The East Carolinian, September 1, 1983






2e
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No jf
Thursday September 1,1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Ship's Anchor Causes International Waves
B DrNMSKlLCOYNE
Maff Writer
he past two weeks, interna-
ntion has come to ECU,
Aith a sports championship
an achievement of one of
olastic programs. Under the
hip of William Still,
r of maritime history,
Gordon Watts Jr under-
archaeologist, the
pound anchor of the Civil
battleship Monitor was
ered Monday.
l Dec 31, 1862, the Monitor,
world's first ironclad warship,
down in a storm off Cape
eras. It remained there in an
nknown grave for more than 100
rs.
The vessel foundered as it was
tig towed to Beaufort, NC,
where it was to particilpate in a
Union blockade of Confederate
poi v In March 1862, it had won
fame in its standoff duel with the
Merrimac, the premier ironclad of
the Confederacy, in history's first
battle between armored ships.
In 1973 came the news that
underwater archaeologists had
discovered the wreck in 230 feet of
water 16 miles off the cape. Public
interest appeared at once and was
stimulated from time to time by
the recovery of materials from the
vessel. An especially interesting
recovered artifact was the ship's
latern. As the Monitor took on
water that fatal night in 1862, its
crew hoisted a red light, signaling
the tow ship that the ironclad was
in distress. That was the last word
from the doomed ship. When this
small latern was brought to the
surface, the press covered the
event and ECU was in the news.
The research team was ready
for a bigger and heavier object
and Monday they got it. Despite
careful planning, glitches
developed and the event became a
movie scenario writer's dream,
with all the necessary tension and
high drama caused by technical
problems. At the last minute the
flotation bags ruptured. Down
went the partially lifted anchor,
plunging to the sea bottom. Time
pressed the researchers. Because
of the depth of the wreck and the
pioneering nature of their
recovery effort ("this is the
deepest underwater ar-
chaeological project ever under-
taken" Still said), the equipment
was hi-tech and very expensive to
use, the research ship alone
costing $8,000 per day while on
station. Finally, on August 29
came the triumph, as the heavily
encrusted anchor broke the sur-
face.
The world paid attention to the
historic moment; newspapers and
TV stations across the country
noted it, and the big-time an-
chormen of the networks all
reported the event. Still says that
the expedition is giving valuable
information to scholarly research
and a big boost to ECU and its
unique maritime program. He ad-
ded, "Ours is the only university
that combines maritime history
with an underwater research pro-
gram
The Monitor project, which
was also sponsored by the
Washington-based National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Ad-
ministration, has made possible
the eventual recovery of the
Monitor's iron gun turret and
cannons.
However, Still noted that since
the wreck is upside down, with the
hull above the turret, the attempt
to raise the turret, nicknamed the
"cheese box must be carefully
planned and executed so that
there will be no damage to the
fragile wooden hull, which is in
"horrible condition" and
"resembles Swiss cheese
Although divers made videod-
tapes deemed necessary for the
plotting of the recovery of the tur-
ret, time restrictions kept them
from collecting sediment samples
of the ocean floor, also essential
in planning the lift. However,
Watts says further tests will be
made in an expedition tentatively
set for August 1984. He estimates
that the turret will be recovered in
1987.
Watts expects the anchor to ar-
See MONITOR, Page 3
ECU Low On Black Faculty Members
By KIM RICE
staff Writer
According to statistics released
the ECU institutional research
department, in the 1982-83 school
there were 129 ad-
ministrative positions. Only one
f these positions was, and is still,
held by a black.
There are approximately 800
faculty positions: 21 are held by
blacks � about 2.5 percent. These
numbers are compared to a 10.3
percentage of black students on
the ECU campus.
'ECU governs its faculty selec-
tions by the Affirmative Action
3Ian stated Dr. Mary Ann
Rose, assistant to the chancellor.
This plan is in compliance vn'th
universities nationwide.
"We actively reach out and
Death Penalty
make an effort to recruit
minorities to our faculty and
staff Rose said.
The university has many pro-
cedures for recruitment of
minorities. Flyers are sent to black
colleges and universities, along
with advertisments. "We get the
word out to out black faculty
members in hopes that they will
notify friends who they feel are
qualified Rose said.
ECU does not hire faculty
members solely because of their
race, she added. "A person must
be qualified first and foremost.
Then, if it so happens that the
qualified person is a member of a
minority � we�t
Not only nre the overwhelming
majority of administrators at
ECU white, they are also
predominantly male. Both ad-
ministrative and faculty positions
at ECU are dominated by men
with 279 faculty positions held by-
women out of a total of 854 op-
portunities (29.5 percent.)
"There is not a structured pro-
gram in place at ECU to recruit
black faculty members said Dr.
Donald Ensley, associate pro-
fessor community health. Ensley
is one of ECU's black faculty
members .
According to Ensley, there is a
change of attitude taking place by
the federal, state and local
governments towards the Affir-
mative Action Plan. "The feeling
seems to be that there should not
be an affirmative action plan,
Ensley said. "The government is
beginning to feel that people
Murderer To Be Executed
By PATRICK O'NEILL
News Editor
Seven people have been ex-
ecuted in the United States in
almost 20 years. Tomorrow in
Mississippi, Jimmy Lee Gray
could become the eigth.National-
ly, there are 1,202 people on death
row, a record for this country.
In North Carolina, there have
been no executions since 1964, but
experts predict a new wave of
N.C. executions could begin soon.
At present, N.C. has 34 people on
death row; all are waiting for the
results of their court appeals to
determine if they will have to die
in the gas chamber of Raleigh's
Central Prison.
Although Gray's case is in
Mississippi, a Durham-based
organization called North Caroli-
nians Against the Death Penalty is
holding a vigil Thursday evening
outside the mansion of Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr. NCADP is ask-
ing people from across the state to
join their vigil. "We oppose ex-
ecutors wherever and whenever
they happen says Kristin
Paulig, a spokesperson for
NCADP. "State boundaries don't
matter, the issues are really the
same; its's always the poor
minorities who are executed
NCADP has been sponsoring
the vigils at the governor's man-
sion on the eve of any scheduled
execution anywhere in the coun-
try. Hunt is on record supporting
capital punishment.
Paulig is urging people opposed
to the death penalty to come to
Raleigh "to let Gov. Hunt know
that we don't want to see any ex-
ecutions here, and we're always
watching
Paulig claims three-quarters of
the inmates on deathrow are in the
Southern states. "Most of the
lead cases are in the South she
said. "Lead" refers to those cases
of inmates nearest to the end of
their appeals options.
She believes a "lot of work"
must be done if trends (which
show the majoiity of people sup-
porting the death penalty) are to
be changed.
Paulig noted two myths she
says are associated with the death
penalty. "One of the myths is that
executions are plainless and
quick she said.
She illustrated her point with
the case of John Evans of
Alabama. Evans was executed by
electrocution last April.
Eyewitnesses to his execution
reported it took three jolts of elec-
tricity to stop Evans' heartbeat
and that it appeared Evans was
suffering throughout the ordeal.
"The reports were detailed and
gruesome Paulig said, calling
the event "particularly
gruesome
Another myth Paulig cited is
that the death penalty works as a
deterrent to murder. "The death
penalty has no deterrent effect
Paulig said. "It does not reduce
murder rates
Paulig said studies have been
conducted which prove her point
that "violence begets violence
"When you have the state in the
business of killing people, you're
sanctioning violence she added.
According to statistics quoted
by NCDP, there are currently
1,202 people on death row nation-
wide. Blacks account for 508, or
42 percent. Whites number 623,
or 52 percent, with other
minorities accounting for the re-
mainder.
See MISSISSIPPI, Page 5
should be capable of getting a job
on their own qualifications
Ensley said the change in
climate is causing a "benign
neglect attitude " that is impac-
ting negitively on blacks.
Dr. Lilla Holsey, associate pro-
fessor of home economics, said
that ECU's percentage of black
faculty members is "very low" in
relation to the black student
population
Dr. Dennis Chestnut, associate
professor of psychology agrees
with Ensley. "It is essential that
ECU make an active and assertive
effort to recurit blacks. Chestnut
said
"There is no systematic ap-
proach to the recruitment of
blacks Ensley said, adding that
the state of North Carolina re-
quires recruitment of black facul-
ty members, as well as students, to
all 16 of the state's universities.
ECU maintains a black enroll-
ment of 10.3 percent, compared
to an 87.4 percentage of white
students.
Recruiting women to ECU's
faculty is also a difficult process,
according to Rose. Of 129 ad-
ministrative positions, only 33 are
held by women. No ad-
ministrative position is held by a
black woman.
The ony area in which women
show any noticeable gains are in
secretarial and clerical oppor-
tunities. Of 565 employed by ECU
in these areas, 545 are women.
William Still
Gordan Watts
Department Of English
Begins Writing Center
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff �rii�
This fall ECU Students who
need additional help with writing
skills may seek assistance at the
Writing Center � a program
sponsored by the ECU Depart-
ment of English.
Dr. Patrick Bizzaro, associate
professor and writing center direc-
tor, says, "The center's program
will be parallel to and in support
of the objectives of ECU's basic
English composition course
This year, English 1100 students
are required to write a placement
essay. "The placement essay writ-
ten by all freshman will help make
certain each student is receiving
an appropriate dose of writing in-
struction Bizzaro said.
Students may also be referred
to the center by faculty members.
Bizzaro estimates that 300-350,
students will require this
assistance.
A special program is also set up
for special admissions students. A
weekly commitment of five hours
is required � three in class with
the instructor, and two in the lab
with a teaching assitant. The assis-
tant leads small group exercises
and tutorials. The lab meets at 10
a.m. Monday thru Friday.
"Also, for the first time at the
university Bizzaro added, "all
students, regardless of their year
in college or their discipline they
are writing for, will have a place
to �o for help with their writing
problems He stressed that' tile
purpose of the lab is to give sup-
port to all writing that is done on
campus.
Throughout the year, the center
will also hold "mini-workshops
The workshops will cover
"universal problems" such as
grammar, study skills, proofing,
and editing.
Approximately 40 graduate
teaching assistants and faculty
will staff the center. "The
teaching assistants in the English
department are exceptionally
qualified to help students with
their writing Bizzaro said.
The writing Center is located in
Austin 308 and 309. Permanent
hours have not been set.
Fraternities Considering Dry Rush
Marching Pirates
These drummers are undoubtedly thinking of ways to "heat the heat" as they practice for their opening
performance. Watch for the band at upcoming football games.
By LARRY WILLIAMS
Staff Writer
Due to the recent revisions iff
North Carolina's laws concerning
alcohol consumption, skepticism
has arisen on campus as to the
feasibility and legality of holding
the traditional "wet" fraternity
rush. Subesquently, a drive has
been initiated by Associate Dean
of Student Life James Mallory
and Interfraternity Council Presi-
dent Bobby Pierce to change rush
to a "dry" event.
Although this fall's rush will
not be affected by the drive,
Pierce feels the new rules will pro-
bably be in effect by the time spr-
ing rush 1984 rolls around. "It is
almost a sure thing that rush will
be dry next year Pierce said.
As mentioned, the main reason
for rush's going dry is the new
state drinking statute, which takes
effect Oct. 1, raising the legal
drinking age in North Carolina
from 18 to 19.
Mallory said reasonable precau-
tions have to be taken to meet the
new regulations. Consequently,
either campus fraternity rush goes
dry or each participant must be
carded to avoid liability suits
against the fraternities or ECU.
"The fraternities must adapt to
the new laws Pierce said, ad-
ding that ECU would be the first
N.C. college system to go dry.
Pierce claims the alternative of
carding people at rush would
eliminate 80 percent of the
freshmen from these events. "We
(the fraternities) don't want to
eliminate anyone he emphasiz-
ed.
The fraternities did not want to
switch to a dry rush this fall,
claiming they would not have ade-
quate time to prepare for the
switch. But most fraternity
presidents asked are supportive of
the new plan for dry rush, most
saying that although fewer people
may participate, those in atten-
dance will be more truly in-
terested, making for a more pro-
ductive rush.
Lambda Chi Alpha President
Randy Tyler likes the idea. "In
the long run, it will be better
Tyler said.
Kappa Sigma President Floyd
Oakley said he hopes the new plan
will bring more people to the
smaller houses which are not
financially able to put on
elaborate rush parties.
Although most fraternities sup-
port dry rush, Sigma Phi Epsilon
president, Glenn Conway said the
plan might be restrictive. "We
will have to see in the spring he
said.
ECU Beta Theta Pi president
Jim Ussery said "approximately
75 percent" of the colleges in the
nation already have dry rush and
it has been successful.
Bank 24 Hours A Day
By PATRICK O'NEILL
NewiEMfcor
On August 19 two North
Carolina banks began operating
automated banking machines on
ECU's campus.
The machines, operated by
Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. &
Branch Banking and Trust, are
located near the north-west en-
trance to Mendenhall.
On Friday, the ECU "Teller
II" machine, installed by
Wachovia, completed 184 transac-
tions, the highest single day figure
thus far
Wachovia accounting clerk
Ariston Langley said the amount
of students using Teller II has
been lower than expected.
Weekend figures released by
Wachovia show only 400 transac-
tions from Friday to Monday.
"We were hoping that it would be
booming Langley said. She
blamed poor publicity for the low
use figures.
BB&T had no official figures
on the number of transactions on
their ECU "BB&T 24" machine,
but BB&T marketing manager
Mimi Miller said the bank was
"very pleased" with the activity
thus far. Both Langley and Miller
said they hoped more students
would begin to use the machines
once the word got out.
BB&T maintains another
automatic banking machine on
the campus of N.C. State Univer-
sity. Wachovia maintains
machines at six other N.C. college
campuses.
Any ECU student, faculty or
staff member with a Wachovia or
BB&T banking card is eligible to
use the banking machines.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SPETEMBER I, 1983
Announcements
4
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type if on an an
nouhcement form and send it to
The Eatt Carolinian m care of
?he production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd sued paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that vour announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
PuMiCity
The deadline for an
nouncements .s 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesdavv for the Thurs
day paper No announcement;
received �fter these deadline;
will be printed
This space is available to ail
campus organizations and
departments
ZBT
ZBT wekomes ECU back on
our second year of existance
Congratulations to the Epsilon
Kappa Chapter of Zeta Beta Tau
tor receding their charter1
Many Thanks to the Founding
Fathers and Alpha pledge class
for making ,t happen
Welcome back little sisters! A
meeting has been scheduled for
Monday the Sth at 7 30 it will be
held In the Basement of
Umsfead All sisters must at
tend because of officer elections
CAMPUSCRUSADE
Please 'om us for our firts
PRIME TIME fellowship this
Thu- Sep' at 7 p m in the
Nursing Building 101 We are
featuring a film entitled "The
Secret of Loving " The Gallop
Poll rated McDowell as the most
popular speaker on the
American college campus
Come ioin m the fun We are
'poking forward to meeting you
BE A LEADER
interested in �"laking a change
tor tne befrer n N.C.? Be ome a
member o the group that makes
a difference The North Carolina
Student Legislature We are
meeting Mondays at 7 00 in
Poom 212 Mendenhall Hope to
see you there
HORSEBACK RIDING
The Outdoor recreaton center
it sponsor ng horseback riding
trips t0 Jarman's stables
Peservat.ons and payment J5 00
�or fh� Thurs afternoon trips
art due by 4 00 p m each Aed
Tr-Tsportation and a fun filled
uninterrupted hour of horseback
riding are provided The shuttle
leaves Memorial Gym at 3 30
p m and part.c pants should be
back at the gym by 5 45 p m Get
together a han a dorm or ,ust a
few friends and see f our seat
fits the saddle
BUCCANEER BABES
There will be a group picture
taken Thurs. September 1, 1983
at 3 00 Meet at Scales
Fieldhouse before 3 00. All
1983 84 Buccaneer Babes are
asked to attend
UNDERSTAND
THE BIBLE
Do you want to really know
God and his will tor your life? If
so. you need to know how to read
the bible, and understand what
you have read (ACTS 8 30 31)
This is the key to a dynamic
Christian life tilled with power
love, and sound thoughts (11
TIMOTHY 1 7 We will be star
tmg a class soon to teach in
terested people how to underst
sand The Bible Stop by
Mendenhall Student Center.
Room 212 on Monday,
September 5th between 5 30 and
6 30 for more information
i Hebrews 11.6)
RECREATION
CLUBS
The following Recreation
Clubs sponsored by the Depart
ment of University Unions will
meet on the ground floor of Men
danhall Student Center at the
following times Table Tennis
Club, Monday, September 12th
at 5 00 p m Chess Backgam
mon Clubs. Tuesday. September
13th at 5 00 p m . Headr
ts. Spades Clubs, Wednesday,
September 14th at 5 00 p.m
Bridge Club, Thursday.
September 15th at 5 00 p m
All ECU students, faculty,
staff and their guests are
welcome to join The above
meetings are organization
meetings only Tme of play and
location of meetings will be
discussed
BOWLING
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a Mixed
Doubles Bowling League this
Fall Each team will consist of
two (2) men and two (2) women
Sign up on the main bulletin
board on the bottom floor of
Mendenhall Student Center in
dividuals are encouraged to
sign up as the MSC Staff will
organize teams All ECU
Students. Faculty. Staff, and
their guests are welcome
The organizational meeting is
Monday September 12, 1983 at
6 00 p m in the Bowling Center
Team Captains, League Pres
dent and Secretary will be
determined at this meeting as
well as t;me of play
For further information, call
Linda Barkand Crafts and
Recreation Director at 757 6611
ext 260 (after 5 p.m call the
Bowling Center at ext 267
MEETTHE
COACHES DAY
The Student Athletic Board is
sponsoring a meet the coaches
dav on September 1 1983 from
11 30 to 1 00 m front of the stu
dent supply store Come out and
meet your favorite coach
CIRCLE K
ECU Circle K Club invites you
to come out and join us this com
ing and every Tuesday night at 7
p.m in Mendenhall room 221 for
fun and socializing Hope to see
you there
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Any women interested in play
Ing rugby, please come to the
organizational meeting to be
held Wednesday, Sept 7, at 5
p.m in Memorial Gym Room
102 Practices will be held
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and
Thursdays 4 530 beginning
Sept 13 at the Allied Health
Field Absolutely no experience
necessary
BUCANEER BABES
There will be a meeting on
Tuesday Sept 6 for any girl in
terested in helping out with foot
ball recruiting at 8 30 p.m at
Scales Field House All previous
members are asked to attend at
9 00 pm For more information
call Scales Field House
SOULS
ELECTION
Anyone interested in running
for an office in SOULS should
submit the application blank
found in the Souls ad in this
paper This application should
be submitted no later than
Wednesday, September 7, 1983
by 5:00 p m to the circulation
desk in Mendenhall Elections
will be held on Thursday
September 8 An installation
meeting will be held on Thurs
day night at 7 00 in Mendenhall
Everyone is urged to attend this
meeting All faculty, staf
members and students are in
vited
COOP JOBS
Black and Decker in Tarboro
NC has an opening for a Co op
accounting student part time for
Fall 1983 Must be a junior or
senior and have a 2 5 GPA In
terested students should contact
the Co op Office. 313 Rawl. im
mediately!
GAO
The U S General Accounting
Office will be interviewing on
campus in October for Coop
iobs for Spring 1984 Must be a
Sophomce or jun.or bus npss
maior anc have a 2 5 GPA or
be'ter For more information
students should contact the Co
op Office in 313 Rawi
OLD TESTAMENT
Beginning on 8 Sep a course
on the Old Testament will meet
once a week during the 83 84
school year from 6 30 8 00 p m
each Thursday m Brewster
building room 303 B The class s
open to an students The mstruc
tor wil1 be B'll Evenhuis of the
Church Education System of the
Church of Jesus Christ of matter
Day Saints Please come and en
toy an excellent review of the
Old Testament
BASEBALL
TRYOUTS
Anyone interested in trying
out for the ECU Baseball team
should meet at Harrington Field
on Friday, September 2, at 3 30
p m Prospective players should
be dressed in workout attire.
BIOLOGY CLUB
ANDAED
Free Hot dogs will be served
at our first meeting of the
semester, Monday at 6 30 out
side, behind the greenhouse The
calendar of the year is on the
agenda plus a film presentation
on the Caribbean medical school
at Ross University Dr Ayers,
advisor to AED, will present
slides of his summer visit to
Ross University m the
chemistry building on Sept 13th
at the AED meeting to give the
students another "perspective
regareding this out of the county
medical school So all biology
club members. AED members
and interested persons are
welcome to come.
KA
We invite you to visit our
house during Rush We are
ECU'S oldest fraternity and
maintain the highest standards
m intramural athletic competi
tion, service to the community
and charitable organizations
scholarship and social functions
The same ideals and traditions
that made Kappa Alpha one of
the school's most outstanding
fraternities 111 1958. can still be
found today Check the other
houses ano then let us tell you
why we think KA may be the
best for you The parties start at
9 00 on Sept 6 ana 7 We are
located on 500 East nth
SEMINAR
Dr Grover Evereh, r will be
holding a sem.nar on ' Bind f0
of Cations by Lasalood A, A
microbial lonophore EHects of
cation charge and solvent
polarity" focusing on the
Chemical aspects To be held
Friday. Sept 9 at 2 00 in
Flanigan 201
FLAG FOOTBALL
OFFICIALS
The Department of
intramural Receational Ser
vices will begin tram-ng clinics
for intramural Flag Football Of
fioais Thursda . per 1
1983 a' 6 prti m Roorr
Memorial Grrnnasturn An
ECU student may attend these
framing clinics Rules inter
pre'ations ano mechanics will
be discussed Officials will be
hired based on practical and
written tests Flag Football Of
fioais Clinic Thurs Sept l
1983. 6 pm. Rm 102 Mem
Gym
PHI SIGMA PI
Aelcome oack brothers! This
semester's first meeting will be
Sept 1 at 5 00 .n Austin 130
There will be an Executive
Council meeting Sept 6 in David
Whitley s Time TBA
PAPA PATZ
Your Adult Entertainment Center
Presents
i
TMUR. SEPT. 1
NIGHT
-FREE ADMISSION
-FREE. DRAFT" f WINE
if ALL. MIXED DRINKS
M PRICE
�n Life
Papa Katz Is A Private Cluh
For Members & Guests
We Have All ABC Perms
10th St. Ext At
Riverbluff Rd.
N
H
f I 1NarHe
CLASSIFIED ADS Ymi maw nu ttu ln� �� :��� �- Ad(
us a separate sheet o paper ���,�
units per line Each letter, pone- i M ���� �i. � ,�. No lines. at .
'vsiiwi mom mrni www wimum j counts as one unit. Capitalize and
nyphenate words proper 1 y. Leave space at end of line if word j doesn't fit No ads will be ac j cepted over the phone We reserve the right to reject any ad. All ads must be prepaid. Enclose j 75� per line or fraction of a hue. j Pkase print legibly! Use capital and f tower wasc letters Return to Ihe Media Board secretary by 3 p.m. the day before j publication. j I
1


