The East Carolinian, August 26, 1983






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Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.2
Friday August 26,1983
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 10,000
A Test Of Patience
It's A Tough Life
B ANDREA MARKELLO
9Mfl Wnlrr
Thousands of students turned
Wednesday, some came as
y as 4 a.m to once again go
�ugh the tedious process of
dropping and adding courses. Ac-
ding to statistics from 1982,
approximately 8,000 ECU
indents went through drop-ad
last tall making more than 30,000
.nges in their schedules.
This year appeared to be more
of the same. At the outset of the
via, the line of students reached
from the back of Memorial Gym,
circled around the Brewster
Building and ended at the front
entrance of Memorial Gym.
Patient line waiters, sipping
tree soft drinks, struck up conver-
sations with other students and
:orged such comments as, "I've
been waiting here an hour and 15
minutes, and anyone who pays
SI500 doesn't deserve to spend
this much time waiting or.
�'There should be two lines and
they should be open earlier And
of course, "Can you believe this?
I've never seen it like this
Most students standing in line
were dropping and adding
General College courses such as
English 1100, Spanish 1001 and
Biology Lab 1051. Other students
were preparing to register and still
had no idea what courses they
wanted.
One psychology major said he
"couldn't get any courses while
a physics major had less of a pro-
blem since few students signed up
for the courses he needed.
Surrounding buildings were
desolate compared to the crowded
Memorial Gym, strewn with emp-
ty paper cups and worn-out
workers trying to reorganize in-
correct schedules. The few
students in the corridors were anx-
iously searching for advisors and
secretaries possessing drop-add
forms and cards or were seeking
information pertaining to possible
course selections.
Throughout the frustrating day
intermingled with drizzling rain,
the drop-add line slowly decreas-
ed. Most students seemed to ac-
cept the line as a part of the
scheduling process but the majori-
ty agreed that the minimum two-
hour wait was too long, especially
when there was a good chance you
wouldn't get the courses you
wanted.
GARY PATTERSON � Photo Lab
Now doesn't this look familiar? No ECU student needs to hear more
about the waiting lines on campus this week for everything from drop-
add to the bathroom. Just remember, patience is a virtue.
Who Are The'Peacekeepers'?
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Sf�i 1-dilof
Earlier this year President
Ronald Reagan tried to quell the
t;de of resistance to his military
policies by renaming the M-X
missile, the Peacekeeper.
Presumably, the new name was an
attempt by Reagan to convince
Americans that his military pro-
grams were indeed designed to
keep the peace.
Despite his efforts, Reagan still
receives much criticism for his
policies, both at home and
abroad. At times the public outcry
of anti-nuclear activists in
Western Europe appears to be
more specifically directed at
Reagan and U.S. policy than it is
toward the Soviet Union.
At present there are plans being
made by anti-nuclear activists in
the United States and Western
Europe to stage massive
demonstrations in October oppos-
ing U.S. plans to begin deploy-
ment of Pershing II and cruise
nuclear missiles in Western
Europe.
These Euromissiles, another
name for Pershing and cruise, will
only require about six minutes
from launch to target. Opponents
feel the six-minute range is too
short and could force the Soviet
Union to begin a policy of
"launch-on-warning
Theoretically, launch-on-
warning could result in an ac-
cidental nuclear exchange if
Soviet radars mistakenly warn of
an attack and automatically ac-
Analysis
Summer Happenings
News Recapped
By LARRY WILLIAMS
SMI nlcr
While you were gone (or before you came) the news went on.
Here's a breakdown of the top stories:
July 27 � The U.S. Senate approves 4.6 billion dollars to begin
building the MX missle.
President Reagan defends naval and troop exercises in Central
America saying it is not a sign of U.S. aggression in Central
America.
July 28 � FCC approves a telephone rate increase.
July 29 � The House approves a plan to stop covert aid to Cen-
tral America.
July 30 � Fidel Castro says Cuba will stop all aid to Nicaragua if
all countries stop sending arms and advisers to Central America.
Actor David Niven, 73, dies.
July 31 � Reagan pledges to cut down bureaucratic waste.
Roger Mudd loses job as NBC anchorman to Tom Brokaw.
August 1 � The Reagan administration plans more cuts in finan-
cial aid to the Department of Education.
U.S. envoy Richard Stone meets with Rebeu Zamora, a leader of
El Salvador's left wing rebels, in search of peace in the region.
August 2 � President Reagan says that his administration has an
unparalleled achievement record for civil and womens rights.
Soviet Union increases arms deliveries to Nicaragua.
Private colleges increase costs by 7 percent.
August 3 � The House of Representatives approves a national
holiday in memory of Martin Luther King Jr.
August 4 � U.S. advisers and arms arrive in the African country
of Chad.
August 5 � Secretary of State Schultz defends U.S. military ex-
ercises in Central America.
Gov. Hunt admits problems in a new law hindering the use of con-
fidential informats by law enforcement officials.
August 6 � Unemployment rate drops to 9.5 percent.
Interest rates reach their highest level in a year.
August 7 � Largest military maneuvers in Central America
begin.
August 9 � Gov. Hunt opposes a nuclear waste dump in North
Carolina.
August 10 � ECU Chancellor John Howell is the highest paid
chancellor in the University of North Carolina System.
August 12 � Most apartment complexes in Greenville will make
living quarters hard to find.
August 14 � Chad asks U.S to intervene as Libyan planes bomb
Chad. Reagan says no tr ops would be sent.
Mexican President Miguel de la Madriad Hurtago criticizes
Reagan's actions in Central America.
August 16 � The Greenville Planning and Zoning Commission
approves zoning amendments for ECU development of dor-
mitories. . , . . t.
August 21 � ECU scientists and divers begin searching for the
anchor of the Civil War ironclad ship the USS Monitor.
August 22 � ECU Chancellor John Howell opened the 1983-84
school year on an optimistic note.
tivate a response.
"If the USSR goes to launch-
on-warning because of Pershing
II, computers may fail and do us
all in said Carroll Webber, a
former ECU math professor. "A
number of retired NATO generals
are scared
Webber, a founding member of
the Greenville Peace Committee,
recently spent a month in
Washington D.C. to learn more
about the Euromissile deployment
plan and other related issues.
North Carolina peace activists deployment
nations. All vow to consume only
water until action is taken to
"break the momentum" of the
nuclear arms race. The fasters in-
dicate that a U.S. decision to
cancel Euromissile deployment
would result in the fast ending.
Although the fast has received
little media attention to date,
peace activists believe this will
change as the participants come
closer to death, possibly igniting
international outcrys for action to
save their lives. The fast began on
Aug. 6.
According to Webber negotia-
tions between the U.S. and
Soviets being held in Geneva,
Switzerland have shown
"practically no outward sign of
agreement
Reagan is contending that the
of the missiles is
Preparation for college life is
often a difficult task for students,
but for many of ECU's foreign
students the job is much more
complicated. Their task often re-
quires patience and expertise for
dealing with a multitude of pro-
blems unusual to Americans.
Foreign students are often lead
through a maze of government
regulations and paperwork as they
attempt to begin their U.S. educa-
tional experience.
Lucy Wright, ECU foreign stu-
dent advisor, claims many foreign
students also experience dif-
ficulties exchanging their native
currency for American dollars.
"Some students are not allowed
to bring expense money out of
their country Wright said. "The
current strength of the American
dollar on foreign money markets
only adds to a problem already
complicated with paperwork
Some foreign students must ap-
ply for currency exchange up to
six months in advance of their
departures. Often students will
make their currancy exchanges
through a black market to speed
up the process
All foreign students are re-
quired to have medical insurance.
"We've had some students run up
medical bills in the thousands
Wright said. "Without insurance
and with the usual delay in ex-
changing currency, some students
would be in serious financial trou-
ble.
According to Wright most
foreign students receive aid from
their own countries. ECU does
not give finanicial aid to foreign
students.
Onuoha Oti, a ECU geology
student from Nigeria, arrived two
weeks late for his classes last year.
He cited paperwork: delays at the
American Embass as the reason
for the delay.Lsualiy first-year
students receiving Nigerian Final
cial assistance have no problems.
Oti said.
"One can never be sure wh
causing the delay. Sometime- I
can take a semester to complete an
exchange Oti said.
Another foreign student, who
asked not to be identified. c i
plained about his country's sir
monetary policyThere is a lack
of money and a poor econorm
my countr right now. There an
no dollars to buy things the stu-
dent said. " You cannot exchange
currency through domestic bar.Nv
at this time Oti sugges that
one reason for the excessive
amount of red tap
desire by Nigerian of fie ils to in-
sure their fund- are b -ed for
the intended purpose. "II . ea
student, Nigeria thinks your
money should go for an ed
tion, not for starting a business
other matters
Oti said political :h u ees
economic problem- add to
In Nigeria, strong meas r�
control the black market
feet. Niger' "ileavingtl -
may take om $70 to $80 w
them.
Another foreign student, also
requesting anynonmitv, com-
plained about his country's strict
monetary policv. "There is a lack
of money and a poor economy in
my country right now he said.
"There are no dollars to bu
things. You cannot exel . ge cur-
rency through domesi c banks at
this time
This student sai( exchanging
money was not a problem, bul I
paperwork involved in leaving his
country and applying for school
were a hassle. He plans to return
to his native country after gradua-
tion to help his people.
Naso Worries A bout
Apathy Of Students
have already set up plans for a
statewide rally on Oct. 22. The
event is being called the "March
on Raleigh
At present there are at least 11
people participating in an open-
ended "Fast for Life The group
is comprised of citizens from six
Grad Student
Elected To
National Post
By THERESA DULSKI
Stall Writer
Ken Smith, an ECU en-
vironmental health major, has
been elected vice president of the
Student's National Environmen-
tal Health Association. Also,
graduate student Beth Vail, was
elected at the Norfolk, Va. con-
ference in July. Smith and Vail
are the first national NEHA of-
ficers from ECU.
Smith, who has been a graduate
student at ECU for two years, is
also the vice president of ECU's
NEHA student chapter. "The
purpose of the National En-
viromental Health Association is
to make students aware of the op-
portunities available in en-
vironmental health and to en-
courage the development of en-
vironmental awareness Smith
said. The organization also
"encourages a sense of profes-
sionalism among environmental
health students he said.
Smith hopes to see greater par-
ticipation among environmental
health students nationwide. His
goal in the next year is to increase
public awareness.
NEHA participated Wednesday
in the Student Life Celebrates on
the ECU mall. The group set up a
display and passed out pamphlets.
On Aug. 29, the president of
NEHA, University of Georgia
student Kay Bess, will speak at an
organizational meeting of ECU's
chapter. The meeting will be held
in room 201 of the Belk Building.
to reach
essential if the U.S. is
parity with the Soviets.
The Soviets already have their
SS-20 missiles based in Eastern
Europe. SS-20's are considered
similar to the Pershing and cruise.
So far the Soviets have not been
willing to use their SS-20's as a
serious bargining chip in the
Geneva talks.
Many experts see the deploy-
ment of Euromissiles as a
dangerous step on the part of the
United States and it is expected
that the move will continue to
receive resistence.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Stall Writer
Student apathy has long been a
problem on college campuses, but
SGA President Paul Naso has a
plan to combat the problem at
ECU.
Naso says the key to fighting
apathy is exposure. He wants to
have a direct impact on student
life because people "won't care
about an issue unless it directly af-
fects them
Student legislators will have the
primary responsibilty in im-
plementing Naso's plan. This
year's legislators will also have
the added dimension of public
relations.
The SGA is plannig a leadership
conference this year to help
legislators develop interpersonal
skills.
After the conference, legislators
will "keep communications
open" with dorm presidents,
house councils and the Student
Residence Association, Naso said.
Naso is planning a weekly agen-
da in the East Carolinian to make
students aware of events before
they happen. Also planned are ap-
pearences by various legislators
on W'ZMB, the ECU radio sta-
tion.
Naso said it is his job to expose
students to the effects of student
government. He is optimistic
about his plan to reduce apathy
on campus and is looking forward
to � good year.
A pizza-eating contest was part of Wednesday's celebration on the mall.
PATTERSON - Photo Las
LaNeave Forced To Move
By ANDREA MARKELLO
SUff Writer
Due to the program budget cut
by the Presbyterian Synod, ECU
