The East Carolinian, August 24, 1983






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Bhs
(Eamltntan
c 3
Vol. No.?
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Wednesday August 24,1983
Greenville, N.C.
Universities9
Tuitions Up
30 Percent
By MILLIE WHITE
Autstanl t�, Kdilnr
Beginning this year, ECU
students will be paying more for
their education. Yes, tuition rates
have gone up.
In July, the UNC Board of
Governors ratified a 10 percent
tuition increase for in-state
students and a 26 percent increase
for out-of-state students.
Because of the board's deci-
sion, ECU's tuition rates for in-
state students rose from $372 to
$410 a year while out-of-state tui-
tion rates increased from $2,160
to $2,722.
Specialized schools such as nur-
sing and medicine had similiar
rate increases. All 16 campuses in
the UNC system were effected by
the rate hikes.
This is the second time in four
years that the N.C. General
Assembly has increased tuition
costs in an effort to balance the
state budget.
As a result of the two increases,
in-state tuition has risen by ap-
proximately 30 percent; out-of-
state rates have increased by ap-
proximately 32 percent.
UNC President William C. Fri-
day said Tuesday that he thinks
"the negotiations that were car-
ried on resulted in a series of in-
creases that were of a level that
most people can cope with this
year He added that he hoped no
tuition increases would be called
for in the future.
"We always regret it when tui-
tion rates have to go up said
ECU Chancellor John Howell ad-
ding that North Carolina has tried
to keep the rates as low as possi-
ble.
Howell said the university will
spend the extra money on items
"we need very much such as
repairs on leaky roofs and new
computer equipment.
24 Pages-2 Sections
Circulation 10,000
Hike In Drinking Age
Will Take Effect Oct. 1
On The Move
OAHY PATTUSOM �
It is time once again for that perrenial and laborous ritual of moving into apartments and dormitories.
These diligent workers seem to be having no eas time of it.
By ANDREA MARKELLO
Staff U rim
Eighteen-year-olds will be
allowed to drink alcohol for only
a few more weeks since minimum
drinking age in North Carolina
will be raised to 19 starting Oct. 1.
The law was passed by the N.C.
General Assembly, earlier this
year, as part of the Safe Roads
Act, designed to toughen current
laws on drunken driving.
According to the N.C. Depart-
ment of Crime Control and Public
Safety, the Safe Roads Act repeals
the present laws on drunken driv-
ing in North Carolina and
replaces them with the single of-
fense of driving while impaired.
DWI still judges drivers' impair-
ment of mental and physical
facilities and requires proof of at
least .10 percent blood alcohol
content.
Punishments under the new law
are stricter than those under
previous statutes. One new factor
is the exclusion of any possibility
of plea bargaining to lesser of-
fenses. Punishments for a DWI
offense include a 24-hour jail
term, a 24-hour community ser-
vice term, a loss of driving
privileges for 30 days (or any com-
bination of the three) or a fine of
up to $100. Harsher punishments
could include two years in jail and
a maximum fine of 52000.
A letter to N.C. colleges from
the N.C. Department of Crime
Control and Public Safety states
that "a first offender (will) be re-
quired to pay for and attend
classes at one of the state's
Alcohol Drug Education Traffic
Schools" and will be assessed a
car insurance cost increase of 395
percent for three years.
Another provision in the act
allows law enforcement officials
to set up road blocks to screen
drivers.
The new law will have an affect
on large numbers of ECU
students, especially in-coming
freshmen who are generally under
19. Rather than reduce the
number of 18-year-olds consum-
ing alcohol, officials hope the law
will reduce the number of students
who are drinking and then driv-
ing.
Rep.Ed Warren(D-Pitt), sup-
ported the law which he said is
designed to save Jives.
Warren said he would oppose
raising the minimum drinking age
to 21. He supported the recent law
because he believes it will help
control the drinking problem in
hie a schools.
"The law is in a testing
period Warren said. "It is a
lengthy bill with more work to be
done in the future. There is a lot
See DRINKING, Page 6
International Fast For Life Begins
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Nrw� tditnr
On Saturday, 10 people began
their third week of a water-only
fast which they have vowed to
continue � until death if
necessary � if action is not taken
to "break the momentum" of the
nuclear arms race.
Pictured above are seven of the participants in the "Fast For Life Top
row, from left to right, is Guyon, Nodet and Lariviere. On the bottom
nm are Fernex, Didier, Gray and Granada.
Book Prices Vary
The group, which includes par-
ticipants from six nations, is call-
ing the event an " International
Fast for Life
The theme of the fast is "To af-
firm that all humanity has a right
to live freed from the pain of
hunger and the threat of
holocaust
The fast beg n on Aug. 6 in
conjunction with the 38th an-
niversary of the dropping of the
first atomic bomb on the Japanese
city of Hiroshima.
Participants in the fast include
two Americans, a Japanese Bud-
dhist monk, four French citizens,
a West German, a Canadian, and
a Spaniard.
The ten are fasting at three
locations: Oakland, Calif Paris
and Bonn, West Germany. They
range in age from 26 to 58. Four
are fasting with their spouses and
five of the participants have
children.
All the fasters have long
histories of activism in the peace
movement.
"Gandhi and many others
throughout history have offered
their lives for their moral and
ethical principles through fasting,
we intend to do the same said
American faster Charles Gray.
Gray, 58, is fasting with his
wife Dorothy Granada, 52, in
Oakland. The two Americans
along with French faster Solange
Fernex initiated the idea of the
fast beginning in 1979.
Gray, the father of two grown
children, admits the fast has not
been easy for his children to ac-
cept. "It's been very difficult for
them and so we've made it a point
to spend a lot of time (with them)
in an effort to reach an understan-
ding with each other as to why
we're doing this and the impor-
tance of it Gray said in an Aug.
5 interview.
Granada, the mother of a
20-year-old son, married Gray last
year. Initially, her son was oppos-
ed to the fast, but has since decid-
ed to support his mother.
Granda, a Chicano, sees the
fast as an effort to free the poor
from hunger and poverty.
"Probably my
tion is to stop
Granada said,
motivation, as
primary motiva-
the arms race
"My personal
a third world
woman, growing up in this coun-
try, is not so much that I'm afraid
the world is going to get blown up
� but it's (the arms racekilling
my people. This is intolerable to
me Granada said.
Neither Gray nor Granada view
their actions as suicidal. "We're
trying to call people to action
claims Granada. "It's a high risk
for us personally, but it's a higher
risk if we do not take this action
� if we don't all accelerate our
disarmament efforts.
"I feel great. I feel really
good said Granada in a
telephone interview Monda. the
seventeenth day ol the fait. We
get a little tired. We work for
about three hours interacting with
people then we have to lie down
for about 15 or 20 minutes. But I
feel good, I have good energy
my head feels clear � we're all
doing fine
Granada said the three groups
of fasters stay in contact on an
almost daily basic, but as of yet
there has been no action taken
that might result in the fast en-
ding.
"We're sort of consulting with
each other about what letters to
write to heads of state. But we're
not any place yet where we see any
hopeful signs we would consider a
break in the momentum
Granada said. "We really con-
sider it quite early in the fast
yet
Granada said that the fasters
were receiving their most en-
couragement from the poeple who
are supporting them. "We get a
stack of mail everyday, people
telling us how the fast has touched
peoples lives and what they're do-
ing (to support us.)" she added.
Granada said the support from
many people was "very very grati-
fying" and that that support was
keeping them strong.
"I'd like to have it end, but I
don't think that's going to happen
immediately so we're preparing
ourselves for a long fast
Granada said.
The Oakland fasters have a
medical team of four docotors
monitoring their conditions. They
are also making arrangements to
be admitted to a nearby hospital
in the event one of them becomes
sick.
The fast is particularly focusing
on an effort to convince the U.S.
not to deploy its Pershing II and
cruise missiles in Western Europe
later this year. They are also aks-
ing that the Soviet Union disman-
tle their SS-20 missiles already-
based in Eastern Euope. Either
decision would bring an end to the
fast.
To date the fast has received
some national and international
news media coverage, but the
fasters admit they still have a lot
of work ahead of them to get the
word out.
Ellen Wilson, a spokesperson for
the fasters, said that solidarity
fasts were taking place
throughout the world in support
of the Fast for Life.
They're asking people to inun-
date world and national leaders
with letters and phone calls urging
them to take action to break the
momentum of the nuclear arms
race.
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
Exchange on
of textbook
stores reveals

According to national figures,
the expense of purchasing re-
quired textbooks makes up ap-
proximately 4 to 5 percent of total
educational expenses. Students at-
tending ECU may purchase their
textbooks at either the ECU Stu-
dent Supply Store, located in the
Wright building, or from the
University Book
Cotanche Street.
A comparison
prices at the two
there is often little difference in
book cost. The following is a price
comparison among Five books
that are normally used by students
fulfilling their general education
requirements:
The Writing Project, an English
1100 text, is $10.95 at the Student
Supply Store and $9.95 at UBE. A
used copy is $8.20 and $7.45
respectively.
A used copy of The Essentials
of Life and Health, a HLTH 1000
book, is $12 at the ECU Store and
$12.70 at UBE.
At the Student Store, a copy of
College Algebra, a MATH 1063
and 1065 textbook, costs $23.95
new and $17.95 used. At UBE a
new copy costs $21.95 and a used
copy costs $16.45.
A political science textbook,
Government by the People, costs
$21.95 new and $16.45 used at the
Student Supply Store. The same
book at UBE costs $22.95 new
and $17.20 used.
A biology 1050 textbook,
Biology; The Uniting and Diversity
of Life, costs $26.95 at both UBE
and the Student Store.
Both UBE and the Student Sup-
ply Store receive book requests
directly from faculty members,
usually two months prior to each
semester.
Publishers usually set the price
on books, allowing the stores a 20
percent mark up in most cases.
Used books are obtained either
from other college bookstores and
companies that specialize in the
buying and selling of used books
or from students.
The buy-back policy at ECU is
the same as most U.S. college
bookstores. When buying a used
book, most stores pay half the
original price. The used textbook
is then resold for 75 percent of the
new price.
Martin Lather King Jr. will be honored Saturday la a
Washington, D.C. ceremony marking the 20th an-
niversary of his historic "I Have A Dream speech
King To Be
Honored
Organizers are predicting ap-
proximately one million people
will converge on Washington,
D.C. this Saturday to mark the
20th anniversary of the historic
"March on Washington" when
the late Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. gave his famous "I have a
dream" speech.
"We still have a dream: Jobc,
Peace and Freedom states a
brochure announcing the march.
The brochure claims that "three
critical conditions" exist in socie-
ty: "insufferable unemployment,
an escalating arms race and the
denial of basic rights and pro-
grams which insure freedom
The brochure calls on Americans
to march to correct these condi-
tions.
In Greenville, the Pitt County
chapter of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference is spon-
soring a bus to Washington for
the march. Local SCLC President
Bennie Roundtree said the bus
will leave Greenville Saturday at 3
a.m. from the old York Memorial
Church, located on Albemarle
Avenue. The price of a roundtrip
bus ticket is $10.
Chancellor's Note
Dear New Students:
I am pleased that you decided to attend East
Carolina University, and I hope that your
career here will be an enjoyable as well as in-
structive.
Some of you have already decided which
courses you will pursue. Those of you who
have not yet made your decision will find a
wide range of programs available.
Your faculty have been rated by student
opinion surveys. An impressive majority of
those responding have found them well
prepared, committed to high standards of
professional competence, caring and ready to
give help when needed, and open to student
questions. Call upon them for advice and help
of you have problems. If you work and listen,
you will join the equally impressive list of
respondents who reported last year that they
were learning a great deal.
Greenville and Pitt County are friendly
toward East Carolina University and its
students. There are many cultural and enter-
tainment opportunities available on and off
campus. Sample the extra-curricular events,
for a well-rounded education includes more
than course work.
Get active in your student organizations. It
is through them that student needs and wishes
are most effectively expressed.
Best wishes for the beginning year of y
carccr! Sincerely,
JohnM.
a






��
THE If AST CAROLINIAN
AUGEST 24, 1983

?
Announcements
Protesters Raid A VCO
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care o
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office m the Publications
Building Flyers ano handwrit
'en copy on odd sued paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want ara suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
t he dead! me for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
?or the Tuesday paper and 3
c m Weanesoavy for the Thurs
cay paper No announcements
'eceved after these deadlines
w'H be prin'eo
This space s available to all
ampus organizations and
departments
PEACE
Twenty years after the first
Warch on Washington and Mar
tin Luther K ng s famous
i Have a Dream address there
will be another gathering in D C
this Saturday The Theme is
Jobs Peace and Freedom The
sponsorshp ,s very broad
NAACP SCLS ano NOW are
arranging tor a bus to go to D C
and return within 24 hours The
price of a round trip is $10 The
deadline s past, but there may
still be room For information
call 758 H'85 752 4476 Or
�"58 10797
If interested in a local obser
vance cai' 758 4906
NEWMAN
The Cathoi'C Newman Com
muntiy invites you to a Berger
'n Beer Bash on Sunday,
August 28th at 3 p m at the
Newman Center 953 E Tenth
Stree' Everyone is welcome
Come and bring your friends
Donation $1 00
FAST FOR LIFE
A vigil in support of the Fast
tor Life will be held at the Tenth
Street Post Office at U 00 Satur
day morning Four people (2
Americans, 1 Canadian, 1
Japanese) are fasting in
Oakland, four tasters are in
pairs, and two are in Bonn, Ger
many They plan to continue
their water only fast until some
action is taken to break the
momentum of the arms race
Saturday will mark the begin
nmg of the fourth week of the
fas' and will be the fourth local
vigil To join the relay fast here
(take turns fasting for a day or
two at a time), call ?S8 4906 To
encourage action on the arms
race, write to the President
your Congresspeople Andropov
the Soviet Embassy etc I
SAB.
There will be an organize
tional meeting of the student
athletic boarc Tuesday, August
30, 1983 at 5 30 in the Pirate
Club The meeting will be held
over dinner All current
members are encouraged to at
tend this the first meeting of the
Student Athletic Board at the
Pirate Club
MEN'S GLEE CLUB
Tennors and Basses are need
ed for the 83 84 ECU Men s Glee
Club The Glee Club will be
perteroming locally and on cam
pus as well as on four in North
and South Carolina ano Georgia
Membership is open to all men
campuswide The Glee Club
meets 12 1 MWF tor 1 hr credit
For further information see Mr
Glenn at the Music Ofice or call
757 6331 or come to Fletcher
101. 12 00 Friday. August 26
PEACE MEETING
Some peopie think the South
dozes while the world goes past
Don t you believe it1 Attend the
regular meeting of the Green
vilie Peace Committee Friday
night at 6 30 on 610 South Elm
Bring something tor supper, and
get in tune with the activists
ECSOTA
Get "hands on" experience
with occupational therapy. The
occupational therapy students
will have a table set up at the
Student Lite Celebartion on the
mall Wednesday August 24
There will be displays and ac
tivities, so get involved.
OPEN HOUSE
Open house will be held at the
Methodist Student Center on
Tuesday, August 30 from 7 to 9
p.m Stop by for a good time and
a chance to meet some campus
friends Were located at 501
East Fifth Street, across form
Garrett Dorm
NEWMAN
Enjoy the choices that you can
make now that you are on your
own The Catholic Newman
Community welcomes you and
invites you to participate in our
Sunday mass each week at 12:30
m the Biology Lecture Hall.
Each Wednesday at 5 p m we
have Mass, a meeting and a
meal All are welcome to join us.
Donation for the meal is $1.
PIRATE WALK
Pirate Walk, ECU'S student
escort service, is accepting ap
plications for all positions
These positions include director,
assistant director, sectres,
operators and escorts Applica
tions can be obtained from the
S G A office in room 228 in
Mendenhall Student Center
NASA
NASA Kennedy Space Center,
Florida, has a coop position
available beginning September
1983 or January 1984 Must have
completed freshman year to be
considered Prefer s'udent from
Florida, but will consider a stu
dent who has a strong desire to
work n Florida after gradua
tion Must have 3 0 G P A or
better to quality For more in
formation, contact the Co op Of
fice. 313 Rawl to apply im
mediately
SCHOLARSHIPS
Students attending summer
school are in a unique position to
find out about private financial
aid for next Fall and Winter
terms, according to The
Scholarship! Bank
Students interested In receiv
ing a print out of private finan
cial aid that appears to be just
right for them based on their
answeres to a 30 question �p
plication, should send a stamped
self addressed envelope to The
Scholarship Bank, 10100 Santa
Monica Blvd. no.2600, Los
Angeles, CA 90067
According to the director of
the service, many college
students apply too late to get aid
for the year in which they are in-
terested Summer is an ex
cellent time to apply for most
grants since more careful con-
sideration can be given when
there are fewer aplplicants.
The Scholarship Bank has
�Jjjcently converted its data pro-
cessing to a large computer
system and students can be
assured of receiving the most
timely land informative infor
mation on private aid sources
such as foundation, civic
charitable and trade group
scholarships. Students may also
ask to receive a list of intern
ships in their professional fields
There is a modest charge for the
basic list of sources
INCREASE
LEARNING
A program for Increasing
Learning Efficiency will be of
fered by the Counseling Center
this Fall. The first section will
be taught on Monday and
Wednesday at 3 p m beginning
September 7 and the second sec
tion will be taught on Tuesday
and Thursday at 1 p m beginn
mg September 8 Each section
will meet for five weeks Both
groups will meet in 305 Wright
Annex The classes are
available to all sti dents Atten
dance is voluntary No formal
registration is required For
more information call The
Counseling Center at 757 6661
CHEERLEADINGS
Students interested in par
tkipating in the ECU Junior
Varsity Cheerleaders tryouts
should meet at the East end of
Minges Coliseum on Monday,
August 29, I9t3 at 5 p.m. Prac
tice sessions will be scheduled
and discussed at that time.
SIGMA THETATAU
The Beta Nu chapter of Sigma
Theta Tau, th� national honor
society of nursing, will hold its
first business meeting of the
academic year 19�3 194 on Mon
day August 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the
School of Nursing building. All
members please plan to attend.
IRS
IRS Cincinnati Service Center,
Covlngton, Kentucky is looking
for students who want to be
managers very quickly. No ac-
counting background re�uird.
Must be mature and have a
career interest in management
with IRS. Will teach student the
technical aspects of job.
Must have 2 5 GPA or better,
and willing to alternate work
periods, position will begin Fall
1983. Salary will be at the GS 3,4
. or 5 level depending on status
of student. Management, Deci
sion Science, or MBA students
are urged to apply immediately
If interested, stop by the Co-op
Office, In 313 Rawl, to complete
application.
KAPPA SIGMA
We would like to welcome
ever one back to ECU tor
another year of PARTYING! I
STRONG-CAMPBELL
INVENTORY
The Strong Campbell Interest
inventory is offered every Tues
day in 305 Wright Annex at 4
p.m when school is in session
with the exceptions of examina
tion period and registrsation
day. This is available to all
students at no cost No formal
registration is required For
more information, call the
Counseling Center at 757 6661
NCHS
The National Center for
Health Statistics, Public Health
Service, Rockville, MD has two
co-op openings for students 11
terested in working with health
and nutrition survey among
hispanics in the U.S. Student
must have an inters' in a career
in vital and health statistics.
Should have at least one course
in statistics or computer science
because will be working with
data collected. There is also an
opening for a student to work
with hispanic community. Will
be working with doctors and
technicians form throughout the
nation. Must be bilingual and
have knowledge of hisplanic
culture and speak Spanish. Will
be recording data in Rockville
headquarters. Must have a 2.5
GPA or better and majoring in
Bio Statistics, Community
Health, Nuturtion, Sociology,
Political Science. or
Psychology Position will begin
Fall 1983. Salary will be at the
GS 3 4 level and requires alter
nating work periods Contact the
Co op Office, in 313 Rawl, for ap
plication
INDIAN FESTIVAL
Perquimans Country Parks
and Recreation Department and
Chamber of Commerce will
sponsor its second annual 5K
(3 1) miles) Run Saturday,
September 17 All ages are en
couraged to attend with awards
given to each age group Cer
tificates will be given to ail that
finish and the first 100 to register
will receive a T shirt Pre entry
fee is S7
A large festival of many en
joyable activities and entertain
ment is planned September
15 17, so make plans to bring the
entire family.
For more information on
registration, please contact
Howard Williams, Perquimans
County Parks and Recreation
Department, P O Box 32, Her'
ford, N C 27944, or (919)
426 S695 office hours are 9 15
Monday Friday
CLASSIFIED ADS
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us a separae sheet of paper if
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ooesn t tit No ads will be ac
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reserve the right to reject any ad.
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tower case letters
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� �
The East Carolinian
.Vrwnjj ihe Ltjmpus tcmmumt
uncr 1923
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday during the sum
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper of East
Carolina university, owned,
operated, and published for
and by the students of East
Carolina University
Subscription Rate: 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU. Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The East
Carolinian, Old South
Building, ECU Greenville,
NC 2734
6309
Telephone 757 6366, 6367,
On July 13, shortly
before 8 a.m seven
militant peace ac-
tivists impersonating
employees and carry-
ing fake identification
badges gained en-
trance into the AVCO
Systems Divisions
plant in Wilmington,
Mass. and damaged
an undetermined
amount of property.
The seven were ar-
rested and charged
with tresspassing and
mischievous damage
to property.
AVCO, a defense
contractor, for the
U.S. Government, is
involved in the
research and produc-
tion of several nuclear
weapons systems in-
cluding the Pershing,
cruise and M-X
missiles.
The seven activists,
armed with hammers
and containers filled
with their own blood,
hammered on parts
and equipment they
claim were being used
in the production of
the nuclear missies.
They also claimed to
have poured blood on
blueprints, AVCO's
literature and other
missle components.
Reports from two
of the demonstrators
estimate the total
amount of damage to
be between $10,000
and $60,000. One of
the seven, John
Schuchardt, said one
local radio station
estimated the damage
at $100,000.
Despite the high
damage estimates, the
demonstrators, have
been charged with
mischievous damage
of less than $100, a
misdemeanor.
"Theythe pro-
testers) did not gain
access to any secured
areas, there was no
breech of classified in-
formation and they
did not damage
missile or defense
components said
AVCO public rela-
tions administrator,
John FouhyThey
poured blood on some
unclassified engineer-
ing blueprints
Schuchardt said
one AVCO employee
valued one of the
blueprints at $1000.
"I poured blood on
six of them they're
trying to cover it up, '
Schuchardt added.
The seven, all
members of a group
called the Atlantic-
Life Community, call
themselves the" AV-
CO Plowshares
They claim they con-
ducted their protest in
fulfillment of the Old
Testament statement,
written by the Hebrew
prophet Isaiah which
states: "They shall
beat their swords into
plowshares, spears in-
to pruning hooks
5A11 were held in jail
for 8 days on 10 per-
cent of $10,000 bond
each. The judge then
released the seven on
their own
recognizance. They
are now free awaiting
a trial date. A hearing
is set for Sept. 27.
One of the pro-
testors, 25-year-old
Frank Panapoulas,
said he took "a leap
of faith"when he
dropped out of a PhD
program at Syracuse
University (N.Y.) to
get involved full-time
in the peace move-
ment.
Panapoulas said the
group experienced lit-
tle difficulty in gain-
ing entrance to the
defense plant, which
is protected by armed
Schuchardt said
AVCO is conducting
the cover-up because
the company realizes
it is acting in opposi-
tion to the will of the
people. "They're verv
vulnerable because of
the enormity of the
evil thev're engaged
in
much (preparation) a
you can and then
leave the rest to the
spiritPanapoulas
said. "When we walk
ed in there, we walked
in like we belonged
there � which we
did
The protesters
claim they gained ac-
cess to the M
missile production
area and also damag-
ed a test unit for the
Pershing 11 missile.
Schuchardt said he
believed the Pershing
II may now be "off of
production" as a
result of the damage
Fouhy claims that a
console to an en-
vironmental test oven
was the only ap-
paratus damaged b
the protestors.
The seven defen-
dants presented a mo-
tion for dismissal at
an Aug. 8 hearing.
David Kennedy, a
Harvard University
law professor was
called as an expert
witness on aspects of
international law.
The defendants
claim the possession,
manu facture and
development of
nuclear weapons is il-
legal under certain in-
ternational statutes
which outlaw the use
of weapons that could
indescriminately kill
non-combatants.
LowellMass.)
District Court Judge
John Murphy denied
the motion.
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B PAIRItl
A 20-vear-ol
posed for a ph(
the September
magame. Lisa
summer course
State University
ble to pose in
'The Girh
Conference
Distefano,
modeling profes
as i6, appear!
page photo.
Playboymodehn
boost to her mi
career.
Distefano
tuaJly get invol
first she'd like
playboy centerf
'aen me two
point and it wl
another year
fold Distel I
Carolinian in
Infir
Educ
MELANIERC
Most Stud
visit the St
Health Center
they're 5
health center
member11, are �.
to change that
New prograr
fered by the SHJ
phasize more
just illness . 1
programs concej
on health a
and disea
tion as well.
The health
tion program,
began last ye;
tempts to ei
students about
concern whu
pertinent to 1
According I
Jernigan. a
practioner
SHC. 'he
education pi
"deals with ail
of health care;
been most su.
in sexuality an
traception
Wash
Predil
Washington
resident Dck
traveled to C
America
Southern Mcxij
May. When he rl
ed in June Weicl
the East Car,
believed Guat
president Gen
Rios Montt
probably be
thrown in th
future
. Although
had never tra I
the region Deforj
does n 0 t
Spanish, he wa
to make an a.
prediction. Ml
government w .11
pled on Auku
Brii





