The East Carolinian, July 27, 1983






t
&Uz iEant Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.S7Noj 7
Wednesday July 27,1M3
GreeavtUe, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
RegistrationAid Link
Feds Grant Extension
Male college students who ar
seeking federal financial aid have
been granted a one-month grace
period until Sept. 1 to sign forms
certifying they have registered for
the draft.
The Department of Education
originally set the deadline for
Aug. 1 after the U.S. Supreme
Court lifted a lower court's in-
junction against the law requiring
federal aid recipients to certify
they had registered for a military
draft.
ECU students requesting finan-
cial aid will be required to fill out
a "Statement of Educational Pur-
poseRegistration Complaince"
which asks if the applicant has
satisfied the registration requi-e-
ment or is exempt.
ECU Financial Aid Director
Robert M. Boudreaux has been
critical of the new law because he
claims it discriminates against the
poor and could create an ad-
ministrative burden for his office.
As of Tuesday, Boudreaux said he
had still not received the official
notification of the 30-day exten-
sion, but he is expecting to hear
from the Dept. of Education on
Wednesday.
Six Minnesota college students
challenged the constitutionality of
the draft registration law and
secured a court injunction against
it which was overruled by the
Supreme Court in June.
Boudreaux claims it will not be
to the student's advantage to not
sign the Statement of Educational
PurposeRegistration Com-
pliance at his first opportunity.
We're not going to dispense funds
without the student's signature on
the form, Boudreaux said.
Boudreaux said any student
receiving federal financial aid who
has not signed the registration
compliance form will have to be
turned in to the Secretary of
Education. "I am obligated to
report them, and I don't want to
do that Boudreaux said.
Boudreaux said it was very
unlikely that the Supreme Court
will take action on this case before
Sept. 1, and by then his office will
be obligated to receive a signed
Registration Compliance from all
aid applicants.
Howell Hosts Ceremony For Henderson
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Assistant News Editor
ECU's oldest living professor
Dr. E.L. Henderson was a guest
of honor Monday evening at a
reception held at the home of
Chancellor John M. Howell. The
affair was held to mark Hender-
son's honorary designation as
professor emeritus.
The Henderson, 96, received
the honorary rank from ECU on
June 21 after Charles Coble, dean
of the School of Education and a
neighbor of Henderson, initiated
the process to have the honor
given to him.
Henderson came to what was
then East Carolina Teacher's Col-
lege in 1923. He served for many
years as director of student
teaching and was chairman of the
Department of Administration
and Supervision during his 21
years of service.
Henderson was fired for
disloyalty only 13 days before he
was to become eligible for retire-
ment. University President Leon
R. Meadows fired Henderson.
Meadows himself was later con-
victed and imprisoned for misuse
of funds. After Meadows' convic-
tion, Henderson filed suit in 1947
contending his dismissal was il-
legal. After settling the case out of
Court Henderson's retirement
benefits were restored.
Henderson has only visited
ECU on two occassions since his
retirement and has said that he
still does not want to be involved
with the university. He was never
been reinstated after the disloyalty
incident.
The reception at the Howell's
home was also to honor Coble for
his role in obtaining the professor
emeritus status for his friend.
On June 23, Howell signed
papers conferring professor
emeritus status on Henderson and
the Chancellor, Coble and Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Angelo A. Volpe walked to
Henderson's home near the cam-
pus to present the documents in
an impromptu ceremony.
Henderson and his wife, the
former Sula Cook, have lived in
Greenville since the professor's
retirement.
Fire Strikes ECU Frat House; Arson Suspected
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Asinuiii Ne�
A suspicious fire at the Lambda
Chi Alpha fraternity house last
week is being investigated for ar-
son. '
The fire, which took place July
17, caused some structural
damage to the three-story dwell-
ing located at 500 Elizabeth St.
No ECU students were residing in
the house at the time of the blaze.
Investigators from the Green-
ville Police Department believe
that the two fires discovered in a
first floor den at approximately
7:30 p.m. may have been started
by some young children who were
seen running from the house
around the time of the fire.
"All indications are that this is
an arson fire said Det. Sgt. Fred
Hall of the Greenville Police
Department, one of the officers
investigating the fire. "There was
no electricity or water on in the
house, we could see no reason
how the fire could have started
Hall indicated that burned-out
matches were found near the area
where the fires occurred. There
was also a kerosene fuel can
discovered in the same room.
"We're still investigating it Hall
added.
Porter Shaw, president of the
housing corporation of the Lamb-
da Chi Alpha fraternity, said oat
contractors had been contacted to
give estimates on the cost of
repairing the damages.
One fire was started in a corner
of the room, and the other was
started by a set of doors. Shaw
said the corner fire caused the
most damage, including burning a
hole in one wall and another in the
ceiling. Some curtains and a new
rug were also burned while further
Student Opinion
Congressional Sex Critiqued
Davis
The House of Represen-
tatives took rare action last
week when it officially cen-
sured two of its members who
had publically admitted to hav-
ing had sexual relations with
17-year-old House pages. Reps.
Daniel B. Crane, R-II1 and
Gerry E. Studds, D-Mass
both received the disciplinary
action which basically
amounted to public humilia-
tion. ECU students
were asked whether the actions
taken by the House against
Crane and Studds were
justified, too harsh or not
harsh enough.
Joe Campbell, English,
Sophmore � "I thought it was
totally much too harsh a
punishment. It's their decision
what they do with their private
lives. Society should not be
able to dictate in this area
Billie Ward, nursing, Junior
� "Personally, I thought what
they did was totally uncalled
for. But, there was nothing il-
legally done � morally yes �
but that's something they'll
have to Uve with
Kiziie Davis, musk educa-
tion, graduate student � "I
fed they should have been ask-
ed to resign. They (the pages)
were imposed on and taken ad-
vantage of by these con-
gressmen
Flroz Mo homed All,
business, junior � "I think
(the House censure actions)
were not strong enough. Con-
gressmen should lead rather
than be ted; they should set an
example. They should have
been dealt with more harshly
damage was caused by the smoke.
Shaw also believes the fire was
started by children playing. He
said they probably put some
flamable material down and tried
to torch it, Shaw said.
Shaw praised the quick
response of the Greenville Fire
Department. "The fire depart-
ment got there fast and did a real-
ly great job of containing it An
unidentified neighbor called the
fire department apparently after
spotting smoke coming from the
building.
According to Shaw, no ECU
students have been living in the
fraternity house during the second
summer session. Eighteen
students are scheduled to be living
in the house during the fall
semester.
Hall said that the case has also
been turned over to county
juvenile authorities to try and
determine the identies of the
children seen running from the
dwellings.
This was the third fire to occur
in an ECU fraternity house this
year. In January, a Predawn
blaze caused extensive damage to
the Tau Kappa Epsiion fraternity
house located on 10th Street
resulting in the condemnation of
the structure. On June 30, an elec-
trical short in a window fan was
the cause of a fire that damaged
an upstairs bedroom at the Kappa
Sigma fraternity house al.o
located on 10th Stieet. Student
residing in the houses at ?- rje
of the blazes were not injured.
The TKE house remained clos-
ed for several months following
the blaze which caused extensive
damage to the third floor of the
dwelling.
The Kappa Sigma has remained
open. The room where the fire
took place has been closed. No
figures have been released regar-
ding the cost of repairing the
damages at the Lambda Chi or
Kappa Sig houses.
Record Temps
In Greenville;
Energy Use Up
The worst heat wave of the yea.
continued to scorch Eastern
North Carolina and much of the
nation last week, putting record
demands for energy on many
power companies, including the
Greenville Utilities Commission, a
GUC official said Tuesday.
Energy consumption hit an all-
time high in Greenville Thursday,
with power output reaching
149,100 kilowatts, said Mike
Waters, substation and controls
engineer for GUC. The previous
record of 143,400 was set only
three days earlier.
Temperatures Thursday were
the highest of the week in Green
ville, hitting 98 degrees in the
afternoon and lowering only to 70
degrees at night. Waters said the
record power demand was
primarily caused by the weather,
and he expected demand to be less
this week as temperatures decline
slightly.
The utilities' program of load
management control, designed to
reduce power usage during peak
hours, was in effect from about 2
p.m. to 9 p.m. and cut approx-
imately 9,000 kilowatts from
Thurday's energy demand,
Waters said.
GUC has not requested con-
sumers to make specific conserva-
tion measures to cut power usage,
but Waters said any conservation
would be in the consumer's in-
terest as it would cut individual
utilities costs. GUC has not had
any trouble in supplying the in-
creased power usage.
Legislators Admit Sex With Pages;
Crane, Studds Censored In House
The House of Representatives
Wednesday took disciplinary ac-
tions against two of its members
who admitted to having engaged
in sexual relations with House
pages.
The House chose to formally
censure Reps. Daniel B. Crane,
R-Ill and Gerry E. Studds,
D-Mass, Crane admitted to hav-
ing sexual relations on several oc-
casions with a 17-year-old female
page in 1980. Studds who is un-
married admitted to having sexual
relations in 1973 with a 17-year-
old male page.
Both men publically responded
to the charges before the House
took formal action. "It is not a
simple task of any of us to meet
adequately the obligations of
either public or private life, let
along both Studds told his peers
during regular House proceedings
on July 14. "But these challenges
are made substantially more com-
plex when one is, as I am, both an
elected public official and gay "
Studds said the reUtionship
with the page was "mutual and
voluntary, without coercion " He
added that the relationship
"without question reflected a very
serious error in judgement" on his
part.
Crane apologized and 0
actions a mistake. "It happened
three years ago. I'm human, and
in no way did I violate my oath of
office. I only hope my wife and
children will forgive me
The findings regarding the ac-
tions of Crane and Studds were
unearthed by a House ethics com-
mittee. Special counsel Joseph
Califano spent $1 million and
50,000 hours of staff time in con-
ducting its investigation. The
committee, officially called the
Committee on Standards of Of-
ficial Conduct, had voted 11-1 to
recommend that Crane and
Studds be officially reprimanded
for their actions. A reprimand is
the mildest form of punishment
available.
Advocates of censure, the next
stronger punishment after repri-
mand, won out and the House
voted to revise the committee's
recommendations and take the
stronger action. Censure required
that both men stand before the
House and hear the judgement of
their peers read. In addition, the
House requires that its censored
members be stripped of any com-
mittee chairmanships for the re-
mainder of the current Congress.
Studds was accordingly stripped
of his chairmanship of the Coast
Guard and Navigation Subcom-
mittee of the Merchant Marine
and Fisheries Committee. The
final vote to censure the two con-
gressmen was 421-3 for Studds.
During the days prior to the of-
ficial censure, some House
members were calling for Crane
and Studds to be expelled from
their posts. "This is not a ques-
tion of sexual relations between
consenting adults said Rep.
Newt Gingrich, R-Ga in calling
for the two to be expelled. "This
is a question of the powerful ex-
ploiting the powerless, of an adult
praying upon schoolchildren
Two major Massachusetts'
newspapers had also called on
Studds to resign from his office.
The Boston Herald and The
Patriot Lodger both called on
Studds to step down. The Herald
is the second-largest newspaper in
Studds' district. Both Studds and
Crane have vowed to remain in
office. It is not known if either
will seek re-election.
The House has only used cen-
sure or reprimand on 24 occas-
sions in its history, and only six
times in the last SO years. All of
the recent cases of disptinary ac-
tion involved questions financial
misconduct on the part of House
rfc,m !�� ��.�. m, �,






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 27, 1983
'



Announcements
COMPUTER CLASSES
Non Credit Computer
Classes: l.Small computer
Saturday 9 00 a.m. 4 00 p.m
August 27, 1983. 2 Word
Processing Saturday 900
am 400 p.m. September 10,
19S3. 3. Programming in Basic
Saturday 900 am 400 p.m.