will no longer be able to enjoy the
services of Presbyterian Campus
Minister, the Rev. Stewart
LaNeave.
LaNeave had been working
with ECU's Presbyterian students
for more than seven years. He
doesn't hide the fact that he hates
to leave Greenville behind. "I've
been crying for the last month
LaNeave said Thursday, the night
before he left Greenville for his
new post, at a parish in Norfolk,
Va.
"The campus ministries were
the first to be cut LaNeave said
refering to the budget cuts that cut
funding for his jobWe saw it
coming, but hoped we would have
another year
"The same situation is occurr-
ing at Appalachian State Universi-
ty LaNeave said. For the time
being, the Presbyterian ministry
programs at The University of
North Carolina at Greensboro
and Chapel Hill, and the program
at N.C. State, appear to be safe
from cuts. However, with future
budget cuts, their stability may
weaken, LaNeave said.
LaNeave has left the combined
Presbyterian and Methodist
ministries in the hands of Rev.
Dan Earnhardt, ECU Methodist
Campus Minister.
LaNeave said he enjoyed his
time in Greenville, especially his
work with the students in his pro-
gram. "It was a once upon a time
happening with memories we will
hold a long time LaNeave said.
J '
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
olumn, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
the Eas' Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office m the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd sized paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
� ent will run as long as you
a an' a"d suggest that you do not
ily solely on this column for
oubln it
The deadline for an
ountemenfs is 3 p m Monday
�-ir the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesdayy for the Thurs
My paper No announcement?
�xeived after these deadline
will be printed
This space s available to all
i ampus organizations and
lepartments
STUDENT
LEGISLATURE
Are ov interested in govern
�lent particularly in working
�he workings of legislative
bodies' Like to get some real ex
perience m a real legislative
;ody� Then attend the onenta
� on meeting of ECU'S chapter of
��ie North Carolina Student
legislature on August 29 in
Wndenhall room 212 at 7 p m
. si us give you a great learning
'perience'
ECU HILLEL
Eas' Carolina university will
e holding 'ts traditional ham
�racr ana hot dog barbecue to
t new school year
he t �i : �' ue w ; 'ake place at
"ip Elm street Park located m
im St between 10th St and
Itti 51 from 3 o'clock until 7
. � "his will be an excellent
� me to meet and talk with your
��How Jewish students The cost
�- S2 00 tor members $3 00 tor
-on members
NASA
NASA Kennedy Space Center,
Florida, has a coop position
available beginning September
1983 or January 19�4 Must have
completed freshman year to be
considered. Prefer student from
Florida, but will consider a stu
dent who has a strong desire to
work in Florida after gradua
tion Must have 3.0 G.P A or
better to quality For more in
formation, contact the Co op Of
fice, 313 Rawl, to apply im
mediately
MODELS NEEDED
Self help positions available if
interested (nude or otherwise)
please see one of the following
teachers in the School of Art as
soon as possible Wes Crawley,
Tran Gordley or Kappy
Oeneghan
INDIAN FESTIVAL
Perquimans COuniry rar�.s
and Recreation Department and
Chamber of Commence will
sponsor its second annual 5K
i3 1) miles) Run Saturday
September 17 All ages are en
couraged to attend with awards
given to each age group Cer
tificates will be given to all that
finish and the first 100 to register
will receive a T shirt Pre entry
fee is S7
A large festival of many en
lOyable activities and entertain
ment is planned September
15 17, so make plans to bring the
entire family
For more information on
registration, please contact
Howard Williams, Perquimans
County Parks and Recreation
Department, P O Box 32. Hert
ford. N C 27944, or (919)
426 5695 office hours are 9 15
Monday Friday
PEACE MEETING
Some people think the South
dozes while the world goes past
Don't you believe it! Attend the
regular meeting of the Green
ville Peace Committee Friday
night at 6:30 on 610 South Elm
Bring something for supper, and
get in tune with the activists
JEWISH HOLIDAY
Anyone interested in atten
ding the Jewish High Holiday
Services please contact Jac
queune Kartchner at 785 6265 or
Dr Resnik at 756 5640 Tickets
are free to students but reserva
f ions must be made. Transports
tion is available
EPISCOPAL
BISHOP
CELEBRATES
Bishop Sidney B Sanders of
the Episcopal Diocese of East
Carolina will celebrate the
Eucharist and preach at the first
service of Holy Communion for
Episcopal Students on TUES
DAY EVE at 5 30 P.M. at St
Paul's Church at 406th Fourth
Street The Bishop and students
will have an opportunity to get
acquainted at informal supper
following the service.
NARCOTICS
ANONYMOUS
Do you have a drug problem
Narcotics Anonymous may help
you We meet on Tuesday nights
at 8 p.m. in Jarvis Methodist
Church, 510 S Washington
Street Greenville There are no
fees and all are invited to attend
AMBASSADERS
Welcome back ECU Am
bassaders! We really missed
you guys! We will have our first
General Meeting on Wed , Aug
31st, at 5 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Multi purpose room. We have
some great activities planned
for the group and so we'll look
forward to seeing both our old
and new Ambassaders
EARLY
REGISTRATION FOR
THEMCAT
Dr. John S. Childers, Director,
East Carolina University
Testing Center, strongly urges
all candidates planning to take
the October 1, 1983, Medical Col
lege Admission Test (MCAT) to
make absolutely sure they have
a registration packet available
in time to meet the September 2,
1983 .postmark deadline Can
didates may obtain a registra
tion packet by writing: MCAT
Registration, The American Col
lege Testing Program, P O.
Box 414, lowa 52240. Applica
tions are also available in the
ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105, Greenville,
NC Register Early!
STUDENT NAT'L
ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH
ASSOCIATION
Student Nat'l Environmental
Health Association the ECU
chapter of the Student National
Environmental Health Associa
tion (SNEHA) will meet August
29 at 7 30 p.m in Allied Health
room 201 Kay Bess from the
University of Georgia, national
president of Sneha, will speak
Everyone is welcome to attend
PHI SIGMA PI
Welcome back, brothers! This
semester's first meeting will be
Sept 1 at 5 00 in Austin 130
There will be an Executive
Council meeting Sept 6 in David
Whitiey's Time TBA
COMPUTER CLASSES
Non Credit Computer
Classes 1 Small computer
Saturday 9 am 4 p.m. August
27, 1983 2 Word Processing
Saturday 9 am. 4 p m
September 10, 1983 3 Program
ming in Basic Saturday 9 am
4 00 p m. September 24, 1983
Contact the Division of Continu
ing Education at 757 6143
STRONG-CAMPBELL
INVENTORY
The Strong Campbell Interest
Inventory is offered every Tues
day m 305 Wright Annex at 4
p m when school is in session
with the exceptions of examma
tion period and registration
day This is available to all
students at no cost No formal
registration is required For
more it ormation, call the
Counseling Center at 757 6661
NEWMAN
Enioy the choices that you can
make now that you are on your
own. The Catholic Newman
Community welcomes you and
invites you to particilpate in our
Sunday mass each week at 12 30
in the Biology Lecture Hall
Each Wednesday at 5 p.m we
have Mass, a meeting and a
meal. All are welcome to join us
Donation for the meal is $1.
CHEERLEADINGS
Students interested in par
ticipating in the ECU Junior
Varsity Cheerleaders tryouts
should meet at the East end of
Minges Coliseum on Monday,
August 29, 1983 at 5 p.m Prac
tice sessions will be scheduled
and discussed at that time.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Students attending summer
school are in a unique position to
find out about private financial
aid for next Fall and Winter
terms, according to The
Scholarship! Bank
Students interested in receiv
ing a print out of private finan
cial aid that appears to be just
right for them based on their
answeres to a 30 question ap
plication, should send a stamped
self addressed envelope to The
Scholarship Bank, 10100 Santa
Monica Blvd. no.2600, Los
Angeles, CA 90067
According to the director of
the service, many -ollege
students apply too late to get aid
for the year in which they are in
terested Summer is an ex
cellent time to apply for most
grants since more careful con
sideration can be given when
there are fewer aplplicants
The Scholarship Bank has
recently converted its data pro
cessing to a large computer
system and students can be
assured of receiving the most
timely land informative intor
mation on private aid sources
such as foundation, civic
charitable and trade group
scholarships Students may also
ask to receive a list of intern
ships in their professional fields
There is a modest charge for the
basic list of sources
IRS
IRS Cincinnati Service Center,
Covington, Kentucky is looking
for students who want to be
managers very quickly No ac
counting background requird
Must be mature and have a
career interest in management
with IRS Will teach student the
technical aspects of job
Must have 2 5 GPA or better,
and willing to alternate work
periods position will begin Fall
1983 Salary will be at the GS 3.4
, or 5 level depending on status
of student Management, Deci
sion Science, or MBA students
are urged to apply immediately
if interested, stop by the Co op
Office, in 313 Rawl, to complete
application.
INCREASE
LEARNING
A program for Increasing
Learning Efficiency will be of
tered by the Counseling Center
this Fall. The first section will
be taught on Monday and
Wednesday at 3 p m beginning
September 7 and the second sec
tion will be taught on Tuesday
and Thursday at 1 p m beginn
ing September 8 Each section
will meet for five weeks Both
groups will meet in 305 Wright
Annex The classes are
available to all students Atten
dance is voluntary NO formal
registration is required For
more information call The
Counseling Center at 757 6661
NCHS
The National Center for
Health Statistics, Public Health
Service, Rockville. MD has two
co op openings for students in
terested in working with health
and nutrition survey among
hispanics in the US Student
must have an interst in a career
in vital and health statistics
Should have at least one course
in statistics or computer science
because will be working with
data collected There is also an
opening for a student to work
with hispanic community Will
be working with doctors and
technicians form throughout the
nation Must be bilingual and
have knowledge of hisplanic
culture and speak Spanish Will
be recording data in Rockville
headquarters Must have a 2 5
GPA or better and majoring in
Bio Statistics, Community
Health. Nuturtion, Sociology.
Political Science, or
Psychology Position will begin
Fall 1983 Salary will be at the
GS 3 4 level and requires alter
nating work periods Contact the
Co op Office, in 313 Rawl. for ap
plication
BIBLE STUDY
Check it out! The Navigators
investigative Bible Study
fellowship Brewster B Wing,
room 304 Every Tuesday, 7 30
p.m beginning August 30th
REBEL
The REBEL. ECU s
LiteraryArt magazine, needs
an Art Director, a poetry Editor
and a prose Editor Apply at the
REBEL office on the second
floor of the publications
building. MWF 3 00 4 00 Also,
the Writing and Art contests will
be starting soon, so be ready1
WRESTLING
Anyone interested Ml wrestling
meet in Memorial gym Room
102 Monday September 12th at
f 00pm
FAST FOR LIFE
A vigil in support of the Fast
for Life will be held at the Tenth
Street Post Office at 11 00 Satur
day morning Four people (2
Americans. 1 Canadian. 1
Japanese) are fasting in
Oakland, four tasters are n
pairs, and two are in Bonn Ger
many They plan to continue
their water only last until some
action is taken to break the
momentum of the arms race
Saturday will mam The beg'n
nmg of the fourth week of the
fast and will be the fourth local
vigil To Oin the relay fast here
take turns fasting for a day or
two at a time), can 758 4906 Tc
encourage action on �he arms
race, write To The PresidenT
your Congresspeopie Andropov
the Soviet Embassy etc
SAB.
There will be an organ,ia
tionai meeting of The sjoer-
aThieTic ooarc Tuesday AuguS.
30. 1983 at 5 30 .n The P rd.f
Club The meeting o � -
over dinner All Cvrrenl
members are encouraged It d-
tend this the first mee'ng q ��
Student Athletic Boara v nit
Pirate Club
SIGMA THETATAU
The Beta Nu chapter j
Thefa Tau the national norv
sooety of nursing arill hoia -5
first business meeting v -rf
academic tear 1983 i�84 �.�
day August 79 at 7 30 c m nth.
School Of Nursing t. - . .
members please plan -r v
PEACE
Twenty ,ears af'er It first
March on UtfasMngtOfi a v .
t,n Luther K ing s ltffl(
I Have a Dream aaqress ��.
will be another game' nginO
this Saturday The tn�
joes Peace ana Freeao The
sponsorship s very oroa
NAACP. SCuS ana NCA are
arranging tor a bus to go to 0 C
and return with,n 24 hours fly
price of a round trp s j ; r�n
deadline s past, but then
sTill be room For Inform!
call 758 1785. 752 4476 or 7S .
If inferested in a ioca
vance call 758 490�
ECU Stud
f
Hollans
Remember the Freshman
CLASSIFIED ADS
Ycu may use tfe form �T right or
use a separa'e sheet ot paper if
you need more lines There 6ft 33
units per line Each letter, punc
luatton mar' and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
nyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end ot line if word
doesn't tit Nn ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid- Enclose
?5� per line or fraction of a line.
r tease print legibly! Use capital �nd
lower ase leiieis
Return to the Media Board
secret a r b 3 p.m. the da before
publication.
-r
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Name
Address.
Luncheon at Jarvis
firvztaf fZjd Phone
iryDi�ic�rnrlnutfl