THE LAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24981
AVCO
c ha r d l said
conducting
p because
pan realizes
in opposi-
he will oi ihe
' 1 he 're ver
t because ol
it oi the
6 engaged
i as
and then
he
.las
e walk-
talked
. onged
we
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1
t i o n
the
ssile.
he
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-

- U-
s
Party
�at.5-9
Box 33
'835
NTIL
sett
ice.
58
IE

f
ECU Co-Ed In 'Playboy'
By PATRICK O'NEILL
News Kdiim
A 20-year-old ECU student
posed for a photo that appears in
the September issue of Playboy
magazine. Lisa Distefano took a
summer course at North Carolina
State University making her eligi-
ble to pose in Playboy's feature,
'The Girls oi the Atlantic Coast
Conference
Distefano, who has been
modeling professionally since she
was 16, appears nude in a full-
page photo. She hopes the
'avftonnodeling job wiii be a
boost to her modeling and acting
career.
Distefano would like to even-
tually get involved in films, but
first she'd like to be chosen as a
playboy centerfold model. "It's
taken me two years to get to this
point and it will probably take
another year before 1 get a center-
told Distefano told the East
Carolinian in a recent interview.
Distefano said she was chosen
for the Playboy modeling job out
of 150 applicants from NCSU
alone. Three other NCSU
students appear in the ACC
feature.
Distefano said she considered
being chosen by Playboy an
honor, but that the prospect of
appearing nude was a little unset-
tling at first. "Looking at it
through a purely artistic sense, it
was easy for me Distefano
saidl was nervous at the pro-
spect of taking off my clothes, but
it was such a professional and
clean atmosphere. It's great to
work with professionals
Playboy photographer David
Chan photographed the ACC
feature. He spent 11 hours taking
more than 900 photos of
Distefano in order to come up
with the one picture used in the
feature.
Distefano said the photography
was done in an old house outside
of Chapel Hill, N.C.
Distefano said the reaction to
her decision to appear in Playboy
has been basically positive. "Of
course there has been negative
(reactions), this being the Bible
Belt she said adding that all the
negative feedback she's gotten has
come from women her own age.
"1 have always modeled and if
a person is to take their craft
seriously you have to look at it
through a totally artistic and pro-
fessional sense Distefano said.
"If I start seeing things through a
regional point of view, then I
won't get to where 1 want to be,
which is, hopefully, with a career
in acting
Distefano said the reaction of
her parents was "not to be men-
tioned" adding that "you really
can't be prepared for something
like that � when your daughter's
nude
Distefano said it was unfor-
tunate that some people view
women totally as sex objects. She
praised Playboy for its profes-
sional quality adding that she did
not view the magizine as being
pornographic "One thing I'm
really impressed with about
Playboy is the photography
Distefano said, "the way that
women are brought out as such
beautiful creatures; it's really flat-
tering
Distefano said it was getting a
little "ridiculas" that people now
stare at her when she goes out
publically.
"If people judge me on the
basis of what I do with my free-
time � what I do, professionally
� then you can't change their
minds and basically I don't v.�nt
to Distefano said.
"I'm happy with what I'm do-
ing, I've always been happy and I
think I'm doing the right thing
GARY PAT" ERSON - Photo Lac
ECU student Lisa Distefano is the sole Pirate in the September issue
of Playboy magazine. The magazine featured girls oi the ACC
Infirmary Not Only For Sick;
Education Programs Stressed
MEL AN IE ROGERS
Most students only
visit the Student
Health Center when
they're sick; but
health center staff
members are working
to change that.
New programs of-
fered by the SHC em-
phasize more than
just illness care; the
programs concentrate
on health awareness
and disease preven-
tion as well.
The health educa-
tion program, which
began last year, at-
tempts to educate
students about health
concerns which are
pertinent to them.
According to Jolene
Jernigan, a nurse
praciioner at the
SHC the health
education program
"deals with all areas
of health care; but has
been most successful
in sexuality and con-
traception
This year with new
staff members con-
tributing their exper-
tise, other health pro-
blems, such as
diabetes, will be
covered in the health
education program.
Various topics will be
offered in all campus
residence halls, and
the SHC is trying to
become more involv-
ed in classroom lec-
turing as well. The
SHC can provide lec-
tures on almost all
medic all y related
topics.
The major problem
with some areas of the
health education is
lack of student
response.Jerigan said
that a rape seminar
held in the women's
dorms last year wasn't
successful because
�'people tend to be in-
terested in things
which affect them im-
mediately
Although the health
education program is
being extended, the
major emphasis will
remain on sexuality
and contraception.
Jernigan hopes that in
a few years, as more
people hear the pro-
grams, changes will
come about in the
"attitudes .and
misconceptions held
by many people
The men's dorms will
also be included for
the programs on con-
traception, although,
according to Jer-
nigan, "there was ab-
solutely no participa-
tion last year In-
creased effort will be
used this year to reach
males.
The SHC also plans
to distribute a booklet
to students on health
care tips, including
such topics as
emergency first aid.
In another area of
the SHC's expansion,
dorm directors will
now be provided with
programs on first aid
and the most com-
monly asked medical
questions so they will
be better prepared to
help students.
Located next to
Joyner Library, the
SHC has doctors on
duty from 8 a.m. until
5 p.m but emergency
service is available
24-hours-day during
regular school ses-
sions.
All services, in-
cluding most tests and
medication dispens-
ing, are included in
the required health
service fee. With two
part-time and three
full-time medical doc-
tors, the SHC can fill
the needs of ECU
students. In addition
to medical care, two
psychologists are
available to students
at no extra cost. The
SHC operates bet-
ween school sessions
and all summer.
SALE
PAWN SHOP SPECIALS
TV's, B and W, Color starting at $39.95 SA VE
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Cassettes, Turntables, Receivers, Speakers
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405 EVANS ST 752-2464 Downtown Mall
752 7303
ATTIC
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$1.00 WED and THUR
SIDEWINDE1
Washington Man
Predicts Future
FRI and SAT
DRIVER 1
��:�
,
H.H on FRI 4 30-7 00
SUNDAY
MAXX WARRIOR
COMING 12th ANN. PART
MON SCPT �H.
C. -�� �� v��
Washington, N.C.
resident Dick Welch
traeled to Central
America and
Southern Mexico in
May. When he return-
ed in June Welch told
the East Carolinian he
believed Guatemalan
president Gen. Efrain
Rios Montt would
probably be over-
thrown in the near
future
. Although Welch
had never traveled to
the region before, and
does not speak
Spanish, he was able
to make an accurate
prediction. Montt's
government was top-
pled on August 8 by
another Guatemalan
military general.
In a June interview
Welch said he believ-
ed Montt was a
sincere man. "The
guy's for real and I
think he'll die for it
real soon Welch
said.
Montt had been ac-
cused of numerous
human rights viola-
tions by opponents of
his military regime.
Welch acknowledged
that atrocities did in
fact occur, but he
believed that the
military � without
approval from Montt
� conducted the kill-
ings.
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ittifei
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LIMA l
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�"


i m �
I I
7 . & SW

�-VtSi � �
UsFFnTgHT
PLACE TO BE
DURING THE SUMMER
ITS A TRADITION
UXi
a
t
vt.
?msw-rJ -
.��
On The Road
Dick Welch traveled to Central America
in May. He is pictured above with
children from the region.
Across from U.B.E.
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3U?e East (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, fwM�n�,r
Darryl Brown. - r�-
WAVERLY MERR.TT. n,oAdVfrllsmt C.NDY PLEASANTS. �.�,
Hunter Fisher. Mmmm Patrick Oneill. News Edllor
Ali Afrashteh. o ���,� Carlyn Ebert. �,�,�, Edllo.
Stephanie Croon. , inulallon K1anagfr Lizanne Jennings. mm
Clay Thornton. , s� Todd Evans. �m Wa�a��
August 24, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Noise Ordinance
Cooperation Yields Best Solution
As students return this week to
begin the 1983-84 school year, many
may not be aware of a new city or-
dinance enacted over the summer
that will affect most students' way
of life. The Greenville City Council
passed a new noise oridinance
regulating all residential
neighborhoods around ECU that
permits no household to create
noise levels exceeding 55 dB bet-
ween 11 p.m. and 7 a.m or ex-
ceeding 60 dB at any other time.
According to standard estimates,
an average conversation or a normal
room air conditioner produces
about 60 dB, and a television or
vacuum cleaner produces about 70
dB. (Exceptions are made in the law
for such normal noise makers as
lawn mowers.) The Greenville
Police will use sound meters,
measuring from property lines or
street curbs, to check on possible of-
fenders.
The point is, the ubiquitous stu-
dent tradition of playing stereos
loud enough for the whole
neighborhood to hear and having
yard parties that sound like block
parties is now probably illegal. The
ordinance carries a $50 fine.
Undeniably, the ordinance was
needed. In many Greenville
neighborhoods, houses are only five
or ten feet apart. Frequently there
are unreasonably loud gatherings
which neither perturbed neighbors
nor city officials until now had any
power to moderate. Most loud party
goers tend to forget that, at 1:30
a.m they can still be heard a block
away where neighbors are trying to
sleep. The new law was sparked by
citizen demand, and it is the best
solution that takes into account all
citizens. Everyone has the right not
to be disturbed by a neighbor's
radio or loud argument; the or-
dinance assures that.
Greenville officials, however,
nearly went too far with the or-
dinance. When the city council first
proposed the law last fall, they in-
tended to regulate not just the city
but also the ECU campus, including
dorms. However the ECU Division
of Student Life, headed by Vice
Chancellor Elmer Meyer, stepped in
-Campus Forum
and convinced the city that its
jurisdiction should not extend onto
the ECU campus, that the university
is and should be independent from
the city, and ECU can best regulate
its own activities and property.
Also, Meyer was instrumental in
getting an exception to the noise or-
dinance for fraternity and sorority
houses. The student life office
worked with city officials and stu-
dent groups, primarily the
Panhellenic and the Inter-Fraternity
Councils, to negotiate a clause in
the ordinance that permits each
fraternity house one exception to
the noise limit per semester, and
Meyer personally attended the
public hearing on the ordinance to
fight for the frat house clause.
Meyer's actions and the cooperation
of city officials are laudable on
these important parts of the or-
dinance. The university should
maintain an independence from the
city, and the fraternity house excep-
tion is the most sensible solution for
all concerned. One exception a term
is not an excessive burden or in-
convenience on neighborhoods, and
fraternities must acknowledge that
they still live in residential areas
where people sleep, homework must
be done, and residents have a right
to quiet in their homes. The city
acknowledges the fact that frater-
nities and sororities are social
organizations of college students
who will inevitably party and make
noise on occasion. Also, according
to the IFC and Panhellenic Council,
the fraternities acknowledge their
neighbors' right to peace and quiet
and they are satisfied with the law.
All in all, the ordinance worked
out about as well as one could
hoped for. Action needed to be
taken to protect residents from in-
considerate, loud neighbors, and
the Division of Student Life, with
the city's cooperation, defended the
best interests of ECU students and
the university. ECU students should
be glad to know that, in Greenville,
town and gown get along quite well
together, and ECU has a Division of
Student Life that really does protect
and fight for the qualilty of student
life.
Personal Views Change History
By DARRYL BROWN
It is interesting, sometimes frighten-
ing, how individuals make a difference
in history. Lasting ramifications can
hinge on the convictions, preconceptions
or misconceptions one person. Faced
with similar circumstances, personalities
make as much difference as anything
else in the course of human events.
There is ironic proof of this in the com-
parison of John F. Kennedy's American
University speech of 1963 and Ronald
Reagan's address to the Association of
Evangelicals, presented almost exactly
20 years later. The historical situations
in which the speeches were made are
similar; 1963, as now, was a time of
tense U.SSoviet relations. Moreover,
nuclear weapons were of major concern,
and, more fundamentally, world peace
seemed precarious and virtually unat-
tainable (or at least unsustainable).
The interesting thing is the two
leadcrs'approaches to similarly difficult
international relations. It is the attitude
of each man, even before he shapes for-
mal polices to confront specific issues,
that is in such apparant and dramatic
contrast. The two speeches reflect not so
much a political strategy or national
policy as they do the personal outlook
and convictions of each man, and the in-
stincts or preconceptions from which
each formulates political strategies and
actions. The speeches have the common
theme of how the United States should
view the Soviet Union and how it should
strive to deal with and coexist with that
nation in the modern world. Each presi-
dent defines his personal beliefs on how
to view and treat one's adversaries, and
clarifies the convictions he holds as he
formulates American foreign policy.
Reagan, ir. the speech that
perhaps reveals his personal ideas most
blatantly, contends United States faces,
in the Soviet Union, an "Evil Empire"
that is "the focus of evil in the modern
world He did not urge communication
or a working out of a peaceful coex-
istance, but instead insists the U.S with
divine command and blessing, is
"enjoined by Scripture and the Lord
Jesus to oppose it with all our might It
is from ;his notion of a holy crusade car-
rying out God's will that Reagan starts
whenever he deals with the Soviet
Union.
Kennedy, in what is often considered
the best speech of his presidency, issued
an alternative to the self-righteous, Cold
War mentality in dealing with the
Soviets, an attitude that had prevailed
for over a decade in the U.S. until he
was elected.
Kennedy thought it a less devisive,
more productive attitude not to return
Soviet rhetoric and hyperbole; he chose
to rise above it: "It is sad to read these
Soviet statements But it is also a war-
ning � a warning to the American peo-
ple not to fall into the same trap as the
Soviets, not to see only a distorted and
desperate view of the other side Ken-
nedy did not envision an "Evil Empire
but instead believed that "no govern-
ment or social system is so evil that its
people must be considered as lacking in
virtue. As Americans we find com-
munism profoundly repugnant But
we can still hail the Russian people for
their many achievements. And if we can-
not end now our differences, at least we
can help make the world safe for diversi-
ty
Kennedy's speech seems written to
correct the excesses of Reagan's sermon.
Instead of usurping the role of religion
and making it a�presidential and na-
tional job to spread Christian salvation
over the world, Kennedy realizes the
proper role of a political leader as con-
fronting the problems of man's world
and the affairs of state. Reagan sees
relations between the U.S. and the
Soviet Union as the inevitable clash of
divine goodness versus ultimate evil;
Kennedy sees the relationship in a more
realistic perspective, urging us "not to
see conflict as inevitable, accomodation
as impossible He asserts that "our
problems are manmade; therefore, they
can be solved by man No problem of
human destiny is beyond human be-
ings
Reagan's view is not one the nation
can even feel safe with. One need not
drag up from history the myriad ex-
amples of battles fought and persecution
waged in the name of God and as the ex-
ecution of divine will.
Kennedy's attitude also proved to be
effective and practical in international
relations. He insisted, "1 am not referr-
ing to the absolute, infinite concept of
universal peace and goodwill Let us
focus instead on a more practical, more
attainable peace, based on a series of
concrete actions and effective
agreements Indeed, the propose. n
worked. His proposition brought an im-
mediate improvement in L SSoviet
relations (the speech was given a scant
nine months after the Cuban Missile
Crisis), and it facilitated the Nuclear
Test Ban Treaty between the Soviet
Union and the United Slates, which
went into effect four months after the
speech.
It proved not to be a soft, ultra-liberal
ideal that opened a "window 0f
vunerability" but rather a reasonable
approach to human affairs. Peace, Ken-
nedy said, is the necessary rational end
of rational men Rather it is Reagan's
view that seems impractical, for he aims
not for gradual improvement in world
relations but for the ultimate destruction
or conversion of the Soviet Union, and
the salvation of that nation. He inserts
religion and dogma where moralnv is
needed; he confuses the goal of his hoJv
mission, confronting world evil, with
something much more hard for him to
comprehend: a different point of view.
That, clearly, does not make for rational
foreign policy.
It is tragic, then, that what marks the
twenty year anniversary of Kennedy's
landmark address is Reagan's divisive,
ethnocentric lecture on the divinity, of
America in a fight against the "Evil
Empire Kennedy made a construc-
tive, hopeful speech that hau concrete,
beneficial results. Reagan's sermon
could be only destructive and an-
tagonistic. Kennedy's address extended
an olive branch to the Soviet Union,
vitualk calling a halt to the Cold War.
The branch Reagan extended was kindl-
ing wood, sparked by fire and
brimstone, to reignite the Cold War and
proliferate bellicose rhetoric and closed-
minded, distorted attitudes. His thesis
proves to be more the recalcitrance that
continues human conflict than a path
for resolving it.
Guidelines For Forum Use
The Campus Forum is a regular
feature of The East Carolinian's
editorial page which allows students,
faculty and area citizens to express opi-
nions on current issues. It can be used
to respond to articles or stories in this
newspaper or other issues pertaining to
the ECU campus, the Greenville area
or anything of interest to The East
Carolinian readers
The campus forurri, serving the pur-
pose of a Letters to the Editor section
or a guest editorial column, is the most
visible and effective vehicle for ex-
pressing opinions and communicating
ideas on the ECU campus. The
newspaper is here to serve all students
and all readers.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail
them to or drop them by the
newspaper's offices on the second for
of the publications building, across
from the entrance of Joyner Library.
All letters solicited to and printed in
the Campus Forum are subject to the
following conditions:
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Make Your Point, Suffer Fools Gladly;
Or, How To Survive A Fickle Readership
FBTURIHG f
(rR,NCHiEF
By PATRICK O'NEILL
There are several ways an editorial
writer receives feedback from readers,
the most common of which is letters.
(On occassion I have been corralled and
berated by an outraged reader as I walk
across campus. Usually this means a five
or ten minute sidewalk debate complete
with a scolding for my
"shortsightedness)
For the most part I welcome feed-
back, at least from an informed reader
who writes a letter for the purposes of
informing me of his or her views or to
give me some constructive criticism; that
is always welcomed and often thought
provoking. However, I receive a lot of
letters from overly emotional readers
who prefer to spout rhetoric and call me
names.
Take a letter a received last week
(please). It was a three-page, typewrit-
ten, uninformed, unfair critique of
several of my editorials from last year.
The writer said he found it "hard no
to read (my) one-sided articles He also
called "some" of these articles stupid
and said he often laughs his way through
them. (Alas, I must be entertaining at
least.)
The problem is, he must not read my
articles very carefully, for he can't even
spell my last name.
He also claims that he has not "read
one single article" written by me in
praise of the United States or critical of
the Soviet Union. First of all, if the ac-
tions taken by my government (I am a
voting Democrat) in a certain situation
are as they should be, then I see no real
need for praise. I expect my country's
leaders to behave in ways consistent with
good reason and common sense.
On several occassions I have written
editorials criticizing Soviet policies. For
example, the opening sentences of my
Feb. 22 editorial read: "Since 1979 the
Soviet Union has occupied, dominated
and controlled the country of
Afghanistan. The U.S.S.R. continues to
spread its wrath of violence and murder
on an innocent populace I am stronglv
critical of Soviet actions in both
Afghanistan and Poland � they should
allow the people of those nations to
determine their own leaders and govern-
ment.
The letter writer also claims that I
have "so much" to say about U S
policy in El Salvador � you bet 1 do'
This is America � no the Soviet Union
We base our system of government on
democratic principles and justice not
totalitarianism! I believe it is my repon-
sibility as an American citizen to take an
active role in the affairs of this country
I also feel it's my duty to confront
leaders when they are not acting respon-
sibly or justly. Sure, I decry the in-
justices being perpetrated by the Soviets
too, but I'm not a Soviet r;tizen.
I see participation in my gover at as
more important than anything I can do
regarding the Soviet Union.
U.S. policy in regard to Central
America is atrocious. The writer said,
"We only fight to assure the world that
we will protect democracy In the case
of Central America the term
"democracy" is nebulous. We have no
right to tell another government how
they should rule themselves, such as
we're trying to do in Nicaragua. If
Nicaraguans want to run their govern-
ment in a different way than us, that's
their right.
In El Salvador, there is no justice for
the masses. A small percentage of the
people are extremely wealthy, while the
vast majority of the El Salvadoran peo-
ple wallow in hunger and poverty. If
that's an example of democracy, I don't
want any.
On the topic of nuclear weapons, my
critic said: "I would like as mush as
anyone to see the whole world without
nuclear arms, but there (sic) here and
your or I cannot change that
Wait a minute! I thought being able to
change policies was an integral part of
democracy. I believe the system can
work, and change � for the better �
will come from the efforts of all of us
the world possesses about 60,000 nuclear
weapons. If we don't change this fact,
we're in for a lot of trouble.
At present, world military spending is
approximately $1 million dollars per
minute, while 50,000 thousand people
die each day from "dramatic strava-
tion As a Christian I cannot sit idly by
while so much suffering exists. I am fist
and foremost a citizen of the world �
we're all in this together. Freedom,
justice, equality and economic security
are for everyone � not only Americans.
Finally the writer stooped to his
lowest level when he said: "Had you
been alive then (World War II), you
would have praised Hitler and hated the
U.S. for getting involved
It's sad that he could lower himself to
say that I would ever praise a man who
murdered millions of people.
Let the comments of this person be an
example for all new ECU students. If
you want to be an informed and con-
structive critic, avoid writing like him.
A'
?
I1

