The East Carolinian, August 30, 1983






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Bht
(Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.3
Tuesday August 30, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Crowds March In Washingto
To Remember King's Speech
By PATRICK O'NEILL
News Kdilor
STANLEY LEARY � Photo Lab
We Still Have A Dream
250 000 people, including ECU students and faculty, gathered in Washington D.C. Saturday to celebrate
the 20th anniversary of Martin Luther King's famous "I Have A Dream" speech.
Divers Find Anchor
By MILLIE WHITE
wiM�n! Sm tdilor
At 9:54 a.m. Monday, ECU
divers and scientists placed the
1,300-pound anchor of the USS
Monitor aboard the research
vessel Johnson. According to
Gloria Thompson, project
manager for the Monitor National
Marine Sanctuary, the anchor will
sta aboard the Johnson until
Thursday when it will arrive at
ECU, where preservation efforts
will begin.
According to Thompson, the
anchor "i& in g.ocxA condition but
heavily incrusted with coral, sand
and shells
While on the Johnson, the an-
chor will be wet-wrapped because
it will deteriorate rapidly if expos-
ed to air. Thompson said.
Once at ECU, the anchor will
be placed in a holding tank and
undergo electrolysis, a slow pro-
cess to remove incrustation.
Because of the anchor's size, con-
servation efforts are expected to
take approximately 18 months,
Thompson said. She added that
the six-foot chain attached to the
anchor will also be preserved.
The anchor was in 225 feet of
water about 16 miles south of
Cape Hatteras, N.C.
Researchers originally planned
to recover the anchor last week
but were delayed due to bad
weather.
The Monitor sank during a
violent storm on Dec. 31, 1862, as
it was being towed from Hampton
Roads, Va to Beaufort, N.C.
"The reason it sank said Gor-
don Watts, ECU's underwater ar-
chaeologist for the expedition,
"was because the vessel was
designed not to be seaworthy but
rather to fight in shallow coastal
rivers and sounds.
The Monitor sank quickly and
rested upside down on the ocean
floor. It remained there until 1973
when Watts, leading a discovery
expedition, found the remains.
Earlier that year, the Monitor
and the Confederate Ironclad
Virginia, also known as the Mer-
rimac, made naval history when
they fought to a stand off in the
world's first battle of armored
ships at Hampton Roads, VA.
Before the anchor was
recovered, four crewmen made
color videotapes of the Monitor
site. The videotapes are con-
sidered crucial by scientists who
plan to raise the ship's gun fuirent
tentatively set for 1985.
Dina Hill, project coordinator
for ECU, said "the anchor was
one of the objectives but not the
primary objective" of the expedi-
tion. Hill said that video
documentation and engineering
assessment, such as soil testing,
were two of the main purposes of
the dive.
School Seeks Reaccreditation
B TINA MAROSCHAK
NUff Writer
The ECU School of Education
underwent complete reorganiza-
tion and is currently functioning
according to new guidelines.
Reorganization was necessary
after the school was denied ac-
creditation last March by the Na-
tional Council for Accreditation
in Teacher Education and placed
on probation by the N.C. Board
of Education.
The new plan gives the dean of
the School of Education complete
authority over all programs and
matters related to teacher educa-
tion.
The Council for Teacher
Education was created to assist
the dean. The council represents
each teacher education program
and is composed of approximately
30 people. In addition, two
students will be appointed to serve
as voting committee members.
Dr. Charles Coble, dean of the
School of Education, said new
emphasis on multicultural educa-
tion will have a great impact on
the student. The school's task is to
provide experiences that will
enhance prospective teacher's
understanding of the subject, Co-
ble said.
Coble defined multicultural
education as "a concern for and
recognition of the cultural diversi-
ty that exists within this coun-
try�a recognition of the con-
tributions different cultures make
to American society To meet
the NCATE standards, a series of
programs will be held for teacher
education students and faculty.
To achieve success, Coble said,
"student attention and attendance
to these events is critical
Another important change is a
revision in the education cur-
riculum. Special education and
reading instruction courses will be
required for all prospective
See ED. SCHOOL, Page 6
Under the theme, "We Still
Have A Dream: Jobs, Peace and
Freedom more than 250,000
people converged on the nation's
capital Saturday to commemorate
the 20th anniversary of the 1963
"March on Washington" when
the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
gave his famous "I have a dream"
speech.
Despite the high temperatures
and crowded conditions, par-
ticipants in the march patiently
and peacefully listened to more
than eight hours of speeches from
dozens of leaders in the movement
for peace and justice. The
speakers and the crowd were a
well mixed array of blacks and
whites from various organizations
and backgrounds. However, there
was little doubt that the spirit of
King, was the omnipresent factor
uniting the marchers.
Hundreds of banners bearing
King's portrait were scattered
throughout the crowd. "Working
to Fulfill the Dream stated a
banner carried by members of the
Southern Christian I.eadershin
Conference. "We Still Have A
Dream read another.
As evident as the groups' sup-
port of the King ideal, was their
disdain for Ronald Reagan.
"Dump Reagan In '84" appeared
on many placards. Pockets of
marchers chanted, "Ronald
Reagan, he's no goodsend him
back to Hollywood
The calendar of speakers and
entertainers included many of the,
same people who actively partic-
pated in the 1963 march. Black
leaders Jesse Jackson, Ralph
Abernathy and Coretta Scott King
spoke before the crowd. Enter-
tainers Stevie Wonder and Harry
Belafonte, Gil Scott-Heron, Dick
Gregory, Graham Nash, the
Freedom Singers and Peter, Paul
and Mary. Shirley Caesar led the
crowd in singing the black na-
tional anthem, "Lift Every Voice
and Sing
March organizers chose not to
invite a representative from the
Reagan administration to address
the crowd.
Other speakers included
representatives from religious
groups, women's groups, labor
unions. Congress and many more.
Anchor Brings Fame
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Nwi Cdllor
When an air bag floated to
the ocean's surface with the
1300-pound anchor of the
Monitor attached to it Monday
morning, history was made; and
as a result the words "East
Carolinia University" will ap-
pear in newspapers and be
spoken over the air waves
througncut trie vvorfci
Last week major television
networks, including P.B.S
joined the B.B.C. and several
major U.S. newspapers hoping
to see the anchor successfully
raised.
"There's really been nothing
like this that has arroused so
much interest said William
Shires, director of the ECU
News Bureau.
Shires, who has been with the
bureau for 12 years, called the
raising of the Civil War vessel's
anchor a "historic treasure
ECU Chancellor John
Howell said he was "very pleas-
ed" and proud that the ECU
Maritime History and Under-
water Research Program had
succeeded in its efforts.
"I certainly am pleased that
two of our people, Bill Still and
Gordon Watts, did it Howell
said. "What they've done
demonstrates that we have an
excellent program
Howell said the anchor rais-
ing demonstrates the high quali-
ty or ecu's programs. He call-
ed it "a very nice package of
teaching, research and public
service
Both Shires and Howell
spoke of the historical
significance of the event. "This
is an artifact people will want to
see for years to come Howell
said. "It takes the history books
a chapter of two further
Shires added.
Shires called Monday's news
"almost anticlimactic" after all
the attention generated during
last week's unsuccessful bid to
raise the anchor.
Workshops Conducted
In attempts to familiarize
teacher education students,
faculty, and administrators with
Multicultural Education, Dr.
Dudley E. Flood, Associate
State Superintendent of the
State Department of Public In-
struction, will present two
lecture-workshops Thursday,
Sept.l.
"Multicultural Education"
will be the topic of the two
workshops. The faculty
workshop, which will be held at
4:00 p.m. in the Nursing
Auditorium, will be followed by
a student workshop and recep-
tion for Dr. Flood at 7:30 p.m.
in Jenkins Auditorium.
"This is one of the ways the
University is working toward
reaccreditation with NCATE
wrote Asst. Dean of the School
of Arts and Sciences Dr. Marie
Farr in a memo to the East
Carolinian.
Jackson, a former King lieute-
nant and possible 1984 presiden-
tial candidate, excited the crowd
with his speech. "We must dream
a new dream Jackson told
them. "We must expand the
horizon of our dreams. Let us
continue to dream
Belofonte said, "we are not a
bunch of malcontents" conspiring
with communists and denying the
progress of the past 20 years . . .
"our pain needs no conspiracy. It
is real
� Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young
noted the advancements he said
had been made in the 20
yearsWe are the people
Young told the crowd. "This is a
government of the people, for the
people and by the people � you
are the people
See CROWD, Page 3
High Temps
Heat Up
ECU Dorms
When ECU students arrived on
campus last week, they were
welcomed with a heat wave.
Temperatures hovered at or above
the 100 degree mark and have not
dropped noticeably since. Lying
around, loose clothing, fans blow-
ing and a cool beverage in hand
has become a familiar scene in
ECU resident halls.
While living on campus has
definite advantages, residents of
ECU's 14 non-air-conditioned
dorms have become all too aware
of the drawbacks.
There are a limited number of
sTfr-crrmffTfcncrJ rcsfdrncc half
rooms available to students. Slay-
has some air-conditioned rooms
which are reserved for handicap-
ped students. Jarvs is completely
air-conditioned, a luxury for
which its residents pay $75 extra
per semester. "It is definitely
worth the extra money said Jar-
vis resident Steve Reed.
Tyler resident Susan Robbins
and Jones resident Angie Barnes
said they would both be willing to
pay the extra money for air-
conditioning. Many students
echoed similar comments.
According to Carolyn
Fulghum, director of residence
life, "plans are to air-condition
Couen and Fleming Halls for the
1984-85 school year She also
emphasized the fact that this
year's weather has been unusually
hot, a point also made by Charles
Home, director of the Greenville
Utility Commission in a recent in-
terview.
Most students are fighting the
heat with fans. Ken Walker has
two fans running continually in
his room at Jones, as does Lisa
Whitley, head resident at Slay.
Clement resident Claire
O'Connor keeps cool by swimm-
ing, a method utilized by several
other students.
Number Of Bicycle Thefts Increase In Fall
B GLENN MAUGHAN
MiffWrilef
If you've ever had your bicycle
stolen then it's easy for you to
identify with the emotional pain
that comes from such an ex-
perience. You can't reverse it,
your bike's gone, but there are
steps you can take to prevent it
from happening again. It's even
more important now because
September marks the month when
bicycle thefts increase sharply.
Already, two bikes have been
stolen this semester. According to
campus police, a female student
witnessed two males take bikes
from the rack at Fletcher dorm
Wednesday night. Further in-
vestigation showed the the locks
on the two bikes had been cut.
Statistics from ECU campus
police show September as the se-
cond highest month for bicycle
thefts. Jane Davison, ECU police
officer, regards each new school
year as a troublesome time for
bicycle owners. "We have to
educate all the new students to
that's gom� on The new crop of
students needs to realize that
thirves arc very active in
September
Last fall semester, 47 bikes
worth over $6,000 were stolen.
During the fall semesters for the
past four years police records
show that 303 bikes worth in ex-
cess of $40,000 were stolen.
According to Davison, bicycle
larcenies are down one-third since
June of 1981, but the costs to
owners has risen almost 13 per-
cent during the same time. Bikes
worth almost $17,000 were
reported stolen during the 1982-83
school year.
Recovery is often a matter of
chance. "Luck plays a big part in
recovering property but if
students are careful (and) keep an
eye on their valuables, they can
lessen their risks she said. Cam-
pus police records show 7 bikes
were recovered out of 53 reported
stolen during the 1983 spring
semester.
"Student help is most impor-
tant for curbing thefts Davison
said Students should report it if
they observe someone walking
along a bike rack tugging on
chains. "Using common sense can
deter crime; if someone sees a
non-student, someone who looks
like they're 14 or 15, messing
around a bike rack, an alarm
ought to register in their heads
she added.
Campus police encourage
reporting thefts since it may help
them slow down thieves. "We can
use the statistics to step up patrols
in that area; students can assist
us said Davison. A report of a
theft last February, turned in by a
student, resulted in an arrest
within seven minutes of the crime.
Students can also help
themselves by having a safe,
secure, locking system. They
should register the bikes with
campus police and the department
also has an engraving tool to fur-
ther protect property and aid in
recovery should it be stolen or
lost.
Davison thinks students might A
picveni losses if they're more locks
wary or mindful of their property.
to can. To
with the campei security office.
- � m � �
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INI
M i,IM M
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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LIFEGUARDS
rguarcH f,( tht (Vpi
ol i n t r a m u' a i
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ADVISOR NEEDED
FACULTY STAFF
ITRAMURALS
VG POOTBALL
OFFICIALS
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WORK STUDY
lents jvhc have hfen
ass gned the F nan, ia ft d
the vs � �, Pro
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GAMMA
BETA PHI
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Piea ' � ' �"
O T MEETING
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PRE PHYSICAL
THERAPY
STUDENTS
- .� � - ege and
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November ppw p� too
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FIELDHOCKEY
Attention anyone tnterested m
p'amg Women s intramural
field hx kev tnerf Is a meftmg
on Wednesday Sept 7 at 4 p m
in Room 10? of the Memorial
Gym i vou i. an ' maKe the
meeting p.ease ail Cory at
STUDENTSMAKE
A DIFFERENCE
I � ad 04 teeing helpless to do
anything to improve ovr world"
Tired o teeimg �s though yrxi do
not have any impact on the
SO" a' issues 'ha' atteit voor
t.tp T hen iO'n over hal a million
stinipn's ifl JS states c anactn
ano Aust'aia who are working
with Publlt interest Research
Gi ours i piRGs'
PiRC-s are student run non
par tisan resean h �nd advoi at y
i' ga:at'ons They are sup
ported hv activity tees trom
e'hei s devils PlRGsusethe
money to h'ir st�tls Ot lawyers
�rsea'thers organaers �ien
I sts ournatlsts and support
start ' larork wyith students on
, ssi rs ai h the
si lents "c�se piirg s areas
v i � n, 'ude consumer
en . ronmentai
preSeevatiOft pn tlca 'etorrn
ff'd. pol cv ano social
US' v e
The s'udent PIRG Organizing
nmittee s wo-Kmg to
:� . �' RG a KU ano we
neeo . M ' SUPPOrl �e1 'ogetne'
A �?- ,mr- s cleats concerned
A th ese ssues Por more
Jeta s a Jav Stone at
'57 156
COMMUTERS
Students who commute to
ass from ou'S'de 'he Green
p a-ea and need rides or
���v '���a vmjter Ser
. ps a" hard . ' W 6��'
PIRATE WALK
Apr atlons for rector ot
P -a'e Ajik Fscpr' Sevice a'e
i w be rtfl rr'ed P'ease go
? . w � p � A 11 . . p n
Vpnopa l Jeeil Ce"tpr
ne s Septemb' 'th
BAPTIST
STUDENT UNION
The Baptisl student union s
rtfl An oper' nocise tonght a'
� 30 p m Dmner and cp � ream
a be served ai no osl Some
, events a- -np BSu this
eA' rx ude moves speakers
� . rteo n hungei n Greenville
Labcx Da. -vppkeno a s'arve a
� ip held "i Greeny.lip
�. � � rmation all Ma
��a a' '5 5511
NON CREDIT
COURSES
�� - . ipiar Sep'
� -ia t- -pn. h Sep'
mt -t v a Wpsearc h Sep'
a rtrg � -t voga Sep'
per "age srr' N
.�Tr'ii Sep' T'1 : a p
; � � . Sep1 K �: tat Sep
�! Math sepi
janizing Tmpvppt jft
v e Spp' ;p Spee ' Read ng
N Pas?1- i �' latlng
Career Change Oc'
Will �nn Fs'n'p planning Oc� 4.
Money v�a"p's c1 6 Basic
nat t Rea' fcstate
Finance Oct 20 Com
' ng fttectiveiy Oct 3'
� . � nt -i ,ng Education
arm Ha '57 613
SOFTBAL
PLAYERS
Anyone interested in trying
out toe the t t (J Softball Team
please contact Coach Munahan
immediately at 7S7 6161 1 he
first ottic tal meeting wit' be on
September the 6th in Mmges 142
at 3 p m
"TOGA, TOGA
The Pi kappa Ph. Fraternity
would like to welcome everyone
back tor another ell raising
semester vVe want to remind
everyone ot the annual Toya
Patty featuring Gold Rush this
Thursday a? the Piappa house
Any questions t an 'S6 i-ir
TUTORS NEEDED
Upper c lassmen and graduate
students who are interested in
tutoring for F C U Athletics are
invited to an organizational
meeting Wednesday August 31
at 3 00 in the Study entet
Icxa'ed in the basemen' ot Jones
Dorm Please nAe sex lal se
ty number a ' I GO
Pip A 11 S'
FRISBEE CLUB
ECU ' 'Sbee i lob s hold i .
tirst mee'mg tonight a' C �
room 247 MendenhaN vVe a
planning road tnps fnsbeetour
naments and tr sbee par' s ft
membership drive is now in pro
gress Anyone interested in
ultimate iii goit guts I
s'y'e. ano hackysacli s en
i ouraged to a"end U" n ��
'�ps whippi every lues )i �
Trturs at s 00 at the bottom o'
college hill Be wa'chmg for the
Natural Light Frisbee f �
Ultimate F �tr avagan;a on 0 '
R Anc! 9 at ECU Tpr �
Vendenhaii c on . j '
BIOLOGY CLUB
T he E C U B 3g. : s spo
soring a book sale from R 4 on
the 1st tioor of the P.
building on Wed Aug 31 and
T�urs Sep' i Prices 'ange
from ?5 rents t; 00 a th the ' a
or.ty of 'he book s begin B
books
ALL CAMPUS
PARTY
Thp Ph kappa T.i r'atpr
is having d A- - i
ECU Par'v TK rs ��, �
40v Eii:abe I it 9 p n
Band j"0 Beverajr' a I t
- ded I rfTM �" ' II
Ph. Tau s
ARCHERY CLUB
Trip E C U A' hei �
ud 'o Ann xjnee Is first meeting
of the R3 R4 scno. � les
day Sept 6 a' R p �" n -norr 102
Memorial Gym Any me Ar s
prpsted s well orne '
Po' more intormatiOf - �� �
' . . � a' '53 106; ri �-��:�� �
� � ' '55 876
STRONG CAMPBELL
INVENTORY
The Strong Campoei Interesl
nventor, s ottet ed every
day in 305 Aright nnnn at 4
p m when scnoc is in st �
witn rr-�p p� (�itiunv of �"�nrvima
ton per od an I registrsatior
da. This I ivatlabie 1 �
s'udents at no cost No '
registration is reQuired l t
more infofma in a 'he
Counseling Centet ai '5' �'�
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ai 75� pet line $.
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Kfliirn In
stcrelars h
public Hlion
th.
3 p.m
Media Board
the lias before
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CIRCLE K
. JB invites
you to come out and iom u; "
Tues : � . . � ' a' � 00 in
rVtendenhalt roon I i 'jnand
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GOSPEL CHOIR
' ' � Easl It 'ia Gospel
n er1 Rehers a s n I � e
' ' - el fe' beginning a
5 00 ft . � a ans to par
I .�. � � semestei
a � me 1 ittend ?� a n look
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then we I I y
GOLF TEAM
TRYOUTS
� Night s - v .� Ro n
14;
OPEN HOUSE
Open house a ; , � . - .(� the
Method.st Student enter on
Tuesday August 30
good 11 mi �
� ' SO 1
E asi I
BIBLE STUDY
� � � � � The Nat gator:
��� � � a lei B �
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INDIAN FESTIVAL
Perqu mans Country Parks
and Recreation Department and
Chamber of Commerce a
sponsor its second annual 5K
(3 li miles! Run Saturday
eptembet 17 ah ages af 1
COuraged to attpm: a " 'A 11
y.�en to i I � .� )l
' � ates will be given to a ft �'
tnisha no the first lOOtor
will receive a T shirt Pre entr,
s 17
A large festival of mar . �
lOyabie activities and � terta
ment is plan . '����
'l 'T so make plai 1 I 1 3 the
entire family -or more infor
mation on registration please
conta ' H 'a .� � A gms Per
guimans Count, Par�s Ann
Rat'on Department PO
. :4
� � 426 S6v5 office hours are
� �
NARCOTICS
ANONYMOUS
Do ,5c "a - '
Narco' s Anonymous m,
a . � � � '
at fl p m 1 n j ar. �- � � �
S10 S vS �
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SAB
a �. -an organ.a
'ional mee'mg of the
athiet board Tuesoa. �'� .
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Crowd Honors King
In Washington D.C.
out. from Pane I �
Iili55ICAOUNIAN. ALGUSTJO, j J
Coot, from Pace 1
NAArP o 4 unmp'oyment; an
IV n President escalating arms race;
Benjamin Hooks and the denial of basic
ignited the crowd with
his strong attack on
President Reagan's
Policies; policies
which Hooks said
rights and programs
which ensure
freedom More than
400 organizations
?re listed on the of-
"v � '�ivu nil uic LM -
reu ri ilhe.poo,r, and RcmJ program of the
reward the rich
"Policies that talk
about the trickle
down theory but
somehow the trickle
never gets down
Hooks told the en-
thusiastic crowd.
"Policies that provide
a safety net for the
truly greedy, but
nothing for the trulv
needy. We send notice
on you Mr. Reagan
that we are not here to
live in the past and to
leave here simplv sing-
ing, 'We Shall "Over-
come We are here
because we are com-
mitted to the elimina-
tion of Reaganism
from the face of the
earthWe've had
enough of it Hooks
then led the crowd in
a chant of "Reagan
no more in 1984
Organizers of the
march noted that
"three critical condi-
tions" exist in our
society - "insufferable
march as endorsers of
the event.
The morning rally,
which began shortly
after 9:00 a.m was
held on the mall bet-
pool.
The only sour note
of the day's festivities
was the littering pro-
blem. Thousands' of
leaflets and placards
were strewn
throughout the rally
area.
These people are
really doing a fine job
conveying their point
by messing up the
whole area, com-
mented one young
ween the Capital and man not participating
Washington in the rally. Marchers,
on the other hand
claimed there weren't
enough litter recep-
ticles provided to han-
dle the needs of the
large crowd.
One bus traveled to
the march from
Greenville. The trip
was co-coordinated
by the Pitt County
chapters of the SCLC
and the NAACP.
NAACP President
D.D. Garrett, with
help from Greenville
residents Fran Parrott
and Melvin
McLawhorn took care
of the various needs
of the people riding
the bus. Thanks to an
SCLC grant the cost
of the bus ticket was
only $10 roundtrip.
Monument. The
crowd then walked to
the Lincoln Memorial
for the afternoon rallj
which continued until
after 6:00 p.m.
Police, working at the
rally sites, termed the
days events peaceful.
About 100 people re-
quired medical atten-
tion and had to be
taken from the scene
ambulances
because of the heat
which reached highs
in the rmd-90's.
To beat the heat
marchers spent up to
an hour standing in
line at water fountains
and refreshment
stands. Others took a
dip in the Lincoln
Memorial's reflecting
Japan's Fast For Lifer
Celebrates'The Dream9
Bv GLENN
MAI CHAN
and
PATRICK
O'NEILL
Despite the fact he
had not eaten in 22
days, Japanese "Fast
for Lifer" Mirsuyoshi
Kohjima travelled
ttUfSfcuntry to
address the crowd
during Saturday's
Martin Luther King
march in Washington
D.C.
In a related story
the Fast for Life sup-
port committee an-
nounced that two
more people from
Canada had decided
to join the fast. The
two, Brian Burch and
Karen Harrison, from
Toronto, will be join-
ing 11 others who
have been fasting
since Aug. 6. All of
the fasters say they
will fast until there is
a "break in the
momentum of the
nuclear arms race
Kohjima, 34, is a
resident of Tokyo,
Japan. He has been
fasting with three
others in Oakland,
California. Because
of his weakened
physical condition
Kohjima remained in
a wheelchair
throughout the day.
He was accompanied
by his
interpreter Michiko
Ishikawa and fast
supporter Mike Af-
fleck.
Affleck believes the
fasters are not
suicidal. "They are
just like people as far
back as Jesus, who
know they are putting
their life on the line-
firefighters,
policemen, lifeguards,
rescue personnel
people like that, he
said.
The Canadian duo
have been active in the
peace movement for
several years. Burch
was arrested Mar. 6 in
Toronto for pouring
blood on property
belonging to the
American, French,
and British Con-
sulates. "I did this
because these coun-
tries are more con-
cerned with spending
money on war than on
feeding their hungry
People he said.
Harrison, who is
now in seclusion in
Ann Arbor, Mich
fasted for 23 days this
spring. Her actions
brought about a first-
over cruise missile
testing in Canada.
Both said the issue
of upcoming deploy-
ment of NATO
missiles prompted
them to fast. "I'm
fasting to show people
the urgency of life,
death and the arms
race Burch said.
"Spending money on
weapons and not
hungry people goes
against my Christian
values he added.
A teacher of men-
tally and physically
hanidcapped people,
Burch does not
believe his act of
fasting is suicidal. He
believes it is time for
urgency-time to end
the arms race even if
such action may cost
him his life.
The fasters will
cease their actions
when their demands
of ending the arms
race are met. Burch
specifically said,
'The Canadian
government must end
all cruise missile
According to
reports from the Fast
for Life office in
Oakland, the physical
condition of
American faster
Dorothy Granada has
deteriorated con-
siderably in the last
few days. She ex-
perienced the "worst
day" of her fast on
Friday, said fast sup-
porter Cathy Daniels.
All of the fasters
are beginning to ex-
perience more
physical discomfort as
the fast continues.
Particpants in the
Fast for Life are from
six different nations.
They include four
people from France,
two Americans, three
Canadians and one
person each from
Spain, West Germany
and Japan.
Charles Gray, 58,
from Oakland is the
oldest person par-
ticipating in the fast.
He and Granada were
married less than one
year ago.
In November of
1982 Gray, retired,
testing as well as pre- participated in an in-
deployment of ternational fast to br-
the Pershing II in
Europe for me to end
my fast
Affleck told The
ing attention to the
construction of a
cruise missile base at
Comiso, Italy.
Participants Discuss March
By PATRICK O'NEILL
20th aniversary
Darlene Keene is a pre-med
student hoping to attend the
ECU School of Medicine; Dr.
Susan McCammon is an assis-
tant professor in ECU's
psychology department. Last
spring she helped organize a
post-tramatic stress seminar to
help ECU students experiencing
emotional pain as a result of the
Village Green Apartment explo-
sion.
Susan Moran is a member of
ECU's Kappa Delta sorority.
She's an aspiring teacher who
said she is just beginning to
understand and explore the
direction her life is taking.
All these women do different
things on a day-to-day basis,
but on Saturday morning at 3
a.m. they boarded a bus to
Washington D.C. to com-
memorate the
of a dream.
On Aug. 28, 1963 the Rev.
Martin Luther King Jr.
delivered his famous "I have a
dream" speech. Fifteen years
following King's death, these
four women are still moved to
action by his words and joined
thousands of others in a march
for "jobs, peace and freedom
"1 felt like there were things I
had to stand up for Keene
told The East Carolinian, ad-
ding that her decision to make
the trip had been inspired by the
appearance last January of Cor-
etta Scott King in Mendenhall
Student Center.
"It just sparked something
inside Keene said.
McCammon said her main
reason for attending the Satur-
day march was to "help honor
Martin Luther King Jr and to
affirm her agreement with the
0
i& KAPP4 T4(
ideas he worked for.
"There's a lot of 'the dream
that was not fulfilled Mc-
Cammon said, "and I think
that was the whole idea of the
march to celebrate the parts
of the dream that were realized
and to show a commitment for
making more of the dream
come true
"I'm a very big believer in
equality said Moran. "I think
that if you believe in something
you have to stand up for it.
it was history in the mak-
ing continued Moran, "and I
wanted to be part of that. As a
future school teacher I want to
be able to tell my children about
it from a first hand ex-
perience
"People in this country still
face a lot of descrimination
because of their race, gender
and sexual preference Mc-
Cammon said, adding it was
"not acceptable" for anyone to
violate another's civil rights.
Keene said she was inspired
by her trip to the nation's
capital. "All those people work-
ing together for a common
cause was great Keene said.
On the theme of peace
brought out by the marchers,
Moran said, "we may not be at
war, but there are many sorts of
personal conflicts between
groups of people that can be
resolved more peacefully
Many of the marchers also
reflected on the progress that
had been made since the
original march. McCammon
noted the observation of Pitt
County NAACP President D.
D. Garrett-on the large number
of whites who traveled on the
Greenville bus to Washington.
"1 think there's been a lot of
progress since the first march "
IT
e
&-�&Z.
IP
"Welcome Back ECU Party"
FEATURING:
�Cr -V -�-s?sjfr yy. ss Cr ST S-
Your Favorite Beverage Will Be Provided
, Please Hje Proper Identification
THURSDAY, SEPT 1
9:00 p.m.
409 ELIZABETH STREET
.a
:xMo�xy
S.I
First Canterbury
Episcopal Fellowship
Welcome Student
Specials
ala (one month free)
Months Charter Membership $52 00
One Month Reg.$23.00 Now $18.75
Two Month Reg.40.00 Now $30.00
15 Sunton Visits Reg.$30.00 Now $22.50
Pre Register Before Sept. For Aerobic Dance
$16.00 per mo. (non-members) only $9.00 for members
United Figure Salon
s
s
s
I
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h
"Red Oak Plaza 75-2e.c
'�"�W "d f,t�.� c.n�r ,or Womtn) '
- �. . . � j � � s? r.

