melanie
Phillips
undergraduate students getting
credit for Phelps' Field Methods
Course: Natalie Beason, John L.
Bellis, David N. Chiswell, Tracey
D. Edmundson, H. Winslow Hof-
fman, Albert B. Maginnes. and
James M. O'Donnell.
Researchers found shell-
tempered pottery, animal and fish
bones, plant seeds, and charcoal
in abundance. These materials
will lead to understanding what
the Chowanoke ate, how food
was prepared, and where it came
from. The in-site location of these
materials will provide the scien-
tists with a picture of the
organization of the village.
Several other schools are aiding
ECU in the analysis of the
material, though all cultural
Animal
epartment of Birmington
Southern College for identifica-
tion. Likewise, all fish bones are
sent to the Icthyology Department
at the Los Angeles County
Mesueum of Natural History
Plant remains, after preliminary
analysis at ECU, are forwarded to
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill to see if the plants
were gathered wild or are of a
domesticated variety.
Kenneth Hartzell. who will
head a survey of Roanoke Island
later this fall, said there was a
gorget (a medallion) of an unusual
style, and some early ceramics
more ornately decorated than was
expected, but otherwise the ar-
tifacts recovered from the
See ECU, Page 5
F.vU-
m
ECU Archaeologists uncovered dog bones during a recent excavation.
150 Dormitory Rooms
Currently Overcrowded
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Wriaar
Since the beginning of this
semester, 150 ECU dorm rooms
have housed three occupants. The
situation, which occurs nearly pro-rated basis for the number of
every year, is usually remedied nights three persons occupy the
during the first month of school, room. This year room rent for
"The number that we tripled is two people is $870.
based on the history of no-
weeks to get these students match-
ed up with vacancies. "We try to
work toward a four-week period
to get these people out Wooten
said.
Residents receive refunds on a
shows said ECU director of
housing operations Dan
Wooten. "History tends to show
that usually 125-ISO students
never show up.
At present many of the third
persons are being relocated to the
dorm rooms of new students who
have decided to leave school or in
the rooms of the no-shows. Those
who find a room on their own will
be moved right away. The re-
For incoming students, room
assignments are made on a late-
applicant basis meaning that those
who get housing applications in
late have a greater chance of being
tripled-up than those who send in-
formation in early.
This year 57 men and 93 women
were tripled-up. Seven of the fif-
teen ECU dorms were used to ac-
comodate these persons. Clement,
White and Green each had 25
mainder are given a choke from tinec-perton rooms, while Jones,
what's left. Cotton, Flamming and Jarvis
It usually takes a couple of each had less than 10.
T
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 6, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to nave an item
printed n the announcement
column please type it on an an
nouncement torm ana send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available a' the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwnt
ten copy on odd saed paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge tor an
noun. ,��'� r�ts but space is often
limited Therefore e cannot
cmaran'tv 'ha' .Our announce
ment a II 'un as long as vou
want and si li you do not
this oiumn tor
r r-
rit ' an
Ipm Monday
� ' cer and 3
. . fOI the Thurs
. N � louncements
rece. - �� '� � '�� � ' ' ftti
h
�. - ib e lo all
rations and
depa'
HONORS SEMINAR
( urrrni Hunun students and ail
facuitv art reminded of Ibr oppor
usit lo propose Honor Semlaars
ret �pnnK 1�M See pp f-tt of Ibr
. mmwrnaaj for categories "seminars
� re .l�ii jrorrallsl. later-
Jtvlpltnart and leim-laufRI
To be considered proposals must
he submitted in ssnting lo IH lHvid
sudtnoordinator of ibr Honor
Program c � I ngttsh Isepartment
roc further details, call BITS
PHI SIGMA PI
All mrmbm of the r-iecutive
t outsell art lo mm at IVavid
vshitie' house lues "sept 6 al
00 Our flrsi meeting of tbr
icmniri will he held in ustm 130 al
�. p m Mrd ihe th All brothers
���� attend
K PPA
PHAPSI
An informal smoker will br brie
for all interested mrn on September
13 10fl at S M) p.m. In tbr i'offer
House loralrd on the lower level of
Mendenhall Mudrntrntrr
BUCANEER BABES
Itaerr will he a meeting tonight for
all girt intrmied in helping oul with
otBaH recratttaf at t W p.m at
lield House All other
- are asked to atlrnd al �
p.at lor man information, call
vale 11-1 : Hiiit
INTI RNATIONAL
1 A N G U A G E
ORGANIZATION
The International language
Oraaaiiarson will hold Hi first
meeting m Vaednesdav September
9y 1 he mreung will be held in
Brewtierwing, room .101 Ibr
anaaataya will "art al 2 JO If ion are
iBierrMrd sou can comr lair lo the
meetim I he meeting will coaceni
selection of lacultv Ad�toorv of-
fl rr and activities for the fall
emeMrr .( k loberfrst. etc. i
WEIGHT TRAINING
Do van weal lo 'get lato weight
traiaiag bat an lattasidated by tbr
Vsetghi Room' Doa'l bet w omen
tad men who ba�e had Hide or ao
eincrteace artlh llf Uag weights aa par
of aa overall nines, program ar la
.lied lo Jala aa al latraaaaral-ttec.
ServVei for a coarat la BegiaaJng
VAetghi Traiaiag ioa wtH Irara lo
�at lb l arterial aaarhiBta. statioaa
aad light free weights rorrectlv aad
eftVsea.rs ao thai son will fact confl-
deal waea training oa roar oss-b.
Methods laaght -ill laclnde la
trodarrioai lo drrali tralaJag. pro-
gressive resistance ntrctat (PRF.I
aad proper warm ap-rooi down pro-
cedures roaar-add weight traiaiag
to tour fllaeaa profram. Una ap. in
create araa bod) man. get atroager.
aad have fun: Bring lor check oall a
time! wear light weight Com for
tihtt clothing (ihorti aad T-ihirtil
aad � aaaporHvf ithletir ihoe with
rievibtt mid sole (raaalag ihoei with
flaring heed aad or virus wedge art
aol recommended l
SAB
I here will be a meeting of the old
members of Tbr Stadeat Alhletk
Eloard aanaL 7, 1W3 al 9 p m. la
Room 241 of Meadeahall Stadeal
(.eater All member art aiked lo at
lead lo flalllxt oar bailara for the
.tart of aaolber year.
CROSSCOUNTRY
Aa caadidalt for the Mea'i Croaa
( oaolry learn report lo Mlagta l ol
(mum Irark room edatsdat, Sept.
7 al 3.M. An woman lalereated la
the rroai roaalry learn go b roach
BUI (ireMi office.
NIH
A rrpreaealalivt from (he National
laatllule of Health. Bethrada. MD.
will be oa campus October $-7 lo ia-
lervtew sludeais who would like lo be
health research assistants la their
Normal nlaBleer program heginn
lag Spriag 19M. Sladeau wlU par
tlcipalt in nperimeau aad research
regarding disease roairol aad (he
human hodi will receivt $12.� per
da stipend pias fret room aad
board, aad traaaportatloa paid lo
�ad from NIH. Madeau la the
health natural scieaces. computer
scieace. aad baslaeu fields who ai
be iBleresltd should contact Ihe Co-
op Office. 513 Raw I. Immediately lo
sign np for as inleoirw
CO-OP JOBS
I SDA- APHIS in (.oldshoro Nt
and Miami, r i has � co-op ooealag
for a Plant Protection Ouaranlinr
Aide Trainee will dlrrcl �ure
crew looking for gpa molbs. witch
weed, and Imported fire ants, apply-
ing control and regulatory measure-
siudenls who are sophomores or
juniors majoring in Biology. In
tomology . or Botany art urged to ap-
ply. The position will be available
beginning spring 1W4 Salars will be
II the l.N-4 level ($11.Mat) and re-
quires two work periods Isleresled
students should contact theo-op
Office. JO Rawl.
LAW SOCIETY
OrgaiaiiaUonal meeting Ihursdas
evening. September 15. " pm.
Meodrnhail sudea1eater, room
212. Information Diane Jones
TStt-aSa.
PS1CHI
Pal (hi. the aattoaal hoaor society
for aavchotoffj majors, would like to
wcatoaat everyoat bach lo school.
aad wksh eversoae hack la the coming
araacaatt. There will br a covered dish
sapper oa Moada. September 12. la
the Pal t hi 1 Jbrarv la Speight We li
bate dlnaer a short meetiag. aad
wt'U cleaa ap the Pal Chi llbcarv
Members art urged lo altcad. Please
call Triaa Harrtaoa al "sg-hSAJ aad
let aa kaost what yoa art bringing for
aaamaV.
If yon plaa to be active la Psl l hi
this semealer. please comr by the Pal
fan hbrars aad fill oal a locator
card.
If yoa wivuld Uke 10 volunteer lo
work la 'he Pal hi library Ihla
aeaaeiter. call Trtaa Harrison at
7��-gSS2 or Saady Rrglitrr al
355-674. or come b� the Itbrarv
If sou hast aol picked up your
membership certificates yel. yoa may
do so by coming by (he library-
ALPHA
KAPPA ALPHA
The Tbeta Alpha Chapter of
Alpha kappa Alpha Sorority. Inc
will bold a formal Raah for Tall M
oa Sepl I al 7 p.m. la Meadrnball
Multipurpose Room Pleas dress Bt-
cordiagly.
LACROSSE Cl UB
If you play lacroaae. or Jus: want
lo learn, come down lo the bottom of
College Hill al 2:00 oa Tuesday
September 13. �( need rttry oae In
lertated to a I lend
ZETA
PHI BETA
The eta Phi Beta Sorority would
like lo extead aa invitation lo all
youag women interested In pledging.
To acknowledge yoar interest, a let-
ter of iateat Is requested All tellers
should laclade background Informs
tion interests aad hobbles, grade
point average and reasons for pledg-
ing. The deadline for submitting lei
(en Is 5 o'clock. September Mh. All
letters should be seat eta Phi BeU
Sororily. 214 WhJchard
VOLLEYBALL
BADMINTON
I ree Play oile.ball aad or Bad
minion will be offered in Mlagesol-
rseum on September 7. 14. 21 and 2D
from I p.m lo 10 p.m t.qulpmrni
aad supervision will be provided All
sou need is energy and sweat lor
court reservations Jusl call the In-
tramural Offices al 75r0sS4
PHI
BETA LAMBDA
Ihe Omirron Chapter of Phi Bell
lambda will bold us first meeting
Uedncsdav. September 7, al 4 p m
in Rawl 341 Membership la open lo
all person raajortag la business and
btulness rduralion.
SENIORS
Ihe Career Planning and Place
meni Servtct will offer a general pro-
gram about (heir services on Vsednes-
dav September 14. al 4 p m. In
Mendenhall 244 i ou caa gel an ear
ly start by finding oul mote about
registering aad establishing a place
foe recommendations from Ihree fa
lultv rtfertnees. Some discussion of
employers who will come to campus
and employers who you should con-
tact directly will be offered
PRIME TIME
Campusmade for Chrlal b
spoaaoriag "Prime Time" thli
Ihursdas al 7 p.m. la the Nursing
Building 101 Please join us for fun.
fellowship, and Bible study We art
looking forward lo meetiag you.
FACULTYSTAFF
ADVISORS
The Departaseal of intramural
Recreattoaal Services Is requesting
assistance la Ihe Sportlub Pro-
gram. lacul(y or tiff membtrs are
needed (o serve as advtson for (he
following sports clubs Archery,
irtshee TMar, lacrosse. Racquelball.
Rugby Men, Rugby Women. Soccer,
Tram Handball Mrn. Itam Hand-
ball Vsi.men Waler Polo. Held
Hockey Winners and Surfing. In-
terested facultry or staff members
should contact tbr Intramuril-
Rrcrradonal Services Sport (Tub Of-
fice In Room 105- A of Memorial
(iym. Robert lot. 757-064
PI KAPPA PHI
Tbr Broihers arid I Hilt rings of PI
kappa Phi Iralrrnlly would like lo
welcome you lo our house for
Rl'SH. Come oul lo find oul why we
art tbt best fraternity on campus.
(KxVtinning the Chancellor up
two yean straight.) Vt also want lo
thank tveryone for making the loga
party another �ucrrss. sr look for-
ward lo nesl sear's
listen out for Ihe Miller Pi kapp
Beach Music Festival with
"Chairmen of The Board" and
more. 11 will be another good lime
CANOEING
LESSIONS
The American Red Cross and
111 s Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services will be offering
a course In beginning canoeing begin-
ning Sepl 16. Cant will be 12 dollars
and ibrre will be approximates 12
hours of standardized Instruction
Isjuipmrn! and transportation will
be provided, droupa. halts clubs, etc.
art welcome. Classes will be held:
Sepl. 16. 3-6 p m Sepl. 17. 9-12
p.m Sepl 23. 3-6 p m ; Sepl 24
12 p m Registration Deadline Is
September 13 in the Ouldoor Hrc
enler 115 Memorial dim al 4 p.m
All registrants must be able lo swim
PUTT-PUTT
learn Putt-Pull Registration will
be held September 12 and 13 al Ihe
Intramural Ret reaimnal services of-
fice in room 204 Memorial dim. A
(aptains meeting for Pull Pull is
scheduled for Sepiembrr 15 In
Biol gs room 103.
FI AG FOOTBA1 I
Hag loolbail Registration will be
held September 6 and 1 In Ibe In-
tramural Offices Ibeaptalns
Meeting las Hag loolbail will be on
the tin �� 7 p m in Biology room
103 All Interested persons tan call
Ihe 1M Res office al TS7-4M7 for
more information
JOB OPENING
If vou -rr inlrrmird in port
photograph thrn Inlrimunl
Hrt ' Jaiimi StrvfteM amWJ har�. a
part timr Job for sou I Iv hour, arr
�nrd and (hr work i fun If toiTrr
intrrniisl Jul go b ih-r IM Hk of
Tier in room 104 Memorial am and
apph But hurr
CLASSIFIED ADS
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Natfte.
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No fcaCfl-
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at 75 per atae S.
.No ingenious.
x : w� ��
a � ��
UHp
p.� a�a, a�

��� �� �
� � ��

� �� "��
L I.I
�Is.
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
( omt lo Inlrr Varsity oa Waaaaa-
day nlghl at 6.30 la Jraklai
Audilorlam. lAn Building'
Slider from IMsH still
seeing People as Jraaa acta Ibrm "
omt and improve yoar rvesigbl
BINGOICE
CREAM PARTY
I he Drpartmral of I aJvtrsiry
I alons Is sponsortag a Bingo let
(ream Party on lutsdiv. Septa maar
13. 1983 al 7 p.m. la (at Mattt-
Purpoar Room. Tar admiaaloa la M
rrnls and yon gel lo eal all Ik
delicious let cream yoa like AH ECU
sludtnls. faculty, sliff, tkrtr
dependents, and guts, arr wtscoaat.
I he flivors of tcr cream arr Rocky
Road. Praliari aad rtaaa
( bocolatt (Up aad Bailer pecaa
( omt oul and rat delicloai koa
� rram. win terrific prizes and aajaw
Ibe fun. Bring a friend:
ZBT RUSH
( omt oul aad meet Ike brothers at
HI Vtt welcome all frraaaaam la
rusb wblcb will br held la
Mendenhall student t enter (maat-
mtnli on Sep( 6. 7, aad I. from 7:01
(II 11:00 Brvtragr provided Taaa
will he Ibr lasl rusk wilk irer ariaki:
( omt tnjoy ll while yon caa.
ECU MARAUDERS
Iht Department of Militant
Scitnrr invites you lo parttctaaU la
ibr 1(1 Marauders, aa orgaassattaa
oriented toward leadership Dtsalaa
rnrnl thru arisenlure traiaiag.
military las tk s and other oaldoar ac-
tivities.
All students arr welcome Faral
meeting will he held oa Monday 11
Vpttmber 1983 al 7 p.m. la Room
221. Mendenhall student (eater Far
morr informiltoa contact CPT
1 ilvak. al 757-6967
SOFTBALL
intramural Softball Reglitraboa
will be held September 12 aad 13 la
Ihe IM Krc Offices Ibert win be a
captains meeting for all tatsrtalad
parlies on Sep(tmber 15 al 4 p.m. la
Brrwser-103 lor morr laforaan-
li�n Jusl call Ihe latramaral Ofraras
al 757.8-
EPISCOPAL WORKSHIP
aa Tasaaaay Baa.
r 4 (liamil at f:M g.m. al
St. Paaaa
raaarta St. Ta
SUB p.m. Ta
s.
b
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
Hat Caa�
NURSING
STUDENTS
lo rncarivvf jrmar aaratag
by Dacamktr I. 1�8V orders
I be placid la the Stadeal Supply
I. Wrhjat aUilatlBg. ao later tbaa
bar 13, 1983 Orders sboasd
Ike avwtaaJrj Coaaler
mast be paid la fall whea the
� I
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS
WORKSHOPS
Tan Caraar
LACROSSE CLUB
Tat FXV Lacroaae Soon (Tub It
ksTtttaaj aartaaw laurtsied la aaayiag
(fce aaeMaaj game of laarraaat lo at
lead ike m-gaalmtkoaaJ meetiag lo be
batd " itrirf- Saaaimbar 14. 1983
at S p.m. la Room 11 of Memorial
Gym. Ptayiag rxperieact at aol
air am try Rates lackalqati aad
paartag ttralaarr will aa (augbt darlag
prartare isaairii lo be bead rack
Taaaday aad Tbnraday al the CoNcgc
H nasda at 3:38 p.m. For further
mfarmatHa coalart Robert Fox.
Sasart (Tah Caardlaator. Room
laA bsemartal Gym. 7S7-aa4
IM-REC WORK
STUDY EMPLOYEES
PRCCLUB
Hey an yoa PRC majors Get la-
tattad wtlh the PRC (Tab by alien
atag aa art eraam lartal Taeidis,
Saaateaaaasr 8. at 7J8 p.m. la room
144 MiaJiakaB Doa'l aaass oal oa
the fast.
WOMEN'S
SOCCER CLUB
Ta ECU Women , SOCCER
rfam a haldtag Ihea- 1M3-84
mtttiag tedaeday
14. 1983 al 6 p.m ta
Room 181 af Memorial Gym
V iaa ia nttarmtad hi ptayiag soccer
dating 198J�4 rear aaoald aitead
Prartlrai an scheduled
he held oa Taesdayi aad
y-t al Ihe bottom of the hill al
Calanaam aad aa Saadays ta
Gym. Far farther lafotaaa-
tart Robert Fax. Sport Clab
( aocdUaiot Roam I8SA. 757-t
OLD TESTAMENT
Begtaalag om 8 Sept a coarse oa
the OM Tettameal will meet oact a
week dariag Iht 83-84 school year
from 6 .MM'00 p m eark Tkarsday
ta Brewster building, room 303-B.
Tbt data la open to all sladeau Tat
laatnactor sttll be BIB Fveabaks of the
hurra Fdacatloa Syilem of Ibe
Charck of Jeiaiarttl of I alter-Day
Salau. Please come aad rajoy aa att-
reaeai revtrw of Iht OM TesUmeal
MEN'S RUGBY
The BCU Meat Hughs iport club
trill brgla practice Tatsday
September 6. 1983 al 4 p.m oa Ibe
Allied Health Intramural fields
(behind Iht lilted Health Buod.ng
AB aaea interested la Btaylag Ragby
should aiuad this practict. Playtng
rxpertearr ta aol necessary. The clab
prarflcci each Tuesday. tAedaesday
aad Tharaday. 4.00-6:00 p.m . al Ike
Allied Health fleMa The seasoa
opeaer at a boast malrh agalaai the
I alvtrilly of Richmond oa
September 24 al 2 p m oa Ibe Allied
Health ftetds Olhet malrbts dnrtng
Ihe fall seasoa lacladeNa -(hapel
HUT. Fl Bragg. I N( reeaeboro
aad others. For furthtr latormalion
coaceralag Ibht en-itiag aad fast-
paced sport contact Wayat Roast al
752-8041 or altrad the practict ses-
PREPORFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
Tbt Prtproftsiloaal Htahk
ABtaact. aa ocgaaualkoa coaaJallag
of nalaorlty tladatts la hearth resale
carters, withes lo laretle all latertsted
sladeau lo iu first aaeetiag of (he fan
semester oa Tharaday. September I
at 5:38 p.m la Ihe ledoau sartgbi
( ultarat (eater
The guest speaker .HI w Mi Etaet
Masoa. Dtrertot of Votaateer Srr
� sees al F1U Memorial Hoaattal
SEMINAR
Dr. (.cover F.verrb Jr wrW ke
hosdtag a stmlaar oa Baadlag of
Catloaa by lmalftd-A A ��� .
Isaopkort Effects of calioa rBarer
aad solvtal potarKy focaaiag oa the
caemlcal aaaecti To be beM Irtdav
Sept 9 al 2 p aa ta FTaaagaa 281
RACE
Regist ratios for Iht latramaral
Bikr race oa Seatembee I Btal be held
Septeaaber 6 aad 1 ta Iht IM Rec Of
fires Thr I aptalns Met nag will bt
held oa Iht 7ik al t p.m la Memorial
Gym room 101 Bake imaecfioaa
he held al Ihe Captaiaa Meetiag
peas thr amaiBi ta na IM-tar
aseellag IM-Rat Warfe ilady
198J. IM pj na ij
Gpat.
RUGBY
The Eaal Cm-eataa Meat Ragby
Chah ariB begta practict today Seat.
a. at 4 o'ctark haatde the Allied
B at hat ag. oa Ihe latramaral
Aayone laieeaaied a arescome
NO F.XPFR.1F.NCF la aaceaaary
Ala then It a tram mat ting Than-
esas aagbt al 7 o'ctork la th base
meat af Mamaraal Grm. Eteryoac kt
SPORT Cl UBS
Archery. Frttbee Date, karalr.
mrroaae. Racqaelbali Rugby Mea
aad Woatea. Soccer ttoata. Sarf-
iag. Team Haadball men and
Women Badmlaloa.heal.yrllag.
Feaciag Field Hockey, (.ymnastici.
Oatlag, Saow Ski. Aiier Polo.
Waler Ski. Wiad Surfiag.
Wrestbag If yoa art IBleresltd IB
oae of (heat sports or you want lo
organize a group for a sport, contact
thr IX I DeparUaeal of Intramural
Recreational Services SPORTI I B
PROGRAM la Room 105 A of
Memorial (.ymnnaium. 157-1
GYMNASTICS
The Fast Carolinian
Pubiisrteo ever, uesoay
and Thur�,(j�w aur-rig the
i atiff" tear and evt
eVednev3a� rJur iq Wte s
Tne East Ci'o; rti�n s rht
VASDDt' o Ejs'
Carolina urwersi,v. ownea
operjiea arvc pob1 ineo fy
ana Dy tne stuaen's of t as'
Carolina LWi .e'Si'y
Subscription Rate iio ie't
The East Carolinian offces
are located in the Old Sourh
Building on the campus at
ECU Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Se-c aa
�:ress cbanges to The Eas'
Caro r an 010 S '
ding ECU Gr�f,
NC 27&34
Telephone 's1 �3aa sla'
&30v-
FALL RUSH WEEK 1983
SEPTEMBER 6TH - 8TH
f
TUESDAY: The Original Kappa Sigma
Las Vegas Playboy Bunny Night
WEDNESDAY: Go Greek, Kappa Sig Style
Kappa Sigma, a fraternity for your
present college life, as well as the
future, encourages you to come
by and make yourself at home.
Academics, athletics, social activities,
civic and campus involvement and many
other activities make Kappa Sigma
the pride of the collegiate world.
'In Pursuit of Excellence'
Beside Darryl's 1907
For more information call: 752-5543
Incide
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Sr� fast -
In a statement
released Friday, the
two American pax
ticipants in the "In
ternational Fast for
Life Charles Gray
and Dorothy
Granada, said the
disappearance of a
Korean passenger
plane Thursday ,
allegedly shot down
by the Soviets, would
not result in the fast's
ending. They are
awaiting a full in-
vestigation before
maki.
on the
"V.
has N
of
"Inci,
are bo
becaus
arn
prodi
and
incidei
the si
under
-
ragedl
The
in the
Police C
THERESA DL LNKI
Staff � rW
Floyd H 'Ted" changj
Holmes of Austin and
Texas will assume his
duty as Greenville'
police chief October
3. H
Holmes, 45, is a r
native of California
He is currently
employed as a police empn
managemer. � j
specialist by Authur
Young and Company egc
of Austin, Texas
-HARD DA
�Every THURS
-FREE BEER ai
-FREEADMIS
The very
wri
B
-T
winner will re
to NEW YOI
We're taking you
COMII
The Ci
for Memi
Lur.
You.
still here N
pizza in I
your pick li
selection
ghetti 1 at t
hearts contc
It's all vours
i
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN spprgMppft � 1983
.Phone.
i
1







L�J�
PRFPORFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALL1ANGE
Tkr Preprofc.eloaal Healtk
(Hun. aa orfuUattoa rn�tillag
of miaoeif. tivaaru la kealtk reaale4
iintn. Ua lo lavlie all laleraatcd
.tudeais lo Its Mm aMrttag of Iht faM
wantft oa T aar�aav Saateaikar I.
�( 36 � ia Ike leaoaia Wrki
l uiiarml i ram
Tae f aeal ipnttr -01 ke Ms. Etaei
Mom Ihnciar of V oiaatcee Str-
�vn at Pitt Meaiartai Haaprtal.
SEMINAR
IV Ooxr Event Jr wtH ke
aoMtag � kbiui oa Bfaailaa; of
i iB'� � LaaalacM-A. A Mkreaaal
Imoakon Effects of catloa eaaxfr
�ad toiveat aoiartty" foraaiaf oa Ike
fkeaucaf aaatefs To ke keid FrMa.
nt(M � ai 1 a.a. la Flaaaju Ml.
RACE
Regtstratloa foe tke ia
Bikr rare oa Scpteaakcr t wfl ac kaU
xpiraWwT e .mi 1 ia ike IM Rac Of-
fice, lac.piaia. MeetaBj �iH ke
aetd oa Ike "Hk at I am la Memorial
i.�m rooai 102 Bike laaperrjoaa all
be and al tkeaptalaa Mectta.
The Fast Carolinian
PuOiiSec every Tuesday
. 'sv. aurng the
i. aoe- , ari every
A. taesdat lag Mai sum
'�n is the
I ���. sdcwr of East
" .ersi'y owned.
and punished or
Hi � by e s'uden's ot fcast
nj University
Subscription Rate $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
ire located m the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU Greenville. M C
"VASTER Seno ad
�ess "anges to The East
"a- Old South
' n3 ECU f.reenvlle.
630?
Telephony I$J 434. �la7.
1
1983
TH
igma
It
kg Style
!S,
iany
Will Not
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
In a statement
released Friday, the
two American par-
ticipants in the "In-
ternational Fast for
Life Charles Gray
and Dorothy
Granada, said the
disappearance of a
Korean passenger
plane Thursday,
allegedly shot down
by the Soviets, would
not result in the fast's
ending. They are
awaiting a full in-
vestigation before
making a statement
on the incident.
"We feel that there
has been a tragic loss
of life they said.
"Incidents like this
are bound to happen
because the world is
armed to the teeth
producing global fear
and mistrust. We
must not allow such
incidents to interrupt
the serious efforts
underway to end the
arm race, because it
is the arms race that
produces such
tragedies
The 13 Participants
in the water-only fast,
now in its 32nd day,
are appealing to the
nuclear nations to
take action that would
1 'break the momen-
tum" of the nuclear
arms race.
In a medical report
also released Friday,
Dr. Linda Hole, one
of four physicians
caring for the fasters,
said all the fasters
were dehydrated,
weak and suffering
from vitamin defi-
ciencies.
During the last four
weeks of fasting
Granada has lost 28
pounds, Gray 32
pounds, Canadian
Andrea Lariviere has
lost 28 pounds and
Mitsuyosh Kohjima
of Japan has lost 19
pounds. The four are
fasting together in
Oakland, California.
No medical reports
were available on the
fasters in Paris,
France and Bonn,
West Germany.
"Doctors expect
within one to two
weeks that the fasters
will be in a critical
crisis situation said
spokesperson Robin
Knowlton. "So our
time is short
There's no ques-
tion, it (the plane inci-
dent) has had a major
impact Knowlton
told The East Caroli-
nian in a Monday
telephone interview.
She noted, that before
this incident,
Reagan's popularity
had been faltering
because of pressure
from the peace move-
ment.
"It's a setback,
what can I say
Knowlton said.
"We're trying to use
the situation to our
advantage, to really il-
lustrate the hair-
trigger situation in the
world
There is a possibili- -
ty that a second group
of people may begin �"
to fast next week. I
WITH THIS COUPON � � � �
WEIL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
I