September 34. 1983 Contact the
Division ot Continuing Educa
tion at 757 6)43.
EARLY
REGISTRATION FOR
THEMCAT
Dr. John S. Childers, Director,
East Carolina University
Testing Center, strongly urges
all candidates planning to take
the October 1. 1983. Medical Col
lege Admission Test (MCAT) to
make absolutely sure they have
a registration packet available
in time to meet the September 2.
1983 .postmark deadline Can
didates may obtain a registra
tion packet by writing: MCAT
Registration, The American Col
lege Testing Program, P. O.
Box 414, Iowa 52240 Applica
tions are also available in the
ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105, Greenville,
NC Register Early!
MCAT REVIEW
AED (Premed Honor Society)
is sponsoring a three week
review of chemistry, biology
and physics. Registration for the
Review Session will be Sunday,
July 31 from 4:00 p.m. to 4 00 p.
m. In the Fianagen Building.
For more information call
757 6711.
I HAD A DREAM
Martin Luther King Jr. had a
dream. Don't let the DREAM
DIE I Join Thousands of
Americans from across me na-
tion in the August 27th "March
on Washington" for Jobs, Peace
and Freedom.
The March is being held on the
20th anniversary of the famous
1963 "March on Washington"
when King gave his "I have a
Dream" Speech.
Join us for the march. Come to
a meeting to organize rides on
Friday evening at 6:30 p.m. at
610 S. Elm St. or call 752 5724 or
758 4906 Keep trying
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Local
D.D. Garrett. pru-
dent of the Pitt Coun-
ty Chapter of the Na-
tional Association for
the Adancement of
Colored People came
back from the
organization's na-
tional
with t
"Right
moving
Garret
other
NAACP
tended
Draft Re
California draft
resister David Alan
Wayte is no longer off
the hook. On
Wednesday, in a 2-1
ruling, the Ninth Cir-
cut Court of Appeals
reversed iast
November's U.S.
District
sion th
char -v
Wavte.
In the
ruling,
Hatter
that the
Wayte haJ
ECU Gradi
With Ami-
An ECU computer
science graduate who
claimed she could not
accept a job uith a
corporation that was
contributing to the
"proliferation of
destruction" of the
earth has found a
morally acceptable
job.
Mary Rider
graduated this spring
with a degree in com-
puter science and a
minor in accounting.
Rider, 22, claimed in
February that she felt
"a deepening call as a
Christian to be a
peacemaker
Realizing that her
job opportunities
were limited. Rider
searched and wrote
several letters to
North Carolina poace
organizations re-
questing their help.
She also wrote to the
bishop of her religious
denomination for
help.
After a several
month search, Rider
has been hired by an
organization known
as Pro-Lifers for Sur-
vivial, an anti-
abortion anti-nuclear
weapons organiza-
tion.
Rider said she had
been on the mailing
list of the
Pennsylvania-based
group for several
months, and when she
received a letter
stating that the group
was looking for staff
positions she wrote to
them c,
dilemmal
questing
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Rider
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said. "Irutd
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JULY 27.19t3
Local NAACP Leaders Attend Convention
D.D. Garrett, presi-
dent of the Pitt Coun-
ty Chapter of the Na-
tional Association for
the Advancement of
Colored People came
back from the
organization's na-
tional convention
with the message,
"Right now we are
moving toward
Garrett and two
other Pitt County
NAACP leaders at-
tended the convention
held in New Orleans
recently.
"We are together
� that's the best
thing I can say about
the NAACP Gar-
rett said. "We had a
little internal, what
you might call,
misunderstanding,
but, like in every
family, that is going
to happen Garrett
was refering to the re-
cent controversy bet-
ween NAACP Presi-
dent Benjamin Hooks dimensional agenda
and Executive Board set up at the conven-
member Margaret tion.
Bush Wilson. The three areas in-
Garrett said he was elude: a voter registra-
prepared to guide the tion drive, an increase
local chapter accor- in NAACP member-
ding to the three- ship and the enact-
ment of an Economic
Fair Share Program.
Garrett described
the Economic Fair
Share Program as
part of the plan for
the 1980s
American blacks.
for
Draft Resister Loses Federal Court Battle
California draft
resister David Alan
Wayte is no longer off
the hook. On
Wednesday, in a 2-1
ruling, the Ninth Cir-
cut Court of Appeals
reversed last
November's U.S.
District Court deci-
sion that dismissed
charges against
Wayte.
In the November
ruling, Judge Terry
Hatter Jr. declared
that the 21-year-old
Wayte had been selec-
tively prosecuted by
the government
because of his open
vocal dissent of the
registration law.
"They (the Court of
Appeals judges) said
that I had to prove �
give evidence � that I
had been selectively
prosecuted Wayte
said Tuesday in a
telephone interview
with The East Caroli-
nian.
"So, right now
we've asked for a
rehearing in the Ninth
Supreme Court
In dismissing the
charges against
Wayte, Hatter also
cited the Reagan ad-
ministration's refusal
to let defense at-
ECU Graduate Begins Her New Career
With Anti-Nuke, Anti-Abortion Group
An ECU computer
science graduate who
claimed she could not
accept a job with a
corporation that was
contributing to the
"proliferation of
destruction" of the
earth has found a
morally acceptable
job.
Mary Rider
graduated this spring
with a degree in com-
puter science and a
minor in accc ��Hng.
Rider, 22, claimed in
February that she felt
"a deepening call as a
Christian to be a
peacemaker
Realizing that her
job opportunities
were limited, Rider
searched and wrote
several letters to
North Carolina peace
organizations re-
questing their help.
She also wrote to the
bishop of her religious
denomination for
help.
After a several
them explaining her
dilemma and re-
questing more infor-
mation. Prolifers for
Survival President
Juli Loesch wrote
back to Rider that the
organization "needed
people with idealism
like hers
Rider claims that
P.S as she calls the
group, attempts to be
Pro-life "across the
board
"P.S. is not a
political organization,
but rather an educa-
tional one Rider
said. "We don't lob-
by, we don't endorse
political candidates or
legislators
"Personally I don't
forsee the solutions to
such big problems as
these (nuclear pro-
liferation and abor-
tion) being achieved
politically Rider
said. "Initially people
must be informed and
must have a change of
heart. Only then will
Rider said. "A lot of
people, including my
relatives, can't
understand why I'm
not making my for-
tune working for a
corporation. Most
major corporations
are highly diversified.
If I went to work for
G.E. (General Elec-
tric) for example, I
wouldn't necessarily
be directly con-
tributing to the pro-
liferation of distinc-
tion, but I would be
contributing directly
to the profits of
G.E
Rider calls the pre-
sent nuclear arms race
Circut. If we don't get torneys see White
that we'll go to the House and Pentagon
" documents or to ques-
tion presidential
counselor Edwin
Messe. Wayte, a
former Yale
philosophy student
from Pasadena,
Calif said the
government did hand
over some documents
that were "severly
edited and deleted"
and of little use in the
litigation. At one
point, Hatter
threatened the
government with con-
tempt of court for
comments made
about his actions in
the case.
"Basically, I
believe in peace not in
a "horrendous situa-
tion
"I think we are on
the brink of destruc-
tion. In good cons-
cience, I couldn't go
to work for a com-
pany that is involved
in the arms race.
war Wayte said.
"By registering, I
would be supporting
my government's
preparation for war.
Registration has
nothing to do with na-
tional defense
Wayte said he
believes that he and
about a dozen other
non-registrants were
targeted for indict-
ment because "we ex-
ercised our First
Amendment rights
"If we hadn't
spoken out, we all
would be free right
now he said.
Wayte's attorneys
say they expect a rul-
ing on their rehearing
request within 3 mon-
ths.
"Back in the 60s,
we fought for the
privilege to ride in the
front of the bus and
to sit in restaurants
and these kinds of
things Garrett said.
"We are now saying
that the black com-
munity is going to be
looking for their part
of economic develop-
ment
Garrett said that
blacks were only given
token jobs in the past.
"Now, in the 80s, we
are going to be look-
ing for seats on
Boards of Directors in
the corporate world.
We are going to be
seeking to do business
with people who will
do business with us.
We will in some way
or another try to show
those people who fail
to recognize that we
are consumers in this
society; that we are
trying to get our share
of the economic pie
Garrett said that
7,000 delegates at-
tended the New
Orleans convention.
He said the national
body set a goal to in-
crease membership
from 400,000 to 1
million, which would
include increasing the
Pitt County member-
ship from 500 to
1,000.
On the registration
goal, Garret noted
that in North
Carolina there were
"numerous black,
eligible voters not on
the books" or who
had never registered.
Garrett noted that
NAACP did not en-
dorse political can-
didates. "There are
some people running
that we'd rather not
see win, but we don't
endorse candidates
he said.
On the subject of a
possible presidential
run for black leader
Jesse Jackson, Gar-
rett was non-
committal. "We
would like to see so-
meone run who can
defeat the current ad-
ministration Gar-
rett said. If he
(Jackson) can defeat
the present ad-
ministration, I would
go along with him
Radiated Residents On The Pillff
month search, Rider legislation have any
has been hired by an
organization known
as Pro-Lifers for Sur-
vivial, an anti-
abortionanti-nuclear
weapons organiza-
tion.
Rider said she had
been on the mailing
list of the
Pennsylvania-based
group for several
months, and when she
received a letter
stating that the group
was looking for staff
positions she wrote to
meaning.
At present, Rider is
coordinating the
opening of a new P.S.
office which will be
located in Chapel
Hill, N.C. Part of her
work will include
traveling in the
Southeast conducting
workshops for P.S.
For her efforts,
Rider receives room
and board plus $10 a
week in salary.
"Computer science is
a lucrative field
SODDY-DAISY,
Tenn. (UPI) � State
health officials plan
to give away a fresh
supply of anti-
radiation pills to
neighbors of Se-
quoyah Nuclear Plant
next month but some
residents are vowing
to snub the precau-
tionary measure.
"I figure if an acci-
dent happens over
there, I won't be
around long enough
to take a pill. You just
better be ready to say
your last prayer
said Jane Moore, a
widow who lives alone
about one mile from
the plant.
The government
and the nuclear in-
dustry say the
potassium iodide
tablets would prevent
thyroid cancer during
a disastrous release of
radiation at Se-
quoyah. But more
than 2,000 of the
6,000 families living
within a 5-mile radius
of the plant neglected
to pick up the little,
white pills during the
first distribution in
1981.
Those pills now are
out of date and of-
ficials said Tuesday
they are hoping for a
better response from
residents next month
during the distribu-
tion of new pills at a
clinic and high school.
No other state hands
out the tablets.
"We would urge
people to get these
)iUs state Health
a r t en t
conceded there is no
antidote for radiation
burns and other
potential health pro-
blems caused by a
nuclear power plant
disaster. But they said
the pills would pro-
vide at least one
safeguard against
radiation.
"We admit this is a
small thing. We say,
however, that it's the
only thing we can do
ahead of time said
Dr. Sara Sells, the
Health Department's
'�- m�ttcai eonsuKant.
spokeswoman Jean
Inman said. "This is
done as a precau-
tionary measure. In
case of a radiation
emergency, if this ever
happens, then these
people are going to be
prepared
Health officials
"We want to do
everything we can
because we care about
these people in this
area Dr. Sells said.
The pills fill up the
thyroid gland with so
much potassium
iodide that the
growth-regulating
gland doesn't have
any room left for
radioactivity. Taken
as directed, the non-
prescription drug
doesn't pose serious
side effects, officials
said.
During an emergen-
cy, the state health
commissioner or the
governor would use
television and radio
broadcasts to advise
residents to swallow
the pills.
Health officiali
said residents who
survived a nuclear
plant disaster but did
not take the pil's
would be forced to
live with the threat of
thyroid cancer, which
could show up as
many as 30 years
later.
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Stye �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carotin campus community since 1925
Y -J3
t
WAVERLY MERRITT. Doctor oAdrtn,
Hunter Fisher, am
Ali Afrashteh, (w�.