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Vegetables
Beets
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Saturday
400 PM to
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710 N. Greene St.
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ut�ua Nr� F4itor
Having troub'e
deciding on a major?
Has the loe of your
life just told you to
get lost? Are you so
shy that you can't
even find a love of
your life?
If so, then the ECU
Counseling Center is
the place for you. The
center, located in
Room 30" of the
Wright Annex, pro-
vides professional
counselors to help
students
blen I
counter
there ai
twom

September
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said. 'n
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Mmry Smith, director of Real Ci
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By KIM RICE
The REAL Crisis
Center has been serv-
ing the Pitt County
community as a non-
profit, confidential
human services
organization since
1970.
REAL offers us
services free of charge
to county residents.
REAL stresss con-
fidentiality and
anynonmity to
everyone who uses
their services. No ap-
pointments are need-
ed.
REAL, located on
10th street, was
organized by a group
of ECU students who
felt the need for a
crisis prevention
center in this area. In
19-4.
received
from
Carohna
missioi
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REA1
by the Nl
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licensed
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and h
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ECU Students Speak The Naked Truth
Hollans
Houston
By THERESA
DULSK1
Staff Writer
ECU student Lisa
Distefano appears
nude in the September
issue
ofVajftovmagazine.
Respondents were
asked to comment on
Distefano's actions
and what impact, if
any, her actions might
have on the university
as a whole.
Stuart Hollans,
Business,
Sophomore� "The
article didn't affect
me much. It's a plus
for the university. It
isa't degrading
Anita Cofield,
General College,
Freshman- "If cer-
tain things make peo-
ple happy then that
shouldn't bother
anyone else
Carmen Huston,
Nutrition,
Sophomore- It's her
personal business. I
don't believe it affects
the school in any
way
John M. Ho well,
ECU Chancellor-
"Apparently it has
not affected the
university, no one has
called. We don't con-
cern ourselves with
the personal lives of
the student, unless it
creates a problem for
the university
Photos By STANLEY LEARY
Cofield
Howell
Counseling Center A vailable
By MILLIE WHITE
taataaaal Sum f-diior
Having troub'e
deciding on a major?
Has the love of your
life just told you to
get lost? Arc you so
shy that you can't
even find a love of
your life?
If so, then the ECU
Counseling Center is
the place for you. The
center, located in
Room 307 of the
Wright Annex, pro-
vides professional
counselors to help
students with any pro-
blems they may en-
counter. Currently,
there are three
counselors on staff;
two more are expected
to be hired in early
September.
According to Dr.
Will Ball, director of
the center, the
counselors assist
students in numerous
ways. "We are a
generalized counsel-
ing service Ball
said, "which means a
broad range of ser-
vices are offered, all
the way from personal
and career to
academic assess-
ment
The center offers
career counseling for
students who are
undecided about what
to do with their
future. For students
who are having
academic problems,
reading and study
skill classes are taught
each semester.
According to Ball,
one common problem
among students is
their lack of con-
fidence and self-
esteem. "Students are
not as assertive as
they could be Ball
said.
Along with per-
sonal and group
counseling, the center
also offers evening
programs on such
topics as test anxiety,
building relationships
and assertiveness
training. Like all of
the Counseling
Center's services,
these evening pro-
grams are free for all
ECU students.
Most counseling
sessions last about 50
minutes. Everything
said during these ses-
sions is strictly con-
fidential.
According to stu-
dent evaluations, 90
to 95 percent of the
students using the
center were satisfied
with its work.
Appointments to
see a counselor may
be made by going to
the Counseling Center
or by calling 757-6661.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1983
Students Push For PIRG
By JAY STONE
Staff Writer
A group called the
Student PIRG
Organizing Commit-
tee is currently work-
ing to have a campus-
wide referendum held
this fall to vote on an
increase in student ac-
tivity fees of $2 to $4
per semester that
would fund a Public
Interest Research
Group.
Dan Lucas, a
spokesman for
SPOC, told The East
Carolinian efforts to
organize an ECU
PIRG, a student-run
research organization
with ties to consumer
advocate Ralph
Nader, are underway.
Lucas said the in-
crease in activity fees
to fun the PIRG is
needed to give PIRG a
sufficient, stable
budget on which to
operate. A refund
would be available to
students upon re-
quest.
Nadar visited ECU
last March as a part of
the ECU lecture series
and presented a series
of talks on com-
sumerism. Following
Nadar's appearence, a
group of ECU
students began an ef-
fort to found a local
PIRG. The group is
now an SGA-
recognized student
organization.
"Those who op-
pose PIRG's means of
collecting revenue
really oppose PIRG
Lucas said. "PIRG's
have tried to operate
on funds from the
SGA before and all of
them have folded.
"Today students
want to be able to
have an organization
through which they
can exert their in-
fluence on the com-
munities and the
world outside the
university. PIRG is
that organization.
Those who are
satisfied with allowing
students to remain im-
potent oppose it
Lucas said.
Through PIRG, he
added, students will
able to conduct
research on issues of
importance to them
and also work for
legislation and other
measures which their
research suggest
should be im-
plemented. PIRGs
are, according to
Lucas, non-
ideological; they do
not advocate any par-
ticular party or
political organization.
PIRGs work on a
variety of issues,
Lucas said �
everything from bike
paths and women's
health care to illegal
chemical dumping
and environmental
issues.
Those interested in
helping with the
PIRG effort can at-
tend a meeting of
SPOC on Tuesday
Aug. 30 at 6:30 p.m.
in the multi-purpose
room of Mendenhall
Student Center.
PHOTOGRAPHERS
WANTED
8
-The E.C.U. Photo Lab is seeking quality-
minded people for our photojournalism staff.
-Experience helpful in Studio, News or Sports
Photography, Push Processing, Color Processing,
Use of Nikon System.
-Must be able to Develop � Print B�W photos.
-Must have phone � access to a car.
-Must be enrolled E.C.U. student.
-Must have examples of work to show.
-Apply with the Media Board Secretary on
the 2nd floor of Publications Buildings
before September 2nd
�P-l?
mmmmm
Welcome Student
Specials .
(one month free)
4 Months Charter Membership $52.00
One Month Reg.$23.00 Now $18.75
Two Month Reg.$40.00 Now $30.00
15 Suntan Visits Reg.$30.00 Now $22.50
Pre-Register Before Sept. For Aerobic Dance
$16.00 per mo. (non-members) only $9.00 for members
United Figure Salon
Red Oak Plaza 756-2820
(Greenville's finest exercise and fitness center for Worn
� -5" v5- -5- 9-&
en)
Mary Smith, director of Real Crisis Center on 10th Street, says her facility offers confidential,
anonymous counseling services for anyone. The center encourages students to come by.
REAL Extends Helping Hand
By KIM RICE
Stan Writer
The REAL Crisis
Center has been serv-
ing the Pitt County
community as a non-
profit, confidential
human services
organization since
1970.
REAL offers its
services free of charge
to county residents.
REAL stresss con-
fidentiality and
anynonmity to
everyone who uses
their services. No ap-
pointments are need-
ed.
REAL, located on
10th street, was
organized by a group
of ECU students who
felt the need for a
crisis prevention
center in this area. In
1974, the center
received its first grant
from the North
Carolina Drug Com-
mission and Pitt
County United Way.
REAL is chartered
by the North Carolina
Secretary of State,
licensed by the North
Carolina Department
of Human Resources,
and has been ac-
credited by the North
Carolina Drug Com-
mission.
The center provides
a 24-hour HELP-
LINE (758-HELP)
and Dial-A-Teen, a
youth employment
service (758-1976).
Dial-A-Teen matches
area youth to
residents needing
part-time or tem-
porary help.
"We receive 300 to
350 calls a month,
about 35 percent of
those calls are from
ECU students said
Mary Smith, director
of REAL. "The most
common problems
students experience
are interpersonal
Depression is also a
large problem among
college students.
"Freshmen are ex-
periencing something
new and different.
They're away from
home and some of
them don't want to
be. This causes
depression Smith
said. "Depression is
also common among
seniors who are sud-
denly faced with
responsibility of fin-
ding a job
At present, REAL
has 12 volunteers
working at the center,
three of them are live-
in counselors. Smith
said that all
volunteers undergo 50
hours of intensive
training. REAL will
be starting a new
volunteer training in
September. Anyone
wishing to apply for a
job as counselor can
do so by contacting
the center for an inter-
view, Smith said.
READ
the
Classifieds
Back To School Sale
-Indulge in the Best!
10 off all Christian Dior
Bras and Panties
Intimate Apparrel is a Specialty at
Lori's
Locate the Carolina East Center
Next to m Golden Dragon Restaurant
Phone 756-6846
SALE
PAWN SHOP SPECIALS
TV's, Band W, Color starting at $39.95 SA VE
Dorm Size RefridgeratorSAVE
Stereos and Stereo Components
Cassettes, Turntables, Receivers, Speakers
In stock JVC, Sansui, JBL, Pioneer,
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Guitars39.95 up
Jewelry always on SALE
Nice Selection of UK Chains
Electric TypewritersSA VE
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��-� r .





Wt Saat (Earalitfttttt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, GeneralManager
Darryl Brown. ��,��� frf�.�
WAVERLY MERRITT, director 0 Advtrtmng ClNDY PLEASANTS. Sports Editor
Hunter Fisher. flluwu Manager
ALl AFRASHTEH. Crrd.i Manager
Stephanie Groon, r in rr n
Clay Thornton. ��.� sr
erisor
Patrick Oneill, � ��
V-ARLYN tBLRT. Entertainment Editor
Lizanne Jennings, style Editor
TODD EVANS, Production Manager
August 26, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Naso's Plan
Possibilities Aren't Endless
SGA President Paul Naso is pro-
mising to attempt the equivalent of
moving a mountain � in other
words, he wants to alleviate student
apathy, especially regarding the Stu-
dent Government Association and
campus events.
It is a cliche observation that
most students care so little about
:ampus activities and government
that many don't even know the stu-
dent leaders who represent them
and spend their student fees; much
less do they bother to find out their
views or vote for people they agree
with and feel confident of. In fact,
every election turns up an dorm or
two that can't even get enough peo-
ple to run for the offices.
Naso himself was elected to the
highest SGA office with only 1278
votes � less than 10 percent of the
student body. A voter turnout con-
sidered excellent by last year's elec-
tions chairperson Joy Wilkins is 20
to 25 percent.
Naso campaigned on a platform
calling for the formation of an
"information network a campus-
wide system to facilitate com-
munication among offices and ac-
tivities and to help students become
aware of events and opportunities at
ECU. Students "won't care about
an issue unless it directly affects
them Naso says. The network is
designed to expose students to the
SGA and campus issues, and SGA
legislators will carry the brunt of the
load in getting out the word. Naso
plans to activate the legislature into
doing "more than just giving money
away He plans a seminar to
develop the "leadership" skills of
the representatives, and Naso hopes
to increase communication to dorm
residents by involving the SGA in
dorm meetings.
So much for the plan. It is, at the
least, optimistic, vague and
precarious. How effective, for in-
stance, will the skills developed in a
brief "leadership" conference pro-
ve to be in getting constituents to
listen to and act with their represen-
tative? And just because students
are more aware of issues, doesn't
pCampus Forum
mean that they will feel "directly af-
fected" by them. Still, the plan has
noble intentions and distinct if
limited possibilities. Included
should be a way for people to con-
tact their area or dorm legislator,
i.e. published phone numbers or of-
fice hours (for those who actually
know who their legislator is) so they
can voice an opinion. Off campus
residents have a particularly dif-
ficult problem with this, since no at-
large legislators are assigned to par-
ticular neighborhoods around cam-
pus. Since over half the student
population doesn't live on school
property, they won't be able to at-
tend the well-planned dorm
meetings with SGA legislators.
Laudable and with more chance
of success is Naso's plan to coor-
dinate organizations which already
have informed, active, interested
students. Campus organizations, as
with state and national politics, are
run by a minority of dedicated peo-
ple, and it is these, working together
in a coordinated communication
network, who could improve cam-
pus efficiency. Social, honor and
service fraternities and sororities
could be included in the network as
well as the organizations Naso plans
to include, such as the Student
Residence Association.
As for the student body in
general, good luck, Mr. Naso. With
the amount of effort and concern
you seem to be putting into the idea,
and with specific, viable
maninfestations of those ideas, you
may be able to raise the percentage
of students interested in SGA-
related activities from 10 percent to
15 or 20 percent. That would be a
laudable increase indeed.
Coordinating those already active
in campus life, making sure the
right hand knows what the left is
doing, so to speak, will probably
produce bigger results. Naso
realizes he can't cure student
apathy, but he hopes he can put a
dent in it. He set himself the best
goal: "I know I can't get them
(students) all, but I can get some
Guidelines For Forum Use
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
WEWERE mm FOR TRUTH, JUSTICE ANP THE AMERICAN
WJILIC0N6RESSOTFUNPIK6 COVERT OPERATIONS
ANDTKISONE SOESTOTHAT BLONPE OM ELM STREET
PANT, PANT, 5T0P WMLSTOP PANT, PAWT, STOP
Soviet Boy's Dilemma Exposes
Weakness Of State Department
By GREGORY RIDEOUT
For two weeks, the two most powerful
nations in the world played political tug-
of-war on unfamiliar turf. It seemed
that a little Russian boy, a lover of rock
music and, apparently, America's apple
pie, wanted to stay in the United States
now that he was here. If all the facts are
true (and the State Department insists
they are), 16-year-old Andrei Berezhkov
wrote letters to the New York Times and
the president saying, "I hate my country
and it's (sic) rules and I love your coun-
try. I want to stay here
The larger-than-playground aspect
was this: Andrei's father happened to be
a high-ranking Soviet diplomat with
Moscow's embassy here; this wasn't
stickball � it was bonafide hardball.
The United States lost the game. It field-
ed a team without guts.
We are a free society. Each person
who requests political asylum, or has at
least seems to have requested it, deserves
the right to a private interview with State
Department officials. Last week, as An-
drei flew out of Dulles International Air-
port toward an even more restricted life,
President Reagan was probably on his
mind. He probably wondered how a
man who constanlty extols America's
virtues could let a little boy who was try-
ing to grab on to them get away so easi-
ly.
The administration had hung tough
all the way into the late innings. Then,
when the going got tough, the president
and his moderate advisors served up
gopher balls. A hasty press conference,
"Our nation, for however
noble a reason, should
never comprimise its prin-
ciples, or it ceases to be the
leader of the free world
arranged by the Soviets, offered the
United States a way out of the dilemma.
Instead of helping Andrei by letting him
talk in private, the administration let his
well-rebearsed speech count as a request
to go home. Home run for Andropov.
A wise man once said that a giant is
only as great as his most humble gesture.
It seems that an idle threat by Moscow in
the overall game prevented Uncle Sam
from stooping down and giving little
Andrei a bat to hit with. There uere
reasons for not helping Andrei. It seems
that just when a thaw had begun on
East-West relations, Andrei skated into
the picture. But our nation, for however
noble a reason, should never com-
promise its principles, or it ceases to be
the leader of the free world.
So, now the lights on the world's field
are out, and both teams have showered
and gone home. But one player's future
in the bigs is gone. Andrei has departec
the team plane in Moscow; his one
chance shattered by world realities.
Authorities on the Soviet Union will tell
you that Andrei is a marked citizen uho
will always be watched and never forgot-
ten. He will never be allowed to have
even the minimal amount of freedom
that even the lowest class of Moscoues
possess. He will never go to college. In
fact, the phrase that the State Depart-
ment uses in political cases, that "there
(is) a potential for retaliation against the
individual for his asking for asylum if he
returns to his country definitely ap-
plies here.
The United States has shown another
defect in its game plan. Andrei, it seems,
will never hear another Rolling Stones
record. He didn't ITS no jmja.
New Public Pedagogy In Polk
By DARRYL BROWN
Starting this Fall, Polk County school
children in western North Carolina can
look forward (probably with dismay on
the part of many), for the next three
years, to a school year with 200 days in-
stead of the state-wide norm of 180.
They will also be attending school one-
half hour more than their counterparts
around the state.
The Polk County school system is one
of the first in North Carolina to accept
the state's offer to try an extended
school year, an experiment for which the
state is putting up $400,000 to cover
such additional costs as teacher salaries.
The lengthened-year idea is the result,
obviously, of increased concern nation-
wide for the quality of American educa-
tion. Laments have been voiced and
recommendations made by everyone
from the president's education commis-
sion, to the national governor's con-
ference committee, headed by Gov.
James B. Hunt (D-N.C), to a Carnegie
Foundation report issued just last week.
Most call for increased teacher pay,
longer school days and years and more
homework, especially in "basic" sub-
jects such as math, science and English.
North Carolina's trial run in Polk
� County follows that prescription almost
to the letter. Gov. Hunt, trying to hold
on to his reputation as leader in educa-
tion legislation and reforms, was in-
strumental in getting the additional
funds from the state budget.
As a spokesman for the Polk school
system noted, local children will take
essentially almost four years of school in
the time other kids take only three. In-
deed, the extra 20 days each year for
three years will give the students an addi-
tional third of a regular school year, and
the extra half hour each day will result in
100 additional classroom hours each
year.
The increased state funding is also
permitting the Polk school system to
broaden its curriculum, offering for the
first time such courses as advanced
chemistry.
Still, despite the apparent advantages,
some parents in the area are opposed to
the changes. The most frequently heard
argument is that children will have so
much of their time taken up by school
that there will not be time "to let
children be children The fact is, under
the present system, students go to school
less than half the days in a year; they at-
tend school 180 and can "be children"
185. The increase sends them to school
only slightly more than half of the year,
leaving 165 free days. A summer vaca-
tion cut from 12 weeks to nine or 10
hardly seems to be overburdening
students;surely the family can fit a vaca-
tion and summer camp in there
somewhere.
Children are rarely needed anymore to
work on the family farm planting or
harvesting crops and thus needing a
shorter school year permitting free time.
(Surely when such was the case, children
had even less time to be "children")
Nationwide only 3 percent of school-age
children come from agricultural
families; in North Carolina the percen-
tage is only slightly higher.
Polk County residents should jump at
the chance to improve their rural school
system with progressive ideas and state
dollars. North Carolina has a reputation
for an excellent public university system
but an unremarkable secondary school
system. The results of the experiment
won't be in for a few years but, as the
Polk school spokesman said, the in-
creased classroom time and course offer-
ings have to make a difference.
Indians, Rebels Getting CIA Paychecks
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � What is the
CIA's guerrilla campaign in Nicaragua
costing the American taxpayer? No one
will say for sure. But we sent our
associate Jon Lee Anderson to
Nicaragua to talk with rebel com-
manders who are leading the fight
against the Sandinista forces. For the
first time, some of the guerrillas talked
actual dollars and cents to an American
reporter.
The people our associate interviewed
were leaders of the Miskito Indian
forces. There are 2,000 of these Indians
fighting the Sandinista government's
troops in the swamps and bayous of
Nicaragua's Atlantic coast.
The Miskitos said the CIA offered
rebel forces an initial sum of $80,000 but
they say they never saw a dime of it.
They get their money and supplies
through the CIA's favorite group, the
Nicaraguan Democratic Force, know as
the FDN. The Miskitos say the FDN
kept the whole $80,000.
For a while, they said, they also got
$50,000 a month. But now they com-
plain that "the gringos" � the CIA �
have cut their allowance back to $35,000
a month. This does not include arms and
ammunition � just food, transportation
and other supplies.
The FDN numbers about $13,000
men, almost seven times as large as the
Miskito rebel army. It's a safe assump-
tion that the CIA is paying its favorite
guerrillas at least as much per man as it
pays the Indians. A little arithmetic
shows that the bill for the CIA's not-so-
secret war is more than a quarter of a
million dollars a month. And that's not
counting weapons and ammunition.
In fact, the FDN, guerrillas are probably
getting a lot more per capita than the
Miskito Indians. Miskito leaders com-
plained that while their men are going
hungry, the FDN rebel leaders are living
in luxury at the CIA's expense. The In-
dians said the FDN commanders are
paid $3,5000 a month and have houses
and expenses paid by the CIA � that is,
by American taxpayers. Other officers
get $2,000 a month, the Indians claimed.
Uanad Features Syndicate. Inc l�3
&.
UL.U
Pictured to the right are r
of the illage Green aparu
2 in a ga explosion. One
dozen were injured, some
week, after clean-up operJ
SGA
B DENNIS
kIKOYNh
Stall �nlrr
The Student
Government Associa-
tion is the offical
voice of student opi-
nions, looking after
student needs and in-
terests and budgeting
$100,000 of student
fees.
The legislature
sponsors two loan
progiams for students
caught in finanical or
medical emergencies
It also funds camp is
groups and organiza-
tions from its
S 100.000 budget, in-
cluding such larger
organizations as the
11U(
P
St u
legi
Senl
droj
in
I
I
�.
t � o
r
LAUNDR4
33 Washers -
Present thi
1-FREE V
We honor an
coupon when
Located at the Ii
of E. 10th St.
Harbin Highlan
2804 E. 10th St.
Phone 7521
hammmmmmmmmMmmi
11
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of particj
GreenLeJ
Band,
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18"
S�S-
�4 STREET
T, STOP,
Ml
'ofc
� and can be children"
�e sends them to school
more than half of the year,
tree days. A summer vaca-
12 Aeeks to nine or 10
be overburdening
rely the family can fit a vaca-
ummer camp in there
-arei needed anymore to
he famih farm planting or
crops and thus needing a
ool year permitting free time.
such as the case, children
c to be "children)
onl 3 percent of school-age
come from agricultural
North Carolina the percen-
shghtK higher,
inty residents should jump at
3 improe their rural school
progressive ideas and state
Irth Carolina has a reputation
lllent public university system
Temarkable secondary school
e results of the experiment
a feu years but, as the
1 spokesman said, the in-
fsroom time and course offer-
make a difference.
ychecks
least as much per man as it
idians. A little arithmetic
he bill for the CIA's not-so-
j? more than a quarter of a
rs a month. And that's not
apons and ammunition.
DN. guerrillas are probably
It more per capita than the
ians. Miskito leaders corn-
while their men are going
FDN rebel leaders are living
fthe CIA's expense. The In-
the FDN commanders are
a month and have houses
paid by the CIA � that is,
taxpayers. Other officers
lonth, the Indians claimed.
1" Svndivaic lite 1W3