S
annoiuues the first Fall
Student Holy Communion
at St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401E. 4th St.
celebrant: Bishop Sidney Sanders of the
Diocese of East Carolina
Supper will be served following the service.


























bair salon
Conveniently Located
in Downtown Greenville
Latest Style Cuts
perms, hennas,
highlights,
waxing, manicures
758-8553
THE E.C.U.
CIRCLE K CLUB
Welcomes you
back to school
and invites you to our
first meeting this fall.
Date: Tuesday, Aug. 30,1983
Time: 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Place: Mendenhall Rm. 221
What is Circle K
It is the largest coed college
organization sponsored by a
Kwanis Club like Key Club.
It is a service organization that
is involved in helping others
while learning things ourselves
Also involved in having fun and
socializing. So come out and find
out more about us. Hope to see you
there.
752-7303
ATTIC
ANGirUDanm. I�Ftit ah Yor
WED. STUDENTS TO
CONTROL GROUP
THURS.
LADIES NIGHT
STILLWATER
with Jimmy Van Zandt
FRI.ANDSAT
1 I NO VACANCY 1
SUN.
FABULOUS KNOBS
318 S. Evans St. Mall, Greenville, N.C.
lECU I.Ds recieve 107o offl










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&t East (Earolintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller. �,�, Wu�afrr
Darrvi Brown, waningtd,wr
WAVERLY MERRITT, owrtarowi.
Hunter Fisher, m. ��
ALl AERASHTEH. MMmr
Geoff Hudson, onMm wanr
Ci ay Thornton, r��( &����
Cindy Pleasants. spor.sEd.tor
Patrick Oneill. Nemsmm,
UARLYN fcBERT, Enlrr.ainmrnt Editor
Lizanne Jennings, styitEd,tor
TODD EVANS, Production Manager
August 30, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Press Coverage
Why No 'Black Astronaut' Story?
Today, at 12:15 a.m mission
eight of NASA's Space Transporta-
tion System, the space shuttle
Challanger, carried into orbit the
United States' first black astronaut.
There are probably those who did
not realize the history being made
today, for the event did not get the
(over-) abundant press coverage
that the first U.S. female astronaut,
Sally Ride, received two months ago
on the previous shuttle flight.
Sure, the occasion of Air Force
Lieut. Colonel Guion "Guy"
Bluford Jr 40, did not afford the
opportunity for such irresistible
headlines as "Sally Takes A Ride"
and "Ride Sallies Forth Into Space"
("First Black 'Guy' In Space" just
doesn't have the same delicious
pun), but it seems it should have
been portrayed as no less a momen-
tous event.
Bluford is at somewhat of a
disadvantage in that 'he Ride hype
is only two months old, and
magazines aren't quite ready for
another NASA astronaut on their
covers, no matter who it is or what
the occasion. Ride, remember, grac-
ed the front covers of Time,
Newsweek and myriad other
magazines and newspapers.
Still, why not Bluford? Is the
black struggle for equal acceptance
at an end? Are we now a country
virtually colorblind? The answer is
certainly no. But does this mean we
are at least more colorblind than
"sexblind? technically, blacks did
receive their freedom and the right
to vote years before women, but
rarely did those 19th century laws
become enoforced or practiced until
the last 20 years, and undoubtably
many violations still exist. Also, the
Civil Rights Act, the equivilant of
the Equal Rights Amendment for
blacks, was passed 20 years before
the ERA, which focused on
discrimination against women, was
defeated. Is it, then, that women
have replaced blacks as America's
No. 1 oppressed group, and did Sal-
ly Ride have a bigger hurdle to over-
come than Guy Bluford?
Bluford is not the first black in
space; he had one predecessor,
Cuban Arnaldo Tamayo Mendez,
flying with the Soviets. But neither
was Ride the first woman � the
Russians sent two women into space
before the U.S. did. So, why did
Ride make the cover of Time and
Bluford make, in the same
magazine, only the fifth paragraph
of a one-page article that was just as
interested in the shuttle's night-time
take-off?
Perhaps because Bluford is a
man, while Ride broke that long-
standing fraternal order of the
Right Stuff. A man, we assume, is
tough enough to handle the job. We
don't have to ask Bluford, as we did
Ride innumerable times, Will you
cry when the going gets tough?
Perhaps we, deep down, know that
black people can do the job if they
can get past society's color barrier,
while we still wonder whether
women really can stand equal with
men, and therefore it is a major ac-
complishment and news story when
they do. After all, only South
Africa, the Klu Klux Klan and a
state or two in the Deep South
search for scientific proof that
blacks are inferior to whites, but it
is undeniable that women are at
least physically weaker then men.
Perhaps, then, the press celebra-
tion and hype over Ride was almost
an unconscious insult, for some
could hardly believe a woman could
do such a thing, and do it well. By
the same token, the lack of atten-
tion over Bluford's flight could be
taken as a compliment, for there is
little question anymore of the
equality of races, only of their ac-
ceptance by prejudiced individuals,
and of course a black handle the
job.
If such is the case, Ride's com-
petence surely put those un-
conscious doubts, that had lingered
all too long, to rest. And no doubt
Bluford will do the same. The
astronauts themselves, filled with
that Right Stuff found in both sexes
and any skin color, take the best at-
titude. Bluford and Ride both em-
phasize that they are astronauts
first, and it just happens that their
haven't been any blacks or women
before them. Perhaps one day the
press coverage over issues concern-
ing sex and skin color will hardly ex-
ist and not even be worth mention-
ing. That day, unfortunately, is a
long way off.
SHUTS ANOTHER INPEPENPENT APPWING FOR A PHONE FRANCHISE,
An Activist's Guide To Action:
To Bring Change, Start At Home
By PATRICK ONEILL
Very often I am approached by people
who are searching for a way to "get in-
volved" in the effort to make our world
a more just place to live. It's always
refreshing to know people are struggling
with that question because most people 1
encounter feel helpless or overwhelmed
by the problems facing the world today.
There is hope.
There are countless ways for us to
work for change, and with a little sear-
ching I'm sure you will see a way you
can begin to make a difference.
Perhaps the issue that must be dealt
with immediately is the nuclear arms
question. The world stockpiles more
than 60,000 nuclear weapons. Common
sense tells us that we can not go on in-
definitely building these things and still
survive.
If you want to work for disarmament
you can: study, educate others, write
your legislators, demonstrate or par-
ticipate in non-violent direct action. All
of the above will have an impact. Form a
group for the purpose of exchanging
ideas � or join one that's already
established. (This rule applies with
almost any problem.)
If the problem of hunger in our world
bothers you, don't just shake your
helpless head. Again, you must begin the
process of trying to understand why
50,000 people � human beings like us
� perish each day from starvation.
Don't buy all that talk about how
"We'll always have hunger because the
Bible says so Just because the Bible
makes a "statement of fact" doesn't
mean we shouldn't be working to
minimize the suffering. First of all, there
is enough food to go around. In the U.S.
our domestic pets and farm animals are
much better fed than most people in the
world.
Make an analysis of your own pat-
terns of consumption and begin to "live
more simply so that others may simply
live Consume less and share what you
have with the poor. This may seem
futile, but it's not. We must begin
rCampus Forum
somewhere and starting at home is a
good place.
I avoid buying products made by Nes-
tle's, Campbells and Libby's. i also
don't buy Red Coach lettuce. To me, all
of these companies have shown a blatant
disregard for the rights of the poor and
downtrodden.
Nestle's markets an infant formula
product in undeveloped countries even
though most mothers there cannot af-
ford, or properly use, this product. As a
result they are discouraged from
breastfeeding and many of their babies
"Injustice any-
where is a threat to
justice everywhere
�Martin Luther King Jr.
die from malnutrition or from disease
because they fed them formula mixed
with contaminated water. Nestle has
made little effort to change its marketing
practices and they should be boycotted.
The other two companies (Libby's is
owned by Nestle) are guilty of
mistreating the people who work in their
fields. Write to these companies telling
of you plans to boycott. They will write
back � they're willing to spend millions
to "clear their names but they don't
seem willing stop the injustices, keep the
pressure on.
If abortion is an issue that outrages
you, then I suggest you work to change
people's hearts and minds � not laws.
Women (and men) must be convinced
that there is another way. Those who
claim to be "pro-life" and still support
the nuclear arms race are blind to the
truth. Yes, abortion is morally unaccep-
tible � but so is war, poverty and oppre-
sion. They must all be eradicated.
Women, blacks and other minorities
are still treated as second class citizens in
our world. Don't passively accept the
status quo on this issue. These oppreed
groups are not only suffering as persons.
but by keeping them in this state, we
don't allow them to develop to their
potential. We deprive them � and
ourselves � of the gifts they might share
with the world if they were free from
their bonds. Martin Luther King, Jr.
said it all : "Injustice anywhere is a
threat to justice everywhere Work for
this change; again, do it from within
first.
Our prisons and jails are literally bulg-
ing with people who are "misfits" and
"outcasts They are lonely, helpless
and receiving little or no rehabilitation.
When they get out they will find no jobs
and usually return to a life of crime. It's
a vicious cycle. Most people in prision
are not mass murderers. Most are poor,
uneducated and willing to work. These
people should be treated as we treat
others who are sick or suffer from han-
dicaps. They need help. Support prison
reform, visit prisoners and write them
letters. They live absolutely miserable
lives and anyone working for justice
must not forget them.
A good way to begin a plan of action
for justice is to begin to see our world as
a single unit. Nationalism is a good
thing. We should all be proud of our
heritages, but if the actions of our
leaders are not in the best interests of
our sisters and brothers in other lands,
then we must resist those actions.
These are just a few suggestions to
begin a life of direct involvement. As
you work for justice and peace you
begin to see this world in a much more
beautiful and unselfish way. The
rewards are countless; the solution ex-
ists. Peace.
Ever Wonder
why political co narratives rarely sup-
port the same issues or viewpoints as en-
vironmental conservationists?
Health Center Offers Best Deal In State
l am a third-year science education
major working in the ECU Student
Health Service's laboratory. As an
assistant under the supervision of Mrs.
Barbara Winn, registered medical
technologist, I have been witness to
countless student complaints about the
SHS. The ECU student body's ap-
parent lack of appreciation for the ser-
vices they receive at the SHS has pro-
mpted this essay, written from an in-
. 'der's point of view; an insider who is
also a student, sharing the same in-
terests and expectations of any other
ECU student.
ECU students pay a health fee of
$34.50 per semester during the fall and
spring semesters, and $11.50 each sum-
mer session. Some students complain
that this is too much money to be re-
quired from a student's meager
budget. This essay concerns itself with
exactly what students are getting for
that $34.50.
The benefits covered by the health
fees are outlines in a brochure
distributed by the SHS. They include
all professional services rendered by
the medical staff, unlimited visits to
the SHS, most drugs in the pharmacy
(excluding those specially ordered),
routine allergy, insulin, and other in-
jections, most routine laboratory pro-
cedures, confidential diagnosis and
treatment of venereal diseases, routine
breast and pelvic examinations and
prescription for oral contraceptives.
There is also a psychiatrist on staff.
When comparing the ECU students'
medical expenses with a Greenville resi-
dent's expenses for the same
treatments, it is easy to see how much
money we save. Birth control pills, for
example, are $4 per cycle at the SHS.
At the Kroger pharmacy, they are $10
per cycle, and that does not include the
doctor's office visit fee to obtain the
prescirption.
A routine physical, which includes
an examination, urinalysis, blood cell
count, cell differential and EKG, is
covered by the student's health fee. At
the medical school's family practice
center, it costs about $100. A pap
smear and routine pelvic examination
which includes a urinalysis is $5 at the
SHS. At the family practice center, it is
a minimum of $48. Suture of minor
cuts and a tetanus shot is covered by
the health fees here at ECU. In the Pitt
County Memorial Hospital's emergen-
cy room, the minimum fee would be
$42, and that does not include the
emergency room physican's fee or the
return visit to have the stiches remov-
ed. If you contract a bad case of flu
and become dehydrated, two hours in
the hospital's emergency room for
observation and the administering of
I.V. fluids would cost you a minimum
of $58. For a student at ECU, it would
all be covered in the health fees.
Also, a visit with the psychiatrist at
the SHS would cost you, as a student,
nothing, for as long as you need to
stay. At a local psychiatrist's office in
Greenville, it would be approximately
$45 for a thirty-minute visit.
According to the SHS annual report
for 1982-1983, filed by Dr. James H.
McCallum Jr the director of the
ECU's Student Health Services, there
are four criteria utilized for the evalua-
tion of the SHS's performance: ser-
vices offered, patient satisfaction, pa-
tient utilization and cosi effectiveness.
Using the above criteria, the annual
report surmises that "we may be very
near our original goal of becoming the
'best SHS in the North Carolina
university system Indeed, ECU's
SHS does approach this mark. In a
comparative analysis included with the
annual report, the following informa-
tion was revealed. With ECU's health
fees at $69 per year, the only N.C.
university to better that cost is North
Carolina State, with health fees at $64
per year. However, N.C. State's SHS
budget is now in deficit and the ad-
ministration there plans to raise the
fees this fall. Also, ECU has a higher
utilization ratio (patient visits divided
by enrollment). The cost per visit for a
N.C. State student is $22 For an
ECU student, the cost is $18.65 per
visit.
UNC-Chapel Hill has the highest
fees at $154 per year. They also charge
for all pharmaceuticals, and charge $40
for pre-entrance and other physicals.
They have no connection between their
campus counseling center and the SHS
mental health section.
In regards to other N.C. universities
that were questioned, none offer more
services than does ECU. ECU also pro-
vides a group insurance and accident
insurance plan for all students through
a company selected by the Student
Health Advisory Committee. A group
plan provides students with a less ex-
pensive program than an independent
policy plan.
According to Kay Van Nortwick, the
administrative manager for the SHS at
ECU, the payroll there exceeds the
amount of money received from the
student health fees, which is the only
source of money for the health ser-
vice's budget. Since last year, patient
visits have increased 7 percent, and
laboratory work has increased 19 per-
cent. The pharmacy also began dispen-
sing oral contraceptive agents this past
year. All of this has occurred with no
increase in student health fees. Present-
ly, the health center is falling back on
reserve money to meet its expenses.
The annual report also outlines the
three major goals and objectives of the
SHS for the year of 1983-1984 and
beyond:
� work toward the cooperative
unification of all the diverse health and
related programs into one beneficial
manageable effort.
� continue to strive toward ex-
cellence in athletic medicine (service,
education, research).
� continue to serve the student
population with greater medical exper-
tise, more and varied services and
modernized equipment within the
budgetary confines.
It is obvious that the ECU Student
Health Service is service-oriented and
aspires to serve the student body as ef-
ficiently and effectively as possible.
Student cooperation and appreciation
would make that objective more readi-
ly attainable.
Mauree Donnellan
Junior, Science Education
!

i

SGA A a
Students
M;

BO!
I
I
Des
B CjREG RIDEOl L
tatntcmtormpomrm i
ECL Student At
tornev General Harrv
Dest said Fndav he
stror.glv urges ail
students to read the
SGA Documents
handbook so the -
be acquainted with all
university rules Dest,
in a message primal
aimed towu
freshmen, said m
students are "totally
oblivious to
regulatior
Dest, a-
general, is respon
for rev
student m
He and V
Dean q: Ju
Jame- B Ma
decide which
are aJlowec to t
before the
Boaru De-
main ;re- i
mg case- I
�s the seri .
the infra.
Afton
Bv T1V
MROs( HAK
�i�f - �
At ton. asma
in the northeaster!
part of N
Carolina, rect
nonal attention la- i
ear when it was
chosen to be the site I
for a hazardous - a I
landfill. After oppos-
ing the landfill tor
five years, loca tl
residents and cotmi Ft
officials final. � :
to civil disobedience i
protests in hope- -1
stopping construc-
tion.
PCB, a chenv.cai
suspected of ca i
cancer, was dumped CM
illegally in 19S along
240 miles of N.C. ui
roads. The con- are
taminated soil was imi
moved from the roaj