Stephanie Groon, am Manager
Clay Thornton, Team s�
Fielding Miller, ommi ��"
Mike Hughes, Managing Editor
Cindy Pleasants, $�� &�
Greg Rideout, � ���
CARLYN EBERT. Entertainment Editor
Lizanne Jennings, style Editor
DAVID GORDON, Production Manager
July 27, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
-30-
Another academic year has
come to a close. In just a few short
days (which, of course, seem in-
finitely longer for those of us who
still have exams ahead), East
Carolina University will say good-
bye to 1982-83. But before we put
the year behind us, it might be
beneficial to take a look at some of
its highlights (and lowlights).
� � �
It was a year which saw Dr.
John Howell assume the role of
permanent chancellor. Following
the incidents on 1981, when then-
Chancellor Thomas Brewer an-
nounced his resignation amid a
wave of dissention and disarray,
Howell took the post, returning to
ECU the security and stability that
had diminished under Brewer's
reign.
I personally have not had much
interaction with the chancellor, but
by all standards, Dr. Howell has
done a competent job in his first
full year. He has kept a cool head
in some trying situations. He has
kept abreast of student opinion,
yet as his job dictates, he has pro-
ven he can be firm when necessary.
� � �
It was a year of success, a year
which saw the ECU Pirates post
their first winning season in three
years in both football and basket-
ball. Unfortunately, it was a year
just like previous years in regards
to fan support. Now, I'm the first
to admit, I'm no man of the world.
Be that as it may, I have never in
21 years seen such fair-weather
fans as those who "support" ECU
sports. When the Bucs are winn-
ing, everyone and his brother is a
Pirate fan. But just let them get
down by a touchdown, and the
lines leaving Ficklen become
longer than they were to get in.
I do realize the futility inherent
in writing something of this
nature. Some things, regretably,
will never change. Nonetheless,
whereas it might not help at all to
complain about the status quo, it
certainly can't hurt either.
� � �
1982-83, as any other school
year, was a year which saw a new
student government take office. I
myself have never been much
enamoured of the SGA, but then
again, I'm quite sure that feeling is
fairly mutual. It just seems to me
that a group of college students
(whether or not they aspire to
higher political goals) should
realize their limitations. Green-
ville, N.C is not Washington,
D.C. Deciding whether or not to
build a new bus shelter (as
honorable as that task may be) is
not a life-or-death question.
I don't want to give the impres-
sion that I feel the SGA is wor-
thless. Not at all. I think students
should be afforded the opportuni-
ty to govern themselves in some
aspects. But the asinine bickering
and in-fighting over petty dif-
ferences which have characterized
student government at ECU for
years only work to reinforce con-
tentions that students are not
responsible andor mature enough
to govern themselves. I'm not con-
demning individuals, simply at-
titudes. And it is my hope that the
newly elected officers for the
1983-84 school year will be able to
transcend the customary BS and
assume a responsible attitude for
the coming year.
� � �
The 1982-83 school year was one
which saw its fair share of con-
troversy. Perhaps the two issues
which drew the most attention dur-
ing the year were the proposed
classroom building location and
the proposed commencement
ceremony location. Each pitted
student against administration in a
stubborn deadlock.
But despite the administration's
vow of obstinancy, it was rewar-
ding to see that the students won at
least a compromise on one issue.
Hopefully, this will set the stage
for the future, as more and more
students realize the power of their
collective voice.
� � �
1982-83 held different ex-
periences for each of the campus
media. The '8182 Buccaneer
came out in April of '83, but per-
sonally, I found it almost worth
the wait.
The Ebony Herald continued its
fine tradition of insightful jour-
nalism. And if you don't believe
me, just take a look for yourself;
there are plenty of copies of the
May issue still at Mendenhall.
The 82-83 Rebel held true to its
reputation, providing probably its
most diverse student literary col-
lection to date.
ECU's student radio station,
WZMB, celebrated its first an-
niversary on the air in February.
And despite the healthy mutual
criticism we exchange regularly
(between newspaper and radio sta-
tion), I sincerely hope the mutual
respect and good working relation-
ship these two media currently
practice will carry over into future
years.
The ECU Photo Lab is,
perhaps, the least appreciated of
the campus media, as the majority
of their late nights in the lab are
spent working for the other media,
i.e yearbook, newspaper(s), etc.
Nonetheless, I can say in all hones-
ty that without these guys, putting
a paper together would be next to
impossible.
And finally, of course, a word
or two about The East Caroli-
nian I suppose I should first ad-
dress some of the questions and
complaints I've heard about the
newspaper over the past couple of
years:
Most of the students I know
tend to be quite critical of The East
Carolinian, as well they should be,
I suppose. After all, as an environ-
ment of learning and growing, the
college campus should inspire a
free marketplace of ideas. And in
putting out a newspaper, no matter
how small or large, criticism is just
part of the game. But at times, I
think it would do the student body
well to remember that we who put
The East Carolinian together
(which generally entails working
until 3 or 4 a.m. two nights a week)
are students as well, with the same
responsibilities and worries, the
same tests and papers, as other
students. And as students, it seems
to follow that we are also learning.
Believe me, none of us here is so
arrogant as to consider him or
herself a professional. I think it's
pretty safe to say that we all make
mistakes. It just so happens that
when we make mistakes, 10,000
copies get printed!
And although I realize my objec-
tivity here is somewhat mired, I,
nonetheless, have nothing but
respect and admiration for my
fellow staff members. And with
this in mind, I leave you (I can say
"you" because you're probably
the only ones who've read this far)
with my thanks for your support
and my best wishes.
Two final notes: Darryl, the
keys are in my office. Hope you
can find them. And Pat well,
you just keep on trying, pal.
MM.
THE EAST CAM
A Troublesome Preceden t
By DARRYL BROWN
The Supreme Court's recent decision
to allow tuition tax credits to parents
sending their children to private schools
has opened a whole new range of
possibilities for the American tax
system.
Why should we stop there? The same
principle can apply to many areas. The
idea is, don't make people pay twice,
and don't force them to shell out for ser-
vices they're paying for elsewhere. If
parents are paying tuition for a private
school, why should they help carry the
burden of public education?
President Reagan advocates, and the
Supreme Court allows for, tuition tax
credits that will put more money in the
pockets of those thousands of families
strapped with having to shell out for
private schools.
Now, it may well be in the interest of a
democracy to have an educated
populous, and more funds are needed
now than ever for schools, what with all
the hullabuloo about declining
American education. But right now,
necessity urges us to put extra cash in the
pocket of the average, overtaxed
American so he or she can buy a color
TV and an Apple He and pull us out of
this recession with some good oi con-
sumer spending.
Therefore, why stop at tuition tax
credits? How about, say, transportation
tax credits and public library tax credits?
Why should people have to pay taxes to
support some smelly public bus system if
they own a car? Non-bus riders should
be eligible for a tax credit so they can put
a down payment on a new Chevy
Chevette or Chrysler LaBaron
(American models only, of course). That
way, they won't be paying for services
they don't use, and they'll further
stimulate the automobile industry, put-
Fast For Life begins Aug. 6
ting more of those UAW members back
on the job, along with some steel
workers and others to boot. Supply side
economics at its best.
And libraries. Why should people
have to pay taxes to support a library if
they don't use it? Nobody with a TV to-
day is going to read a book anyway. To
be fair, everyone who buys a television
with his tuition tax credit should get a
library tax credit, too. No one in his
right mind would spend days over the
1,000 pages of Gone With The Wind,
when he can watch Clark Gable on the
tube uttering that immortal line,
"Frankly, Scarlete, I don't give and
be done with the whole thing in one
evening.
And think of all those television
makers who would benefit. If our goal is
to aid the economy, what makes more
sense: Buying a TV that takes a whole
assembly line of workers to construct?
Or borrowing a library book that one lit-
tle English major sat writing in a log
cabin for three years?
And that's just the beginning. For in-
stance, why should those who can afford
to buy a house, and thereby stimulate
the depressed construction industry,
have to support public housing projects?
Why not give a larger housing tax credit
on the ubiquitous 1040?
The possibilities are endless. The
Supreme Court has finally given the go-
ahead to cut the private sector loose and
let Reagan be Reagan We shouldn't
have a worry in the world, right?
OF COURSE ITS YOURS �.
Peace Group Chances Ultimate Sacrifice
By PAT O'NEILL
"We have just dropped a bomb on
Japan which has more power than
20,000 tons of TNT. It was an over-
whelming success
� Pres. Harry S. Truman
Aug. 6,1945
What President Truman termed "an
overwhelming success" almost 38 years
ago, moments after the U.S. had drop-
ped the first atomic bomb on
Hiroshima, was in truth a massacre of
untold magnitude. Never before in the
history of our world had such a horrible
act of violence been taken by human be-
ings against other human beings.
The bombs the United States dropped
on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 kill-
ed more than 150,000 men, women and
children instantly. Hospitals, nursing
homes, schools � anything and
everything was obliterated by the two
blasts. According to the first reports
from Tokyo, "Practically all living
things were destroyed beyond recogni-
tion by heat and pressure from the first
atomic bomb
When I read the press accounts of the
first atomic bombings, I am amazed that
there was so little objection by
Americans to what we'd done. I suppose
people were so caught up in the spirit of
the war that it was hard to feel much
compassion for the innocent Japanese
civilians who had been incinerated.
Nonetheless, there were some people
who were able to see beyond the
"overwhelming success" Truman spoke
of.
"We annihilated 100,000 persons at
one shot, most of them civilians wrote
the Rev. Dr. Bernard Iddings Bell of
Rhode Island in an Aug. 10,1945, tetter
to the New York Times. "And then, in
spite of 'universal horror repeated the
performance at Nagasaki (These ac-
tions have shown that) our methods of
war are cosmically and cold-bloodedly
barbarous beyond previous experience
or possibility
Another concerned American, Francis
R. Walton, also writing to the Times,
said that by using the atomic bomb, the
United States had "sunk to the spiritual
level of the Nazis
"It is simply mass murder Walton
wrote, "sheer terrorism on the greatest
scale the world has yet seen
In 1945, there were only three atomic
bombs on the planet. Now, 38 years
later, the nations of the world have more
than 50,000 nuclear bombs pointed in all
directions, waiting only for their push-
button commands to launch us toward
Armageddon. The world has learned
very little over the short span of the
nuclear age. The fact that we haven't us-
ed these nukes in 38 years is little con-
solation. Logic shows us that our luck is
surely due to run out.
There are, however, some signs of
hope in these difficult times.
Throughout the world, thousands of
people are beginning to recognize the
futility of our nuclear Russian roulette.
Many are taking to the streets to protest
the insanity of the arms race; some are
going to jail for their acts of civil disobe-
dience.
But perhaps the bravest of these are
the nine people who will take part in the
Fast for Ufe. Beginning Aug. 6, these
nine will begin their fast for disarma-
ment and peace. While many of us are
enjoying the summer break, these people
will be consuming only water in the
memory of those who were killed in
Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They will also
be fasting for the millions of people suf-
fering from hunger in a world of plenty.
They hope their efforts will inspire
others to take action for peace, to con-
tact their leaders and demand a hah to
the arms race so the poor of the world
can live. I can offer them only my hopes
and support and ask each of you to do
the
"r�
� � � i �
Farewi
Being that this is the last issue
illustrious newspaper for the
schoolyear, and thus being the
portunity for its not-so-ilh
editor, yours truly, to unleash
pen in these short lines, I have h
tremely difficult time this week
decide on what the hell to writel
Indeed, it is characteristic,
customary for an exiling edij
myself to attempt to sum up hi
past experiences and future wisl
equally customary final editor
predecessors did it, and (it sJ
follow) their predecessors beforl
The trouble is, at times like th
philosophical. Well, you can a
you want, but my mother reads
have to call it "philosophical
There is so much I wish to sal
very little room and time in whif
it. And to try to say everything
have said over the past two yJ
single column would sul
ridiculous.