I
I
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENT TO COLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50C OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50C OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargement
Sl.OOOFF Any 8x10,8x12,11x14 Color Enlargement
ort j( contra hop
' 818 SOUTH COTANCHE STWEET
As
GREENVILLE. NLC. 27834
792-0888
Limit one coupon per order- coupon expires 6-1-84
Police Chief Appointed
TUaVaaWfiat rkW T� CVI a� ��
THERESA DULSKI
Suit Wrtaar
Floyd H. "Ted"
Holmes of Austin
Texas will assume his
duty as Greenville's
police chief October
3.
Holmes, 45, is a
native of California.
He is currently
employed as a police
management
specialist by Authur
Young and Company
of Austin, Texas.
"I do understand
that there are a lot of
changes to be made,
and I'm looking for-
ward to that as a
challenge" Holmes
said.
Holmes said one of
his first changes will
be to "elevate the
educational
emphasis" in the
department.
"There are few col-
lege graduates in the
entering level of
patrol officers
Holmes said. "The
entering level require-
ment is passing the
G.E.D. high school
equivalence test
An increase in of-
ficer education can be
brought about by
"more closely
associating the police
department with the
university police pro-
gram Holmes said.
Classes are offered
in the ECU Depart-
ment of Social Work
and Correctional Ser-
vices, including a
minor in law enforce-
ment.
Holmes said the
police department can
"encourage officers
to go back to class by
assisting in terms of
schedule shifts
without jepardizing
any public safety ob-
jectives
7527303
�ATTIC
AH �rl. Dorm I �tl � Vaae
WED. STUDENTS 99C
LSUBWAYJ
THURS.
LADIES FREE TILL 11:00
Tx-RAVESJ
JRLANDSAT.
j STORMZJ
sun
iNIGHTHAWKSI
fall CatOUMA s
Th. ��
lyrfdjrt in Town
Aaii Awysias!
AN �urgsrs An Y.ib
?W ftW, Ground Fresh.
Doily From OVortons.
Bring thh oJ-10 OFF
Any Ice Croat
Wmi. Hw-o Mr SO �� AN
Me, fro AaW wtafc CU ID
TW Ctajjp Mi S tmm
rn. 14 of Hat Wa ��, 79
�-��It,
W aWaaOwkMAfciaic
So. Lotto aatoJtol Aon
�� kaato aM M� �M� M
900TIL 2:00
HARD DAYS NIGHT
-Every THURSDAY at the Carolina Opry House
�FREE BEER and Happy Hour(8:30-10:00)
FREE ADMISSION ALL NIGHT
The very best In solid gold Rock and Roll
with WITNs Greg Allison
Beginning Sept. IS, 1983
-TWIST CONTEST-
Flnal judging Oct. 6,1983
winner will recleve an all expense paid trip for 2
to NEW YORK CITY - PLUS Sl.OOa CASH.
We're taking you Back In Time For the Time of Your Ufa!
COMING SOON MIKE CROSS. SEPT. 11
The Carolina Opry House Is a private club
for Members and Guest only. All ABC Permits.
COMING SEPT. 15
ISLAND NIGHT'
Watch for Details
Soft k. Croon C
�&J2&
Floe,
fCI CrssawHIa It
-v
t.
open 7 days a week
� PklVaTf CLUk NOT OPEN
TO THE Of Nf 81 PUBLIC
Across from U.B.E.
SUCotanchoSt.
751-000
HAPPY HOUR
EVERYDAY
4:00 - 7:00
SUPER HAPPY HOURS
, WED.andFRI.
4:00 - 5:00 250 DRAI

a
Tree Howe'
TTTes-
Sept. 6
MARK DEATON
WED. SALAD BAR
Special AD Yon Can tat
n 15 5-9
YES, PANT ANA'S
IS GOING
PRIVATE,
MEMBERSHIPS
WILL BE
DISCOUNTED
TIL OCT. 1,1983

752-3997
WITHIN
WALMF4S QgTAHCl
SCtVB MOMf-STYLf FOOD
HAS FRESH � AMD �tLAD
FEATURES DAILY SFf OALS
HAS TAKEOUTS
mn all ��c aKMh
RUSH
TAU
,
Lunch Buffet Lovers, Take Your
PickOf
The Pizzas
At Gatti's.
CATCH
THE
BUS
AND
PARTY
Your favorite lunch buffet is
still here. Still serving the best
pizza in town. Honest, lake
your pick from our great daily
selection of pizza and spa-
ghetti. Eat to your
hearts content.
It s all vours.
The lunch buffet:
Ail the pizza ami spaghetti u can cat.
$2.99
DAILY
11AM TO 2PM
DINNER BUFFET
All the pizza
spaghetti and salad
yon can eat
$3.09
MON.andTUES.
5PM TO 8PM
CALL
FOR A
RIDE
752-4379
WAIMT YOU
TO BE A
(ECU STUDENTS ONLY)
409 ELIZABETH ST.
corner of Cotanche and 10th St.
The best pttu in town, jh
Phone 758-6121
TUES. 9:00pm wtii-ROCK-N-ROLL PARTY
WED. 9:00pm until- HAPPY NEW
(school) YEAR PARTY
THURS. 91)0pm uiiti- SMOKER
"COMESEE WHA TMAKES LSBEST
THC
HtU
10THST
MT
� m ��� ,p- m
UifHntmmtfrn0bjitw .
B
j





IU?� East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
FitL ding Miller, oemmmmm
Darryl Brown, umm tdno,
WAVERLY MERRITT. Dtrecor of Adwimng ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports Eduo,
Hunter Fisher, ��.�. Manager Patrick O'neii.l, News ���
AL 1 AFRASHTEH, Credu Manager CARl YN EBERT, MUll Hill Editor
Geoff Hudson. �� wr Lizanne Jennings. �wr ��
CLAY THORNTON, Tnhm,al Supervisor TODD EVANS. Production Manager
September 6. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Writing Center
New Ideas Meet Student Needs
Starting this semester, the ECU
Department of English is making
major changes in the way it ap-
proaches the problems of freshman
writing skills, with the new Writing
Center as the primary vehicle for the
program.
Traditionally, freshmen were
placed in an ENGL 1100 class and
taught grammar and syntax skills,
emphasizing the basic rules for
writing the English language. Class
sizes usually ranged from 25 to 35,
and more often than not the only
time a student saw a teacher on a
more individual basis was when he
or she sought out the professor dur-
ing office hours. This year however,
a major overhaul has taken place,
and, with the addition of new facul-
tv member Patrick Bizzaro to
oversee the operation, ordinary
freshman English classes, taught in
a new approach, will be sup-
plemented by the Writing Center, in
which students work on a one-to-
one basis or in small groups with
graduate teaching assistants.
For the first time, all freshman
students this Fall had to write a
placement essay by which the
English faculty could evaluate their
writing skills. If, after being graded
by two faculty members, a need for
met eased attention is seen, students
are recommended to the Writing
Center.
The approach is almost revolu-
tionary at ECU, and innovative for
the majority of college curriculums.
No longer are students approached
with the traditional "fundamentals
of grammar" instruction and urged
to put to use the rules learned. In-
stead, starting with a sample of the
student's writing, the teacher works
on improving specific problems or
weaknesses pointed out in the stu-
dent's essays. In other words, in-
stead of reiterating lists of puncua-
tion and grammar rules that the stu-
dent has heard throughout high
school, the program identifies and
works specifically with personal dif-
ficulties of each student.
"It's a whole new way of teaching
writing says Carlyn Ebert, a
graduate assistant working in the
center. "We're coming out of the
dark ages. It's a new attitude
toward writing � it looks at writing
as a process" instead of as list of
rules, says Ebert.
By the time they get to college, ac-
cording to Ebert, most students
have a basic grasp of writing skills,
and need to fine-tune more advanc-
ed skills or master specific dif-
ficulties, as well as gain confidence
in their writing. The center teaches
how to "revise and refine writing'
according to Ebert, while not
repeating material already
mastered, and while stressing the
students personal strengths.
Indeed, the new methods, which
can still be considered experimental,
seek to teach writing by writing, not
by a textbook. The center is
remarkable in that, at a school with
more than 13,000 students, it gives
personal attention to any student re-
quiring it. Neither does the program
it have the stigma of a "remedial"
course, for it is designed to help all
students who want it, as well as all
students who are referred to the
center by their teachers. It is not just
another class students must sit
through; the center is a pair of
rooms (Austin 308 and 309) with
comfortable carpeting in which
students sit on couches or around
tables with a teacher in groups of
four or five to work on personal
projects.
The results of the new teaching
methods are of course yet unknown.
The ambitious and progressive pro-
gram will take the dedicated efforts
of faculty, not just in the English
department, but across the campus
as well, for any instructor has the
opportunity, and perhaps an un-
written duty, to recommend
students to the center whom they
identify as having writing problems.
Most of all, the center will take the
effort and cooperation of students
� students who will put in the extra
effort to work with faculty in the
center, even though they get no ad-
ditional credit hours for doing so.
(Though und .ubtably many
final course grades will be
improved.) Students need to take
advantage not only of the regular
programs at the Writing Center,
which are conducted from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday
through Thursday and until noon
on Friday, but also to become in-
volved in special workshops held
throughout the year. They can help
any student with virtually any pro-
blem related to writing, and they
most be scheduled so that most
students can attend.
ECU has had, for several years, a
math lab to assist students having
trouble with college algebra; it now
has an even more elaborate program
designed to help students with skills
that are essential for every major or
career. The entire ECU community
should be proud of the innovative
and progressive instruction with
which the English department is at-
tempting to meet the educational
needs of its students.
GfttttHWV&HUpVQgj
BOBBV HAVE WO BEEN PLAVNQ WITH THOSE COMPUTER
ACCESS COPES AAIN ?T.
Airplane Tragedy Should Make
U.S. Examine Attitudes, Policies
By PATRICK O'NEILL
" comes at a good time for the presi-
dent. "
�A Sept. 1 comment by a CBS
News correspondent, referring to the
Korean airliner allegedly shot down by
the Soviets.
The above remark taken out of con-
text appears absurdly insensitive. How
can there ever be a "good time" for 269
people to be killed? However, when the
fact is considered that President Reagan
is planning to request the largest so-
called defense budget in history, the
comment makes more sense. Reagan will
surely have more people on his side now
as he attempts to justify the increased
expenditures.
The events that led to the deaths of
these people appear somewhat sketchy
and continue to change. Was the jet ac-
tually shot down? So far, Russia denies
this. Did the pilot make an independent
decision or was he ordered to shoot? By
who? The truth may never be known,
but the fact is clear that 269 people are
dead.
If Russian military leaders ordered the
shooting down of the jet � knowing it
was a passenger plane � then I must ad-
mit I will be totally shocked. Such an ac-
tion can only be viewed as insane. I can-
not believe that Soviet President An-
dropov played a role in the final deci-
sion. Andropov is not Adolf Hitler, and
Americans who wish to portray him as
such only serve to add to the world's in-
stability.
The incident will have a grave negative
impact on the Soviets, and Andropov
knows it. My hope is that his recent
silence is his way of buying time for the
purpose of finding the best way to make
an apology.
There are several other factors which
still need clarification. If the U.S. was
able to obtain a recording of the Soviet
pilot's words, then I want to hear them
myself � and I want the validity of the
recording to be authenticated by an
uninvolved third party. I also want the
Soviets to allow a thorough search for
"Why do we live in a
world where a jet
straying off course
risks being shot
do wnWhy do we
control the sky above
us?"
the wreckage by another third party.
Perhaps parts of the fuselage may in-
dicate what actually happended to the
plane.
But I guess the real question I want to
raise is, Why? Why do we live in a world
that is so full of fear and mistrust? Why
do we live in a world where a jet straying
off course risks being shot down? Why
do we control the sky above us?
It is tragic that nations have reached a
point where they are so threatened as to
feel compelled to control what moves in
the air above them and the water around
them. "Distrust" and "fear" are the
real reasons that we hate so much � the
real reasons that the plane is lost. It's
not that the Russians are barbarians, but
rather it's our perception of them as be-
ing something other than human.
If we constantly recognize them as
enemies, then it is unlikely we can ever
reach peace with them. We must begin
to view them as human beings who are
capable of goodness and logic.
Yes, it does seem they shot down
the plane, and yes, it can only be viewed
as an act of terrorism if they did. But
Americans must not be blind to other
acts of terrorism that go on every day,
and to which we are a party.
Just as the Russians terrorize and at-
tempt to control the people of Poland
and Afghanistan, the United States does
likewise to the people of Central
America. Our actions at My Lai during
the Viet Nam War show that we are
capable of blatant atrocities. A.mri.a�.
constantly refuse to recognize the
similarities in the behavior of "us" and
"them
Until we begin to make an effort
towards peace by changing our own
policies, it is unlikely that the Soviets
will make changes. The distrust and fear
will expand. Tensions are very high and
dramatic, and gentle steps are necessary
if the world is to survive. No, this inci-
dent does not come at a good time for
the president or for anyone else. It is
tragic; it is dangerous. I only hope
Reagan will continue to handle the situa-
tion in a way which will help resolve the
mysteries and heal the wounds.
Campus Forum
Students Decry Soviet Actions
HEWENS.MOWE PONT SLOWER HOUSES ANVNIORE,
NOW WE JUST RAISE TO INTEREST RATES
When ABC's World News Tonight
program � the moderate among the
network news shows � dedicates
almost five-sixths of its broadcast to a
single news item, as it did last Sept. 1,
then it's time for the rest of us to sit up
and listen.
Here's the gist of the report: Korean
Airlines' flight 007, a Boeing 747 en
route to Seoul, South Korea, from
New York, strayed into Soviet airspace
after a stopover in Anchorage, Alaska.
On Aug. 31 at 1600 Greenwich Mean
Time (12 noon EDT) the aircraft
"came to the attention of Soviet
radar" and remained under constant
surveillance for the next VA hours. It
was tracked over the Kamchatka
Peninsula, over the Sea of Okhotsk
and over Sakhalin Island. Several
MiG-23s were scrambled and under
direct control at all times.
At 2:12 p.m. EDT, one MiG pilot
reported visual contact. Soviet asser-
tions to the contrary, it appears that no
radio contact was made. At about 2:25
the pilot armed and fired one air-to-air
missile, and 269 souls � men, women,
children � were blasted into the
hereafter. At 2:38 the airliner disap-
peared from Japanese radar. Fifteen
Americans were aboard, including
U.S. Rep Larry P. McDonald (D-Ga.).
Now, granted that the Korean plane
was flying over a fairly sensitive
military base, this cannot and will not
excuse the barbarity of their actions.
The Soviet government has yet to
realize that in order to gain the respect
of the civilized world, it must itself
behave in a civilized manner. It failed
to do so near the end of World War II,
when Russian troops took revenge on
the people of Austria and Germany. It
failed to do so in Hungary in 19S6, or
in Czechoslovakia in 1968, or in
Afghanistan in 1980. It failed to do on
on Aug. 31, 1983. Until they learn, can
it seriously be said that we can trust
them? Can it seriously be said that they
should be trusted.?
At a recent meeting of Christian
evangelicals. President Reagan de-
nounced Moscow as "the focus of evil
in the modern world I laughed at
him, wondering what on earth this
clown could be talking about. How
could any single nation be the focus of
eviti Patently ridiculous!
I'm not laughing now.
Jonathan R. Houston
Junior, English
The tragic loss of life resulting from
the Soviet's murderous attack upon
KAL flight 007 is a sad illustration of
the mendacity of the Kremlin.
After tracking the passenger plane
for over two hours, Russian MiGs shot
down the civilian plane, with over 260
people on board, over Sea of Japan.
The radar image of the five-times
weekly flight fills up a radar scope like
no spy plane can.
There is no doubt the Soviets knew
that plane was full people; they would
be clearly visible seated inside from the
light shining out the windows of the
plane.
Positively, no Soviet military pilot
would take such action without a direct
order from his superiors. Such an
order could originate only from the
Soviet Supreme High Command
(UGK) � idri Andropov and com-
pany.
In addition to shooting down the
plane, searchers were sent out only
after it was certain any survivors would
have died of exposure.
The attack is one of the many events
in a long history of barbarism, terror
and lies. (Broken treaties would fill
many volumes.) Andropov and his
hachet man are amoral and sinister.
Pat O'Neill and his band of Soviet
sympathizers arc now in a disillusion-
ing position of having to look at the
ugly reality of the U.S.S.R. Often in
the past, the Greenville Peace Commit-
tee has been silent about Soviet aggres-
sion. When they have said anything,
they seemed timid. Will they speak out
against the Soviets now?
It is ironic that Rep. Larry-
McDonald, outspoken critic of the
Soviets (and the nuclear freeze move-
ment) was silenced by a Soviet heat-
seeking air-to-air missile.
Tim Whiscnant
Senior, Business
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, alt let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they art limited
to one every five issues.
t
Sexual!
By GLENN MALGHAN
MNhfei
Sexually transmitted diseases
(STD), continue to plague
America's youth. As is the case in
any American city, town, or com-
munity, ECU's population will
have its share of students infected
with STDs.
Once contracted, many STDs
are treatable and the Student
Health Center maintains a
knowledgeable staff with ex-
perience in curing these various
diseases.Confidential diagnosis
and treatment of STDs is
available from the center.
Students may feel some social
stigma attached to their problem
but Kay Van Norwick, ad-
ministrative manager of the SHC.
stressed confidentiality as a major
part of treating STDs. "Preserv-
ing privacy makes our contact
with the student that much
easier Van Norwick said.
ECUExd
Cont. From Page 1
Chowanoke site were
consistent with earlier
finds.
The actual unear-
thing of the
Chowanoke village
took two and one-half
months. "The sor-
ting, cataloguing and
collating of data will
take far longer than
the digging process
Hartzell said.
Archeological
research destroys the
excavation site. Since
the material unearth-
ed cannot be fully
analysed on-site, an
artistdraftsperson
must be part of any
archeological expedi-
tion.
Julie Melton, a
graduate student in
maritime history, was
hired to make
topographical maps
of the site.
These r
with the
artifacts.
Phelps
cheologist?
dimensional
tive of the
aluable
cultural am
Melton s�
.ai imp(
t h w h i 1 e
joyabie.
can one
in the sumi
side in the
get
discoer
cess " Mel
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discipline
A s pan
America
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F. ect, Pi
puoL h a
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Carolina
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1983