r, V
Law:
Twelve persons fil-
ed sun between JUK
� and Aug. 4 agains't
tne v'Hage Green
apartment owners and
Agent
Many V
GLENN MAUGHAM
Staff Writer
Once the scourge of
North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong
soldiers. Agent
Orange has come
home to plague
America, her militar
veterans, and her
courts. Used as a her-
bicide defoliant.
Agent Orange was
found to contain
dioxin, a controver-
sial substance linked
to a variety of health
problems in
laboratory animals.
A study conducted
b the U.S. Air Force
contends that its per-
sonnel suffered no
more ill effects from
the chemicai than
those not exposed
However. 2.2 million
Vietnam veterans are
now seeking relief
from the Veterans
Administration and
the chemical com-
panies responsible for
its manufacture.
These veterans
believe Agent Orange
is causing cancer in
them and birth defects
in their children.
sN
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lTn� OPft! HI
THAT 6�"R5 M
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We're taking y
Th
All ABC Permii
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Hi NEVER
ACK SEAT
A PRESIDENT.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24, 1983
�;tff
cmLUWB
iistory
in international
1 am not referr-
ing nite concept of
goodwill Let us
more practical, more
on a series of
- and effective
rd, the proposi n
osition brought an im-
in IS. -Soviet
is gien a scant
ihe Cuban Missile
tatcd the Nuclear
"vtueen the Soviet
nited Spates, which
months after the
soft, ultra-liberal
a "window of
i ither a reasonable
sirs. Peace, Ken-
arv rational end
tr it is Reagan's
tical, for he aims
-ement in world
ill mate destruction
5 niet Union, and
��' nation. He inserts
nere morality is
goal of his holy
- 'Id evil, with
i-d for him to
point of view.
jke for rational
hat marks the
?rsar of Kennedy's
Reagan's divisive,
on the divinity of
i tight against the "Evil
: made a construc-
�-peech that hau concrete,
Reagan's sermon
nl de-tructive and an-
nnt.J's address extended
inch to the Soviet Union,
rig a halt to the Cold War.
ich Kvjtidn extended was kindl-
I od, sparked by fire and
-ignite the Cold War and
:ose rhetoric and closed-
d orted attitudes. His thesis
be more the recalcitrance that
human conflict than a path
ing it.
s Gladly;
leadership
I there is no justice for
fees. A mall percentage of the
(ire extremeh wealthy, while the
ntv of the El Salvadoran peo-
I in hunger and poverty. If
example of democracy, 1 don't

le topic of nuclear weapons, my
I "i would like as mush as
he whole world without
ns, but there (sic) here and
I .anno! change that
minute' 1 thought being able to
es as an integral part of
I I believe the system can
nd change � for the better �
le from the efforts of all of us.
jd possesses about 60,000 nuclear
It we don't change this fact,
for a lot of trouble.
jsent, world military spending is
�nately $1 million dollars per
while 50.000 thousand people
i day from "dramatic strava-
ks a Christian 1 cannot sit idly by
much suffering exists. I am fist
;nv st a citizen of the world �
111 in this together. Freedom,
quality and economic security
heryone � not only Americans.
jy the writer stooped to his
level when he said: "Had you
Ive then (World War II), you
ave praised Hitler and hated the
getting involved
fd that he could lower himself to
I would ever praise a man who
J millions of people.
e comments of this person be an
for all new ECU students. If
it to be an informed and con-
critic, avoid writing like him.
ECU
Twelve persons fil-
ed suit between July
X and Au�- 4 against
th Village Green
apartment owners and
several corperations
in connection with the
March 2 explosion
that killed one ECU
student and injured 12
others. The blast oc-
curred when propane
gas dryers in the laun-
dy room of the apart-
ment complex explod-
ed.
Dennis O. Martin
filed suit July 29th in
Wake Superior Court
on behalf of his son,
David Martin. David,
an ECU Broadcasting
major, died after the
Agent Orange Still Troubles
Many Veterans Of Viet Nam
GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
Once the scourge of
North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong
soldiers, Agent
Orange has come
home to plague
America, her military
veterans, and her
courts. Used as a her-
bicidedefoliant,
Agent Orange was
found to contain
dioxin, a controver-
sial substance linked
to a variety of health
problems in
laboratory animals.
A study conducted
by the U.S. Air Force
contends that its per-
sonnel suffered no
more ill effects from
the chemical than
those not exposed.
However, 2.2 million
Vietnam veterans are
now seeking relief
from the Veterans
Administration and
the chemical com-
panies responsible for
its manufacture.
These veterans
believe Agent Orange
is causing cancer in
them and birth defects
in their children.
Walter Tucker,
from the Division of
Verterans Affairs,
Greenville, calls the
Air Force study a
"whitewash He
said, "There is still
not enough informa-
tion available to make
a medical judgement
and it will probably be
at least another year
or two until there is
He added, "I'm con-
fident about the
Center for Disease
Control (Atlanta) fin-
ding some answers,
but the government
hasn't considered all
the par-
ticularshasn't given
the Agent Orange
issue all the considera-
tion it merits
Fred Schaeffer, a
North Carolina native
now living in Los
Angeles, served in
Vietnam and believes
he was exposed to
Agent Orange.
Schaeffer complain-
ed, "I feel like a time
bomb, i don't know if
I'll develop cancer or
if my children will be
born deformed. When
I first heard about
dioxin being in Agent
Orange, I knew I was
in deep trouble He
added, "this stuff
poisoned me for life
but there's nothing to
do now but wait
Trichlorophenox-
yacetic acid, a major
ingredient in
defoliants used during
the Vietnam conflict,
was first suspected of
causing health pro-
blems. Later, studies
and test showed that
an unwanted by-
product created in the
manufacturing pro-
cess was to blame.
Dioxin, also known as
TCDD, is a by-
product that the En-
vironmental Protec-
tion Agency states "is
one of the most toxic
substances ever
discovered
Analysis of the
defoliants used in
Vietnam (Agents:
Orange, Purple, Blue,
White, etc.) shows
levels of dioxin severe
enough to cause ma-
jor difficulties in
some laboratory
animals. Yet the Air
Force study reflects
that the levels "of
dioxin that reached
the forest floor in
Vietnam were at least
20,000 times less than
the levels of dioxin
found in Times
Beach, Missouri
Victor Yannacone
Jr who represents
some veterans seeking
compensation for ex-
posure to Agent
Orange calls the issue
"a national
disgrace
Lewis Milford, a
lawyer with the Na-
tional Veteran Law
Center, is trying to
force the Veterans
Administration to
hold public meetings
on the issue. His
lawsuit, active since
1979, is becoming
frustrating, "I didn't
think it would go on
this long and I don't
know when it will
end
For the millions of
Vietnam veterans, this
battle will be fought,
won or lost, in the
courts and the
laboratory.
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explosion threw him
from his second-floor
bedroom into a near-
by swimming pool.
Martin's suit re-
quests a jury trial and
seeks $1.5 million in
damages. Friday, the
Martins declined to
comment on the mat-
ter.
Eleven others in-
jured in the explosion
also filed lawsuits
Aug. 4 in Wake and
Pitt counties. They
are seeking a total of
$3.8 million in com-
pensatory damages
and $1.9 million in
punitive damages.
The complaints
state that a large
amount of liquid pro-
pane gas, the
substance used to heat
the dryers, leaked out
of the system into the
laundry room. The
gas was ignited by an
electrial device on a
hot water heater.
The suits claim
negligence on the part
of the landlords and
several companies in-
volved in the sale, in-
stallation and
maintenance of the
dryer and its gas supp-
ly.
Doris Seabolt,
mother of ECU stu-
dent Ricky Seabolt
who was injured in
the explosion, also
plans to file suit
within the next few
weeks. Seabolt spent
over three months in
three different
hosDitals recovering
from severe head and
liver injuries.
Greenville lawyers
Thomas F. Taft and
Kenneth Haigler
prepared the most re-
cent cases. "It is not
unusual in a lawsuit
involving huge
amounts of monies
for the parties to be
unable to reach a set-
tlement and have to
litigate Taft said
Friday. He added that
a trial date has not
been set because "the
preliminary stages of
a major lawsuit like
this one requires a
year to a year-and-a-
half
Samuel A. Mc-
Conkey and Reginald
M. Fountain, owners
of the apartments.
could not be reached
for comment.
The corporations
named in the suit are
Solon Automated Ser-
vices Inc Interna-
tional Dryer Corp
United Technologies
Corp Fenwal Corp
Blount Petroleum
Corp. and Pargas of
Farmville.
Other plaintiffs in-
clude David Charles
Brannan, seeking
$116,813 in compen-
satory damages and
$75,00 in punitive;
William D. Chadwick
Jr $715,209 and
$305,000; Barton
Timothy Collins,
$75,000 and $35,000;
John Felton, $351,253
and $150,000; and
Sidney Darrel Mit-
chell, $97,541 and
$45,00; Matthew
Perry, $165,844 and
$100,000; Henry
Redicker, $823,407
and $400,000;
Michael Strother,
$935,693 and
$450,000; Melody V.
Tetterton, $378,585
and $200,000; Charles
R. Yopp Hi, $75,000
and 535,000; and
Kather ne G. Yopp,
$100,001 and $50,000.
The blast complete-
ly destroyed one
apartment building
and damaged sur-
rounding buildings. A
swimming pool was
also destroyed. None
of the structures have
been rebuilt.
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THEEAS1 I'AROI INIAN
AUGUST 24, 1983

1
How To Get Around Greenville, ECU
(Without Waiting For The Pamphlet)
�� � �
"How to Get
Around ECU and
Greenville" is the title
of an eight page
brochure that has
never been published
The SGA secretaries
of transportation
haven't been able to
find funding. Since
the brochure won't be
published, here are
some of its most
useful highlights.
If you don't have a
car, there are five op-
' ons, the SGA bus,
the city bus. a bicycle,
walking, and a
wheelchair. If you do
have a car, there are
three areas of needed
information: parking,
ride pooling and lost.
The SGA supplies a
campus transit systm.
Student Government
Transit is financed,
operated and directed
by students. You paid
tor it, so use it and
improve it. For more
information, contact
the Transit Office in
225 Mendenhall, or
call 757-6611 and ask
for Transit. Wallet
cards giving schedules
will be available.
"GREAT stands
for "Greenville Area
Transit the city bus.
There are three lines,
running to the air-
port, to the hospital
and to Pitt Plaza and
Carolina East Mall.
All buses go by the
campus. For maps
and schedules, ask
any driver; for
schedule or other in-
formation, call
752-4137 and ask for
GREAT.
Bicycles are
vehicles, regulated in
Greenville as
throughout the state,
by the N.C. Vehicle
Code. Further cam-
pus regulations in-
clude a required
registration permit.
For more informa-
tion, contact the City
Planning Depart-
ment, the Recreation
and Parks Depart-
ment, the ECU Traf-
fic Office and the Tar
River Bicycle Club
(758-9928).
Walking comes
naturally (or did,
before Henry Ford).
You can make it even
better by finding the
new city wilderness
park, the seeping spr-
ing, stained glass win-
dows, a rose garden,
and outstanding
historic landmarks.
Contact the Pitt
County Historical
Society, the Green-
ville Area Preserva-
tion Association, the
Greenville Depart-
ment of Recreation
and Parks, and the
ECU Department of
Intramural and
Recreational Services
for more information.
For a map of
wheelchair-accessible
buildings contact the
Handicapped Student
Services or city
engineer L. Murphy
(752-4137). The
multicolor-coded map
shows where the curb
ramps or "cuts" are
located.
There are five
categories of parking
on campus; staff, day
student, university
registered vehicle,
university owned
vehicle, and visitors.
All five require park-
ing permits. Maps are
available. Contact the
ECU Traffic Office
for more information.
Ride pools can be
arranged by using
bulletin boards,
newspapers, and ride-
pool boards. Some
ECU bulletin boards
are official and re-
quire approval, with
regular removal of
dated notices. Long
distance pool boards
are located in
Mendenhall.
Commuting to
campus by car costs
more than most
students realize. A
typical calculation, in-
cluding parking,
registration, in-
surance, depreciation,
and operating costs
comes to $4.38 per
day. These are the
private costs only;
public costs (lost
taxes, lost shade, air
pollution) are ig-
nored. Years ago,
Ivan Illich calculated
that, by counting the
time required to earn
the money to keep up
a car auto drivers
often average only 4
miles per hour plus
lost health.
Looking For Housing?
GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
It you haven't
found a place to live
by the time you read
don't give up
hope. "Housing is
available according
I ucy Wright of the
Off-Campus Housing
Office located in
Room 211, Whichard
Building. Her office is
an excellent place to
begin a search for liv-
ing accommodations.
Off-Campus Hous-
ing offers the prospec-
tive tenant several
choices including a
roommate service and
rentals of rooms,
apartments, mobile
homes and houses.
Anyone connected
with ECU may use the
Housing Office.
Wright said that
student 'are the
number one priorities
right now She add-
ed that students
"shouldn't panic if
they haven't found
housing yet the
housing is there but
your choice may be
limited
Those who end up
renting can expect to
pay $80 to $560 for
their space. Average
rates for property
range from $80-200
for one room,
$140-225 for a one-
bed'oom apartment,
$165-325 for a two-
bedroom and
$165-360 for a three-
bedroom.
After finding your
place, expect to pay
between one to two
months rent for a
security deposit; there
will also be deposits
and installation
charges for hooking
up water, gas, sewer,
electricity and a
telephone.
Greenville Utilities
charges $75 for a
deposit, avoidable by
having good credit
references, and up to
$15 to turn on elec-
tricity, water and
sewer lines.
Telephone service re-
quires a $50 deposit,
again avoidable, and
a $23.23 to$53 charge
for installation. Any
deposits are refunded
after final payment is
made.
Wright stated,
"Students should try
everything to find
housing Rental lists
are readily found on
campus bulletin
boards, in local
newspapers and The
East Carolinian.
Drinking Law
Improves Safety
Continued From Page 1
involved, and with the aid of the
N.C. court system, the bill can
have successful results
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor of
student life, said "I wish it wasn't
necessary to raise the drinking
age However, he added that
with the high record of traffic ac-
cidents among 18-year-olds and
the need for better highway safe-
ty, the law is necessary. "The law
will restrict the drinking of
18-year-olds Meyer said. "It is
their responsibility to know and
understand the law and its conse-
quences
Meyer has no definite predic-
tion on the effectiveness the law
will have in controlling student's
drinking habits, but he did in-
dicate there would be a change in
the university's "internal rules
"Campus parties will have to be
careful in who they are serving
he said. He stressed that students
must act responsibly concerning
alcohol consumption.
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MONDAY & TUESDAY
NO COUPON NECESSARY
Buy any Large 2 or more Ingre-
dient Pizza, and get one with
same number of toppings FREE
plus 6 FREE Cokes.
Charles Blvd.
757-1955
LOOK FOR VALUABLE COUPONS IN THE GREENVILLE PHONE BOOK YELLOW PAGES!
r
i
i
i
i
buy a large pizza
and get a small one free
Buy any large pizza with Two (2) or more toppings and
get a small pizza with the same number of toppings
Free. Save S6 75 or more
1983
Offer good thru October 31,
with this coupon
757-1955
One discount per pizza
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
iJ
save $2.00 on any pizza
Order any size pizza, large or small,
and save $2 00
f!
f�i
Offer good thru Oct.31,1983 m J
with this coupon f
757-1955 5111 I
One discount per pizza I I
$3.00 l
Order any large pizza with two (2) or more �
toppings and save S3.00
i&. 4 :
IJFK Offer good thru October 31 1983 �
with this coupon I
757-1955
One discount per pizza
luncheon special � between i
11:00 tO 3:00 P.ITI. � Buv any Large Pizza
get one FREE with same number of Toppings with this �
coupon - free Cokes
IDli
I
I
J L
Offer good thru October 31,1983 �
with this coupon. I
757-1955
One discount per pizza I
a
ADVERTISEO
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available
sale at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store except as
specifically noted in thi, ad
for "
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU Sat. Aug. 27 AT AAP IN GREENVILLE
ITEMS OFFERED FOR F ALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
SIZZLING SUMMER SAVINGS
DOUBLE COUPONS
5 FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND, WE WILL DOUBLE
MANUFACTURERS COUPONS. EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS,
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS.
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
Between now and Aug 27. w� will redeem national
manufacturer a cents ort coupons up to W tor
double their value Offer good on national minu
facturers cents-ofl coupons only (Food retailer
coupons not acceptedCustomer muat purchase
coupon product In specified size Expired coupons
will not be honored One coupon per customer per
Item No coupons accepted for free merchandlae
Offer doea not apply to AftP or other atore coupons
whether manufacturer Is mentioned or not When
the value of the coupon exceeds 50 or the retail
of the Item, this offer la limited to the retail price
Sa�ings are Great with A&P's
DOUBLE SAVINGS COUPONS!
COUPON A
COUPON B
COUPON C
COUPON D
MFC
CENTS Of F
25'
18'
50'
75'
�P 4D0ED
CENTS OFF
25'
18'
50'
25'
TOTAL
COUPON
AT �&P
50'
36'
$1 00
$1 00
SAVE 40 LB.
Whole Rib Eye
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Pork Roast
FRESH LEAN COUNTRY FARM
9-12 lb.
avg.
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
BONE-IN
Chuck Steak
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
BONELESS BOTTOM
Round Steak
Boston
Butt
VALLEYDALE
1 Sliced Bacon
1 lb.
69
1
269 Box-0-Chicken 59c
US DA INSPECTED FRESH
U.S. 1
White Potatoes 5 � 99c Yellow Onions 3� 99G
SUNNYSLOPE JfW LARGE CR,SP AAf
Nectarines lb b5r Fresh Broccoli s 99c
save up to 20 GREAT GROCERY, save up to 72
IAVIN
Jane Paricer Bread
fHITE
Limit
Two
Dixie Crystals Sugar
PURE CANE
Limit
One
Orange Juice
MINUTE maid frozen
Breyer's
ALL NATURAL
12 02.
Limit
One
V2 gal
ctn.
Limit
One
ANN PAGE
��& KRAFT PARKAY tM
Mayonnaise v �HT Margarine 2 J& I00
CORONET ASST. tf& chicken � meat loaf � saus steak � turkey Bf
Paper Towels 3 09 Morton Dinners r 79
SAVE 11
SAVE 20-
Krispy Crackers
SUNSHINE
Star Kist Tuna
CHUNK LIGHT (IN OIL � IN WATER)
.iJHtlSW;
kCM . . M
16 02.
pg
1
l
Limit
Two
,� Stv-Krft
16 V2 02.
' can
Limit
Two
SAVE 50
Coca Cola
DIET COKE � SPRITE � TAB
2 Liter 99
GOOD ONLY IN
GREENVILLE
Budweiser
6-12oicans$2.35
IMotton 1 12 LITER WINE
$4.59 Choblit Rhino
GOOD ONLY IN (.mjIWUlj
Greenville Square Shopping Center
703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N.C.