Naturally, then. I'll try.
First of ali, gauging from my
record, I guess I owe a few
here and there. So:
� To all the fat people I've
by calling attention to the fact
are so incredibly obese and disj
am sorry. I promise I will ne
again.
� To all those who su
unbearable pains of hemorrhc
who have been the butt of so
my bad jokes, I am also sorry
� To all the ECU football
whose intelligence I have quest
harshly and unjustly on occasioj
my sincere apologies. In oth
guys, I done did a bad thing,
real, real sorry.
� To all the people who w
College Hill cafeteria
Mendenhall snack bar, 1 am sc
the jabs in the past atx
disgusting "food Of cour;
more sorry for those poor stuc
still have to eat there, but I at.
you all as well, and I'll never d
� To all the Puerto Ricans
Haitians and people from N�
who I have offended, althougr
know this is impossible as
nothing embarrasses you,
nonetheless, sorry.
� To all the administration
members whose competence
errantly compared in the past
so many Himalayan yaks, I
must admit, all this time,
wrong; most Himalayan yaks
do half the job you people d
� And finally, to all the prir
per folk who I've offended
with talk of noscpicking,
and dead roadside animals, I
and I promise never to
anything so disgusting
again. Even if I should see a
Bernard by the side of the
a bunch of maggots crawlii
what used to be his eyes
should happen to see
nosepicker practicing a shifty
in church even if, by som
luck, I should see a fat,
bum sneeze in the barbecue
Hardees, 111 keep it to myself
worry. I won't write about
stuff ever again.
Secondly, in addition to
guess I owe a great deal of
equally great deal of people.
� To all the fat, sweaty
pus, without whom I w
nothing to write about nine
i
i





recedent
jnakers who would benefit. If our goal is
In aid the economy, what makes more
jsense: Buying a TV that takes a whole
c-ssembly line of workers to construct?
Or borrowing a library book that one lit�
It e English major sat writing in a log
Icabin for three years?
And that's just the beginning. For in-
i ance. why should those who can afford
It buy a house, and thereby stimulate
the depressed construction industry,
have to support public housing projects?
Why not give a larger housing tax credit
on the ubiquitous 10409
The possibilities are endless. The
iSupreme Court has finally given the go-
jahead to cut the private sector loose and
�let Reagan be Reagan We shouldn't
have a worry in the world, right?
ate Sacrifice
barbarous beyond previous experience
or possibility
Another concerned American, Francis
R. Walton, also writing to the Times,
said that by using the atomic bomb, the
I United States had "sunk to the spiritual
lievel of the Nazis
"It is simply mass murder Walton
I wrote, "sheer terrorism on the greatest
scale the world has yet seen
In 1945, there were only three atomic
bombs on the planet. Now, 38 years
later, the nations of the world have more
than 50,000 nuclear bombs pointed in all
I directions, waiting only for their push-
button commands to launch us toward
Armageddon. The world has learned
very little over the short span of the
nuclear age. The fact that we haven't us-
ed these nukes in 38 years is little con-
solation. Logic shows us that our luck is
surely due to run out.
There are, however, some signs of
hope in these difficult times.
Throughout the world, thousands of
people are beginning to recognize the
futility of our nuclear Russian roulette.
Many are taking to the streets to protest
the insanity of the arms race; some are
going to jail for their acts of civil disobe-
dience.
But perhaps the bravest of these are
the nine people who will take part in the
Fast for Life. Beginning Aug. 6, these
nine will begin their fast for disarma-
ment and peace. While many of us are
enjoying the summer break, these people
will be consuming only water in the
memory of those who were killed in
Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They will also
be fasting for the millions of people suf-
fering from hunger in a world of plenty.
f They hope their efforts will inspire
others to take action for peace, to con-
tact their leaders and demand a halt to
the arms race so the poor of the world
I can live. I can offer them only my hopes
and support and ask each of you to do
the same.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Other Opinion
July 27, 1983 Page S
What Writing For The
Paper Has Done To Me
By GREG HIDEOUT
I think I'm about to start a new tradi-
tion. You see, it has always been
customary for the editor to write a "30"
editorial when he leaves, but not for the
news editor. Well, at the risk of boring
most of you, I'm about to give my
thoughts on ECU as seen through my
eyes. I'm going to call it 29'2.
This is the 10th time I've started this
paragraph, and I still can't get it right. I
was going to talk about ECU in general,
but, naah, I don't think I will. Instead, I
believe I'm going to write about what
I'm writing in � The East Carolinian.
First of all, appreciate it. I've seen
many student newspapers, and believe
me, you're reading one of the better
ones. All newspaper staffs work hard,
but I think not one worked with more
dedication than the staff I had the
Farewell Apologies & Thank- Yous
Being that this is the last issue of this
illustrious newspaper for the 1982-83
schoolyear, and thus being the Fmal op-
portunity for its not-so-illustrious
editor, yours truly, to unleash his banal
pen in these short lines, I have had an ex-
tremely difficult time this week trying to
decide on what the hell to write about.
Indeed, it is characteristic, if not
customary for an exiting editor like
myself to attempt to sum up his or her
past experiences and future wishes in the
equally customary Final editorial. My
predecessors did it, and (it seems to
follow) their predecessors before them.
The trouble is, at times like these, I get
philosophical. Well, you can call it what
you want, but my mother reads this, so I
have to call it "philosophical
There is so much I wish to say and so
very little room and time in which to say
it. And to try to say everything I should
have said over the past two years in a
single column would surely be
ridiculous.
MIKE
HUSHES
Ooh! I Was
An Ugly Kid
Naturally, then, I'll try.
First of all, gauging from my own past
record, I guess I owe a few apologies
here and there. So:
� To all the fat people I've offended
by calling attention to the fact that you
are so incredibly obese and disgusting, I
am sorry. I promise I will never do it
again.
� To all those who suffer the
unbearable pains of hemorrhoids and
who have been the butt of so many of
my bad jokes, I am also sorry.
� To all the ECU football players
whose intelligence I have questioned so
harshly and unjustly on occasion, I offer
my sincere apologies. In other words,
guys, I done did a bad thing, and I is
real, real sorry.
� To all the people who work in the
College Hill cafeteria and the
Mendenhall snack bar, I am sorry for all
the jabs in the past about your
disgusting "food Of course, I am
more sorry for those poor students who
still have to eat there, but I apologize to
you all as well, and I'll never do it again.
� To all the Puerto Ricans, Cubans,
Haitians and people from New Jersey
who I have offended, although we both
know this is impossible as apparently
nothing embarrasses you, I am,
nonetheless, sorry.
� To all the administration and faculty
members whose competence I have so
errantly compared in the past to that of
so many Himalayan yaks, I am sorry. I
must admit, all this time, I've been
wrong; most Himalayan yaks couldn't
do half the job you people do.
� And finally, to all the prim and pro-
per folk who I've offended in the past
with talk of nosepicking, bed-wetting
and dead roadside animals, I apologize,
and I promise never to write about
anything so disgusting and tasteless
again. Even if I should see a mangled St.
Bernard by the side of the highway with
a bunch of maggots crawling through
what used to be his eyes even if I
should happen to see some sly
nosepicker practicing a shifty pick-n-roll
in church even if, by some stroke of
luck, I should see a fat, disgusting street
bum sneeze in the barbecue sauce bin at
Hardees, I'll keep it to myself. So, don't
worry. I won't write about that kind of
stuff ever again.
Secondly, in addition to apologies, I
guess I owe a great deal of thanks to an
equally great deal of people. Thus:
� To all the fat, sweaty people on cam-
pus, without whom I would have had
nothing to write about nine times out of
10, I thank you.
� To the administration, who, simply
by virtue of their noble performance
over the past few years, have made
writing this column that much easier, I
am grateful.
� To Slim Whitman, Boxcar Willie
and Jerry Mathers as the Beaver,
whose brilliant entertainment careers
have helped make the world what it is to-
day, thanks.
� To all the ECU football players,
whose sheer mastery of the English
language lends new meaning to the term
"collegiate athlete" (that just means like
when you guys play games and wear
your special clothes and stuff while
you're living here at college), keep up
the good work.
� To the 1982-83 SGA, who upheld
the fine reputation of their predecessors
by championing such timely, important,
inspirational causes as ticketing
unregistered vehicles, constructing unus-
ed bus shelters and serving watermelon
to incoming freshmen, I am eternally
grateful.
� To the staff of last year's Buccaneer,
who worked diligently and thanklessly
to deliver us such � impiuwin 1981-12
yearbook in April of 1983, my sincere
thanks.
� To the ECU campus security of-
ficers and their illustrious blue-light
security system, thank you. I don't
know what the hell the lights are suppos-
ed to do, but I've noticed they do keep
mosquitoes away at close range. Also,
many thanks for keeping hose killer
10-speeds off the sidewalks and for
ticketing my car twice a week over the
past two years for even the most
miniscule infraction. I'm sure I'm a bet-
ter person for it.
� To all the local Greenville businesses
who've taught me a valuable lesson
about the real world over the past few
years by charging me exhorbitant prices
for second-rate products, I thank you.
And although I know I could never
begin to repay you all, nonetheless,
please consider this brief paragraph as
just a small token of my feelings for
you.
� To the ECU football office, who
lured such big-name gridiron powers as
Illinois State, East Tennessee State and
Central Michigan into Ficklen last year,
and who plan to top that off with an ap-
pearance by none other than bowl-
contender Murray State this season
how can I ever thank you?
� To our beloved janitor, Monty, who
never once critiqued my column for
grammatical errors, thematic consisten-
cy or sentence structure and who could
sweep floors and empty the trash with
the best of 'em, I say simply, thanks.
� To all my old English and jour-
nalism professors, who did critique my
columns for grammatical errors,
thematic consistency and sentence struc-
ture, but who can't sweep floors or emp-
ty the trash worth a damn, my humble
thanks.
� To all the people I owe money to,
thanks. Your checks are in the mail.
And if you believe that, I've got 20 acres
of beautiful waterfront property in the
luxurious Mt. St. Helen's valley that I'm
looking to sell to someone just like you.
� And last, but certainly not least
(unless, of course, if I were judging a
beauty pageant, in which case both
"last" and "least" would pertain), to
my fellow East Carolinian staff
members, who � can you believe it �
have had to put up with me even longer
than you reader(s) have. To you deca-
dent, obscene, yet fun-loving and
sincere, individuals (1 can't seem to
remember all of your names), I say
thank you and farewell. Throughout our
many long nights together, you have
each earned a place in my heart But
not to worry, it's nothing a good, strong
dose of Di-Gel won't cure.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a
runner-up in the 1982-83 East Caroli-
nian Managing Editor of the Year con-
test, has only one regret in life This,
of course, being that he is not someone
else.
pleasure of being a part of. Most news
can be sobering stuff, so a touch of
craziness is a prerequisite for someone in
the newspaper business. Believe me; we
are crazy.
Second of all, just because I'm rambl-
ing, did you know the newspaper isn't
printed here. It's printed in Tarboro.
Just thought you'd like to know. And by
the way, newspapers don't use big lead
presses and stuff anymore, they use
space-age technology with newfangled
things to bring you the news. Wow.
Today, editors mainly just
make the coffee for reporters
who have just come back from
secret meetings with governmen-
tal deep-throats
The East Carolinian also makes alot
of money � through advertising and
from pay-offs. But, its staff members
get paid doodley squat. Hi ho.
Other things you might not know are
that there can never be an odd-number
of pages in a newspaper (think about it),
and page one never has ads.
Also, newspaper reporters (except
Mike Hughes) no longer wear brown
derby hats with a press card stuck in the
band that goes around the outside of the
hat. They now wear T-shirts with the
word "bullshit" written across it. That's
just in case they run into a bureaucrat
who answers questions in Orwellian
doublespeak.