V
til
'IT-
05E COMPUTER
Make
Policies
Distrust" and "tear" are the
ons that we hate so much � the
that the plane is lost. It's
the Russians are barbarians, but
It m perception of them as be-
rthing other than human,
constantly recognize them as
then it is unlikely we can ever
ice with them. We must begin
hem as human beings who are
of goodness and logic.
i does seem they shot down
le, and yes, it can only be viewed
ct of terrorism if they did. But
ins must not be blind to other
terrorism that go on every day,
iich we are a party,
the Russians terrorize and at-
control the people of Poland
jhanistan, the United States does
to the people of Central
Our actions at My Lai during
kt Nam War show that we are
of blatant atrocities -����' �� ,
I r f v refuse to recognize the
ses in the behavior of "us" and
e begin to make an effort
peace by changing our own
unlikely that the Soviets
e changes. The distrust and fear
land. Tensiou: are very high and
Ic. and gentle steps are necessary
Id is to survive. No, this inci-
not come at a good time for
ident or for anyone else. It is
is dangerous. 1 only hope
will continue to handle the situa-
way which will help resolve the
; and heal the wounds.
ctions
Jd of exposure.
ttack is one of the many events
history of barbarism, terror
(Broken treaties would fill
olumes.) Andropov and his
lan are amoral and sinister.
j'Neill and his band of Soviet
Jizers are now in a disillusion-
tion of having to look at the
litv of the U.S.S.R. Often in
the Greenville Peace Commit-
een silent about Soviet aggres-
hen they have said anything,
led timid. Will they speak out
the Soviets now?
ironic that Rep. Larry
Id, outspoken critic of the
Hand the nuclear freeze move-
fas silenced by a Soviet heat-
lair-to-air missile.
Tim Whisenant
Senior, Business
orum Rules
ast Carolinian welcomes letters
xg all points of view. Mail or
Um by our office in the Old
wilding, across from Joyner
Utrposes of verification, all let-
it include the name, major and
vtion, address, phone number
kature of the author(s). Letters
wed to two typewritten pages,
paced or neatly printed. All
re subject to editing for brevi-
mity and libel, and no personal
will be permitted. Students,
ind staff writing letters for this
I reminded that they are limited
very five issues.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases Plague Youth
By GLENN MAUGHAN
SUfT Writer
Sexually transmitted diseases
(STD), continue to plague
America's youth. As is the case in
any American city, town, or com-
munity, ECU's population will
have its share of students infected
with STDs.
Once contracted, many STDs
are treatable and the Student
Health Center maintains a
knowledgeable staff with ex-
perience in curing these various
diseases.Confidential diagnosis
and treatment of STDs is
available from the center.
Students may feel some social
stigma attached to their problem
but Kay Van Norwick, ad-
ministrative manager of the SHC,
stressed confidentiality as a major
part of treating STDs. "Preserv-
ing privacy makes our contact
with the student that much
easier Van Norwick said.
Students will not get their pro-
blem broadcast to the waiting
room and need not tell the clerk
what is wrong, Van Norwick add-
ed. "I feel like we've come a long
way in helping students with
STDs she said. Conferences are
held in a private cubicle with a
nurse or doctor and records are
not available for public inspec-
tion.
According to members of the
SHC staff, ECU does not have
higher occurrences of STDs than
other institutions of similar size.
Jolene Jernigan, a SHC family
nurse practioner, said the occur-
rence of STDs is always prevalent
when people enter their sexually
active years.
Statistics released by the Center
for Disease Control in Atlanta,
show at least half of all STD cases
are among people under age 24.
"We do have a higher incidence
of herpes and gonorrhea than
other STDs said Van Norwick.
According to Dr. Andrea L.
Brand, a medical doctor on the
SHC staff, at least 2 or 3 people
come daily to SHC with symp-
toms that could be related to a
STD. "I see a goodly number of
patients who do have an STD or
are showing symptoms Brand
said.
In Pitt County, there have been
600 cases of gonorrhea reported
this year and 65 cases of syphilis.
In July, 340 people utilized Pitt
County's venereal disease treat-
ment center but Beth Murphy,
coordinator for the county's VD
service, believes the figure for Ju-
ly is low.
Murphy said no big increase in
herpes has been documented
although her office must limit
treatment of herpes to pregnant
women or other higher-risk in-
dividuals.
Murphy said a fairly high number
of syphilis cases were reported this
year. "With only one V.D. in-
vestigator for the whole county,
it's really the responsibility of the
individual to inform their sexual
contactsSTDs are an epidemic
in Pitt County right now she ad-
ded. Health officials stress the
need for individuals to seek pro-
mpt treatment.
Brand said many people are
misinformed or have misconcep-
tions about STDs. Predominantly
bacterial in origin, STDs cannot
be prevented by vaccine although
antibiotics are available and will
generally halt the infection.
Usually passed by way of sexual
intercourse, STDs have risen in
number due to relaxed sexual
mores, public ignorance, and bet-
ter scientific methods used to spot
the diseases.
Reinfection is always possible
but the use of condoms and the
knowledge that your partner is
healthy can prevent further out-
breaks. Many STDs have
�dangerous consequences: sterility,
insanity, fetal transfer, cancer,
even death.
In 1978, the Council on Disease
Control reported 80,000 women
were sterilized as a result of con-
tracting gonorrhea. Another
damaging side effect is the cost.
Hospitalizing the syphilitic insane
costs taxpayers an estimated $44
million annually.
Even more alarming is the
possibility that an individual can
contract a STD and not realize it.
Women especially can mask STD
symptoms but with aid of routine
tests like a pap smear, complica-
tions can be avoided.
Speed is essential in combating
STDs. "The faster we can get to
someone who has a disease, the
less likely the infection will
spread Murphy said.
ECU Excavation Complete
Cont. From Page 1
Chowanoke site were
consistent with earlier
finds.
The actual unear-
thing of the
Chowanoke village
took two and one-half
months. "The sor-
ting, cataloguing and
collating of data will
take far longer than
the digging process
Hartzell said.
Archeological
research destroys the
excavation site. Since
the material unearth-
ed cannot be fully
analysed on-site, an
artistdraftsperson
must be part of any
archeological expedi-
tion.
Julie Melton, a
graduate student in
maritime history, was
hired to make
topographical maps
of the site.
These maps, along
with the catalogued
artifacts, will give
Phelps and other ar-
cheologists a three
dimensional perspec-
tive of the site, an in-
valuable tool in
cultural analysis.
Melton said her job
was important, wor-
thwhile and en-
joyable. "Where else
can one work outside
in the summer and in-
side in the winter, and
get the thrill of
discovery in the pro-
cess " Melton said.
"Archeology is detec-
tive work and physical
labor combined in one
discipline
As part of the
America's 400 An-
niversary Committee
Project, Phelps will
publish a book about
the culture of the
Carolina Algonkian
Indians. Phelps said
he hopes the book will
be published in 1986.
The team will prepare
a slide and sound
show complete with
some of the artifacts
unearthed during the
dig.
Anyone interested
in seeing the artifacts
is invited to stop by
the Archeology
Lab,located in the old
cafeteria building
near Joyner Library.
i
J
YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
"lour BSN means you re a pn.tcsMon.il In the Army, it ,iio
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P.O Box 7713. Burbank.CA 91510
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
Goals Set By SRA
By MILLIE WHITE
Aublaat Hmm Kditor
A new plan recently
approved by the Stu-
dent Residence
Association calls for
the unification of
campus residence
halls. SRA President
Mark Niewald said he
hopes to "bring more
student input to deci-
sions that are made
concerning residence
hall students
Other plans by the
SRA include increas-
ing student input into
the residence hall
budgetary process and
encouraging student
opinions regarding
the formation of more
co-ed dorms.
The SRA also
wants to eliminate
quick decisions made
by the administration
because of time
pressures.
Other goals of the
SRA include lobbying
to achieve social and
political objectives
sought by the student
body in the areas of
housing.
I
i
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412 oz Jr. Sirloin $2.19
8 oz Chopped Sirloin $2.49
Meals served with King Idaho Baked
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Daily Specials 11a.m10p.m.
Mon 8 oz chopped Sirloin $2.99
Tues Beef Tips $1.99
Wed Beef Ribs $3.49
Specials served with King Idaho Baked
Potato or F.F. & Texas Toast.
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved Veg Bar
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I Ml I SI CAROI INIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER' 1983
l'Hit 6
v.
t �
l �? 7flste 0 Summer
BT �( fQ f
For most of EC! , Labor Da was business as usual. But students
took advantage of the holiday' weekend � the last real weekend
before classes shift into high gear � to savor one last taste of
carefree summer fun. Whether charging the net or charging up
energy reserves by simplv relaxing in the sun, it seemed everyone
was outdoors doing something. Even cracking the books was a lit-
tle less painful from a sunny dormitory ledjje. Most students.
however, felt they deserved just one more day.
Hot Rhythms,
New 'System
Synchrosound
Bv MIKE HAMKR
M�ff M rlicr
Synchro System
King Sunny Ade and the African
Beats
Synchro System, King Sunny
Adf's second record released in
this country on Mango Records, is
a fascinating album, perhaps
because the music is so different
from what most of us are used to
hearing. And yet even the
uninitiated listener can tell that it
is a record full of sensitivity.
Imagine layers of percussion,
including talking drums; add a
simple guitar riff or two over that,
and then put in some ethereal steel
guitar. Add some silky call-and-
response singing over that, and
you might be able to imagine the
sound of King Sunny AdS and his
African Beats.
The distinguishing aspect of
King Sunny Ad�'s music � its
texture � puts the percussion at
the forefront with the lead talking
drum player getting the attention
that we would normally show a
lead guitarist. Nine percussionists
and two bass players receive credit
on the album, fronting a band
with 22 players in all.
Both Synchro System and last
year's Juju Music (the only two of
King Sunny Ade's recoi
available in the Lnited States,
good introductions to juju musi.
a genre characterized bv
and-response vocals and tali
drums. A talking drum is trucl
with a stick while the fre-
simultaneously strikes the I
the drum, giving a full range
sounds. These drums we-
used as communication bv
Yoruba people of Nigeria The
make a sound similar to todav
syn-drums. The singing, wh
not in Fnghsh but in a j
influenced Nigei
reminds me of recordings ot
gospel spirituals from tr
Sea Islands
This is a smoot:
very different from c
reggae music And tl
and an important record 1 : i
strong suspicion that K g
Ad�'s music has influenced Br
Eno and the Talking Heads, a;
would recommend that anyone
terested in the dir- new mu
�- ; be tak gin tl
years ought to give Synch
Si stem a good list
Pla Huhi Tonight
Roily Graj and Sunfire
Pla H ith j Toniaht
Dolphin Record
see HOT, Page 7
Tribute To Olivier
Runs Tomorrow
By CARLVN FBFRT
Mention the name Sir Laurence
Olivier almost anywhere, and the
superlatives begin to flow: ver-
satile, exciting, brilliant, 'the
greatest actor of our time
But when the press asked Sir
Olivier what he'd rather be called,
the actor director producer
replied. "How about Lord
Larry0 "
This Wednesday night Olivier
stars in a double cinematic treat at
Mendenhall's Hendnx Theatre: at
6 p.m. as Othello and at 9 p.m. as
Richard III Both are full-length
color British screen adaptations of
the Shakespeare plays.
In Othello, Olivier gives a stun-
ning portrayal of the famous
Moor who woos, wins and then
murders his faithful wife in ill-
founded jealous rage. The 15
film, co-starring Maggie Smith as
Desdemona and Frank Finlay as
the mind-poisoning Iago, is
literally a filmed version of an ac-
tual Olivier-staged performance
of the tragedy.
"His Othello is certainly a
classic; he plays a very emotional
black man whose conversion to
Christianity is a very decisive
change in his life experience
said Dr. David Sanders, professor
of English. "And then when he
realizes that he's done a very un-
christian deed, he forsakes all of
his Western way s "
Olivier switches personas and
locales � from a black Moor in
murderous king in 15th century
Britain � in Richard III. The
director as well as the star, Olivier
shares the acting credits �
Ralph Richardson (Buckingha
and Claire Bloom (Lady Anne.
whom ne successfully courts
across the corpse of her husband)
Olivier, who debuted on stage
in 1922 playing Kate in an ail-boy
performance of The Taming of
the Shrew at the Shakespeare
Festival Theatre at Stratford-on-
Avon. has played diverse roles
over his long career. Ran:
from Hamlet (for which he w
the Best Actor Oscar; the film al
received a host of other awards,
including Best Film) to Nathan.
Detroit in Guys and Dolls.
Olivier's roles have garnered him
nine Academy Award nomina-
tions and a special award for his
first Film as a director. Henry V,
in which he starred as well. In
1979, Olivier received another
special Oscar for "the full body of
his work his lifetime of con-
tribution to the art of film
Tomorrow's double feature
pays tribute to Olivier's special
genius. Admission is free for
students with ID and activity
cards.
'Strange Brew9 Tastes Good. Eh?
By MICHAELS. Bl lA,
Sl�ff W rittt
Strange Brew (now playing at
the Plaza Theater) could well be
the funniest film released this
summer. Whether or not it will be
a box-office hit is another matter.
Despite some good reviews, it is
not receiving the media campaign
bestowed on such a profound film
as Getting It On.
Strange Brew stars Rick
Moranis and Dave Thomas as
Bob and Doug McKenzie, the big-
gest thing to come out of Canada
since Moosehead Beer. As hosts
of "The Great White North" on
NBC's SCTV, the McKenzie
brothers popularized such Cana-
dian expressions as "Take off,
eh?" and the popular
"hosehead Each week they
would drink beer, eat back bacon
and philosophize on topics like
putting mice in beer bottles to get
a whole case free.
With their growing success
came a record album. Geddy Lee
of Rush sang on "Take Off the
hit single from the album. Then
there was "The Beer Hunter
Russian roulette utilizing a can of
beer instead of a bullet. It seemed
the McKenzies had but one
medium left to conquer � the
silver screen.
The boys' first Film effort is
Strange Brew, and it begins on the
set of "The Great White North
Bob and Doug point out some of
the obvious differences between
television and film and then pro-
ceed to show their movie. This is
the funniest sequence in Strange
Brew, an obviously low-budget
production about the last man on
Earth, replete with flesh-headed
mutants and tape measure radios.
Following the failure of their
sci-fi opus, the brothers flee home
for some beer. In fact, most of
what Bob and Doug do in this
movie involves beer in one way or
another. They may well do tor
brew what Cheech and Chong did
for pot.
The McKenzies' quest for lager
eventually leads them to the
Elsinore Brewery, where they end
up with jobs. Their father (voice
skillfully provided by Mel Blanc)
is so ecstatic that he calls all the
neighbors.
REVIEW
But something
Elsinore. The
mysteriously killed,
takes over the
is rotten at
owner is
His daughter
brewery but
discovers strange events going on.
Who is trying to wrest control of
the fact �ry from her? Why is her
name o 1 the high score chart of
"Galactic Border Patrol a video
game she's never played? And
what rcallv happened to hei
father?
The answers lie within your
typical world domination plot.
Brewmeister Smith (Max Von
Sydow) has been conducting ex
periments involving both Elsinore
Brewery and the local sanitarium.
The plot is so fiendish and so
dastardly that it seems no or-
dinary mortal can stop it.
Of course. Bob and Doug are
no ordinary mortals. Not by a
long shot.
This film does have some bad
aspects, particularly in plot. I
wasn't always sure what was go-
ing on at some points, especiallv
with Brewmeister Smith's plans.
The viewer may walk away
wondering what a lot of things
meant or even why they were in
the film in the first place. But the
plot problems only come up when
Bob and Doug aren't involved.
When the Canadian brothers
are on the screen, though, the Film
works. Moranis and Thomas take
two characters that got Five
minutes of air time on each
episode of SCTV and turn them
into something more. Strange
Brew succeeds because Bob and
Doug are eminently likeable. They
may be buffoons, they may be
strange, but you care about them.
It's also refreshing to see a film
about a couple of regular guys.
They don't care about nuclear
disarmament or the economy.
They may be bumbling fools, but
they're happy bumbling fools. In
a summer of films with deep
meanings, the only message here
is that it's all right to drink beer
and have some laughs. This is
true escape.
If you were a fan of SCTV, you
should like this film. If you're a
Canadian, you should like this
film. But if you're a big beer
drinker, you should love this film.
As far as I'm concerned. Strange
Brew is the summer's third-be-
comedy (behind Trading Places
and Vacation). Just about all the
best comedy is now coming from
Saturday Sight Live and SCTl
alumni.
Strange Brew won't win any
prizes for deep philosophical
ideas, but it's fun. Children will
enjoy Hosehead the Dog. Good
triumphs over evil, and the good
guys don't do anything too moral-
ly reprehensible, so yes, your kid
brother can tag along unless
you don't want him to.
The Plaza probably won't take
too kindly to you if you bring
along your own six-pack of
Moosehead or Molson (however
good it might taste with a tub of
buttered popcorn.) But you can
fly your Canadian colors at
Strange Brew: Just wear your tu-
que. But be ready to squish it
down over your ears if the
hosehead behind you complains
he can't see. Tell 'em to take off
)