DownJ
I
of t
ed
I
-
B Dennis Kilcone
�waff � nut
Despite two recent
economic recessions
and the rise o! shopp-
ing centers awav from
the Fifth Street-Evans
Street business an
G r e e n v i 1 1 e
downtown merchant
are optimistic ah
the future. Accord
to Dave Moiser,
ecutive director oi the
Downtown (jreenwlle
Association,
decline in store .
cies from sevenu
last year to five thi
year showv an
provement "M
the stores ar
a profit; 1
aid.
However pr
were not alwa
bright.
downtown
area was sv.tr
trend that bega
this country al
World Ud:
everv Main Str
America
Faculty
ECL Char
Howell w e I c
member-
academiv. ,
ceremonv M
Mendenha i H:
Howell joint
Trustee Cha
Kinsey and sevei
ficials in add:
house. "We
change that
deal of inger 1
without large
money Howei.
convocation. He als
faculty in the are-
noting that EC I �
are publishing more
obtaining more grant me
research.
Kinsev praised I
was "great to be id
something bigger tha
Howell Quoted Ln.
North Carolina Presidenl w
Friday who said: I
the great -
tion in the state
years Friday ma
ments in a June
The East Carolini
Howell sper a b
time a :
efforts being und
School of Educai
denied react
Howell pi
Charles Coble
of Educat "W�
"We are now
on the right trac -
Library
SOPHIA BOUKRs
One of th
places a new Ft I
dent should bee
familiar w
Joyner Iibrarv
All student - a - -
quired to take a
librarv science c
which will teach them
how to use the lib
However, until
class is taken there.
new students m a
find the following
librarv tips helpful.
In order to check
out material, students
must hae a librarv
card. To obtain a
card, students mut
show their ECU ID
and current actiutv
card. The ID muv;
be presented each
time the library card i
used.
The library con
tains more than
500,000 volumes and
6000 journal and
magazine subscrip-
tions. Its microform
collection of more
than one million items
makes it one of the
largest collections in
the state.
Other services
found at the library
include 32 domestic
and foreign
newspapers, phone
books from numerous
cities and
photocopiers (10 cents
per copy).





to be readily available (or
:h A&P Store except as
IVILLE
JEALERS OR WHOLESALERS.
SAVINGS
ONS
MM!
USE 5 COUPONS.
50 COUPONS.
FACE VALUE!
i Great with A&Ps WINGS COUPONS!
? 44- 1 . t EMTS �N ' 41-
SO
1 Ifr36
B 50-$1 00
25$1 00
SAVE 40 LB.
ork Roast
LEAN COUNTRY FARM
I
lacon
D FRESH
icken
1 lb
pg
69
1
59'
E 40 LB
Sausage
QUALITY
i
I
ions 3�:
iccoli
99e
99c
each
bunch
WE UP TO 72�
rystals Sugar
URECANE
I
Limit
One
NATURAL
2 gal
ctn.
Limit
One
en 1 ib
�, pkgr
SAUS STEAK � TURKEY
linners ?
1
79�
WE 20-
Ki st Tuna
T (IN (ML � IN WATER)
I
Limit
Two
Iweiser
ons $2.35l
2UTERWINE
lit Rhine
NPTTWT7TfW
inter
N.C
Downtown Business Thrives
MI01JNIANJ 24. 1?83JL
By Dennis Kilcoyne
SUTT Writer
Despite two recent
economic recessions
and the rise of shopp-
ing centers away from
the Fifth Street-Evans
Street business area,
Greenville's
downtown merchants
are optimistic about
the future. According
to Dave Moiser, ex-
ecutive director of the
Downtown Greenville
Association, the
decline in store vacan-
cies from seventeen
last year to five this
vear shows an im-
provement. "Most of
the stores are showing
a profit; It's a nice
aid.
However, prospects
were not always so
bright. The
downtown business
area was swept up in a
trend that began in
this country after
World War II striking
every Main Street in
America.
The deterioration
of the inner core of
cities and towns forc-
ed businesses and peo-
ple to the suburbs.
The shopping center,
with its unlimited
parking spaces,
became king.
For a generation
this national trend has
been visible in Green-
ville, which now has
Pitt Plaza, Greenville
Square, and the
enclosed Carolina
East Mall. However,
Greenville downtown
merchants challenged
the malls.
In 1975 the city,
hoping to attract
customers back to the
traditional shopping
experience, completed
the downtown out-
door mall which
united the Fifth
Street-Evans Street
area by a traffic-free
pedestrian walkway.
Competition from
the Carolina East
Mall, which opened in
1980, caused extra
concern when it at-
tracted the large
department store,
Belk-Tyler, away
from downtown.
"That was a big
blow said Moiser.
But Frances Bailey,
operator of Brody's,
another departmen1
store which has re
mained downtown
noted that while
Evans Street was hurt,
it soon recovered
"We're cruising
along Bailey said.
"I don't think
Carolina East Mall
has hurt downtown as
much as all the mer-
chants thought it
would
Bailey believes that
Carolina East Mall is
really a regional retail
outlet while
downtown still at-
tracts local shoppers.
As further proof
that Evans Street was
not permanently hurt,
Moiser pointed out
Faculty Welcomed
ECU Chancellor John M.
Howell welcomed faculty
members into the 1983-84
academic year during an official
ceremony Monday in
Mendenhall's Hendrix theatre.
Howell joined ECU Board of
Trustees Chairman C. Ralph
Kinsey and several other ECU of-
ficials in addressing the full-
house. "We face a future of
change that will require a great
deal of ingenuity to respond
without large infusions of
money Howell tola the faculty
convocation. He also priased the
faculty in the area of scholarship,
noting that ECU faculty members
are publishing more material and
obtaining more grant money for
research.
Kinsey praised ECU saying it
was "great to be identified with
something bigger than oneself
Howell quoted University of
North Carolina President William
Friday who said: "ECU is one of
the great success stories of educa-
tion in the state in the last 25
years Friday made his com-
ments in a June interview with
The East Carolinian.
Howell spent a good deal of
time addressing the restructuring
efforts being undertaken by the
School of Education, which was
denied reaccreditation last spring.
Howell praised the efforts of
Charles Coble, dean of the School
of Education. "We are noon.
"We are now confident that we're
on the right track Howell said.
"The new organization at ECU
will serve as a model for other in-
stitutions. We believe we have
turned a problem into an ac-
complishment The School of
Education is expected to be re-
approved for accreditation later
this year.
Howell also presented two ECU
faculty members with outstanding
teaching awards. Peggy H. Wood,
professor and chairperson of the
Department of Medical Record
Science, and Dr. Noaman C.
Pendered of the School of
Technology received the awards.
It was the second time in three
years that Wood received the
award which is presented by the
ECU Alumni Association.
E. Marvin Slaughter Jr presi-
dent of the ECU Alumni Associa-
tion presented the awards which
included engraved pewter trays
and $500 stipends to be used for
professional advancement ac-
tivities.
Student body president Paul
Naso also addressed the faculty
members, praising them for their
work.
"There's a problem on this
campus Naso added referring to
student apathy. "I intend to com-
bat that "
Vice Chancellor for Academic
Affairs Angelo Volpe also in-
troduced several administrators
and faculty members who had
been promoted or recently joined
ECU.
that the three vacan-
cies created by
Carolina East Malls'
opening were soon
filled.
Another problem is
seen by Bronson
Matney, who owns
two businesses on
Evans Street. He
deplores the lack of
variety of eating and
specialty shops or
boutiques. "Shopping
is a form of entertain-
ment he said;
therefore, such shops
must be close by the
larger stores.
To stimulate trade
and draw the
downtown businesses
together, some mer-
chants, mostly on
Fifth Street, are plan-
ning a system of in-
tegrated discounts for
students. The stores
hope to have the plan
operating by October.
The discounts will
be based on a system
of cards. For exam-
ple, when a student
purchases a shirt at
Marsh's Surf-n-Sea,
she will show student
identification and
claim a discount card.
She could then take
the card to For Heads
Only and get a haircut
at 15 percent off the
regular price.
R a m o n a
Hainsworth of the
Blue Moon Cafe, is
credited with conceiv-
ing the discount-card
idea. According to
Hainwsworth, the
downtown businesses
should do something
to show students " we
care about them
"Besides, you can
build a better business
on volume than on
high prices she add-
ed.
Hainsworth is also
planning to begin a
food purchase plan
for students in her
restaurant. "I know
I've got good food
and that students will
come here if they
know about it she
said.
Although the ma-
jority of businesses
are optimistic, the
nightclub operators
are less optimistic.
Earlier this year,
North Carolina's
General Assembly
passed the Safe Roads
Act to combat
drunken driving. One
provision in the bill
Library Services Available
SOPHIA BOWERS
Staff Writer
One of the first
places a new ECU stu-
dent should become
familiar with is
Joyner Library.
All students are re-
quired to take a
library science course
which will teach them
how to use the library.
However, until the
class is taken there,
new students might
find the following
library tips helpful.
In order to check
out material, students
must have a library
card. To obtain a
card, students must
show their ECU I.D.
and current activity
card. The I.D. must
be presented each
time the library card is
used.
The library con-
tains more than
500,000 volumes and
6000 journal and
magazine subscrip-
tions. Its microform
collection of more
than one million items
makes it one of the
largest collections in
the state.
Other services
found at the library
include 32 domestic
and 7 foreign
newspapers, phone
books from numerous
cities and
photocopiers (10 cents
Per copy).
Library books are
loaned for 22 to 28
days and always due
on Wednesdays.
Following a two-day
grace period, students
will be assessed a 10
cent per day fine on
each overdue book.
Joyner's many ser-
vices aid students do-
ing research. Accor-
ding to library person-
nel, the best place for
students seeking
guidance is the
reference department.
Reference
librarians give general
tours of the library,
bibliographic instruc-
tion and free han-
douts concerning the
library. Janet
Kilpatrick, head of
the reference depart-
ment, said students
with questions about
the library or its ser-
vices can seek help at
the reference desk.
Library hours are
as follows: 8
a.mmidnight, Mon-
day through Thurs-
day; 8 a.m9 p.m
Friday; 8 a.m6 p.m
Saturday; and 1
p.mmidnight Sun-
day. Hours will be ex-
tended during exams.
9.Q�
The Best
in Top 40
Beach and
Dance Music
Mixed Beverages
Sunday-Monday-Tuesday-Thursday
HapF y Hour Prices 8-til
Wed. Men's Night
Penny Draft Everyone
8-til
Fri. Super Happy Hour
4-9
Sat. Penny Draft Everyone
8:30-tU
Fri. Sept. 2nd Nuts-n-Bolt Night
Prizes All Night Long
private dob members and guests
260 West Tenth Street 752-1493
raised the legal age for
beer and wine con-
sumption from 18 to
19. This move was
conceived in hopes of
removing alcoholic
consumption from the
high schools.
Although this law is
likely to reduce the
number of drunken
drivers among teen-
agers, it will also cut
into the business of
Greenville's
nightclubs. "We are
concerned about the
nightclubs Mosier
said.
The raising of the
drinking age "will
wipe out the whole
freshman class
Moiser claims. In
fact, so great is the
threat to their
businesses, the pro-
prietors of The Attic,
a popular downtown
night spot, are con-
sidering converting
their business into a
21-and-over
nightclub.
Welcome Back E.C.U.
Look for our Campus
Drink Stand
fM. "
t
"VcN
-v
o,
�'Sj
Western Steer,
Family
STEAKH0VSE
3005 E. 10th St. Greenville
Ask About our
V.I.P. Cards
15 T9SJSSf "ME ro th,nk
ABOUT ARMY ROTC?
(Jk
2S
-is
-P
v
It s the perfect time
You re a freshman, right1 And you want
n) make college a real learning experience '
Well ROTC can add a valuable
dimension to your college education A
dimension oi leadership and manage-
ment training And that'll make your
degree worth more
ROTC, otters scholarship and
financial opportunities, too
5. the opportunity to graduart
with a commission and
K. :m your future as an
officer
For more informa-
tion contact Major Mike Bishop
or Captain Heldur Liiak
at 752-6967 or come by
�zj
S�
Room 324 Enin Hall.
ARMY ROTC.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE

JzL
'�

BE SURE TO
I REGISTER FOR
MLSC1001
INTRO TO ROTC
ANDTHE ARMY
AS AN ELECTIVE
THIS FALL. THERE
IS NO OBLIGATION
BB&T 24 NOW AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
BBffT
P
LP B7 e
w
M
$ '
BB&T 24 can handle your banking trans-
actions any day or night, on weekends and
holidays, 365 days a year.
You can access up to 10 different BB&T
accounts. In less than 30 seconds you can
get cash with your BB&T 24 card, Visa or
MasterCard. You can also make deposits,
transfers and payments.
Late in the fall, you will be able to use
BB&T 24 across the nation through the
PLUS� SYSTEM network. You'll have access
to your accounts at over 3,000 locations
wherever you travel throughout the USA.
NO SERVICE CHARGE CHECKING
FOR STUDENTS AT BB&T
When you open your checking account
at one of BB&Ts three convenient Green-
ville locations, just tell the lady that you're a
full-time student at ECU. Shell flag your
account to waive all service charges.
PRIZES! PRIZES! PRIZES!
We're going to give away lots of prizes on
Wednesday, September 7, from 9 a.m. until 5
p.m. at the BB&T 24 machine at Mendenhall
Student Center.
If you already have your BB&T 24 card,
bring it along. If you don't, we'll lend you
ours. You may win cash, tickets to athletic
events, or other valuable prizes.
Don't forget September 7.
BB&T
"Owned by PLUS SYSTEM, Inc. 7526889
M�mb�r FMtor.1 D�pot marine. Corporation
nas
�MMMflLMM0t39







I
j THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 24. 1983
YOUR ONE-STOP SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS
2 BLOCKS
FROM ECU
211JARVISST.
CORNER
3rd AND
JARVIS ST
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET, Inc.
OVERTON'S COMPETITION SKIS
WORLD'S LARGEST WATER SKI DEALER
UNIVERSITY ECONO WASH
(See Ad Pg. News-3)
� h� now, but e
aunts' We k� �� !�� .bout Oettou
�, etcome Students-w to ,eH y�u ,ars
! . few minutes of you corner 01 m.
wVe � �e P rt locate �' nt0� Green
We �'� con ,tom ECU �n� � lures eveP
on,y 2 blocks from -P�'JS prices, .no
t0" �o wmes. no �'��
st.mos, no B home.
ou money .nome.�� r first
M UWe you to m.Ue Ove� �� , f �"(he hier
,��, l0�� otscou ,�,��"
,�H Une of P�'� s�"pl"S . 0vet,on's every
We h.ve � ��" sn�ppi�R �� �e
Come see why more
o�y-
Sincerely yours.
-eo Jenkins
Art Center
M-
Overton'Snper
cOOPontorece.eyour�-
Jrvj
Summit
Jarvis
OVERTON'S
Local
To Fi
Glenn Maughan
SUff rtlrf
For the past thre
Saturdays, Greenvill
residents and ECl
students have beel
holding vigils outsu
the 10th Street po
office in support
the Fast for Life.(S�
related story on paj
1 .)The group has beel
seeking to educaf
residents about tl
fast. The Greenvm
supporters have als
been conducting
relay fast on a dai
Librai
During
Under its ne din
tor, Ruth Kat
Joyner Library hj
recently made soi
changes designed
improve service,
eluding extendi
hours on u-eekenj
and expand'
facilities and equii
ment for student usj
The new
schedule calh n
Joyner to close at
p.m. on Saturday ai
open at 1 p.m.
Sunday Previous
the library closed at
p.m. on Saturday ai;
opened at 2 p.m.
Sunday.
WELCd
WEBU
EVANS
Open
WELCOJ
Coml
Gre
COKE,
PEPSI
2 Liter
95
MILLER
LITE
6 pack 12oz. cons
$1.99
h. 9-143
FREE -
FERARRI
SUNGLASSES
I WITH THIS COUPON AND A $40.00
FOOD ORDER AT OVERTON SUPERMARKET INC.
SORRY, KEG PURCHASE EXCLUDED FROM THE
OFFER. LIMIT ONE PAIR SUNGLASSES PER I.D.
NUMBER. THIS COUPON NOT VALID IN CONJUCTION
WITH ANY OTHER OFFER OR DISCOUNT
OFFER LIMITED TO STUDENTS ONLY!
NAME-
ADDRESS
ID NO.
AMT. PURCHASE
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
DANNON
YOGURT
Assorted Flavors
8oz. Cup
59
WE CARRY A
FULL LINE
OF PARTY
SUPPLIES
AND KEGS
FRITO LAY
RUFFLES
80Z. BAG
89C
FREE BREAD!
E �M3
Present this coupon for one free loaf
of Overtoil's Penny Pincher Bread with A
$10.00 Grocery Purchase. Limit One Free
Loaf per I.D. Number.
THB COUPON NOT VALID IN CONJUCTION WITH
ANY OTHER OFFER OR DISCOUNT.
Name
Address
I.D. Number
ECU 10 DISCOUNT
ON ALL FOOD ORDrRS
OVER $10.00 ��
PRESENT COUPON
TO CASHIER FOR 10
DISCOUNT ON GROCERIES
TV ������� wMin,
Name!T
Address
I.D. Number
CENT
Green
Open
fSYOUl
THA
wl
Y
$3.
Coggins
7S4-I
F38
- �nmiin�ii mh
. I IWW !����. ,�11.
-mil �� � . � � '�"������,
t
1
i





ING
RNER
dAND
VIS ST
(See Ad Pg. News-3)
Summit
Jarvis
OVERTON'S
CO
V.
RITO LAY
RUFFLES
80Z. BAG
89
DISCOUNT
LL FOOD ORD:RS
OVER $10.00 e��m3
ESENT COUPON
CASHIER FOR 10
:OUNT ON GROCERIES
Tim coupon not valid i� coition
with ony otfcor oHt or discount
.1
?
L ocal Support Given
To 'Fast For Life'
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST M, 13
Glenn Maughan
sun Wriier
For the past three
Saturdays, Greenville
residents and ECU
students have been
holding vigils outside
the 10th Street post
office in support of
the Fast for Life.(See
related story on page
1 )The group has been
seeking to educate
residents about the
fast. The Greenville
supporters have also
been conducting a
relay fast on a dailv
oasis since the vigil
began August 6.
Jeremy Tarlo, of
Greenville, said he has
"been pleased by the
number of people
who responded
favorably to the
group's action
Karen Tarlo, an
ECU nursing
graduate student, said
she objects to govern-
ment cut-backs in
health care, while
defense spending is
being increased. "We
are spending all this
money to kill people
but health care money
has been cut back.
This puts me in a dif-
ficult position
Susanne Darwin,
an ECU English ma-
jor, who participated
in the vigils asked,
"When will the arms
race be stopped?"
The vigils at the
post office will con-
tinue in support of the
Fast for Life as long
as the fast is going on.
Another vigil is
scheduled for 11 a.m.
this Saturday.
Library Makes Addition
During Summer Months
Under its new direc-
tor, Ruth Katz,
Toyner Library has
recently made some
changes designed to
improve service, in-
cluding extended
hours on weekends
and expanded
facilities and equip-
ment for student use.
The new time
schedule calls for
Joyner to close at 6
p.m. on Saturday and
open at 1 p.m. on
Sunday. Previously,
the library closed at 5
p.m. on Saturday and
opened at 2 p.m. on
Sunday.
During the week,
the government docu-
ment section will
lengthen its operating
time by three hours,
and remain open till 8
p.m.
New additions to
the library include
electric typewriters, a
remodeled exhibition
gallery on the en-
trance level and more
tables and chairs
throughout the
building.
In the typing
rooms, four IBM elec-
tric typewriters have
replaced the older
manual models.
Directions for using
the machines are
posted and students
have free access to the
typewriters during the
library's regular
operating hours.
The remodeled ex-
hibition gallery will be
used primarily for stu-
dent art shows,
however other
campus-related ex-
hibitions will also be
presented during the
year. Anyone wishing
to use the gallery can
do so by making a
reservation at the
librarv.
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
ians
Come see Our Great Selection of:
Greeting cards for all occasions
Out-of-town newspapers
New and Used Books:
Magazines
EVANS NEW AND USED BOOKS
321 Evans St. Mall
Open 7 days a week 9:00AM-6:00PM
752-3333
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
Come see Our Great Selection of:
Greeting cards for all occasions
Out-of�town newspapers
Magazines
Books
CENTRAL BOOK AND NEWS
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7days a week 9:30AM-9:30PM
756-7177
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THAT BIG TRIP HOME?
WE CAN GET
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754-5244