vmH&W
poses
tment
h. There were
a Andrei. It seems
� had begun on
x drei skated into
r however
lid never eom-
ceases to be
ts on the world's field
ns have showered
one player's future
Andrei has departed
Moscow; his one
world realities.
moo will tell
i a marked citizen who
ever forgot-
be allowed to have
(mount of freedom
t Moscowites
er go to college. In
ne State Depart-
iscs, that "there
r retaliation against the
ing for asylum if he
auntry definitely ap-
: States has shown another
plan. Andrei, it seems,
it another Rolling Stones
diila'l4�f bo
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26. 1983 5
Pictured to the right are rescue volunteers clearing away the remains
of the Village Green apartment building that was destroyed in a March
2 in a gas explosion. One ECU student was killed in the blast and a
dozen were injured, some seriously. Picutured above is the area this
week, after clean-up operations are generally finished. The nearby
Village Green Before And After
swimming pool was filled in and no construction of a new building is
expected on the site. Structural damage to nearby buildings has been
repaired Twelve ECU students or their families are suing the owners
of the apartment complex and related companies for a combined total
of several million dollars.
SGA
By DENNIS
Ml COYNE
staff Uriler
The Student
Government Associa-
tion is the offical
voice of student opi-
nions, looking after
student needs and in-
terests and budgeting
$100,000 of student
fees.
The legislature
sponsors two loan
progiams for students
caught in finanical or
medical emergencies.
It also funds campjs
groups and organiza-
tions from its
$100,000 budget, in-
cluding such larger
organizations as the
��� V.�����;
o - �� �
�.�� 6 - . � ����
" .� .�io ' �
��'��� �?� i o �' �
Marching Pirates and
smaller groups such
as the Frisbee Club.
The SGA also in-
fluences university
policy affecting
students. The
legislature last year
objected to a Faculty
Senate proposal call-
ing for students'
dropped courses to be
included on official
transcripts. The
policy was not
adopted by the
university.
The legislature
meets every Monday
at 5 p.m. A speaker of
the legislature, elected
by fellow represen-
tatives, presides over
o
the meetings. The
legislature is compris-
ed of 50 students, not
including class of-
ficers. Twenty-five
are day students who
live off campus and
25 are elected at-large.
The remainder of
members are dor-
mitory represen-
tatives.
Proposed bills
move through the
body as they do in
state and national
legislatures: they are
proposed, submitted
to committees,
debated in the
legislature and then
voted on.
The legislature is
� � � o "� "ft '
��.�� ��. o, -
. . . � - � � .
divided into four
committees: ap-
propriations, rules
and judiciary, student
welfare and screens
and appointments.
Thus, legislators con-
centrate on one sub-
ject and develop an
area of expertise for
legislative debates.
Take your student
legislature and its
work seriously. With
the support of the stu-
dent body, the
legislature can serve
students.
How Your Bills Get Passed
Jmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
In order to stream line the
budgeting process, the SGA
Legislature appropriated much of
it's 1983-84 budget last spring.
Bu' for groups that missed out on
eany funding, money is still
available. If your club needs
money, here's how to get it:
� Prepare a detailed budget re-
quest. Break your request down
into a line item form which ex-
plains exactly where the money
will go.
� When the legislature first
meets, contact the speaker or a
member of the Appropriations
Committee. He will write your
budget request into a bill.
� The bill will be introduced in-
to the legislature at the next
meeting. It will then be sent to the
Appropriations Committee for
evaluation and possible cutbacks.
After the committee meeting, one
may have to defend the requests.
� After the committee's study,
the bill goes back to the
legislature with the committee's
recommendation. The bill is then
approved m flrnirri-
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ii
Greek Kick-off 83"
FRIDAY NIGHT,
AUGUST 26th
i Fraternity & Sorority Specials & Contests
, The BAND "Dlussion" plus
t' Free Draft, Beverages & hors d'oeuvres
The Fraternity & Sorority with the highest percentage
of participants will win a FREE Social together at the
GreenLeaf (plus beverages).
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The GreenLeaf welcomes all Greeks to
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FOR INFORMATION CALL 757-3107
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save $2.00 on any pizza
Order any size pizza, large or small,
and save $2.00.
Offer good thru Oct.31,1983
with this coupon.
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One discount per pizza ;
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luncheon special � between
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get one FREE with same number of Toppings with this
coupon - free Cokes v
Offer good thru October 31,1983
with this coupon.
757-1955
One discount per pizza
I

'
��-� m m m ,
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1983

Peace Activists Speak Out Against Reagan
By GLENN
MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
In a speech at the
annual American
Legion convention
Tuesday, President
Reagan criticized the
peace movement for
advocating strategies
that were "weakening
the free In North
Carolina, several
peace activists, in-
cluding some ECU
students, took of-
fense to the Presidents
remarks.
Keith Hoggard, an
ECU student active in
the peace movement
disagreed with
Reagan's remarks.
"He doesn't know
what the peace move-
ment is
aboutHoggard
said. "He seemes to
think the peace move-
ment is for unilateral
disarmament or strict-
ly one-sided in its
positions
"The movement
doesn't want to
weaken the U.S. but
would rather see the
balance of power 'in
neutral The peace
movement is more for
a bilateral build down
than anything else
Hoggard added.
Commenting on
Reagan's statement
that "We Americans
covet no foreign ter-
ritory and we have no
intention of becoming
policemen to the
world Peter Colby,
an ECU psychology
student said, "It's
ironic he would say
such a thing, con-
sidering our troops
are in Israel, and
we're supporting
covert actions in Cen-
tral America. His
statements are totally
contradictory
Anne Welch, coor-
dinator of the
American Friends
Service Committee's
Greensboro office,
also took offense at
Reagan's comments.
AFSC is an interna-
tional Quaker peace
organization.
"The peace move-
ment wants security
like everyone else
Welch said. "We (the
Proposed Building Causes
Problems For The University
By KIM RICE
Sun U ritrr
Although the N.C.
General Assembly did
not appropriate fun-
ding for a new arts
and sciences building
at ECU this year, the
university has not
abandoned hope for
the construction, ac-
cording to Angelo
Yolpe, vice chancellor
for academic affairs.
"We're still op-
timistic Volpe said.
Chancellor John
M. Howell said that
though there is no
money for the
building this year,
"mavbe bv 1985 or
1986 the funds will be
available
The new building,
first planned in the
Spring of 1982, is
needed to relieve over-
crowding of students
and faculty. Many
faculty are in substan-
dard space which in-
cludes sharing offices
or working in rooms
and closets converted
into offices.
"In our business
building the faculty is
in somewhat of a
honeybee situation.
They are closed in
together and really
need more space
Volpe said.
Some students and
faculty have objected
to the proposed site of
the building, which is
on top of the present
steam plant and in the
adjacent wooded lot
behind Rawl building.
Opponents claim the
new building will
destroy one of the last
natural areas on cam-
pus that is part of the
Sally Joyner
Memorial Ar-
boretum. The ar-
boretum originally in-
cluded the land on
which Austin, Rawl
and the science
buildings now stand,
as well as the present
gazebo area.
Some opponents
claim the building
would concentrate too
much activity and
traffic in one area of I
campus.
Plans for the three-
story building call for I
the first floor to have!
semi-circular,
amphitheater-style
lecture rooms and
larger classrooms
upstairs. The hallways
will have windows
and seating for
students.
The new building
will give additional
office space to the
English, foreign
language and business
education depart-
ments and the School
of Business.
Many area residents
opposed to the con-
struction feel the area I
is used as a place of
solitude. "I challange
that Howell said.
"People don't sit
there
Self-Defense KARATE
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� �� ������������
movement) rethink
the idea of security
and understand that
modern warfare of-
fers nobody securi-
ty
Welch was also
critical of Reagan's
Central America
policies. "The U.S. is
seeking to control
what kinds of govern-
ment exist in Central
America, Welch said.
"They can never be
free because of their
proximity to the
U.S
The Rev.Charles
Mulholland, a former
ECU campus
minister, was strongly to build more nuclear ing we have enough
critical of the Presi- weapons sounds like arms; but Reagan is
dent's speech. 1984, where yes is no busy running for of
and truth is falsity.
Peace people are say-
ing we have enough
arms; Congress is say-
"Reagan is hype
Mulholland said. "
For Reagan to say the
best way to disarm is
fice
" �'� i
ktf i i
How's Your 'Student Life'?
By ANDREA
MARKELLO
SUtt Writer
Students at ECU
are fortunate to have
a well-organ .zed Divi-
sion of Student Life,
but what exactly does
it do?
The student life of-
fice, says Vice
Chancellor Elmer
Meyer, head of the
divison, "has the
responsibility for
creating services to
compliment the
academic program
and help students
grow socially and in-
tellectually
James Mallory,
coordinator of the
ECU judicial system
in the student life
divison, said, "the
services are to fit all
the needs of the
students. We are here
for the students to br-
ing their problems to,
so solutions can then
be found. It is well
worth the students'
efforts to utilize the
services to enrich the
college experience
Mallory said.
Major programs in
the Division of Stu-
dent life include
Career Planning and
Placement Services,
Dining Services,
orientation and
judiciary, public safe-
ty and university
unions.
Rudy Alexander,
associate dean of
University Unions
and director of
Mendenhall Student
Center, said his
facilities are heavily
utilized, especially the
snack-bar, banking
area, Hendrix Theater
and the recreational
area.
The Career Plann-
ing and Placement
Services, located in
Bloxton House, is one
of the most useful in
the student life
divison. Furney
James, director of the
career planning and
placement office, said
the service should ap-
ply to all academic
levels and "entering
freshmen should look
at employment
trends
SSSSSSS'SSSSSSSSSSfSSSSS'SSSSSSSSSSSfSsm.
Virginia
Crab tree's
:�-
Coats, Furs, and Suits Sale
Furs- Rabbits, Minks, and and more
All Reduced
Wool Coats - Entire Stock Reduced
Down Look Coats - All Reduced
Suits- Super Section
Entire Stock Reduced
$10.00 down will hold them
until Sept. 1st.

20 OF all regular price Merchandise to all ECU and Pitt Community Students This Weekend only

Fall Stock Reduced
Sweaters reg. $38.00
sale $19.90
Blouses asst. styles, colors, and fabrics
Reg. $18.00 to 24.00
Sale $13.90 and $14.90
Great Selection
Dresses Reg. $42.00
Oxfords $29.90
AND MUCH MORE
J
Summer Stock Reduced
Almost All Shorts
only $5.90
Almost All Skirts
only $14.90
Almost All Pants
only $9.90
Almost All Tops
only $6.90
Dresses and Summer
Groups
50-70 OFF
VIRGINIA
'�'�j �
r-
Carolina East Mall
Vermo
Say
This loel lady is one of the
Bread Puppet DomeMa Resurn
The Com
While A
As ECU
B ELIZABETH JENNIV,
Despite the rain and drizzJ
East Carolina students continues
to enjoy themselves at the
annual On The Mall Wednesdal
afternoon.
Live entertainment, free pv
and hats, watermelon b)
chunks and all the Mello "i el
and Coke you could drink mad!
On The Mall a success.
"On The Mall gave stuck
chance to be familiar with varioui
departments which serve the I
pus said Ken Hammond,
gram director of the Departmenj
of University Unions. It also ga
various social organizations tim
to meet and speak with nev
students interested in student in
volvement. Freshmen got the:
first glimpse of ECU'S
known reputation of student par
ticipation.