I
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I
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I
?
I

I
a ht,
I em
and Pr
lion
tnhu
this
m
Oreer vine
Now Be
Most de-
true qua
dett v.
PIZZA
all tha
W
pizzasi
No S
give FREE
our larx
puzas. TR
CALL 758 6266 Gr

I
I
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I
$1 0
Giant
������ 9lark . yO VF-fl nL
Grand Pri2 l i is liMiuim tils Tllll)KlU 1 MMl III w� lull's
B






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6. 1983
S,
��
n:
nd
cd States) are
to juju music,
r ted hv chant-
. and talking
um is struck
the free hand
ikes the face of
full range of
lumv were once
ition by the
Nigeria They
" to today's
pging, which is
in a French-
man dialect,
:ordings of old
Icm the Georgia
and; it is
contemporary
rhis is a good
.ord. I have a
lat King Sunny
need Brian
g Heads, and I
hat anyone in-
tion new music
next couple of
-ie Synchro
ffht
n fire
Tonight on
the second
te
ier
personas and
olack Moor in
15th centurv
Y.ard III. The
e star, Olivier
credits with
Buckingham)
(Lady Anne,
Is fully courts
ner husband).
uted on stage
e in an all-boy
t Taming of
Shakespeare
Stratford-on-
diverse roles
reer. Ranging
which he won
the film also
other awards,
i) to Nathan
and Dolls,
garnered him
-ard nomina-
award for his
:tor, Henry V,
;d as well. In
leived another
he full body of
fetime of con-
of film
ible feature
hvier's special
is free for
and activity
9
ler's third-best
rrading Places
it about all the
coming from
he and SCTV
on't win any
philosophical
Children will
le Dog. Good
, and the good
ling too moral-
yes, your kid
long unless
to.
tbly won't take
if you bring
six-pack of
lson (however
with a tub of
But you can
in colors at
wear your tu-
y to squish it
ears if the
you complains
rm to take off.
I
i
i
Kfyy The Wall Stixfcos
I
I
I
Got The Blues, Mama
Five of Greenville's finest blues and jazz bands will be featured
at 6:00 this Saturday night, Sept. 10, when WVSP (90.0 FM) airs
a benefit concert played early this summer at the Attic. Music
from Big Boy Henry (above), the Rutabaga Brothers and ihe
lemon Sisters, Lightning Wells with the Sting Rays, Jazz Plus,
and Proteus will highlight the three-hour broadcast.
W YSP i" oiees Serving People) brings music and vital informa-
tion to rural counties of North Carolina and Virginia. Programs
range from information on food stamp laws to the station's
Prison and Justice Forum. Funding comes from listener con-
tributions, grants and benefits such as the one to be broadcast
this weekend.
U
Pizza JLtut!
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
Hot New Rhythms Mix
Urban Funk, Calypso
Continued from Page 6
record released by Roily Gray and
Sunfire since their move to Chapel
Hill from Boston in the late '70s.
This is another North Carolina
recording project, and it's a good
one. The album was recorded at
Steve Gronbeck's studio in
Chapel Hill, and the sound quali-
ty is great.
Four of the five members of
Roily Gray and Sunfire grew up in
Trinidad in the West Indies, so
their roots are well-grounded in
calypso. But the music on Play
With Us Tonight is a combination
of soul and calypso called Soca.
Soca uses West Indian melodies
played on steel drums, guitar and
keyboards driven along by an
American urban-funk bass line.
Soca flows and ebbs with the emo-
tions of the musicians and their
audiences, incorporating many of
the free-form aspects of street
jazz.
Roily Gray and Sunfire are a
club band � they know how to
get a party going, and they can
make people dance up a sweat.
This LP makes a fine testimonial
to their ability to play happy,
upbeat music.
The production is very good;
hats off to Steve Gronbeck of
TGS Studios in Chapel Hill. Lise
Uyanik and Shannon Schroeder
provide some fine background
singing, and horn arrangements
(supervised by Mike Evans and
Roily Gray) are equally fine.
Bassist Joel Keel is probably the
strongest musical influence in the
band. On "Fire and Brimstone
the first cut on the album, his bass
moves the entire song along, while
the the remaining instruments
provide the off-beat rhythm.
My favorite song on Play With
Us Tonight is "Boston Jump a
song of celebration with an ir-
resistible melody. Other recom-
mended favorites include the title
track and "All the Tea in China
a good love song.
Although Play With Us
Tonight appears to be primarily a
party record, Gray's use of clich-
ed expressions throughout his
lyrics could seriously handicap his
band from gaining a national au-
dience. There isn't anything in the
lyrics that will make the listener
come back for more.
Roily Gray and Sunfire used to
play Greenville until a couple of
years ago. I can tell that they have
done some fine tightening of their
act since then. With luck, they'll
be back in town sometime soon to
provide some soca dance music
for our needy souls.
Reviewer Mike Hamer plays
bass and sings lead and harmony
vocals with the Rutabaga Brothers
and the Lemmon Sisters. Albums
courtesy of the Record Bar.
I
he QreenLeaf
Beat State!
(Frt. Sept. 9)
Presents
Beat State!
( Fri. Sept. 9)
f
I
I
I
I
I
L.

$1 off any Large or
Giant 3 topping
The Beat State Party'
with Billy Scott and The Georgia Prophets
the 1982 Beach Music Entertainer
of the year.
Free Draft till 10:00
Ladies � price
Admission $3.00
Come join the Greenleaf in
the 1983 ' Beat State Party '
Buffet and Dinner Available
And coming in September:
John Clayton Thomas and Blood, Sweat, and Tears
Pure Prarie League R,ta Coolidge
The Greenleaf
'Home of the Big Name Entertainment'
FOR INFORMATION CALL 757-3107
The CrecnLeaf, 1104 N Memorial Dr.
Aitos from (He Airport)
Greenville. North Carolina
Parker presents 2500 chances
your father never had.
Enter the Parker Topof-the-
Qass Sweepstakes and you could
win something that can give you a
real advantage in life.
Your ownTexas Instruments
home computer.
While youre at it. pick up
something better to write with,
too. A Parker Jotter ball pen
Its microscopically-textured
ball gnps the paper to help prevent
messy olobbing and skipping.
And it writes up to rive times
longer than most ball pens.
Look for sweepstakes entry
forms and details at your college
bookstore. But do it soon With
over 500 computers to wia this is
one sweepstakes worth entering.
While you still have the chance.
t PARKER
:
r. V.lwKn pr. �ruhtt J ik-ri�Ki riaiu J i� LiT (Km 0�Ttv� 15. N6 NfHTTTL
11



.
,
.


� i
512 E. Nth St.
(2 Blocks W. of Boy's Dorms)
Come talk
to Sammy
about a meal plan.
We Specialize In Home Cooked Food
-All You Can Eat Vegetables
on Large Plate $3.85 tax
(1 meat, 3 veg bread and tea)

.
11
Daily Specials
Open
S. . 99 plus tax and drink
(1 meat, 2 veg. and bread)
� 11:00 to8:00



served I1-2
7 days
a week

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8
THt EAST AR()IIN1n
SI I'UMHI Ro. SK
The Fraternity Experience
Fraternity life offers the experience of a com-
bination of different stages. It involves rushing,
pledging, being a brother, and finally, being an
alumnus after graduation from college.
What is Rush?
The first and foremost stage is that of the frater-
nity rush. As a student at ECU, rush is very im-
portant, because joining a fraternity depends on
this stage. Each fraternity at ECU is different.
Each stresses different qualities which may or may
not appeal to you. Therefore, deciding which
fraternity you would like to join is an important
decision to make.
Fraternity rush at East Carolina is informal and
open. An individual has the freedom to look at all
of the houses during this period. There are three
days that all houses arc open for rush. During that
time, you will want to visit each house at least
once. Men are encouraged to participate fully in
these three days, to meet as many of the members
as posMble. AMer these three days, a man should
have a good idea of what houses interest him.
The purpoe of rush is not only to have a good
time; it also gives you a chance to meet new people
and for them to meet you. Rush is a meaningful
experience that can lead to long-lasting college
friendships.
Whai is Pledging?
Pledging consists of an educational process that
familiarizes you with your individual fraternity's
history. This period will last from eight to 10
weeks. Like rush, this will be a period of time for
you to make a final decision on whether fraternity
life is right for you. You will have the chance to
participate in chapter functions. The activities of
pledges varies from house to house but is
guaranteed to be a most enjoyable time.
What is it like
to be a Brother0
As d brother, you will do most ot the
same
things that were done during your pledgeship: ser-
vice to East Carolina and the surrounding com-
munity is a top priority of all fraternities. Also,
social calendars must be planned at least a
semester in advance to allow the brothers to get all
their studying done beforehand. Participating in
serenades, dances and sorority mixers provides
many opportunities for making new friends and
for taking a break from school during the
semester.
The allumni and intramural programs are also
important parts of the fraternity. An active alum-
ni program keeps graduates involved in the
chapter. Intramurals helps to bring out that com-
petitive spirit which lies deep within us all.
Another experience in fraternity life that can help
you to become a better person is the respon-
sibilities and leadership capabilities that are learn-
ed by being an officer.
Most important of all is the feeling of
brotherhood, of knowing that there are always
several around whom you can depend on in time
of need or simply have a good time with.
What is it like
to be an Alumnus?
Upon graduation, as an alumnus, one of your
first benefits from having been in a fraternity will
be your use of job-finding opportunities, which
every fraternity has. Applying the leadership
qualities learned as a member of a fraternity is
always a plus when looking for a job. Also, as an
alumnus, you will always be welcome to return to
your fraternity house at ECU to reminisce about
your college days to the new undergraduate
brothers.
Of course, if you would like to be even more ac-
tive, then you may wish to join your chapter's
alumni association. This organization will keep
you in touch with your fraternity as well as with
vour school.
Bobby Pierce, IFC president, addresses the Interfraternity
Council
38
Jitter Jrrati mil" Council
TheU Chi Colony
kappa Alpha
Kappa Sigma
Beta Theta Pi
- 5$:
.
Delta Sigma Phi
Sigma Nu
I'm;iM
Sigma Phi Epsiion
greek
alphabets
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LIPSILON
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PHI
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Active - An initiated member of a fraternity, who is still active at
the college
Bidding - Inviting a rushee to join a fraternity
Chapter - The local unit of a national fraternity
Fraternity - A Greek-letter organization based on brotherhood
and honor
Creek - Sorority or fraternity members
Hazing - Unethical initiation practices frowned upon by Creek-
letter societies
Honorary - A fraternity which bases its membership on scholarship,
achievements, and other prerequisites
Housemother - The chaperone or house director who lives in the
fraternity house
Independents - Student who are not members of social fraterni-
ties
Initiation - Ritualistic ceremony by which pledges are made active
members
interfraternity Council (IFC) - College organization of men's
fraternities
Pinning - The act of bestowing a fraternity pin of a man upon the
giri of his choice
Pledge - A man who has accepted the bid of a fraternity and who
hat taken the first step toward full membership
Preferential bidding - A system used during the last days of rush
by fraternities to indicate their choices
Professional fraternities - Specialized fraternities which confine
its membership to a special field of professional or vocational
education. One may be a member of both a professional and
a social college fraternity
Sorority - A Creek-letter sisterhood, also called a fraternity
OMEGA
1
J