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4 I
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CANOE
TRIP
The outdoor recreation center
operated by the Department of
intramural Recreational Ser
vices is sponsoring a conoe trip
on Tuesday Sept 6 The trip is
suitable for beginning canoers
The trip will be a leisurely pad
die down the tar river lasting ap
proximately 2 hours Par
ticipants will meet at the out
door recreation center in
Memorial at 3 30 p m and
should arrive back at the gym
by 6 00 p m Advance registra
tion and a $3 00 payment due by
4 00 p m on Monday Sept 5 The
Outdoor Center's hours are
Mon Pri 1 5 p m
Fn 9 11pm
Tues Wed Thur 2 4pm
ADVISARY
INTRAMURAL
The intramural Advsary
Board meeting is scheduled for
today from 4 6 p m m Memorial
Gym room 105 All necessary
parties should attend
GYMNASTICS
Don't let those skills waste
awa' if vour gymnastically In
dined, or iust need a little prac
tice for that methods class 'hen
fake advantage of the free use
periods of the gymnastics room
m Memorial Gym The IRS
�ment sponsoring a
supervised per.od for recrea
t.onal use of the gymnastics
room on Tuesday ano Thursday
n ghts from 740pm 900pm
The area will be open for free
apoaratus The room will open
for use beginning Sept 6 Your
ECU ID s required tor admit
tonce
FIELD HOCKEY
Attention anyone interested in
pli.ing Women's intramural
field hockey there is a meeting
on Wednesday Sept 7 at 4 p m
m Room 102 of the Memorial
Gym If you can't make the
meeting please call Cory at
758 8985
FOR SALE
Golf Clubs J160 00 per set
SoftbaM Gloves $21.00
per glove
Basketballs S16 00 each
Footballs $24.00 each
Soccer Balls S?8 00 each
Bats $12 00 each
BUT WAIT! WHY BUY
Stop by the Equipment check
out room located in 114
Memorial Gym and borrow the
equipment you need Cut your
costs for having fun by borrow
mg these items and many more
including frisbees, jump ropes,
softballs, towels, tug o war
ropes, badminton requets, ten
nts racquets, racquetball rec
quets to mention just a few This
is a free service excluding late
fees or feess for lost damaged
equipment Be sure to bring
your ID and Activity Card for
rour check out and CHECK
OUT the Equipment Room
HONORS SEMINAR
Current Honors students and
an faculty are reminded of the
opportunity to propose Honors
Seminars for spring 1984 See
pp 87 188 of the catalogue for
categories Seminars are ideailr
generatist, interdisciplinary,
and team taught
To be considered proposals
must be submitted in writing to
Dr David Sanders, coordinator
of the Honors Program c o
English Department For fur
fher details, call 6373
CHECK USOUT
Check us out! There's no bet
ter deal in town than at the IRS
equipment check out room m 115
Memorial Gym The room is
operated by the department of
Intramural Recreational Ser
vices to provide students and
staff archery equipment, bad
minton equip , basketballs, foot
balls, golf equip racquetball
racquets and bails soffbal!
equip , soccerbalis, volley balls,
and mucn more at no charge
Yep! This is a
tree service ahvated to the pur
suit of life, liberty and FUN!
Take charge of your life at r�o
charge1 Check us out!
SPORT CLUBS
Archery. Fnsbee Disc,
Karate, Lacrosse. Racquetball
Rugby Men and Women, Soccer
Women. Surfing, Team Hand
ball Men and Women. Badmm
ton. Chess, Cycling. Fencing
Field Hockey. Gymnastics.
Outing, Snow Ski, Water Polo,
Water Ski, Wind Surfing
Wrestling if you are m
terested in one of these sports or
you want to organize a group for
a sport, contact the ECU
Department of intramural
Recreational Services SPORT
CLUB PROGRAM in Room 105A
of Memorial Gymnasium,
757 6064
"TOGA,TOGA"
Everyone has been waiting for
't and here it is. The 3rd annual
Pi Kappa Phi all campus Toga
Party it will be as wild anc
crazy as ever Don't miss Gold
Rush in action! Please bring
proper I D Get wild with the Pi
Kapps by the lake
ABA
Alpha Beta Alpha the Library
Science Fraternity, will hold its
first meeting of the school ear
on Tuesday Sept 6th af 5 30 in
the Library Science Building
All members and potential
members are myited to attend
HEARING IMPAIRED
The ECU Program for Hear
mg impaired Students and the
Sign Language Club announce a
non credit Introductory Sign
Language class beginning 6 00
p m Wednesday. September
14th m Brewster B Wing 203 For
those who have already taken
the introductory course an in
termediate course will be of
tered on Tuesday nights starting
September 13 at 6 00 p m in
Brewster B Wing 205 The class
will be free to Greenville
student ano adults There is no
registration required and no age
limit Students may enroll for
the class on Sept 14th and Sept
21 For more information, call
757 672?
WORK STUDY
EMPLOYEES
Students who have Deen
assigned by the Financai Aid
Office to the Work Study Pro
gram and who are further
assigned tdo tne Department of
intramural Recrea'ional Ser
vices are scheduled to meet
Tuesday September 6. 1983 a'
5 30 p m n Room 102 Of
Memorial GmnaS'um Upon
arriving at ECU these students
should acquire their Aork Study
Contracts at the Financial Aid
Office The contract, ciass
schedule and soc ai security
card should accompany the s'u
dent to the (M.Rec
meeting IM Rec Work Study
Meetng Tuesday September 6.
1983 5 30 p m . Rm 102. Mem
Gym
PRCCLUB
Hey an you PRC maiors ge'
involved with the PRC club Dy
attending an .ce cream soca.i
Tuesday September 6. 7 30 p m
m room 244 Mendenha Don t
m ss Out on the tun
CADP
There wiii oe a mee' ng of the
Campus Alcohoi and Drug Pro
gram on Tuesdar September 7th
at4 OOociock.n room 21C Ei-wn
Had Anyone interested -s in
vited to attend
GAMMA
BETA PHI
Welcome bacx mempers Our
first genera: mee'ing a oe
held on Thursda. September 1
� n 244 Mendenha.1 � c in E�
ecutive committee members
will meet In Room 243 a 4 30
p m Please hr c a'e-d
ARCHERY CLUB
The ECU Archery Club s pro
ud to announce its f.rsf meeting
o the 83 84 school year on Tues
day Sept 6. a' 8 p r- n room 102
Memoria. Gym Anyone who is
interested s welcome to attend
For more information call Gene
Taylor at 752 1062 or Todd Ban'
toy at 752 8768
STRONG-CAMPBELL
INVENTORY
The Strong Campbel. mteres'
inventory :s ofered every Tues
day - 305 A' ght Annex at 4
p m when school 'S in sess-on
wth the exceptions o rxafnfcta
tion period and registrsa or
day Th.s is avaiiaole to a,
students at no cost No torrra
registration is required For
more formation, ca Mta
Counseling Center at 757 64
IRS
The iRS Department w -y-
art opportunity for free f 3.
volleyball and or badminton In
M nges Coliseum on August 31
Sep'emoer 7. 14. 21 2 fron 8 OC
pm 10 00 pm These da'es
provide a rare opportune. o-
voiieybaii and. or badm.tor ac
tivities on campus due to the
busy schedule o' ac' . I es
reflected in the packed use 01
our facilities The equipment
and superv S'on wii be proineM
and a cour' rnaf even pe rese'v
ec by calling 757 6064 between I
a m and Ham "the only thing
else you need s your body and a
little swea
The Fast Carolinian
i.i.r . 3
Published eery Tjesda.
and Thursday during the
academic year anc every
Aednescay dur.ng tie sum
T.er
Tne East Career a- s the
ie'MMr M Eas
Caronna Univers'y 0"f;
operatec. and pub'ished tor
and by 'ne s'jOf o Eas
Car3 r-d ,ers �,
Subscript,on Rate t?0 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU. Greenville. N C
POSTMASTER Se"d a?
:ress cfanges to The Eas
Carolinian O'd South
Bu id.ng ECU Greeny 1
NC 27834
Telephone rS7-Me, 6347
630
I
?
ECU'S WTV CENT6P
roe 15 veacs
Q&QD
FUWD-RAISGR lOtrr- OimtCfeNT
EVENTS EACH IVTOC . FffOM&KHVl
OOtfTCST 10 AIR GUTAe COWCST.
OUftX KHZ EAST CAt?oaviAKj ft?
UPCOiMlrSfO gvCKTTS
'COU�G� MGMT'L WfiTU IVZMI
HAPPV HOUR, l.OOAOW.
CAWS TIL i:�j TS CAWS
Til cufeiMG - C0M.N6 Soon
WZMB'UVC
ENDOFTHCW6K PARTV
3:3o-7:oo FffBF ADM. 5oiG4N3 "TfL E:IS
70CANS TIL 7:3o -7WG OftfiTY OOMniSrlCS
pgtm :ooil moo iuiTH car� sna iot
7U� 86ST
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MU5.C
OUR f&AOUS LADIE5 MGUT -
.5 YG&SS, ScMOAVUAS BBM OUR SPECll MGMT
KH? LAOICS - 5DBfcFT ftR lAOlES WUILFfT UST
ANO FREE ADM. R LAOftSS
W0UBS 00-V.OO
&20-i;6o E�T.
TUE SWF OF U49 ELBO R6WMMDS YOU TO j
DWV9 OWFULLY. WE ARE COWEMfcTLY LOCATED
MTUIN WALKING DISTANCE OP E.C.U. OAMPtS
VwMTM UPCOMING ECU. BOS S6RSMCE FOR WE
campus 4 Community . toMT �sk vcoe upe 4
Your fRcwos laves, use responsibility
VfUGN CONSUMING AlCoMOU C BtVE?AGE;
?
4
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4
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4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
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prom
formal
Drug
JENNIFER
JFNDRAMAk
s��ff ttrwrr
During the o
of their college
careers, most student
come into contact
with alcohol I
most, this doev .
constitute a probic
but for some it may.
For the latter group.
ECU has a program
designed to help
The Cam
Alcohol and Dr
Program, located
IrvMn Hall (ro
301-303).
Black Pro
B SI AVF
DARWIN
SUff �m,i
Black studen
narrowing the
tional gap with -
students. Test scores
on standard
achieemen'
taken b
children have
ed, according to D-
Lyle V. Jone
professor
psychology. c
Chapel Hill. Jones
reported that b . �
students born
made 10 percent revser
errors on the
than black child
born in 195?
In some instanc
the error rate has been
cut in half, but in a
story to L'Pl Monday,
Jones added
I
Dc
Peti
agr,
S

oun
fur
J
Watch r-
EC
Sat. (Sept. 3
at i
H
D
On
Cok
-1
r�
i
! -
I
� offi
We have
911 Dickinson
1700 West Six!
315SUntonsbi
' � ���!� . P�
I
P