side to Warren Coun- rai
ty � the sue chosen the
by the Hunt ad- cessi
ministration for the the I
landfill.
Last year more thai
500 protestor we
arrested
demonstration in-
cluding an ECL stu- b
dent. The protests ga
ended after 6 -
Iuckloads of con-

Weicoi
Guarantees ces' P
Over 25
Complete Waterbe

.?' �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30. 1983

I FRANCHISE,
ion:
Home
'ppreed
- is persons.
� -tate. we
. e p to their
em � and
e night hare
free worn
. ither king. Jr.
. ' ce anvvhere 1 a
everywhere Work for
t from uithin
' trail) bulg-
I e misfits" and
. lonely, helpless
"enabihtation.
it the will find no jobs
urn to a life of crime. It's
Most people in pnsion
urdereri Most are poor.
ing to work These
e treat
er from han-
p Supp pi -on
and write them
miserable
2 for justice
m.
a plan ot action
- n to see our world as
alism is a good
fuld all be proud of our
� 'he actions of our
x in the nterests of
her- in other lands,
roe actions.
li. i few .gestions to
� oKement As
e and peace you
� rid in a much more
�n way The
. the volution ex-
Wonder
natives rarely sup-
� viewpoints as en-
nists?
late
has increased 19 per-
ic also began dispen-
Jceptive agents this past
has occurred with no
MI health fees. Present-
inter is tailing back on
o meet its expenses.
eport also outlines the
Is and objectives of the
ear of 1983-1984 and
t.ard the cooperative
11 the diverse health and
into one beneficial
rt.
to strive toward ex-
ilic medicine (service,
;arch)
Ito serve the student
greater medical exper-
varied services and
juipment within the
Ines
that the ECU Student
I is service-oriented and
It he student body as ef-
fectively as possible,
ttion and appreciation
it objective more readi-
Mauree Donnellan
Inior, Science Education
SGA Attorney Wants !
Students To Read Rules
B (,REG RIDEOUT
ECl Student At-
torney General Harry
Dest aid Friday he
ngly urges all
students to read the
vv A Documents
handbook so they will
be acquainted with all
:� kersit) rules. Dest,
in a message primarily
aimed toward
'reshmen, said most
students are "totally
obi ious to certain
regulations
De as attorney
general, is responsible
for reviewing cases of
lent misconduct.
He and Associate
Dean of Judiciary
ames B. Mallory
decide which students
arc allowed to go
before the Honor
Board Dent said the
main criteria for pass-
ing cases to the Board
s the seriousness of
the infraction.
Mallory disciplines
students involved in
less serious cases.
Students who are
required to go before
the Honor Board are
given a student public
defender to argue
their case. Steve Sher-
bin is public defender
for the upcoming
academic year. The
Board is empowered
to suspend or fine "the
student, or it can
decide the student
deserves no punish-
ment. .
Students who are
disatisfied with the
Board's decision can
appeal to the Review
Board, ECU's court
of last resort.
Dest said his main
goal for 1983-84 is to
achieve parity in
sentencing. Lst year,
Dest said, punishment
for the same crime
varied greatly in a
number of cases. As
attorney general, L�est
has no official
authority to demand
parity, but he feels
cooperation between
the two boards, the
public defender's of-
fice and his office will
achieve his goals.
Dest said freshmen
account for a majori-
ty of the infractions
against the university.
Two of the most com-
mon offenses are set-
ting off fire alarms
and book stealing. He
said the newly-created
Academic Integrity
Board would handle
all cases of cheating
this year. There are
usually three or four
cases per semester.
The Honor Board
meets once each week
and hears an average
of six cases per night.
Dest has two
assistants to help him
in prosecuting cases,
students Rick Brown
and Blake Eudaley.
Faculty Discuss
New Building
School Days, School Days
It's a return to the grind and by no most EC I students should be getting back into the swing
of things. These students pictured here look like the studious types.
Afton Still Fighting PCB Dump
By TINA
VHROSCHAk
M�ff �nlrf
Afton. a small town
in the northeastern
part of North
Carolina, received na-
tional attention last
year when it was
chosen to be the site
for a hazardous waste
landfill. After oppos-
ing the landfill for
five years, local
residents and county
officials finally turned
to civil disobedience
protests in hopes of
stopping construc-
tion.
PCB, a chemical
suspected of causing
cancer, vas dumped
illegally in 1978 along
240 miles of N.C.
roads. The con-
taminated soil was
moved from the road-
side to Warren Coun-
ty � the site chosen
by the Hunt ad-
ministration for the
landfill.
Last year more than
500 protestors were
arrested in
demonstrations, in-
cluding an ECU stu-
dent. The protests
ended after 6,440
vuckloads of con-
taminated soil were
dumped.
Ken Ferruccio,
president of Warren
County Citizens Con-
cerned About PCB's,
led others, including
numerous civil rights
leaders, in protests
against the landfill.
State officials claim
the location was
chosen for geological
reasons; however,
Ferruccio believes
that the rural area was
picked because of the
high percentage of
minorities in the
county.
To work safely, the
landfill must remain
completely water-
free. During the
unloading period the
area received approx-
imately three-quarters
of a million gallons of
rain. Ferruccio claims
the water was not suc-
cessfully pumped out,
therefore endangering
the environment by the
release of toxic
chemicals into the
soil.
Ferruccio also
believes dangerous
gases may be seeping
into the atmosphere
because of holes in the
landfill's plastic
cover. "It's just a
matter of time before
the liners fail and en-
danger the environ-
ment Ferruccio
said.
"All of this infor-
mation combined
leads us to believe that
the landfill is in trou
ble Ferruccio said.
"We intend to go in
there, and by this
winter we'll have the
information we
need After that,
Ferruccio intends to
publish the data
substantiating his
case.
"The suspen-
sion of human rights
and the use of
political force to store
dangerous wastes in
poor and minority
communities unable
to defend themselves
is a problem that is
very serious, claims
Ferruccio. "Along
with the economy and
jobs, it is the most
serious issue
Although the coun-
ty received a SI00,000
compensatory state
grant, residents re-
main angry. "I'm
psychologically in
prison because ot me
landfill Ferruccio
said during a recent
interview. "Until we
find a solution, I will
either be in prison or
on the way to
prison
"Our goal for War-
ren County is to
detoxify the site � to
work to a detoxifation
solution Ferruccio
adjjed
Last March Ferruc-
cio was arrested for
the ninth times, an
average of more than
one arrest per-month
during the time the
PCB protests were
taking place.
His ninth arrest was
for felonious larceny
when Ferruccio and
"another Afton resi-
dent tried to move a
water pump that they
claim was being used
to pump toxic water
into a nearby creek.
Ferruccio spent
more than two weeks
in jail after refusing to
post bail. During this
time in jail, Ferruccio
refused food and only
drank water. He also
spent part of his time
studying the life of In-
dian pacifist leader
Mohandas Gandhi.
Last September
when the protests
against the dump were
at their peak, several
civil rights leaders
participated iii the
civil disobedijnee ac-
tions.
Among those
arrested were U.S.
Congressional
delegate Wal :r E.
Fauntroy from
Washington D.C. u"J
the Rev. Joseph
Lowery, national
president of the
Southern Christian
Leadership Con-
ference.
At this point, wnn
the landfill already in
place, Ferruccio has
now decided to lead
the effort to detoxify
the PCB.
By KIM RICE
sI�ff A nirr
Although the N.C.
General Assembly did
not appropriate fun-
ding for a new arts
and science building
at ECU this year,
ECU officials are still
optimistic about the
proposed building.
Opponents of the
building claim the
new building will
destroy one of the last
natural areas on cam-
pus that is part of the
Sally Joyner
Memorial Ar-
boretum.
Concerning the new
addition,biology in-
structor Vincent Bellis
said two possibilities
need to be addressed.
The first question is
whether ECU should
be a highly centraliz-
ed university.
The proposed new
building would create
an overabundance of
traffic in the area. If
constructed in a dif-
ferent location, the
university would be
less centralized, Bellis
said.
He said a second
possibility is to build
several small
tion was given to the
matter. Many deci-
sions were made hasti-
lyBellis said.
Due to the size of
the proposed
building, the Davis-
Joyner Arboretum is
one of the few loca-
tions on campus
which would provide
adequate space.
Bellis said the site is
not valuable as an ar-
boretum because it
hasn't been maintain-
ed. "However, many
of the largest and
more valuable trees
on campus are located
in that area. It would
be a shame to see
them destroyedhe
said.
Bellis said the
university should look
into other possible
locations before the
next legislative session
as well as other alter-
natives.
Martha Elmore.
with the library
science department,
said in a letter to The
East Caroli-
nianThere is so lit-
tle natural beauty left
on our campus. Can
we afford to destrov
it?"
buildings which Contacted this
would alleviate the week, Elmore said her
problem of centraiiza- feelings have not
tion and provide changed. "It would
easier financing. be a shame to see a
"One wonders if building built there on
adequate considera- that particular site.
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THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
AUGUST JO, 9
ECU Has Leading Handicapped Services
B THERESA
DlI SKI
and
SOPHIA
�OWERS
All of the 16 univer
sities within the
University of North
Carolina system are
mandated to provide
services for 'heir han
dicapped students, in
accordance with Sec-
tion 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of
1973
"Because ECU got
an ear! start in this
program, we have
been credited with
having the leading
program of the
University System
said C.C. Rowe,
director of handicap
ped scivices for ECU.
" 1 he first thing to
reahe when you are
considering the han-
dicapped is that all
handicaps are not im-
mediately apparent
said RoweOur oi-
fice is working with
the wheelchair
students and those
with heart problems,
diabetes, or even so-
meone iniured in an
auto accident who
may temporarily need
special help
Many handicapped
students need special
care and require the
use of an aide, or per-
sonal care attendant.
Rowe continuously
interviews applicants
and keeps a current
list of qualified care
attendants. The actual
hiring is done in-
dividually by the
disabled student. If
special training is
needed, staff
members from the
Student Health
Center work with the
aide.
Gene Atkinson, a
transfer student ma-
joring in computer
science, credits ECU
for having an
"accessible campus
Accessibility is the key
word to a handicap-
ped person, especially
those, such as Atkin-
son, who must use
To Class On Wheels
ECU students Brian Rangeley and Michael Dixon are pictured here sit-
ting near the entrance to Raw! Building. Rangeley and Dixon must use
wheelchairs as their means of transportation to get around campus.
Their travel became easier when ECU installed several automatic door
openers at various camDus locations.
wheelchairs as their
main means of
transportation. "I'm
having a problem get
ting aides. I'm still
looking for two
more Atkinson
said. "I'm also having
problems answering
my phone, but Mr.
C.C. Rowe is working
on the problem
Special academic
services such as
Braille writers, inter-
preters for the hearing
impaired, and career
counseling for the
disabled student are
offered here at the
university. Captioned
films and special
driver's training pro
grams are also
Ed. School
Doing Job
Cont. from Page I
teachers,
regardless of their ma-
jor.
At NCATE's
recommendation, a
new evaluation system
was initiated. The
bylaws state that the
committee "insures
that systematic
evaluation of teacher
education programs
and its graduates is
conducted on a
regular basis and that
feedback is provided
to the appropriate
persons, departments,
or schools
New procedures
and guidelines have
been set for "entry in-
to, passage through,
and exiting from"
teacher education
programs. The details
are contained in a new
handbook, and will he
available to all ECU
education students
from Sept. 12-16.
Effective im-
mediately, Core Bat-
tery I. and II. of the
National Teachers Ex-
amination must be
taken before prospec-
tive teachers can enter
upper levels. The
registration deadline
is Sept. 26.
NCATE is schedul-
ed to revisit ECU on
March 19 - 21 to
determine if the
School of Education
has met accreditation
standards.
available for ECU's
deaf students. Adap-
tive intramurals and
recreational activities
are available through
ECU's Intramural-
Recreational Services.
George Chester, a
junior psychology
major who is visually
impaired, said the
handicap services are
adequate. "I use it for
reader services, tutor
services, and equip-
ment they have pur-
chased in the library. I
mostly use the visual
tech, typewriter and
brailwriter Chester
said.
One recent addition
to campus has been
the automatic door
openers on many
buildings to facilitate
easier access for
wheelchairs. Brian
Rangeley, an ECU
English student, uses
a wheelchair to get
around. "For the
most part, the han
dicap services are ef-
fective Rangeley
said. " The major
thing I've seen that
has helped me most is
the power door
openers.
Atkinson was pleas-
ed with Garrett dorm,
because it has an
automatic wheelchair
lift in the lobby and a
handicap accessible
bathroom.
Jessie McGowan, a
wheelchair student
studying early
childhood education,
likes the electric door
openers, but she
wishes there were
more. "They should
have electric door
openers in
Mendenhall she
said. 'Those doors
are the hardest to
open "
Rowe claims h i
primary goal is to
assist each individual
so he or she can be
constantly striving
toward independence
"ECl' is proud of her
handicapped
students Rowe said
, Now
thenes a new
Teller H
on campus
The Gender Gap
Women Are Voting Differently
B ANDREA
MARKELLO
Staff WriMi
The term gender
gap, pertaining to the
change in women's
voting patterns and
attitudes, was for-
mulated in the 1980
Reagan election
when, for the first
time, women voted
differently than men.
"We are making pro-
gress on the gender
gap said Fran Par-
rott, vice president of
The Pitt County-
Greenville chapter of
the National
Organization of
Women. "Men and
women are becoming
more open-minded
about womens' rights.
The concepts included
in the Equal Rights
Amendment have a
more widespread ap-
preciation, and
women are now being
seen in a different
light, with more ac-
ceptance of their role
changes
"In terms of the
ERA Parrott con-
tinues, "Reagan
believes in the' E ' and
the' R ' but not the' A
He doesn't follow
through with his pro-
posals, and he will
eventually find out
how valuable the
women's vote is to an
election's out-
come.It's just a mat-
ter of time before
women will gain pro-
per support in
political office
Several national
leaders in the
women's movement
claim that Reagan is
having difficulty
understaanding the
gender gap
One instance,
recently reported in
Newsweek, involves
an apology, by
Reagan, to Polly
Madenwald, national
federation president
for The International
Federation of
Business and Profes-
sional Women.
Reagan had failed to
keep an appointment
to meet with the
group.
In apologizing,
Reagan admitted,
"It's not enough to
say I'm sorry, so I in-
tend to do penance.
And we have been do-
ing a number of
things here with
regard to . . recogni-
tion of women's
place. I want you to
know I've always
recognized it, because
I happen to be one
who believes that if it
wasn't for women, us
men would .still be
walking around in
skin suits and carrying
clubs Many of the
women were outraged
by the President's
statement.
A more recent inci-
dent pertains to the
August 22 resignation
of Barbara Honneger
from her Justice
Department job after
declaring that Presi-
dent Reagan's pro-
gram to end sex
discrimination in
federal laws and
regulations was a
"sham
A barrage from
White House
spokesman Lawrence
M. Speakes helped ig-
nite the resignation
when Speakes
acknowledged that
Honneger had once
played an "important
role" as a bunny at
the White House
Easter egg roll.
ERA Honneger's
negative attitude is ex-
pressed in her August
21 Washington Post
editorial which con-
cludes, "There are
other aspects, mostly
economic, of any ef-
fort to undo wrongs
against women in this
country. But frankly,
my dear, I don't think
Ronald Reagan gives
a damn
A statement from
the national LWV of-
fice assumes Reagan
knows exactly what
the gender gap is and
takes advantage of it;
he realizes he gets
more votes from men
than women.
Newsweek, August
15, confirms this.
"The White House
recognizes that
Reagan will not win a
majority of women,
but he needs to hold
his 1980 supporters. A
June New York
TimesCBS News poll
shows the gender gap
turning into Death
Valley; the president
has 57 percent ap-
proval among men
but wins the approval
of only 39 percent of
women
The editorial in the
Washington Post,
August 21, by
Richard Lugar, chair-
man of the National
Republican Commit-
tee, proposes "A Plan
to Elect More GOP
Women In doing
so, Lugar offers, "the
Republican Party
must affirm, formally
and forcefully, that
we believe totally in
the appropriateness
and the desirability of
women seeking
political and
economic power in
our society As
chairman, I am en-
couraging the can-
didacies of women in
every state and am
prepared to commit
the maximum legal
funding and support
for any Republican
woman. If successful,
this campaign would
furnish a new genera-
tion of voices and role
models for
mainstream American
women. If we begin to
hold up our end of
society's obligation to
women, we will be
rewarded both at the
polls and in wiser
public decisions