Lambda Chi Alpha
Sigma Tau Gamma
the
Fraternity
experience
EC
Septa

-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 6, 1983
�a
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itina t( � .
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. . . -
lm put

IFC Executive Officers
Back: Lee Hardee (Admin. VP), Bobby Pierce (Pres.),
Robert Harris (Exec. Asst.) Front: David Brannan (Treas.),
Steve Chase (Exec. VP), Sam Barwick (Sec.) (Not pictured:
John Greer, Exec. Asst.)
- �-
Zeta Beta Tau
It
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� .TS�
rkia Theta Pi
Pi Kappa Phi
tmWlJfT xy��
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Tau Kappa Epsilon
Signs Tau Gamma
Alpha Sigma Phi
experience
ECU Rush
September 6-8
Fraternities At ECU
Fiction
Fact
Fiction:
I don't care anything about fraternities; all they
do is drink and party.
Fiction:
I can't join a fraternity because I'm not rich. All
fraternity brother are rich.
Fiction:
I don't want to join a fraternity because they all
dress and act the same. I want to be myself.
Fiction:
If 1 do join a fraternity, I'll do bad in school,
maybe even flunk out. Fraternity brothers' grades
are always terrible, and they never study.
Fiction:
I'm scared to rush a fraternity, because if I go to
one, I'll have to join.
Fiction:
If I do join a fraternity, I'll lose all my old
friends and won't be able to get involved in other
campus activities.
Fact:
Contrary to popular belief, drinking is not a
prerequisite to joining a fraternity. The consump-
tion of alcohol is a decision that is left up to the in-
dividual. Partying is only one aspect of fraternity
life. The total fraternity experience involves par-
ticipation in scholarship, service, athletic activities
and most importantly, brotherhood.
Fact:
A common misconception that often prevents
college men from joining a fraternity is that the
"fraternity experience" is too expensive.
However, on the average, fraternity life will pro-
bably save you money. The greatest advantage ap-
pears in room rent. For the 1983-84 school year,
dorm rent is listed at $430 per semester, while the
average room rent in a fraternity house is $340 per
semester. Also, as a fraternity member, most of
your social activities will be paid through your
dues. Individual social expenses can add up to
much more. Although fraternities are reputed to
be expensive, a closer look can show a more effi-
cient and meaningful use of your money.
Fact:
While fraternity members do live together,
share common goals and interests and participate
in many of the same activities, no one ever
demands that you dress one way, nor that you act
in a certain manner. Most fraternities pride
themselves on diversity. Just as there are dozens of
types of students at ECU, the same applies to
members of each fraternity.
Fact:
Not true, a top priority of most fraternities on
campus is scholastic achievement. National
studies show that members of fraternities are more
likely to graduate than non-members. This is pro-
moted at ECU through the assistance and en-
couragement of fellow brothers. Perhaps the
greatest academic advantage the fraternity system
has to offer are the individual houses themselves.
Being in a fraternity brings one into contact with
as wide variety of people who possess a wide range
of knowledge in different academic areas.
Fact:
A fraternity does not consider a visit during
rush to a house a commitment to join. As a matter
of fact, you are encouraged to rush more than one
fraternity to see which one, if any, is suited to you.
The more contact one makes with a fraternity is to
the advantage of everyone concerned.
Fact:
As was stated before, fraternities don't seek to
take over and control your life; they are merely a
group of men bonded together in brotherhood by
common goals and ideals. Fraternities are places
to make new friends, not to forget the old ones
you have. You are also encouraged to get involved
in campus activities. Of all the factors in a univer-
sity environment, fraternities offer the greatest
opportunity for leadership development. In fact,
the continued successful and efficient operation of
a fraternity demands that leadership be developed.
Phi Kappa Tau
1. Alpha Sigma Phi
2. Beta Theta Pi
3. Delta Sigma Phi
4. Kappa Alpha
5. Kappa Sigma
6. Lambda Chi Alpha
7. Phi Kappa Tau
8. Pi Kappa Phi
9. Sigma Nu
10. Sigma Phi Epsilon
11. Sigma Tau Gamma
12. Tau Kappa Epsilon
13. Zeta Beta Tau
14. Theta Chi Colony
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1 1983
Divorce, Booze And Growing Old:
Liz And Carol Explore Life After 40
NEW YORK (UPI)
� Elizabeth Taylor
and Carol Burnett
team up for the first
time in Home Box Of-
fice's Between
Friends, a rich drama
about two divorcees
in their 40's whose
chance meeting grows
into a friendship that
gives each new
strength.
Miss Taylor plays
Deborah Shapiro, a
soft but well-read
romantic who turns to
the bottle and grabs at
the first thing she
finds floating � a
crude, pudgy and
balding-but-well-
heeled businessman
� to assuage her fear
of being alone.
Miss Burnett plays
Mary Catherine
Castelli, a practical
businesswoman who
lives with her teen-age
daughter and covers
her loss of a partner
by bed-hopping with
married men.
The two women
seem to be unlikely
candidates for a
friendship � especial-
ly at their first
meeting when
Deborah runs her car
into Mary Catherine's
outside the latter's
real estate office.
But when Mary-
Catherine gets
snowed-in at
Deborah's mansion,
which she is trying to
sell, the two share a
bottle of wine and
begin to talk about
the dreams of their
youth and the reality
of growing old �
maybe alone.
The made-for-TV
movie, which debuts
Sept. 12, is based on
Shelley List's book
obody Makes Me
Cry.
Miss Taylor does a
rousing job with
Deborah's drunken
outbursts and Miss
Burnett is excellent as
the cool-headed
friend who takes her
to task for them.
If Between Friends
has any weakness, it
might be that it is too
much a woman's
story to be enjoyed by
men.
There is for in-
stance Deborah's
drunkenly solemn an-
nouncement that she
has discovered that
one of her pubic hairs
is grey.
Miss Burnett said
she did not know how
men would react to
the movie.
"I'm the last one to
ask about that she
said in a telephone in-
terview. "I'm the one
who said no one
would like Four
Seasons except
middle-age couples
and no one was more
surprised than me
when it turned out
teenagers like it
She said a friend,
who had been running
a cassette of the movie
in her house, told her
that some carpenters
who were working
there started watching
it. "At one scene they
got real interested and
one of them said,
'God, I didn't know
women talked like
that to each other
Miss Burnett said
the script by Miss List
and Jonathan Estrin
was written with
herself and Miss
Taylor in mind. "I
liked it and I thought
'gee, terrific, if
Elizabeth is doing it I
will too
She was quick to
point out, however,
that the only
similarities between
herself and her
character was "I'm
separated (from her
husband). That's
where it begins and
ends. I'm not like
Mary Catherine
While making the
movie for six weeks in
Toronto, the two ac-
tresses who had never
worked together
became good friends,
Miss Burnett said.
"I don't know what
there was, but I spent
six weeks laughing. I
felt like I was 11 years
old. She is a very fun-
ny person Miss
Burnett said of Miss
Taylor.
"We were like two
girls in Sunday
school. Sometimes
(director) Lou (An-
tonio) would have to
say to us, 'Now folks,
we have to be
serious
Between shooting,
the two actresses
would sit down
together, "chat and
unload Miss
Burnett said.
"Lord, we'd watch
soap operas
together she said.
"I've watched All My
Children for ages and
Liz likes One Life To
Live and General
Hospital. I'd fill her
in on the background
and she'd fill me in so
we'd know what was
going on
Bored with the beach?
Played out at the arcade?
Join the fun at
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The comical horny hangups of the
Porky's can play Sept. S, 9 and 10
at Headrtx Theatre. Shows are at 7
and 9 p.m.
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THE CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE WELCOMES ALL
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ai the CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
FREE

I .
I
Sunday, Sept. 11
HERE'S HOW
Clip coupon below for $5.00 off the regular $10.00
Carolina Opry House Membership Fee.
Present this coupon at the Carolina Opry House
before Sept. 11,1983 and purchase your membership
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X
OtP
By KEN BOLTON
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -
What a show it was!
In all, there were 1,318 yards
worth of total yardage, 93 points
a kickoff returned for a
touchdown, a punt returned all
the way and two on-side kicks.
Not to mention a flip perform-
ed in the end zone and a penalty
for spinning the football on its
end.
The show took place last Satur-
day night in Tallahassee and it
wai called the East Carolina-
Florida State extravaganza � an
exhibition that will be
remembered for a long time.
The fact that FSU won 47-46 is
only the beginning of the story
Henry Williams, a transfer stu-
dent from Northwest Junior Col-
lege in Mississippi, left the 46,261
fans in shock with a 56-yard punt
return for a TD and a 99-yard
return of the second-half kickoff.
Offensive guard Terry Long takes
quarterback Kevin Ingram looks do
yards rushing and 138 yards passing.
Buc Sho
Although ECU football coach
Ed Emory didn't gain an upset
Saturday night at Florida State,
he did earn respect, credibility
and, hopefully, some fan loyalty.
After a, 47-46, offensive war
with the Seminoles, the Pirates
returned to Kinston airport with a
cheering crowd waiting for them.
"The fans had so much en-
thusiasm Emory' said. "Coming
off that plane and seeing those
people was probably the thing
that has touched me more per-
sonally than anything since I've
been at ECU.
"It made you feel like
somebody did appreciate vour ef-
fort
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
At the same time, however,
Emory was trying to recover from
one of the "most lowest points in
my life he said. "We thought
we were going down and beat one
of the top-ranked teams in the
country and get what we wanted
for this program
Emory described the game as
the "greatest spectator game I've
ever seen in college football but
added that when the record goes
down, it will be a loss that the
Pirates should have won.
"We let the team keep the ball
too much he said. "They had
the ball almost 37 minutes to
ECU's 23 minutes, but we had 75
plays to their 58 plays he con-
tinued.
"We had almot seven yards
per carry on offense, and they
(FSU) carried almost six yards. So
we were much more productive on
offense, and we scored much
more than they did