Phone
1 rt Umflri

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T i

STRONG CAMPBELL
INVENTORY
� .�-� T jes
- a- Bhi Minn a� 4
n session
v 04 e�amin
� hJ reg.s'rsa'ion
�. B64e to all
-� So torrpjl
- �-� s 'ecu!red For
coll the
�� '57 661
IRS
epartmenl otter
'� 'Of ree piay
bOdfTI �oo n
vet m on Augus 3!
'4 21 28 tr-om 8 OC
- T-es� aa'es wi'
ire opportunity for
oajdmiton ac
f to � t
�d . es
� packed use of
� ,s -re equipment
be provde1
nay eve1"1 De reserv
64 Se'vveen 9
Tht only thing
- � But sodv ana a
A ea
Kavt Carolinian
� Ijpsdav
�-�
"c every
H) "e sum
- 1 j �
sk-flD Of Eas
� � owned
� ed tor
� ' - Ea'
. ��� - �.
�atP uo yearly
� E ast Carolinian offices
d'ed in the Old South
- -Qing on the campus o�
C U Greenville N C
'�" �� TEH Send as
� Be " Te Eas
Ola S
�reen lie
Telephone 757 6366 6367
&30�
I
!T�J?
BACK
aifOuuc
poe
sesr
ic
fGWT
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:ated!
PCS
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t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1. 1983
Drug Rehabilitation Program Helps Students
B
JENNIFER
JFNDRASIAK
Sl.ff Wrllrr
During the course
of their college
careers, most students
come into contact
with alcohol. For
most, this does not
constitute a problem,
but for some it may.
For the latter group,
ECU has a program
designed to help.
The Campus
Alcohol and Drug
Program, located in
Iiwin Hall (rooms
301-303). is
"committed to the
promotion of a cam-
Pus environment
wnich is conducive to
responsible decision-
making concerning
alcohol use or non-use
by all members of our
community accor.
d,n8 to one of
CADP's informa-
tional brochures.
CADP aims to
provide education, in-
formation and refer-
ral for students with
problems involving
alcohol and drug
abuse in order to pro-
mote responsible deci-
sions regarding
substance use.
CADP's staff
generally consists of
between 25 and 35
student volunteers
who provide peer
counseling and a
reference group for
their fellow students.
The staff is all-
volunteer and is cur-
rently in the process
of rebuilding.
ECU student Keith
Blanks, president of
CADP, said that,
while the staff has
traditionally come
from areas such as
social work,
psychology and nurs-
ing, members are
drawn from all areas.
Staff members are
oriented by means of
a seven-week training
course consisting of
approximately one
two-hour session a
week. During this
course, they are
educated in issues
concerning substance
abuse and are taught
techniques to be used
in dealing with their
peers.
McGuire says that
CADP's major goal is
prevention. For this
reason, one of
CADP's primary
Black Professors Voice Opinions
B SUZANNE
DARWIN
SUff Hrtler
Black students are
narrowing the educa-
tional gap with white
students. Test scores
on standardized
achievement tests
taken b black
children have improv-
ed, according to Dr.
1 vie V. Jones, alumni
professor of
psychology, UNC-
Chapel Hill. Jones
reported that black
students born in 1970
made 10 percent fewer
errors on the tests
than black children
born in 1953.
In some instances,
the error rate has been
cut in half, but in a
story to UPI Monday,
Jones added that
black improvement
varies depending
upon their ages, tests
and subject matter.
Among other factors,
Jones cited the long-
term effects of
desegregation as a
reason for improving
scores. He said,
"There's no way to
tease out (of the data)
what caused the
higher scores
Desegregation is a
determining factor,
however
Commenting on the
findings. Dr. Joyce
Pettis, ECU associate
professor of English
agreed with Jones.
"Since integration,
black students have
access to the same
amounts of money
funded to schools
She added. "Being
born after the civil
rights movement of
the 60s brought about
new attitudes and ex-
pectations
Another ECU
faculty member, Dr.
L. i 11a Holsey,
associate professor of
home economics said,
"I'm happy to hear of
the results and the
change will continue
as a result of better
educational oppor-
tunities
Dr. Jasper Register,
ECU associate pro-
fessor of sociology,
questioned the results.
"It's easy to accept
something like these
studies on standardiz-
ed tests, but you can't
be sure about them
when you don't know
how biased the tests
were.
Pettis was also
skeptical about the
validity of standardiz-
ed tests. "There has
to be some kind of
measuring device
There are other
aspects besides test
results � like high
school grades � to be
considered
Pettis and Register
said that a cultural
bias exists on standar-
dized tests and was a
reason why blacks
and other minorities
fair poorly as com-
pared to white
children.
Speculating on
future results, Jones
emphasized educators
"have to do better
even if the scores are
narrowing; we could
narrow the gap fur-
ther, improve it
Watch the Pirates in Action!
ECU vs. Florida State
Sat. (Sept. 3) on BIG SCREEN T. V.
at MR. GA TTIS Kick off 7P.M.
a great way to have a good time
Pizza and the Game.
Corner of Cotanche and 10th
HOLLOWELL'S
DRUG STORES
Old Fashioned
Orangeades and Lemonades
Coke, Mellow Yellow, Tab, Sprite
99t
Wefeature
Fountain Coke and Pepsi
Banana Splits
Sundaes
Milkshakes
Back to School Special
2 Hotdogs and Small Coke I
or Pepsi 1
SI 00
Offer Good Thru Sept. 4,1983 j
We have 3 stores to serve you in Greenville
911 Dickinson Avenue 752-7105
1700 West Sixth Street 758-4104
315 Stantonsburg Road 757 -1076
focuses is on educa-
tion. Dorm advisers
are trained in the early
recognition of pro-
blems and are taught
to intervene, referring
the students to CADP
if necessary. Staff
members use
breathalyzer
demonstrations,
social affairs, movies
and slides to educate
students. This year,
they will also work
with fraternities to
promote responsible
drinking. Blanks said
he wants to stress the
fact that CADP
members are "not
prohibitionists" and
wants to promote the
idea that "you can
have fun with alcohol
and not put yourself
in a dangerous posi-
tion
Many of the
students who take ad-
vantage of CADP's
services are referred
by James Mallory,
assistant dean for stu-
dent life. If ECU
students get into trou-
ble, and alcohol is a
cause or an allied
cause, they are sent
through a program
consisting of a
workshop and a one-
on-one counseling ses-
sion. Between
75 and 100 students
went through the pro-
gram last year, and,
according to Mallory,
the results were "very
positive
Students do not
have to be referred to
CADP in order to
benefit from its pro-
grams. The office is
open between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m. on
weekdays, and
visitors are welcome.
Strict confidentiality
is guaranteed. Staff
members are also
available to give ad-
vice to students who
may be worried about
problems their friends
or relatives are hav-
ing. Students with ex-
tensive problems are
referred to Alcoholics
Anonymous, Nar-
cotics and
Anonymous or Men-
tal Health.
Monitor Will Undergo
Extensive Examinations
Cont. From Page 1
rive at ECU on Fri-
day, when a painstak-
ing restoration effort
will begin.
Still stressed how
hard it is to think of
anything that could
equal the degree of at-
tention the Monitor
project has focused
on ECU. Watts was
quick to add that the
project was "just one
aspect of the complex
program" in maritime
research at this
school.
He says that the
next project is an ex-
pedition this fall to
study a sunken British
blockade runner from
Civil War day .
In addition, Watts
hopes to eventually
investigate the "large
concentration of
sunken blockade run-
ners off Cape Fear
But in the mean-
time, as other trips are
made to the Monitor
and as more of its
parts are raised, the
eyes of the world will
turn to ECU. Under-
water research of
historically important
ships arouses public
interest.
FRIDAY
AND
SATURDAY
ATTIC
ON MON SEPT. 5 HELP US
CELEBRATE THE ATTIC'S
12th AIW1VERSARY
with 197 prices on the car (&5t H H j
and pay what yc j want at the joor over
12.
WITH
SOUTHS '6 ROCK NIGHTCLUB
i
J :thee.c.u. vs. f.s.u. football:
J; GAME WILL BE SHOWN ON �
: THE ATTIC'S 7FT T.V. AT 7:00 :
SUNDAY
�$
NEW PERMANENT POLICY
V FREE fc
ADMISSION
EVERY NIGHT FOR ALL
ECU GIRLS DORM STUDENTS
(EXCEPT CONCERTS)
WED SEPT. 7th
12th ANNIVERSARY
PARTY COIIT.
99C ADMISSION FOR
ALL ECU STUDENTS ALL
NIGHT WITH
KAPP4 T4
7p1
"Welcome Back ECU Party"
FEATURING:
Your Favorite Beverage Will Be Provided
(Please Have Proper Identification)
THURSDAY, SEPT 1
9:00 p.m.
409 ELIZABETH STREET
THE
HILL
lOTH ST
CAMPUS
3THST
DOWNTOWN - �v E
PAJlTV
4THST
Don't Forget Rush
TUES WEDSTHURS�
SEPT. 6,7,8, at 9:00 P.M.
752-4379 409 Elizabeth St.
�. . .1 X�' M .





QUr Eaat (Eoruliniatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mil ler. 0y.w���,
Darryi Brown, wna�mfFrfor
Waveri y Merritt. irifMMu Cindy Pleasants. .Wj ���,
Hunter Fisher, sR�n�, ���� Patrick Oneill, ta &-
ALI AFRASHTEH, rrf, Manner CARLYN EBERT. ��m�mm�.��a,or
Geoff Hudson, fvk va�,r Lizanne Jennings, ����
Clay Thornton, r�hn,cai sur Todd Evans, Produce Manr
September 1, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Leo In '84
Chancellor For Governor
Indications are that former ECU
Chancellor Leo Jenkins will try for
the Democratic nomination for
governor next year. Jenkins is said
to be encouraged by the support he
is getting for the governor's race
and has said, in an interview with
the Raleigh News and Observer, of
his current campaign, "This is for
keeps
Jenkins was chancellor of ECU
for 18 years, until he retired in 1978.
He was by all accounts an effective,
forceful leader capable of getting
things done in the face of long odds
or strong opposition. Jenkins is the
man primarily responsible for
upgrading East Carolina from a col-
lege to a university, a status that was
granted in 1967. There was opposi-
tion within the UNC system and the
state legislature for the increased
prestige and funding the move
brought to ECU, but Jenkins show-
ed himself to be an influential politi-
cian and lobbyist, and university
status was granted in large part
because of his tenacity.
A fight that was even more dif-
ficult was the struggle to establish a
medical school at ECU. Jenkins put
in years of lobbying efforts at the
state level to gain support for the
med school. Schools of Medicine
mean big cash outlays for develop-
ment and continued large funding
for operation. Some officials at
other leading UNC univeristies, in-
cluding UNC-Chapel Hill
Chancellor Christopher C. Ford-
ham, opposed the ECU medical
school. Despite the powerful objec-
tions, Jenkins won state approval
and funding and brought the med
school to ECU.
Jenkins brought other im-
provements to ECU, including a
substantial increase in enrollment
and improvement of the School of
Art, the only accreditated one in the
state, that now bears his name.
During his tenure, he
demonstrated himself to be an ef-
fective leader, not only of the
university, but on a state-wide level.
His influence with the N.C.
legislature has proved to be effec
tive, and he has continued his work
with state government as a special
consultant to Gov. James Hunt.
His familiarity with state govern-
ment, matched with his interest and
expertise in one of the most impor-
tant issues a North Carolina gover-
nor must deal with � education �
(over two-thirds of the state's
general fund budget goes to public
schools and colleges) makes him one
of the few people who know the
structure and needs of the N.C.
education system well enough to
continue and expand Hunt's work
in maintaining the quality of the
UNC system and making much
needed improvements in state
secondary education.
Jenkins faces an uphill battle in
his bid for the governor's seat. His
campaign coffers are low in com-
parison to other candidates; he
listed only $2,100 in contributions
with the State Board of Elections as
of Tuesday, according to the News
and Observer. His campaign of-
ficials are counting on grass roots
support and Jenkin's speeches on
important issues to counter the
larger budgets of other candidates.
But if the citizens of North Carolina
listen to the man who last Spring
received ECU's first honorary
degree, they should find a capable
leader for the state and a candidate
they can support.
Three Years Later
?
1
Americans have learned a lot
about the Polish people in the last
three years. Since the inception of
the eastern bloc's first free trade
union, Solidarity, three years ago
yesterday, Poland and the plight of
its people under a repressive com-
munist regime have made frequent
headlines in U.S. newspapers.
Americans have learned of a people
who used to be thought of only
vaguely in the context of a
"Polack" joke. We have since come
to know, better understand and
sympathize with this deeply
religious, courageous people.
Wednesday, thousands turned
out in cities across Poland to mark
the third anniversary of the creation
of Solidarity. In silent vigils and
peaceful gatherings, children,
housewives and the elderly, as well
as workers, defied the government's
demand to ignore the anniversary, a
demand they backed up with threats
of severe punishment. Groups were
stopped with water cannons, tear
gas and blockades by military
police, but they still turned out.
Strikes planned by Solidarity of-
ficials did not turn out to be massive
or very effective, but workers still
showed loyalty to the organization.
Most heavily gaurded by the
government were the major cities of
Warsaw and Gdansk, the place of
Solidarity's origin. It was here the
crowds faced the greatest
belligerence by the government.
Change will not come soon or
drastically for the Polish people.
Revolution is unlikely, especially
under the heavy guard of Polish and
Soviet government repression, but
at least the world has a better
understanding of the nation's
dilemma, and at least the Polish
people are united, through their
Catholic religion, to continue to
hope for a better way of life. Their
solid determination and resilience
may, someday, bring small changes,
such as the installation of a
Solidarity-like union or more civil
rights and freedoms, but until then
the people have only their religion,
common conviction and hope.
It is a tragedy that so many
millions must put up with such
repression when it is clear the ma-
jority of the people do not approve
of their government. Self-
determination, the right of a people
to choose their own form of govern-
ment, is a basic human right, and
one that the Soviet Union and the
government of Poland have
violated. There are nations who
have chosen Communism and Soviet
aid, for better or worse, but they
have not in Poland, and they have
not in other places such as
Afghanistan.
The past three years have given,
to the American people, a better
understanding of the Poland and
the repression of its governing
regime. It has also, incidentally,
caused a decline in popularity of the
Polish joke. One cannot look at
Lech Walesa, or see crowds oppos-
ing military watercannons and tear
gas, and then ask "How many
Polacks does it take to change a
lightblub?"
'Tell them to forget raising only the Monitor's anchor and to raise the
whole thing We can use it off Nicaragua
Military Muscle Needs Moderation
By GREG RIDEOUT
The recent battle casualties in war -
torn Beirut, Lebanon, have vividly
reminded those of us back at home of
the world-wide military commitments of
the United States. The two marines who
gave their lives were part of a huge
number of permanent and non-
permanent detachments stationed in
places as diverse as Panama and Great
Britian and as far apart as Brazil and
Japan.
With more than 500,000 sailors and
soldiers on duty throughout the world,
and with continuing crises in the Middle
East, Central America, the Persian Gulf
and North Africa, people have begun to
question our showing of the flag in all
corners of the world. We are overex-
tended, say some military experts. I tend
to agree.
First of all, it's good to show the nag,
and President Reagan has certainly done
it as much as any president since Teddy
Roosevelt. But running it up the pole
and splitting it down the seams are two
entirely different things. Reagan must
reassess his priorities and determine ex-
actly where he wants his battleships and
tanks to go. Careful planning, not
haphazard action, are the keys to show-
ing Moscow they can't run at will
against the gipper's defenses.
The current Big Pine II maneuvers in
Honduras are a case in point. They were
hastily thrown together as a signal to the
Sandinista regime and the rebels in El
Salvador; Pentagon officials were flab-
bergasted. According to one general, it
usually takes from six months to a year
to set up a field operation of this type �
Reagan gave them a matter of weeks to
draw up the plans. Maybe this time lapse
shouldn't be, but it made us look sloppy
in Andropov's eye. Good intentions,
bad execution.
Reagan definitely wants to be viewed
with more respect by the guys in
Moscow, and he certainly wants to pre-
vent the Soviet Union from filling any
future geopolitical gaps in key world
areas. But, he has to realize that the
manpower he has is limited. Careful
allocation of troops and, as he has
shown, the willingness to use them are
the the two tasks he must show the
Kremlin he can master.
What's a good suggestion for getting
the necessary number of troops to send
across the world? NATO. The United
States at present has 333,000 men and
women stationed on bases and bat-
tleships in and around Europe. This is a
majority of our armed forces
worldwide. Reagan must urge his allies
to be responsible for their own
backyards if he is going to protect those
places on the planet where our help is
really needed.
Britain and West Germany must, as
Reagan has implicitly implied, accept
our help in defending the European con-
tinent in terms of missiles, not men.
Freeing of American troops to go
elsewhere is essential if Reagan is to put
a halt to our stretching of the defense
rubber band before it snaps back in our
face.
So, with the problem of overextension
of the nation's military might laid before
us, we must examine briefly the underly-
ing theory of showing a strong defense.
So far, in terms of Soviet and Cuban ac-
quiesence, it seems to be working. Fidel
Castro has called for talks on the Cen-
tral American situation and Anaropov is
taking seriously our desire to tc rou�
on nuclear defense issues.
Like it or not, it's a mean world with
the Soviets. They may not be bent on
good ol' world domination anymore,
but they sure like throwing their AK-47s
around to every insurgent group that
rises up against democracy. We have to
show them that Uncle Sam has been lif-
ting weights lately.
VMM mm SHORTEST LIFE WAl
s
BRAZILIAN
APHID
AFRICAN
TSE-TSE
r-Campus Forum
GUATEMALAN
DICTATOR
Cheerleader's Leader Is Tops
Last week my college cheerleading
squad attended a cheering camp at
George Mason University in Fairfax,
Va. The cheerleaders from ECU were
also in attendance at this camp. During
the course of the four days we had the
fortunate experience of getting to
know one of your representatives, Mr.
James K. Elkins. The purpose of this
letter is to commmend your univeristy
on your selection of such a Fine in-
dividual.
My squad, along with several others
from smaller schools, was getting a bit
discouraged by the vast disparity bet-
ween themselves and those from larger
schools. Mr. Elkins took time from a
harried schedule to sit down with them
and offer some encouragemnt to them.
His gentle understanding and genuine
concern was, for them, one of the most
rewarding and memorable experiences
of the camp.
In a time earmarked by intense com-
petition between schools, it is indeed
refreshing to encounter such an unbias-
ed, sincere, good-will ambassador.
You have every reason to be proud of
this mature young man.
Loraine M. Boudreau
Cheerleader Advisor,
Sacred Heart University
Carribean Basin
The Caribbean Basin is the soft
under-belly of the United States. If we
allow further extension of Russian-
instigated communism in this area, we
shall be flooded with millions of
refugees, even though the military'
threat is minimal, thanks to President
Kennedy's naval blockade of Cuba in
the missile crisis.
President Monroe has said we regard
any attempt by the European powers to
extend their system to any portion of
this hemisphere as dangerous to our
peace and safety. We view any in-
tervention for the purpose of oppress-
ing the free and independent American
nations, or controlling in any other
manner their destiny, as the manifesta-
tion of an unfriendly disposition
towards the United States.
In 1906, when Germany sent a bat-
tleship to Venezuela to exact payment
of a debt, President Roosevelt advised
the German government that if any at-
tempt was made to occupy Venezuelan
territory, he would dispatch the U.S.
fleet.
Now hear this: The United States
must project immediate police power
throughout the Basin, using our
destroyers and frigates. Critical areas,
such as Nicaragua, should be blockad-
ed and ALL military arms should be
considered contraband, subject to
seizure.
All American nations and peoples
should be free to work out their own
destiny without interference in their in-
ternal affairs, even as the United States
has done. This is in accordance with
International Law, the Charter of the
United Nations, the Charter of the
Organization of American States and
the U.S. tradition, as ably expressed
and practiced by Presidents Teddy and
Franklin Roosevelt and Woodrow
Wilson.
Wake up, America!
Ken Tomkinson
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
tetters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel.