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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24, 1983
Area Banks Have Much To Offer Students
TINA MAROSCHAK
surr writer
For incoming col-
lege students, opening
a bank account is the
first step toward
achieving in-
dependence.
Shopping around
and asking questions
are the keys to finding
out which bank works
best for you. Green-
ville has several bank-
ing institutions and
each has something to
offer the ECU stu-
dent.
ECU Student Bank:
The student bank is
located on the first
floor of Mendenhall
Student Center. The
bank cashes checks
for students with a
valid ECU ID, activi-
ty card, and drivers
license.
Checks from
hometowm banks
may be cashed up to
$125 during a seven
working-day period.
The bank will not
cash personal checks
unless they are from
the university payroll.
Students may open
a savings account with
the bank however, no
interest is earned. The
bank merely holds the
money for safekeep-
ing. Students can
withdraw money from
the account anytime.
Branch Banking &
Trust Company:
BB&T is a full service
bank oriented toward
the ECU student. The
bank has three Green-
ville branches.
BB&T offers free
checking to all full-
time stur . . A
minimum deposit of
$100 is required to
open a regular check-
ing account, but once
the account has been
opened, the balance
may fall below that
limit.
BB&T also offers a
special checking ac-
count called Checking
Plus. For a three-
dollar monthly-
charge, customers
receive basic banking
services, plus $10,000
accidental death in-
surance coverage, free
checks, travelers
checks and money
orders.Discount
theatre and amuse-
ment park tickets;
hotel, motel, and car
rental discounts; a
magazine and a
Pirate
Walk
Delayed
By THERESA DULSKI
Staff W ril�
Pirate Walk,
ECU's escort service,
will not begin opera-
tions for at least two
weeks. According to
1982-83 Pirate Walk
Director, Paul
Sumrell, it will take at
least two weeks to
gather all the applica-
tions for escorts and
operators.
A new director and
other Pirate Walk of-
ficals must also be ap-
pointed.The applica-
tions must then be
processed through the
office of James
Mallory, associate
dean of student life
"We were pleased
with the response and
number of people
who used the service
last year Sumrell
said. "We are hoping
for increased par-
ticipation this year
The blue lights
located around cam-
pus are another ser-
vice provided for
students in case of
emergency. The
phones attached to
the blue lights ring
directly to the campus
security office.
Students wishing to
apply for escort posi-
tions may do so by
calling 757-6166 or
applying in Pf �n
the Pirate Walk office
in Mendenhall.
CHECASH card are
also offered.With the
CHECASH card
customers can cash
personal checks up to
$100 in more than
7,800 U.S. banking
locations at no
charge.
To open a regular
savings account with
BB&T, a minimum
deposit of $50 is re-
quired. Customers are
allotted three monthly
withdrawals. For each
additional
withdrawal,
customers are charged
a one-dollar fee. A
service charge of
$1.50 is also levied if
the balance falls
below $50 and no
deposits are made.
NOW Checking re-
quires a minimum
deposit of $500 in the
checking account and
$2000 in savings. The
money earns 52 per-
cent interest com-
pounded daily and
paid monthly.
The bank has 24
hour banking
machines at Arlington
Boulveard, Medical
Village, and
Mendenhall Student
Center.
BB&T recently
became a member of
the Plus System,
which allows
customers to use
banking facilities in
47 state to get cash,
check balances or
transfer funds.
First State
Bank.First State, also
a full service bank,
has four branches in
the area.
First State has free
service to full-time
students. Checking
and savings accounts
can be opened with a
$25 minimum deposit.
After the account is
established, the
balance may fall
below $25.
For a flat fee of
$4.75 per month,
students can obtain
the Club checking
plan. The club ac-
count, which offers
all the services of a
regular checking ac-
count, also includes
$10,000 accidental
death insurance
coverage, discount
theatre tickets, travel
coupons, and
traverlers checks.
The NOW Ac-
count, which earns 5J
percent interest, re-
quires a $500
minimum balance. A
two-dollar fee plus 15
cents per check is
levied if the balance
falls below the
minimum.
BankAround, First
State's 24-hour bank-
ing machine, is
available at two loca-
tions.
North Carolina Na-
tional Bank: NCNB
has four Greenville
locations. It is a full
service banking in-
stitution, offering
regular savings and
checking accounts to
ECU students. A
minimum deposit of
$100 is necessary to
open either of the ac-
counts. A service
charge of $2 is levied
each month along
with a fee of 20 cents
per check. Charges
can be avoided by
maintaining a $300
balance in regular sav-
ings.
Students can earn
interest on checking
accounts with Bonus
Checking at an annual
rate of 52 percent.
This requires a
minimum balance of
$500 in regular sav-
ings or $1000 in
checking. If the
balance falls below
the required
minimum, the
customer pays three
dollars per month and
20 cents per debit.
Regular- savings
earn 5: percent an-
nually, compounded
daily.If the average
balance is below
$2500, a one-dollar
fee is charged for the
third and following
withdrawals. A mon-
thly fee of $1.50 is
levied if the balance
falls below $100.
Bonus savings earns
5.75 percent annually,
compounded daily.
To open the account a
minimum deposit of
$25 is required, and
funds must be left on
deposit for 90 days.
After that period,
withdrawals may be
made on the first ten
days of January,
April, July, or Oc-
tober. At other times
a 90-day written
notice is needed.
There is a penalty for
early withdrawal.
NCNB has three
Greenville-one at each
Greenville Boulevard
branch, and one at
Mendenhall Student
Center.
The bank is also a
member of the Plus
System, providing
banking services
across the country.
Peoples Bank &
Trust Company:
People has one
Greenville branch and
requires a minimum
amount of $100 to
open a regular check-
ing account. The ser-
vice charge is $3 per
month and 20 cents
per check.
Students can avoid
the monthly and per-
check service charges
by maintaining a
minimum $400
balance in a checking
or savings account.
For a monthly fee
of $5, customers can
become members of
the Peoples BanClub.
With this service,
customers receive free
checking, checks and
travelers checks. It
also provides $10,00
accidental death in-
surance coverage and
discounts at hotels,
motels, and well-
known tourist attrac-
tions.
Peoples Daily In-
terestChecking Now
Account works like a
regular checking ac-
count except that it
earns 52 percent in-
terest. There is no ser-
vice charge as long as
the monthly balance is
at least $500. If the
balance falls below
the $500 minimum, a
$6 service fee is levied.
Planters National
Bank: Planters has
three Greenville of-
fices.
Regular Checking is
the most popular
checking account at
Planters. To qualify
for free checking
customers must keep
a $300 minimum or
$750 average balance,
or by maintaining a
$300 balance in a
Planters Regular Sav-
ings Account.
To earn 52 percent
interest on every
checking dollar, a
$100 minimum in
checking or a $500
minimum in savings
must be maintained.
Only when the
balance falls below
the minimum does a
monthly service
charge of $3 plus 25
cents per check apply.
With Interest Check-
ing customers also
receive free travelers
checks.
A regular savings
account, which also
yields 52 percent in-
terest, requires a $300
minimum. A service
charge is levied if the
balance falls below
this limit.
Planters Green, the
bank's 24-hour bank-
ing machine, allows
the performance of
over 35 transactions
and is located at the
Pitt Plaza Office.
Wachovia Bank &
Turst Company: In
Greenville, Wachovia
has branches at four
locations.
To open a regular
checking account a
$50 minimum deposit
is needed. In order to
get free checking a
balance of $300 must
be maintained in sav-
ings. The account is
charged $2 per month
and 15 cents per check
if either account falls
below the limit.
Wachovia's NOW
Account is an interest
bearing checking ac-
count that earns 5'
percent interest. A
balance of $500 is re-
quired to open the ac-
count.
Wachovia Teller II,
the bank's automated
banking machine,
allows immediate ac-
cess to all Wachovia
accounts. Several
Teller I Is are located
throughout Green-
ville, including
Mendenhall.
Wachovia also pro-
vides every customer
with a personal
banker who gives the
customer personal
and professional at-
tention and service.
banking machines in
11
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
phone
752-3172
Cliffs
Seafood
Specials
Monday thru Thursday
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted for slaw 53- extra
ARMY ROTC CAN HELP
PUT YOU AHEAD OF
THE CROWD.
Adding Army ROTC to
.
rf
to
y
Hf�
a&
WS&
if
W
r"i
ill
"Us
H'
your college education can give
you a competitive edge.
Regardless ot your chosen
major, Army ROTC' training
magnifies your total learning
experience.
Training that helps you
develop into a leader, as well
as a manager ot money and
materials. That builds your selt-
confidence and decUion-makin
abilities. And gives you skills
and knowledge you can use
anywhere. In college. In the
military. And in civilian life.
Army ROTC provides
scholarship opportunities and
financial assistance too. But, most importantly, Army ROTC lets
you graduate with both a college degree and a commission in
today's Army, which includes rhe Army Reserve and National
Guard.
So come out ahead by enrolling in Army ROTC. For more
information contact Captain Heldur Liivak or Sergeant First Class
Terry Boyles in Room 324 Erwin Hall or call 752-6967
m
�i
w
�� ��?: v, xJy
ft jjj HISTOLOGY i1!f�J
� ��
ARMY ROTC. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
Wednesday-Thursday
Super Specials
4 P.M9 P.M.
Fried
PopCorn Shrimp
All You Can Eat
Trout
All You Can Eat
Steamed Crabs
All You Can Eat Steamed In Spice
4.99
2.99
4.99
���� All You Can Eat
Seafood Extravaganza
;
Alaskan Crab Legs
rf
S Shrimp Creole Deviled Crabs
Your Choice Of As Many As 5 Items
v
'
Abram's
Seafood
tw
Hows:
Sunday
Thursday
11:00 AM-
9:00 PM
Friday
11:00 A.M. to
10:00 P.M.
Saturday
4:00 P.M. to
10:00 P.M.
Barbecw
Oyster Bar
710N.Grm�
Greenville,
St.
C.27834.
752
0090
Take Outs
Welcome
Cttertne. Specialist,
Xeter: Anything
Anywhere
Anytime
The Perfot
Th
M
You could drive six hoi
or take a bus to Raieigh
fine arts, but lovers of pr
and classical music can i
here on campus.
Two fine programs
and the Artists Series �
names to Greenville tl
Theatre A
The Department ol i
Arts Committee of Pa
announced its IV- -�
series are two innovative
Thirties musical and a c I
Each performance bc
Theatre.
Leading off the season I
tor-y Ensemble on Mondai
Ensemble is a fine, pi
whose energy and
On Tuesdav. Ja:
Pat Carroll will brinj
Stein to life in the awan
Gertrude Stein, Gertrude
The ser;e contim.
Dance Companv on Tr.i
From their home in Gr
waves around the world as
dance compar. rnej
The return of The A
arm of the John F. Ka
ming Arts, ura up
tion of John Housemaii
American musical da
BlitzensteirA The Cradle
Season Tick
Season tickets for all
mances may be obtained
Ticket Office. Mendenh
Carolina University ("5"
form will be sent to yoi
chased season tickets last-l
September 30, 1983.
The Theatre Arts Sen
drama and dance a
four shows for the p
chase season tickets. Se
for ECU students. S2.
under) and S30 for ECU
'
The AMi


�"��" JO "





I

ents
a cess to all Wachovia
accounts Several
a Teller 11s are located
throughout Green-
wile, including
Mendenhall
w achovia also pro-
vides ever customer
a personal
who cues the
- ner personal
rofessional at
"� and service
IP
?
la
ss
U CAN BE.
.99
.99
.99
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X
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Take Outs
Relcom
9 Specialists
ter Anything
Xnywhcre
nvtlm
THfctAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
AUGUST 24, 1983
Page 11
The Performing Arts
Theater, Dance,
Music At MSC
on could drive six hours to Washington, D.C.
oi take a bus to Raleigh for entertainment in the
fine arts, but lovers of professional theater, dance
and classical music can indulge their passions right
here on campus.
I wo fine programs � the Theatre rts Series
and the Artists Series � bring bright lights and big
�ames to Greenville this vear.
Theatre Arts Series
The Department of University Unions Theatre
i C ommittee of East Carolina University has
announced its 1983-1984 season. Included in the
series are two innovative young dance companies a
ities musical and a one-woma tour-de-force
Each performance begins at 8:15 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre.
1 ead.ng off the season is the Alvin Ailev Reper-
r Ensemble on Mondav, November 7 1983 The
Ensemble is a fine, professional group of dancers
whose energy and style are world-renowned
Tuesday, January 16, 1984, veteran actress
i at C arroll will bring controversial poet Gertrude
vein to life in the award-winning one-woman plav
Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein '
he series continues with the Frank Holder
ance Company on Thursday, March IS 1984
rom their home in Greensboro, they're making
av es around the world as one of the hottest voung
dance companies in America.
The return of The Acting Company, the touring
irm ot the John F. Kennedy Center for the Perfor-
ming Arts, wraps up the season. Under the direc-
o John Houseman, thev will present an
encan musical classic of the mid10s Marc
Blit7enstein's The Cradle Will Rock.
Season Tickets A vailable
Season tickets for all four of these fine perfor-
mances may be obtained by contacting the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East
Carolina University (757-6611, et. 266). An order
form will be sent to you at that time. If you pur-
chased season tickets last year, you must reorder by
September 30. 1983. if you desire your same seats.
The Theatre Arts Series season tickets offer fine
drama and dance at the best of buys; you'll get
four shows for the price of three when you pur-
chase season tickets. Season ticket prices are $15
for ECU students, $21 for youth (age 14 and
under) and $30 for ECU faculty and staff, and $30
to the public.
The Central Ticket Office is open Monday
through Friday, 10 a.m4 p.m. The earlier you
order, the better the chance of obtaining the best
seats.
N.C. Symphony
The North Carolina Symphony highlights a pro-
gram of classical concerts to be held on campus
during the 1983-1984 year.
Sponsored by the East Carolina University
Unions Artists Series Committee, the new season
also features cellist Lynn Harrell, The Romeros
Quartet, pianist Anton Kuerti, and the Chamber
Music Society of Lincoln Center.
The North Carolina Symphony Orchestra will
perform Wednesday, September 14 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium on the ECU campus. The
other concerts will be held at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix Theatre.
The Symphony is one of our state treasures.
Under the direction of Gerhard! Zimmerman with
Charles Treger as violin soloist, this concert pro-
mises a feast for the ears.
Classical Offerings
On Thursday, November 17, the Artists Series
features cellist Lynn Harrell, one of the worlds's
finest musicians, with his beautiful singing sound.
Unquestionably supreme in a special field of
musical virtuosity, The Romeros Quartet will per-
form a concert of classical guitars on Thursday
February 9, 1984.
Following the Quartet is pianistic supernova An-
ton Kuerti on Tuesday, March 13, 1984.
The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center,
a juxtaposition of the world's finest musical per-
sonalities whose whole is greater than the sum of its
parts, will conclude the season with a concert on
Monday, March 19, 1984.
Season tickets for the 1983-1984 Artists Series
may be obtained through the Central Ticket Of-
fice.
Of the many adantages to season tickets, the
most important are the saings you'll enjoy off
single ticket prices. At $50 for ECU students, the
savings are 50 percent over individual ticket prices.
ECU faculty and staff pay $15 and save 66 percent.
The public pays only $20 and saves 56 percent. This
means you enjoy high quality performances
without spending a lot of money.
Last year, 78 percent of the house was sold as
season tickets. Order today to be sure of your seat
and your savings with the 1983-1984 Artists Series!
Pat Carroll single-handedly recreates the era and the woman in Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein Gertrude
Stein.
'National Lampoon's Vacation:
. 9
Getting There
Is All The Fun
The Alvin Alley Repertory Ensemble opens the Theatre Arts Series Nov. 7
poto by DONALD MOfT
By EDDIE COCKRELL
Special lo T h Kasi t arollaian
Up until recently, it seemed that
the Saturday Night Live alumni
and their big-screen personae were
like video games: a noisy, multi-
million dollar industry we were
just going to have to live with.
Then Dan Aykroyd matured
almost before our very eyes in the
terrific Trading Places. Eddie
Murphy doesn't count � he's not
an original SSL-er, and besides,
he had comic maturity from the
moment he stepped in front of a
movie camera. Now, after a hit-
and-miss film career, Chevy
Chase delivers a solid satiric
characterization in Sational Lam-
poon's Vacation (now playing at
the Buccaneer).
Based loosely on a short story
that appeared in Sational Lam-
poon in 1978, Vacation is the
story of the Clark W. Griswolds,
a fearlessly middle-class family
from Chicago. Clark (Chase),
who develops food additives for a
living, has decided to spend his
two-week vacation with his family
at Walley World, a commercial
mecca on the left � uh, West
Coast. Rather than do the sane
thing and fly the family there,
Clark had decided to trade in the
Buick for a new station wagon
and make the trip by car. The film
opens as he and his son pick up
the new automobile. Did you ever
see an awful James Brolin thriller
called The Carl Well, the
Griswoid's new wagon � a
Wagon Queen Family Truckster
in metallic pee � looks just like
an '80s version of the title
monster.
Anyway, the Griswolds are
soon lost in a St. Louis slum,
where they are swindled out of
money and the Truckster loses her
(its?) hubcaps. Since Clark's wife
Ellen (Beverly D'Angelo) promis-
ed her cousin she'd visit, they stop
at their farm in Kansas. Duped in-
to driving crotchety Aunt Edna
(Imogene Coca) and her dog to
Phoenix, they promptly get lost in
Monument Valley.
With Aunt Edna safely
delivered, Clark is almost seduced
in a motel pool by the Woman in
the Car (Christie Brinkley), a
dazzlingly, disgustingly healthy
sexual icon for our times. Caught
almost in the act by Ellen, Clark
makes it up to her before continu-
ing their trek westward.
As Walley World looms in the
distance, the family rejoices.
Finally, they get to see Marty
Moose and go on all the rides. The
trip was worth it. "After all
says Clark, "we're the
Griswolds"
Walley World, however, isn't
open. Undaunted by this turn of
events, Clark buys a gun and
forces a security guard (John Can-
dy) to give them a guided tour of
the park. There follows about 10
minutes of what could pass for
outtakes of This Is Cinerama, as
the Griswolds and Candy go on
one roller coaster ride after
another.
Meanwhile, S.W.A.T. teams
have surrounded Walley World
and Roy Walley himself (Eddie
Bracken himself) confronts the
Griswolds with their crime. Dad
soon convinces Roy of their
sincerity, and another vacation
comes to an eventful end.
The plot has been laid ont in
detail to illustrate the success of
Motional Lampoon's Vacation as
opposed to the failure of, say,
Caddyshack or Chase's under-
rated Modern Problems.
Specifically, Vacation mines the
same lode of humor as Modern
Problems, with the added advan-
tage of shared experiences to draw
from: we've all been on disastrous
vacations, so we know what it's
like to get lost, fall asleep at the
wheel, and have the dog pee on
lunch. When Dad enthusiastically
announces that with a detour of
only four hours they can visit the
largest free-standing mud dwell-
ing in the western hemisphere, we
involuntarily cringe in horror.
All the above-mentioned films
needed was a more accessible
storyline: instead, perhaps
celebrating a liberation from
television's censorship, they
became a parade of adolescent
sex, drug and shit jokes. Vacation
stays on the relatively safe
grounds of the nuclear family, in-
breeding and general farce. It
can't go wrong, and doesn't.
One assumes that the chief ar-
chitects of Vacation's success are
Chase, director Harold Ramis and
writer John Hughes, who adapted
his own short story for the screen.
Their successful collaboration is
nothing short of miraculous, if in-
evitable; Chase's track record is
well-known, but Ramis is
notorious for the awful Cad-
dyshack (his directorial debut)
and Hughes scripted the absolute-
ly wretched Sational I ampoon
Class Reunion. But let's face it:
they've all had enough brushes
with success to keep moving.
Ramis co-wrote Sational Iam-
poon's Animal House and co-
starred in Stripes, while Hughes
was one of the magazine's writing
standouts in the late '70s.
But it is the absurd, barely-
controlled vision of Chevy Chase
at the wheel of the Family
Truckster that keeps Vacation
moving. Looking like a tan, fit
and preppy Jabba the Hut,
Chase's schtick, as always, is his
mimicry. Even while having a
man-to-man talk with his young
son in the middle of the desert, he
can't resist waggling an eyebrow
and flattening his lips. But
Chase's Clark Griswold really
wants everybody to like him. He
wants the vacation to go perfectly,
and when nothing doess, his only
defense is desperate sincerity. In
previous roles, this was seen as in-
sult humor, but in both Modern
Problems and Vacation, he's
developed it into a Harold
Lloydish earnestness that's both
funny and ingratiating.
See VACATION, Page 15
w.





i
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24, 1983
Stress Expert To Give Lecture
Tension headache,
teeth ground down,
stomach in knots,
fingers clamped
sweatily to your class
scheduled as if they
were SuperGlued
Take a deep breath.
The Department of
University Unions
lecture Committee
ttill present lecturer
Jerry Teplitz on Tues-
day, September 27 at
8 p.m. in a program
titled "Managing
First Year Stress" in
Hendrix Theatre of
Mendenhall Student
Center on the East
Carolina University
campus in Greenville.
Teplitz will
demonstrate techni-
ques to be used in
managing stress, and
the lecture will be
geared toward
students starting col-
lege. Teplitz's ideas
can be applied,
however, by anyone
starting something
new: a job, a move to
a new location, and
een marriage.
Participants will
learn and actually ex-
perience a wide range
of techniques and ap-
proaches to dealing
with the stress they
are about to ex-
perience. Response
from other college
campuses has been
highly enthusiastic,
ranging from after-
lecture excitement to
disappointment on
having missed such a
potentially infor-
mative program.
The lecture pro-
mises immediate
benefits: it guarantees
to leave participants
more relaxed at the
conclusion of the pro-
gram than thev were
at the beginning.
Teplitz, a pioneer in
stress management,
has spoken at over
350 colleges and
universities across the
United States and
Canada since 1974.
His background is as
unique as the program
he presents. A
graduate of Hunter
College and Nor-
thwestern Law School
as well as a Master
Teacher of Hatha
Yoga, Teplitz is the
author of three
books. The most re-
cent is Managing
Your Stress: How to
Relax and Enjoy. He
also has a Master's
Degree in Wholistic
Health Sciences and
has been designated a
Certified Speaking
Professional by the
National Speakers
Association. His
other lectures include
"Managing Exam-
Jime Stress "How
to Relax and Win"
and "Effective
Leadership Skills
Tickets go on sale
beginning Tuesday,
September 13 at the
Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m
Monday through Fri-
day. Ticket prices are
$1.50 for ECU
students, $2.50 for
ECU faculty and
staff, and $3.50 for
the public. All tickets
at the door will be
$3.50.
WITH THIS COUPON � � � �
WE'LL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENT TO COLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50c OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50C OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargement
$1.00 OFF Any 8x10,8x12, 11x14 Color Enlargement
art J( cowefo hop
' 518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
Jerry Teplitz, stress management expert
GREENVILLE. N.C. 27834
752-0888 I . .
Limit one coupon per order- coupon expires 6-1-84
512 E. Nth St.
(2 Blocks W. of Boy's Dorms)
Come talk
to Sammy
about a meal plan.
We Specialize In Home Cooked Food
take out
752-0476
All You Can Eat Vegetables
on Large Plate $3.85 tax
(1 meat, 3 veg bread and tea)

!
Daily Specials
$. 1.99 plus tax and drink
Open & meat 2 veS- and bread)
11:00 W8.00
7 days
a week
served 11-2
Now Nikon makes fine
photography easier and
more convenient than ever
THE
AUTOMATIC
NIKON FE
WITH NIKON
50mm fIJJ
SERIES E LENS
ONLY
$299.95
Simply sensational a light, compact auto-exposure
35mm sir with the precision and versatility that only
Nikon can offer The Nikon FE gives you automatic
exposure accuracv with any of nearly 60 famous INikkor
lenses . plus easy-to-use features for creative
photography Theres also a special Nikon automatic
electronic flash that actually programs the FE shutter,
and a compact motor drive for up to 3 5 shots per
second. Try it yourself come in today!
art 4f coticfo hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE. N.C. 27834
752-0688
Attention Students
Frames
Start At
$13
Student Regency
Economy
Sets
$7C00
Twin i Kj
SQCOO
Full S 3
312 Toil
innerspnnq
matfre� and
foundation
heavy duty
cover & pri
built borders
Special
10 Yr Warrdnti
Twin Set
s105
Full Set
s135
IS Vr Warranty
Tuin
Imperial
20 Vi Warranty
3 1 2oil innervpr
inq mattrvv 80
(oil bo fc ftp rinq
Permalator to
prrvrnt lumping
Double flanged to
prevent slipping
Beautiful floral
(ov - r
s134
Full
$165
Queen
s195
King
s250
3S0 C oil innertpr
ing mattre� 88
coil heav duts, box
�pring Layers &
layer� of thick pad
ding and beautiful
e&lra deep quilted
damatk cover
Tvl in
s160
Full
s198
Queen
s228
Kinq
s310
We are having our annual
Welcome Back to ECU Sale
60 and more off during this sale
90 Days Same As Cash
Vim
MatT. ard
C lout i ard
VWkomed
oft 4 camera hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
752-0688
Your One Stop Store For Everything Creative
i Offer a Complete L
of Camera Supplies
and Equipment.
Photof inishing by Eastman Kodak
48 Hour Kodak Slide Service
24 Hour Kodacolor Service
by Colorcraft
Nikon and Canon Cameras
Lenses, and Accessories
A Complete Line of Kodak
Film, Equipment and Supplies
Kodak, Agfa, and llford
Photo Papers
We Offer the Best
Selection of Art
Supplies in the East
� Supplies for the Student
1 Amateur, and Professional
� Graphic Supplies by Letraset,
Zipatone, Tactype, Alvin,
Decadry, E-Z Letter, and many more.
� Custom Framing
� Drafting Supplies
� Largest Selection of Mat Board
Artist Boards and Artist Papers
In the East
� Ready Made Frames and Framing Supplies
� Framed and Unframed Posters and Prints
� �
?
r
� n m










V
Vtardecr
A SAUSAGE & EGG BISCUIT, COFFEE
AND FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE $1.29
Otter good at participating Hardees restaurants Please present
coupon betore ordering One coupon per customer, per order,
please Customer must pay any sales tax due Coupon not good
in combination with any other otters
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours through September 14, 1983.
SGEG COF OJ COUPON! SAUSAGE BlSC
Yfatdegj
A MUSHROOM 'N SWISS
BURGER, REGULAR FRIES AND
MEDIUM SOFT DRINK S1J9
Otter good at participating Hardees restaurants Please present
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer, per order
please Customer must pay any sales tax due Coupon not good
in combination with any other offers
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours through September 14, 1983.
MUSH REG FRY MED DK MEAL DEAL MUSH
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
Hardeor
C1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
TWO HAM BISCUITS $1.29
Otter good at participating Hardees restaurants Please present
coupon betore ordering One coupon per customer per order
please Customer must pay any sales tax due Coupon not good
in combination with any other offers
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours September 15 - 21, 1983.
2 HAM BlSC 2 LESS HAM BlSC
Hardear
TWO BIO DELUXE
BURGERS $2.29
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants Please present
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer per order
please Customer must pay any sales tax due Coupon not good
in combination with any other offers
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours September 15 - 21,1983.
2 DELUXE 2 LESS DELUXE
C1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
Hardegr
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
A BACON & EGG BISCUIT, COFFEE
AND FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE $1.19
Otter good at participating Hardees restaurants Please present
coupon betore ordering One coupon per customer, per order
please Customer must pay any sales tax due Coupon not good
in combination with any other offers
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours September 22 - 28, 1983.
BCEG COF OJ COUPON BACON BlSC
Harder
TWO MUSHROOM W SWISS
BURGERS $2.29
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants Please present
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer, per order
please Customer must pay any sales tax due Coupon not good
in combination with any other otters
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours September 22 - 28, 1983.
2. MUSH 2 LESS. MUSH
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
ttardeer
M983 Hardees Food Systems inc
A SAUSAGE & EGG
BISCUIT W
Otter good at participating Hardees restaurants Please present
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer, per order
please Customer must pay any sales tax due Coupon not good
in combination with any other offers
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours September 29 - October 5,1983.
SGEG REDUCED SAUSAGE BlSC
Vtardecr
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
Hawaii I :
A BACON
REGULAR HUES AND
MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $1.99
Offer good at participating Hardee s restaurants Please present
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer, per order
please Customer must pay any sales tax due Coupon not good
in combination with any other offers
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours September 29 - October 5,1983.
B CB. REG FRY. MED DK . MEAL DEAL. B CB
e 1983 Hardees Food Systems inc

kv





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST
24. 1983 13
University Book Exchange
516 S. Cotanche Street
Downtown Greenville
Open Thursday & Friday
until 900p.m.and open
all day Saturday
FREE COUPON BOOK-
AVAILAELE TO E.C.U. STUDENTS
ONLY AT THE UB.EGET YOURS!
QOJ8
t (This years coupon
book has over 50
coupons from
Greenville's finest
merchants!)
FREE PIZ
Wednesdfl2:30
Come eat a4unc
&P.T.A!
2:30p.m.
t U.B.E.