0
ECU students work their muscle
�� various games and competition
�� the rain. I





n
nave enough
ns; but Reagan is
5 running for of-
�:�:�'�?��
r
�?
House, is one
H useful m
student Hfc
I urney
� director off the
inning and
" ce, said
e should dp.
academic
tnd 'entering
si ouid look
p I o y m e n t
'
k 756-5267
lu:00to9:00
���mr �.MMm
THb EAST t AROl INIAN
Style
AUGUST 26, 1983
Page 7
Vermont Talks Politics Over Bread, Puppets
Phofo courtesy o Tony and Fran Reciek
Say Cheese
This loel lady is one of the puppets exhibited at the Vermont
Bread Puppet Domestic Resurrection Circus and this August.
ByMIKEHAMER
Staff Writ
The passing of August is quite
different in the northeastern cor-
ner of Vermont than it is in
eastern North Carolina. This is a
country where the weather can
turn cool at a moment's notice �
cool enough to require sweaters, a
fire in the evenings, and paper
caps for the tomatoes which nor-
mally ripen only in the early days
of September
At this time, eery year, these
Vermonters are preparing for the
Barton Fair. While stacking the
last of their wood for the long
winter ahead, many people from
all parts of the country gather at
the Daisy Dopps farm in Glover,
Vermont, for the annual Bread
Puppet Domestic Resurrection
Circus and Pageant.
This event is a gala show that is
meant for adults and yet is also
entertaining for children.
Four assets soon become evi-
dent to a newcomer to Bread and
Puppet. The first of these is that
the crowd is extremely well-
behaved and conscious of its en-
vironment. There is no trash seen
on the grounds, reflecting the
crowd's gratitude for the perfor-
mance.
Burt Porter, a musician who
helps every year with the perfor-
mance said, "An improtant thing
to remember about Bread and
Puppet is that you are in it. When
you're invited to come to an event
that obviously has taken a great
deal off thought and effort to
prepare, when nobody is charging
admission and the leader off the
group is personally slicing the
bread that is given to you, it's
hard to feel like a customer. Most
people seem to go through a phase
of feeling as guests and eventually
arrive at the point where they feel
themselves to be in some way par-
ticipants in the festival
One also notices there are pup-
pets around. Lots of puppets. Lit-
tle puppets, people-sized puppets
and huge 15 foot puppets. There
are also animal puppets. And
there is music, too. The music
doesn't consist of show tunes per-
formed by an orchestra in a pit;
rather, the music is more likely to
consist of an eerie saxophone line,
or a combination of violin and
drum music. As the music
enhances the show, it also affects
the listener. Hey, this is real
theatre.
Another bonus which appeals
to a spectator is that everything at
Bread and Puppet is free. The
shows are all free; and the sour-
dough rye bread, which Peter
Schumann, the creator of Bread
and Puppet, bakes himself.
Politics is the main reason peo-
ple are attracted to Bread and
Puppet. If you are insulted when
someone pokes fun at the in-
dustrial military complex, then
Bread and Puppet's politics pro-
bably would not appeal to you at
all. The troupe's politics are the
reason why the company led the
June 12, 1982, disarmament Rally
in New York City. Bread and
Puppet is currently preparing for
an appearance in a major Euro-
pean disarmament rally in Lon-
don in mid-October, in connec-
tion with International Disarma-
ment Week.
Steve Myott, a director of
Children's Theater Productions in
northern Vermont spoke about
what it is like to be a volunteer
puppeteer for Bread and Puppet.
"An important part of being a
puppeteer Steve said, "is seeing
the people who come from dif-
ferent places to help out. Some
come from .nearby and some come
from different parts of the world.
This year we had a person from
Japan, four from France, one of
whom is a professional actress,
and others from Germany, Mex-
ico, and Canada, and all over the
U.S.
You get to meet professionals
from all over. Puppeteers, pro-
fessors of dramatics and all kinds
of talented persons. And it's a
reunion in a sense for those of us
who have volunteered over the
years
Steve went on to speak about
Bread and Puppet's director,
Peter Schumann. "I feel that
everyone at Bread and Puppet
respects Peter Schumann for what
he does. He has a vision of what
he wants that isn't always that
clear to puppeteers, but the pup-
peteers are receptive to his direc-
tion. The circus and the pageant
are only rehearsed Five times, and
Schumann has to be direct with all
the puppeteers. Everyone is part of
the development of the show. I'd
say that the theatre needs the pup-
peteers as much as the puppeteers
need the theatre
A day at Bread and Puppet
begins with slide shows which run
from 2-4 p.m. These shows are
located at different corners of the
farm. Next comes the circus, cer-
tainly the lightest portion of the
theatre's offering for the day, and
the favorite of all of the many
children in the audience.
Speaking about the circus,
Steve, who played the part of a
huge gorilla, said, "The circus is a
fun thing � it is a circus. Bread
and Puppet have always realized
that people need to laugh. The cir-
cus is made up of funny little
scenarios using all kinds of pup-
pets. I don't know of any other
audience that is as receptive as a
Bread and Puppet audience
When the circus has Finished,
there is usually a choice in musical
presentations which provides a
musical interlude before the even-
ing's performance of the pageant,
this year's show offered a choice
between a puppet opera, a 50's
acappclla singing group, a tradi-
tional eastern European music
band and an intense presentation
called "Evening Beat" which was
conceived and performed by a
group of teenagers.
The climax of a day at Bread
and Puppet is the pageant. The
pageant is perennially an ar-
chetypal story of good versus evil;
at times the evil predominates.
This year the good forces prevail-
ed. It is very difficult to describe a
Bread and Puppet pageant. One's
mind merely absorbs the images;
it is impressionistic. The evil
forces came in behind a plane
whose roar was simulated by three
chain saws whose blades had been
removed. After the military forces
had prevailed for awhile, killing
all of the plants and animals, the
audience was left with hope as a
huge blue boat came and took the
people of the land in. As the
darkness set in at Daisy Popp's
farm, we were Filled with an
undefined sense of hope.
The Bread and Puppet
Domestic Resurrection Circus
takes place each year in Glover,
Vermont, in the month of August.
Volunteers are never turned away.
If your vacation plans should take
you to this part of the country,
ask the locals when Bread and
Puppet is going to happen. It'll
would be an experience you would
never forget.
The Competiton Gets Tough
While Aerobicizers Dance
As ECU Students Let Loose
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
Despite the rain and drizzle,
East Carolina students continued
to enjoy themselves at the forth
annual On The Mall Wednesday
afternoon.
Live entertainment, free posters
and hats, watermelon by the
chunks and all the Mello Yello
and Coke you could drink made
On The Mall a success.
On The Mall gave students a
chance to be familiar with various
departments which serve the cam-
pus said Ken Hammond, pro-
gram director of the Department
of University Unions. It also gave
various social organizations time
to meet and speak with new
students interested in student in-
volvement. Freshmen got their
first glimpse of ECU's well-
known reputation of student par-
ticipation.
The festivities began at 3 p.m.
with competion fribee throws,
beer can tossing, keg stacking and
the basketball throw. Several
businesses advertized their pro-
ducts by distributing free
souvenirs.
The Mello Yello Chug-off at-
tracted many thirsty participants.
Anthony Martin, an ECU stu-
dent, exhibited his chugging talent
as he took first place in one chug-
ging heatThat mother was
cold' exclaimed Martin.
Zena Rhodes, a freshman from
Plymouth N.C took first place
in one womens' chugging heat.
"I'm gonna do it again, but it'll
probably kill me said Rhodes,
as she made her way back up to
another chugging heat. A Mello
Yello T-shirt was awarded to all
first place chuggers.
"This is a good way to relax
after the long day in Drop-Add
said Sara Roba, a senior from
Snow Hill.
An energetic aerobic
demonstration convinced the
crowd that they too could bend,
stretch and jump in any which
way. To prove that the weather
didn't supress their bursts of
energy, the aerobic instructers, as
well as the crowd, hopped across
the mall in a train like fashion as
the rain began to pour.
Later that evening, the band
Lahnn and Loftin, played in
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre.
The Student Union Special Con-
certs Committee provided the
entertainment.
As many students made their
way back to their dorms with an
abundance of posters and hats,
thus came the end of the forth an-
nual On The Mall. Be watching
for the next event sponsored by
the University planning commit-
tees.
ROB POOLE � Photo Lab
One, Two, Three, Stretch!
ECU students work their muscles at Wednesday's 'On The Mall Along with aerobics, students participated
� LT T H T-shirts and posters were awarded those eager enough to come out j
in the rain.
� MoviesDatesTime
2 Best FriendsAug. 25, 26, 277, 9:30
2 The Quiet ManAug. 318
9 Sophie's ChoiceSept. 1, 2,35, 8
2 Othello, Richard IIISept. 76,9
2 PorkysSept. 8, 9, 107,9
� Eating RaoulSept. 148
� The VerdictSept. 15, 16, 177, 9:30
� Officer And A GentlemanSept. 22, 23, 247, 9:30
� 39 Steps, SpellboundSept.287,9
� 48 Hrs.Sept. 29, 30, Oct. 17,9
� Magic FluteOct. 58
� FrancesOct. 7, 87, 9:30
� Breaker MorantOct. 198
� The Year Of Living � DangerouslyOct. 20, 21, 227, 9:30
2 Heart Of GlassOct. 267,9
� Aquirre, The HungerOct. 27, 28, 297,9
� Dawn Of The DeadOct. 2911
2 Seven SamuraiNov. 27
2 TootsieNov. 3, 4, 57, 9:30
2 GandhiNov. 10, 11, 125, 8:30
2 Brittannia HospitalNov. 168
2 One From The HeartNov.18, 197,9
� EmmanuelleNov. 1911
� Funny Thing Happened On 2 The Way To The ForumNov. 205
2 TommyNov. 207
2 Blues BrothersNov. 209
2 OctopussyDec. 1, 2, 37, 9:30
0 Veronika VassDec. 78
2 The Lords Of Discipline i � �Dec. 8, 9, 107,9


� -
. j
- i i�iii m itmm
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1983
Fasters Face Death If Arms Race Continues
By PATRICK O'NEILL
NmbBAm
Dorothy Granada, 52, and
Charles Gray, 58, have been mar-
ried for nearly 10 months. Neither
may live to celebrate their first
wedding anniversary.
At present the two Americans
are in their third week of an inter-
national fast which they hope will
bring about "a break in the
momentum" in the nuclear arms
race.
They are fasting with nine other
people from France, Spain,
Canada, West Germany and
Japan. The 11 are fasting at three
locations: Paris, France, Bonn,
West Germany and Oakland,
California. Gray and Granada are
tasting in Oakland. Between them
they have three grown children.
The couple was interviewed by
telephone on August 5, the day
before their fast began. Below is a
partial transcript of that inter-
view.
WSSStSffStSSMUSSSrMS?SSSSSSMtSSSfSSSSSSrSSSSSM
INTERVIEW
VS"SjVfSVSSSyVSSSWSSSSS'SMWSSS
O'Neill: Many people saw he
movie Gandhi. They saw the In-
dian Pacifist leader participating
in fasts in an attempt to stop the
violence in his homeland. Why
have you decided to participate in
a Gandhian-type fast?
Gray: I actually have been in-
spired by Gandhi from the time I
was a teenager many years ago. So
when people warned me that by
the middle of the 80's we would be
possibly be facing a point of no
return in the nuclear arms race, I
began thinking about how could
this possibly be stopped and what
new non-violent tools might we
use (to) end this horror. So having
been acquainted with Gandhi,
fasting was one of the things that
we (he and Granada) thought of.
With other people in the peace
movement (we) gradually
developed a plan for having this
fast (The "Fast for Life") in
1983
Granada: We see the crisis of the
advent of first-strike weapons so
destabilizingthe arms race has
got to be stopped now before
cruise and Pershing II missiles are
placed in Europe.
Gray: We compare our action to
the kind of action that any or-
dianary person would take if
something very precious to them
was threatened � like if their
child falls in a river, they will take
the risk of jumping into the river
to save their child. We are willing
to take a risk because we think the
life of this planet is possibly in
very grave danger. We love life,
we love children, we love music �
that's the whole point. We want
this to continue and there are cer-
tain times when people have got to
be willing to risk even their lives in
order to save what is most
precious to ail of them. So we
consider (our actions) just the op-
posite of suicide. If anything, it's
the world that's about to commit
suicide.
Granada: If your children or your
husband were in a burning
building, if you went into that
building to try to save them you're
risking not coming out. Well I
don't think anyone would call
that suicide. And that's what
we're trying to do. We're trying to
call people to action. It's a high
risk for us personally, but it's a
higher risk if we do not do this ac-
tion. If we don't all accelerate our
disarmament efforts we are in a
higher risk.
O'Neill: Do you envision the fast
as a sign of hope?
Gray: Yes, we open the mail
everyday (and) we are very en-
couraged by peoples response to
the fast. They're saying: Yes I'm
going to help; yes, I'm going to
write letters everyday so we do
have that hope. At the same time,
we're realistic, we know that
we're up against an immense war
machine, so it is realistic to say:
'sure, we are risking the fact that
we might have to give our lives to
this thing.
O'Neill: Does the prospect of long
suffering and possilbe death
frighten you? Are you going
through apprehensive feelings at
times?
Gray: Oh yes, sure, sure. We
wake up in the middle of the night
sometimes and say: 'Why am I
doing this, Why me?' We know
it's not a pleasent kind of ex-
perience when your body begins
to use up its important tissues.
And, there's pain involved and
there's suffering involved and we
certainly are not looking forward
to that, but somehow there's got
to be a cry that gets through to
people and this may be the kind of
thing that has to be done.
O'Neill: Under what cir-
cumstances will you call the fast
off?
Granada: We'll call off the fast
when we see a break in the
momentum of the nuclear arms
race. What form this takes we
don't know because we don't have
a crystal ball. But we would like to
see things like a morotorium on
cruise and pershing II, say a
moratorium of a year or longer.
We would see (a break in the
momentum if) Congress cut of the
funds to a substantial part of the
first strike weapons system. We
really do not know what the turn-
ing point will be that will tell us
the arms race is turning around,
but we're sure it's going to come.
O'Neill: If one of you becomes
too sick or unconscious who will
decide for that person whether the
fast will continue or end?
Granada: We will designate so-
meone to speak for us. We
haven't got all the details worked
out, but we are designating people
to speak for us. (Note: a decision
to call off the fast will be made by
consensus. The fasters stay in con-
tact with each other on a daily
basis.)
O'Neill: Are you participating in
the fast primarily as an act of
faith or because you see if as th
most effective tactic for yourself?
Granada: I think I'm doing the
fast because it's a method that
speaks to me personally. If has
something to do with may faith as
a Christian. It has something to
do with identifying with my sisters
and brothers we are hungry. And
it's a non-violent form 0f
resistance. So it (the last) uptakes
to me in a very persona' way Yes
I feel very definately called I fee
that this is my ministry and I tee! I
have been called to this
O'Neill: You both have childr-
and other people who love you,
What are their reactions to your
decision?
Gray: Well, it's been ver,
difficult for them, so we've made
it a point to spend a lot of time in
an effort to reach an understan
ding with each other as to wh
we're doing this and the impor
tance of it. And as a consequent
(of our efforts) a number of our
family members now support the
fast even though they fear for our
lives. But they also recognize the
nature of the crisis, that all our
lives are in danger, and thai
serious action isn't taken
world isn't going to last very long
BL UE MOON
CAFE
Save Your Stomach
Don 7 eat Fast (Fried) Foods
Eat Good Fresh Home Cooking
A t the BL UF MOON CA FE
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Think about it.
Four years of tuition. Four years of rental
student housing. . . plus all the incidentals of financ-
ing a college education. For most of us, it
isn't easy. Not by a long shot.
But here's a thought that not only
makes it more affordable, but makes it
sensible as well:
You can purchase a fully-furnished
2-bedroom, 2 or 2 xh -bath condominium
townhouse apartment at
Kingston Place (only a
mile from ECU.) at pre-
construction prices
with a full 90
financing plan to make it
even easier.
Think about it.
Tax laws now permit a parent to rent to a
son or daughter so long as the rent charged
is at "fair market value
KINGSTON
HACE
So, you want a gtxxl place for your student
to live. You rent him or her your g(xxi place At the
end of four years you've not only educated a young
person, but you've also paid a goodly sum
toward the costs of owning income
property!
And at the end of their college
stint, you can continue to rent your condo
minium at Kingston Place or sell it outright
an excellent tax
shelter for parents
Think about it
VtTiy wait four
years for a return on your
college investment dollars
when Kingston Place can
begin paying you back toda ?
Pre-construction purchase
reservations are now being accepted on a first-come,
first-served basis. We invite your inquiry.
ECU T-Shirt.
Complete with oil New ECU
BASEBALL UNDERSHIRTS by Soffe
one get one free (of equal or Is
RUSSELL SPORTSWEAR
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wide seUrrlTtn of color and sixes
MANY OTHER ITEMS ON SALE!
COME AND SAVE WITH US TODAY!
STUDENTS� Don't Go Through Another Yearof the "Housing Hassell"
Have your Parent call today or yon come by our office for additional information.
Kingston Place 3101 S. Evans Street Greenville. N.C. 2834
IN N.C. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-682-8102 (Outside N.C, call collect 919-756-0285)
Kingston Place is a development of FR Corporation of Hilton Head Island. South Carolina and marketed by L'nkon of America Inc
BOfID S H.L HODGES CO
SPORfliQ GOODS
raMhftoa HUrwmmi
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f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
New
Begins
Singing and danc-
ing auditions for the
Fast Carolina
playhouse production
of the famous rock
opera Jesus Christ
Superstar are schedul-
ed for Tuesda and
Wednesday, August
30 and 31 in the
Messick Theatre Arts
Center on the East
Carolina University
campus. Th3 audi
lions wil i at 1 �
p.m. each evening in
Room 206
Jesus hrist
Superstar is a rock
music treatment of
Christ's passion that
gathered a world-wide
reputation even
before it opened on
Broadwav in 191
The New York pro-
duction
characterized bv
tacular scenic and
lighting effect and
some of the most
dazzling costumes
seen on The drea,
White Hay in many
seasons.
The musical tells of
the last week in
Christ's life,
culminating in Hi
crucifixion and H
followers' searching
cries for meaning in
His death.
oj
D
I
ml
I
acl
rel
ml
r
3JT REYNOLDS
L
'Best Friends' e
pear tonight and
Mendenhalls Hel
Admission is b I
l.D. and Activity
EYEG
Sail
OFf-EP GOOD T-
20
TC
40
OFF ALL
EYEGLASS
FRAMES
With Purchase Ot
Prescription Lenses
30
NON
SU
THIS AO �M
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m. m m � �� v � m Oi