BL
Dr. Gerhard Kalrnu
the vearS first Biol
Laws
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(HARMONY HOUSEl
YOURPROFE!
CONCERTS
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i





THfc EAS1AKOLINIAN
SLPTLMBtR I, 1983
;
nd to raise the
leration
igan musi urge his allies
: sible for their own
f is going to protect those
el vheie our help is
West Germans must, as
plicitly implied, accept
ding the European con-
' of misiies. not men.
American troops to go
sential if Reagan is to put
stretching of the defense
it -naps back in our
pe problem of oerextension
- military might laid before
I nine bneflx the underly-
t showing a strong defense.
rm- of Soviet and Cuban ac-
eems to be working. Fidel
:alled for talks on the Cen-
to situation and Andropov is
fusly out desire to be tough
defense issues.
not, it's a mean world with
They may not be bent on
lurid domination anymore,
j like throwing their AK-47s
� er insurgent group that
democracy . We have to
I Uncle Sam has been lif-
latelv
I
,LAM
&L4Ajew&-vvtT3 �54TO 9M).
military arms should be
:ontraband, subject to
can nations and peoples
re to work out their own
ut interference in their in-
, even as the United States
us is in accordance with
Law, the Charter of the
ns, the Charter of the
of American States and
dition, as ably expressed
' by Presidents Teddy and
osevelt and Woodrow
America!
Ken Tomkinson
urn Rules
iroliman welcomes letters
points oj view. Mail or
p our office in the Old
n?, arrows from Joyner
es of verification, all let-
ude the name, major and
address, phone number
of the author(s). Letters
two typewritten pages,
or neatly printed. All
tyect to editing for brevi-
md libel.
��
' U
4
Biology Club Meets
Dr. Gerhard Kalmus and Roxanne Tavlor discuss student turn-out at
the ear s first Biolog C lub meeting!
Laws Concerning DWI
� �' and umvenuy ttudenn from the
n Department aft rtme Prevention
On October I, 1�8V North Carolina wiii nave a tie
Id ol ia� dealing with those who operate a vehicle while
mpaired hv alcoholx bevcrafa or jn other impairing
our 1 he sale K,mj ol 1983 Joe much more
dive the drinking age tor heer and unfortified wine
9. W� would ike tor :he students attending our col
reges and unrsersities to he aware ot the new law
Perhaps the h-s; was to evplain some ot the .on
ptehensise provisions ol the new law is to state a
hypothetical -ase involving a student -we will call him
.Use stopped bj a Stale Highwav Patrolman for driving
under :he influence ot an impairing substance
Joe ma have been cropped at one ol the roadblocks
law enforcement agencies can now establish under the
Safe Roads V: to check tor drunk drivers He ma have
been stopped because the trooper saw him drinking a
beet while driving
I nder the Sale Road- Vt. it is unlawful lor ihc driver ol
a vehicle to consume anv alcoholic beverage while dm
mg
I nder the new law. Joe van be arrested and charged
nder the single offense of impaired driving There are
no lesser included offenses, such as careless and reckless
driving alter drinking, in the new law. thus, there will be
no more plea bargaining There is onlv one charge, and it
can Pe proved in one of two wave
I Bv showing the driver's physical or manial (acuities
are appereciablv impaired bv an impairing substance or.
2 Bv showing the driver's alcohol concentration i C) is
0 10 or more
If Joe refuses to submit to a chemical test, his license
will be revoked for one vear He can appls lor limited
driving privileges onlv after surrendering his license lor
six months of the revocation
If Joe registers 0 10 AC or more on a chemical test, Ot
refuses the test, he will be taken before a magistrate and
his license will be suspended immediateh for 10 das-
This is mandati-rv No one gets oft Out-of-state students
will have their privilege to drive in North Carolina
suspended for 10 davs, just the same as studenis licensed
in North Carolina
If the magistrate determines Joe Is too unpaired to he
released the magistrate is empowered under the a to
hold Joe lor up to T4 hours or until a responsible, sober
adult will take responsibilitv for him In no event mav
live be held for more rhan 24 hours
rsl�-�. J� will hme m rrijii on ibr charge- If l.sc is con
victed of driving while impaired, the law requires the
rudge to hold a sentencing hearing where Crossh
gravating Drunk Driving (GADO) factors, aggra
factors and mitigating factors are presented bv the pro
secutor and defense attorness The judge must wcig:
these factors in imposing sentences
If two GADD factos ia prior impaired driving offense
in the past seven vears. driving with revoked license lor
an impaired offense, causing an accident resulting in
senous Injur) to another i are present, there is a man
dators minimum jail term of 14 davs and Joe can be I'm
ed up to S2.O00 If one GADD factor is present. Joe 'aces
a mandators minimum seven davs in lail and a fine up to
$1,000 II Joe has two or more prior convict:����
mg impaired within seven vears. punishment is the same
as if he had two GADD (actors
If no GADD factors are present, the ludge wri-
aggravating and mitigating factors It aggravate .
tors outweigh mitigating factors. Joe can be seme
a minimum of 72 hours in jail, or I! hours of commumtv
service or 90 days without driving or a combination ot
all He also faces a fine of up to $500 If aggravating and
mitigating factors balance out, Joe faces a sentence of 4
hours in jail, 4X hours commumtv service or 60 davs
without driving or a combination of all Additionally.
Joe can be fined up to $250 'f the mitigating factors
outweigh the aggravating factors, Joe faces a jail term of
24 hours, or 24 hous commumtv service or V) davs
without driving or a combinai in ol all Joe can be fined
up to $100
Some aggravating factors are gross impairment or an
�U ol 0 20 or mote, especially reckless driving, an acci
dem causing over $500 damage or personal injury; dnv-
ing while license revoked, two or more 3 point motor
vehicle otlcnses within 5 vears. or one or more prior con
vtcrjoas ot l)W more than " vears old. speeding lo elude
arrest, speeding more lhar 30 miles per hour above the
posted limit, and passing a slopped school bus
Some mitigating factors are slight impairment solelv
(torn alcohol. AC of 0 11 or less, slight impairment solely
ftom alcohol and no chemical test available, generally
safe driving at time ol offense, no setious tralfic offenses
within pasi s vears. impairment caused bv lawfullv
prescribed drug, and voluntarv submission to ireatment
before trial
II this is J.ve's first unpaired driving otlense. he will
lose his driving privileges for one vear He is eligible for a
severelv curtailed limned driving privilege onlv after he
has served a court ordered period ol vehicle non-
operahon If it is Joe's second offense, he loses his
license for four vears and can get no limited privilege
Revocation is permanent lor ihe thud offense
In matters of license revocation tor out of stale
students. North c aiolina has reciprocity with mosi states
lor impaired driving crimes Ihe North Carolina Dvi-
sion of Motor vehicles would send the report of vour
conviction to vour home siate and that siate could apply
the sanction In anv evenr. North Carolina will revoke
vour privilege to operate a motor vehicle in this state
If Joe holds a North Carolina provisional license
(issued to 16 and 17-year olds) and is convicted of DWI
or refuses 10 take a chemical test, or is caught driving
with anv amount ol alcohol or anv impairing substance
in his svstcm (excluding prescriptions taken in a lawful
amount), his license will be revoked until he is 18. or for
45 davs. whichever is longer
The law also provides a one vear license revocation if
An underage person attempts to purchase or pur
ises an alcoholic beverage.
J1 underage person aids or abets another to artempt
to purchase or purchase an alcoholic beverage,
An underage person attempts to purchase, purchases
possesses alcoholic beverages bv using or attempting
to use a fraudulent duvet's license ot other I D . or by
� ending his driver's bcense or anv other I D lor that put-
pose
II lor rrgisicis 0 20 or more on a chemical te�r. h will
h- referred (o an appropriate puhln 01 private laceihtv for
��raiment and .ounseluig Ac levels ia those langes are
indicative ot problem drinkers Problem drinkers cause
the matoruv ot accidents involving impaired drivers
It Joe is caught tor Dk I alter his license is revoked, he
lacev forfeiture ol his vehicle
Another important aspect ol the Safe Roads Act which
mav allect students is the "Dramshop" provision Under
this provision, negligent sale of beer, wine or liquor to an
underage person mav subject the seller to civil liability if
ihe underage person (hen i nniHBMI the beverage and as a
result ot consuming the beverage has an accidenl while
driving impaired This provision led operators of
establishments which sell alcoholic beverages lo ask for
the power 10 hold a person's I D lor a reasonable time to
check the I Ds validitv The seller must tell ther person
whv he is holding the I I)
In addition to the criminal and administrative sanc-
tions mennoned above, loe laces a host of other pro
biems arising trom a conviction tor DW I If he is a first
ol'rnder. he will he required to pas lot and attend classes
at one ol the slate's Alcohol Drug tducalion Traffic
Sch.vols His car insurance will climb precipitously.
Whatever it cost before the conviction, u will now cost
him 39s percent more- 395 percent more tor ihree years!
Ii is not worth it to drink and drive Your persona
COM are too high The costs to society are too high. If
vou drink, don't drive If you drive, don't drink
-SLA&
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Stnp in ;tt Subway after your late night fun Try cine of our
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k. , ii- ��� m top U v. ur inch We're open til! 2 ') a m
sr i"i � ' .t �'� ; k
.SUB
A"ie'ic's Famous
Foot Long Sandwich
208 E. 5th Street
N.C. Coastal Waters Polluted
By
GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
be
on
In a soon to
published report
coastal
ECU'S
Sociology, An-
thropology and
Economics will
release information
proving that the ef-
fects of pollution have
seriously deteriorated
North Carolina's
coastal waterways. Maiolo, chairman of
The report is a follow- the school and coor-
up to a similar study dinator of the study,
conducted in 1978, is the author of
which stated:
"population growth
pollution, in two (coastal) coun-
School of ties was found to be
accompanied by in-
creased amounts of
estuarine acreage clos-
ed to shell-fishing as a
result of the degrada-
tion of water quali-
ty
Dr. John R.
Mississippi Prisoner
Awaiting Execution:
numerous articles and
textbooks dealing
with maritime
sociology.
Maiolo said the
study shows that in-
creases in population
are causing havoc
with the local
fishermen and
creating a pollution
problem that
threatens the
harvesting of shellfish
and other marine life.
"Effluent containing
coliform bacteria is
closing down a hell of
a lot of acreage
Maiolo said.
Maiolo noted
that4 'tremendous
pressure" has been
placed on the North
Carolina coast; clos-
ing coastal areas due
to pollution means
losses in the
thousands of dollars
for coastal fishermen
and communities
As more and more
people move into the
area, their septic
Cont. From Page 1
North Carolina has
34 death row inmates,
16 of whom are black.
There are also one
native American and
one white women on
awaiting execution.
"It's no accident
that nearly a majority
of the people on death
row are people of col-
or Paulig said, ad-
ding that N.C, a state
with a 22-percent
black population, has
a 50-percent non-
white death row slate.
"The death penalty
is the racist institu-
tion Paulic said.
She also disputed the
argument that
justifies the higher
number of blacks on
death row because
they commit more
murders. "There's no
relationshp between
crime rates, race and
the institution of the
death penalty
Paulig said.
Paulig said
NCADP recognizes
there are dangerous
people who need to be
segregated from the
rest of society, but she
doesn' t believe
prisons � as they are
� are doing the job
humanely. "We can
imagine alternatives
that are secure, keep
dangerous people off
the streets and are not
made of steel and con-
crete and do not in-
volve the terrible
deprivation that our
prisons do Paulig
said.
NCADP will be
vigiling for one hour
Thursday night.
Members are urging
citizens to send
telegrams to
Mississippi Gov.
William Winter urg-
ing him to commute
Grey's sentence to life
in prison.
PART TIME
City afl Grata rife
Far�rgi Cot�
�� to ��� cMcfce are �4t4 to �t .tin yo�ik ia 1st
!����� � grate kr��aj la the M aaaaai paaaaaai win.
� he Kermtio. u. r�r.i DtjMrt. -�, ia-�ho�r
r TUllw��������.Se���aaern. Mia ho.r
bvaataaat bj aftajaaj aaaaai aaal haja tab �j � re,ulr
Aaaj at tht City rTv,art OfIte. Maakiaal IuWm
caraw of Wfal Fifth aaal Waahiattoa Smcb. GraeaviU s.(
JOBS
