Now there's a Teller II at East Carolina
I Iniversity. With a machine i n campus and
two others nearby, banking at Wachovia
is more convenient than ever.
.Y u Ea �
Mendenhall Student y enter C ampus
Othfj � " �' � i �
Pitt Plaza Highway 26-1 Bypass
University 802 E. loth Street
With Teller II you can do your banking
any time of the day or night, 365 days a
year. You can make deposits, transfer
funds, make loan payments, chock your
account balances, and of course, get cash.
Teller II �� banking the easy way
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
v
Membei RDlIjC
BECOME A 4-LETTER MAN
w

BE SURE TO
REGISTER FOR
MLSC1001
INTRO TO ROTC
ANDTHE ARMY
AS AN ELECTIVE
THIS FALL. THERE
IS NO OBLIGATION
i. -
"iv are i
otol college men and women
lies mArmv ROTC?
hiM'ininy hiui
Probably because Armv ROTC is full of
the kind 01 people other people go out of their
way to meet
ROTC students tend to be high achievers
who ,rv interested in more than their studies
They're popular students with a serious side,
hut who like to have a good time. loo.
In other words, when people join Armv
ROTC" thev often meet people a lot lik 'hem-
selves
For more information, contact Major Mike
Bishop or Captain Heldur Liivak at 757-6967
or come by Room 324 Erwin Hall.
ARMY ROTC.
BEAU YOU CAN
Universi
H (.1 FSS
MAI (,HA
I A
m the P
i
I M �
.
m e n �

i
Students
HMI
r M KOVMI �



ted







i
i
Band Mi
Prepare
Bn ei ibhh pa
S I U �
think
ing hack to scho
the fall Neme-
select
students kn i
ECU Ma
Pirate is ah
here. In the he n
the da
ha-
prepare this
five
e Marcl
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"Pici
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I HF I ASTAROl INIAN M GUST 30, 198?
S
in
she
hose doors
si to
n s his
s to
� ridual
. in be
striving
�ndence
d oi her
p p c d
e said
W