?
� �
� - m �

' . " J �� �
iwnnvf'p'
H





14
THt EAST l AROLON1AN
AUGUST 24, 1983

; Free Concert Today
e You've sweated in long lines all day, shuffl- just be a part of the crowd on the University
ing schedules, computer cards and bookstore Mall for pop rock duo Lahnn and Loftin to-
bags that break. But you can forget it all and day at 5:15.
Reserve Madrigal Tickets Now
It's painful to think
about Christmas
hopping when it's
still hot and humid.
But if you want to
be ure to begin your
holidays with a time-
honored tradition.
: ow is the time to pur-
chase tickets to the
Madrigal Dinners
sponsored each year
b the Department of
University Unions.
I h i s year, these
Elizabethan Feasts
will be held November
29. 30, December 1-3,
1983. di 7 p.m. in the
Multi-Purpose Room
of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
Modeled after an
Elizabethan festival in
country manor
house, the Madrigal
Dinners open the holi-
day season each year
in traditional English
fashion. The Lord
and Lady of the
manor preside over
the entire feast; they
dress in luxurious
period costumes of
velvet and lace and
stand ready to greet
their guests. Again
this year, Jim and
Franceine Rees are the
gracious host and
hostess.
Magicians,
tumblers, poets and
musicians provide the
entertainment. The
Madrigal Singers,
under the direction of
Dr. Charles Moore of
the ECU School of
Music, highlight the
evening. Resplendent
in their beautiful
costumes, they sing
age-old madrigals and
Christmas selections.
The group also per-
forms traditional
Elizabethan dances.
Dinner is served by
costumed waiters and
waitresses. The meal
� wassail and roast
beef with all the trim-
1 CARPET FOR YOUR
mings � provides a
delicious complement
to the exciting enter-
tainment. Long ban-
quet tables covered
with snowy white
cloths add to the feel-
ing of a true royal
feast.
Those who have at-
tended before buy
their tickets as soon as
they are released for
sale. Tickets will be
available beginning
Monday. August 22.
so plan to reserve or
purchase your tickets
then. They are
available at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office.
Ticket Office hours
are Monday through
Friday, 10 am. to 4
p.m. Ticket prices $9
for ECU students, $14
for ECU faculty and
staff and for the
public. One dollar of
the S14 is a tax-
deductible donation
to the School of
Music Scholarship
Fund. Tickets must be
paid for within 72
hours after they are
ordered.
Tickets are also
available by mail.
Direct mail orders to:
Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student
Center, East Carolina
Universitv, Green-
ville, N.C. 27834.
Please make your
check payable to
"Central Ticket Of-
fice enclose a
stamped, self-
addressed envelope
with your order, and
indicate the full
names of all ticket
holders for whom you
are ordering so we can
place them on our list
of Honoured Guests.
Madrigal Dinners
Experience the tradi-
tion.
DORM
Only S9-S15 Per RolhlOOo Nylon
Waterproof

�V�� � s .�� �
On Sale Aug. 23-26th
ALPHA PHI PARKING LOT
(Bottom of the Hill)
!
X
I
3@3@SSSSSS@S@S@3g
EYEGLASS
Sale
OFFER GOOD THRU AUG 31 1983
20
TO
PL
mxim
Ui
Cheek Out Our
$15-(5 meals)
Meal Plan
Serving Home Style Food at
Reasonable Prices
Lunch and dinner
Specials Daily
ll:00am-9:00pm Daily
Take Out Order
752-3997
118 E. 5 th St.
Block From Campus
With All ABC Permits
40
OFF ALL
EYEGLASS
FRAMES
With Purchase Of
Prescription Lenses
30
OFi
MOST
NON PRESCRIPTION
SUNGLASSES
INCLUDING BAOSM & .OMB
THIS AD MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER
CtEAR
GBEENWILLt STORF OHL1
5 "uTdT
pucians
Phonr
!12 1146
M iniM Common!
AtlOM f om Doclon P.il
OpanlA M 1 HP H Mon hi
BmcNm UrUai DitpwMira) Oom
' call uv torn AN
; I Tl llAHlkAIiON
I WITH TMC (JOCTOA
Of tOu. LHDICI
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
5 P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
�LASAGNA
�SPAGHETTI
$3.99
�.v
California
Concept
of
Greenville
"THE cm MS
THE STYLET
Precision Cuts P?rms
Henna Easy Styles
For Men and Women
1100 Charles Blvd. Greenville
1100 CHARLES BLVD.
(Choice of 3 Sauces)
with Garlic Bread
aU you can tot soup and salad $4.99
��-�
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BICYC16
POS
NC
QUALITY BIKE
SALES a SERVICE
� TREK
� RALEIGH
� FUJI
� PEUGEOT
� BMX
530 Cotanche Street
Greenville n C 27834
757 361 6
LYNN DAIL MANAGER
Gerry Smith president
10 speed bikes starting at:
129.95 fully assembledready to ride
Ross Adventurer
Raleigh Record 10 speed
your cost 159.95 wrebate
IEVDvmiDAV -I A A
ALl-VOU-CAN-EAT J.VJf
FLOUNPEK DINNER
752-2967
WE NOW DO
NEW WAVE AND PUNK
HAIR DESIGNS
aIso Open Fri. and Sal.
mights midnight-3 a.m.
Schwinn World 159.95
Earth Cruisers and Pipelines
IfJreakfast Bar open 6:00am
SH0NEYS
Available at Low Prices
Expert Repairs and Service
J0�
I
Chase Tt
Continued from
Page 11
Beerly D'Angeio,
a vastly underrated
actress, is sexy and
stoic as Griswold's
long-suffering wife
It's interesting that
while Christie
Bnnkley is supposed
to represent the temp-
tations of single life
� fast cars, a loose
lifestyle, cold beer, an
even tan � it's
D'Angeio who has the
sexiest moments in the
film. Bnnkley's only
redeeming moment,
in fact, is when Clark
spots her at a roadside P a
picnic area. Holding a
cold beer, she's danc-
ing slowly next to her
car while two burly-
looking guys lounge
next to her. l!
direct contrast to
Clark's domestic life
of wrapped sand-
TrrrimrirrryTTTnnj o re-
wich(
You'
ment
mg
televi;
just a
film"
on thl
is an
the r
same
Som
the
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and
Cvbi'i
Th
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and
n ien
die al
prec
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and
of anl
Conn
CIVC- the b
OJlT Felloe
a y Frii
-T
-H'ULie
mza
��
9:45 Sunda School
11:00 Worship
We're The
Open 7 D
2FREEDRI
WITH SMALL
PIZZA
Tomato & Chees
Onion .
Peppers
Pepperoni
Mushroom
Hamburger
Sausage
2 U�ay .
3 Wav
4 v
House Special
SUBS
Meatball
Sausage
Pastrami
Ham
Italian
Turkey
Rcastbeef
Super Sub
Steak
Steak & Mushro
Tuna
BLT
Salami
SALADS
Tossed
Greek
Chefs
1 Cheese Raviol
2 Cheese Mann
3 Lasagne (Servj
4 Spaghetti
With Sauce
With Meatballs
With MushroomsJ
With Sausage
2 Way: Meatball
3 Way: Meatball
DRINKS
Pepsi. Mt. Dew,
One D
St
Sunday thru Wei
i






-
Mil
ptm.

76 ��:
ide
irvice

r
j
Chase Takes A ' Vacation
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24, 1983
15
Continued from
Page 11
wiches and tired kids, tion uses the talents of Walley World itself.
You've seen this mo- Eddie Bracken and Jutting skyward at the
Beverly D'Angelo, ment, her gently rock- Imogene Coca in brief end of a monstrously
i vatl underrated �ng dance, on the but memorable large and totally emp-
television ads, and it's cameos. As Aunt Ed- ty parking lot, the
just as affecting in the na, Coca is given little bizarre skyline should
film's context as it is physical business but remind you of every
on the tube. Brinkley nevertheless manages trip you've ever taken
actress, is sexy arid
stoic as Griswold's
long-suffering wife.
It's interesting that
while Christie
Brinkley is supposed
to represent the temp-
tations of single life
� fast cars, a loose
lifestyle, cold beer, an
even tan � it's
D'Angelo who has the
sexiest moments in the
film. Brinkley's only
redeeming moment,
in fact, is when Clark
spots her at a roadside
picnic area. Holding a
cold beer, she's danc-
ing slowly next to her
car while two burly-
looking guys lounge
next to her. It's a
direct contrast to
Clark's domestic life
of wrapped sand-
is an astute choice for
the role, following the
same path as Suzanne
Somers's Woman in
the T-Bird from
American Graffiti
and anything starring
Cybill Shepherd.
The supporting cast
is uniformly good,
with Randy Quaid
and Jane Krakowski
particularly
memorable as the tru-
ly Gothic Cousin Ed-
die and his wife. In
precisely the same
way Trading Places
used Ralph Bellamy
and Don Ameche to
evoke the comic spirit
of another era, Vaca-
to steal a fair amount
of scenes. Without
giving away a key gag,
it's safe to say that her
peaceful exit provides
the biggest laugh of
the film. More subtle
is Bracken's flustered
but sincere imitation
of Walt Disney, circa
1950. Exhibiting the
same uncanny comic
timing on display in
some of Preston
Sturges's more ntanic
vehicles, Bracken
shares an extended bit
with Chase that
makes them both look
good.
A brief but major
laugh of Vacation is
to Disney's mecca
even if you've never
been.
Director Harold
Ramis is nowhere
near as relaxed or
polished as John Lan-
dis, but National
Lampoon's Vacation
continues a new mar
riage of contemporary
and classic comedy
forms.
The first free MSC film runs Aug.
25-27 at Hendrix. See Friday's
paper for full listings.
rmm vnrrmwwnvwwttn
y����yW���Wl�l����imnm i � m a
�r
Come CELEBRATE (or mourn)
�� r- tome Lf � rwA i , (or mourn)
Le" - the beginning of Fall Semester
OOT Fellowship, Refreshments, Movie
M SCHEDULE
SUNDAj KOFWINGS
In front of Garrett
In front of Fleming
Leave parking lot at White
Parking lot behind Slay
Arrive a' fmnianuel
ECU STUDENT
m
Immanuel
9:45 Sunday School Baptist Church
11.00 Worship 1101 S. Elm St.
� iii9� �'8 � �g g 8 9 8 P B a � ' gBB� �B11��
yvE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR
LCLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CH'NA&CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
COIN & RING Uto.
401 S. EVANS ST. OPEN 9:30-5:30 MONSAT.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
"YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
T'J
X
v
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
COUSIN'S PIZZERIA
(FORMERLY FAMOUS PIZZA)
321 E. 10th ST. Greenville
FREE QUICK DELIVERIES
758-5982 � 758-5616
We're The Best
Open 7 Days
2 FREE DRINKS
WITH SMALL PIZZA
TP,Zrh SMALL
Tomato & Cheese4.75
Onion495
Peppers4.95
Pepperoni5.05
Mushroom 5.05
Hamburger5.05
Sausage 5.05
2 Way5.95
3 Way6.5o
4 Way6.90
House Special7.05
SUBS SMALL
Meatball 3.35
Sausage 3.35
Pastrami 3.35
Ham 3.35
Italian3.35
Turkey 3.35
Roastbeef3.35
Super Sub3.75
Steak 3.35
Steak & Mushroom3.75
Tuna3.35
BLT3.35
Salami3.35
SALADS
Tossed
4 FREE DRINKS
WITH LARGE PIZZA
LARGE
7.95
8.95
8.95
9.05
9.05
9.05
9.05
11.25
13.25
14.50
15.00
LARGE
4.50
2.25
k 3!35
Chef s 3.35
1 Cheese Ravioli
4.95
2 Cheese Manicotti 4 95
3 Lasagne (Served with Salad & Garlic Bread) 495
4 Spaghetti
With Sauce 3 95
with Meatbaiis " 495
With Mushrooms 4 95
With Sausage 4 95
2 Way: Meatball & Mushrooms 5 05
3 Way: Meatball, Mushroom, & Sausage " 550
(1-4 Above Served With Salad & ftHi'pl
DRINKS
Pepsi, Mt. Dew, Orange, Diet Pepsi, Tea . .50
COUPON
ONLY FOR DELIVERIES
One Dollar Off Small Pizza
Specify On The Phone
COUPON
ONLY FOR DELIVERIES
Two Dollars Off Large Pizza
Specify On The Phone
SEE REVERSE SIDE FOR MORE COUPONS
Sunday thru Wednesday 10:30 A.M. till 1:00 A.M. Thursday thru Saturday 10:30 A.M. till 2:00 A.M





















Klean Jeans
Laundromat
Located at 208 E. 5th St.
Behind Subway
Fluff-n-Fold
-Dry Cleaning
Dropoff and Pick Up
25 off on Dry Cleaning
Thru September
J ��������??���?�??����






















I PRESENT THIS AD AND YOUR STUDENT ID FOR e
20
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
HAIRCUTS
Reg.
$8.00
NOW
$6.40
Appointments
recommended but
not necessary
Simply present this
ad and your student
I.D.
Expires Sat. Sept. 10
CALL TODAY 756-2950
MITCHELL'S
HAIRSTYLING
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16
THl AS I'AROl IN1AN AUGUST 24, 1983
Top Runaways
Rolling In Soon
�yCARLYIN KBFRI
talrrtainiarai � "lor
The films are free
and (he diversity stag-
gering: Big-name
Oscar runaways like
Gandhi and Footsie
budd) up week after
week with film-buff
fodder like
assbinder's
eronika Voss and
t oppola's One From
the Heart.
sponsored b the
Student Union Films
( ommittee, fresh
movies roll each
weekend (Thursday,
Friday and Saturday).
in Wednesdays, the
offerings are special
films, such as Hit-
chcock double
features or lo w -
budget yuk riots like
hating Raoul.
Three additional
1 ate Night Saturday
flicks bring sex. slime
and sensation to Hen-
drix Theatre: Fm-
manuelle (Nov. 19).
Dawn of the Dead
(Oct. 29) and John
Waters's unforget-
table olfactory treat.
Polyester (in
Odorama, Sept. 24.
And you keep your
Scratch ' N Sniff
card.)
Representing the
box office biggies of
last year in the
weekend P opu1a r
Film series are Goldie
Hawn and Burt
Reynolds as Best
Friends (Aug. 25-27),
Meryl Streep in
Sophie's Choice
(Sept. 1-3), Pork)'s
(Sept. 8-10). Paul
Newman in The Ver-
dict (Sept. 15-17 )and
the steamy An Officer
and A Gentleman
(Sept. 22-24).
The boys � the
Busboys, that is,
along with Eddie
Murphy and Nick
Nolte � are back in
town Sept. 29-30 and
Oct. 1 in 48 Hrs. Film
critics glowed all over
Best Actress nominee
Jessica Lange in
Frances (Oct. 7, 8 �
no Thursday show-
ing), but the film
eluded most theater-
goers as Lange's
Academy Award-
winning performance
in Tootsie (Nov. 3-5)
dominated the movie
listings. Veteran
Australian director
Peter Weir's The Year
of Living Dangerous-
ly plays Oct. 20-22,
and David Bowie
teams up with
Catherine Deneuve in
The Hunger Oct.
27-29
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4