Editors, on the other foot, do still
dress like they work at the Daily Planet,
but no one calls them chief, although
most wish they were called something
that nice. Today, editors mainly just
make the coffee for reporters who have
just come back from secret meetings
with governmental deep-throats. Oh,
well.
I guess I should say something about
the people who sell the ads. But I won't
on account of that's where all the money
is. But the fun is being able to write this
stuff, so I guess I did say something.
I guess my telling you all this adds up
to one sure(?) conclusion. I want you to
know what "those people" are doing in
that old building across from the library.
I want you to realize the late hours and
that dedication stuff, but most of all 1
want to tell you that we are learning, just
as you are, well, some of you.
So, with that all tied together, now I'll
tell you what's right with the world: It
hasn't blown up recently. That's all I
can think of, sorry.
Oh yeah, so long guys.
'Debategate' Not Likely To Hit Big-Time Scandal
The Case Of The Missing Books
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � The Washington
press corps is already calling it
"Debategate but that may be a little
melodramatic to describe the uproar
over the Reagan campaign's use of Jim-
my Carter's White House briefing
documents just before the 1980 debate
between the two contenders.
There's no indication yet that the
briefing-book caper could turn into a
scandal on the scale of Watergate. But
reporters and congressional in-
vestigators are digging into the mystery.
The FBI has been unleashed on the case.
And our own staff is hot on the trail.
Here's what we've learned:
The Carter briefing book was copied
late on the night of Oct. 22 and early in
the morning of Oct. 23, 1980. Twenty-
four hours later, David Stockman was
using the briefing papers to rehearse
Reagan for the debate.
Who did the copying? We have iden-
tified him as James C. Rowland, who
worked directly under Carter aide David
Rubenstein in the White House.
Rowland told us he made about a
dozen copies of the briefing book � IS
copies at the most. They were circulated
only to Carter intimates at the White
House and at Camp David.
Significantly, no copies of the briefing
book were sent to campaign head-
quarters. Any material that found its
way to the Reagan campaign, therefore,
must have come from the White House
itself, not from some disgruntled Carter
campaign worker.
That might explain why House
Speaker Thomas "Tip" O'Neill,
D-Mass isn't anxious to pursue the
Great Briefing Book investigation: It
could prove to be as embarrassing to the
Democrats as to the Republicans.
Meanwhile, former Reagan ommkm
officials have admitted that they set up a
task force to keep check on possible
military operations that might help
Carter's re-election bid. A network of
former military officials, for example,
kept a worldwide watch on stockpiles of
spare parts for F-14 jet aircraft.
Why spare parts for this plane?
Because Iran's AyatoOah Khomeini
needed the parts for Iran's air force and
might have been willing to trade the
hostages for them. If the campaign spies
spotted any unusual movement of the
parts, it might have been a signal that a
deal had been struck � airplane parts in
exchange for the hostages.
The trade, of course, was never made,
but the incident demonstrates the extent
of campaign espionage.
SOVIET CINEMA: Residents of
Moscow have been flocking to see a
government-produced propaganda film
called "Incident in Quadrate 36-80 It
portrays an American submarine com-
mander as a gun-packing nut who reacts
atrociously after his nuclear reactor cat-
ches fire and starts an accidental attack.
The Russians, of course, react with
kindness and humanity. They offer their
assistance to the Americans and decline
to escalate the conflict.
The film, however, represents an in-
telligence bonanza for U.S. agents who
have seen it. The Soviet aircraft carrier
Kiev is prominently featured, and there
are close-ups of the vessel's jets,
bombers, refueling apparatus and ship-
POLITICAL POTPOURRI: Accor-
ding to our sources, former White
House political aide Lyn Nofziger has
been urging Drew Lewis, the former
secretary of transportation, to take com-
mand of Reagan's 1984 campaign. If
Lewis accepts the job, Nofziger will join
the campaign; if not, he will sit it out.
Apparently, Nofziger believes Lewis is
the one man who can keep the lid on
Reagan's faction-ridden camp.
Copyright, m
United Feature Syndicate, lac.
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THE EAST CAROL 'NlAN
Features
JULY 21, 19t3 Pag 6
Crowd Sings Praise
For Season Finale
On ECU Campus
The snappy one-liners fry as Sonia Wabk (Sara Riva Krieger) meets
mon Gersch (John Kuhn) for the first time in They're Playing Our
Artists, Musicians Participate
Song. The 1979 Brcuway smash runs through Saturday at McGinnis
Theatre.
AMUSE Opposes Nukes
By PATRICK O'NEILL
The day Ronald Reagan took
office was not a bright day for
many of America's liberals. Some
feared the worst � more
economic woes, cuts in social pro-
grams or even a possible war.
People can debate the impact of
the Reagan administration for a
long time, but few will dispute
that his election did accomplish
one thing: It caused the creation
of a lot of new organizations to
oppose Reagan's policies.
Such was the case with the
North Carolina organization
known as AMUSE (Artists and
Musicians United for a Safe En-
vironment). "The day Reagan
came into power, we were found-
ed said AMUSE coordinator
Bob Eidus. "The group was
founded because Reagan policies
represented a potential threat to
many programs designed to pro-
tect our environment
The three-year-old non-profit
organization is comprised of ar-
tists, musicians and "other en-
vironmentalenergy activists
According to Eidus, the group
cites education as its first priority,
sponsoring lectures, benefit con-
certs, fairs, seminars, major con-
ferences and pamphlets. The
organization also lends out audio-
visual aids to interested groups.
"By sponsoring concerts and
other fund-raising events,
AMUSE raises money to support
a community-based grants pro-
gram to which grass-roots
organizations submit proposals
for public education, networking
or projects aimed at environmen-
tal and renewable energy-related
issues Eidus said.
AMUSE is specifically opposed
to nuclear power, which its
members feel is unsafe and
uneconomical. "Conservation is
the cheapest energy source
claims Eidus. "We support telling
the truth about nuclear power
The group supports other alter-
nate energy sources such as
hydroelectric plants, windmills
and solar energy.
Supporters have performed
benefit concerts to raise money
for local groups across the state.
AMUSE has supported citizen
groups opposed to utility rate
hikes and has held concerts prior
to public hearings to generate
publicity for the group and the
issue.
In May AMUSE sponsored the
Eno Energy-Arts Festival in
Durham. The day-long festivities
included a broad range of educa-
tional events and entertainment.
More than a dozen speakers lec-
tured on topics ranging from
"The National Budget: Military
Cost vs. Economic Security" to
"Composting Toilets
Experts gave demonstrations on
such activities as greenhouse con-
struction, yoga and organic
gardening. And seven musical
groups entertained throughout the
day.
Eidus said the idea to found
AMUSE was devised by a group
of North Carolinians and did not
originate from the national group
known as MUSE (Musicians
United for Safe Energy), although
one of AMUSE's board members
was also a member of the MUSE
board of directors.
?Eidus claims the AMUSE idea
has caught on in other states and
that AMUSE chapters have now
been founded in New York,
Texas, Tennessee and in the
Washington, D.C. area.
"AMUSE is always looking for
active involvement with the
public Eidus said. He adds that
new public input is always needed
for the development of the
organization's skillsresource
bank which includes "many
talented people working in the
fields of the environment,
renewable energy resources,
health, music, art, consumer ac-
tion, business, design and com-
munity development
Recently AMUSE bought two
full-length films which have
received national recognition. No
Place To Hide: Growing Up in the
Shadow of the Bomb and You
Love This Planet are both
available from AMUSE at 708
McCulloch St Raleigh, N.C.
ByCARLYNEBERT
and DARRYL BROWN
Neil Simon has probably
published more works than any
living playwright; his collected
plays, screen treatments and
books (33) approaches the Bard's
38. This irritates quite a few hard-
core Shakespeare scholars, since
in another five years Simon will
surely catch up and take the lead.
But even so, Simon's comedy for-
mula � and it is formula � con-
tinues to please audiences. Neil
Simon has found himself at the
helm of a theater comedy machine
that takes few risks but guarantees
a good draw.
The East Carolina Summer
Theatre finishes up its 1983 season
in McGinnis Theatre with Simon's
They're Playing Our Song, a con-
temporary two-person musical
which showcases Simon's gift for
smart repartee and the well-turned
one-liner.
In They're Playing Our Song,
however, Simon doesn't smother
his too-well-turned phrases in sac-
charine sentimentality. Recent
Simon screenplays (most notably,
Chapter Two and Only When I
Laugh) suffered from the writer's
overbearing pronouncements on
middle-class values and a certain
monotonous predictability.
They're Playing Our Song runs
along the line of fresher Simon
vehicles like The Odd Couple or
The Goodbye Girl: the fast-paced
dialogue doesn't overwhelm the
characters in this story of a
modern, skewed relationship.
It's also a semi-biographical
tracing of composer Marvin
Hamlisch's collaboration with
lyricist Carole Bayer Sager.
Hamlisch, whose Broadway
usical credits include A Chorus
�dne, has written some of the past
decade's finest elevator tunes
("furniture music") as well as
legitimate stage hits, pop
blockbusters and award-winning
film scores. Just think how many
of Mike Douglas's guests would
be at a loss for a song without
Chorus Line's "What I Did For
Love
But, unfortunately, most of
Hamlisch's tunes for They're
Playing Our Song run together in-
to one long Las Vegas lounge act.
The exceptions in Monday night's
opening performance relied on
jazzy vocal assistance from the
six-member "chorus" or from
cute props (tiny toy pianos).
Sara Riva Krieger and John
Kuhn took the leading roles of
Sonia Walsk and Vernon Gersch,
a hyper, neurotic lyricist and a
successful, stuffy composer
brought together by their agents.
They fall in and out of love over
the course of two acts, have
hilarious arguments, part painful-
ly and re-unite just in time for the
final curtain. Both Krieger and
Kuhn possess more than adequate
musical and comedic gifts to carry
the roles, though Krieger had to
endure a body mike that garbled
and grated some of her most
lyrical moments. Certainly
See CROWD, Page 7
Matinee Scheduled
Greenville area residents and
ECU students have a chance to
see the East Carolina Summer
Theatre's final presentation at
reduced rates.
A special matinee perfor-
mance of They're Playing Our
Song is scheduled for Thursday,
July 28, at 2:15 p.m. Tickets are
$7 each, a 30 percent reduction
off the regular price. The
McGinnis Theatre box office,
corner of Fifth and Eastern
Streets, will be open every day
this week from 10 a.m. until
8:30 p.m.
They're Playing Our Song
pairs the musical talents of Mar-
vin Hamlisch and Carol Bayer
Sager with a Neil Simon script.
On Broadway, Lock Arnaz
starred with comedian Robert
Klein in the story of a lyricist
(she) and a composer (he) who
find that their private relation-
ship doesn't always run as
smoothly as the songs they write
together.
"When season tickets first
went on sale in November, we
realized this was going to be a
very popular show said Sum-
mer Theatre General Manager
Scott Parker, explaining the
decision to schedule a matinee.
"There are still many excellent
seats available for that perfor-
mance he said.
Tickets may be purchased at
the box office or may be reserv-
ed by calling 757-6390.
Beach wear Didn't Cut It In Olden Days
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
Style WOm
"Let's go to the beach
Easy enough. Grab a cooler and
towel, put on your bathing suit,
get a car and pile in. In less than
two hours you're baking in that
sun with the ocean 50 yards from
your toes.
Fifty years ago this wasn't such
a favorite pastime. In fact, going
to the beach could turn into
somewhat of a chore. The main
reason was the bathing suit.
In 1933 bathing suits were made
of wool. Usually black or navy
with a big ol' belt around the
waist. Lengthwise, the shorts
traveled down to mid-thigh.