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i
11
ol
ol
I Hfc EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 6, 1983 Page U
ot Pirates Astonish Nation At FSU
By KEN BOLTON
A-tot�l Spar Erfhor
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -
Vhat a show it was!
In all, there were 1,318 yards
rorth of total yardage, 93 points,
kickoff returned for a
mchdown, a punt returned all
le way and two on-side kicks.
Not to mention a flip perform-
ed in the end zone and a penalty
far spinning the football on its
kid.
The show took place last Satur-
day night in Tallahassee and it
was called the East Carolina-
Florida State extravaganza � an
exhibition that will be
remembered for a long time.
The fact that FSU won 47-46 is
Only the beginning of the story.
Henry Williams, a transfer stu-
dent from Northwest Junior Col-
lege in Mississippi, left the 46,261
fans in shock with a 56-yard punt
return for a TD and a 99-yard
return of the second-half kickoff.
"it just broke wide open said
Williams, whose kickoff return
was simply a 99-yard dash down
the left sideline. "It's something
we practiced on all week
The second-quarter punt return
was the first of his career for
Williams, who runs the 40 in 4.23
seconds.
With all of those big plays, it
was the kind of game that kept
everyone in their seat, in fear of
missing some more of the
fireworks.
By the way, there was some ex-
cellent defensive play by both
teams � but the night belonged to
the "O
FSU quarterback Kelly I r�wrey
ran the Seminole pro-style offense
to virtual perfection, completing
28 of 35 passes for 322 yards and
three touchdowns. Lowrey com-
bined with tailback Greg Allen
(154 yards rushing and three TDs)
to power the Seminoles.
But it was the Pirates who made
the college football world take
notice.
The game was seen by many
people to be a warmup for Florida
State in preparation for their
meeting next weekend with LSU.
After all, Florida State was
ranked No. 7 nationally in both
the AP and UPI polls. The
Seminoles had outscored ECU
119 to 24 in their previous two
meetings. Most "experts" had the
Pirates anywhere from a 20 to
30-point underdog.
But ECU quarterback Kevin In-
gram had plans of his own. The
senior QB from Philadelphia
threw for 138 yards and ran for
another 124.
"I thought Kevin Ingram
played the best game I've had a
quarterback play since I've been
at ECU commented Pirate head
coach Ed Emory.
But even though the Pirates
proved that they could compete
with one of the best programs in
the country, Emory wasn't
satisfied.
"We didn't come down here for
a moral victory Emory stated.
"We didn't come down here to do
anything but win. We're disap-
pointed
While Emory was frustrated,
FSU head coach Bobby Bowden
was relieved. "Boy am I glad that
one's out of the way Bowden
said after the three-hour and
10-minute struggle.
"I was impressed with their
(ECU's) execution and their kick-
ing game was better than ours
he added.
So effective was the Pirates' ex-
ecution that ECU didn't have to
punt the entire game. Williams'
TD return was the only punt of
the contest.
Only two fourth-quarter tur-
novers kept ECU from pulling off
the upset.
With Florida State trailing
46-41 but threatening deep in
5TAf LEAKY - ECU Wwto u
Offensive guard Terry Long takes care of two offensive linemen while game of any quarterback that he's been associated with during his four
quarterback Kevin Ingram looks down field. Ingram finished with 124 years at ECU. Long also lived up to all the pre-season hvpe that has sur-
yards rustling and 138 yards passing. Emory said Ingram played the best rounded him.
Buc Showing Brings Back Fan Loyalty
Although ECU football coach
Ed Emory didn't gain an upset
Saturday night at Florida State,
he did earn respect, credibility
and, hopefully, some fan loyalty.
After a, 47-46, offensive war
with the Seminoles, the Pirates
returned to Kinston airport with a
cheering crowd waiting for them.
"The fans had so much en-
thusiasm Emory said. "Coming
off that plane and seeing those
people was probably the thing
that has touched me more per-
sonally than anything since I've
been at ECU.
"It made you feel like
somebody did appreciate your ef-
fort
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
At the same time, however,
Emory was trying to recover from
one of the "most lowest points in
my life he said. "We thought
we were going down and beat one
of the top-ranked teams in the
country and get what we wanted
for this program
Emory described the game as
the "greatest spectator game I've
ever seen in college football but
added that when the record goes
down, it will be a loss that the
Pirates should have won.
"We let the team keep the ball
too much he said. "They had
the ball almost 37 minutes to
ECU's 23 minutes, but we had 75
plays to their 58 plays he con-
tinued.
"We had almost seven yards
per carry on offense, and they
(FSU) carried almost six yards. So
we were much more productive on
offense, and we scored much
more than they did
Emory praised the offensive
line for protecting senior quarter-
back Kevin Ingram. But the head
coach will be concentrating on
placekicker Jeff Heath's protec-
tion for the games which lie
ahead.
The NCAA record-holder had a
field-goal kick and an extra point
blocked by FSU. "We should
have had four points Emory
said. "There's no excuse in col-
lege football for a blocked extra
point or blocked field goals
The threat of Heath changed
the Seminoles game plan even up
until the last minute of play. FSU
went for an extra two points just
in case Heath should come back
with another 51-yard field goal.
According to Emory, Heath not
only changed the Seminoles' tac-
tics but the Pirates as well.
"It changed my own strategy
he said. "Last night, two or three
times, the coaches felt like we
should go on with a fourth down,
but you've got to take those
points when they're there
Despite the Pirates' incredible
offensive game, Emory wasn't too
thrilled about the team as a whole,
In short, defensive play could
have been better. "We were
disappointed with the team's lack
of intensity and enthusiasm he
said. "They (FSU) just kept com-
ing at you and, sometimes, you
get back on your heels, and you
never have time to get on your
toes and play the inspired defen-
sive football it takes to win
But let's give credit where
credit's due. The Bucs did stop the
big play with help from corner-
backs Rally Caparas and Calvin
Adams. Both players broke up
passes thrown in the endzone.
"We did stop the big plays
Emory said. "The longest play
they had all night was 23 yards.
We'd bend at times, but we didn't
break
One player that did break the
Seminoles' defense was Junior
College transfer Henry Williams.
The flanker scored on two kickoff
returns. After a 56-yard run and a
forward flip in the endzone,
Williams followed with a 98-yard
touchdown run. A sprint that
even left a 4.23 (40-yard dash
time) athlete gasping for air.
"Henry Williams is probably
one of the Finest athletes on this
campus and in the country
Emory said. Williams gained a
reputation for demonstrating his
gymnastic ability after scoring a
touchdown at Mississippi's Nor-
thwest Junior College.
Unfortunately, the 5-8,
160-pound speedster might have
to restrain sometimes, Emory
said. "Officials don't like that
he said. "They told us a week ago
that they wouldn't call anything
on that, but I told him not to do it
the last time Williams didn't do
it, but Norwood Vann then spinn-
ed the ball. The officials followed
with a 15-yard penalty.
Other than a few hurting calls,
the game went just as the Bucs
had hoped, Emory said. Except
for the outcome, that is.
"It came down just like we
rehearsed it for a year he said.
"We thought we wanted the foot-
ball with less than four minutes to
go. We wanted the game to be
close.
"When the score was 47-41,
they couldn't stop us. When
Kevin took the ball from the 38 to
the 32 yard line, I knew we were
doing it too quick.
"When they went ahead, 47-46,
1 knew we were going to win that
football game But then Ingram
fumbled the ball on a ques-
tionable call by officials, and
Emory was furious. The coach
knew the Bucs could have had a
great chance with Heath. "If the
offense could get the football to
the 40-yard line, we'd kick it and
win the ballgame. We believed
that
Coach Emory and the Pirates
weren't the only ones who believ-
ed that. For the first time in years,
this campus town was again reviv-
ed with the intense school spirit it
has so desperately lacked.
Last season, Division-I oppo-
nent Missouri,(also on this year's
schedule) printed memorabilia
with the phrase, "Where in the
hell is East Carolina?" Well,
Tigers, this year we think you and
everybody else will know.
Pirates On TV
ECU's annual grudge match
with N.C. State will be televised
nationally this weekend on
WTBS-TV, it was announced
Sunday.
Kickoff time has been switch-
ed to 8:12 p.m. to facilitate the
broadcast, which will cover the
50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico
and the Virgin Islands.
An additional 500 tickets to
this weekend's game in Raleigh
will go on sale Tuesday at 8:00
a.m. at the Athletic Ticket Of-
fice in Minges Coliseum.
The tickets are for the "hill"
in the end zone and are for $12
apiece. All reserved seats for the
game have been sold.
ECU territory, linebacker P.J.
Jordan broke through and stop-
ped Allen on a crucial fourth-and-
one.
So the Pirates took over with 12
minutes left in the game, needing
to sustain a drive. Another
touchdown could have put the
game out of reach.
But FSU defensive back Eric
Riley intercepted a deflected pass
at the ECU 21 � the first tur-
nover of the game for the Pirates.
It only took the Seminoles four
plays to score, with Lowrey
throwing a five-yard scoring strike
to Tom Wheeler to make the score
47-46 after the two-point conver-
sion was unsuccessful.
The Pirates received the kickoff
with a little over four minutes left
on their own 23-yard line. After
two short runs, Ingram broke
loose on an option-right and ran
all the way down to the the
Florida State 32.
But Ingram was hit from
behind and the ball squirted into
the hands of FSU's Riley. The
Seminoles then proceeded to run
out the remaining 3:39 and
escaped with the victory.
"Florida State did a great job
Emory said after the game. "I
thought they were the No. 1 of-
fensive team in the country before
the game and I still think that.
"But I never had a question in
my mind that we wouldn't win
when we had the ball with four
minutes left he said. "I didn't
think they could stop us
ECU's next opponent is N.C.
State, and new Wolfpack coach
Tom Reed was in the pressbox
scouting the Pirates.
It must have been a somewhat
scarey experience for the
Wolfpack coaching staff as the
Pirate offensive line continually
opened gaping holes for Ingram
and running backs Earnest Byner
and Tony Baker.
The Pirates, who finished 13th
in the nation in rushing offense
last season, churned out 251 yards
on the ground. Ingram led the
way with 124 yards, followed bv
Baker (55 yds.), Byner (50) and
Jimmy Walden (26).
It was evident from the very
beginning that this game was go-
ing to be dominated by the respec-
tive offensive squads.
FSU took the opening kickoff
and marched the ball to the ECU
38 on seven straight runs. But
fullback Cedric Jones fumbled the
next handoff and Prate tackle
Hal Stephens pounced on it.
ECU then took over and took
the ball to the Florida State
34-yard line. Jeff Heath then
booted a 51-yard field goal to give
the Pirates a 3-0 lead.
Little did the fans know about
what was upcoming in the nexT
two and one-haif hours. A total of
four touchdowns would be scored
before the end of the first quarter.
After the Heath field goal.
Lowrey started taking control. He
completed five of six passes in a
79-yard drive that ended with
.Allen's two-yard TD run.
The 'Noles kicked off from the
ECU 45 due to a penalty and tried
an on-side kick that Brian Mc-
Crary recovered on the 35.
On third-and-12, Low rev com-
pleted a 23-yard pass to Tonv
Johnson for a first down on the
Pirate 14-yard line. On fourth-
and-one, Lowrey hit Tom
Wheeler in the end zone for the
touchdown.
The PAT snap was hobbled,
and the Seminoles clung to a 13-3
lead � leaving many people to
wonder if it wa going to be a
repeat of last year's 56-17 trounc-
ing.
But the Pirates bounced right
back as Ingram hit tight end Nor-
wood Vann in the deep seam of
the FSU defense for a 35-yard
touchdown.
See INTENSE. Page 12
Emory: Everything But
Calls Were First Class '
Following ECU's startling
performance against Florida
State Saturday night, Pirate
head coach Ed Emory was
visibly upset at the officiating.
"First thing I want to say is
that it's an embarrassment to the
state of Florida, an embarrass-
ment to Tallahassee and an em-
barrassment to Florida State for
three officials to take the game
away from you he stated to
the press in the locker room.
"They had three officials out
there who made about seven
calls that were unbelievable he
added. "On our last play, when
Ingram fumbled, I thought the
guy was going to get a spearing
call
Other instances in which
Emory alluded to included an
apparent touchdown that Nor-
wood Vann had taken awav
from him because the official
ruled that he had dropped the
ball. Another official standing in
the end zone had already raised
his hands to signal the
touchdown.
"Their boys (FSU's) played
their hearts out and our kids did
too Emory elaborated. "The
officials shouldn't control the
outcome of the ball game. He
should call the football game as
honest and as fair as he can cail
it. It's just a shame and I hope
that never happens at Ficklen
Stadium in Greenville. If it does,
I don't want to be a part of it
Another point in which
Emory was furious over was a
couple of times when it appeared
that an FSU receiver had trap-
ped the ball instead of catching
it.
"Everything about their
(FSU) program is first-class
Emory stated. "When we've
been treated great even, time we
come down here. Everything was
first-class, except for about three
officials out there
Even though Emory was
disappointed, he was able to
look at the situation realistically
"That's the way it goes he
said resoundingly. "We'll line
up and play again next week
"bhsiaii
UN1VERSTTY
'3 � IB Ml
$
�H
SMNOl E TERRITORY
STMUV UtfTV - ECU I
The scoreboard shows the final results, bat there was much more to
the game than the point total indicates.
' � ��Qm0wHmj "mim�





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1983
Intense Pirates Refuse to Fold
Cont'd From Page 11
The Seminoles were
charged for roughing
the passer on the TD
play, and the penalty
was marked off on the
ensuing kickoff �
setting up the herald-
ed "Bam-Bam" play.
The entire Pirate
kickoff team formed
a wedge as Heath roll-
ed the ball ten yards
and recovered it
himself at the FSU 33.
Four plays later, In-
gram scored on a
13-yard run and the
shock waves began to
radiate from the Doak
Campbell Stadium.
The first quarter end-
ed with ECU winning
17-13.
The two teams then
traded touchdowns
(Heath's PAT was
blocked) to give ECU
a 23-20 lead � setting
up Williams' spec-
tacular punt return.
FSU punter Louis
Berry lofted a high
kick to Williams at
the ECU 44, where
the 1982 junior col-
lege Ali-American
headed toward the
right sideline, picked
up some key blocks
and cut back to the
left to complete the
TD scamper.
After breaking the
end-zone barrier,
Williams performed a
forward flip that
would have made any
gymnast green with
envy.
A controversial
pass-interference call
enabled the Seminoles
to pick up 33 yards
and Jones plunged in
from the five-yard
line with 1:30 left in
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knocked away in the
end zone and the
score stood: ECU 46,
FSU 41.
The next drive was
the one in which Jor-
dan stopped Alien on
fourth down, but the
two Pirate turnovers
kept the victory out of
ECU'S grasp.
After the struggle
was over, a sweat-
drenched Emory was
complimentary of the
FSU program but was
aware of the strides
that the Pirate pro-
gram had made since
last year.
Everybody
shouldn't start ques-
tioning Florida State,
because they played a
hell of a football team
tonight Emory
stated. "We are for
real


the first half.
The initial half �
which was packed
with enough action
for a whole game �
ended with ECU
leading 30-27.
The marching band
had barely gotten off
the field before
Williams returned the
second-half kickoff
all the way back from
his one-yard line.
Although Williams
was understandably
too tired to flip this
time, Vann picked up
the ball and spun it on
the ground � draw-
ing a 15-yard penalty
for illegal participa-
tion.
Lowrey went to
work again following
the kickoff, driving
the Seminoles 61
yards on 11 plays for
the touchdown that
brought FSU to
within three, 37-34.
An Ingram-to-
Walden pass that
covered 36 yards
highlighted the next
Pirate possession, one
that finally ended
with a Heath field
goal from 21 yards
out.
On the Seminoles
next possession,
Lowrey used a good
mixture of passes and
draws to complete a
82-yard march to the
end zone. Allen went
over from the one-
yard line to give FSU
a 41-40 lead.
Seven straight runs
put the Pirates on the
goal line, where Byner
crashed through for
the touchdown.
The Pirates decided
to go for two points,
but Ingram's pass was
JOLLY'S
PAWN SHOP
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Accepting Any Items Of Value For Collateral
AH Transactions Confidential
-� ca3r
�'v ����
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STANLEY LIMY � Ku WkHo Lad
Sophomore tailback Ton Baker finished with 55 yards on 11 carries against the Seminoles.
Now Nikon makes fine
photography easier and
more convenient than ever
THE
AUTOMATIC
NIKON FE
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ITALIAN BUFFET
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GREENVILLE N.C 27834
7 52-0688
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At lolly's Pawn Shop
We Loan Top Dollars
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dise For Sale
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AM & FM Radios
Car Radio & Speakers
Hfaiers
n
Musical Insirumrnls
& I �u Mi r Han
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Larg defection Of Electron s
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Jolly's Pawn Shop
Corner of Greene St & Pactolus Huy.
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752-5759
Hours. 9-6 MonFri. � 8 5 bat
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with Garlic Bread
HUM all you can eat soup and salad �V4.rV
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I also Open Fri. and Sal.
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Your favorite beverage provided
wmmm
THE MILLER BREWING COMPANY
PRESENTS
A multi-image presentation of the marketing and advertising strategies that have catapulted
Miller Browing Company from seventh place in the beer industry to second place today This
entertaining program is free and open to the public
iti Sept. 9
10 a.m.
catioi Leo Jenkins Art
Auditorium
Presented by
Marry Ann Hadaor
Miller Brewing Co.
CO Tankard Co.
Student Chapter of America
Marketing Association
ACCL
(UP1) The
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference has good
reason to promote
itself for its qualn
quarterbacks this
season, but not just
for the three signal
callers who garnered
all the early attention.
Unheralded Wayne
Schuchts of Virginia.
Scott Stankavage of
North Carolina and
Mike Eppiey of Clem-
son distinguished
themselves on the
season't first weekend
by leading their teams
to victory.
Schuchts enjoyed
the biggest thrill, out-
duelling Duke's Ben
Bennett to lead
Virginia over Duke in
the ACC's only mtra-
league game
In other contests,
Stankavage com-
pleted his first seven
passes and 12 of his 14
attempts to pace 10th-
ranked North
Carolina past South
Carolina 24-8; Eppiey
passed for three
touc
for
Clei
Wei
44
paij
linel
intel
Schi
touc
the
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For
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the
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Member F D1C
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t .
t:0�8Kt$N
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1983
13
b Fold
�Id
one
k the
end one dnd the
score stood: ECl 46,
41
1 he next drive was
the one in vhich Jor-
dan topped Allen on
th down, but the
:�v Pirate turnovers
kepi the victoi
I Cl 's grasp
the struggle
was over, a sv
ched Emory was
complimentary of the
1 SI program but was
awa 'he strides
Pirate pro-
si nee
Fat
ia State,
because the) played a
otball team
� I 0 I v
We are for