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f





THE EASTC AROl INIAN
Sports
AUGUST 24. 1983
Page I
Soccer
B KEN BOI.ION
Bucs Battle Heat. Tough Schedule
B CINDY PLEAS A NTS
Sports Mllor
During the last few days in Ju-
lv. Head Football Coach Ed
Emorj was looking toward the
August month with anticipation,
concern and uncertainty.
But of all his concerns, Emory
was most anxious to see how his
players and a completely new staff
would interact. What has been the
outcome since then? Emory
couldn't have been more pleased.
"It's been like putting sweet
and low in tea Emory said.
The coaches and players have
blended so well together. I'm sur-
prised at how good it's working
out
"You would have the idea that
these coaches have been here 10
years together the wa they are
working, and it appears to have
been nothing but a positive thing
for our players
Offensive Line Coach John
Zernhelt is the only assistant back
from last year. Zernhelt. however,
said he has worked with almost all
of his fellow coaches at one time
or another during his career. He
described the new staff as a
"pleasant reunion
New Offensive Coordinator Art
Baker stressed that a staff with the
ability to work well together is one
of the main ingredients needed to
be successful. "We've blended
well Baker said. "There are
some who are very vocal, very ag-
gressive, and there are some who
are quiet.
"Some of us may have different
interests off the field, but we work
together when we're on the field,
he continued. "What I'm most
impressed with is that this staff is
made up of keen competitors.
Their desire to win is very deep,
and that rubs off on the players
Although a close-knit staff is
essential, Emory named quite a
few other elements that will deter-
mine whether the Pirates will cap-
ture their tenth winning season in
12 years. "We must first stay
healthy Emory said. "Second,
our quarterback play must be very
sound. And three, we must have a
better defense
After working up to four prac-
tices each day, the Pirates have
now begun one practice daily
because of classes. Late practices
were scheduled earlier this week
because of the immense heat.
According to Emory, however,
heat isn't the problem. "Our kids
came back in great shape he
said. "The heat isn't really a pro-
blem. It's the humidity
The amount of humidity is
determined by a wet bulb reading.
When the amount reaches a cer-
tain level, the players take a
break. The players have been
drinking a great deal of fluids, but
the KX)-plus temperature has had
quite an effect on practices �
especially at Sunday's scrimmage
game.
'The players appeared slug-
gish, which was in part, I'm sure,
due to the extreme temperatures
and the amount of liquids taken in
by the players Emory said.
The Pirates had 20 scrimmage
plays, but the offense was unable
to score � something Baker
wasn't too thrilled about. "I'm
happy with the defense because
when we're out there on the field,
they will be taking up for us and
making our job easier he said,
"but we (offense) just made too
many mistakes.
"You can't overcome con-
secutive 15-yard penalties and ex-
pect to score he added.
"We need to be more polished
and more persistent
Emory's response was just as
displeasing as Baker's. "We made
too many mental mistakes and
had too many penalties Emory
said. "We had our ones and twos
versus the scout teams. Our top
people let their play drop to the
level of the competition, which is
something a good football team
cannot do
Finding a quarterback to back
up Ingram posed another problem
as well. "Offensively, we may
4 rtk " ,
GARY PATTERSON-ECU PltOtO Lab
Phil Elmassian, defensive secondary coach, talks with junior cornerback
Calvin Adams during one of the Pirates' practices this week.
Buc Schedule Features
12-Game Home Slate
A 27-game schedule was an-
nounced last week for the East
Carolina University basketball
team for the 1983-84 season.
The Pirates will play in the
ECAC-South tournament follow-
ing the regular season, March
8-10, with the winner receiving an
automatic bid into the NCAA
Championship tournament.
The Pirates, under second-year
head coach Charlie Harrison, will
open the season Nov. 26 at home
vs Campbell University, and con-
clude the year with James
Madison University at home
March 3.
A 12-game home slate will
feature all ECAC-South league
foes and games against in-state
rivals UNC Charlotte and UNC-
Wilmington.
The road schedule will see the
addition of Virginia Com-
monwealth, Boston University,
Northeastern University and the
continuation of traditional games
with all ECAC-South foes and a
game at Duke University.
Holiday tournament action will
be in the Bradley University River
City Shootout, Dec. 20-21, in
Peoria IL with host Bradley,
North'Texas State and Alcorn
State.
The Pirates will return eight let-
termen and three starters off Har-
rison's first club, which finished
16-13 and advanced to the semi-
finals of the ECAC-South tourna-
ment.
The schedule: Nov. 26, CAMPBELL
UNIVERSITY, 7:30; Nov. 30.
CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT, 7:30; Dec.
3 at Virginia Commonwealth University,
Richmond, VA, 7:35; Dec. 10 at Duke
University, Durham, NC 7:30; Dec. 17,
DREXEL UNIVERSITY, 7:30; Dec.
20-21 at Bradley University River City
Shootout (ECU vs Bradley, 7:00 CST,
Alcorn State vs North Texas State, 9:00
CST, Dec. 20); Dec. 28 at Boston Universi-
ty, Boston, MA , 7:30.
Jan. 2, UNC CHARLOTTE, 7:30; Jan.
7 at Northeastern University, Boston, MA,
7:30; Jan. 9 at George Mason University,
Fairfax. VA 7:30; Jan. 14 at William �
Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 7:30; Jan. 19
FRANCIS MARION COLLEGE, 7:30;
Jan 21, UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND,
7:30; Jan. 25, UNC-WILMINGTON,
7:30; Jan. 28 at James Madison Universi-
ty, Harrisonburg, VA, 7:30; Jan. 30 at
Navy, Annapolis, MD, 7:30.
Feb. 4, GEORGE MASON UNIVERSI
TY, 7:30; Feb. 6 at Eastern Illinois Univer-
sity, Charleston, IL, 7:30 CST; Feb. 8 at
Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL,
7:30 CST; Feb. 11, WILLIAM ' MARY,
7:30; Feb. 14, HOWARD, 7:30; Feb. 18 at
Richmond, Richmond, VA, 7:30; Feb. 20,
NAVY. 7:30; Feb. 25 at UNC-
Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, 7:30; Feb.
29 at Campbell University in Fayetteville,
NC, 7:30; Mar. 3. JAMES MADISON
UNIVERSITY, 7:30.
have tried too many quarterbacks
trying to find the right people
behind Ingram Emory said. "I
think we lost some consistency
After working up to four prac-
tices per day, the Pirates are now
undergoing one night workout
and will begin a late afternoon
practice daily when classes begin
on Thursday. For the first time
ever, the Pirates now have a
lighted practice field.
According to Emory, the
Pirates are right on schedule
practice-wise. They have already
been through 38 practices and
have 29 practices left before
gametime. An NCAA rule allows
only a certain amount of practices
from the first day of class until
gametime.
With FSU as the season debut,
the Bucs will need every chance
they can get to prepare for the
Seminoles. Just what will the
Pirates have to do to fight off the
great talent they'll go up against
this season? Emory has three
things in minds. "One, we must
outwork our opponents he said
"Two, we must out-communicate
our opponents. And three, we
must out-motivate our op-
ponents
Realistically, the odds of the
Pirates upsetting a team with a
five-million dollar program are
slim. But the Pirates don
that wa. according t
"Just ask any coach
player, and they'll tell you I
they believe they tan beat I SI
Even if that doesn't h
Emory can always chalk h
experience. In his
Division- teams like ESI
"greatest challenge ever '
"If we get beat, that :
mean that we don't beli
Division I he added " -
it's not how wc start, but hov
end up
Offensive Tackle Coach Charlie Elmquist observes as Pirates set up for a pla at the line of scrimmage.
Offense May Be Fastest Ever
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports V dllnr
"We've got 10 short days to get
ready Those were the words of
Head Football Coach Ed Emory
concerning the Pirates' first-game
clash with Division-I powerhouse
FSU.
After a 56-17 defeat last season,
the Bucs would obviously like to
gain a little respect down in the
sunny state. "Last year, they just
out defensed us, but I don't think
that will be the case this year
Emory said.
"If we can keep it close until
the fourth quarter, I think we've
got a great chance (to beat FSU)
he said.
The Bucs have been preparing
for their first bout since August 6,
and according to Emory, the
players came back in excellent
condition.
"This is the best conditioned
football team � and the fastest �
that I've ever been associated
with Emory said, following the
team's 40-yard running drills.
"I'm extremely pleased with the
way our players reported back
he continued. "The times are
super. There's no question about
that. Anytime you have an entire
unit clocked in under five
seconds, you've got to be pleas-
ed
Emory has something else to be
quite pleased about. Injuries.
"We're in better shape injury-
wise than we've been in the four
years I've been here Emory
said. Presently, number two
quarterback John Williams has
sustained the worst injury with a
sprained ankle. He is expected,
however, to be ready for the FSU
trip.
Number one quarterback Kevin
Ingram has suffered a shoulder
bruise, but observers contend that
Ingram has been playing in top
form since he returned in August.
"He (Ingram) has matured a great
deal and has been fantastic in pre-
season Emory said. "The job
(number one quarterback) is his at
present and someone will have to
take it away from him. Kevin's
leadership is better; he has con-
fidence and is throwing better
Williams, who is also a guard
on the men's basketball team, was
definitely giving Ingram a battle
for the position until his injury.
"His absence really hurts us
Emory said, "as none of the four
young quarterbacks are ready to
Play
During last weekend's Media
Day activities, Emory analyzed
each offensive position and the
players who are now filling each
role. Here are his assessments:
Center: "I feel we are very, very
strong at center Emory said.
"All three at the positions were
originally walkons, and all three
are just overachievers Senior
John Floyd, a walkon who earned
a scholarship, has returned as
ECU's starting center for the se-
cond consecutive year.
Junior Tim Mitchell, who is
also vying for the center position,
has been the biggest surprise thus
far, according to Emory. "Tim
lost weight over the summer, has
had a great pre-season, and is
competing for the starting posi-
tion Redshirt freshman Greg
Thomas is the third man in line,
but he is presently out of commis-
sion with a back fracture
Offensive Guard: "We have
three players that can play with
anyone in the country Senior
Terry Long will be the premier
lineman and juniors Norman
Quick and Ricky Hilburn will
serve as backups.
Offensive Tackle: "John
Robertson will be a fine pro pro-
spect and is in the same class as
Tootie Robbins with the St. Louis
Club Senior Mac Powers, who
returns to the team after being
sidelined with a knee injury last
season, has also been impressive
during practices. Sophomore
Greg Quick and freshman Tim
Dumas will serve as backups.
Emory described all four as
"good ones
Tight End: "We have the most
quality and depth at tight end of
any position on the team Emorv
said. "Norwood V'ann (SeniorJ -
number one ai 1 proba
most underrate playei
team. We have excelleni
in Lloyd Black, a
ago as a walkon 1 v� ave
thought could p. Jut:
Damon Pope, who
quickest plavers oil
4.4 speed, will a
depth.
Wide Receivers
most improved area oi
team Emory said. -V sp
we have quality in Stefon Adams
(junior) and his brother Vn
(freshman). In the fla: �
tion, we have a great battle -
on between Rickv Nichols nun.
and junior college transfer Hei
Williams (junior). The) arc is)
superior players with ven
good speed
Fullback: "Earnest ByiK
best total back I've ever coac
on a football team. He's del
in the class of AC. Collii
Theodore sutton, former Pii
players. Despite his greatness,
he's being pushed by another ven
strong player, Reggie Brai
(junior). Both will pla a greal
deal
Tailback: "We have two g
athletes at tailback, but they b
are so very small Jimmy
Walden and Tony Baker are so
close that Emory said "one CO
Hip a coin for a starter
Emory: Defense Wins Games
By KEN BOLTON
AmIiUbi Sports Editor
When ECU faces Florida State
on Sept. 3, the Pirate defense will
be trying to control an offense
that has averaged nearly 60 points
a game in the only two ECU-FSU
meetings.
But this year's ECU team is ex-
pected to be the strongest in many
years, and the Pirate coaching
staff is well aware of the impor-
tance of a solid defensive unit.
"To win, we must have a better
defense stated fourth-year head
coach Ed Emory. "You only win
with great defense
The Pirates won't have to wait
long to find out due to the fact
that the Seminoles return seven
starters from an offense that
averaged 35 points a game in
1982.
"The Florida State game will
give our players a good criteria to
go by said first-year defensive
coordinator Tom Throckmorton.
"But the first game is not the en-
tire season and we will try to be
competitive against everyone
Perhaps the biggest asset for
this year's defensive squad will be
the number of seniors expected to
start. Throckmorton estimated
that as many as seven seniors
could be starting on defense.
"The seniors have great
character and work tremendously
hard to put themselves in position
to be successful Throckmorton
elaborated. "They work as hard
as any group I've ever been
around
The biggest question mark at
this point is how much the loss of
All-American defensive end Jody
Schulz will hurt. Schulz, who is
currently playing for the
Philadelphia Eagles, led ECU
with 105 tackles last year.
Another area that will be wat-
ched carefully will be linebacker.
The return of Mike Grant should
bolster a position that was
plagued with injuries in 1982.
A general assessment of each
defensive position for the 1983
Pirates follows:
TACKLE: Probably the
strongest overall position on the
entire defense with potential all-
stars Steve Hamilton and Hal
Stephens back for their fourth
year as starters.
"We have two great ones at
defensive tackle said Emory.
"Steve Hamilton is the best I've
been associated with in 25 years of
football. But not but an edge
behind is Hal Stephens
NOSEGUARD: This has been
an unsettled position throughout
Emory's years and remains in that
class. Gerry Rogers, who Emory-
feels is underated due to the talent
of the other linemen, will be called
upon to start.
If there's a hard-luck case on
the Pirate team, it has to be
Rogers. After transferring from
Maryland to Villanova, Rogers
was unable to play because the
Wildcats dropped their football
program. A case of
mononucleosis kept him out the
entire 1981 season at ECU, and
then Rogers broke both hands on
the first dav of fall drills in 1982
DEFENSIVE END: The loss oi
Jody Schulz to the NFL ranks will
leave a hard-to-fill hole in the
Pirate defensive line. But a strong
contingent of returning experienc-
ed players will fill in the gap.
Jeff Peques, a senior from
Laurinburg, is a returning starter
on one side of the line, while
seniors Curtis Wyatt and Kennv
Phillips are battling for the other
spot.
LINEBACKER: The best word
to describe this position in 1982 is
to simply call it a disaster. At one
time, 11 linebackers were out for
one reason or another. But with
the return of Mike Grant, the
leading tackier in 1981, the depth
at linebp-rker is strong.
Throckmorton compared the
linebacker position to the running
backs on the offensive side. "You
can never have enough good
linebackers he stated. "So
many things can happen so fast
See DEFENSE, Page 21
'toons t am
With less than I
eeks before the first
official match of the
1983 season, I
soccer coach R
( hurch is optimistic
about about this
year's squad
"With the quality
recruits that are com-
ing in, and a fine
group of veterans
returning. I look for
our record to improve
this season Church
stated.
The Pirate
first season
Church at the h-
tied the hoo! re.
for most wii
vear while postii j
overall record of 7
The Pirate- I
been practicing I �
three times a la
the
temperatu-
iecond-yea
pleased with the p:
gress " Hie team
really matured u
:er players,
commented. "1
jre rej . .
toge
extra ha:d
While tra
and
1)1
Br
ai
St!
I

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CALL TODAY FOR
21
4
L





THE EAST CAROL IN IAN
AUGUST 24J952
19
1
ule
j a dollar program are
he P ates don't see it
to Baker.
isk an coach or any
and the'U tell you that
ieve the can beat FSU
I that doesn't happen
always chalk it up to
In his words,
I teams like FSL are the
challenge ever
heat, that doesn't
don't belong jn
lie dded. "After all,
m tart, but how He

lage
i�i
Ever
.1 Vann (Senior) is
and probably the
ed plaer on the
excellent backup
:k, ho three years
n 1 would not have
play Junior
�.ho iv one of the
vMi the team with
. will also provide more
ncivers "This is the
� ed area on our
I said. "At split end
in Stefon Adams
his brother Amos
1). In the Hanker posi-
a great battle going
- I � Nichols (junior)
ege transfer Henry
nior). The are just
with very, very
'Earnest Byner is the
k I've ever coached
earn. He's definitely
: AC. Collins and
sutton, former Pirate
Despite his greatness,
pushed by another very
aver. Reggie Branch
will play a great
iU "We have two great
� but they both
ver small Jimmy
and Tony Baker are so
jt Emory said "one could
tin for a starter
ames
dav of fall drills in 1982.
1NSIVE END: The loss of
hul7 to the NFL ranks will
hard-to-fill hole in the
efensive line. But a strong
mt of returning experienc-
rrs will fill in the gap.
Peques, a senior from
furg, is a returning starter
side of the line, while
Curtis Wyatt and Kenny
are battling for the other
(BACKER: The best word
ibe this position in 1982 is
y call it a disaster. At one
linebackers were out for
son or another. But with
lrn of Mike Grant, the
I tackier in 1981, the depth
icker is strong.
:kmorton compared the
ter position to the running
the offensive side. "You
-er have enough good
cers, ' he stated. "So
lings can happen so fast
DEFENSE, Page 21
�I 11
Soccer Team Faces Tough Year
By KEN BOLTON
With less than two
weeks before the First
official match of the
1983 season, ECU
soccer coach Robbie
church is optimistic
about about this
vear's squad.
"With the quality
recruits that are com-
ing in, and a fine
group of veterans
returning, I look for
our record to improve
this season Church
stated.
The Pirates, in their
first season with
Church at the helm,
tied the school record
tor most wins last
vear while posting an
overall record of 7-10.
The Pirates have
been practicing two or
three times a day in
the triple-figure
temperatures, and the
second-year coach is
pleased with the pro-
gress. "The team has
really matured as soc-
cer players Church
commented. "They
are really pulling
together and working
extra hard
While travelling up
and down the east
coast over the off-
season, Church was
able to pick up some
quality recruits and
replenish the holes left
by departing defen-
sive backs and
goalies.
Gone from last
year's team are
starters Duane
Degaetano, Steve
Brody, Dennis Elwell
and Chip Baker. But a
strong recruiting class
will help make up for
some of those losses.
Some of the recruits
expected to see play-
ing are: goalie Grant
Pearson and
defenders David
Sept. 6
Sept. 10
Sept. 15
Sept. 19
Sept. 24
Sept. 25
Sept. 27
Oct. 1
Oct. 3
Oct. 5
Oct. 12
Oct. 17
Oct. 20
Oct. 22
Oct. 26
Nov. 2
Nov. 5
Nov. 9
Henenlotter, Doug
Patmore and Palmier
Grossi. Alan Smith,
who set Georgia scor-
ing records last year,
and Junior College
All-American Brian
Colgan will be
counted on to provide
much of the punch.
Church considers
this year's forward
line to be the strongest
link in the team's
chain. Along with
newcomers Smith and
Colgan, Mark Hardy
and Doug Kelly will
be trying to Fill the
nets.
Hardy, a junior
from Morristown,
N.J has led the
Pirates in scoring for
the past two years.
Last year, Hardy was
instrumental in the
Pirates setting a
school record with 34
goals.
According to
Church, the key to
this year's team will
be play of the mid-
fielders. Billy Mer-
win, Danny Wheling,
Dave Skef fington and
Jamie Reibel head up
what Church calls the
most improved area
on the team.
With this year's
schedule � which
could be the toughest
PFEIFFER, 3:00
at George Mason
ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN, 3:00
at UNC-Charlotte
at Rutgers
at Monmouth College
OLD DOMINION
at Campbell
ELON COLLEGE, 3:00
UNC-GREENSBORO, 3:30
at UNC-Wilmington
at USC-Spartanburg
at N.C. Wesleyan
METHODIST COLLEGE, 2:00
at Virginia Wesleyan
at William & Mary
at Christopher Newport
N.C. STATE, 3:00
in school history �
the Pirates will have
to be competitive in
every match in order
to be successful.
"Soccer is no
longer considered a
'weak sister' at
schools in the United
States as more and
more money is being
put into the pro-
grams Church ex-
plained. "So while we
may be improved, so
will every team on our
schedule
As Church puts it,
the Pirates will have a
very good shot at win-
ning more games than
last year's squad did.
"This is a very
young and inex-
perienced team, but
they're more talented
and hungrier than last
year Church stated.
"If we put it all
together, we will win
quite a few
The Pirates get
thirds underway this
weekend with scrim-
mages against two
very good soccer
schools. On Friday,
the Pirates travel to
High Point and on
Saturday, ECU will
be heading to Bel-
mont Abbey.

Welcome Back ECU"

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jO 1Mb t AST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24,
Kobe Sets Ultimate Goal
?
!
By RANDY MEWS
sufl Writer
Swimming Coach
Rick Kobe knows ex-
actly vhat his goal is
for the upcoming
season. "We want to
hae the best team in
Ed' history he
said.
With the large ar-
ra of talent return-
ing, that may not be
an impossible task.
I eading the men's
team will be last
year's Most Valuable
Swimmer, freestyler
Chris Pitelli. "We ex-
pect Chris to close in
on several varsity
records this year
aid Kobe, "as well as
make our freestyle
relay team one of the
best in the country
Complimenting
Pitelli in the freestyle
will be Stranton
Smith, a very versatile
swimmer who is also
strong in the in-
dividual medley
event.
Co-Captains Greg
Wary and Doug Mac-
MUlan will both be
dominating forces in
the butterfly. Fach
are freshman record
holders, and Mac
Millan currently holds
the 200-meter varsity
mark.
Diver Scott Eagle
will be a key factor in
the point totals as he
attempts to repeat as
an NCAA regional
participant.
Breaststroker and
All-America Joanne
Mc Culley will be the
main force on the
women's team. Kobe
expects her to finish in
the top vix at the na-
tionals as she vies for
All-America status
once again.
Cindy Newman is
the most versatile of
the women, leading
the wav in both the
freestyle and butterfly
strokes. As a
freestyler she is effec-
tive in the 50 all the
way up to the
500-meters.
Corrine Seech is
strong as a diver, and
is expected to qualify
for the nationals for
the second con-
secutive year.
Kobe also had an
excellent year
recruiting, in what he
described as "the
finest crop of incom-
ing swimmers ever to
be assembled at
ECU
"We filled all the
spots where we had
some problems last
year he said, "and 1
don't see any
weaknesses on the
men's or women's
team for the upcom-
ing season
Foremost among
the recruits is Chema
Larranaga from
Lima, Peru Lar-
ranaga holds two
Peruvian national
records and was a par-
ticipant in the 1980
Olympics in Moscow
In 1982, he was
junior college cham-
pion in the 500 and
1650-meter freestyle
events and was
runner-up for na-
tional swimmer of the
year.
Also joining the
Pirates will be
backstrokers Kevin
Hidalgo from
Chester, a. and
Caycee Paust from
Richmond. Both hold
times in their events
that are better than
the current ECU var-
sity records.
Diver Lori Miller of
Columbus, Pa. will be
a fine addition com-
plimenting current
divers Eagle and
Seech. Kobe describes
Miller as having na-
tional notential.
Among the 26 new
recruits, 16 men and
10 women, Kobe also
managed to sign two
National Champions
and a junior college
All-America.
"I expect
everybody to con-
tribute immediate-
ly Kobe said.
"Swimming is the
type of sport where
freshmen can step
right in, and I feel
about 75 percent of
our new kids will
score points for us in
their first season
Although the
Pirates are going to be
strong in every event,
Kobe will look for the
most out of his
freestylers. "We're
solid all the way from
the 50 to the
1650-meter events
Steven Hollett, a
transfer student from
Tennesse who
becomes eligible in
December, and Stan
Williams who returns
from a year's stay in
Texas are two ad-
ditinal swimmers that
will join the freestyle
corps in the fall.
The Pirates begin
practice on Sept. 5 in
preparation for their
five month long
season which pits
them against some of
the toughest teams in
the country.
The men will com-
pete in 12 duals meets,
and the women in 13,
against such teams as
North Carolina, N.C.
State, Johns Hopkins,
South Florida and the
Naval Academy.
Kobe has high ex-
cpectations for the
upcoming season and
after several exhibi-
tion meets, the Pirates
should be ready for
their Nov. 18 season
opener against N.C.
State.
s
u

u
�.
.
y




:


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ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY1
Swim Coach Rkk Kobe is hoping that this year's squads may become the best teams in ECU history. Along with all-America
Joanne McCuiley and other top swimmers, the Pirates should have several athletes advancing to the nationals.
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PARENTS CAN PAY TUITION
WITH INTUITION
Think about it.
Four years of tuition Four years of rental
student housing plus all the incidentals of financ-
ing a college education For most of us, it
isn't easy. Not by a long shot.
But here's a thought that not only
makes it more affordable, but makes it
sensible as well.
You can purchase a fully-furnished
2-bedroom, 2 or 2 Vz -bath condominium
townhouse apartment at
Kingston Place (only a
mile from ECU.) at pre-
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with a full 90
financing plan to make it
even easier.
Think about it.
Tax laws now permit a parent to rent to a
son or daughter so long as the rent charged
is at "fair market value
KINGSTON
PLACE
So, you want a gcxd place for your student
to live You rent him or her your good place At the
end of four years you've not only educated a oung
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And at the end of their college
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STUDENTS� Don't Go Through Another Yearof the "Housing HasseU"
Have your Parent call today or you come by our office for additional information.
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IN N.C. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-682-8102 (Outside N.C, call collect 919-756-0285)
Kingston Place is a development of FR Corporation of Hilton Head Island. South Carolina and marketed by I
y I nicim of America. Inc
Bak
To
In the hea
August practice
for East C aroln
football team, the
tion has become e
hotter in the Pii
backfield a Trj
Baker and Jim
Walden vie for
starting tailbd .
With the
opener aga
Florida State
two eeks ad.
ECU coaching
left with the pleas
problem'
deciding lx
two talented I
as to who
the starting
Tallahassee.
Defe,
First
Cont'd From Pag
P.J Jordan I
at linebacke-
and is slated to fill
of the spots again i
year Reliable bat
ups include redsh;
Chris Santa Cruz aj
JICO T
Johnson.
CORNERRBAC
A four-way batl
shaping up for
two cornerbacK p -
tions. With Sam VI
ris and Gerald 5
missing from
year's squad, Chu
Bishop return as
only starting quarti
back
On the right sic
the defer,
backfield. Bishop j
be pushed hard
Footb
On Sail
While
students a I
through the de 3
drop-add this ve;
they will also be at
to purchase :V
tickets to the v
State game or Sc
10.
A special hoc
be set up in Me-
Gym on V edneal
and Thursday, w
students can buy
tickets with an activi
card and student 1
Price of the ticket1
$12.00.
In addition. tick
can be purchased
Mi nges Colisei
from 8:00 am
5:00 p.m.
Before each hori
game this ear. stj
dent tickets can be o
tamed Tuesda
Wednesday ari
Thursday
8:00-5:00 in Mind
and 10-4
Mendenhall Stude
Center. Students
receive one free tick
with an ID and actyj
ty card, and may bJ
one guest ticket
Vetera
Adds
ECU veteran trad
coach Bill Carson wil
add two more team
to his coaching duti
this school year. 1
addition to the men'l
indoor and outdool
teams, as well al
coach a cross countrf
team.
Cross country is be
ing added to th(
Pirate program thij
fall, as the ECACf
South will hold
cross country cham
pionship November
at the University oj
Richmond. Th