Imagine sitting in the hot sun
with wool wrapped around 75 per-
cent of your body. A jump in the
ocean would cure that sweaty pro-
blem. Watch it; wool has a
tendency to get a little heavy when
wet. As a matter of fact, swim-
mers refused to go out too far in
the ocean for fear the undertow
might whisk away that 10-pound
bathing suit with the swimmer in-
side. After a little swim, there's
nothing like the itchy feeling of
wet wool drying on your skin.
Boy, those were the good ol'
days.
Honestly, they were the good
ol' days, compared to the era of
the ancestors of that bathing suit.
The late 1680s bathing suits
consisted of fine yellow canvas
�owns. Complete with long full
sleeves that would fill with water
to prevent any outline of the
human shape from being seen.
Mem' bathing suits were made of
the same material, but shorts and
waistcoats were the bastes here.
The end of the 1700s brought
on a new-found material for
bathing suits brown linen.
Women wore jackets and pet-
ticoats of this fabric, but not to
swim in. Swimming areas were
separated by sexes, and the
modest men and women swam in
the nude. Of course, there was
always the problem of that
'Peeping Tom
Women took a giant step in
1870 and began to wear trousers.
Black flannel trousers, taut at the
ankle, with a blouse tunic. A blue
or red worsted braid circled the
waist.
At the turn of the century,
trousers became knickers of linen
or wool, and black or white stock-
ings hid the bare calf and ankle.
Many swimmers found
themselves extremely tired very
soon because their attire was just
too heavy to lug around in the
water.
There were only two models of
bathing suits available in 1905,
and they ran $2.98 each from a
Sears' catalog.
Mens' suits were constructed of
a short sleeve shirt and knee pants
all in one piece. These were made
in solid colors with fancy stripes
and ran about 65 cents.
Contrary to our yearly un-
predictable style changes in swim-
ming apparel, these standard suits
reigned the beaches for years.
California initiated the first ma-
jor style change in bathing suits in
1925. Bare arms and calves expos-
ed. This style crossed the coun-
try's beaches within a few years.
1935 was the year men were per-
mitted � or brave enough � to
reveal their chests to the public.
Although the bare-chested look
didn't take hold immediately,
men slowly but surely began en-
joying appreciative glances from
the laches as these bold male sun
worshippers shed their bathing
shirts and flashed their legs in
mere shorts.
Through the 50s and 60s,
bathing suits got shorter and
shorter, and much more reveal-
ing. Luckily, thinner materials
such as lycra and cotton had by
then replaced the ever-burdening
wool.
The two-piece was introduced
in the late 50s and continued to
change its style as the summers
passed. By 1964, the bikini, which
made its debut on the French
Riviera, spread throughout the
United States.
For girls too shy to wear the
skimpy bikini on the beach,
backyard pools began springing
up across the country. In 1948,
only 2500 pools existed. Ten years
See NEW, Pate 7
In 1917,
J
Crowd L
Successful
Coat, from Page 6
Krieger has one of the
finest (and strongest)
voices of the sum-
mer's four produc-
tions, but she was
hindered
helped
microphon
Locssin
been better!
her do
without
New Styles
Reveal Mo
As Summei
Cont. from Page 6
later 87,000 pools dot-
ted the landscape, and
within 15 years the
number grew to
300,000. And with the
boom in pools came a
corresponding boom
in bathing suit sales
and man a
and styles.
If bikir
of the
women stu
original
Ruffles, s
bold color
ed these
garments.
one-piec
August Pre
To Catch
By STEVE BACHNER
Staff WrtUx
The trades have it; and accor-
ding to the trades, August is going
to be an interesting month for
movies, if not a risky one. In this
final month of summer wishes,
studios make a last ditch effort to
ce money with films that �
ften times � aren't thought of as
�big enough contenders for earlier
release. Usually, with the excep-
tion of a few films put off until
ithe slim fall season, the last of the
"big" commercial products are
released during this month; they
have to tide us over until
Christmas. Here's what we have
to look forward to:
COMING IN AUGUST
Pursuit of the Pink Panther
(MGM): Ted Waas stars as a Newf
York City detective assigned tol
locate the missing Inspector!
Clouseau, as well as the Pink Pan-
ther diamond. Blake Edwards
directed the seventh in the series
The Star Chamber (Twentieth
Century Fox): Michael Douglas
and Hal Holbrook star in
suspense thriller about the secret)
deliberations of an "extra-legj
body
Easy Money (Orion): Rodney
Dangerfield is a carousing bab
photographer who stands to in-
herit a fortune if he will lose
weight and give up all his vices.
With Joe Pesci and Jennifer Jasor
Leigh.
Strange Invaders (Orion): Paul
Le Mat, Nancy Allen, Diana Scar-j
wid and Louise Fletcher. Contend
porary sci-fi tale of invaders fror
another world who attempt to sei-
July Dim
Mon-Thursl
Buy any Steak
pay only half pi
of same
AH Meals Served
Potato or French
�Lunch
Mon-Sat
4 12oe. Jr. Sirloin
8oi. Chopped Sirloin
AU
Served with King
or French Ft
2 Location
5UU Tv �
mm ��� m m �
iJim�Aiiil mm mi ml i �n
- - �r mr iiitj�tmimmiiffii

Am





MU Page 6
Ings Praise
on Finale
Campus
It's also a semi-biographical
tracing of composer Marvin
Hamlisch's collaboration with
lyricist Carole Bayer Sager.
Hamlisch, whose Broadway
usical credits include A Chorus
-ine, has written some of the past
decade's finest elevator tunes
("furniture music") as well as
legitimate stage hits, pop
blockbusters and award-winning
film scores. Just think how many
of Mike Douglas's guests would
be at a loss for a song without
Chorus Line's "What I Did For
I oe
But. unfortunately, most of
Hamlisch's tunes for They're
Playing Our Song run together in-
to one long Las Vegas lounge act.
The exceptions in Monday night's
opening performance relied on
jazzy vocal assistance from the
M-member "chorus" or from
cute props (tiny toy pianos).
Sara Riva Krieger and John
Kuhn took the leading roles of
Sonia Walsk and Vernon Gersch,
a hyper, neurotic lyricist and a
successful, stuffy composer
brought together by their agents.
They fall in and out of love over
the course of two acts, have
hilarious arguments, part painful-
ly and re-unite just in time for the
final curtain. Both Krieger and
Kuhn possess more than adequate
musical and comedic gifts to carry
the roles, though Krieger had to
endure a body mike that garbled
and grated some of her most
cal moments. Certainly
ier
m
f '�' 5
per
lw -
Ir
l.

l
ll
I
See CROWD, Page 7
Scheduled
starred with comedian Robert
Klein in the story of a lyricist
(she) and a composer (he) who
find that their private relation-
ship doesn't always run as
moothly as the songs they write
together.
'When season tickets first
went on sale in November, we
realized this was going to be a
very popular show said Sum-
mer Theatre General Manager
Scott Parker, explaining the
decision to schedule a matinee.
"There are still many excellent
seats available for that perfor-
mance he said.
Tickets may be purchased at
the box office or mav be reserv-
ed by calling "57-6390.
Days
wool.
The two-piece was introduced
in the late 50s and continued to
change its style as the summers
passed. By 1964, the bikini, which
made its debut on the French
Riviera, spread throughout the
United States.
For girls too shy to wear the
skimpy bikini on the beach
backyard pools began springing
up across the country. In 1948
only 2500 pools existed. Ten years
See NEW, Page 7
fwever, know all about H.
S4,
A
i
Crowd Loves Simon's 'Song
Successful Performances Close
THF EASTCAROl INIAN
JULY 27. 1983
Coot, from Page 6
Krieger has one of the
finest (and strongest)
voices of the sum-
mer's four produc-
tions, but she was
hindered more than
helped by the
microphone. Director
Loessin might have
been better off letting
her do her songs
without the un-
necessary, and ir-
ritating, back-up.
Kuhn was
delightful as the
overgrown, insecure
preppy composer. His
understated, reserved
style was a fine com-
plement to Krieger's
more frenzied, flam-
boyant kitsch.
Edgar R. Loessin's
direction was as
quickly paced as
New Styles In Bathing Suits
Reveal More Leg And Tummy
As Summer Days Get Hotter
Cont. from Page 6
later 87,000 pools dot-
ted the landscape, and
within 15 years the
number grew to
300,000. And with the
boom in pools came a
corresponding boom
in bathing suit sales
and manufacturing
and styles.
If bikinis were out
of the question,
women stuck with the
original one-piece.
Ruffles, sequins and
bold colors glamoriz-
ed these once drab
garments. In 1964
one-piece bathing
suits advertised in the
high-fashion
magazines cost about
$24 and bikinis $18.
Nowadays, bathing
suits are cut, colored
and angled in such
ways that any false
move could result in a
revealing situation.
Mens bathing
August Preview: Flicks
To Catch Over Break
By STEVE BACHNER
SUTf Writer
The trades have it; and accor-
ding to the trades, August is going
to be an interesting month for
movies, if not a risky one. In this
final month of summer wishes,
studios make a last ditch effort to
make money with films that �
often times � aren't thought of as
big enough contenders for earlier
release. Usually, with the excep-
tion of a few films put off until
the slim fall season, the last of the
"big" commercial products are
released during this month; they
have to tide us over until
Christmas. Here's what we have
to look forward to:
COMING IN AUGUST
Pursuit of the Pink Panther
(MGM): Ted Waas stars as a New
York City detective assigned to
locate the missing Inspector
Clouseau, as well as the Pink Pan-
ther diamond. Blake Edwards
directed the seventh in the series.
The Star Chamber (Twentieth
Century Fox): Michael Douglas
and Hal Holbrook star in a
suspense thriller about the secret
deliberations of in "extra-legal
body
Easy Money (Orion): Rodney
Dangerfield is a carousing baby
photographer who stands to in-
herit a fortune if he will lose
weight and give up ail his vices.
With joe Pesci and Jennifer Jason
Leigh.
Strange Invaders (Orion): Paul
Le Mat, Nancy Allen, Diana Scar-
wid and Louise Fletcher. Contem-
porary sci-fi tale of invaders from
another world who attempt to set-
tle on Earth.
Yor, the Hunter from the
Future (Columbia): Reb Brown
stars as a mythical warrior sear-
ching for his tribe in an era when
"time and technology are
paradoxically reversed
Savage Islands (Paramount):
Tommy Lee Jones and Michael
O'Keefe. Action and adventure
on the South Seas in the late 19th
Century.
The Man Who Was Not There
(Paramount): Steve Guttenberg in
a 3-D action-adventure comedy as
a lowly government official on the
run from police and international
agents.
Smokey and the Bandit Part III
(Universal): The continued adven-
tures of the Bandit and Sheriff
Buford T. Justice. Stars Jackie
Gleason, Paul Williams and Pat
McCormick (but not Burt
Reynolds).
Going Berserk (Universal): Joe
Flaherty, Eugene Levy and John
Candy of SCTV fame. A
limousine driverpart-time drum-
mer is brainwashed by a religious
aerobics cult.
Flipped Out (Embassy):
Malcolm McDowell and Daniel
Stern. Backstage spoof of a New
Year's Eve rock concert.
Cujo (Warner Bros.): Suspense
thriller starring Dee Wallace, bas-
ed on Stephen King's best-selling
novel.
Risky Business (Warner Bros.):
A sophisticated youth-oriented
comedy about love, sex, and free
enterprise, starring a cast of
newcomers.
Spinal Tap (Embassy): Comedy
about a British rock group return-
ing to the United States for its
farewell tour, directed by and
starring Rob Reiner.
i
July Dinner Specials
Mon-Thurs. 5pm-10pm
Buy any Steak at Reg. Price and
pay only half price for second steak
of same or less value
AU Meals Served With King Idaho Baked
Potato or French Fries and Texas Toast
i
Lunch Specials
Mon-Sat. 11 am-5 pm
4 l2oz. Jr. Sirloin $2.19 with Salad Bar $3.19
8oz. Chopped Sirloin $2.49 with Salad Bar $3.49
AU Meals
Served with King Idaho Baked Potato
or French Fries and Texas Toast
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd.