Wachovia
Bank & Trust
rl
N.
SURE TO
.ISTER FOR
LSC 1001
OTOROTC
THE ARMY
N ELECTIVE
FALL. THERE
OBLIGATION
Major Mike
i iiak at 757-6
Kruin Hall.
University Receives Grant
B (,1 ENN
MAUGHAIN
S4�rf �rlln
rwo ECU scientists
recently return e d
from the Pacific after
studying a solar
eclipse that took place
on June 11. Dr. Floyd
I Mattheis, chair-
man of the science
education d e part
meat . said I C I
received one oi onl
ten grants given b the
National Science
Foundation to par
ticipate in the stud of
the solar phenomena
which took place ovei
lava, Indonesia.
Mattheis, accom
pa mod h I
Physics Professoi l)i
Edward l Seykora,
investigated a sound
wave d i s t vi r b a n c e
created b y solar
eclipses. Seykora,
who developed two
new detectoi systems
involved in the stud,
said the "disturbance
is related to waves
associated with explo-
sions oi meteorite
travel but not on the
same scale. I he waves
are of a ver low tre
quency with hardly
anv force
Seykora made two
mps, one in Januray
to India, to set up
monitoring stations
and another to Java
lust prior to the
eclipse. He noted that
the sound wave was a
theory in 1970 and
this is the tirst lime
scientists have been
able to confirm the
wake disturbance ex
ists. "We were able to
nick it up 4,(XX) miles
a w a v,
ed.
Sevkora add-
Seykora said the
results could be
published within six
months. Joining the
ECU duo were teams
oi investigators from
the Kitt Peak Obser-
vatory, the U.S.
Naval Observatory
and the Sacramento
National Obser-
vatory. Funding for
the research was ob-
tained through grants
from the NSF Solar
Eclipse Expedtion.
mjlSS THROUGH!
Students Wait For Financial Aid
B STAC 1
rl KOWITZ
I�M filer
1 aiiv last week, the
at ECU'S finan-
cial aid office grew
long as students
waited for hours to
get information on
ible grants and
loans.
Some students were
angry, while others
were satisfied with the
service they received.
Others complained
about the long lines
One unidentified
student said.
'There's nisi too
much disorganiza-
tion. Waiting is the
�orst part of it
Emma Green, an
ECU freshman, said
new government cuts
and regulations are a
definite factor in the
problem. Both
students and a d -
ministration are hav-
ing to adapt to man)
changesshe added
Another freshmai
James Clinkscle said
students need to be
better informed. "If
the students received
the information thev
needed, things would
go more smoothly
Clinkscle said
T h e p e o p 1 e
working in financial
aid are doing the best
the) can said slu
dent Francine
i ,ii mer. I hey can't
process the informa-
tion anv faster. The
o n 1 v thing for
students to do is
wait Farmer said
-he saw no other solu-
tion to the problem.
1 CU Director oi
Financial Aid Robert
Bourdeaux. disagreed
with some of the
students remarks, "I
don't feel the lines are
anv longer than
they've been in past
years he said. "We
divide the students in-
to two lines, and their
wait should not be
any longer than 45
minutes
By weeks end, the
long lines were gone
and the new semester
underway, so students
with complaints will
probably remain quiet
untill the spring.
Band Members
Prepare Shows
Bv El IZABETH PACK
staff nirr
When other ECU
students are still
thinking aboui com-
ing back to school for
the fall semester, a
select group of
students known as the
ECU Marching
Pirates is already
here. In the heat of
the day they practice
hard. trying to
prepare this year's
-how for the football
games.
"The band consists
approximately 230
people, and is the best
sounding band in the
five vears I've been
here said Tom
Goobby, director of
the Marching Pirates.
The year's opening
number will be
"Pictures of Spain
then the precussion
section will play a
drum solo, followed
by Chicago's "Free
A Doc Severson tune,
"Spanish Dreams
will foilow "Free"
"There will be a
, lassical ending that
everyone will love,
but I'm keeping that a
secret Goolsbx said
" The color guard is
smaller this year, but
it's terrific Goolsby
said. "1 think that
we'll reallv blow N.C.
State's band off their
field
With the help ot
sophmor e music
students Jodv Stiles
and John Pruiti for-
mally with the Spirit
of Atlanta drum
corps, the horn sec-
tion will have a verv
P o w er f uI s o u n d .
claims Goolsb). Both
o them played a solo
while they were with
"The Spirit
Asked about the
Marching Pirates'
chances of going with
the football team to a
post bowl game,
Goolsby said: "If the
bowl is important
enough to bring in a
lot of monev, we will
probably go, but if
it's a small one. 1
doubt the band will
go, due to lack of
funds
HARD DAYS NIGHT
,??�?
��������������?��??��??���
VolaR
HAS sTUST
JbE&uNl
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Every
THURSDAY
at the
CAROLINA
OPRY HOUSE
Happy Hour
FREE Draught
(8:30-10:00)
FREE ADMISSION
ALL NIGHT
�,��������
Midnight Drawing for a FREE KEG
Every Thurday Night!
We're takina you Back in Time For the Time of Your Life!
The 6�y House is Now a Privote Club!
All ABC Permits Members owd Invited Guests Only
Mike Cross
Sept.
ECU'S ftTV CENTfip
roe 15 vEAes
WRCOMtS BACK
&&&
WTJ
FUND-RAISGR UGT- DlFFSBfcNT
EVENTTS EACM UTOC , ReoM&KW
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HAPPY HOOP, l.OOAOM.
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END OF TMC WEE PARTY
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Pl&A :ODlL iHOO UilTW CAK5 SPLL TO
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THE EAST CAROL INI AN
Entertainment
AUGUST 30. 1983 Page 8
Top Violinist
To Perform Here
A performance by the North
Carolina Symphony Orchestra
and guest soloist Charles Treger,
violinist, opens the ECU Unions
Artists Series' 1983-1984 season.
The concert will be held in Wright
Auditorium on Wednesday, Sept.
14 at S p.m.
Tickets are available beginning
Aug. 31 at $2.50 for ECU students
and S50 for ECU faculty and
staff and for the public from the
Central Ticket Office. All tickets
sold at the door will be $7.50.
Founded by Pulitzer Prize-
winning composer Lamar Str-
mgfield, the North Carolina Sym-
phony, comprised of 48 volunteer
musicians from 16 communities,
performed its first concert in
Chapel Hill in 1932. From those
early days, the symphony has
developed in size and scope, back-
ed by supporters organized in 3"
chapters statewide. Last year, the
symphony's 73 full-time musi-
cians traveled 22,000 miles within
the state, appeared in more than
120 communities and performed
more than 370 adult and educa-
tional concerts.
Gerhardt Zimmerman was
named Artistic Director Conduc-
tor o the North Carolina Sym-
phony in 1982. Formerly
Associate Conductor of the St.
Louis Symphony. Zimmerman
also served as musical director of
the Canton Symphony for three
years. He has guest conducted
many different symphony or-
chestras across the nation and has
performed several times with the
National Symphony in
Washington, D.C including a
special concert on the lawn of the
Capitol with composer Aaron
Copeland narrating his own
Lincoln Portrait
As euet soloist, violinist
Charles Treger brings to the stage
an extraordinary new vision of the
violin. Treger has performed
regularly from his repertoire of 50
concertos with such conductors as
Abbado, Bernstein, Boulez, Or-
mandy and Ozawa. He is also one
of the founding members of the
Chamber Music Society of Lin-
coln Center. He performs on a
beautiful Hartmann Stradivarius
made in 1723.
Season tickets are still available
for the 1983-1984 Artists Series
which includes, in addition to the
North Carolina Symphony, Lynn
Harrell. The Romeros, Anton
Kuerti, and the Chamber Music
Society of Lincoln Center. The
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall is open Monday
through Friday. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information call
5-6611. ext. 266.
TV's Preacher Boys:
Dealing Holy Oil
From Pitt County
By GORDON IPOCK
xiiff Wntrr
For all you Saturday night par-
ty hounds who can't make church
Sunday morning, television
preaching can provide that last
chance for moral edification
before another Monday rolls
around.
But why bother with big-name
evangelists like Jerry Falwell or
PTL's Jim and Tammy Bakker
when you can watch two Pitt
County preacher boy v. Green-
ville's Reverend Jim Whittmgton
and Winterv llle's Reverend
Charles Young.
Whittmgton telecasts at 11:45
Sunday evening on WITN Chan-
nel Seven, and Young follows at
12:15. Their styles are remarkably
similar. Both play up the down-
home, good-ole-boy angle, and
both rely on charisma. Both sing
as much as they preach. The
telecasts are recorded before live
audiences.
Whittmgton, however, is the
more refined of the two. He wears
well-tailored three-piece suits ac-
cented with gold rings, watches
and bracelets. After brother Larry
Whittington warms up the con-
gregation with some up-tempo
gospel singing, Jim comes onstage
singing another positive gospel
tune like "There's A Land Where
We'll Never Grow Old Jim
knows how to get the audience in-
to a friendly mood. He often com-
mands folks to join hands or to
"give somebody a hug Nobody
ever falls asleep at Jim Whit-
tington's services; he keeps 'em
alert and peppy by constantly urg-
ing the congregation to give him
� or themselves � "a hand
Light the applause sign, please.
An organ playing in the
background vanes the mood and
follows the tempo of Jim's
preaching which mostly con-
sists of folksy wisdom and
homespun homilies but very little
direct scripture.
"Now everybody wants to be
like everybody else he says, pac-
ing the stage, gesturing with one
hand and holding a microphone in
the other. "White people go down
and lay on the beach for hours
trying to get black, and black peo-
ple buy bleaching cream and
powders trying to get white
Whittington smiles at this bit of
cleverness, and the racially-mixed
audience applauds and amenv
Finally Whittington gets
around to the gospel. Imminent
catastrophes predicted by the
Book of Revelation are a favorite
topic. As the organ trills, he cites
the mark of the beast, the great
tribulation and the anti-Christ �
an apocalyptic horror story.
In the final portion of the
telecast. WhittingTON. as he
calls himself, makes a personal
pitch to the viewer. Jim urges
those with a "special need" to
place their hand on a piece oi
paper, trace their hand's outline
and write their special need in the
palm area of the tracing. Then the
viewer sends the tracing to Whit-
tington, who promises to lay his
hand on it and pray for the
viewer's written need. Personally.
1 prefer the TV preachers who
simply ask you to place your hand
on the TV screen. It's easier, and
you don't have to send in a cash
donation with your tracing.
The Reverend Charles Young
doesn't have W'hittington's refine-
ment. His rent-a-tux get-up with
frilled shirt and velour bow tie is a
See PITT. Page 10
Violinist Charles Treger, the only American to win the International Wieniawski Competition in Warsaw
solos with the N.C. Smphon Sept. 14.
'Cujo: 'Man Flees Dog
B EDDIE COC KRELL
sp�i�l iii I h t �:ariifiaiin
'That sucked said the kid in the Hobie t-shirt
at the next urinal.
"But that dog was bad said his compatriot at
the sink as he applied the finishing touches to his
hair. "1 mean, bad. Can you imagine owning a dog
like that? That would be bad. I mean, bad. Yeah.
the movie sucked
Only minutes earlier, these same two horror film
fans could be seen scraping each other off the bot-
tom of their seats as the lights went up on the latest
big-screen adaptation of a Stephen King novel, Cu-
io. Similar reactions could be heard floating
around the theater, as people pried each other's
arms from around necks, shoulders and waists.
The guy one row back who had been cracking wise
to a couple of girls throughout the film, shutting
up only long enough to have the bejesus scared out
of him, was up and out of the theater like a shot the
moment the first end credit appeared. This is
human nature: by leaving so quickly, he was deny-
ing the intensity and impact of what he'd seen.
Man flees dog
He wasn't alone: the theater emptied rapidly.
Consider, then, the strange fate of the effective
horror film. It is either embraced b a large au-
dience as a "family" shocker, a- was Alien, or it is
sxich a brutal moviegoing experience that no matter
how well-made it is. it's going to get bad press bv
the nature of its viciousness. The Texas (hainsa
Massacre is such a film. So isujo.
Director Lewis Teague (who did the hugelv en-
joyable John Sayles-scnpted Alligator in 1980) has
been given a script that cuts away all of King's
subplots and concentrates on the conflict of a
woman and her young son trapped in a Pinto bv a
rabid dog. King's gleefully malicious sense of
See KUDOS, Page 10
Fall MSC Films Shine With Oscar Winners
David Bowk stars as a man with a bizarre secret in 'The Hunger one of the many free films offered at Mendenhall this term.
By CARLYN EBERT
tnlrrK.nmcnl tditor
The Student Union Films Com-
mittee offers free films every
weekend in Mendenhall's Hendrix
Theatre.
Wednesday night special films,
weekend late shows and special
double and triple features supple-
ment the weekend Popular Films
Series with other, less frequently-
aired movies and golden oldies.
Last week we listed the Com-
mittee's choices for August
through October, but Hendrix's
silver screen won't go blank as
soon as Halloween and Dawn of
the Dead fade away.
November promises Dustin
Hoffman in mascara and pan-
tyhose in Tootsie (Nov. 3-5), Best
Actor Ben Kingslev in last year's
Best Picture Gandhi (Nov. 10-12),
Francis Ford Coppola's One
From the Heart (Nov. 18 and 19
� no Thursday show) and a pre-
Thanksgiving smorgasbord of fun
on Sunday, Nov. 20: a Film adap-
tation of Broadway's A Funny-
Thing Happened on the Way to
the Forum, the rock opera Tom-
my and the ever-popular Blues
Brothers. The theme is "Musical
Decades with Forum the entry
from the '60s, Tommy from the
'70s and Jake and Elwood from
the '80s.
Octopussy, one of this year's
new James Bond films, and The
Lords of Discipline round out the
weekend series on Dec. 1-3 and
8-10, respectively.
Wednesday double features pay
tribute to Shakespeare on Film
(Olivier in Othello paired with
Richard III at 6 and 9 p.m. on
Sept. 7). vintage Hitchcock (9
Steps and Spellbound at 7 and 9
p.m. on Sept. 28) and director
Werner Herzog with Heart of
Glass and Aguirre, The Wrath of
God (Oct. 26).
The rest of the Wednesday-
series shapes up with John Ford's
The Quiet Man at 8 p.m. Aug. 31
and the offbeat Eating Raoul
(Sept. 14). Ingmar Bergman goes
Mozart in The Magic Flute (Oct.
5), Cannes Festival Award Win-
ner Breaker Morant plays Oct. 19
and Japanese master director
Akira Kurosawa's much-imitated
1954 Seven Samurai comes to
campus on Nov. 2. Lindsay
Anderson's Britannia Hospital
(Nov. 16) and the late Rainer
Werner Fassbinder's Veronika
Voss (the last film he completed
through post-production) con-
clude the fall's W ednesday special
Films on Dec. 7.
All films � weekend, Wednes-
day, late-night and Sunday
matinee � will be shown in
Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre. Admission is by
student ID and current activity
card (yes, you've already paid for
these flicks) or by MSC member-
ship. For weekly accurate time
listings or last-minute changes,
check the information desk at
Mendenhall. Or look for last Fri-
day's East Carolinian, which ran
a clip-and-save table listing all the
Films. The Entertainer, available
at Mendenhall, runs synopses and
film times, and information
boards located near the Student
Supply Store and the Croatan also
list the week's Films.
Singer
B ROBIN AUK
East Carolina is bu
all the activity that ace
the beginning of fall term
School of Music has f
rhythm, and that me I
recitals and concerts are n
ing scheduled for the upd
months.
The first recital will b
Sunday. Sep- 11 P
member Dr Clyde Hiss
aill perform in Flet
Hall at 8 p.m with Dr 1
Hoekman accompar
piano.
Hiss has chosf
composers Robe'
Antonin Dvorak
his recital.
He will sing Bit
Dvorak in
Czechoslovakia the
native language The
inspired by the Psalm;
Hiss says these -
ed in the 189
in Dvoraf 's life rh -
Natalie's L
Surfaces A
RALEIGH (I
� The Oci
p r e rr. i e r e
Brainstorm, the ate
Natalie Woe . " -
mov.t. ill be a
tie aa:r to ra -
money for the N rth
Carolina Museum
History Ass )C ates,
officials a d asi -
week. i
Ticket- � - the evi
premiere, wh
stars Chi I ph e r
Walker, and Louise
Fletcher, will cc
SI 00. The museum
associates hope to
raise $100,000.
���������������������
(2 Bio,
Come talk
to Sammy
about a meal plan.
H e Specialize
All You
on Large
(1 meat.
(1 met
Open
ll:00to8:00
7 days
a neek
���������
I PRESENT TH1

ST
DISI
HAIRCJ
Reg
$8J
NO
$6.
Mi
N
Pitt
���������fclM.ig
- �� V
-w






V
ii Competition in Warsaw
Dog
ppeared. This is
i hewasdcny-
I C w tic'd een.
tier emptied rapidly.
e effective
raced b a large au-
av was Alien, or it is
;� no matter
bad press by
The Texas C hainsa
5
� did the hugely en-
ptcd Alligator in 1980) has
- awa ail of King's
J ttes ehi the conflicl of a
�son rapped in a Pinto by a
sefullv malicious sense of
Page 10
nners
ntage Hitchcock (39
Spellbound at 7 and 9
on Sept 28) and director
r Herzog with Heart of
and Aauirre. The Wrath of
(Oct 26)
ler
le rest of the Wednesday
r shapes up with John Ford's
Quiet Man at 8 p.m. Aug. 31
he offbeat Eating Raoul
14). Ingmar Bergman goes
art in The Magic Flute (Oct.
Tannes Festival Award Win-
ireaker Morant plays Oct. 19
Japanese master director
ra Kurosawa's much-imitated
Seven Samurai comes to
(pus on Nov. 2. Lindsay
ier son's Britannia Hospital
i. 16) and the late Rainer
ner Fassbinder's Yeronika
s (the last film he completed
ugh post-production) con-
le the fall's Wednesday special
is on Dec. 7.
dl films � weekend, Wednes-
late-night and Sunday
Umee � will be shown in
ndenhall Student Center's
tadrix Theatre. Admission is by
Idem ID and current activity
rd (yes, you ve already paid for
;se flicks) or by MSC member-
ip. For weekly accurate time
kings or last-minute changes,
leek the information desk at
mdenhall. Or look for last Fri-
g's East Carolinian, which ran
lip-and-save table listing ail the
is. The Entertainer, available
Mendenhall, runs synopses and
Im times, and information
ards located near the Student
ipply Store and the Croatan also
n the week's Films.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30. 1983

Singer To Perform Schumann, Dvorak
There are still some things
we have yet to imagine.
Bv ROBIN AYERS
Suit W rii�
East Carolina is buzzing with
all the activity that accompanies
the beginning of fall term. The
School of Music has its own
rhythm, and that means that
recitals and concerts are now be-
ing scheduled for the upcoming
months.
The first recital will be held
Sunday. Sept. 11. Faculty
member Dr. Clyde Hiss, vocalist,
will perform in Fletcher Recital
Hall at 8 p.m. with Dr. Timothy
Hoekman accompanying him on
piano.
Hiss has chosen 19th century
composers Robert Schumann and
ntonin Dvorak as the focus of
his recital.
He will sing Biblical songs from
Dvorak in the original
Czechoslovakian, the composer's
native language. The songs were
inspired by the Psalms.
Hiss says these songs, compos-
ed in the 1890s. were written late
in Dvorak's life. "Thev represent
his most mature style says the
vocalist.
Four chabrier songs, composed
about 1840, make up the selected
Schumann works. A chabrier
song is satirical, and its subjects
are animals. Translated from the
French, the chabriers are part of a
larger group of songs titled
"Poet's Love When he had the
work published, Schumann omit-
ted four songs, and Hiss will per-
form the missing chabriers at the
recital.
Songs by Offenbach and by
Gilbert and Sullivan will conclude
the program.
Hiss, who joined the School of
Music faculty in 1965, received his
doctorate and master's degrees
from the University of Illinois and
his bachelor's degree from the
Baldwin-Wallace Conservatory.
He has studied under Pierre Ber-
nac, Bruce Foote and Burton
Garlinghouse. At ECU, he also
serves as director of the School's
Opera Theater.
Natalie 's Last 'Brainstorm'
Surfaces As Big Charity Gala
RALEIGH (UPI)
The Oct. 6
premiere of
Brainstorm, the late
Natalie Wood's last
movie, will be a black-
tie affair to raise
money for the North
Carolina Museum of
History Associates,
officials said last
week.
Tickets to the
premiere, which also
stars Christopher
Walken and Louise
Fletcher, will cost
$100. The museum
associates hope to
raise $100,000
"We kicked the
price around for a
long time said
William Arnold,
director of the North
Carolina Film Office.
Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. selected the
museum associates
for the benefit after
deciding to make the
opening a charitable
event, Arnold said.
He said the museum
associates were work-
ing to raise $2.5
million to renovate
the former state art
museum.
Brainstorm will be
shown at the 500-seat
Mission Valley
Theater in Mission
Valley Shopping
Center in Raleigh.
There will be two
showings on opening
day. Between show-
ings, the charity will
host a preview party
at the Capitol City
Club.
Susan Pittman,
assistant executive
director of the
museum associates,
said invitations to the
premiere already had
gone out to the 5,000
associates.
J
NM-
���THICTtfl g j
A magnificent and powerful film, 'Sophie's Choice starring
Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline, airs at Mendenhall's Hendrix
Theatre this Thursday through Saturday at 5 and 8 p.m.
S,SSSSSSS'SSSSSSSS'S'SS
�' SSSffS,
Dr. Clyde Hiss, vocalist, will be featured in the School of Music's first
public recital this fall.
phone
752-3172
Located I mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
ram HUNGER
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Come talk
to Sammy
about a meal plan.
SPECIAL
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OFFER
take out
752-0476
Monday thru Thursday
We Specialize In Home Cooked Food
-All You Can Eat Vegetables
on Large Plate $3.85 tax
(1 meat, 3 veg bread and tea)
Daily Specials
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While youre at it. pick up
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10
I HI I S! �. AROl INI AN
�l t,l M H). 1983
Kudos For'CujoFilm Treatment
Makes An Effective Horror Flick
Com. from Page 8
humor has created a
chain of events that
lcue them stranded
over three sweltering
days without relict.
Although the ending
of the film has been
drastically altered.
Cujo exists at the mo-
ment as the most
faithful adaptation of
a King novel et. (The
Dead one is to be
released later this
month, and John
Carpenter has just
completed principal
photography on
Christine, after hav-
ing the rug pulled out
from under his
Hrestarter project.)
Teague has wisely
opened up the action
b employing a
downright Germanic
stv le; the camera dips,
swoops, glides, tracks
and pans with an ex-
hilarating freedom we
haven't seen in an
American film since
John Badham's
Whose Life Is It
Any nay?
Although the film
doesn't look cheap, it
does look economical.
With that in mind,
you'll marvel at the
meticulous set design
and terrific make-up
jobs, particularly on
Dee Wallace and the
dog. In fact, the dog's
performance is such a
per fectlv-realized
J e k v 11 Hvde
metamorphosis that
it's hard to believe
one dog did the whole
film. Maybe there was
more than one dog, a
good dog and a bad
dog. At any rate, the
animal action (it says
in the credits) of Karl
Lewis Miller and the
animal handling of
Glen Garner and
Jackie Martin is first-
rate.
King's books have
always had a way of
lulling you to sleep
with a good story and
then knifing you in
the back while you
snore. Cujo has the
same power; there
isn't a cheap shock in
the entire film. Never-
theless, as at least one
audience proved, the
movie has a way of
sneaking up on you
and doing its job
before you know it.
Kudos, then, for Cu-
jo. And that dog was
bad.
Pitt County's TV Preacher Boys
Deal Holy Oil Miracle Packages
Coat, from Page 8
tack compared to
W hittington's svelte
and his style is
much more
rismatic much
more dramatic, too.
His singing is reminis-
cent of 1 it tie
Richard's wailing.
i his woolly hair
and mutton chops
ke Wolf man
Jack's
N oung also appeals
to a racially-mixed au-
dience. His rhetoric is
even more down-
home than W h i t -
tington's: "Bible days
are here again he
shouts. After a heavy
dose of soul-rock-
gospel music. Young
bypasses preaching
the gospel and tears
straight into miracle
healing. On Sunday's
telecast, a five-year-
old boy who had
undergone surgerv for
an open spine regain-
ed his sense of touch
The part of
Young's telecast that
really got my atten-
tion, though, was his
free "Miracle
Package It con-
tains a bumper sticker
that reads. "I Am
Protected By The
Blood Young
assured viewers that
the sticker would keep
witches at bay. The
Miracle Package also
contains a prayer
cloth and a cellaphane
packet of annointing
oil. A golden praying-
hands decal is llo in-
cluded. Each packet is
heavily prayed over,
according to Young,
before he sends it to a
viewer.
"Charles Young
has never prayed a
prayer that God
didn't hear says the
youthful Young. It all
works, he says.
because the Holy
Ghost is in each
Miracle Package.
Whether any of it
works or not, I don't
know. But getting all
those free deeals.
stickers, cloths and oil
is a lot neater than
tracing your stupid
hand on a piece of
paper and sending it
to Jim Whittington.
You can always use
the annointing oil to
make a holv salad.
&
stereo
SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
Reg.60
00
ALPINE
car audio systems
Less is truly more The Koss HV X is a
remarkable engineering achievement in
lightweight comfort and sound reproduc-
tion The HV X s brilliance and clarity will
astound you And its deep bass response is
unmatched by other lightweight phones.
U t.
$149.95
��.
fflfflt C-901
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f a f CCTTCC Cassette (ilidi ' Metal-Stereo Dual Fui ction
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3 for $10.00
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The tirst and best complete rec-
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1983
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AIWA
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WELCOME BACK ECU
105 Trade Street
a
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available I
sale at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store except as
specifically noted 11 this ad
or
)
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT, SEPT 3 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEN0, WE WILL DOUBLE
3 MANUFACTURERS COUPONS, EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
5 COUPONS
Between now and Sept 3. we will redeem rational
manufacturer a centa-ort coupons up to W tor
double their value Otter good on national manu-
facturer centa-off coupons only (Food retailer
coupons not accepted Customer muat purchaae
coupon product in specified sue Expired coupons
will not be honored One coupon per customer per
item No coupons accepted for tree merchandise
Offer doe not apply to AAP or other store coupons
whether manufacturer is mentioned or not When
the value of the coupon exceeda 50 or the retail
of the item this offer is limited to the retail price
Savings are Great with A&P's
DOUBLE SJWMGS COUPOMS!
rOUPOW
COUPON A
COUPON B
COUPON C
COUPON D
CtNTSO��
25-
18-
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75
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25
18
50
25
SO
36'
$1 00
$1 00
si
SAVE 20 LB.
SAVE 30 LB.
RED OR WHITE
Seedless Grapes ! Delicious Apples
! WHITE I rrrN EASTERN GOLDEN
79c
eat Groce7
U
SAVE 22
HOT DOG OR
JANE PARKER
Savings j
SAVE UP TO 50
Upton Tea Bags
.�-l-i'
r8ct.
pkg-
I
Lipton
FAMILY SIZE
24 I !l"till M SI6
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Two
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SAVE 71
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Charcoal Briquets AAnn Page Cola
A&P BRAND
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101b.
Limit
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NowSave A&P Gold Register Tapes for
great savings on quality
Stainless Steel Cook ware
1Qt.
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Saucepan
With $200 Worth
A&P Gold
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18 8 Stainless Steel
with 3 layer tn-ply
bottom for better cooking
HERE'S HOW IT WORKS . . .
� Save your valuable A&P gold register tapes starting Sunday August 28th
" n you have the amount of A&p 9�,d register tapes needed, redeem them at th�
A&P check stand. dl ine
� Naturally you can start saving more A&P gold register tapes for the next rnokxAr�
item you plan to select. cuuKware
� And remember, all items are on sale for the duration of this proaram Thm nf�r ,e
scheduled to end Sat Dec 17,1983. � er ,s
C
Gr ����! ii �- nitArc b lODpn Center
703 creenville Blvd. Groenville, N.C
JobsLooli
For Barttl
With Fin
ByPHKRRIM,
Suft nirr
If you've ever pur-
chased a mixed drinl
chances are vou didn't
give much though to
what is involved in
becoming a
bartender, or a
mixologist" as tl
are sometimes .ailed
For the pa three
years, the i
Carolina School
Bartending ha-
cd many
bartender ii
North arolma
well as the S
Owned and ma- �
b Stuart Ha
the school rel
to 510 Cotanche
from it original
tion on Arl ngti
Boulevard
June.
"Busu.v
ing ex
Haithcock. I
relocating d
the school ha
ed a stea
studer-
the art of n
Studer:
ing to sacrifice $25
for the �
struction need-
complete the
Haithcock,
penenced bartend
himself, i n s 11
most of the three-
hour long wecf -
classes. During
first week of via
student- are required
to learn rrr- �n i
1 y 15 0 d : � �
recipes rant
pink ladies to
tinis. 'Each st
works out r. g
behind the tra
bar. mixing one
after another while
trying to increase
speed and improve the
quality of his
Students bee
familiar with
area's more popular
drinks, such as
white Russian, ma
and the triple s�
tea. and the) a
learn the proper ser-
vice of beer, wine and
other bar staples
But how var
school afford to lei
couple hundred
drinks go to
after each
Haithcock solves
prol
simui
lookj
real
tunal
I
bai
ma
V 1
ass
'TheQuiel
Runs To
Tomorrow ' s
Special Movie
Mendenhail is The
Quiet Man, starring
John Wayne. In his
only corned)
Wayne piav- a boxei
who, after winning
fame in -merica.
returns to his na
Ireland sworn
fighting, he is con-
sidered a coward bv
the Irish town
until he must I .
win the beau
woman he loves
(Maureen O'Ha
The winner
Academy wards
Best Director (John
Ford) and Besl
Qui