tanks will only add to
the situation
Maiolo added.
Funded in part by
ECU, the UNC Sea
Grant College Pro-
gram and the South
Atlantic Fishery
Management Council,
the project included
the work of several
ECU graduate and
undergraduate
students. Reba Lewis,
graduate student
assistant in Sociology
who designed a ques-
tionaire for the pro-
ject, said shell fishing
was "just about
finished in Brunswick
county
According to
Lewis, many of the
coastal residents "feel
helpless" and are
unaware of steps to
take to solve their
problems. Many of
the permanent
residents resent out-
siders fishing there
and friction exists bet-
ween those who
harvest shellfish
manually and those
who use mechanical
means. All of these
problems add to a
larger problem that
results when restric-
tions are placed on
fishermen after areas
have to be closed due
to pollution.
The nine county
project concluded this
past summer, but the
study will be ongoing.
"This involves ECU
in world-wide plans
for fishery manage-
ment, Maiolo said.
g t.t.t.l �.� 8 8 8 8 8 B.B.t llllllMIIHHHi 11 in n�ai m m m ne o a a a aa B)t
"Welcome Back ECU"
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THl EASTCAROI IN1AN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1983
Group Wants Jobs, Peace, Freedom Coalition
WASHINGTON
(I PI) - The chair-
man of last weekend's
'March on
Washington" said
I uesdav the broad
based coalition that
drew 300,000 mar
chers will now lobby
for specific "Jobs,
Peace and Freedom"
legislation.
Walter Fauntroy,
who is also the
District of Colum-
bia's non-voting
member of Congress,
predicted his "New
Coalition of Cons-
cience" could have a
"decisive impact" on
Vice Chancellor Meyer
Advises ECU Students
Dear Student,
All of un in the Division of Student Life are happy that you
are with us as students. Our staff are here to serve and work
with you as you begin or continue your education at ECU.
This issue and the last issue of The East Carolinian spotlighted
some of our departments which are here to serve you.
It you have questions, problems or ways we can improve
our services to you, please contact the various student life of-
fices.
I once heard a distinguished university president spell out
what he thought you, as students, ought to receive from your
university education:
1) To read and analve competently, write clearly, speak
fluentlv;
2) To develop life-long curiosity and self-discipline;
3) To understand the foundations, assumptions, limitations
and interrelationships of knowledge of ourselves, our society
and our environment;
4) To understand some culture and time other than our
Ow n;
5) To understand the issues of life, the problems of society
and the value sstems tor conduct in order to allow commit-
ment;
6) To learn to live in a diverse community; to treasure �
not just tolerate � a difference of opinion; to form some
lasting friendships;
7) To develop skill, precision and competence in one chosen
area,
8) To experience some creative opportunity.
Thes. goals can be attained both in the classroom and out-
side the classroom. Strive to attain them. If you do, you will
be getting the most out of your years at ECU.
Again, rhose of us in the Division of Student Life and your
own elected student leaders want to hear from you so that we
can all work together to improve student life at ECU. Always
fee! free to ask us questions and make comments on how we
can work better with and for you.
BeM wishes for a successful 198r 84 experience.
Sincerely,
Elmer Meyer
Vice Chancellor for Student Life
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Congress and on next
fall's election
The coalition's im
mediate goals include
passage of the rem-
troduced Equal
Rights Amendment, a
bill to create jobs in
high unemployment
areas and another to
make Martin I uther
King Jrs birthday a
national holiday.
'More than
300, ()()() marchers
revived Martin I uther
King Jrs dream of
jobs, peace and
freedom for all
Americans, Fauntroy
told a news con-
ference.
"Now the millions
of Americans
represented by those
maichers must let
their political leaders
know that the march
was only the first step
in making that dream
a reality he said.
"The second step
will come in the
statehouses, halls of
Congress and the elec-
tion booths next
November said
ly
The march Satur
day commemorated
the 20th anniversary
of King's landmark
civil rights march on
Washington. Par-
ticipants called for
n�.ui fulfillment of King's
Fauntroy, who led the dream of equality and
crowd in chants justice for all.
against President Speaker
Reagan several times
during Saturday's ral-
after
speaker at the rally
denounced the
�viuic man Know mat tne march during Saturday s ral- denounced the
Campus Regional Development Institute
Helps Resolve Community Problems
Among ECU'S Since Its indention nrnfit nroani7atinn: nf accictQne tr cr
Among ECU's
most prominent
outreach service pro-
grams is the Regional
Development In
stitute, housed in the
Willis Building, at the
corner of First and
Reade streets.
Organized in 19M,
the Institute was
developed to provide
a practical approach
to the resolution of
economic and social
problems within a
32-county region as
well as to help
capitalize on the
strengths for future
economic and social
development.
Since its inception,
the Institute has
gradually grown in
staff, scope and com-
mitment to the
development of
eastern North
Carolina, with a full-
time staff of five pro-
fessionals under the
direction of Janice
Faulkner. Staff
responsibilities are
divided into three
areas: community,
business and environ-
ment.
r h e c o m m unit v
section works with
local governments,
quasi-local govern-
ment groups and non-
profit organizations.
The business facet
promotes small
business and in-
dustrial development,
and the environmen-
tal section provides
assistance with
physical design plans,
permit assistance and
investigative reports
concerning specific
environmental pro-
blems.
The Institute's
plans for the near
future include the
completion of a data
service on eastern
North Carolina
municipalities and
counties, expansion
of assistance to small
businesses, an in-
crease in efforts to
market the region's
attractiveness for
retirement develop-
ment and the initia-
tion of a
canoe nature trail
through eastern North
Carolina.
Interested students,
faculty and staff
members are welcom-
ed to use any of the
institute's resources
and discuss involve-
ment in projects af-
fecting the future of
eastern North
Carolina.
Reagan administra
tion and called tor an
end to what thev call
ed unfair and un
sound economic,
social and defense
policies
Fauntroy an-
nounced that the ycaj
old coalition, com-
posed of abou! 700
groups representing
causes ranging trom
civil rights and labor
to the nuclear treeze
and the environment,
will maintain a per
manent National
fice in Washington
The central office
will provide 325 .
offices with manuals
"outlining the
targeted legislation.
the local legislator's
voting records and
publicity and l � I
ing hints he
Just as the lYr
march galvanized the
nation to enact the
Civil Righ; v of
19M. the enormo
successful Marh
Saturday and the con-
tinuing I i t i c a 1
pressure of the new
coalition" will pro-
duce reform, aid
Fauntrov.
I arlier Tut :
the Nj'i.iiij; l
vatne Polii; ai Act
( ommittee
rtfei
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the formatioi
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I Hi 1 M i AK�.M IN! AN
Style
SEPTEMBER 1. 198?
Page
To Cramped Dorm Rooms
GORDON I POCK Photo Lab
Doubling Up
Pam, standing, and Donna live the split level life in .larvis.
By GORDON IPOCK
Staff Wrii�
ECU's warren-like dorms seem
unlivable to many students used
to more spacious accomodations.
The standard dorm furnishings of
two beds, a couple of desks or
table and some chest of drawers
leave scant room for an extra
chair or sofa from home. Besides
books and clothes, a student can
squeeze in a rent-a-frig, a hot
plate and a ghetto blaster and
that's about it.
The solution? Go split level
with a dorm loft.
According to the campus hous-
ing office, lofts can be con-
structed in any ot ECU's dorms.
Unfortunately, in the newer
dorms where the ceilings are low
and the beds and everything else
are often bolted to the floor, lofts
are difficult to build and of
limited value. But the older dorms
like Jarvis, Fleming and Cotton
are loft haven. Their cavernously-
high, ten-and-a-half foot ceilings
offer a lot of extra living space to
any resident that's handy with a
hammer and a saw.
Sophomores John Greif from
Baltimore and Ron Gatto from
Fort I auderdale have turned a
once-crowded and drab Jarvis
room into a slick and roomy
bachelor's pad. Their six-foot-
high loft covers about half their
room. Both beds are on the loft
leaving the floor for a living and
study area. There's plenty of
room for their large sofa, a coffee
table and a hi-fi cabinet.
"We had to make an estimate
of what lumber we needed, the
amount we needed, went out and
bought it, brought it back here,
brought one piece in at a time and
constructed it that way explain-
ed John. "The room wasn't big
enough to bring all the lumber in
at once, so we brought it in piece-
by-piece, measured it, cut it and
put it up.
"We had a basic plan and
diagram, but a lot of it was im-
provised along the way con-
tinued John.
Ron worked as a carpenter this
summer, but both he and John
agreed that professional skills are
not needed to build a loft.
"We had all the power tools we
needed and all the wood tools
said Ron. He walks to the closet,
reaches in and pulls out a skill
saw.
The guys said they built the loft
in only three hours � an amazing
feat considering the high quality
of design and construction.
"It's held up on four-by-fours,
supported by two-by-fours with
half-inch plywood on topsaid
John. "The lumber cost $150
A knock at the door.
RonCome in
John Who is it
A blond coed pokes her head
around the doorCan I come
in?" She's followed by her
mother.
"Oh wow says the mother,
walking about and ogling the loft.
"This is really something
"People like it says Ron.
"Everybody likes it. They all want
us to buld them oneespecially
girls.
As a rule, girls aren't as hands
with hammers and saws as guys
are, but that doesn't mean they
don't have lofts. There are per-
mits for 23 lofts in Jarvis and
Fleming dorms alone with most of
the lofts in girls rooms. Many girls
get boyfriends and fathers to
build them, but some, like
sohomores Pam Vernon from
Chapel Hill and Donna Spurrier
from Charlotte, simply buy a loft.
Pam and Donna bought their
loft at the end of spring semester
from two girls across the hall.
Since lofts usually must be taken
down over the summer, they
crated it home and then brought it
back when school began last
week. With the help of dear old
dad and some brothers, the had
it nailed together in no time.
Buying a loft is apparentlv a
smart move.
"We got a good deal on
itsaid Donna. "It oniv cost us
S70
"And it cost them SI 10 just to
make it added Pam.
Pam and Donna's loft covers
one side of tjieir room. and. as
with most lofts, supports their
beds. With the beds out ot the
way, they've added wicker fur-
niture and cushions to the room.
The redwood-stained two-bv-
fours of their loft add to the relax
ed Bohemian decor.
For most dorm residents, get
ting out of the dorm and into an
apartment is a major goal. But
John and Ron. and Pam and
Donna intend to stay in Jarvis un-
til they graduate. Dorm lofts, thev
say. make dorm life livable. Oniv
Pam could think of a dorm-loft
disadvantage.
"If you're drunkshe said,
"it's hard to climb up the lad-
der
But Dorm Loft Regs Can Be A Hang-Up
oniv real disadvantage � pain in the neck is
more like n � with dorm lofts is the red tape that
comes with them.
You can't just throw one up. First you must get a
building permit from campus housing Alone with
permit thev give you three pages o! regulations.
I he regulation, set up bv the campusoccupational
Health and Satetv Office, ate checked by dorm
K A.s Ignore the tegs and your name starts travel-
g up campus housing's bureaucratic lad-
dereventually your lott gets thumped.
John and Ron discoverd this Then ladder didn't
descend towards tHe door. Instead, it was located in
the center of ifio room facing ihc window lire
� ard i - to the regs. John and Ron didn't
know ghl come and thump their loft; thev
knew it was in jeopardy I he relocated the
ladder to avoid having to tear their lott down.
Curious who the loft-thumping heavy in housing
is, I followed a tangle o red tape finding as many
sstions as answers. The R.A s don't thump lofts;
neither do residence hall directors Connie Burgess,
director for larvis and Fleming dorms, has a
temperment as pleasing as Snow White's. She
wasn't abo . fluff and puff and thump anyone's
� down.
1 did set. a note, however, in Burgess' office that
stated: "I se ot milk crates in dormitories is il-
legal She had no idea why the rule existed; she
just knew it had come down the bureaucratic
pipeline the same as all other rules.
Nancy Smith, assistant dean of resident life, was
not the loft thumper either, but she tipped me that
the milk-crate rule originated in N. C. state law
Finally Carolyn Fulghum, associate dean and
director of residence life, admitted that she and
Director of Housing Operations Dan Wooten are
the loft thumpers. They have final say on whether a
loft stays or goes. And the milk crates? According
to Fulghum, the law was prompted by the N.C.
Milk Commission. Ira Simon, director of campus
food services, Fulghum said, had more details.
Simon said there indeed is a state law that forbids
the ownership oi milk crates bv anyone but dairy
companies. You can be fined and jailed for having
one in your dorm room or any place else.
So what did all this red-tape chasing prove? Well,
nothing about Dean Fulghum, Dan Wooten or
anyone else in campus housing. They're not out to
harass dorm students. As individuals they're all fine
people doing their jobs, and the loft regs they en-
force are designed only to protect students from in-
jury and dorm rooms from damage.
But somehow, when you paste the individuals
ogether with rules, permits and regs that might
orginate from who knows where, it can all seem
like z gooey bureaucratic mess to a peon student
down in the dorms.
An easily crafted loft can make a crowded dorm room fun to live in.
GORDON IPOCK - Prvo'o LaB
Flunk A Test? Take A Deep Breath And Keep Slouching
WASHINGTON (UPI) 1
first began hearing rude com-
ments about my posture when 1
was a itty bitty baby toddling
about in them old cotton fields
back home.
Later, Army drill sergeants
sounded the same theme.
"Shoulders back thev would
shout. "Stomach in! Chin out
Even then, I instinctively knew
that slouching was good for you 1
just couldn't figure out how I was
being benefitted. Now I know.
According to the September
Omni magaine, slumping helps
ward off mental depression
brought on by failure.
Omni cites studies in which 50
college students who were in-
structed to sit in a slouched posi-
tion after failing a test suffered
less remorse than 50 flunkers who
sat erect.
Moreover, the magazine re-
ports, those who slumped "were
more self-confident and actually
tried harder" on the next test.
"Slouching promotes a kind of
detachment it quotes a
psychologist as concluding. "If
depression starts to set in, it might
not be a bad idea to take on a
slumped position and withdraw
for a while
My sentiments exactly.
But you don't have to rely on
college students for documenta-
tion of the value of slouching.
Take some of the great figures of
history and divide them according
to posture. Those who assumed a
ramrod stance and those who,
when not actually lying down,
moved about in a sort of semi-
crouch.
You will find, I think, that the
latter were less likely to sink into a
blue funk when life dealt them a
nasty blow, as life has a way of
doing.
Two examples spring to mind:
Abe Lincoln and Groucho Marx.
Photographs of the day make it
clear that Lincoln brooded a lot.
Although he obviously had much
to be depressed about, his reac-
tion to failure probably was in-
fluenced by the fact that he wore
stovepipe hats and had to stand
straight to keep them from falling
off.
I am now convinced the reason
all that brooding never took him
over the deep end was because he
was taller than most folks and had'
to bend over slightly to make
conversation.
Groucho, by contrast, was
about as straight as a coathanger.
Stooping made it easier for him to
go with the flow and maintain his
equilibrium.
His perpetual tilt undoubtedly
did as much as funny punch lines
to enhance his career in comedy.
It is, however, not enough
merely to observe the psycho-
logical benefits of slouching, as
Omni has done. There also is a
physical reason why slouchers are
more likely to stay in a roseate
frame of mind.
Look closely at the spinal discs
and you will see thev are
something like dominoes. When
stacked one atop the other in
perfect symmetry, dominoes tend
to sway at the top. In human
spinal cords, this is about where
the medulla oblongata connect-a
to the hypothalamus.
Better stability is achieved bv
offsetting the discs through slum-
ping, thereby creating a can-
tilevered effect.
Physiology aside, it was good
of Omni to give us a rationale for
drooping. Next time someone ad-
monishes you for slouching, just
explain you are trying to keep a
stiff upper lip.
Dieters Beat The Big Battle Of The Bulge
STANLEY LEARY - Photo Lab
Munch Out
Although these fellas have kept their trim physique, many have been caught by the forbidden 'bulge
By ROBIN AYERS
Staff Write
Here it is! One more article on
one of the most disliked words in
the English language: Dieting.
It is a small comfort to know
I'm not the only one with a weight
problem.
Where are the rest of you?
Hiding behind a crowd of svelte,
physically fit beach bunnies and
jocks?
Show yourself. As one who has
spent (at least) two years trying to
beat the battle of the bulge, I've
become familiar with the traps
and tribulations of dieting.
America is in the midst of a
fitness craze and I am briefly jum-
ping on the bandwagon. Here are
some basic guidelines and tips I've
digested along the way.
Road blocks and pitfalls await
anyone trying to lose five pounds
or a hundred pounds. Inspiration
and motivation for dieting ranges
from elusiveness to disap-
pearance. Losing weight for a par-
ty or a sweetheart may provide
temporary motivation. Unless you
want to lose for yourseIf,the
weight may be back in a short
time. Inspiration comes from in-
side and the pounds fall away.
There is no substitution for a
balanced, nutritious diet. It has
been found that skipping meals is
no help but may often be a hin-
drance.
Diet pills are a popular way of
trying to lose weight easily. If you
want caffeine, drink a couple cups
of coffee. You'll become full, not
to mention the work out your
digestive system gets from the
Java. Wait awhile and you'll be in
a position where you feel like
you're alredy losing several
ounces. Quickly.
When beginning a diet, you
may lose a few pounds fast and
will then seem unable to lose any
more. Initial weight loss may just
be water; the fat goes later. The
body will reach "plateaus" as the
weight will level off temporarily
while the body is adjusting to the
loss.
Exercise is an excellent and
painful supplement to dieting.
Dedication is put lo the test with
running shoes, jump ropes.
bicycles and aerobics class, every-
day. You may not be losing
weight at the present, but toning
the muscles regularly will bring
about a desired body faster. So I
keep telling myself.
Holidays and skimpy summer
clothes may be pitfalls or excuses
for not losing. All the trimmings
of Thanksgiving and Christmas
go from the table to the waist at
lightning speed. And how many
people (including myself) wish to
hide in tents rather than be caught
dead in a swimsuit, much less a
pair of Bermudas.
All the more reason for trying.
A good attitude reaps a healthy
spirit, a healthy body.
Alchoholic beverages are lethal
to the life of a diet. If anything is
loaded with calories, it is this li-
quid diet of ECU. know.