2903 E. 10th St.
trunks come in a
variety of color com-
binations. Even the
thin Speedo bikini has
sold itself to a few
confident sunbathers
and to many serious
competition swim-
mers.
Suits are made to
hide the flaws, expose
the better features and
make the wearer sexy
no matter their weight
and height. These
1980 styles have made
quite a few unknowns
into celebrities
because of the fan-
tastic figures they cut
in their bathing suits.
While traveling to
the beach, say your
thanks that wool
bathing suits are out-
dated, and showing
some skin is no longer
offending. As we all
know, a wool bathing
suit in Greenville
:ould be fatal.
�. '�,� �.� ,fi,hJmb i ���mmimtm
Simon's witty
dialogue. The
choruses, portraying I
Vernon and �onias i
subconscious or alter-
ego voices, provided �
nice visual �
embellishments. Their
appearance over the s
lovers' headboard to j
chime in six-part har- g
mony on the last few
bars of "When
You're In My Arms" I
put the song's soupy I
seriousness in a less j
serious perspective. �
Like Pippin, A Lit- �
tie Night Music and I
No, No, Nanette, j
They're Playing Our j
Song boasted big- 1
budget sets, superb 1
technical execution I
(except for the poor 1
miking on Krieger) 1
and exceptionally fine I
performances by the i
orchestra and musical i
director Joe I
Distefano.
Audiences expec- 1
ting typical Neil
Simon won't be disap- 1
pointed. They're 1
Playing Our Song is
one of his less weighty I
pieces, with just �
enough serious con-
tent to offset the 1
snappy, light
dialogue. And most
importantly, the 1
leading actors who p
must carry the show
send out enough �
believable electricity 1
to make the audience I
care about the I
characters.
s"11H'liiiiHHimiiiiuiimiiiiiiiimiiiiimmiiniitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniifitiiiiii
mum I
STUNT MM I
The final MSC free Him of the summer is an offbeat
mystery romancethriller starring Peter O'Toole. The Stunt
Man airs tonight at 8:00 in Hendrix Theatre.
iiiiiHimmiimiiiiiituiuiiuiiiiiiiiiiimimiTliiimiiiiiimmiminiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiimiiiimimiimmiiiimmmmii.iiiiij
V
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these adver
tised items is re
quired to be readily
available for sale m
each Kroger Savon
�xcept as specifically
noted m this ad If we
do run out of an item
we will offer you your
Items and Prints choice of a com
Effective Tnru ST3?W 1983 CTfcHttiS5
the same savings or a
ramcheck which will
entitle you to pur
chase the advertised
item at the advertised
price within 30 days
FLEECE
Bath
Tissue
ROll
Pkg.
LITE, REGULAR
OR BARBEOUE FRITOS
Pounder
PREMIUM
Miller Beer
TAB
DIET COKE OR
Coca cola
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Hamm's Beer
2-Ltr.
N.R.
Btl.
SAVE
40c
PACKED IN WATER
Kroger Tuna
Cans
KROGER
ALL MEAT OR
All Beef
wieners
KROGER
Multigrain
Bread
N
cgfiSftittft i
�'� y
l1-Lb.
Loaf
u
rc&.
ONE INGREDIENT
Pizza Bread
2�3
bu?
AMERICAN OR MUSTARD
Potato Salad
Lb.
mmmmmmmmmm





��� I

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JULY 27 1983
PagcS
Charlie Harrison Gets -j
Three-Year Extension
ECU Athletic Director Dr. Ken
karr announced last week that
Head Basketball Coach Charlie
Harrison's contract has been ex-
tended.
Harrison joined the Pirate staff
last season and led his newly-
acquired team to an impressive
16-13 finish. The head coach also
recorded one of ECU's finest
recruiting years, including three
future Pirates who played in the
East-West all-star game Tuesday.
"We feel extremely good about
the basketball program and its
future with direction from Charlie
Harrison Karr said. "At the
time we selected Charlie, we felt
he was the right man to put our
program together in a very
positive manner and point it in the
proper direction for the future.
"With his outstanding 16-13
first year, but moreso, with the
many positives that surrounded
his program, we feel even stronger
that Charlie is the man to lead
East Carolina to its finest days of
modern basketball.
"For these reasons, I am pleas-
ed to announce that we are exten-
ding the original contract that
Charlie signed last year
Harrison, who signed a three-
year contract when he arrived at
ECU, now has a new three-year
contract extension.
With this strong vote of con-
fidence, Harrison many now en-
joy the East-West clash even
more. ECU hasn't had three
players in the all-star game since
the mid-1960's.
Derrick Battle, a 6-6 forward
from Northern Nash; Jack Turn-
bill, a 6-9 forward from Wilm-
ington New Hanover; and Roy
Smith, a 6-7 forward-center from
Gastonia Hunter Huss, played in
the game Tuesday night at the
Greensboro Coliseum.
"We're just elated to see three
of our six recruits in the game
Harrison said. "All of our
recruits will be playing and con-
tributing this coming season. This
gives us and our fans a chance to
see three fine future Pirates in ac-
tion against other outstanding
future college players
Last year, Harrison and his
team's 16-13 mark was the best
Pirate finish in three years. The
squad set a record for defense
scoring, allowing only 63.6 points
per game to break a 20-year-old
school record. The Pirates also
recorded the most road wins since
the 1974-75 season, and atten-
dance at home games increased
nearly 1,000 per game.
"We were pleased with last
year, but I feel this is really my
first season Harrison said.
"I've had the chance to put in my
system of play and recruited my
class.
"I look forward to 1983-84,
especially knowing that I have a
vote of confidence through the
contract extension from the ad-
ministration. I appreciate the ex-
tension and feel it means a great
deal to our overall program
Head Basketball Coach Charlie Harrison, seated here beside his assistants Dave Pendergraft and Tom
rise, just signed a new three-year contract.
Pirate Football Team Gets Respect A t Last
Pirate Head Football Coach Ed
Emory has been pleasantly sur-
prised by positive media reviews
from various football tabloids
and magazines.
"It's about time we started get-
ting some respect Emory said.
"Now we just need to get it in
September
Somebody out there certainly
thinks they will. In the 1983 edi-
tion of Pigskin Review" for ex-
ample, the Pirates are referred to
as "one of the nation's best foot-
ball secrets
Also in the review, the Bucs'
schedule was referred to as being a
brutal one, but then added that "
this club is capable of beating just
about anyone on a given Satur-
day
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
"They'll do it again this year
with a powerful running game
that should be even more effective
thanks to what appears to be an
improved aerial attack and a stub-
born bunch of stop troops the
Review stated.
"When all is said and done in
1983, don't be surprised if the
Pirates rock in with eight, even
nine wins chalked up Sounds
pretty good, huh?
Freshmen football players will
report for pre-season camp on
Aug. 6 and will begin work-out
practices on Aug. 8. Upper
classmen will report to ECU on
Aug. 11 and will begin practicing
on Aug. 12.
Imogene Turner has been nam-
ed head women's volleyball coach
and assistant women's softball
coach for ECU.
The 40-year-old Turner will
take over the Lady Pirate
volleyball program this fall and
assist Softball Coach Sue
Manahan during the spring.
A 1963 graduate of ECU,
Turner returned to her alma mater
in 1982 as an instructor in the
Health and Physical Education
department. She will continue
that role this season.
The Conway native played
basketball and softball at ECU
and went on to coach volleyball,
field hockey, track, basketball
and softball for 15 years in
Delaware and Georgia school
districts.
Turner received her M.A.
degree from Cal State University
in 1968.
Both football and basketball
graduate assistant coaches have
been named for the upcoming
season.
Head Coach Charlie Harrison
has selected former Pirate starter
Charlie Green to be his assistant.
Green completed his playing
career with ECU this past season,
helping the Pirates to a 16-13
finish as the second-leading scorer
and rebounder on the squad.
A native of Washington, D.C
Green transferred to ECU after
two seasons at Catonsville Com-
munity College in Baltimore, Md.
He quickly became noted as a
clutch player with outstanding
leadership abilities. Head coach
Emory will have five graduate
assistants helping out this year.
They are: Robert Barrow, running
backs; Jeff Farrington; defensive
backs; Dave Davis, defensive
ends-scout team; Kermit Blount,
offensive backfield-scout team;
and Joe Godette, tight ends.
28-year-old Barrow was head
football coach at Northern Nash
High School in Rocky Mount fcr
two seasons and was an assistant
coach at Middle Tennessee State
last season.
Farrington, 22, was a graduate
assistant football coach at The
Citadel in 1982.
Davis, 33, was a defensive back
at Frederick College in Port-
smouth, Va before becoming
head football coach at Northeast
Academy in Lasker, N.C. from
1971 to 1974. He also served as
head coach at Hobgood
Academy, Scotland Neck High
School and Camden High.
Blount, 25, was an all-CIAA
quarterback at Winston Salem
State University in 1977 and 1978.
He also played in the 1977 Gold
Bowl and the Black College All-
Star game in 1980. He was the
quarterback coach and assistant
offensive coordinator at Arm-
strong Kennedy High School in
Richmond, Va the past two
seasons.
Godette, 24, played offensive
guard, tackle and tight end during
a four-year career at East
Carolina from 1976 to 1980. He
has been an assistant coach at
J.H. Rose High School in Green-
ville for the past two seasons.
Women's Pirate Basketball
Coach Cathy Andruzi has an-
nounced that Lillion Barnes and
Laurie Sikes will serve as assistant
coaches for the 1983-84 season.
Barnes, who will be Andruzzi's
chief assistant, was a student-
assistant coach last season while
completing her degree in
psychology. She held the distinc-
tion of being the first four-year
letterwinner in the Andruzzi pro-
gram. The Wilson native was in-
strumental in the Lady Pirates
NCAA tournament berth in 1982.
Sikes completed her career in
1981 as the all-time assist leader at
ECU, although she only played
for two seasons. The Marietta,
Ga native tranferred from Peace
College in Raleigh.
Pirate Tickets will once again
be on sale at Wachovia banks all
throughout eastern North
Carolina.
This is the third consecutive
year that Wachovia has
distributed Pirate tickets. The 47
branches are located from the
Virginia border north to the SQuth
Carolina border South, each of
Raleigh. The Fayetteville area has
also been included in this program
for the first time this year.
Season tickets or individual
game tickets for East Carolina
home football games are av ailable
now and will be throughout the
season.
"We are extremely pleased that
Wachovia has continued to work
with us on this ticket program
said Athletic Director Ken Karr.
"The results of the first two years
in operation indicate that this is a
very good way of getting tickets to
fans outside the immediate
Greenville Pitt County area
As Pirate fans and friends begin
their purchases, they will find
three ways of buying tickets at
Wachovia. One, the season ticket
for ECU's four home games is
$40.00. Individual game tickets
are $10.00 each. And third, the
Economy Plan ticket is available
again this year, with one buying
five season tickets in a special sec-
tion for half price.
The Pirates wil open its 1983
season on Sept 3 at Florida State,
with the home opener against
Murrav State set for 7 p.m. on
Sept. 17.
Keith Zengel, a four-year
member of the ECU tennis team,
has joined the Pirate staff as an
assistnat coach for 1984, head ten-
nis coach Pat Sherman announc-
ed.
Zengel plaved for ECU from
1978 to 1982. The Baltimore,
Md native received his degree in
1982 in physical education.
Greg Barnes and Rochel Rit-
tgers have been named assistant
trainers for the ECU Sports
Medicine Department.
The two will assist ECU's
Sports Medicine Director Rod
Compton in the health
maintenance of all Pirate athletes,
as well as teaching courses in the
univesity's sports medicine cur-
riculum.