� �
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN
DEPEND ON von
?�"v women o lha t terrxng C eH
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SHMCB. � Tu-Mdov ScmJ
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(�'





)e readily available f
l&P Store except as
D
WHOLESALERS
ONS
HJMi
LSE - 5 COUPONS.
I 0 COUPONS
ICE VALUE'
Great with AiP s
hgs coupons
50
36-
$1 00
$1 00
1
68
58
ft
SAVE $1.50
III
30 LB.
is Apples
N GOLDEN
99�
E UP TO 50
Tea Bags
ILY SIZE
I
Limit
One
E $1.10
ItPQt lce
iiuoi Cream
IAVORS
!59
Limit
One
VE20
age Cola
JLAR & DIET
I
Limit
Two
ipes for
kware
With $200 Worth
A&PGold
register tapes
8 8 Stainless Steel
with 3 layer tn-piy
lorn for better cooking
. August 28th
fed. redeem them at the
for the next cookware
rogram This offer is
nter
I N.C.

JobsLookGood
Fcr Bartenders
With Finesse
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 30, 1983 11
Bv PHER RING
Start Writer
If you've ever pur-
chased a mixed drink,
chances are you didn't
give much though to
what is involved in
becoming a
bartender, or a
"mixologist" as they
are sometimes called.
For the past three
years, the East
Carolina School of
Bartending has train-
ed many of the
bartenders in Eastern
North Carolina as
well as the Southeast.
Owned and managed
by Stuart Haithcock,
the school relocated
to 510 Cotanche St.
from its original loca-
tion on Arlington
Boulevard this past
June.
"Business is boom-
ing exclaimed
Haithcock. Ever since
relocating downtown,
the school has enroll-
ed a steady supply of
students eager to learn
the art of mixology.
Students are also will-
ing to sacrifice $250
for the 30 hours of in-
struction needed to
complete the course.
Haithcock, an ex-
perienced bartender
himself, instructs
most of the three-
hour long weeknight
classes. During the
first week of class,
students are reguired
to learn approximate-
ly 150 different
recipes ranging from
pink ladies to mar-
tinis. Each student
works out nightly
behind the training
bar, mixing one drink
after another while
trying to increase his
speed and improve the
quality of his service.
Students become
familiar with the
area's more popular
drinks, such as the
white Russian, mai tai
and the triple sec iced
tea, and they also
learn the proper ser-
vice of beer, wine and
other bar staples.
But how can the
school afford to let a
couple hundred mixed
drinks go to waste
after each class?
Haithcock solves the
problem by using
simulated liquors that
look exactly like the
real ones. Unfor-
tunately, tuition does
not include happy
hour.
There is more to
bartending than just
making drinks. Part
of the training in-
volves skills to im-
prove rapport with
customers. Being able
to remember names of
regular clients is one
skill that Haithcock
stresses in his pro-
gram, along with be-
ing a good listener.
Personal ap-
pearance is another
key point. A sharp-
looking, fast
bartender can always
expect a better yield in
tips.
Although you pro-
bably won't make
your first million serv-
ing drinks, there is a
good possibility you'll
be able to find work
in any town that has
liquor by the drink.
"There are plenty of
bartending jobs
said Haithcock.
"They open up every
day In these times
of high unemploy-
ment, this is an
unusual thing to hear,
considering the
average bartender
makes about four
dollars an hour and
$25 in tips per night.
College students find
bartending an ex-
cellent way to bring in
extra cash.
In the past three
years, over 600
students ranging in
age from 18 to 50
have graduated from
the school. According
to Haithcock, 85 per-
cent have found
employment in the
Southeast with many
remaining in the
Grcenville area.
"People will always
drink said
Haithcock, "whether
times are good or
times are bad
And they'll always
need that friendly, ef-
ficient neighborhood
barkeep. Stuart
Haithcock feels confi-
dent his program and
his students will be
able to fill that need.
'TheQuiet Mart
RunsTomorrow
Tomorrow's
Special Movie at
Mendenhall is The
Quiet Man, starring
John Wayne. In his
only comedy role,
Wayne plays a boxer
who, after winning
fame in America,
returns to his native
Ireland. Sworn off
fighting, he is con-
sidered a coward by
the Irish town folks
until he must fight to
win the beautiful
woman he loves
(Maureen O'Hara).
The winner of
Academy Awards for
Best Director (John
Ford) and Best
Cinematography, The
Quiet Man boasts
authentic Irish actors,
exquisite settings and
the trademark
WayneFord bare-
fisted climactic fight
scene.
The free flick airs at
8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. Admission is
by student ID and ac-
tivity card or MSC
membership.
KKSKAKC'H PAPERS
89 to rhoos �� an suOict�'
Bulh$?lo'rr�cu"�ni 30 rv- �'�
I 'Ofl Cu��0�r. rCMa.c & ��.� aSSS
I� t V �. ir �
Rr�mrrk. I I 32? IO�hc A.e �206W
. �. no��C90025i?'31477 8226
cT-e,
ABORTIONS UP
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L





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
AUGUST 30. 1983 page 12
Hop
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sportitdlior
In five days, the ECU football
team will once again head for
Florida State to try and gain a lit-
tle respect.
This will be the third meeting
between the Seminoles and the
Pirates. In 1980, FSU devastated
the Bucs, 63-7. Last season, the
Seminoles offense exploded in the
first half, and the Division-1
powerhouse walked away with a
56-17 victory.
If the Pirates aren't playing for
respect, they certainly could have
another motive. Revenge. Emory,
however, is going with the first
one.
"We're fighting for respect
said Head Coach Ed Emory.
"Our goal this season is for cons-
tant improvement, and we'll be
tested very' quickly with an opener
against a team like Florida State.
We need to be more competitive
against a great team and to make
the football game a close one
How can the Bucs make the
game a close one? After last vear's
From
showing, the answer is easy. Ex-
ecution will be the difficult part.
The Seminoles scored on plays
after ECU fumbled, threw a pass
interception and another fumble
before halftime. The Pirates also
gave up a 67-yard pass that set up
another Seminole touchdown,
giving FSU a 35-3 lead at the half.
In the second half, FSU scored
three times while the Pirates
scored twice.
"First, we have to eliminate the
big play Emory said. "Florida
State is going to get at least one
big play on every team they face.
We have to keep that number at a
minimum.
"Secondly, we must make them
spend time moving the football
and, at the same time, we've got
to move the ball
Offensive Coordinator Art
Baker agreed after looking at last
season's film. "Last year they
threw bombs he said. "Then
two men would both go up and
come down empty-handed. We
can't make mistakes like that
The quarterback on the other
end of those passes was FSU stan-
dout Kelly Lowrey. The 6-1,
225-pound senior was nine for 15
for 237 yards against the Bucs.
"As for Kelly Lowrey, we're get-
ting ready to play against him.
But should he not play (Lowrey's
presently out with sprained
shoulder), Coach Bowden has fine
talent with his number two and
three people
This Saturday's game will be
the season opener for both teams,
and both Baker and Emory stress-
ed the importance �of that crucial
first game. "How we play against
Florida State is how we'll play
against other teams Baker said.
"Every team has their own per-
sonality, and we should see a
some of ours at Florida State.
They're (FSU) on a roll right now,
but in a sensewe're on a roll too
Emory named two reasons why
the opening bout is so detrimen-
tal. "The first game is important
for confidence. Secondly, playing
FSU improves our credibility
Although Emory has con-
sistently praised the Pirate offense
as being possibly the quickest ever
at ECU, he quickly pointed out
that the Bucs will meet their
match at FSU. "Florida State just
has so many skill people with so
much speed he said. "It scares
me for our secondary. Heck, their
defense couldn't stop the skill
people in their spring game, and
they have a very fine defense
The Seminoles, however, won't
be the only sharp-looking team on
the field Saturday, according to
Emory. "I'll tell you what, you'll
see two good teams out there.
We're not playing to prove we
belong in Division-I. We're play-
ing to show we've closed the gap
even more.
"If we lose, it's not the end of
the world he continued, "no
matter what the score is. The em-
phasis shouldn't be put into winn-
ing
Then the head coach ended with
the most well-known but fitting
cliche: "It's how we play that
counts
ROB POOLE ECU Ffcoto i�b
ECU offensive coordinator Art Baker, shown here, hopes the Bucs will
show some of their personality in Saturday night's opening game.
ECU Schedule Features Many Long Trips
By KEN BOLTON
Assimar Sports Editor
(Note: This is the first in a two-
part series on ECU's 1983 op-
penents. The second part will ap-
pear in Thursday's edition.j
ECU's 1983 football schedule
might look like it belongs in a
travel brochure, but the Pirates
are hoping to take advantage of
their opportunistic journeys.
Of ECU's 11 games this year,
seven are away from home, in-
cluding three trips to the state of
Florida and treks through
Missouri, Pennsylvania and
Mississippi.
The Pirates' schedule, the
toughest in school history, in-
cludes battles with six in-
dependents as well as teams from
the Big Eight conference
(Missouri), the Southeastern con-
ference (Florida), and the ACC
(N.C. State).
Following is a round-up of
ECU's 1983 opponents:
Florida State University
Sept. 3 � 7:00 p.m. '
DOAK CAMPBELL STADIUM
Many experts have picked the
Seminoles as the best team in the
country � and for good reason.
FSU has no less than 16 starters
returning from last year's team
that averaged almost 35 points per
game while posting a 9-3 record �
including a 31-12 defeat of West
Virginia in the Gator Bowl.
In the wire service polls released
Manahan Shines On Squad
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
When other softball teams
are putting away their ball and
bats, Head Softball Coach Sue
Manahan is just gearing up for
her team's championship
playoffs this weekend.
Manahan's team, The
Stompers, will defend their title
at the American Softball
Association (ASA) Major Open
Slow-Pitch Tournament in
Montgomery, Ala. The
Stompers are now 55-5.
"We've won every tourna-
ment we played in except one
she said.
One reason the Richmond,
Va team has been so successful
is because of Manahan. She's
averaged over .400 in batting
and has been thrice-named to an
all-tournament team. In one
tournament, Manahan hit a
steady .700. "I don't think I got
an out all day she said.
"Nothing just went wrong
The head coach isn't the only
East Carolina connection on the
nationally-recognized team.
Fast-pitch pitcher Stacy
Boyette, a 4.0 student, also
spent her summer in Richmond
as well.
According to Manahan, the
softball team won't begin prac-
tice for their new fast-pitch
season until after Labor Day
weekend.
But then it's all business as
usual. "We lost everybody in
outfield except Melody Ham
Manahan said. "We've got a lot
of work to do
Because of the switch to fast-
pitch play, Manahan's main
concern will be offense. "It's
gonna take some time to
develop reaction she said.
"Offensively, we'll have to put
in a lot of time
Although the schedule has
not been completed, Manahan
said an emphasis has been put
on lining up very strong com-
petitors. "We'll be playing
against teams who are in our
position she said.
Florida State and UNC-
Chapel Hill, two of ECU's op-
ponents, will also make the
transition to fast-pitch. George
Mason, ranked fifth in the na-
tion last year, will be another
team on the Pirates' schedule.
Competition, however, is
nothing new to the Pirates. In
fact, last season the Lady Bucs
beat FSU here to mark one of
the biggest upsets of the year.
The Seminoles have a budget
$83,000 larger than ECU.
"There's no way we should
have won that game if you look
at the odds, but then again we
had such a strong team
Manahan said.
What about this year's team?
"We're gonna be young, but
we've got players with a lot of
heart, players that will put
out
When asked if several of the
players opposed the transition
to fast-pitch, Manahan quickly
said yes. "In the beginning,
several said they just weren't
going to play, but the girls with
fast-pitch experience persuaded
them to give it a try. They con-
vinced them that it just might be
a challenge. 1 think they'll be
happy to be back
As for Manahan, she hasn't
quite made up her mind yet
about the team's new style of
play. "I'm not sure if I'm hap-
py or not. We were so successful
in slow pitch.
"We'll just have to wait and
see
last weekend, the Seminoles were
ranked No. 7 in both the AP and
UPI listings.
In last year's meeting of the two
schools, Florida State rolled up
706 yards in total offense to
tomahawk the Pirates, 56-17.
Seminole head coach Bobby
Bowden, in his eighth season at
the FSU helm, is quick to point
out that his squad will not be
looking past ECU.
"It would be nice to start think-
ing about LSU or Auburn or
somebody else right now but we
can't do that Bowden stated.
"You ask anybody whose studied
their (East Carolina's) program
and who knows what they've got
coming back and they'll tell you
to watch out
Bowden will have more than
enough ammunition to throw at
the Pirates in next Saturday
night's game, which is the season-
opener for both teams.
Returning for the Sejninoles is
tailback Greg Allen, who led the
nation in scoring last year with 21
touchdowns � four against ECU.
He was also seventh in kickoff
returns (25.7) and 11th in all-
purpose yardage (138.5).
Defensive tackle Alphonso Car-
reker, who has made many pre-
season All-America teams, will
anchor an FSU defense which he
feels will be better than last year's.
"Everyone's improved over last
season and we've got a lot of
depth at all positions Carreker
said. "But I expect East Carolina
to be really hyped up this year,
especially since we've beaten them
the last-two years
And if the Pirates can play up
to their potential, they may return
home with a few Seminole scalps
in their hands.
North Carolina State Universitv
Sept. 10� 7:00 p.m.
CARTER-FINLEY STADIUM
Anytime ECU and N.C. State
play football, it's a big game.
With the two schools located only
85 miles apart, this annual contest
is a chance for both schools to
gain some bragging rights.
The biggest question mark for
N.C. State in pre-season practice
has been the quarterback posi-
tion. With Tol Avery gone from
last year's 6-5 team, there is not a
QB on the team that has ever
taken a snap in a game for the
Wolfpack.
The battle for the signal-caller
job is shaping up between a pair
of JUCO transfers � Tim
Esposito and Bob Guidice. At
tailback, Joe Mclntosh. who was
the ACC Rookie of the Year in
1981, only managed 780 yards
during an injury-fraught '82.
The new Wolfpack coach is
Tom Reed, who replaced Monte
Kiffin after last season. After the
fall practices started mounting.
Reed was optimistic about his new
club's outlook.
"1 think we have the ability to
be a competitive football team
Reed stated.
See ECU, Page 13
ECU Opener To Be Televised
FSU-ECU Game Televised:
WITN-TV, Channel 7, will carry
a live telecast of the game from
Tallahassee, Fla. The NBC net-
work station will have Dick Jones
relaying play-by-play, and Paul
Baker giving color commentary.
Head Football Coach Ed
Emory was elated that fans would
ing from school. Herndon, who
had been running number two
since Williams' absence, has been
having problems with his joints.
"He said it had become very pain-
ful for him to play Emory said.
At linebacker, Ron Reid is hav-
ing arthroscopic knee surgery and
may be out for four or five weeks.
be able to watch the Pirates play Also on the injured list are Offen-
this Saturday. "We represent this sive Guard Ricky Hilburn with a
school, and I'm just happy our bad knee and Greg Thomas with a
fans will have a chance to watch fractured shoulder.
"With our injuries and lack of
depth, we are not the football
team right now we expected to
be Emory said.
he said. "I think our kids are
ready to play on television. We'll
do our best to represent this
school well
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
Academic Losses: Laurinburg
Sophomore Greg Quick, a starter
at right tackle, and Laurinburg
senior Tony Smith, an alternating
starter at noseguard, were both
declared academically ineligible
last week. Goldsboro sophomore
Bubba Bunn, a tailback, has also
been found ineligible to attend
ECU. While both are eligible by
NCAA rules, the three athletes
don't meet ECU standards.
"Both players are great losses to
us said Emory. "It's hard to
Good Scrimmage: After a
disappointing scrimmage last
week in the hot weather, this
Saturday's game proved to be
more positive, according to
Emory. "It was very good he
said. "We probably scored two or find good big men, and both Greg
three times and Tony were big and good. Our
The Bucs practiced third-and- depth is really hurt by their loss
short, third-and-long and goaHine
situations.
Having gone through 47 prac- academic losses are are something
tices, Emory added that the Bucs he doesn't count on. "That just
are tired of hitting each other and kills you he said. "If you lose
are ready to take on someone else, four to injuries, that ups your
moved Rich Autry to offensive
guard from tight end. Likewise,
we have moved Darrell Speed
from quarterback to running
back
Top Rushers Back: Five of last
year's top rushers are back for the
'83 season. Tony Baker is the
leading returner with 827 yards
last year in 10 games. He has a 6.6
average. He returns as the 16th
top rusher in the country. Just
behind is fullback Earnest Byner
with 768 yards and a 5.5 average
last year.
Top Scorers Return Record-
setting placekicker Jeff Heath
leads the way with 75 points.
Should he continue in that pace.
Heath could become the Pirates'
all-time leading scorer in four
years. Quarterback Kevin Ingram
was second last season with 48
points, while Earnest Byner had
36 points.
State Tickets Still On Sale: A
few tickets for the N.C. State-
ECU game are still available, but
only a few are left. The remaining
Emory added that he expects to tickets can be purchased at hi
lose a few players to mjuries, but Ticket office in Minge?a,lkeUm
This type of offensive-line surge should help the Pirates when they battle No. 7 Florida State Saturday night
in Tallahassee.
Injuries: Steve Hamilton is
back in action, although Emory
said the defensive tackle is about
70 percent right now. Quarter-
back John Williams, who has
been badly needed to back up
Kevin Ingram, is working at about
75 percent after recovering from a
hurt ankle.
The biggest loss came this week
when quarterback Brian Herndon
announced that he was withdraw-
total to seven. That's when you
start getting worried
Position Changes: Because of
injuries, the coaching staff has
Going For The Big 10 ECU has
had nine winning seasons in the
last 11 years and would like verv
much to make that 10 in 12 years
No other Division I-A team irTthe
7 HtUe r3�S wfnnina Car�Hna �
now, we have got tl Lc X 5KeT!E5 tnfp�Ugh C
healing in a hurry Emory said Z iV?i lJC Plratcs �
"Our depth has just been accumnlirJ' 2?Piratcs e
depleted, especially on the oFfen Tat mk hff E?'1 record
line with injuries and an i�" TJ11 �blished
our
Three former
athletes and one
former coach arc be-
ing inducted this fail
into the East Carolina
University Sports Hall
of Fame. The four
will bring the total
number to 42 in the
Sports Hall of Fame
Howard Gerald
Porter, former
basketball coach.
Lieutenant Colonel
James Carl Thomas,
former basketball
player; William Mor-
ris Hill, former
wrestler; and Richard
Foley Cherry. Jr
former football
player, are the in
ductees for 1983.
The induction
ceremonies will occur
during halftime of the
first home football
game on September
17 at 7 p.m. vs Mur-
ray State Universitv.
Originated in 1974
the ECU Sports HaJl
of Fame honors those
individuals who have.
by their direct par-
ticipation in East
Carolina Universitv
intercollegiate
athletics, brought
outstanding recogni-
tion to themselves and
to the universitv. Ten
were inducted in 19"4.
but no more than four
may be inducted per
year at present.
Howard Porter
served as ECU head
basketl
194- l
the
coach
wins
basketl
ECU
Sp;
s e a s o
team
183-K
cent),
school
historj
Over
Po-
losing!
Thcl
ended
inciudl
Natioi
of
A t h 1 I
Chai
Kansj
23
and
are i
that
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with
recor,
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thai
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s t r u
( ai
ECU Sch
Loaded H
Top Pow
Cont'd From Page 12
As in the past, this
year's game plans to
be a wild affair �
both on the field and
in the stands.
Murray State
University
Sept. 17� 7:00 p.m.
FICKLEN STADIUM
This vear's contest
will be the first
meeting between ECU
and Murray State.
The Racers, located in
Murray. KY. are
members of the Ohio
Valley Conference.
On paper, the
Racers can't match up
to the Pirates as far as
depth of qualitv
athletes. MSU lost 17
starters from a team
that went 4 last
year.
The Racers are led
by head coach Frank
Beamer, who is 12-10
after two years at
Murray State.
Players to watch on
the Murray State team
include wide receiver
Stan Trice, tight end
Bart Robinson,
fullback Neal Cumm-
ings and defensive
back Ralph Robin-
Son.
University of
Missouri
Oct. 1 � 1:30 p.m.
FAUROT FIELD
With a couple of
j-eaks, ECU could
Have beaten the Tigers
P last year's contest.
Already into the
gurth quarter, ECU
trailing 14-9 after
ee Jeff Heath field
Is (45, 38 and 42
ds).
But the Tigers used
59-yard TD run by
c Drain late in the
e to seal the vie-
over the stubborn
ates.
Mizzou lost seven
ers on defense,
v m � .
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In
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�To he,p ou, ��.���. we �,ve SrtSSlSSft ��-