M i AKdl IMAN
M Gl si �, 1983
ues
ti

S 1
S
I(,
I


h
llH
4
New Musical
Begins Soon
- ng dnd danc-
iditions tor the
C a r o 1 i n a
ise production
he famous rock
Jesus Christ
i rstar are schedul-
I uesda) and
nesday, August
and M in the
ssick 1 heatre Arts
itei on the I asl
i l niversit)
1 he audi
at 7:30
each evening in
206
Jesus Christ
i rstar is a rock
. atment of
ission that
. i rid-wide
on een
for opened on
in 1971.
New ork pro
' : 0 :i ' was
�d h sDec-
:ula . enic
lighting effects
the
.
i kite H
I rK
and
and
mosi
- tmes
I he Creat
in man
Christ's
.nnating
i on
i -
tells or
eek in
life,
in His
: Hi
searching
' �i meaning in
. ath.
There are 30 roles
open for casting bv
Director Edgar
I oessin, who com-
mented. "We have a
variety of roles
available for the
show, but we are par-
ticular interested in
rock-style singers and
musicians Audi-
tioning singers who
can sing rock-style as
well as legitimate-style
songs should bring
music and prepare a
song of their choice
which shows the voice
to best advantage. An
accompanist will be
provided no
"acappella" singing
will be permitted.
Dancers should br-
ing rehersal clothes
and shoes and will be
given routines bv the
choreographer. Mavis
Ray.
Jesus Christ
Superstar will be the
first production of the
EC I P lav house
season and will be
performed in MeCnn-
nis Theatre October
5-8. and October 10.
ECU students, facul-
staff and local
residents are all in-
vited to audition.
lot further infor-
mation call 757-6390
in Greenville.
CODE HA � ' I
4
Best Friends' continues to ap-
pear tonight and fridav night at
Mendenhalls Hendrix Theatre.
Admission is b ECT student
IT), and Activity card.
EYEGLASS
Sale
1000 THRU AUG 31 1983
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TO
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t





?
THE EASTCAROl INI AN
Sports
AUGUST 26, 1983
Page 10
Amazing Heath Begins
His A11-A merica Quest
� �
By RANDY MEWS
SUftVriler
ECU sophomore sensation Jeff
Heath is certainly making a good
case for himself as the first
placekicker to ever be named All-
America on the Pirate football
squad.
In just his first year of college
football. Heath was the team's
leading scorer, averaging 6.8
points per game � a statistic that
ranked him 35th in the country.
He connected perfectly on 27 ex-
tra points and made 16 of 23 field
goals.
Heath hit an amazing 47 of 49
extra points in high school as well,
but can offer no explanation for
his extreme accuracy. "A lot of
credit goe to the snapper and
holder, but as for me he said,
"I just keep my head down and
concentrate
Many people have been billing
Heath as an all-America can-
didate after his fabulous freshman
season, and he admits that the
pressure has gotten to him. "Last
year nobody had heard of me
he said, "but this year people will
be looking at me, and if I don't
live up to their expectations, I'll
be a disappointment.
"To be named an All-America
would be a great honor, and it is
one of the goals I gave set for
myself. I don't expect to earn it
this year, but if I can improve my
field goal percentage I think
things will �ork themselves out
ECU kicking coach Jack Boone
is also excited about the upcoming
season for Heath. "If Jeff con-
tinues to improve as he did
throughout his first year, I don't
see how anvbody can keep him off
theA'l-America team he said
"Jeff is the type of guy you
don't run across too much
Boone said "He is a dedicated
athlete and has great work habits.
His potential is unlimited, and
there's no doubt in my mind that
Jeff has a great, great future
ahead of him
One of the main factors con-
tributing to Heath's success is the
amount of power he puts behind
each one of his kicks. At First
Colonial High School in Virginia
Beach, he set a state record by
kicking a 58-yard field goal.
He accomplished that feat once
again last year in what was the
most memorable game of his
career.
Against Texas-Arlington, he set
two NCAA records by making
four field goals over 40 yards as
well as averaging an amazing 49.5
yards on each one of his kicks.
The 6-0, 202-pound Heath is
proud of his leg strength, but
doesn't know what to attribute it
to. "I've never done anything out
of the ordinairy to condition my
legs he said. "I didn't start
kicking a football until ninth
grade, and the only thing I can
think of is that I've been playing
soccer since I was 11 years old
Coach Boone is equally baffled
with Heath's strength, but says
that under the right conditions he
could kick a field goal up to 62
yards.
Now in his second year, Heath
is familiar with the extensive
workouts which take place before
classes begin. The Pirates practice
four times a day, each one lasting
approximately two hours.
"I jogged and worked on a con-
struction crew this summer
Heath said, "so the practices
weren't that bad, but you really
don't have time for anything else.
We have a 12 o'clock curfew, and
we're only allowed to go out
Saturday nights
Although the practices are
tough, Heath knows they are well
worth it. "They prepare you men-
tally as well as physically for a
long, hard season
Among the many achievements
in his freshman season, he ranked
nationally with 1.4 field goals per
game, was named the ECU
Outstanding Specialty team
player, set two NCAA records
and three ECU records.
If Heath continues to do what
he accomplished in just one year,
he will not only be ECU's first
ever All-America place kicker.
He'll also be the youngest.
Denkler France-Bound
For Professional Team
GARY PATTERSON ECU Photo Lab
Jeff Heath, ECU's sophomore sensation placekicker, credits his leg
strength to playing soccer during his younger years. The Virginia Beach
native kicked the longest field goal ever by a high school or college player
in the state of North Carolina last year when he booted a 58-yarder
against Texas-Arlington. Heath has a good shot at making some All-
America teams this year.
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Milor
Former Lady Pirate Mary
Denkler has finally solved her
dilemma. But, oh, what a dilem-
ma it was.
The All-America forward had
countless honors bestowed upon
her last season for her many
career accomplishments as a
Pirate.
During her four years, Denkler
placed first in career field goal ac-
curacy with a 50.9 percentage. She
placed second in all-time scoring
with 1,789 points and sixth in
career scoring average with a 15.7
average. In rebounding, Denkler
finished her career in fourth place
with 800. The list goes on.
She was named to two all-
tournament teams last season and
received all-America honors from
the Women's Basketball News
service. But the award that meant
the most to her was the $2000
NCAA graduate scholarship -the
first ever to be awarded to an
ECU athlete.
Denkler, an urban planning
major, maintained a 3.0 average
through her college years. Her
Head Coach, Cathy Andruzzi,
described her as "the most cons-
cientious student-athlete I've ever
been associated with
Along with the scholarship,
however, came mixed emotions
for Denkler. Should she continue
her education or prolong her
basketball career if she got the op-
portunity?
For a while, Denkler wasn't
quite sure she w ould get an oppor-
tunity. After weeks of practice,
Denkler headed for the Pan-
American tryouts this summer.
Unfortunately, her stay was short.
Competing against hundreds of
athletes, Denkler didn't make the
first cut.
"That's the most talent I've
ever seen in one place Denkler
said when she returned. "It was
just incredible
Although disappointed,
Denkler chalked the trip up to ex-
perience, but her desire to play
team basketball grew even
stronger.
She wanted to go to Europe.
Denkler waited patiently as her
agent negotiated contracts. And
finally she got word. She was go-
ing to Cosne, France to become
the only American member of a
French Club team. She had an
eight-month contract.
Everything seemed to fall in
place. She had gotten her oppor-
tunity to play and, even better,
her graduate scholarship had been
extended.
When reached by telephone at
her parents' home in Alexandria,
Va on Wednesday, Denkler talk-
ed about her upcoming trip with
much enthusiasm.
"I'm reallv looking forward to
it Denkler said. "It's just a
great experience for me
Denkler will leave on Sunday
and fly to Luxembourg. She will
then go to Cosne, which is located
about 100 miles outside of Paris.
At this point, Denkle said she is
mainly concerned about being
able to communicate not only
with people but with her team-
mates as well. "I went to Morocco
last summer on a school trip, so
that's the only chance I've had to
try and communicate in French. I
really want to be able to learn so I
can have conversations with
others
Andruzzi, who is obviously
very proud of Denkler, stressed
how few opportunities arise for
women to play basketball level on
a professional level. "We're just
excited for her Andruzzi said.
"She's got this chance and she'll
make the best of it. She's made
the commitment
Denkler will have yet another
commitment in eight months. She
begins playing in France in
September and will return to the
states in April. That's when she'll
begin concentrating on another
career. "I'm not sure where I'll go
right now she said. "I'm going
to apply everywhere
Meanwhile, Denkler couldn't
be happier about her upcoming
world traveling, but she quickly
added that eight months will pro-
bably be long enough. "I'm sure
I'll be ready to come home she
said, "where I'll be able to have
conversations very easily
Pirate Squad Full Of All-Star Candidates
B CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Mii-T
Each fall. ECU Sports Infor-
mation Director Ken Smith and
his staff begin heavily-publicized
campaigns to build up potential
All-America athletes.
Last season, their target was
defensive end Jody Schulz, who is
now with the Philadelphia Eagles.
This year, however, their task
isn't quite as simple. Instead of
Mike Grant