��































n Shop
'i. � 8 s.k





w-
� �� ��� �
NY
Dla� � � ms
Ann Hadaor
Brewing Co.
ankard Co.
lapter of America
fng Association
ACC Loaded With Talented QBs
(UPI) - The
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference has good
reason to promote
itself for its quality
quarterbacks this
season, but not just
for the three signal-
callers who garnered
all the early attention.
Unheralded Wayne
Schuchts of Virginia,
Scott Stankavage of
North Carolina and
Mike Eppley of Clem-
son distinguished
themselves on the
season't first weekend
by leading their teams
to victory.
Schuchts enjoyed
the biggest thrill, out-
duelling Duke's Ben
Bennett to lead
Virginia over Duke in
the ACC's only intra-
league game.
In other contests,
Stankavage com-
pleted his first seven
passes and 12 of his 14
attempts to pace 10th-
ranked North
Carolina past South
Carolina 24-8; Eppley
passed for three
touchdowns and ran
for another to help
Clemson trample
Western Carolina
44-10; and Ap-
palachian State
linebacker Joel Carter
intercepted two Gary
Schofield passes for
touchdowns to lead
the Mountaineers to
27-25 upset of Wake
Forest.
Maryland's
Boomer Esiason, the
pre-season star with
Bennett and
Schofield, will get his
debut Saturday when
the Terrapins face
Vanderbilt. Other
contests this weekend
feature Clemson at
Boston College, Duke
at Indiana, Georgia
Tech at Alabama,
Memphis State at
North Carolina, East
Carolina at North
Carolina State, Navy
at Virginia and Wake
Forest at Virginia
Tech.
Bennett was ex-
pected to star in the
Virginia-Duke game,
but Schuchts matched
him. Schuchts tossed
touchdown passes of
80, 65 and 21 yards,
matching Bennett's
three TD tosses.
Schucht's two long
scoring strikes were to
wide receiver Quentin
Walker, who also
scored on a 58-yard
reverse.
"If we didn't get
those three plays from
Quentin, we wouldn't
have won Virginia
coach George Welsh
said later.
"On offense, we
responded when we
needed to Schuchts
said. "I loved the
chance to go up
against Ben Bennett.
He's the pre-season
All-America. I was
nervous for a week. I
hoped things would
go like that, and they
did
It was just another
workman-like perfor-
mance in North
Carolina's destruction
of South Carolina.
The Tar Heels'
defense held the
Gamecocks to just
201 yards total of-
fense while
Stankavage passed for
one Tar Heel
touchdown and ran
for another.
Tyrone Anthony
got North Carolina's
third touchdown on a
four-yard run and
Brooks Barwick kick-
ed a 22-yard field
goal.
"As usual, it was a
matter of execution
Stankavage said.
"And tonight, for this
game, we were hitting
on all 11 cylinders
The Clemson Tigers
may be out of the run-
ning for the ACC title
because of recruiting
violations, but that
didn't seem to affect
its play Saturday.
Eppley started the
rout of Western
Carolina by hitting
Ray Williams on a
nine-yard touchdown
pass and followed it
later with touchdowns
passes of four yards
to K. D. Dunn and 39
yards to Terrance
Roulhac. The junior
signal-caller also
scored on a 12-yard
run, reserve quarter-
back Tony Parete hit
paydirt on a three-
yard run and two
kickers booted three
field goals.
Pizza inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
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Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
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No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
I
I
I
I
I
L,
$1 off any Large or yL.
Giant 3 topping Pizza
I
I
I
I
I
J
t Now
theiels a new
Teller H
on campus.
Now there's a Teller U at East Carolina
University. With a machine on campus and
two others nearby, banking at Wachovia
is more convenient than ever.
New East Carolina University location:
Mendenhall Student CenterCampus
Other locations convenient to East Carolina:
Pitt PlazaHighway 264 Bypass
University802 E. 10th Street
With Teller II you can do your banking
any time of the day or night, 365 days a
year. You can make deposits, transfer
funds, make loan payments, check your
account balances, and of course, get cash.
Teller II - banking the easy way.
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
Member F.DIjC.
g
AOVERTISEO
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily av�
sale at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store ex
specifically noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED. SAT 10 AT AAP IN GREENVILLE
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
- FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND, WE WILL DOUBLE
D MANUFACTURER'S COUPONS, EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS,
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
)
Batwaan now and Sapt 10. wa will mtmm national
manufacturers osnta-orf coupons up to 50 for
doubts thatr vsJua OMar good on national manu-
facturers' cants-off coupons only (Food retailer
coupons not acceptedCustomer must purchase
coupon product In specified size Expired coupons
will not be honored. One coupon per customer per
Item No coupons accepted for free merchandise
Offer does not apply to AP or other store coupons
whether manufacturer is mentioned or not When
the value of the coupon exceeds 50 or the retail
of the Hem. this offer Is limited to the retail price
Savings are Great with A&P s
DOUBLE SAVMGS C0UP0HS!
M�C S
COUPON A
COUPON B
COUPON C
COUPON D
�� �XXC
SAVE $1.41 LB.
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
BONE
IN
U.S.D.A.
CHOICE
lb.
JUMBO
CALIFORNIA
sLfARfei
SAVE $1.50
With
Honeydews
each
only
SAVE 20 LB.
SAVE 30 LB.
RED OR WHITE
Seedless Grapes Delicious Apples
" H WHITE I -afEASTERN GOLDEN
ygc ooc
� 4 V m
jeat Gr0Ce7
Savings 2
SAVE 22'
HOT DOG OR i .
Hamburger Rolls lipton Tea Bags
yW JANE PARKER (C.
Liptun
SAVE UP TO 50
FAMILY SIZE
8ct.
I
24 I .Mill M SUe
II
Limit
Two
24 ct.
pfcg.
Limit
One
SAVE 71
SAVE 20
Charcoal BriquetsJJMnn Page Cola
A&P BRAND
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10 1b.
bag
Limit
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Limit
Two
NowSave A&P Gold Register Tapes for
great savings on quality
Stainless Steel Cookware
1Qt.
Open
Saucepan
it
With $200 Worth
A&P Gold
register tapes
18 8 Stainless Steel
with 3 layer tri-ply
bottom for better cooking
HERE'S HOW IT WORKS.
� Save your valuable A&P gold register tapes starting Sunday. August 28th
� When you have the amount of A&P gold register tapes needed, redeem them at the
A&P check stand.
� Naturally you can start saving more A&P gold register tapes for the next cookware
item you plan to select.
� And remember, all items are on sale for the duration of this program. This offer is
scheduled to end Sat Dec. 17,1983.
C
Greenville Square Shopping Center
703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N.C.
)
JL.

ffc " -


mn0ummf ��e��
i
V





14
THE EAST CAROL ON1AN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1983
Netters Look To Lloyd
By RANDY MEWS
V�ff WrtlM
Senior Co-Captain
Diane Lloyd must be
an establishing force
on this year's ECU
volleyball team in
order for the Pirates
to have success.
ECU returns only
four players from a
team that went 26-13
last year.
Lloyd, a Chapel
Hill native, plays the
setter position and ac-
cording to her coach,
Imogene Turner,
most of the offense
will revolve around
her.
"In volleyball
Turner said,
"Whoever fields the
ball over the net
passes it to the setter,
whr in turn passes it
to the hitter. In
almost every offensive
play we have, Diane
will be that setter
"Lloyd is aware she
will be involved in
most of the action but
feels comfortable in
that position. "I've
been a setter all four
years that I've played
at ECU she said,
"so it's not like I'm
doing something dif-
ferent. I'm just more
involved in the of-
fense because I've
been here for so long
and I have the most
experience
As one of the two
captains, Lloyd is
looked upon as a team
leader. Coach Turner
recognizes those
qualities in Lloyd and
expects her to be most
� -t
helpful during the
season where she can
be an on-the-court ad-
visor.
"I've been helping
some of the new
players in practice
Lloyd explained, "but
1 think it's more of a
case where the four of
us from last year are
all acting as team
leaders
When speaking of
the Pirates chances
for the upcoming
season, Lloyd is quite
optimistic. "We've
really been working
hard together as a
team and have shown
a lot of improvement
since practice
started
The only thing that
really worries me is
ur lack of height
Lloyd said. "Most of
the teams we play
have several players
over 6-0, but our
tallest player is only
5-9
Some of those
teams the Pirates will
face include North
Carolina, Virginia,
Kentucky and
Georgia, but Lloyd is
quick to add that if
the Pirates are scrap-
py and can hustle,
they will be able to
compete with any
team they play.
With such a deman-
ding schedule and a
team full of rookies,
the Pirates have been
spending a lot of time
on the practice court.
Lloyd said the Bucs
have been concen-
trating on drills,
defensive techniques
and practicing every-
day for three hours.
"We also lift weights
twice a week, which
doesn't leave us much
free time outside of
classes and studying.
When Lloyd isn't
practicing, she's
usually working as a
volunteer assistant
coach for the Rose
High School
volleyball team.
"I'm a physical
education major
Lloyd said, "and
when I graduate 1
want to be a volleyball
coach
But until Lloyd
does graduate, her
mind is occupied with
leading this year's
ECU volleyball team
to a winning season.
I AMA
PERSON1
DO NOT f3U
&W, STArV
OR MOTiUtfE
ME H Awr

-
The ECU women's v
INf, Virginia, Kent
ollebaIi team will pla
uck and Georgia.
a tough schedule this year, including matches with
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MH BJBMi ?JWsS'w'�fc;���-��
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
i
SEPTEMBER 6.1983
15
loyd
defensive techniques
and practicing every-
�ia for three hours
v e also lift weights
twice a week, which
doesn't leave us much
free time outride of
-c'v and studying.
When Lloyd isn't
i c t i c i n g, she's
all) working a a
volunteer assistant
the Rose
S c h o o 1
. un
a physical
major
lid, "and
graduate I
war h a volleyball
Llovd
tc, her
. upicd with
this vear's
ball team
oa� - season
NIOMT
CLUBS
ht fun. Try one of our
have 17 mouth water
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ANYONE INTBtESTTO o attending the
iewah tMQ hottdOy Services pleOSC COll
�Wfajvelina kotchnar ot 7S8 6265 or Dr
esk 756 S640 Tickets FREE to
students Transportation a ovoloble
Pteou colt to moke rwrvotcoi now
WANTED
ANTEO STUOfNT Sates Rap to Ml for
moJ favors glassware sportsweor
NMHh to Grik i. Dorms, dubs. Com
mission. own hours Coll
MO 323 3IQ1
LOOKING FOR MATURE mole studam to
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blocks from campus Call Kvie 758 6708
b'� 6-7 p m oriv
MAIE ROOMATE WANTED Georgetown
Apt I 3 rent and Ut 758 8640
SALE
r-CR SALE Cxntmdgt counselor going out
of business Cambridge diet drink at cost
Coll 249 0192 after 6 00 p m
FOR SALE 6 cu ft refng SI 00 Call after
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FOR SAlE one ol 510 Pioneer tumtobta I
�nth Shurt Vis type IV cartridge still hove
he. and paperwork $100 Call 249 0192
after 6
MISC.
LEGAL HASSLES? Call Howard J Cumm
ings. attorney ot Low No charge for initial
consultation tor ECU Students Coll
758 0006
LOWEST TYPING RATES on campus include I
eipenenced professiono work Proof
reading, spelling and grammatical correc-
tons 355 6748 after 5 30
SAVE ON TOYOTA service ot Bells Fork I
Garage Eiperwnced Toyota mechanic. 4
cvl tune special SI 7 00 4 cyl valve ad
lustment $200 756 3796
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These prices qood thru
Saturday, September 10,1983
10-12 Lb. Average
Sliced FREE!
$198
1 Lb.
USD Cli�ie� - Fanify Pack
Cube
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Holly Farm - Grade A TTiiifc !&�����
Mixed Fryeiim Seedless
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Grapes
$239
Pk�. of 6 - 12 Oz. Cans Reg. & Lt.
Budiveiser
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Half Gallon - 50 Off
liquid Wisk
59
4 Pltk -1 Ply
Page Toilet Tissue
49 Oz. - W Softener
99
399
1 Lb. � Mar�ariaa Quarters
Shedd's Spread
12 Oz. - Libby i
Fab Detergent!PjLuncheon Meat
389.
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14 Oi. - De Feed - C�o�fted Beef Liver & Beef
Kal Kan
KalKan
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U b AST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 6, 1983
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Pi kappa llii lrakrnit)
The Place To Go Is The PI KAPPA PHI
FRATERNITY HOUSE, Sept. 6th, 7th, 8th,
PI KAPPA PHI IS:
DEFENDING FRATERNITY DIVISION INTRAMURAL CHAMPS
FASTEST GROWING FRATERNITY ON CAMPUS
20 YEARS OF BROTHERHOOD
PARTY'S BEGIN
EVERY NIGHT
8:30 PM
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CALL FOR RIDES
AND MORE INFO
GO DOWN 10TH ST. &
TAKE A LEFT ON
EVANS ST. GO APPOX.
2 MILES TO ARLINGTON BLVD.
& TAKE A RIGHT. THEN
PROCEEED 1 MILE TO
HOOKER ROAD AND TAKE
A LEFT. THE PI KAPP
HOUSE IS ON THE
LEFT ABOUT y� MILE.
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V
Hardegr
A SAUSAGE & EGG BISCUIT, COFFEE
AND FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE $1.29
SSSSSESWgTdue Cown
�H�.?��.1lurin.?�e9u,ar breakfast menu
hours through September 14, 1983.
Hardeer
A MUSHROOM N'SWISS
BURGER, REGULAR FRIES AND
MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $1J9
SGEG COF o. COuPO SAUSAGEBISC
Harden
S�SSK�S tax due Coupon S good
0"ou?s?hrou�rhrQ9UJar breakfast me"�
nours through September 14, 1983.
' FRY MED DK MEAL DEAL MUSH
c 1963 Hardees Food Systems Inc
MUSH REG FRY MED DK MEAL DEAL MUSH
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems inc
TWO HAM BISCUITS $1.29
m combination w,th any othlr offer? �UP�n n0t g00d
Offerho�u0rc QUrl?9 rtgular brakfast menu
hours September 15 - 21, 1983.
2 HAM BiSC 2 LESS HAM i
nardecr
TWO BIG DELUXE
BURGERS $2.29
�f,er good at participating Hardees rpfanrantc du.
coupon before ordering OnecounnrmSd ease present
Please Customer mustpaVany safes taK S16' perorder
m combination with any other offer! Coupon not good
�ffeh22l!te re?U,ar breakfast menu
hours September 15 - 21, 1983.

2 DELUXE 2 LESS DELUXE
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
nardezr
AND FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE $U9
So P'ease present
Please oSSSSSSSSSfS! per order,
m combination with any other oS C�UP�n not good
0ffeh�?.?� QUringrfgu,arbrkfastmenu
hours September 22 - 28, 1983.
ci983 Hardees Fc
r:� ' :�f COUPON BACON BISC
nardegr
TWO MUSHROOM N'SWISS
BURGERS $2.29
-v
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurant ��,
pferenSs?;emoensnt9 �ne �?S2S!��fi� zir
mbSSSth otKfgrf " C�UP�n "0t
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours September 22 - 28, 1983.
2 MUSH 2 LESS MUSH
Hardezr
A SAUSAGE & EGG
BISCUIT 69
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems, inc
C1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
?n l9n Kdat part:clPatin9 Hardees restaurants Please present
coupon before ordering 5ne coupon percustomeVDemrdP?
Please Customer must pay any sales tax dueCoupon not aood
m combination with any other offers p not good
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours September 29 - October 5, 1983.
�EG REDUCED SAUSAGE BlSC
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems
nardeor
A BACON CHEESEBURGER,
REGULAR FRIES AND
MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $1.99
�r good at participating Hardees
Don before ordering Onecoupo
ise Customer must pay any sale
in combination with any other offers"
VHL9S& reSar breakfast menu
hours September 29 - October 5,1983
8 CB REG FRY MED DK MEAL DEAL B CB
C1983 Hardees Food Systems inc
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 6, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 06, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.283
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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