� .
�- n






1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30, 1983
13


!B �OOi.E ECU PHoto L�b
n ht-rt hopes the Bucs will
nitjht s opening game.
'ips
chools to
n mark tor
season practice
uai terback posi-
- g one from
tm, there is not a
.at has eer
game for the

i nal-caller
etv.een a pair
L CO transfers � Tim
bsno and Bob Guidice. At
lack. Joe Mclmosh. who was
ACC Rookie of the Year in
aged 780 yards
-fraught '82.
a Wolfpack coach is
replaced Monte
After the
nounting.
it his new
ability to
�ball team
Nft ECU, Pane 13
elevised
'�. -� to offensive
Likewise,
h moved Darrell Speed
quart running
fp Rushers Back Five of last
- rushers are back for the
n Tony Baker is the
2 yards
He has a 6.6
He returns as the 16th
n the country. Just
back Earnest Byner
is and a 5.5 average
I
p Scorers Retu Record-
g placekicker Jeff Heath
� ' with 75 pomts.
id he continue in that pace,
could become the Pirates'
ie leading scorer in four
Quarterback Kevin Ingram
econd last season with 48
Is. while Earnest Bvner had
mts.
ite Tickets Still On Sale: A
tickets for the N C State-
game are still available but
la tew are left. The remaining
can be purchased at the
office in Mmges Coliseum
"g For The Big 10 ECL has
r ne winning seasons in the
years and would like vm
ltrmnake thatl0ln 12 year's
ther Division 1-A team m the
I of North Carolina has mor
�g seasons, although Nf
does) match the P,rates wlth
Jn 11 years, the Plates have
nulated an 82-39-1 record
mark has been estabhshed
the Pirates moved fror�
hi.Co nference Pl ay JJj
outhern Independent status
our Former Pirates To Enter Sports Hall
Three former
ithletes and one
former coach are be-
ing inducted this fall
Into the East Carolina
Jniversity Sports Hall
f Fame. The four
rill bring the total
number to 42 in the
Sports Hall of Fame.
Howard Gerald
iPorter, former
basketball coach;
Lieutenant Colonel
(James Carl Thomas,
former basketball
player; William Mor-
ris Hill, former
wrestler; and Richard
Foley Cherry, Jr
former football
player, are the in-
ductees for 1983.
The induction
ceremonies will occur
during halftime of the
first home football
game on September
17 at 7 p.m. vs Mur-
ray State University.
Originated in 1974,
the ECU Sports Hall
of Fame honors those
individuals who have,
by their direct par-
ticipation in East
Carolina University
intercollegiate
athletics, brought
outstanding recogni-
tion to themselves and
to the university. Ten
were inducted in 1974,
but no more than four
may be inducted per
year at present.
Howard Porter
served as ECU's head
basketball coach from
1947-1959, recording
the most games
coached and the most
wins coached of any
basketball coach in
ECU history.
Spanning 12
seasons. Porter's
teams compiled a
183-101 mark (64 per-
cent), including the
school's best season in
history in 1953-54.
Over the 12 seasons,
Porter never had a
losing season.
The 1953-54 team
ended the season 23-2,
including a trip to the
National Association
of Intercollegiate
Athletics National
Championship in
Kansas City, Md. The
23 wins, two losses
and 20-plus victories
are all school records
that still stand at East
Carolina.
The 1952-53 team,
with a final 18-5
record, also advanced
to the national tour-
nament.
Porter holds the
distinction of having
five of the school's 10
best seasons and can
still look to the record
books for more than a
dozen school records
that still stand from
his coaching days.
A long-time in-
structor at East
Carolina in the
physical education
ECU Schedule
Loaded With
Top Powers


Cont'd From Page 12
As in the past, this
year's game plans to
be a wild affair �
both on the field and
in the stands.
Murray State
University
Sept. 17� 7:00 p.m.
FICKLEN STADIUM
This year's contest
will be the first
meeting between ECU
and Murray State.
The Racers, located in
Murray, KY, are
members of the Ohio
Valley Conference.
On paper, the
Racers can't match up
to the Pirates as far as
depth of quality
athletes. MSU lost 17
starters from a team
that went 4-7 last
year.
The Racers are led
by head coach Frank
Beamer, who is 12-10
I after two years at
Murray State.
Players to watch on
the Murray State team
include wide receiver
Stan Trice, tight end
Bart Robinson,
ifullback Neal Cumm-
ings and defensive
ack Ralph Robin-
son.
University of
Missouri
Oct. 1 � 1:30 p.m.
FAUROT FIELD
With a couple of
reaks, ECU could
lave beaten the Tigers
last year's contest.
Iready into the
fourth quarter, ECU
'as trailing 14-9 after
iree Jeff Heath field
oals (45, 38 and 42
fards).
But the Tigers used
59-yard TD run by
Sric Drain late in the
ime to seal the vic-
ry over the stubborn
grates.
Mizzou lost seven
ters on defense,
department, Porter is
now retired in Green-
ville.
Lieutenant Colonel
J.C. Thomas was call-
ed by his basketball
coach Howard Porter
as the Finest overall
basketball player ever
at ECU. And it was
during the Thomas-
playing days that the
Pirate teams recorded
four of the finest
years in school history
with records of 18-15,
23-2, 16-8 and 18-3
from 1952-1956.
A four-year starter,
Thomas played in
more games than any
player in ECU
history, serving as
captain of the team
and earning all-
conference honors.
Over his four years,
but the teams leading
tackier, linebacker
Jay Wilson, will be
returning for his
senior year.
The Tigers are be-
ing picked to Finish
behind Nebraska and
Oklahoma in the Big
Eight, but a favorable
schedule (both the
Sooners and 'Huskers
at home) could help
UM to challenge for
the conference crown.
Missouri will be
solid on the offensive
line, as Conrad
Goode and Bernard
Laster supply the
punch at the guard
positions.
But it is defense
that Missouri coach
Warren Powers is ex-
cited about. "As a
group, I think this is
the best class of
defensive players that
we've ever recruited
he stated. "There's
more talent than
we've ever had
Southwestern
Louisiana
Oct. 8� 1:30p.m.
FICKLEN STADIUM
Out of the 17 let-
termen that the Ragin
Cajuns lost from last
year's team, 12 were
starters. So the overall
depth is good with 41
lettermen returning.
The visitors from
Lafayette, LA are
coached by Sam
Robertson, a Ten-
nessee graduate who
is 15-16-2 going into
his fourth year.
The series record
between the two
schools is tied 2-2-0.
The Ragin Cajuns
won the First game 9-7
in 1977, but the
Pirates bounced back
the next year to win
38-9.
In 1980,
Southwestern Loui-
siansa won 27-21 but
lost a 35-31 decision
in 1981.
the team's combined
record was 75-18.
Not a flashy player
nor a big scorer,
Thomas was noted as
the type of player that
just made it happen.
Defense was his
specialty.
During the Thomas
era, the Pirates won
48 consecutive home
games in old
Memorial Gym, a
streak that ended at
50 the year after
Thomas graduated.
After three con-
ference champion-
ships and two na-
tional tournaments to
his playing credit,
Thomas was commis-
sioned into the Air
Force and served in
Korea. He later earn-
ed his master's degree
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ro
and his Ph.D.
For 14 years,
Thomas was an in-
structor and coach at
the U.S. Air Force
Academy. In 1980, he
returned to Greenville
and ECU to serve as
head of the ROTC
unit on campus, a
position he holds to-
day.
Bill Hill was the
finest wrestler in East
Carolina's very suc-
cessful and colorful
wrestling program.
Wrestling in the
177-pound class, Hill
finished fifth in the
NCAA national
championships in
1974 and was named
all-America, the only
time an ECU wrestler
ever earned the all-
America title.
During his four
years on the team
from 1970-74, Hill
never missed a day of
practice and wrestled
in every scheduled
match and tourna-
ment match. Accor-
ding to his head coach
John Welborn, his
perfect attendance
record was as outstan-
ding as his many ac-
complishments.
Named the outstan-
ding freshman
wrestler in 1971, Hill
then was named most
valuable on the ECU
team in 1972, 1973
and 1974. He was also
named the best
wrestler in the state of
North Carolina in
1973 and 1974 while
serving as team cap-
tain.
With an overall
record of 122-15-1,
Hill captured four
Southern Conference
titles, four North
Carolina Collegiate
championships. Dur-
ing his senior season,
he won seven tourna-
ment titles.
Hill is currently liv-
ing in Winterville and
teaching at Kinston
High School.
Dick Cherry rates
as one of the best
quarterbacks ever to
play at ECU, guiding
his freshman and
sophomore teams to
the first two bowl
games in Pirate
history.
Playing for Jack
Boone, Cherry was
named all-conference
three times, all-state
in 1953 and honorable
mention Little All-
America in 1953. It
was during the 1952
and 1953 season that
the Pirates were 6-3-2
and 8-2-0.
In 1953, Cherry
threw four
touchdown passes in
one game while com-
pleting the season
with 16 total
touchdown passes.
Both set school
records that stand to-
day at East Carolina.
With a broken
ankle keeping him out
of play in 1954,
Cherry returned in
1955 and 1956 to serve
as the team's co-
captain.
The highlight of
Cherry's career came
in 1953 when East
Carolina ripped
Lenoir-Rhyne, the big
rival at the time, 34-0.
The Bears were coach-
ed by Clarence
Stasavich, who was to
succeed Jack Boone
as the Pirates' head
coach in 1962. That
marked only the se-
cond time in history
that ECU had beaten
Lenoir-Rhyne and
was one of only six
wins over the Bears in
21 tries in the early era
of ECU football.
Sherry resides in
Washington and
teaches at PS. Jones
Junior High School.
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14
THE EAST CAROLON1AN
AUGUST 30, 1983
Sneaker Sam Sez
Pepsi Club
Want to work out,
but need some incen-
tive? Then the ECU
Intramural-
Recreational Services
Department would
like to invite you to
get involved in its
Pepsi Physical Fitness
Club. The Club is an
independent exercise
program where its
participants can take
part in any one pro-
gram or combinations
of programs.
The requirements
are based on mileage
completed in five dif-
ferent areas: Runn-
ing Jogging, Swimm-
ing, Bicycling,
Pushing
(Wheelchairs) and
Walking. There are
three levels of com-
petition with prizes
for eligible sportspeo-
ple.
When you complete
the mileage for Level I
in an activitiy you will
be eligible for that
level's award.
Sucessful accomplish-
ment of a higher level
will enable you to
choose an award for
the attained level or
for a lower level.
If you complete the
established mileage in
more than one activity
you will receive the
designated award for
the attained level
within each activity.
Duplicate awards will
not be given to a par-
ticipant in any one
year. Awards will in-
clude T-shirts, jogg-
ing shorts and nylon
jackets.
You maintain your
own progress and turn
it in weekly to the IRS
office. They will keep
your totals and a pro-
gress chart. This par-
ticipation is limited to
Fall and Spring
semesters (a separate
program will be con-
ducted for summer
school).
Frisbee I rates
The East Carolina
"Irates" Frisbee Club
was one Intramural-
Recreational Sports
Club that remained
active during the sum-
mer. The "Irates"
made appearences in
the Fifth Annual Pen-
tathon in Bull Run
Park, VA. and in the
WBCY Frisbee Fly In
in Charlotte, N.C.
The team also practic-
ed their disc golf on
campus and took off
to Winston-Salem,
Greensboro and
Virginia Beach to bat-
tle recognized D.G.A.
Pole Hole Courses.
The Ultimate
players continued
their Ultimate prac-
tices despite the sum-
mers 100-plus degree
temperatures. The
Frisbee Club was
represented on the
Carolina Beaches by
some of ECU's finest
freestylers.
The Ultimate Irates
will continue holding
open practices on
Tuesdays and
Thursdays at the bot-
tom of College Hill
Drive and anyone and
everyone is encourag-
ed to come and
"Whip It
The ECU Frisbee
Club also meets Mon-
day nights at
Mendenhall. If you're
interested in Ultimate
Golf throwing skills
or just in freestyling,
give it a try.
Hatha Yoga
Hatha physical
yoga is concerned
with the health and
well being of one's
whole self � not just
the body but the emo-
tional and mental
states as well. And
Hatha Yoga is a new
exercise program be-
ing offered by the
Department of
Intramural-
Recreational Services
this semester.
The practice of
Hatha Yoga offers
men and women a
series of controlled
postures, movements
and breathing exer-
cises that can help
relieve tension and
anxiety, tone muscles,
increase flexibility
and stimulate circula-
tion.
In conjunction with
proper diet Yoga can
also aid in keeping
body weight under
control.
Grand Opening at
SAM'S LOCK KEY SHOPPE
1804 Dickinson Ava.
( Across from Pepsi Plant)
GssmsmMsi 757-0075
All keys 25 off with student I.D.
i
STEAK HOUSE
�-�ssbs�- -assssv
Tues. - Beef Tips $2.99
Served with
King Idaho Potatoe
or French Fries
and Texas Toast
I
I
i
i
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved Veg. Bar
I
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd
2903 E. 10th St.
Now Nikon makes fine
photography easier and
more convenient than ever
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secon Try it yourseit come in today'
ort '� cotjcra hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
on the agenda with
ECU people exploring
the Uwharrie Na-
tional Forest for two
days and nights begin-
ning October 7. The
trail is of moderate
difficulty and hikers
will be expected to
cover six miles per day
� so be prepared.
The trip should cost
between 20 and 33
dollars depending on
how much of your
own equipment you
use. Reservations
must be made through
the Outdoor Recrea-
tion Center in room
113 Memorial by 5
p.m. September 30
because there is
limited space
available.
Final details on the
Canoe trip have not
been released yet, but
if you are interested in
any of these trips just
come by the center
and check it out. It'll
be worth your time.
Faculty Intramural v.
1983-84 brings with
it a new opportunity
for East Carolina
faculty and staff
members to par-
ticipate in Intramural-
Recreational Services
competition.
A separate division
will allow equal com-
petition and participa-
tion to permanent
(half-time or more)
faculty and staff
members. Team
sports to be included
are Flag Football,
Volleyball, Basketball
and Softball. In-
dividual and dual
sports activities such
as Raquetball, Tennis
and Golf will also be
provided for a
minimum of four
facultystaff par-
ticipants.
Officials will be
drawn from the
regular corps of stu-
dent sports officials.
Game times and days
will be determined at
the pre-season
meeting. Graduate
assistants will not be
eligible to participate
in this division.
FacultyStaff
members remain elibi-
ble for the entire
Department of In-
tramural Recreational
Services.
LAUNDROMAT
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Present this Coupon
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We honor any advertised
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Located at the Intersection
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2804 E. 10th St. Greenville
Phone 752 3737
1
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PHOTOGRAPHERS
WANTED
08
-The E.C.U. Photo Lab is seeking quality
minded people for our photojournalism staff.
-Experience helpful in Studio, News or Sports
Photography, Push Processing, Color Processing,
Use of Nikon System.
-Must be able to Develop � Print B�W photos.
-Must have phone � access to a car.
-Must be enrolled E.C.U. student.
-Must have examples of work to show.
Apply with the Media Board Secretary on
the 2nd floor of Publications Buildings
before September 2nd
f(
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7S2-0688
NC 27834
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Introducing the
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ARMY ROTC CAN HELP
PUT YOU AHEAD OF
THE CROWD.
$�
ife J, �
' "I
Get down to business faster.
With the BA-35.
If theres one thing business
students have always needed,
this is it: an affordable, busi-
ness-oriented calculator.
The Texas Instruments
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The calculator is just part
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Creating useful products
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Adding Army ROTC" to
your college education can give
you a competitive edge.
Regardless ot your chosen
major, Army ROTC training ff Ml ?'SP
magnifies your total learning
experience. HI rlMFTlSi IB
� Training that helps you
develop into a leader, as well
as a manager of money and
materials. That builds your self-
confidence and decision-making
abilities. And gives you skills
and knowledge you can use
anywhere. In college. In the
military. And in civilian lite.
Army ROTC provides
scholarship opportunities and i8Li
financial assistance too. But, most importantly, Amu ROTC lets
you graduate with both a college degree and a commission in
today's Army, which includes the Army Reserve and National
Guard.
So come out ahead by enrolling in Army ROTO Foi more
information contact Captain Heldur LUvak or Sergeant First Class
Xatfl Boylcs in Room 324 Erwin Hall or call 75x367
�k
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A jl! HISTOLOGY U fhj
� �!
ARMY ROTC BEAU YOU CAN BE.
ardy:
iCU's
RANDY MFV j
Soccer sensani
rk Hardy is sc
his way to becoj
ECU's all-tii
ling scorer
n just two seaso
5-10. 150-pou
i i o r has ai
tulated 17 goi
has led the Piraj
last two years
scoring and is onlv
goals shy of surpa
ing the school recor
"Mark is w
would describe as
constant scorer s
Head Soccer Coal
Robbie Church
can put the ba
net at anytime ai
from anywhere or.
field. Mark is
son we always
for when r.e�
goal
Hardv is au-are
he's considered
ECU's greasiest
cer player ever
credits that :c
he has beer
soccer sir.ee
four ears
"I was ra
Brazil, and ;
there soccer is the I
tional sport
played defefr
c
We're Th
Open 7
YOUR M
THAT V
co;
One Do!
5p�ci
'������???�???I
� .
911
1700
31S