John Robertson
focusing on one individual, the
sports staff has four contenders
� Offensive Guard Terry Long,
Free Safety Clint Harris,
Placekicker Jeff Heath and
Defensive Tackle Steve Hamilton.
"For the first time since Carl
Summerell, Danny Kepley and
Carlester Crumpler, I don't think
we've even had a team with as
many potential All-America
players Smith said.
The biggest problem, but not
really a problem at all, is knowing
who to push the most for All-
America honors, according to
Smith. "Coach Emory's telling us
we may have 10 draft picks he
said.
Besides the potential All-
America players, five other
athletes have been chosen as all-
star candidates. They include
Defensive Tackle Hal Stephens,
Linebacker Mike Grant, Offen-
sive Tackle John Robertson,
Tight End Norwood Vann and
Fullback Earnest Byner.
Here are a few facts and com-
ments about some of this year's
most highly-touted players:
Terry Long�This power athlete
started getting the recognition he
deserved last season when he was
named Honorable Mention All-
America by the Associated Press
and an All-Southern Independent
first team member. "Terry can be
the premier lineman in the county
in 1983 said Emory. "I have
never been associated with anyone
with the ability he has with his
strength and speed
Long demonstrated his strength
by capturing the North Carolina
Powerlifting Championship in the
super heavyweight division. Long
lifted 2,203 pounds � the third
highest total ever lifted in the
world. Long backs up his strength
with outstanding speed. The 6-0,
280-pound senior runs the 40-yard
dash in 4.8 seconds.
Steve Hamilton�This 6-4,
253-pound senior caught the eyes
of several pro scouts last season.
The New York native was a
member of the second team All-
Southern Independent last year.
A three-year starter who is a
hard-hitter, registered four
quarterback sacks for minus 43
yards. He also had 15 "big
plays which ended in an oppo-
nent loss or turnover.
Emory believes Hamilton could
be a premier tackle nationwide.
The standout runs the 40-yard
dash in 4.7 seconds.
Norwood Vann�Beginning his
third year as a starting tight end,
Vann currently stands 10th on
career reception list with 560
yards in three seasons. He was the
third leading receiver in 1982 with
243 yards in 13 catches for an 18.7
average. This pro prospect has
good hands and good speed.
Clint Harris�This free safety
could become the first player in
Pirate history to lead the team in
interceptions for four consecutive
years. Harris intercepted five
passes last season, including a
77-yard touchdown return against
Central Michigan. He has 12
career interceptions and 226 total
tackles as a three-year starter.
"ClirU could be the outstanding
secondary prospect in the coun-
try Emory said. He has 4.25
speed and weighs 205 pounds. He
has so much ability
Hal Stephens�This defensive
tackle from Whiteville has been a
starter for the past three years. He
was the fifth leading tackier in
1982 with 58 total tackles. He's
received numerous team awards,
including two for hard work in
spring practice.
The 6-4, 235-pound senior had
two stops for loss of minus nine
yards, one quarterback sack of
minus eight yards and broke up
four passes last year.
Jeff Heath�This placekicker
Norwood Vann
had quite a phenomenal freshman
year. Besides rewriting the ECU
record book, Heath set an NCAA
record in a game against Texas-
Arlington. He shattered the
school record with a 58-yard field
goal in that game and also added
53, 42 and 45 yard goals against
UTA. He set the NCAA record of
longest average distance of field
goals with four or more kicks
made with a 49.5 yard average.
Mike Grant�After missing all of
the 1982 season following knee
surgery, this linebacker returns
more eager than ever to get back
on the field. He was the team's
leading tackier in 1981 with 33
solo hits, 48 primary and 51
assists for 132 total tackles.
In 1981, Grant was named most
improved defensive player and
tackle champion. The 6-1,
229-pound senior is very much
needed after the Pirates had so
many injuries at linebacker posi-
tion.
John Robertson�Starting at of-
fensive tackle for the third year,
Robertson has outstanding size,
speed and technique. The 6-6,
257-pound senior is considered a
prime pro selection this year.
Robertson was named to the se-
cond team All-South Independent
last season. The Eden native came
to ECU as a defensive lineman but
was switched to the offensive side
after his freshman year.
Earnest Byner�This senior
fullback is rated by Emory as a
potential national all-star if he
plays 11 games healthy. He was
the second leading rusher last
season with 773 yards in 139 car-
ries for a 5.5 average.
He was given the outstanding
offensive back award and named
offensive captain. He scored five
times rushing and one time on a
reception for 36 points. He needs
less than 500 yards to finish career
among ECU's all-time top ten
rushers.
Earnest Byner
Top Candidate Terry Long
Jeff Heath

im.
ECU free safety Oil
Former Pirate Jod
Harris
Tackle
By KEN BOLTON
.i. . r looki
gettn
In the fourth defer
quarter of last year's Torr.J
ECU -Central "He
Michigan game, the of
Pirates held a slim ing
17-6 lead, but CMU don
was threatening. AJ
With the ball in indul
ECU territory, Cen- is
tral Michigan quarter- mer
back Bob Demarco turnj
dropped back to pass, 4.2:
needing four yards for 40-y
an important first
down. Higl
But Pirate free safe- Virj
ty Clint Harris step- HarJ
ped in front of rec
Dcmarco's pass and mett
streaked 77 yards for the
a touchdown, electri- in
fying the 18,750 fans met
in Ficklen Stadium. Wl
Harris' intercep- tic;
tion, one of five he whej
would have in 1982. EC1
sewed up the game alw
and was a main foot
reason why Harris fort
finished tied for third Pirj
for pass interception prec
return yardage in the
nation last season. cen
This year, Harris last
could become the first Thr
player in Pirate phi
history to lead the for
team in interceptions ncn
four consecutive the1
years. as
Harris, picked as com
honorable mention
All-America by the bee
Associated Press last ye
year, realizes that his
role this year will be yea
more than just in- coi
terceptions and
tackles. skU
"Being a senior as harj
well as a three-year coj
starter, the younger T
guys look up to me defj
for leadership said W
the Chesapeake, Ya. del
product. Rei
The important sivi
leadership factor is Ph
tomething that the
Pirate coaching staff yej
is expecting from coj
Harris. ter
"We're not only ths
m
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Ksrnesi Bvner

THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 26, 1983 11
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ECU free safety Clint Harris (48) returns this interception 77 yards for a touchdown in last year's clash with Central Michigan.
Former Pirate Jody Schuiz, now with the Philadelphia Eagles, heads downfield for path-clearing help.
Harris Prepared To
ackle 1983 Season
By KEN BOLTON
ssuuat Sporti YAot
In the fourth
rarter of last year's
CU-Central
Michigan game, the
grates held a slim
P-6 lead, but CMU
was threatening.
With the ball in
ECU territory. Cen-
tral Michigan quarter-
back Bob Demarco
dropped back to pass,
needing four yards for
an important first
down.
But Pirate free safe-
ty Clint Harris step-
ped in front of
Demarco's pass and
Itreaked 77 yards for
� touchdown, electri-
zing the 18,750 fans
in Ficklen Stadium.
Harris' intercep-
mon, one of five he
Bould have in 1982.
leued up the game
Ond was a main
Season why Harris
finished tied for third
�or pass interception
Return yardage in the
anon last season.
This year, Harris
ould become the first
layer in Pirate
istory to lead the
earn in interceptions
our consecutive
'ears.
Harris, picked as
onorable mention
11-America by the
ssockUed Press last
ear, realizes that his
role this year will be
more than just in-
terceptions and
tackles.
"Being a senior as
ell as a three-year
barter, the younger
guys look up to me
for leadership said
the Chesapeake, Va.
product.
The important
leadership factor is
something that the
Pirate coaching staff
is expecting from
Harris.
We're not only
looking for it, we're
getting it said ECU
defensive coordinator
Tom Throckmorton.
"He's supplying a lot
of leadership and do-
ing things he's never
done before
Along with Harris'
inducive qualities, he
is also the fastest
member of the team,
turning in a blazing
4.25 time in the
40-yard run.
At Great Bridge
High School in his
Virginia hometown,
Harris set a state
record in the 100
meters and was also
the state AAU champ
in the 100 and 200
meters.
While he par-
ticipated in track
when he first came to
ECU, Harris has
always considered
football to be his
forte, something the
Pirate coaches are ap-
preciative of.
"Clint is a 100 per-
cent better player than
last year
Throckmorton em-
phasized. "If he per-
forms like he's prac-
ticing, he'll be one of
the big surprises as far
as professional ball is
concerned
While Harris has
been at ECU for four
years, most of the
"rookies" on this
year's team are on the
coaching staff.
On the defensive
side alone, there are a
handful of first-year
coaches, including:
Throckmorton,
defensive end coach
Waverly Brooks,
defensive line coach
Rex Kipps and defen-
sive secondary coach
Phil Elmassian.
Harris credits this
year's group of
coaches as being bet-
ter, knowledge-wise,
than last year's group,
and gives credit to
Elmassian for helping
him get a better
perspective of the
whole defense.
"He (Elmassian)
has given me a better
outlook on the
defense Harris
stated. "He makes the
secondary look at the
game from the offen-
sive point of view in-
stead of just from the
defensive
Like everyone else
concerned with ECU
football, Harris
realizes the toughness
of this year's
schedule, but he's not
running scared.
Even though
Florida State (ECU's
first-game opponent),
led the nation in scor-
ing lasi year, Harris is
looking forward to
travelling to
Tallahassee.
"I love
challenges Harris
responded. "Once we
cut them (FSU) down,
it will make other
teams realize how
good we are
In order to remain
competitive this year,
every member of the
'83 Pirates will have
to give their best ef-
fort. But the way Har-
ris sees it, this year's
team is ready.
"This team is the
strongest, fastest,
hardest-working and
most determined
group that I've been
around in my four
years here he
stated. "So far,
everything's going
great
And if Harris con-
tinues to perform like
he has the last three
years and this pre-
season, everything
will not be going great
for the opposing of-
fensive units on this
year's ECU schedule.
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Intramural
The Coveted
Crown to
The distinguished W
Chancellor's trophies Hi
are awarded annually the
to the teams within fin
each division who mj
have accumulated the vie
most points col
throughout the year
The year 1982-83 saw Dj
a few dynasties crum- ha
ble and several new b
ones emerge.
Lee Op
BRAND Mrws
Now in his second
year as head golf I
coach at ECU, Jen
Lee is looking for-
ward to an extremely
successful year.
"Four or five
ago, we started trying
to build a competitive
team he said, "and
we're now arriving at
the point where we
can be a contender in
every tournament we
participate in
The Pirates began
practice Monday in
preparation for their
season-opening tour-
nament on Sept 19.
They will practice on
a daily basis for five
hours a day.
"The practices will
be long said Lee.
"but we'll get a lot ac-
complished. We're
going to play 18 he
every day, spend an
hour on the range and
spend another hour
chipping and put-
ting
Lee is excited about
the tournaments ECL
will play in, because
of the talent and ex-
perience returning.
The Pirates only lost
two players to gradua-
tion and neither con-
tributed greatly to last
year's effort.
"Looking at all the
people we have retur-
ning, I feel we car















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Intramurat-Recrentinnnl Artivjtjfs
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 26, 1983
13
Sneaker Sam Sez
The Coveted
Crown
The distinguished
Chancellor's trophies
are awarded annually
to the teams within
each division who
have accumulated the
most points
throughout the year.
The year 1982-83 saw
a few dynasties crum-
ble and several new
ones emerge.
It was a race down
to the wire in the
Women's Residence
Hall division. When
the point tallies were
finalized, it was Flem-
ing who had reigned
victorious. A hearty
congratulations to the
Q T. Pi's, Janice
Daniel and residence
hall director Connie
Burgess.
After a seven year
Scott dynasty in the
Men's Residence Hall
Division, Jones has
taken over the throne.
It was a super year of
participation and fun
and congratulations
are in order to the new
King, Mr. Don
Joyner.
The Greek competi-
tion was spirited,
however both defen-
ding champions
emerged to regain the
titles.
The coveted award
in the Sorority Divi-
sion was retired last
year as Sigma Sigma
Sigma won it for the
third consecutive
year. The Tri Sigs
built up an early lead
this year and held on
to win for the fourth
consecutive year.
Perhaps one of the
most highly contested
races throughout the
year was in the Frater-
nity Division.
Although the Kappa
Sigma's tried hard to
catch the defending Pi
Kap's, it was the Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity
that prevailed through
victory as well as
tragedy to claim the
Chancellor's trophy
for the second con-
secutive year.
Last year the race in
the men's Indepen-
dent Division went
down to the wire with
a narrow three-point
deciding factor. The
Scuzzmen gained
revenge for their se-
cond place showing
last year by capturing
the Chancellor's
trophy for the 1982-83
year.
Lee Optimistic About Upcoming Season
By RANDY MEWS
Slaff Writer
Now in his second
year as head golf
coach at ECU, Jerry-
Lee is looking for-
ward to an extremely
successful year.
"Four or five years
ago. we started trying
to build a competitive
team he said, "and
we're now arriving at
the point where we
can be a contender in
every tournament we
participate in
The Pirates began
practice Monday in
preparation for their
season-opening tour-
nament on Sept. 19.
They will practice on
a daily basis for five
hours a day.
"The practices will
be long said Lee,
"but we'll get a lot ac-
complished. We're
going to play 18 holes
every day, spend an
hour on the range and
spend another hour
chipping and put-
ting
Lee is excited about
the tournaments ECU
will play in, because
of the talent and ex-
perience returning.
The Pirates only lost
two players to gradua-
tion and neither con-
tributed greatly to last
year's effort.
"Looking at all the
people we have retur-
ning, I feel we can
compete with
anybody in the area,
including all teams in
the ACC and SEC
Lee said.
Last year, ECU's
best performance was
a fourth-place finish
at the UNC Invita-
tional, a tournament
that featured one of
the strongest field in
the country. The
Pirates tied with
Wake Forest in that
tournament and
finished ahead of such
powerhouses such as
Clemson, Florida and
South Carolina.
Among the most
prestigious tour-
naments the Pirates
compete in this year
will be the James
Madison Invitational
and the Duke Invita-
tional.
Both host a 24-team
field that include the
likes of Maryland.
Penn State, North
Carolina, Ohio State,
Kentucky, Wake
Forest and Clemson.
Leading the Pirates
attack will be last
year's Most Valuable
Golfer Chris Czaja.
He had the best
overall average score
last year, and is con-
sidered by Coach Lee
to be the most consis-
tent person on the
team.
Sophomore David
Dooley should also be
a definite factor this