8
?. THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1983
Working Conditions For Mig
By MIKE HAMER
Staff Writer
As the new crop of apples
begins coming in from the western
part of the state, and as the fresh
vegetables keep coming from the
eastern, western, and central parts
of the state; few people realize
that the issues involving migrant
workers and the conditions under
which they are working remain.
The issue is a complex one involv-
ing human rights, growers' rights,
and the very underpinning of sup-
ply and demand which dominates
the food industry.
There is a symbiotic relation-
ship between growers and
migrants that would affect the
price and availability of fresh
fruits and vegetables were it to
change. And yet the question
must be asked: "What is the cause
of the problem? Are the growers
all profit seekers who do not care
about the rights of their workers?
Are the migrant workers reallv
predominantly alcoholics and
"ne're do wells?" Or is there
something basically wrong with
the way the food marketing
system works?
In a UPI interview with Fred
McNeeve, George Sorn, general
manager of the Florida Fruit and
Vegetable Growers Association,
said the percentage of the cost of
raising such crops as citrus
vegetables and sugar cane that can
be attributed to labor is 30 to 60
percent.
"Any increase in the labor cost
will impact on the total cost of the
product he said. "The more
substantial the increase, the more
food prices go up
Sorn said labor costs could af-
fect the farmer's choice which
crop to plant and how much to
plant.
"If he knows he cannot retrieve
those costs in the market place,
he'll think twice about planting a
particular crop, or he may reduce
the acreage he plants
According to a UPI report on
the migrant worker situation,
North Carolina is the third largest
employer of farm labor in the
country. It is 11th in the country
in its number of migrant farm
workers.
According to Tom Myers, NC
State Administrator for the
Migrant and Seasonal Farm-
workers Association, there were
an estimated 40,000 migrant
workers employed in the state in
mid-July. The majority of these
migrant workers come into the
state from Florida in mid-April to
harvest cabbage. Many will move
on to the vegetable and tobacco
harvest in this state and in
Virginia. Many will stay in" the
state through the fall to work in
the yam crop.
A report prepared for the North
Carolina General Assembly
estimated that the average annual
income of a farm worker is less
than $4,000. Some estimates put
that figure as low as $1,500 per
annum.
Many of the migrant workers
who pick North Carolina apples
are strictly fruit pickers, moving
from citrus to peach groves to ap-
ple orchards. Some of these
pickers are Haitians and Mexicans
who are in the US illegally.
"North Carolina does not have
"guest workers" who are invited
from other countries as in the case
in some states where apples are
grown Myers said.
Because of their mobility, many
migrant farmworkers do not vote
and many also do not receive the
unemployment and welfare
benefits which other low-income
workers receive.
Joan Preiss, NC Staffperson
for the National Farmworkers
Ministry, feels that the crew
leader system is reponsible for
much of the exploration of
migrant farmworkers.
"Growers are rising the crew
leader system to absolve
themselves of responsibility to
their workers Preiss said on
Tuesday.
"In California the crew leader
system has been done away with
Preiss said. "The unions there are
using hiring halls and the seniority
systems to hire workers; the union
runs the hiring hall. This has suc-
ceeded in doing away with the ex-
ploitive crew leader system
Pink Francis runs a relatively
small apple orchard near
Waynesville, North Carolina.
Francis seldom uses migrant
workers; he mainly uses locals
who have worked for him for 5 or
10 years, drifters who wander in
to work, and some members of
the Cherokee Nation who return
each year to help him with his
crop.
Francis does not use the crew
leader system because he likes to
speak directly with each of his
pickers. He does, however, de-
fend the crew leaders system
"The crew leader system is
good and needed Francis said
"The crew leader takes a lot of
pressure off the farmer. The
farmer is taken up with
marketing, harvesting, shipping,
packing, and looking for new
markets. He usually doesn't have
time during the harvest to inter-
view and pay each worker
When asked about the union
hiring hall system in California,
Francis said, "I think the Farm-
workers Association is a unioniza
tion here in North Carolina
Interviewed at his home in
Winterville on Tuesday evening.
State Senator Vernon White said,
"Some of the crew leaders do ex-
ploit their labor. You have to take
into consideration that much of
the migrant labor force is
alcoholic. They're looking for
something to eat, to wear, and to
drink. The farmers aren't respon-
sible for the way their labor is
treated
"Crew leaders pav by produc-
tion White said, "so much per
bushel. It's not a desirable system.
We've had some bad crew leaders;
some crew leaders have been
sentenced and convicted
Four Orlando, Florida men
were convicted on Tuesday of
holding migrant workers as slaves
at agricultural labor camps in
Florida and North Carolina. The
four men have been sentenced to
five to fifteen years in prison.
North Carolina recently passed
an anti-slavery law. Senator
White handled the bill on the
floor of the state senate.
"I think it tracks the federal
law Senator White said. "The
House version wanted to make the
farmer responsible, but the
farmer never knows what is going
on with the crew
Preiss was extremely disap-
pointed with the North Carolina
anti-slavery bill. "It was a very
gutted bill Preiss said. "Two
vital provisions were deleted. One
would have made the owners
ultimately responsible for labor
conditions on their farms; and the
other would have given the State
Bureau of Investigation the right
to investigate labor practices if
See Migrant, Page 9
Actress Lee Grant Directs
Film 'Women Who Kill'
NEW YORK (UPI)�
HBO's Women Who
Kill is a provacative
study of the shattered
lives of some of the
500 women in U.S.
prisons for murder of
-manslaughter �
isually in the deaths
of people they knew
:nd once loved.
Seven women at
'wo prisons, inducing
Charles Manson cult
killer Leslie Van
Houten, are inter-
viewed during the
nour-long documen-
tary that begins airing
Sept. 7.
Several of the
dories stir the cons-
cience � some of
hese women serving
14 years to life were
"up until that par-
ticular moment"
:av -abiding citizens
� but a couple sound
quite callous.
Oscar-winning ac-
tress Lee Grant, who
is director and nar-
rator of the film,
generally seems sym-
pathetic, but she cau-
tions viewers to
remember that the
�victim's accounts can-
not be heard.
At the Bedford
Hills Correctional
Facility for Women in
Westchester County,
N.Y 42 -year-old
Violet is being visited
for the first time in
two years by her two
daughters and their
children. They have
made a 19-hour trip
by bus from Ap-
palachia with $20 in
their pockets to see
their mother.
It is a touching reu-
nion and especially
disturbing is what the
daughters have to say-
about their mother's
relationship with the
man she killed.
"He beat her up an
awful lot for no
reason. Knocked her
down, kicked her. But
I guess there was love
there. She always
took him back
A fellow inmate is
Virginia, who shot to
death her husband of
26 years, an airline
pilot, after they had
been separated for
two years. The former
high school beauty
queen said it happen-
ed when her husband
came to her in one of
his frequent violent
rages.
Miss Grant states
that if these women
had been attacked by
strangers, their
chances of acquittal
by a jury would have
been much better. But
when their victims are
husbands or
boyfriends, women
almost always are
held responsible in
some way for the
abuse they suffered.
There are other
reasons why women
kill, however.
At the California
Institution for
Women in Chino,
Calif Judy talks
about killing a man
during a robbery
when she was 25 years
old.
Her boyfriend, a
professional burglar,
was shot in the leg
during a robbery. He
told her to shoot the
man and she did,
Judy says. "I don't
know what happens
to me with men she
says. "Women here I
can say no if they sug-
gest some weird ac-
tivity. But men, some
chemical goes off in
my brain.
��
A prison official
says that women im-
prisoned for murder
or manslaughter are
passive, rather than
aggressive � the can't
say no.
Miss Grant
describes only one of
the seven women as
the stereotype hard-
core criminal and that
is Marie, whom the
narrator says has a
lifelong criminal
record.
But there also is
Frannie, 20, a New
York music student
whose drug dealing
finally led to a fatal
argument with a
fellow dealer.
"I don't go around
shooting-people she
protests. "I had to
close my eyes to do it.
But the guy's got
four shots in him
There's Manson
cultist Van Houten,
the "high school
princess turned
runaway" who at the
age of 19 held down
the middle-age wife of
a Los Angeles
businessnman while
the pleading woman
was stabbed repeated-
ly.
"I believed that
Charlie held the
answer to truth and if
1 turned my back on
doing something, it
was morally wrong
she says.
I iiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiifiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiins
AXA
RUSH EAST CAROLINA'S
OLDEST AND MOST
ESTABLISHED FRATERNITY:
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
The Legend Lives On,
RUSH Sept. 6,7,8 9:00
For Rides And Info
Call 752-6159
IIMIIIllltllltlltlllMlllllHMIIIIIIItUllMHIIMIMlltlllMIHllMIMMIIIlltl1lMlllllIIIIHIHMIHItlMIHItlllllIllll�IIHIIIMIIHIIIIIMIMtltllllllMIMlll
)tllwaufflmffiffiffifflmcn�gi�iHKmfig�mm.mm
1L
Introducing the
HUNGRY PIRATE
SPECIAL
)iai5lSl5lg55l�RfllSlSl
Mex ica n Resta u ra nt
'FIESTA TIME
Weeknites 10 til 1
Weekends 10 til 2
757 -1666
El Grande Burito $2.50
Draught 50-
2 - 5p.m. everyday
Every Nite
Georgetown Shops
521 ContancheSt.
MtSWW
BB&T 24 NOW AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
HWST,
�&fel
rw
-1
i
i h
BB&T 24 can handle your banking trans-
actions any day or night, on weekends and
holidays, 365 days a year.
You can access up to 10 different BB&T
accounts. In less than 30 seconds you can
get cash with your BB&T 24 card, Visa or
MasterCard. You can also make deposits,
transfers and payments.
Late in the fall, you will be able to use
BB&T 24 across the nation through the
PLUS� SYSTEM network. You'll have access
to your accounts at over 3,000 locations
wherever you travel throughout the USA.
NO SERVICE CHARGE CHECKING
FOR STUDENTS AT BB&T
When you open your checking account
at one of BB&Ts three convenient Green-
ville locations, just tell the lady that you're a
full time student at ECU. Shell flag your
account to waive all service charges.
PRIZES1 PRIZES! PRIZES!
We're going to give away lots of prizes on
Wednesday, September 7, from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m. at the BB&T 24 machine at Mendenhall
Student Center.
If you already have your BB&T 24 card
bring it along. If you don't, well lend you
ours. You may win cash, tickets to athletic
events, or other valuable prizes.
Don't forget September 7.
BB&T
Owned by PLUS SYSTEM, Inc 752-6889
M.mb MM o, 1mmm Corponmon
'Rowa
HOLLYWOOD
(UPI) � "Rowan and
Martin's Laugh-In
the innovative group
comedy series that in-
spired "Saturdav
Night Live" and
others, returns to TV
in abbreviated, syn-
dicated reruns this
month
The old hour-long
shows have been whit-
tled down to 30
minutes each and
should prove more
than nostalgic visits
with the wild and
wooly band of zanies
that captured the na-
tion's fancy - and
ratings - 15 years ago.
Romping back on
screen will be half-
clad Goldie Hawn,
colorfully body-
painted with sug-
gestive slogans Arte
Johnson in his Ger-
man helmet. Henrv
Gibson with bis out-
sized posey and Ruth
Buzzie in her
atrocious hairnet.
On hand, too, will
be Judy Carne holler-
ing "Sock it to me"
and being drenched
with buckets of water.
Chelsea Brown and
I
re
tn
th
Rl
Tr
Grl
ch
an
sh
Migrant
Has Fina
Downfall
Cond From P. 8
called upon by the
governor
Preiss went on to
say, "In a sense this
bill says it's all right
to hire a slave holder;
it's just not right to be
on
Myers fees that the
new anti-slavery bill
provides no incentive
to prosecute. "When
migrants have been
victims in the state
Myers said, "usually
the law enforcement
of the county has talk-
ed them out of press-
ing charges. We have
a criminal system that
allows a sheriff to talk
a migrant worker out
of filing a com-
plaint
"The price human
dignity has suffered in
the crew leader svsiem
has no price Myers
said. "If a crew leace:
wants to charge S2 for
a pack of cigarettes
and $5 for a bottle of
wine, usually the
worker has no alter-
native but to pay these
prices. The worker
usually ends up los-
ing
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veg
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corn
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fed
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ab
rep
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the
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bill on the
. federal
iaid "The
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the
lisap-
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owners
labor
id the
State
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�age 9
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ATE
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your
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24 card,
1 lend you
� athlete
f889
� S�lm
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER I. 1983
'Rowan And Martin's Laugh-In' Returns
HOI LYWOOD
PI) "Rowan and
Martin's Laugh-In
the innovative group
comedy series that in-
spired "Saturday
Night Live" and
others, returns to TV
in abbreviated, syn-
dicated reruns this
month.
The old hour-long
shows have been whit-
tled down to 30
minutes each and
should prove more
than nostalgic visits
uith the wild and
woo!) band of zanies
that captured the na-
tion's fancy - and
ratings - 15 years ago.
Romping back on
screen will be half-
clad Goidie Hawn,
colorfully body-
painted with sug-
gestive slogans; Arte
Johnson in his Ger-
man helmet, Henry
Gibson with his out-
sied posey and Ruth
Buzie in her
atrocious hairnet.
On hand, too, will
be Judy Carne holler-
ing "Sock it to me"
and being drenched
with buckets of water,
Chelsea Brown and
Theresa Graves danc-
ing in sexy bikinis and
Joanne Worley shat-
tering eardrums.
Lily Tomlin's
Ernestine, the swit-
chboard operator,
and Suzie Cheerleader
characters are back
and the joke wall re-
mains intact.
Best of all, Dan
Rowan and Dick Mar-
tin will be seen in their
Farkle Family sket-
ches and staggering
through the old
cocktail party
bedlam.
Behind the madness
is producer George
Schlatter, the ir-
reverent comedy en-
trepreneur who push-
ed double-entendre to
the limit on network
TV.
Viewers will be able
to pick out guest stars
Richard Nixon,
William Buckley,
Truman Capote, Billy
Graham, Martha Mit-
chell, Oral Roberts
and other unexpected
characters in the
show's cavalcade of
comedy.
Topical gags that
would seriously date
the show have been
lopped. But producer
Schlatter was
astonished at how lit-
tle the country has
changed since
"Laugh-In" left the
air in 1972.
"Some jokes were
prophetic Schlatter
said in his cluttered
office, from which he
produces "Real Peo-
ple
"In one sketch we
did a number about
Ronald Reagan in the
White House. But we
were doing jokes on
inflation, ecology,
pentagon spending,
nuclear waste, drugs,
unemployment. And
Pentagon spending.
They're still with us.
"I predict Dan ana
Dick will become
gigantic stars again.
They were funny and
the show still makes
me laugh.
Laugh-In' had an
impact on all TV com-
edy and commercials.
It opened the door for
'All In The Family'
and 'Saturday Night
Live' by being funny
on serious subjects. It
did the same for video
music tapes with art
pieces on Kenny
Rogers and The First
Edition, the Nitty
Gritty Dirt Band and
the Temptations.
"There was a fast-
paced compression of
time and group com-
edy that influenced
the electronic editing
of taped shows, which
we developed
Schlatter gives full
credit to his writers,
most of whom are
now producers of
comedy shows of their
own, for the brevity,
attack, impudence
and irreverence that
became the show's
hallmark.
"The BBC in Lon-
don studied our tapes
and came up with
'Monty P y t h o n's
Flying Circus
Schlatter said.
"Much of today's
TV comedy is
derivative of
'Laugh-In But our
show was derivative
too. We took liberally
from Laurel and Har-
dy, Milton Berle,
Burns and Allen and
mostly from Ernie
Kovacs
Some of
"Laugh-In's" best
moments are the
unrehearsed bloopers,
dialogue botches, un-
scheduled pratfalls
and others that
Schlatter insisted re-
main in the show.
"I used to do terri-
ble things to Cioldie
get her to break up or
blow lines Schlatter
said. "It drove her
crazy because she
knew we'd just keep
going with the scene.
Finally she'd just
walk off camera.
"We were bawdy
and sexy but there was
also an innocence to
Migrant Work
Has Financial
Downfalls
Con'd From P. 8
called upon by the
governor
Preiss went on to
say. "In a sense this
bill says it's all right
to hire a slave holder;
it's just not right to be
on
fyers feels that the
new anti-slavery bill
provides no incentive
to prosecute. "When
migrants have been
victims in the state
Myers aid, "usually
the law enforcement
of the county has talk-
ed them out of press-
ing charges. We have
a criminal svstem that
allows a sheriff to talk
a migrant worker out
of filing a com-
plaint
'The price human
dignity has suffered in
the crew leader system
has no price Myers
�aid. "If a crew leader
wants to charge $2 for
a pack of cigarettes
and $5 for a bottle of
wine, usually the
worker has no alter-
native but to pay these
prices. The worker
usually ends up los-
ing
Because many
tobacco farmers in the
state are turning to
vegetable crops to
supplement their in-
come it is generally
felt that the state will
feel an increase in the
need for migrant
labor.
According to a
report prepared for
the NC General
Assembly earlier this
year, projections in-
dicate an 80 percent
growth in demand for
food crops in the state
by the year 2000, and
much of that growth
will be in vegetable
production.
"All of this is to say-
that by all projections
the problems
associated with
migrant labor will not
decrease the study
says. North Carolina
must recognize that
the situation will not
disappear. Therefore,
the state must begin to
propose some solu-
tions not only for
humanitarian reasons
but also from an
economic point of
view
Shrimp lovers
Why travel 100 miles
to the beach and pay
high prices for
fresh shrimp?
Popcorn
$s Shrimp
P 0� ALL YOU CAN EAT
:amily Restaurants
$5.99
A WHALE OF A MEAL
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
popcorn shrimp dinner
ALL YOU CAN EAT
$5.99
TUESWEDTHURS.
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327
Kappa Alpha (jr&gr
The Home of Southern Gentlemen
-rift
invites all men to
RUSH
Tuesday and Wednesday Night
Parties begin at 9:00 P.M.
500 East 11th Street
We invite you to visit our house during rush. We
are ECLTs oldest fraternity and maintain the
highest standards in intramural athletic com-
petition, service to the community and chari-
table organizations, scnolarship and social
funct' �ns. The same ideals and traditions that
made Kappa Alpha one of the school's most
outstanding fraternities in 1958 can still be
found today. Check the other houses and then
let us tell you why we think KA may be the best
for vou
the show. We could
be outrageous but
stay within the
bounds of good taste.
We never did any pro-
drug jokes.
"In some respects
we were doing im-
provisational theater,
thinking jokes and
trying to reach a
balance between the
silly and the signifi-
cant
The 140 shortened
"Laugh-In" segments
will be syndicated in
71 cities beginning
Sept. 19, which
Schlatter hopes will
attract a new genera-
tion of young viewers
along with millions of
established
"Laugh-In" fans.
pooooooooooooopo.ooooooooo
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Announcing!
The (.rand Opening of
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CHOICE
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Sept. 7
9am-9pm
ITIK�
Handmade Clothing, toys, etc.
Two Blocks from Dickenson
Between 10th St. and 14th St.
10ao off with this Coupon
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I Phone: 758-9102
.2905 East 10th Street in Greet















