�M
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( rig with all- America
natmnalv
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24. 1983
21
Walden
Top Spot In Pirate Backfield
In the heat of
August practice drills
for East Carolina's
football team, the ac-
tion has become even
hotter in the Pirate
backfield as Tony
Baker and Jimmy
Walden vie for the
starting tailback spot.
With the season-
opener against
Florida State less than
two weeks away, the
ECU coaching staff is
left with the pleasant
�problem" of
deciding between the
two talented runners
as to who will be in
the starting lineup in
Tallahassee, Fla.
Sept. 3.
Baker became the
Pirates' number one
tailback during his
freshman season in
1982 when Walden
went down with a
knee injury during
preseason practices.
Baker responded with
a super season,
leading the team with
827 yards on a whop-
ping 6.6 yards per
carry. Walden, on the
other hand, returned
from his initial
mishap only to be
sidelined with another
injury.
"Either way the
situation works out
this year between Jim-
my and myself, 1
know that we'll be
strong at tailback
said Baker, a 5-10,
1 7 0 - p o u n d
sophomore from
High Point, NC. "I
want to start and I'm
quite sure that he
wants to start, so this
next week and a half
will tell the story.
"For me, I feel that
the competition is
good for us and the
team said Walden a
5-10, 174-pounder
from Greensboro,
NC "The way I feel
is if the decision is for
me to start � or if it's
for Tony � there
won't be any bad
blood because we
both are probably go-
ing to see an equal
amount of playing
time
Walden pointed out
another aspect of the
comparison between
the two runners that
could play in the deci-
sion as to who is on
the field at a given
time.
"Tony is more of a
straight-ahead run-
ner he explained.
"He'll just put his
head down and go
after you, which is
something that you
have to do in football.
Whereas, I like to
make cuts and try to
juke the defender in
the open field. We
have two different
styles
While the styles dif-
fer, the essentials re-
main equal between
the two. Both are
lightning fast, timing
in at 4.4 seconds in
the 40-yard dash dur-
ing the first day of fall
drills, and both
possess explosive of-
fensive abilities.
Baker recorded the
longest run from
scrimmage in 1982
when he sprinted 75
yards for a
touchdown against
Richmond. He also
ran for 165 yards on
20 carries in the
season-ending victory
at Temple. During
Walden's freshman
season in 1981, he ig-
nited the Ficklen
Stadium crowd with a
93-yard kickoff return
against East Ten-
nessee State and a
77-yard punt return
vs. Southwestern
Louisiana.
Pirates '83
SCHEDULE
Sept. 3
Sept. 10
Sept. 17
Oct. 1
Oct. 8
Oct. 15
Oct. 22
Oct. 29
Nov. 5
Nov. 12
Nov. 19
at Florida State
at NC. State
MURRAY STATE
at Missouri
SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA
at Temple
at Florida
EAST TENNESSEE STATE
(Homecoming)
at Miami (FL)
WILLIAM & MARY
at Southern Mississippi
Jp
DOC
3�C
Defense Solid As
First Game Nears
Cont'd From Page 18
P.J. Jordan started
at linebacker last year
and is slated to fill one
of the spots again this
year. Reliable back-
ups include redshirts
Chris Santa Cruz and
JUCO Tyrone
Johnson.
CORNERRBACK:
A four-way battle is
shaping up for the
two cornerback posi-
tions. With Sam Nor-
ris and Gerald Sykes
missing from last
year's squad. Chuck
Bishop returns as the
only starting quarter-
back.
On the right side of
the defensive
backfield, Bishop will
be pushed hard by-
young Calvin Adams
for that position. On
the left side, Kevin
Walker and redshirt
Rally Caparas will
battle for a spot in the
season-opener.
SAFETY: The
return of honorable
mention Ail-
American Clint Har-
ris will add a great
deal of leadership to
the entire defense.
While Harris is
holding down the free
safety position, the
strong safety appears
to be Keith Brown.
"Clint Harris is
playing the best ever
here at free safety
Emory commented.
"Keith Brown, at
strong safety, is hav-
ing the best practice at
that position of
anyone we've had
here
DOC
DOC
:c;
The Paladin DRIVE -IN
(formally Tice drive-in)
Welcomes E.C.U. Back
with Student Night
Every Wed. $3.00 Carload
Now Showing: War Games PG
FOOD
is our
SUBJECT
Anyone interested in trying out
for the ECU Men's Basketball
team should contact Head Coach
Charlie Harrison no later than
Sept. 9. Call 757-6472 for more
information.
�:�:�:�:�:�:��:�:�:�:�:�:�:�:�
Football Tickets
On Sale Today
While ECU
students are suffering
through the despair of
drop-add this year,
they will also be able
to purchase football
tickets to the N.C.
State game on Sept.
10.
A special booth will
be set up in Memorial
Gym on Wednesday
and Thursday, where
students can buy two
v ets with an activity
card and student ID.
Price of the tickets is
$12.00.
In addition, tickets
can be purchased at
Minges Coliseum
from 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m.
Before each home
game this year, stu-
dent tickets can be ob-
tained Tuesday,
Wednesday and
Thursday from
8:00-5:00 in Minges
and 10-4 in
Mendenhall Student
Center. Students can
receive one free ticket
with an ID and activi-
ty card, and may buy
one guest ticket at
half-price with ID and
activity card.
At every home
game this year,
students will have to
have game tickets
AND student ID card.
In order to pur-
chase group tickets, a
minimum of 20
students with current
ID and activity cards
are needed to com-
prise a group.
One designated
spokesperson and one
alternate represen-
tative are needed to
work with the ticket
office during the
home schedule. Each
person may purchase
one guest ticket at
$5.00 and an
unlimited number of
$10.00 tickets.
The designated
spokesperson or alter-
nate must attend a
group meeting at 5:00
p.m. in Room 142
Minges Coliseum on
Thursday, Sept. 1.
Group ticket pick-up
for games will be held
on Wednesday.
WASH
o�.
oXAvAe
211 JARVISST.
2 BLOCKS FROM ECU
ADJACENT TO OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
-ass

'�,
NEW
EQUIPMENT!
�2?v
A. � 'oJ
X
'f
V
O


Veteran Coach
Adds To Duties
a
CIGARETTES
75
(IN VENDING MACHINE)
coV�K oX
r,0
ECU veteran track
coach Bill Carson will
add two more teams
to his coaching duties
this school year. In
addition to the men's
indoor and outdoor
teams, as well as
coach a cross country
team.
Cross country is be-
ing added to the
Pirate program this
fall, as the ECAC-
South will hold a
cross country cham-
pionship November 5
at the University of
Richmond. The
ECAC-South is ad-
ding five champion-
ships this athletic
year, in addition to
basketball. This is the
first time that East
Carolina has fielded a
cross country team
since the mid-1970's.
Carson, entering
his 17th year on the
Pirate coaching staff,
is the senior East
Carolina coach. He
has also produced
more all-American
athletes than any
other coach in East
Carolina history.
fcVittS�iI
to H�1�HaaH�M
IDLfciftUUfeIOMb
!
ONE FREE PLAY
ON VIDEO GAMES
PRESENT THIS COUPON
TO ATTENDANT BETWEEN
8 A.M. & 5 P.M. TO RECEIVE
ONE FREE PLAY ON
THE VIDEO GAME OF
YOUR CHOICE.
LIMIT ONE PREE PLAY PER VISIT.
S25 VALUE 2
ONE
FREE WASH!
PRESENT THIS COUPON
TO ATTENDANT BETWEEN
8 A.M. it 5 P.M.
TO RECEIVE
ONE FREE WASH
LIMIT ONE PREE WASH �SR VISIT.
9-343
JTOtMINSe DRYING
; TIME FREE
i
i
i
s
I
I
I
PRESENT THIS COUPON
TO ATTENDANT BETWEEN
8 A.M. A 5 P.M. TO RECEIVE
28 MINUTES
FREE DRYING
LIMIT ONE PREE DRYING Pt'R VISIT.
9-W3
754 VALUE 75C25C VALUE

mttmrnmwmtm
M






22
THht AST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24, Whi
?
Hamilton Has Faith
One of ECU'S
leading defensive
tackles has not only
been raising opposing
coaches' eyebrows,
but professional
scouts as well.
He's Steve
Hamilton, the
Pirates' 6-4,
253-pound prized
possession . who is
making a serious bid
for all-America
honors as a senior and
a lofty perch in next
spring's NFL draft.
But unlike many of
his fellow teammates
at the defensive tackle
slot, Hamilton is not
the bulky and slower
type. Instead, he has a
lean, muscular build
that enables him to
run the 40-yard dash
in 4.7 seconds.
And with these
qualifications,
Hamilton hopes to
lead the Pirates to a
banner season this
fall.
"We've got a real
good looking team
this year he said
after finishing the
third of four daily
practices during
ECU'S first week of
camp. "Our schedule
is tough this season,
but I wouldn't want it
any other way. We're
not awed by our
schedule at all because
i honestly feel that we
can beat anv team we
play
With a road
schedule that begins
at Florida State and
ends at Southern
Mississippi, and with
visits to N.C. State,
Missouri, Temple,
Florida and Miami in
between, Hamilton
has set a goal which
exemplifies his desire
to succeed.
when first-year coach
Ed Emory saw a
greater need at defen-
sive tackle. "We were
really weak at the
tackle spot Emory
said, "and Steve was
so talented that I
knew he could make
the switch for us
Emory has never
regretted the move.

.
All-America Candidate Steve Hamilton
After graduating
from Uilliamsville
High School in New-
York, Hamilton's im-
mediate goal was to
play for a major col-
lege football team. He
opted to attend Fork
Union Military
Acadenn in Virginia
before signing on with
the Pirates.
Hamilton arrived in
Greenville as a
227-pound tight end
Hamilton increased
his size and strength
while maintaining his
excellent quickness
and became a major
force on the Pirate
defensive front.
last season, he
emerged as a bona
fide pro prospect,
recording 46 tackles,
including seven for a
loss of 54 yards. He
was three times nam-
ed the team's defen-
sive player of the
week and was named
the most improved
defensive player in
1982.
"Last season was
definitely my best, but
my goal for this
season is to be a much
better football player
and for the team to
play up to its poten-
tial he said. "I try
to take most of my
goals one year at a
time.
"Right out of high
school, my goal was
to have a good year at
Fork Union and get a
scholarship. At East
Carolina, I've wanted
to improve each year.
My immediate goal
for the team is to go
to a bowl game and
prove that East
Carolina is a major
college force
Hamilton speaks
freely of his positive
feeling concerning
ECU's outlook in '83,
but he downplays the
recent attention he
has received.
However, it is no
secret that his com-
bination of size and
speed has pro scouts
projecting him as a
high draft pick for
'84.
But for now, Steve
Hamilton is content
with setting his goals
one year at a time �
and going after them.
I
J4
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Hi'
� vv
? im
OAKY PATTERSON ECU PtMt Lab
Defensive Coordinator Tom Throckmorton (right) and Defensive End Coach Waveriy BrookJ
carefully observe defensive play during one of the Pirates' daily practices. '
-�
M
r�
HAIR GALLERY
23C ORCENVM L� 8LVO IThi Tirr- E
Eis WE F am i . t-tft Care P�a�M
355-2076
OPEN MON SAT
Cuts and Styles for
"Guys and Gals"
Mon-Fri and Thurs.
evenings by appt.
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
TELE RENT TV
JPhufH 75tt-cMU2
2905 East 10th Strict in Green
I


, Now
theies a new
Teller E
on campus.
Now there's a Teller D at East Carolina
University. With a machine on campus and
two others nearby, banking at Wachovia
is more convenient than ever.
New East Carolina I diversity location.
Mendenhall Student Center Campus
Other locations convenient to East Carolina
Pitt Plaza Highway 261 Bvpass
University 802 E. 10th Street
W ith Teller II you can do your banking
any time of the day or night, 365 days a
year. You can make deposits, transfer
funds, make loan payments, check vour
account balances, and of course, get cash.
Teller II - banking the easy way.
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
Member Fill.L
:S3aft2��&�fii�
��
jQQ Sq
���� t
Crazy Zacks
across from Meridith College
Hillborough St. Raleigh, NC
Presents
Welcome Back Students
with Playboy 's-the girls of the A. C. C.
live and in person at
friday H. H. from 3- 7
Aug. 26th
sure to be in parking
lot at 5:00pm when the
girls arrive in the Playboy
Rolls Royce.
Bring your P.B. 'sfor autographs
Promises to be the biggest H.H. ever
'�i� -�� -
Intramun
Facult Staff Ad
visors Needed foi
Sport Clubs
The Department i
Intramural-
Recreational Sc
is requc
assistance in the Spo
Club Program Facu
ty or staff me
are needed ti
advisors for ti
following sport
Archerv . Fi
Disc, Lacrosse, ka
quetball, Ruf
Rugby Womei
cer, Team H
Men, Team H
Women, VK a
Field H
and Surfing.
Interested
or staff me
should cor .
I n t r a n
Recreationa.
Sport C!
Room
Memorial
nasium. R
757-6064
IntramuraU
Facult Maff
ECl Faculi
Staff membi
hae an opp
to par'
Depar t m el
lntrar
Recreatio-
competith
A spearate
will be
strict
staff men�
sports to -
are: Flag
Volleyball. EL: �
and Softball. S
divisions will a
established I i
dividual and
sports iR
Tenni- and G
minimum I I
t i c: r �. �
entered
dividual
spo
Come on
enter into the fun
Participate agamsi,
socialize
troduce
other ECl
and staff mem!
For furthci
t i o n c o n t a
Department
Intramural-
Recreational Sei
in Room 204
Memorial G
nasium. 757-6387
I M -Rec serM
Lifeguards
Lifeg .
Department
Intramural-
Recreationa v
during the
semester si
tend the
meeting for lifegu
to be held Tuesda
August 30,1983
4:00 p.m. in R
102 of Men:
Gymnasium.
Minimum
qualificatioi
quired for lifeguard
positions are (1) d
vanced Lifesaving oi
Water Safet instruc-
tor; and (2) CPR r
plicants must be
to show their cer-
tification cards at the
meeting.





w
V
b - l amj -
- �

achovia
Bank&Trust
I
.c.
'S
tever
Intramural-Recreational Activities
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 24. 1983
23
Facaitj Staff Ad-
visors Needed for
port Clubs
The Department of
Intramural-
Kecreational Services
requesting
assistance in the Sport
ilub Program. Facul-
; or staff members
are needed to serve as
advisors for the
owing sport clubs:
rc hery, F r i s b e e
Disc, I acrosse, Rac-
ball, Rugby Men,
Rugb Women, Soc-
I'eam Handball
M 1 earn Handball
w omen, Water Polo,
Hocke Women
S irfing.
Interested faculty
staff members
contact the
a m u r a 1 -
rational Services
' club Office in
105-A of
norial Gym-
im, Robert Fox,
"57 6064.
1 n tra m urals for
ldcult Staff
ECU Faculty and
S if! members now
. an opportunity
participate in the
) a r t me n t of
tramural-
reational Services
petitive program.
spearate division
be established
for faculty and
' members. Team
rts to be included
Flag Football,
eyball, Basketball
d Softball. Separate
ons will also be
established for in-
dual and dual
ts (Racquetball,
and Golf)- A
mum of four par-
rants must be
red in the in-
dividual or dual
sports.
Come on out and
iter into the fun
Paiupate . agauuw
with and in-
duce yourself to
ECU faculty
taff members.
. her informa-
contact the
. � I ment of
' a m u r a 1 -
reational Services
Room 204 of
Memorial Gym-
. 757-6387.
IM-Rec Services
I iteguards
. feguards for the
department of
Intramural-
Recreational Services
luring the fall
semester should at-
tend the second
meeting for lifeguards
to be held Tuesday
gust 30,1983 at
- p.m. in Room
2 of Memorial
Gymnasium.
Minimum
qualifications re-
quired for lifeguard
positions are (1) Ad-
vanced Lifesaving or
Water Safety instruc-
tor; and(2)CPR. Ap-
plicants must be able
to show their cer-
tification cards at the
meeting.
IM-Rec Services
Wor Study
Employees
Students who have
been assigned by the
Financial Aid Office
to the Work Study
Program and who are
further assigned to the
Department of
Intramural-
Recreational Services
are scheduled to meet
Tuesday August 30,
1983 at 5:30 p.m. in
Room 102 of
Memorial Gym-
nasium. Upon arriv-
ing at ECU these
students should ac-
quire their Work
Study Contracts at the
Financial Aid Office.
The contract, class
schedule and social
security card should
accompany the stu-
dent to the IM-lRec
Meeting.
Flag Football Of-
ficials
The Department of
Intramural-
Recreational Services
will begin training
clinics for Intramural
Flag Football Of-
ficials Thursday-
September 1, 1983 at
6:00 p.m. in Room
102 of Memorial
Gymnasium. Any
ECU student may at-
tend these training
clinics. Rules, inter-
pretations and
mechanics will be
discussed. Officials
will be hired based on
practical and written
tests.
Aerobics
The Department of
Sneaker Sam Sez I pet village
Inratmural-
Recreational Services
will again be offering
Aerobic Fitness
Classes to all ECU
students, faculty and
staff members this
fall. The classes are
designed to promote
cardiorespiratory
Fitness, increase flex-
ibillity and improve
muscle tone. Exercise
and aerobic activities
are performed to con-
temporary music to
provide an effective
and fun workout.
The classes are of-
fered at vaious times
during the week and
last for 6 weeks. Fees
are $4 for 1 class per
week and $8 for 2
classes per week for
students and $5 for 1
class per week and $10
for 2 classes per week
for faculty and staff.
Registration for
first session begins
August 29 and ends
September 2. Second
session registration
will begin Ocotber 19
and run through the
21. Check out the
schedule, there's sure
to be a class time and
place that's right for
you!
Outdoor Rec
The Outdoor
Recreation Program
of the Department of
Intramural-
Recreational Services
will be offering at
least three different
outdoor excursions
during Fall semester:
Whitewater Rafting,
Backpacking and
Canoeing. These trips
are an excellent op-
portunity to get out-
doors, explore new
areas and meet new
poeple all at a
nominal price.
The first trip is
Whitewater Rafting
on the French Broad
River beginning
September 24. The
French Broad River
winds through rugged
North Carolina
mountains that rise
more than 1,000 feet
fiom the rivers edge
making it one of the
most spectacular
rivers available for
Whitewater rafting. It
combines thrilling
scenery, 7 miles of
small rapids, placid
pools (suitable for
swimming) and larger
rapids to challenge
your skills, making it
ideal for the novice
and the advanced
rafter.
The group would
leave ECU on the
afternoon of Friday,
September 23 destined
for Hot Springs, N.C.
Camp will break early
Saturday morning
and the trip down the
river is scheduled to
begin at 9 a.m. The 7
mile river trip takes
about 6 hours with
time spent on instruc-
tion and transporta-
tion. A picnic lunch is
provided. Camp is
home again on Satur-
day night, and the
return to ECU is on
Sunday morning.
Reservations must
be made through the
Outdoor Recreation
Center (Rm. 113
Memorial) by 5 p.m.
Monday, September
12. There is limited
space so first come,
First served. Cost will
be 45 dollars for
registration, lodging
and the river trip.
10 GALLON STARTER KITS
$17.00
INCLUDES
TANK, GRA VEL, PUMP, FILTER
CHL ORINE REMO VER,
SAMPLE FOOD
O.
BL UE MOON
CAFE
Save Your Stomach
Don 7 eat Fast (Fried) Foods
Eat Good Fresh Home Cooking
A t the BL UE MOON CAFE
205 E. 5th St. Open 7 Days
Breakfast Anytime!
Meal Plan A vailable. Stop In
Bring in Coupon For 101 off
Anything on the Menu
Open Until 3am Fri. and Sat. Nights
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758-7008
Mr. C. Tennis Center
218-C East 5th St. Hrs. 11-6 Mon-Sat
I (1 coupon per racket) j
Converse Shoes
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Rocket:
Power Ace $50.00
Bronze Ace $65.00
Silver Ace $85.00
Composite Denominator $95.00
Jimmy Connors Leather $35.00 0
Canvas $26.00
Chris Evert Leather $36.00
Canvas $26.00
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arshs
SURF-N-SEA
GREENVILLfc
c ATLANTIC W.ACH
cNorth Carolina
50 Off 50 Off 50 Off
Ocean Pacific
AH Sperry Men's & Women's
Children's Shorts Tepsider Shoes
2o6ff M4�r�w�ff
Men s & Women s
Hawaiian n
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Print Shirts Adu Shorts
20h f ast F ifth Street
Bathing Suits
20 Off
All Other
Remaining
Summer Stock
!
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stereo
SCHOOL
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J 1045th St.
75S-1427
MoA-Sot 10o m 9p m
$8 99 List LT AND Tapes on Sak $5 99
lockson ItowmPrism
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Soft CallAdam and th� Ants
loan Jatt!?��
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Window Shados
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$3g00 Light
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ass yiLRNE,
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stereophones loudspeakers
Less is truly more. The Koss HVX is a
remarkable engineering achievement in
lightweight comfort and sound reproduc-
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astound you. And its deep bass response is
unmatched by other lightweight phones.
$149.95
The Alpine 71SS FMAM Cassette Aulo
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Hearts
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Open 12 to 12 Daily
Coupon:
Bearer of this
Coupon is entitled
to afree 8oz. soft
drink with the
purchase of a double
dip sundae or a larger
individual treat.
Expires 101583.
752-5878
in University Arcade
218 E. 5th St.
SL-Q200
Semi-automatic
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DISCWASHER SC-2
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SIMPLY ADVANCED
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Your Ice Cream Parlor Welcomes You Back!
Cease to our ok conditioned, yet heartwarming
fee piece! We hero 24 quality flavors and
26 testy toppings.
Bo o pert of the piece where friends meet.
We take pride in being ECU's Ice Cream Parlor!
AT-AU
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FOR$10.00WITHmA,A . mMA A �
purchase WALKMAN TYPE ALSO AVAILABLI
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WELCOME BACK ECU
105 Trade Street
mmm wfjjm m





- �. -
a1 5rs

.
MM
STUDENT SUP
STORE
WRIGHT BUILDINC
,?
it I
We a the Student Supply Store would like to welcome you to the camp
to shop Student Supply Store. We are owned and operated by the Um
aim to give you quick and courtious service and make your shopping c
have any questions reguarding the Student Supply Store please ask
happy to assist you.
The Student Supply Store will be open 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug
26th; Monday, 29th; Tuesday, 30th; Wednesday, 31st. The Student S
open Saturday, Aug. 27th at 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for your shopping convenien
our one-stop shopping center for:
i textbooks
licit.
ippli
L ci 1L u Ut I () I S
pirate ivenirs
imprinted jewelry
photofinishing
imprinted wearing apparel
art supplies
official class rings
leisure reading books
gift items
medical supplies
typewriter re
Be sure to register for the following to be given away
on Friday, Aug. 26 of 5 p.m.
$75 Gift Certificate to be used against book and supply purchases
$50 Gift Certificate to be used against book and supply purchases
$25 Gift Certificate to be used against book and supply purchases
Hatteras Canvas Backpack
ECU Sweatshirt
,0
fSA'
pt VlasteH ard
a Hankards





Title
The East Carolinian, August 24, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 24, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.279
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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