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W�
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THE EAST CAROL 1MAN
AUGUST 30. 1983
15
Lmdual and dual
v Krts activities Nuch
s Raqucthall, rcnnis
id Golf will also he
I ided tor a
I umum of four
I par-
fficials Hill he
from the
stu-
ff rials
mes dnxi da s
ermined a:
! vv a 5
aduate
- will not he
pa ' � .
� .
entire
of In-
eational
S 30rts
,rocessing,
photos
f
ATE
7.50
ardy: Constant Scorer May Become
;CU's Next All-Time Leading Scorer
b RANDY MEWS
Soccer sensation
lark Hardy is soon
Kis wav to becom-
ig ECU's all-time
fading scorer.
In just two seasons,
he 5-10. 150-pound
mior has ac-
jmulated 17 goals.
U has led the Pirates
ie last two years in
coring and is only 11
oals shy of surpass-
ig the school record.
"Mark is what I
kould describe as a
Constant scorer said
lead Soccer Coach
tobbie Church. "He
an put the ball in the
let at anytime and
from anywhere on the
field. Mark is the per-
son we always look
w when we need a
foal
Hardy is aware that
ies considered one of
iCU's greastest soc-
cer players ever, and
credits that to the fact
ie has been playing
soccer since he was
four years old.
"I was raised in
Irazil. and down
there soccer is the na-
tional sport. I always
clayed defefnse when
I was young, and it
wasn't until high
school when I came to
the United States that
I was switched to for-
ward and began scor-
ing a lot he said.
I think the switch
made me a better
player Hardy said.
"Although I've only
been a forward for
five years, all the time
I spent playing in
Brazil gave me an ad-
vantage over other
people
Hardy enjoys play-
ing an offensive posi-
tion, and realizes that
it will enable him to
become ECU's all-
time scorer. But his
main concern for the
upcoming season is
the welfare of the
team.
"This is the first
year the ECAC has
ever had a conference
for soccer, and I think
we have a good shot
at winning the tourna-
ment he said.
Coach Church
thinks ECU could
have the best team in
its history. "We have
13 freshmen this year,
and they're all loaded
with
lent he said
"We have more good
players then we've
ever had before, and
the only thing we're
missing is ex-
perience
The freshmen will
get experienced in a
hurry with four top 20
teams and Division III
National Champion
UNC-Greensboro on
their schedule, but
Church is optimistic
about the season
ahead.
"We have the talent
to compete with
anyone, and once the
younger players get
some game time we'll
be solid all the way-
through the line-up.
The new people will
compliment Jeff's
game and make his
job a lot easier on the
field
"I'm also looking
at Jeff to be a team
leader Church said.
"We only have one
senior on the team, so
most people will be
looking towards
Jeff
Hardy feels com-
fortable with the role
as a team leader, but
believes all the team
members should work
together in order to
have a good com-
municative relation-
ship. "1 think
everybody should
share everything they
know, and sometimes
you learn a lot by just
listening he said.
The Pirates have
already begun prac-
tice and participated
in two scrimmage
games over the
weekend. Both were
victories over
Belmont-Abbey, and
Hardy had a goal in
each game.
Hardy played well
in both contests, but
felt he needed to work
on his communica-
tion. "Sometimes I
get so involved in a
game I forget to talk
with my teammates,
and that takes away
from an attack when
we have one in pro-
gress he said.
If he and his
freshmen counter-
parts can perform as
they're expected, the
word upset will no
longer be used to
describe an ECU vic-
tor v.
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Soccer star Mark Hardy shows his scoring ability during a match last season. Hardy mav e well be the greatest soccer
player ever to pla at ECL.
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S1 00 OFF A LARGE MEAT BALL SU8
- see: bcse eese
S' DC OFF A GREEK SAA0
se�.e: -afw(E'i :��Est:
� CfcO'C� o D'Aitc
IT
ir ��.
BE.
' :� :i. ��
$� 00OFF ON A Chef 5 SAIA0
$1 00 OFF ON A
MOT PAS'RAWISoB
COUPON
ONL FOB DELIVERIES
One Dollar Off Small Pizza
Spacify On The Phone
COUPON
ONLY FOB DELIVERIES
Two Dollars Off Large Pizza
Specify On The Phone
HOLLOWELL'S
DRUG STORES
Old Fashioned
Orangeades and Lemonades
'o
i'
Coke, Mellow Yellow, Tab, Sprite i
991 e
We feature
Fountain Coke and Pepsi
Banana Splits
Sundaes
Milkshakes
I ' ' ' 1
f Back to School Special
� 2 Hotdogs and Small Coke I
J or Pepsi
I $1.00 J
I Offer Good Thru Sept. 4, 1983
We have 3 stores to serve you in Greenville
911 Dickinson Avenue 752-7105
1700 West Sixth Street 758-4104
315 SUntonsburg Road 7571076
BB&T 24 can handle your banking trans-
actions any day or night, on weekends and
holidays, 365 days a year.
You can access up to 10 different BB&T
accounts. In less than 30 seconds you can
get cash with your BB&T 24 card, Visa or
MasterCard. You can also make deposits,
transfers and payments.
Late in the fall, you will be able to use
BB&T 24 across the nation through the
PLUS� SYSTEM network. You'll have access
to your accounts at over 3,000 locations
wherever you travel throughout the USA.
NO SERVICE CHARGE CHECKING
FOR STUDENTS AT BB&T
When you open your checking account
at one of BB&Ts three convenient Green-
ville locations, just tell the lady that you're a
full-time student at ECU. She'll flag your
account to waive all service charges.
PRIZES1 PRIZES! PRIZES!
We're going to give away lots of prizes on
Wednesday, September 7, from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m. at the BB&T 24 machine at Mendenhall
Student Center.
If you already have your BB&T 24 card,
bring it along. If you don't, we'll lend you
ours. You may win cash, tickets to athletic
events, or other valuable prizes.
Don't forget September 7.
BB&T
�Owned by PLUS SYSTEM. Inc 752-6889
Member Federal DepoeH Ineurence Corporation
� ���ail mimmmmmmm
p �
P





16
-IHgJEAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 30. 1
983

?
Classifieds
MISC.
PERSONAL
SALE
NEED A BABYSITTER
Dependable Junior in Nursing in
need o� jorne e�tr money is
available to babysit m the even
mgs and some mornings. Has
had much experience caring tor
infants and small children. Have
own transportation Please call
7SJJ 2M or 7Si 6:0 ask tor Kim
C
LEGAL HASSLES Call
Howard J Cummtngs, attorney
at Law No charge tor initial
consultation for ECU Students
Call 7SI 0006
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campus include experienced
professional work pro
otreadmg. spelling and gram
matical corrections 35S �74i
after 5 30
If YOU NEED to make extra
money working on your own,
part time call 752 52�7 between
6 and 6 p m
SPANISH PROBLEMS Affor-
dable tutoring available for info
'S2 40-19
ANYONE INTERESTED in
attending the Jewish high noli
day servicw picas call Jac-
queline Kartchner at 7M-�M5 or
Or. Resmk 7S4-S440. Tickets
FREE to students. Transporta-
tion is available. Please call to
� � r'rv�tions now.
IF YOU NEED to make extra
money working on your own,
part time, call 752 5H7 between
� and I p.m.
WANTED
WANTED: FEMALE ROOM
MATE. Furnished 1 bebroom
apt. microwave, HBO, TV, pool.
Kings Row apt. Half rent and
utilities. Call after � p.m.
752 77JT
FREE ROOM � BOARD in ex
change for house cleaning �
some child care Call J55 417
FOR SALE: Dresser with mir-
ror and matching headboard on-
ly �S. Call Debra, nights and
weekends 7 54005
CARPET Uxi5 Like new. great
tor dorm room, color: autumn
7S2-414t.
FURNITURE FOR SALE:
Single bed with frame, springs,
mattress, dresser, kitchen table
with 4 chairs, Prices are low and
negotiable. Call Bobby 752 9453
FOR SALE: ACOUSTIC
RESEARCH AR � l Speakers.
SJSO tor the pair. Three years
old, still under warranty.
7S2 457 between s ans 10
o'clock.
RIDES
RIDES NEEDED: To Wilson on
Mondays will help pay for gas.
Call 7S2 1770 Ask for Sherri.
Pirate Pride
Bravo!
�J&vaSM
Offensive tackle coach Chariie Elmquist looks on as Mac Powers (64) collides with a fellow teammate in practice drills.
201 c. 5th otreet � Greenville, N.C. 27834 � 758-6190
For Heads Only
(
$1.00 Discount Off
Any Wet Cut or Style.
Call for Appointment � 758-6190
TC !D REQUIRED Expires 11-30. 1983
��
Blue Moon Cafe
Fresh Homecooking
Healthy Foods
Breakfast Anytime
Meal Plan For Students-Faculty
Wed. is 99C Sub Day
Open 8:30 a.m. MonSat.
Open 10:00 a.m. Sun.( Brunch )
HAPPY HOUR 3 to 7 - Mon. thru Sun
205 E. 5th Street
Bring in this Ad for a 10 Discount
UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUOUUUUUUOUUUUUUOOOOOfl
758-7008 o
Mr. C Tennis Center �
��TT1I i ximmuL
iiiiimim
Klean Jeans
Laundromat
Located at 208 E. 5th St.
Behind Subway
Fluff-n-FoldDry Cleaning i
Dropoff and Pick Up
25 off on Dry Cleaning
Thru September
� PA'S � GUITARS
� STRINGS � AMP'S
� ACCESSORIES � DRUMS
MON. - SAT. 10:30 - 6 P.M.
752-1159
218-A E. 5TH ST.
GREENVILLE
BUY �SELL �TRADE & REPAIR
D
D
D
3
D
D
D
3
D
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
D
D
3
D
3
3
3
218-CEast5thSt.
Hrs. 11-6 Mon-Sat
! (1 coupon per racket) J
Converse Shoes
Racket:
Power Ace $50.00
Bronze Ace $65.00
Silver Ace $85.00
Composite Denominator $95.00
Jimmy Connors Leather $35.00
Canvas $26.00
Chris Evert Leather $36.00
Canvas $26.00
30oqooooooooooooooooooo0000000000000000
s
. afHearts
Wf Delight
Open 12 to 12 Daily
COUPON:
TIREDOF JUNKFOOD
:COME TO US FOR GREAT
NUTRICIOUS BANANA
SPILTS-10OFF
12 to 1 AND 5 to 7
COME TO US FOR
YOUR MEAL
752-5878
in University Arcade
218 E. 5th St.
���������?����?�����?�?�?��??????�?�?������
arshs
�URP-N-MA
GREENVILLE
r ATLANTIC EACH
orth Carolina
50 Off 50 Off
Ocean Pacific All Sperry
Children's Shorts Topsider Shoes
Mm 4 To 30
20 off �Ppfi
Hawaiian
Print Shirts
Men's & Women's
Ocean Pacific
Adult Shorts
206 Easi Fifth Street
50 Off
Men's & Women's
Bathing Suits
20 Off
All Other
Remaining
Summer Stock
752 7711
WE ARE YOUR ICE CREAM
PALOR! OUR ICE CREAM IS
GOOD TASTING, FUN AND
HEARTWARMIING! CHILL OUT
WITH THE BEST!
� Phone 758-4061
� 203 East 5th Street
� Greenville. Nopth Carolina 27834
S2.00 OFF OF
$10.00 Olv MORE PURCHASE
INCLUDES & 4LE MERCHANDISE
OFFER I'XPIRES 9-13-83
RIGHT BROTHERS BIKE SHOP
207 E 5th St
Open 10 30 6 00
752-6181 MIYATA
SPECIAUZED UNIVEGA
BICYCLES
AND
COMPONENTS
$10 OFF on a NEW BICYCLE
or
10 DISCOUNT on Parts and Labor
with coupon
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE BY AVID CYCLISTS'
tf�.
Tapscott Designs
222 E 5n St
Downtown Greenville
757 3558
10 Off Merchandise
with coupon
limit
one coupon per purchase
Speciality Gift Shop
Wicker, Brass, Custom Framing
Gift Wrapping A vailable
m
I7





Title
The East Carolinian, August 30, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 30, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.281
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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