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Accepting Any Items Of Value For Collateral
All Transactions Confidential
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� ?
HAS A RING TO IT.
SEE THE ENTIRE COLLECTION OF
HERFF JONES COLLEGE RINGS AT:
September 9:00am-
DATF: 7,8,9,12,13 TIME: 4:00pm
PLACE: Student Stores
if
HERFF JONES
Division of Carnation Company
t
-
fi





llll t S I Mt l INI N
Sports
Bucs Aren't Afraid Of Sunshine Boys
HIM VI - ss
�p -1 .in.
and two
. ECl football coach
his Pirates are
ay's game
anked Floi
set
sed the
i it a press con
I
beco i
C S
. W
motive in mind foi the trip to
rallahassee, I la "We're looking
foi respect he said "Even it
you lose il c lose, that's a big dil
ference than being blown out
I he I'uaics will be counting on
a large group ol eteran players to
prevent anothei blowout. Last
year, Emory took 2b freshmen to
rallahassee but will take only
three this weekend No. 3 quartet
back Ron Jones, runningback
Darrell speed and tinebackei Ron
Ciilliard will be making the tup.
"We ha e more depth on tins
team than am I've coached in
lour eats he said "I've got
more pro scouts in tin office than
I've ever had I ither they're look
ing toi good football players oi
they 're a 'hen time
� North . arolii i
e relatively
N i o 's game but
a ithout players w ho
expei n see action.
i ' fei ard Ricl

� .
v rreg 1 homas ha i I i i
shoulder
Second team qnaUeih.uk lohll
v illiams has returned to ;
aftei suffering an ankle ��;
.ind is "i iinmiiL about 91' ,
right now Emory said.
I i eshman quai tei bai k B
Herndon just withdrew I
school a few day s I he
Greensboro native has had
blems �ith his joints "He sa
k
just got too painful foi hin
1 HUM
I rnory, however, said despite
those injuries, the Pirates 'are the
healthiest we've evei been "
I here will be one startet miss
from Saturday's lineup Ot
ive i,i, kle (ireg Qui k didn't
meet II ademit
despite fulfilling
quirements He's ineligible
(ffensively, the Pirates will be
- i

ft

Emory More Fired
Up In Fourth Year
L-mmm
depending on quarterback k
Ingran id the w i
"He's had the best pre
practice he's evei I
said "We just feel real good
fensively. except tor the lad
the depth in the offensive line
1 si Kelly 1 owrey. I
finished with 1,67 I ya
and 1 1 touchdown fall, will
more than likely be calling the
signals tor the Seminoles. 1 owrey
missed several pi i
because ol a shouldei spi
she .
"We hope hi
Emoi "That1 a I v
� -
I he But , will a t
I inior i
. Mien He le 1 the nat
scoi ing last yea
while registering 21 ' lowi

rh � ti � ��
FSI
pt En
� I aftei i
he


1
J
.
it of 1

�� Sow 1 �

SIud
mked highthe Bucs will be successful
in Division-1 football "Right v aldn't lake a 7-4 he sa d " V ere e

( inch Pleasantsd aboul the season, and we � see how fai we' v e come
I :k InsideW( ne at a time a little m ip this sea

'also m
'ire H 1 si begins a
�me game, a Seminole ma � o the centei
I heId, w here he then throws
into the ground. 1 he
am1 si goes beserk. 1
' 1 .ball players had to in the dressing room during
re school's ritual.
i- MianBut not this yeai "I'm noi
r i d a. n tl them do that this
.year Emory said. "1 want
peninj maythem ro see that renegade ind
� across the field
.ill Emory . his
� ;B : ise the '83 squad
� 'something special. " I his
It'steam has character, but football
�� build that It (football)
i Well,strengthens charactet 1
Riordan Could Pose
Problem For Pirates
B Kr N BOI ION

I emple I niversity

VETER NS SI D1
I niversitv o
year head Bt
��� . . i
"Bear" Bryai
� ft'a;
lai
i
H

4
Headoach hd Emory sji.l ht is mure fired up this season than he's been in
three tears. "We're excited this eaon, and we want to see him far we've
tome he said.
las; yeai
I emple has not had a winning
team since the 1979 team went 9-2
and then beat Californi i in th :
(ia ' i'e Bi a
ne big
I been r. the fool
powers
1940s . tht p rice of it
neighboi - Penr v' ��� u
Wii tw
dependent- recruil
: s. I

tovers.
Bemg an Inde
I
with national po ers :h ii
:he same manner as ECl
year, remple plays five 1982 bowl
earns: Pitt, Penn State. Georgia,
v est irginia and Boston i
ege
If the Owl ive a w inn-
ng season in v ; they will have to
rely heavily on the arm oi senior
tei back rim Riordan.
Temple has always had a tradi
tion ol fine quarterbacks.
Riordan is no exception. The 6'
1 185-pound QB complete M
No
thai number of bow; appearances
70 "7 n
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Marshall i

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ense wl
per a i
Mosi
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See Bls. pJk;i 12
Ingram Fits Role As Pirate QB
Senior quarterback Kevin Ingram jukes a defender in 1st year's 23-10 victory over I emple In that game. Ingrain
rushed for 105 vards and passed for 101 more.
B kr N BOI ION
XtMvlunl sprl. I
Within the framework of any
successful football team stands
one position instrumental in the
fortunes oi the entire team the
quarterback.
I he quarterback, aftei all,
handles the ball on every offensive
play He must be a master oi
disguises, a stout-hearted leader
and a jack oi all-trades.
A team without a quarterback
is like an attacking army without a
general lacking cohesion and
dii ection.
W hen ECU marches into
rallahassee Saturday night, the
Pirates will be led b senior Kevin
1 n g i am , the fleet- foot ed
s i ambler from Philadelphia
While playing only about halt
the tune last year, Ingram threw
foi 605 yards and ran foi anothei
J20 He scored eight IDs on the
ground and two more through the
an
But the 5 11. ISO pound signal
callei wasn't originally a Pirate.
ttei a highly successful high
school career, Ingram enrolled at
Villanova But aftei his first yeai
at Villanova, the Wildcats drop
ped then football program and
Ingram chose to come to ECU
ovei such schools .is Put.
Maryland and Oklahoma State
V (ording to Ingram, it was
l�e at tirst sight "When I first
came here. 1 really, loved it,
responded. It was just one oi
those things
One thing that Ingram had to
adapt to at ECU was a change in
the offensive formation that he
had been used to all his life.
For many years, ECl tans were
used to seeing the Pirates running
out oi the wishbone back field for-
mation. But last ear. under the
direction ol former offensive
coordinator 1 arr Beckish, ECl
followed the lead of main schools
around the country and switched
to the Option I offense
"I had run the wishbone all m
life Ingram said, "but 1 think
I've adapted ver well to the new
offense and 1 actual!) think I like
it better
()ne o the main reasons tor the
swith in formations was to in-
crease the potency of the Pirates'
aerial attack And while the
Pirates still relied on then strong
ground game last season, the ball
was being put in the air more than
in the past.
1 he aerial attack will be needed
this Naturdav night when Ingram
and Co. travel south to face the
powerful Seminoles from Florida
State.
W hile a IrM of people are worn
ing about playing the Seminoles as
a season opening oppenent. In-
gram sees one way in which it
might be an advantage.
"Wc a ays seen
to a good
stated "So 1 see t as a
age to stai t off wii
probably be o i
so far, the P
ry ' � ee
i
yeai
Ingi in . �. :
ing one oi the ma
the Pira
in the pasi
e c o ac I
stafl. especially new
eoordm.r v Bal
"Withou
bettei team tl
been here Ingram stated �
asked to compare ECU t
the past with this year's �
have a lot ol . �
quickness
Ihe Pirate ofl
a long way n pi
this year, as the entire unit
the 40 in less than, 5 0 seconds i
averages close to 270 p
person
s fai as life aftei I I
Business dministration n rj
still up in the air about h
"n !UvI let nature take its
course he said with a relaxed
tone
Xnd it the Pirates follow the
course laid out bv Ingram
year, it should be smooth filing
tor EC I plavers and tans
t
Thes attl
and i oache
Turner
Bv K sm M


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Torre Not Losing Faith
In His Stumbling Braves
d Pose
irates
These aihletes are enjoying a pia dinner sponsored by the ECU Student Athletic Board (SAB) Tuesday night. Players
and coaches from all the Pirate teams were invited to get acquainted with each other.
Turner Left With Few Players
ATLANTA (UPI)
� The Atlanta Braves
have misplaced their
winning touch the
past several weeks,
but Joe Torre has no
intention of throwing
in the towel, not while
there are still a half
dozen games left
against Los Angeles.
"Sure, there's
reason for concern
said Atlanta's
manager after the
Braves went from a
six and one-half game
lead over the Dodgers
on Aug. 11 to a one
and one-half game
deficit on Aug. 30 by
losing nine of 14
games. "But, there's
still plenty of time
left. When you still
have 30 games to
play, being a game or
two behind isn't that
drastic.
"The kev to this
thing is those six
games we still hae
with the Dodgers
(three in Los Angeles
Sept. 9-11 and the
other three in Atlant.i
Sept. 23-25) said
Torre. "We can't
count on other teams
doing our work for
us. We've got to sta
within striking
distance, close enough
so we can get the job
done when we go
head-to-head with the
Dodgers
The defending
champion Braves led
the National League
West most of this
season, but fell
behind on Aug. 29 tor
the first time since
early July when they
lost to the Chicago
Cubs while the
Dodgers were sweep-
ing a doubleheader
against the Mets.
I he Cubs beat them
7-5 that night and 9-6
the next and that had
Torre moaning about
his pitching.
"You can't fault
our bats (the Braves
were hitting .276 as a
team) said Torre
"Any time you score
live or more runs you
should win
Pascual Perez and
rookie Craig McMur-
trv were the stars of
the Braves' pitching
staff over the first
half of the season
But even though his
13-5 record is still one
of the league's best,
Perez has been strug-
gling of late and
12-game winner
McMurtry hasn't
posted a victorv sine
July 27
Torre feels it's just
a coincidence that the
Dodgers won 13 of 15
at the same time the
Braves were in a
slump
"We can't be
distracted bv what the
Dodgers are doing
he said. "You stil!
have to play your
game on the field
They're on a streak
now but that
shouldn't last and.
anyway, we're due for
a streak of our own
"1 still have con
fidence in this ball
club Torre
tinued "We're stil!
playing at a better
pace than when we
won the division last
year. When vou plav
lfS2 game
going to have periods
when you lose a few
more than you win
The important thii
to stay out of a pro
longed slump, to �
yourself together
Bv KM) MrWs
M�l rrr
: illeyball
Imogene
l nigh
ahead with onlv
. plaver

.
I aear's coach,
i)j id son, n the hear: r u i t i n c
1 December.
i e a '
l) where to
a replace-
menTurner, who
hasbeena physical
educanonteacher at
'forthe last yeai
imed
i
i s a �� �.