Cit) of Grra�iB
Part-Uaat Soccer Coach
Ejgkt lo lea coaches are aeeded in work with u(h ia III
taroagk ai� grade le�et� ia Ike fail �occer program wilk
Ike RecrearJoa aad Parks Departjaeal. 10-20 kour
weekh lor II veekj begiaajag September 12 $3 10 kour
Exaerieace ia atariag merer aad kaole4gc of rales sod ata required.
Kppt ai tar n Persoaaci Office. Muatcipai Baildsas
coraer of Weal Flflk aad Waskjagloa Streets. GreeaviUe. N.C.
Playing at: THE LOFT
Lahnn and Loftin
guitars and vocals
Sat. Aug. 27th
9pm-until $2.00 cover
THE BEEF BARN
400 St. Andrews Dr. 756-1161
ANY ROCK�N�ROLL
PIRATES
IN GREENVILLE
;
913
DOLBrEM&TERBO
year after coming off
an excellent summer.
Dooley won one
amateur tournament,
and did quite well in
several others.
Senior Don
Sweeting could well
be this year's number-
one player. "Don was
our number-one
golfer two years
ago Lee said, "but
had a bad season last
year. He's improved
tremendously since
the spring, and we'll
be looking for him to
regain his old form
for the upcoming
season
Freshman transfer
student Mark Ar-
cilesi, from Florida
State, is another top
golfer. Arcilesi
becomes eligible in
January, ind is con-
sidered an outstan-
ding prospect.
Other players who
figure to fit into the
scheme of things are
David Waggoner,
who sat out last year,
and Mike Helms and
Roger Newsom.
According to Lee,
freshmen are not ex-
pected to step right in
and contribute, but
that doesn't mean
that Lee isn't pleased
with his incoming
class.
"Of the four
freshmen that we
recruited, all have a
tremendous amount
of potential and will
be excellent golfers in
the future he said.
"Each player has had
an extraordinary
amount of experience
in high school and
junior tournaments,
and if each puts forth
the same amount of
effort, we expect them
to progress at the
same level
The new team
members are: John
Faidley from Myrtle
Beach, Mike Bradley
and Paul Steelman of
Durham and Steve
Matt from Virginia
Beach.
The Pirates will
open their season at
the Methodist College
Invitational, home
course of pro golfer
Ray Floyd, f
They will be among
18 teams participating
and expect to see their
toughest challenge
from N.C. State.
Chris Czaja, last year's Most Valuable Golfer, will be counted on heavily
this year on the greens and fairways.
N.y�itatft�Al
STEAK HOUSE
yVVXXXVNXXVXXXNNVNXVNXVXVXNNN'v
ATTIC
FRI and SAT
"������'
DRIVER
c.
Fri Sat. and Sunday Special I
Buy one 8 12 ozN.Y. Strip at $5.89 J
;t second 8 12 oz N.Y. Strip 12 price $2.95j
Served with King Idaho Baked Potato
or French Fries
and Texas Toast.
I
r-Sunday Lunch and Dinner Special
I 8oz Sirloin with Salad and Fruit Bar $4.99 f
Served with King Idaho Potato or French i
Fries and Texas Toast 1
'SsksA
BREAKFAST BAR OFFERING!
� Freshly Scrambled Eggs O Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits � Bacon
� Country Milk Gravy � Home Fried Potatoes � Southern Style Grits �
Homemade Muffins � Link and Party Sausage � A Choice of
"Shoneys" Own Special Fruit Toppings � Grated American Cheese �
PLUS The Fruit Bar featuring a variety of fresh fruit and tomatoes
WZMB H.H. FRI
4:30-7:00
i

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3


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-
B
Sunday
JmAXX WARRIOR
VS.VVNV.VVXNNV.XVvSVVVX
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I HATE STATE
A Hiiiene, Baas aessssi 9m ieeo! to � �
o cord carrying number of the '1HATE 1
STATE CLUt INTL Alto available:
moot nationally known teams. For o�-
ftcioi, wallot-siso numbonnie cord, '
tend your name, oddress, $2.00 oad the j I
ngmn of Has team you love to bets to �
Hoofrfcy Rivalries P.O. Bom 31765 �
Roieigb N.C. 27622. A eroat conversation � I
f
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved Veg. Bar
SHONEYS
205 Greenville Blvd.
MONDAY FRIDAY
6 30 AM -11 -00 AM
SATURDAY SUNDAY
HOLIDAYS
9 OC A M -20 P M
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd
2903 E. 10th St.
� 752-1411 �
piece!
e
HIIIIUIIIIHIIIIIHIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllillllllllllllllllHIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIlIT
0oe�
Afcts.
HUCKLEBERRY'S
t
Bob Herring and his staff
welcome all freshmen and
returning students to E. C. U.
and Greenville.
:amiry Restaurants
(Formally Biscuit Town-Across from Crows Nest)
Breakfast Special
2j
(Biscuits)
Savory Sausage
Chedder Cheese
Sassy Steak
Expires Sept. 16
2 for $1.00
2 for $1.00
2 for $1.40
A WjALf 0?A MEAL
Come on out to
Tar Landing Seafood
featuring the finest in
fresh seafood.
34 Sleeve
Short Sleeve
Exclusively at Apple Records
AbrahamLincoln
aad a pair of scissors
fit
Chicken Special
Buy any chiken biscuit
combination and get the
next one of similar value free.
Chicken Chicken Chicken
Biscuit Cheddar Gravy
Expires Sept. 16
xere quality makes the difference
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327
Spectacular Spuds
FREE Spud Picnic
with the purchase of any
Chicken or Rib Suitcase
Expires Sept. 16
aaaiQiiiiawiaBaaaaiiiiWajWfca! nan m� ar � �; �� -�� � � ��� m �� m aa-
a ?-?tav-
� � iiOsaajaajaaSaga ,i i ,
'jaXMaaj
I





I

14 THE EAST CAROLONIAN ALGLST 26. 1983
YOUR ONE-STOP SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS
2 BLOCKS
FROM ECU
211 JARVISST.
CORNER
3rd AND
JAR VIS ST
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET, Inc.
OVERTON'S COMPETITION SKIS
WORLD'S LARGEST WATER SKI DEALER
UNIVERSITY ECONO WASH
(See Ad Pg. News-3)
sumps-no homc.
" VlWe ,o� �o Over di,co�n ��
we wou�d UVO uke w offer (fce cooPo� receie
Therefore. � hgVC 10 do � P p 9�d ��
y��r fO-o orscou W,
luUUne of P�" suppU . (Hertw's er
. more and �ote pe�P
Come see hv more
day-
Sincere yours
n
-�o Jenkins
Art Center
Overton
����
LS�,�or6e�tobHng�hec
o�pon �o receive
v�ur lOo 0'sc
ount
Summit
Jrvfs
Jarvis

OVERTON'S
c
Don
COKE,
PEPSI
2 Liter
95
MILLER
LITE
6 pack 12oi. cans
$1.99
Ex. 9-�3
� FREE
FERARRI
SUNGLASSES
WITH THIS COUPON AND A $40.00
FOOD ORDER AT OVERTONE SUPERMARKET INC.
SORRY, KEG PURCH ASE$ EXCLUDED FROM THIS
OFFER. LIMIT ONE PAIR SUNGLASSES PER I.D.
NUMBER. THIS COUPON NOT VAUD IN CONJUCTION
WITH ANY OTHER OFFER OR DISCOUNT.
OFFER LIMITED TO STUDENTS ONLY!
DANNON
YOGURT
Assorted Flavors
8oz. Cup
59C
WE CARRY A
FULL LINE
OF PARTY
SUPPLIES
AND KEGS
FRITO LA
RUFFLES
80Z. BAG
89
NAME
ADDRESS
ID NO
AMT. PURCHASE
FREEBREALM
Present this coupon for one free loaf
of Overtoil's Penny Pincher Bread with A
$10.00 Grocery Purchase. Limit One Free
Loaf per I.D. Number.
THIS COUPON NOT VAUD IN CONJUCTION WITH
ANY OTHER OFFER OR DISCOUNT.
Name
Address
! ECU 10 DISCOUNT!
ON ALL FOOD ORDfRS 9
OVER $10.00 i�.M4i pi
PRESENT COUPON II
TO CASHIER FOR 10 �
DISCOUNT ON GROCERIES
I.D. Number.
Name.
Address
I.D. Number
?
1
�mami�'mm �'�� �� '�'Tttiwun'wm i'�.

�mm mi �mil i�wtmmitiin.mmimim
mvwmm
Classif
PERSONAL
1
SI
ANYONE INTERESTED in
attending the Jewish high noli
day services please call J.c
queline Kartchner at IS 2H or
Dr. Resnik ?S� s40 Tickets
FREE to students Transport
tion is available Please can to
make reservations now
IF YOU NEED to make etra
money working on your own
part-time, call 7s: 52i7 between
. and I p m.
ECU HILLEL is holding h
traditional hamburger and hot
dog barbeque to start ott the new
school year The barbeque win
be this Sunday Aug 2tth at Eim
St Park between 10th ana �tn
St. from J 7 p m Take th.s
chance to meet ana tain a N
your fellow Jewish students The
cost is only $2 for memoers and
$3 tor non members Be there or
be -quare-
I Spor
Si
� I
E
I
I Apk
: Public

PETl
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TANK. GR
CHLO
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Con
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318 S.Eva
CONCERTS
N.I





1
t

THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 24. 1983 15
R
D
ST
fc. News-3)
it
ON'S
LAYI
F'ES
BAG
UNT
?rd:rs i
.00 l�43
(UPON
OR 10 i
GROCERIES I
I
I
I
I
I
I
j
�id ��
Classifieds
PERSONAL
ANYONE INTERESTED in
ilend.na ft Jewish high holi-
day services picas call Jac-
queline Kartchner at 7SI-424S or
Or Rosmh 7S4 $440. Tickets
FREE to students Transporta
tion is available. Please call to
make reservations now.
IF YOU NEED to make extra
money working on your own
part time call 7$2 S2S7 between
� and I p m.
ECU HILLEL is holding its
traditional hamburger and hot
dog barbegue to start off the new
school year The barbegue will
b� this Sunday Aug 21th at Elm
S' Park between 10th and Uth
St from 37 p m Take this
chance to meet and talk with
our leliow Jewish students The
cost is only Jl tor members and
S3 tor non members Be there or
bt- quare'
LOWEST TYPINO RATES on
campus include experienced,
professional work. pro
otreading, spelling, and gram
matical corrections. 3ss M
after 5:30.
SALE
SPANISH PROBLEMS? Atfor
dable tutoring available. For in
to 7si 404
WANTED
WANTED FEMALE ROOM
MATE Furnished 2 bebroom
apt microwave, HBO. TV, pool.
Kings Row ant. Half rent and
utilities. Call after t p m
752 77S7.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED � Stratford Arms Apts
SU2.S0 plus ultility Call col
lect �1� 34 7 4447
NEEDED RESPONSIBLE
GIRL to rent house with two
others near campus. MO mo
util Call 7S� 1147
FOR SALE: cu ft. refrig. $100
Call after p.m. 752 tsaa.
STEREO SYSTEM FOR SALE
Receiver cassette deck, turn-
table ���. For more informa-
tion call 752 077
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST GOLDEN RETRIEVER
puppy. August wth Female.
Black collar. Lost in area of
Rotary St. Reward! 752-7427.
j Sports Writers
I Needed
: Apply at the
" SHPJSSSiL?ns building
'&)orC5 :
PET VILLAGE
V 8S
10 GALLON STARTER KITS
$17.00
INCL UDES
TASK, GRA VEL, PUMP, FILTER,
CHL ORINE RE MO VER,
SAMPLE FOOD
ifc
























. C
!0
Conveniently Located
in Downtown Greenville
Latest Style Cuts
perms, hennas,
highlights,
waxing, manicures
758-8553
318 S. Evans St. Mall, Greenville, N.C.
2ECU I.Ds recieve 10 off$

ECUS PKFTV CENTEl?
FOR 15 YEARS
WR09MES BACK
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15 V6U5, SONOAYUAS BE6J OUR SPECIAL MGMT
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hours ?;00-2.00 EOT. &: Eo-1;dc3 �SX.
TUC STAFF C TVIP ELBO REWINDS YOU TC
DRIVE CAREFULLY. WE ARE COMVEKHETLY loCAT
WITWIN VsALKIISJG DISTANCE Op �.C.U. CAMPUC
WITM UPCOMING, �.C.(J. BUS SQRV1CS FOR TME
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t
THE I AST t AKOl INIAN
Al uisr24, V8�
Copyright 1983
Kroger Sav on
Ouantitv Rights Reserved
Move soia To Dealers
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each ot these advertised items is required to be readily
available for sale in each Kroger Sav on except as
specifically noted in this ad if we do run out of an item
we will offer you your choice of a comparable item
when available, reflecting the same savings or a rain
check which will entitle you to purchase the advertised
item at the advertised price within 30 days Limit one
manufacturers coupon per item
welcome
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat Aug 27 1983
BULK PACKAGED
COUNTRY STYLE
Sliced
Bacon
fVC 6
Lb.
51
COUNTRY CLUB
Canned
Ham
SLICED
FREE
� VAN CAMP
��M Pork n
Van (amp
Beans
Yteight Watchers
OOAJVGE VAMLLA
ASSORTED VARIETIES
WEIGH" WATCHERS
Treat
Bars
16-Oz
Can
QUARTERS
Kroger
Margarine
USDA CHOICE HEAVY
WESTERN BEEF CENTER CUT
Round
Steak
1-Lb
Otrs
6-Ct.
Pkg
COST CUTTER
IMITATION
Cheese
Singles
12-02
Pkg
Lb
RATH HOT OR MILD
CHOICE
Pork sausage
BATHROOM
Cottonelle
Tissue
.
PAPER
Brawny
Towels
Ijumboi
Roll
1-Lb.
Pkg.
3
P3
S5
gy
THE SCfcHCfcS

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25 Scientific1
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accidentally touched.
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1
tfVMNMNMti
v
f!





V
Choose up to 2 free items on your next 16" large pizza!
Menu
Our Superb
Cheese Pirza
12" Cheese $4 30
16" Cheese $6.35
Domino's Deluxe
5 toppings for the pnce
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12' Deluxe $7 30
16" Deluxe S 0.95
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A delicious combination
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the pnce of only 5'
Pepperoni. Mushrooms
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12" Pnce Destroyer' $8.05
16" Pnce Destroyer' $12.10
Additional Toppings
Pepperoni, Mushrooms
Ham. Onions Anchovies
Green Peppers Black
Olives Green Olives.
Sausage. Ground Beef.
Hot Pepper Rings DouDie
Cheese. Extra Thick Crust
12" pizza $.75topping
16" pizza $1 15topping
Pnces subiect to tax
Pepsi Available
Check your local store
for size and pnce.
Limited delivery areas
Dnvers carry under $20.
C1983 Domino's Pizra Inc
In Qr�mUtECU:
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd.
s
Valid at listed locations
30 minute
guarantee"
Our famous guarantee1
lf your pizza does not
arrive within 30 minutes
of the time you place
your order, present this
coupon to the driver
for $3 off the price of
your pizza
One coupon per pizza
Rivergate Shopping Ctr
Hours:
11AM-1 AM Sun-Thurs
11AM-2AM Fri. &Sat
L
r
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Use up to 2 topping
coupons with any
16" large pizza
Expires 92583
Valid at all listed
Domino's Pizza
locations
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coupons with any
16" large pizza
Expires: 92583
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locations
� id a II
Use up to 2 topping
coupons with any
16" large pizza
Expires: 92583
Valid at all listed
Domino's Pizza
locations
'
m
-vc
ko





V
Second
lesson:
Taste.
Taste why Domino's
Pizza is the first
choice on every college
campus across America.
No stingy toppings here.
No processed cheese.
No pizza "clones tossed
in for free.
We specialize, in real
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We can also guarantee
that claim. If we don't
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No nonsense. No
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Domino's
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L imiteo d8tnwf areas
Dfivers carry under S20
1983 Domino s Pizza Inc

A.
kA





Title
The East Carolinian, August 26, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 26, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.280
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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