all
. .
. young
pet ienced
j "but this
ha- shown more
ement in the
veeks than
any team I've ever
coached before
Foremost among
the returning plavers
will be senior Diane
1 loyd. Captain of this
year team. 1 loyd
plavv the setter posi-
tion and will have
most of the offense
revolving around her.
Hitter L it a 1 amus
is the tther senior on
the team. "She
(1 .unus) has added a
lot to our offense
Turner said, "and will
be instrumental to us
in the season ahead
Perhaps the
Pirates' most versatile
player v.ill be defen-
sive specialist Sandy
Gideons. 'Sandy is
onlv 5-5, but she can
also help out as a hit-
ter Turner said,
'he has a tremen-
dous attitude and will
be a great asset at any
position
Sophomore setter
Ann Guida missed
part of last season due
to a knee injury but
has been working
hard and is expected
to contribute to this
year's effort.
The top newcomers
for the Pirates are
both upperelassmen
who played different
sports for ECl' last
vear Former swim-
mer Jennifer Jays will
be a hitter, and
basketball player Lor-
raine Foster will play
setter.
Although Turner
has to completely
regroup a team this
season, her toughest
task may be com-
peting against some of
the teams on this
year's schedule.
"I felt bad for the
football team when 1
saw their schedule
Turner said, "but if
there's a division-I
school between
Virginia and Florida
not on our schedule,
they were probably
over-looked
The Pirates will
face such teams as
North Carolina,
Virginia, South
Carolina, Clemson,
Kentucky, Georgia
and Duke, as well as
compete in four ma-
jor tournaments.
The Pirates began
practicing as soon as
school started in order
to prepare for the dif-
ficult games that he
ahead. "We've just
been working on fun-
damentals so far
Turner said but
there's no doubt in
my mind that we'll get
stronger as the year
goes on.
"Last year's team
was taller and more
experienced she ad-
ded, "but once the
season rolls around,
we will be able to
compete with
anybody
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irate QB
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Sunday, Sept. 4th, 8:00pm
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917 WMt Morgan Si
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stand vou vour safety comfort and prvao ore
assured tv t� caring staff of the fiemmg Center
SEBVtCES: � Tuesday - Saturday Aportion Ap-
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Accepted � CALl 7�1-5550 DAY O NIGHT �
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ECU STUDENTS BACK TO GREENVILLE:
SEE
MIKE CROSS
in concert
at the CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
FREE


1

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! �-
I 3
r
Sunday, Sept. 11
HERE'S HOW
Clip coupon below for $5.00 off the regular $10.00
Carolina Opry House Membership Fee.
Present this coupon at the Carolina Opry House
before Sept. 11, 1983 and purchase your membership
for only $5.00. You will also recieve 1 ticket
to see Mike Cross absolutely FREE! (You save 10.00)
Also Coming to the Opry House this Fall:
North Tower, Embers, Leon Russell, Super Grit Cowboy
Band, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chairman of the Board,
and many more.
The Carolina Opry House is a private club
members and invited guests only.
�MVWI.w�HlM All ABC Permits �,����,
-COUPON-

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off regular $10.00 COH membership fee
offer expires Sept. 11,1983
You must be 19 by Oct. 1, 1983
You must present valid ID
-COUPON-
t





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1. 1983
i

Pirates To Battle Gators
Cont'd From Page 10
scalping scheme,
alleged recruiting
violations and
academic im-
proprieties.
But if there are any
violations of NCAA
regulations, they
haven't been proven
as yet and the Gators
are concentrating on
another successful
season in 1983.
East Tennessee State
Oct. 29 � 2:00
FICKLEN STADIUM
When East Ten-
nessee State visits
Greenville, it will be
ECU's Homecoming,
and Pirate fans will be
hoping for a repeat of
last year's ETSU
game.
In last season's con-
test, the Pirates total-
ly dominated the
visiting Buccaneers
while posting a 30-0
victory. ECU out-
distanced ETSU in
total yards, 474 to
158.
The Buccaneers
have a battle shaping
up for the starting
quarterback between
Robert Achoe and
Walt Bowlin, who
split duties last year.
Running back Jerry
Butler, who gained
644 yards in '82,
returns to lead the
running attack, which
will be guided by an
offensive line featur-
ing center Scott Rawl-
ings.
The mainstays in
the Buccaneer defen-
sive front are end
Kelvin Edwards and
tackle Calvin Thomp-
son.
The Bucs, who are
members of the
Southern Conference,
only lost four starters
from last year's team
that went 2-9.
University of Miami
Nov. 5 �2:00 p.m.
ORANGE BOWL
The Miami Hur-
ricanes should once
again be one of the
strongest In-
dependents in the
country, but they'll
have to perform this
year without their Ail-
American quarter-
back Jim Kelly.
But Coach Howard
Schnellenberger is us-
ed to playing without
Kelly, who missed the
second half of last
season with a
shoulder injury.
Kyle Vanderwende
started the last three
games of '82 as a
freshman, completing
39 of 64 passes for 465
yards. Along with
Vanderwende,
sophomore Vinnie
Testaverde and red-
shirt freshman Bernie
Kosar can all throw
the ball 70 yards.
Schnellenberger
claims that all three
quarterbacks will be
playing in the NFL
someday.
In the back field,
senior Keith Griffin,
the brother of two-
time Heisman Trophy
Archie Griffin, is the
starting tailback.
Speedy Neal and
Albert Bentley will
also see action.
Miami was 7-4 last
season, including a
41-3 trouncing of
N.C. State.
William & Mary
Nov. 12�1:30 p.m.
FICKLEN STADIUM
When the Indians
and Pirates get
together to play foot-
ball, the games never
lack excitement.
In 1981, the Indians
came to Greenville
and upset the Pirates
31-21. The loss
prevented ECU from
having a winning
season, as the Pirates'
record slipped to 5-6.
Then in 1982, ECU
travelled to
Williamsburg and
came out on the front
end of a see-saw bat-
tle, 31-27.
In the series with
the Indians, ECU
leads by a 10-4 margin
with one tie.
The Indians, coach-
ed by Jimmie
Laycock, finished the
1982 season with a 3-8
record. William &
Mary lost 16 starters
from last year's
squad.
Players to watch
for the Indians in-
clude quarterback
Stan Yagiello, free
safety Mark Kelso,
tight end Glenn Bod-
nar and offensive
guard Mario Shaffer.
Southern Mississippi
Nov. 19� 7:00 p.m.
CST
ROBERTS STADIUM
USM will have to
replace explosive
quarterback Reggie
Collier, the school's
total offense leader,
who now plays in the
USFL. His replace-
ment will be inex-
perienced Robert
Ducksworth � Col-
lier's second cousin.
The Golden Eagles
feature one of the
finest running backs
in the country in Sam
Dejarnette. Last year,
Dejarnette finished
fifth in the country in
rushing with 1,544
yards.
Southern Miss
returns 14 starters,
and coach Jim Car-
mody will shape his
defense around
Gerald Baylis, one of
the premier
noseguards in the
country.
The Golden Eagles
finished the 1982 cam-
paign with a 7-4
record, including a
38-29 defeat of the
University of
Alabama.
In eight previous
meetings with
Southern Miss, ECU
has only been able to
defeat the Golden
Eagles twice. The last
time the two teams
played (1980),
Southern Miss down-
ed the Pirates 35-7.
��
? �
��-� �
�((& fc
M
c� . . , OABY PATTERSON - Ptxrto Lab
Soccer coach Robbie Church gets in some per-season performers to a member of the soccer team. The soccer season eels
underway Tuesday when the Pirates host Pfeiffer at 3 p.m. 8
f MiiiiHiiiimiiiii�����-irttmiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiMiiH
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Fot Toko-ovjt Coll:
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GO PIRATES
HAPPY HOUR
Saturday Night 7:00-till game's end
Catch the EX.UFlorida St. game
live on T.V. at Pharo's.
24oz. beer $1.00
(during the game)
Nawttom Chicken Fish Only $1.85 plus tax with F.F.and
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BRING ID'S
ello
"he 1983 Atlantic
last Conference
lotball season
bns Saturday with
rgia Tech in and
Jmson out as far as
league champion-
is concerned
"he Yellow Jackets
eligible for the
ipionship for the
H time since joining
conference in
f8. The Tigers are
inning a two-year
,AA probation and
ACC prohibition
m competing for
league crown.
Saturday's league
:hedule sees the
"igers hosting
Astern Carolina.
hike at Virginia.
lorth Carolina a:
uth Carolina and
ake Forest hosting
Appalachian State of
the Southern Con-
ference.
The Tigers are ex-
pected to be playing
before a record
crowd, following ex-
pansion of its stadium
to 74,000 seats. Clem
son players say the
are not about to a!
the Clemson proba-
tion to become an ex-
cuse for losing.
"Of course e
can't officially win
the title, but we can
play for pride and I
think that is our ob-
jective this year � to
keep that pride and
respect we've earned
the last two years
said quarterback
Mike Eppley. "I am
sure there are hard
feelings (about the
probation) among
some fans and
players, but we just
have to accept it he
said.
Western Carolina is
I 1

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get o regular
Please �Mresenl
Lin it oi
Voidwl
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3016 E. 11
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�mmammimm � '
mmtm
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P





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER I. 1V83
13
brr learn The soccer eaon �tt
k ARhhR OPTIONS
ft -t - �n1 H vu
� bccaosa
� " � Hoped ;hi�
� Id uud� m junk
- tma knaltzattea �kilh
I - i; �!K-�d in rhr mr fur
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L Mil MuOi-Miiri vawu. 6 JO-ldd
1511
ItltllttlfHIIttltUfr
SE
a

DRUSH
ONTEST
ERRD
ello w Jackets Eligible
Classifieds
SALE
The 1983 Atlantic
oast Conference
football season
�gins Saturday with
jeorgia Tech in and
lemson out as far as
le league champion-
up is concerned
The Yellow Jackets
re eligible for the
umpionship for the
jrst time since joining
he conference in
R78. The Tigers are
jeginning a two-year
ICAA probation and
in AC C prohibition
from competing for
le league crown.
Saturday's league
.hedule sees the
igers hosting
estern Carolina,
uke at Virginia,
.orth Carolina at
jouth Carolina and
�Vake Forest hosting
Appalachian State of
the Southern Con-
ference.
The Tigers are ex-
ected to be playing
e f o r e a record
rowd, following ex-
pansion of its stadium
to 4,000 seats. Clem-
son players say they
ire not about to allow
the Clemson proba-
tion to become an ex-
ruse for losing.
'Of course we
can't officially win
the title, but we can
'play for pride and 1
think that is our ob-
jective this year � to
keep that pride and
respect we've earned
the last two years
said quarterback
Mike Eppley. "1 am
sure there are hard
feelings (about the
probation) among
some fans and
players, but we just
have to accept it he
said.
Western Carolina is
coming off a 6-5
season. The Cata-
mounts lost to Clem-
son 21-10 last year.
North Carolina
players have been
preparing for South
Carolina by watching
films of New Mexico.
New Gamecock head
coach Joe Morrison
led New Mexico to a
10-1 season last year.
South Carolina has
many of the same
players from last year,
when it finished 4-7,
but Crum said he
knows Morrison will
use those players dif-
ferently.
"For personnel,
you can look at South
Carolina but you real-
ly don't know where
they would take that
personnel and put it
Crum said. "We had
to get a general idea
off what they would do
offensively and defen-
sively from looking at
New Mexico
Morrison has in-
stalled a "veer" of-
fense for the
Gamecocks.
"The last time we
sav the veer was 1979
when Bo Rein was at
North Carolina
State Crum said.
While Crum is ex-
pecting some sur-
prises, Morrison said
he expects little
change in the North
Carolina attack,
despite the loss of
running back Kelvin
Bryant.
"I don't expect any
real drastic changes
from North
Carolina Morrison
said. "They are solid,
well-coached football
team with great
athletes
Duke also will be
under the direction of
a new coach Saturday
as the Blue Devils play
their first game under
former University of
Mississippi coach
Steve Sloan. Despite
the change in the
coaching staff, the
fortunes of the Blue
Devils are expected to
continue to rest on the
performance of
quarterback Ben Ben-
nett.
Bennett needs just
144 yeards to set the
record for most total
yards in a career. That
record is currently
held by former Duke
star Leo Hart.
Duke beat Virginia
51-17 last year in
Durham but Sloan
isn't looking for a
repeat performance
against the Cavaliers,
who are in their se-
cond year under
George Welsh.
"We anticipate
Virginia to be much
improved, especially
on defense Sloan
said. "I have always
had great respect for
Coach Welsh and I
admired the way in
which his teams have
always plaved tough
football
Virginia is hoping
for a strong running
attack led by
sophomore tailback
Antonio Rice, who
rushed for 764 yards
last season.
Wake Forest, 3-8
last year, will again be
led by quarterback
Gary Schofield, who
needs just 105 yards
passing to top Jay
Venuto for the
school's all-time pass-
ing yardage record.
Schofield passed for
2,380 vards last vear
alone and hass 4,952
yards in his career.
Wake Forest has
beaten Appalachian
State four straight
times, coming away
with a 31-22 victory
last year.
"It is a game that
has taken on par-
ticular interest over
the past two seasons
for both schools
said Deacon head
coach Al Groh. "We
are anticipating this
year's game to be the
most hard fought bet-
ween the two schools
since I've been here
because of the intensi-
ty of the rivalry and
the fact that it is the
season opener for
both teams
FOR SALE: Obrien competitor
with custom case $120.00. New
Connelly wide track trick ski
with front pro wrap binding
$150.00
FOR SALE: Dorm size trig.
MOO, Full wetsuit MOO, bicycle
SO 00, phone 751 731
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Dr. Resnik 75 540 Tickets
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IF YOU NEED to make extra
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Call I 00 323 3101
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need of some extra money is
available to babysit m the even
ings and some mornings Has
had much experience caring for
infants and small children Have
own transportation Please call
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avec votre cours de francaise'
C'est votre bete noir' Est ce que
vos protesseurs sont heirs'
Telephonei 555 �7�
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SOULS, MINORITY ORGANIZATION NEEDS
YP?.yf9?IPPUCAT,0N BELOW-
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1 UNITED STATES 1913-1921 �
"The greatest institution in America, as it
has always been in the world, is the home. �
I When the young man leaves it and goes to
E college he is wise to be grafted on to a new
home known as the fraternity. The mother
of this new home is high ideals: the father is
hard work, and brotherhood is mutual trust �
and assistance s
Come See What Makes the
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So Valuable! �
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ASIV THURS.
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OCTOBER 14 OCTOBER 18
sstssMCLUDCS PtR PERSOM
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pr�U 't
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C0T�CTFOFUflTMC�
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MBEfl '983
SPONSORED BY THE STUDENT UNION TRAVEL COMMITTEE
ECU STUDENT ATHLETIC BOARD AND BURGER KING
R
ute the spirit behind athletics
our award winning 1983 Varsity Cheerleaders.
'??


'�??
PHOTO BY STANLEY
H4 '�� �
LEARY
National Cheerleading Association Camp
George Mason University
August 14-17 1983
CAMP SPIRIT AWARD
CAMP SPIRIT STICK
4 Superior blue ribbons
for technique and performance
Karen Hall, Soph. Art Cindy Batson, Sr. Business
Patti Harrill, Jr. Interior Design Lisa Chandler, Soph. Accounting
Co-Captain Jennifer Cooper, Sr. Dance
Co-Captain Scott Perry, Sr. Computer Science
Chuck King, Sr. Communication Art
Lisa Lyon, Soph. Computer Science
James Elkins, Soph. Pre-Environmental Law
Brian Foye, Sr. MathComputer Science
Robbie Rice, Soph. Computer Science
Ronnie Rice, Soph. Computer Science
SUPPORT THE HOME OF THE WINNER at the following locations:
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.





14 THEEASTCAROLONIAN SFPTLMBER 1, 1983
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����I

items and Prices
Effective Thru
Sat Sept. 3 1983.
i
FRESHORE BRAND
ORIENTAL STYLE
Breaded
Fantail Shrimp
$E49
1-Lb fcJ
Pkg.
FRESHORE
BREADED
Butterfly
Shrimp
$A99
Lb. �HT
(LESS THAN 19c PER SHRIMP)
FRESHORE PEELED DEVEINED
30-35 READY TO COOK
Cocktail
Shrimp

i
FRESHORE BREADED
ButterflYa o,$269
- Pkg �
Shrimp
1-
Pkg.
FRESHORE ROUND
Breaded
Shrimp .
10-02 r m
pkg.
99
1-Lb
Pkg
4
99
SERVE N SAVE COOKED
Salad tjjqn
Shrimp S� �
Welcome
Back
Students
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
IHIIIIIHIIMIIIIHIHimHHH�IMHIIimilllllllllH�MHIIIIHIIIMIIIIIM.IHIIIIIIHMIIIIIIIIIIMMMHIIHMIH
MMMlMIHIMIMMIMIIIIIMHIMIIIIIIIIMIMIMHIIMIHIIIIMIII�IMIIIIIIIMIMHIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIimilMH
M;��.�.ii 1 �i ��- in.�man iiw m a niilWlWwatj
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 1, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 01, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.282
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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