Barnes received a B.S. degree in
education from Grand Valley
State College and his Masters in
physical education from Ohio
University in 1983. He is a native
of Detroit.
Rittgers, who is from Des
Moines, la earned her B.A.
degree from Northern Iowa and a
Master's degree in physical educa-
tion in 1983 from Eastern Ken-
tucky.
Both are certified trainers by
the National Athletic Trainers
Association.
Head Football Coach is happy that the Pirates are finally getting a
taste of the respect he's sought after for five years.
Pirates Grab Lead In NL East
1
A couple of unfamiliar names
sit atop the two divisions as the
baseball season prepares for
August "stretch" run. In the Na-
tional League East, the Pittsburgh
Pirates are the hottest team in
baseball with 13 victories in their
last 16 games. The Pirates have
used rejuvenated pitching and
timely hitting to move one game
in front of the Montreal Expos.
One big reason for the
resurgence of the Pirates has been
the play of Dave Parker, the NL
Most Valuable Player in 1978.
Since the Ail-Star break, Parker
has been batting over .400 and has
raised his average to .281.
In the American League West,
the Chicago White Sox are leading
a division that no one seems to
want to win. In a division with on-
ly two teams above the .500 mark,
the White Sox have a one-game
lead over Texas and are two
games in front of Kansas City and
California.
But none of it matters because
everyone knows that the Orioles
are going to win the World Series
anyway.
KEN BOLTON
Baseball Today
George Brett will probably start
carrying a tape measure with him
to the plate from now on. The
Kansas City Royals third baseman
had a iwo-run homer taken away
from him Sunday in Yankee
Stadium when it was discovered
that Brett's bat had more than 18
inches of pine tar on the handle.
The Royals filed a protest with
the American League office Mon-
day charging the umpires mis-
interpreted the rules. The Royals
argue that there is no provision in
the rule calling for ejection of a
player or nullification of a hit
resulting from having pine tar
beyond the 18-inch limit.
� � �
St. Louis right-hander Neil
Allen was named National League
Player of the Week Monday.
Allen, outstanding since joining
the Cardinals last month in a deal
with the New York Mets, fashion-
ed back-to-back shutouts last
week.
American League honors went
to another pitcher. Rick
Honeycutt of the Texas
Rangers.Honeycutt won both of
his starts and improved his overall
record to 13-6.
The latest rumor in baseball is
that a major-league franchise will
be established here in Greenville.
It hasn't been officially announc-
ed yet, but "inside" sources have
told The East Carolinian that Bil-
ly Martin is considerng leaving
New York to manage the Green-
ville club.
Possible nicknames for the new
franchise include the Greenville
"Swingers" or the Greenville
"Hispes
Another announcement of par-
ticular interest to this area is
establishment of a new playoff
format. The winner of the World
Series will not be the world cham-
pions until they defeat the winner
of the "Down East Series
This week's trivia question:
Which U.S. city do the Atlanta
Braves play their home games in?
By PATRICK O'NEILL
StaH Writer
"Here's a guy who's chasing
the Triple Crown wrote Sports
Illustrated's Steve Wulf in his re-
cent SI cover story on Atlanta
Braves Center fielder Dale Mur-
phy.
Come on Steve, that's a pretty
big prediction for any baseball fan
to make in the middle of July!
Every true baseball lover knows
that the Triple Crown is baseball's
most difficult and most coveted
prize.
Even a pitcher who leads the
league in wins, ERA's and
strikeouts never receives the praise
and glory that belongs to the hit-
ter who takes the Triple Crown.
To do this a hitter must lead the
league in three categories: home
runs, runs batted in and batting
average.
The Triple Crown Award has
only been presented a mere dozen
times in more than 100 years in
which accurate statistics have
been kept.
The award is perhaps best
known, not because of the few
who have won it, but rather
because of the dozens of all-time
greats who never did. Names like
Ruth, Aaron, Mays, DiMaggio,
and Musial to name a few. They
all got close, but not one of them
was able to take home the elusive
Triple Crown.
Researching the history of the
Triple Crown is like a dream come
true for the baseball statistic
freak. 1 was experiencing momen-
tary losses of breath and uttering
strange sounds in the library every
time I came across another in-
credible stat from years gone by.
Most baseball players would be
happy to lead their league in just
one of the three Triple Crown
categories, so when someone
manages to lead in all three, it's
exciting.
In this feature I'll talk about the
10 men who have won the Triple
Crown, and then I'll go on to
mention the all-time greats who
got close.
Perhaps it was appropriate that
Detroit Great Ty Cobb was the
first player to win the Triple
Crown (three others won the prize
prior to baseball's so-called
modern era.). The Georgia Peach,
best known for his prowness as a
singles hitter and base stealer
took the prize in 1909. The lively
ball era had still not arrived when
See TRIPLE, Page 9
� -r-A
Rozelle
NEW YORK (AP)
Commissioner Pete
Rozelle of the Na-
tional Football
League is getting
tough with players
who use drugs, and
he's got support even
from teams affected
by the four suspen-
sions.
Pete Johnson and
Ross Browner of the
Cincinnati Bengals,
E.J. Junior of the St.
Louis Cardinals and
Greg Stemrick of the
New Orleans Saints
were suspended
without pay by
Rozelle Monday. The
suspensions carry
through the fourth
game of tl
season, at w
the players
tion for
ment.
"None of
is permitted
traing .am;
sessions, m
otherwise
facilities
said. He sj
had thoi
reviewed thl
the four
players al
representatij
reaching th
Only or
four players
� was avj
comment
he or the tl
Triple Cro
For Today
Baseballs Sought-After 1
Goal: The Triple Crown I
Cont'd From Page 8
Cobb banged out a
meager nine home
runs to go along with
his more respectable
115 RBI's and a .377
average.
Although this was
the only home run ti-
tle of his career, no
one could rightfully
call Cobb's feat a
fluke. Let's not forget
he did manage to win
"other batting titles
and three more RBI
titles during his il-
lustrious career
Cobb's combined
career totals for
leading the league in
any of the three Triple
Crown categories is
17, which ranks only
second to Babe Ruth's
19 titles.
The next man to
win the Tnple Crown
had a career total of
13 league titles in Tri-
ple Crown categories.
That player was
Roger Hornsby of the
St. Louis Cardinals.
He's the only national
player who managed
to lead his league in
all three categories
twice. In 1922, Horn-
sby finished the
season with 42 home
runs, 152 RBI's and a
.401 batting average
In 1925, Hornsby
took his second triple
crown with 39
homers, 143 RBI's
and a .403 average.
Like Cobb. Horn-
sby was best known
for his light hitting
skills, he won seven
batting titles and four
RBI titles during his
career. Fortunately
for him, his only two
homerun titles came
in the same years he
led the league in the
other two Triple
Crown categories. On
two other occasions
Hornsby managed to
win two legs of the
Triple Crown.
Fans didn't wait
long for the next Tri-
ple Crown which was
captured during the
1934 season by the
famed Lou "Iron
Horse Gehrig of the
New York Yankees.
Gehrig hit .363 that
year for his only bat-
ting title. To go with
it, he banged out 49
home rum
in 165 nil
won two
run title-
other RBI
career tot
Triple
category
Keep ir
Gehrig pa
same tear
other thanl
Bambin
Ruth. A nl
be prettv
out the Bi
St. Loi
Joe Se&
ed a I
when he
pie Cro
Medwich
runs and
runs to g
his .3
average,
other RBI
wich nev
league in
the Trii
categoru
In V
Red Sol
Ted W
fiist
Crc I
pounde
horr
and hit
He -
Crc
when h
32 homeI
RBI's wl
total in
for any
winner
It's hi
that W
most
Triple
With i
titles,
titles
titles fo
Wffii
he posfl
tional
three
categc
it v
baseb
Tnple
form
York
ANNOUNCING
SATURDAY 0!
HOURS
For your convenience we
for examination and opu
every Saturday from 9 00
p.m. Affordable fees quic
service Co�����t
Believing DR rel. . I
75W
! $
20
OFF ��
i
i

n





f
THE EAST CAKOL1NIAN JULY 27. 1�3
Page 8
lJ "j
LS �
i
w -rr
stants Dave Pendergraft and Tom Bar-
t Last
. n
Inc-
Icar
Vo-
m-
it es
Hi.
in
fcr at
lyed
Etta,
race
iga n
us all
lorth
:utive
has
Ihe 47
the
5QUth
ldual
Irolina
Liable
iut the
Economy Plan ncket is available
again this year, with one buying
five season tickets in a special sec-
tion for half price.
The Pirates wil open its 1V8J
season on Sept 3 at Florida State.
ith the home opener against
Murray State set for 7 p.m. on
Sept. 17.
Keith Zengel, a four-year
member of the ECU tennis team,
has joined the Pirate staff as an
assistnat coach for 1984, head ten-
nis coach Pat Sherman announc-
: Zengel played for ECU frdm
1978 to 1982. The Baltimore,
Md native received his degree in
1982 in physical education.
Greg Barnes and Rochel Rit-
teers have been named assistant
trainers for the ECU Sports
Medicine Department.
The two will assist ECU s
Sports Medicine Director Rod
Compton in the health
maintenance of all Pirate athletes,
as well as teaching courses in the
umvesity's sports medicine cur-
riculum.
Barnes received a B.S. degree in
education from Grand Valley
State College and his Masters m
physical education from Ohio
University in 1983. He is a native
of Detroit.
Rittgers, who is from Des
Momes, la earned her B.A.
degree from Northern Iowa and a
Master's degree in physical educa-
tion in 1983 from Eastern Ken-
tucky.
Both are certified trainers by
the National Athletic Trainers
?d that
work
?ram
Karr.
lo years
jthis is a
Ickets to
lediate
fca.
is begin
till find
:kets at
n ticket
fcames is
tickets
lird, the Association.
�s Sought-After
e Triple Crown
LILL and Musial to name a few. They
all got close, but not one of them
I chasing was able to take home the elusive
5te Sports Triple Crown,
in his re- Researching the history of the
Atlanta Triple Crown is like a dream come
)ale Mur- true for the baseball statistic
freak. 1 was experiencing momen-
's a pretty tary losses of breath and uttering
laseball fan strange sounds in the library every
of July! time I came across another in-
Ivet knows credible stat from years gone by.
, baseball's Most baseball players would be
lst coveted happy to lead their league in just
one of the three Triple Crown
leads the categories, so when someone
LA's and manages to lead in all three, it's
the praise exciting,
to the hit- In this feature I'll talk about the
ple Crown. 10 men who have won the Triple
ust lead the Crown, and then I'll go on to
jries: home mention the all-time greats who
land batting got close.
Perhaps it was appropriate that
Award has Detroit Great Ty Cobb was the
mere dozen first player to win the Triple
100 years in Crown (three others won the prize
t is tics have prior to baseball's so-called
modern era.). The Georgia Peach,
erhaps best best known for his prowness as a
of the few singles hitter and base stealer,
but rather took the prize in 1909. The lively
of all-time ball era had still not arrived when
Names Uke TRIPLE, Page 9
DiMaggio,
Rozelle Suspends Four
NEW YORK (AP)
� Commissioner Pete
Rozelle of the Na-
tional Football
League is getting
tough with players
who use drugs, and
he's got support even
from teams affected
by the four suspen-
sions.
Pete Johnson and
Ross Browner of the
Cincinnati Bengals,
E.J. Junior of the St.
Louis Cardinals and
Greg Stemrick of the
New Orleans Saints
were suspended
without pay by
Rozelle Monday. The
suspensions carry
through the fourth
game of the 1983
season, at which time
the players can peti-
tion for reinstate-
ment.
"None of the four
is permitted to attend
traing camp, practice
sessions, meetings or
otherwise use club
facilities Rozelle
said. He said that he
had thouroughly
reviewed the cases of
the four with the
players and their
representatives before
reaching the decision.
Only one of the
four players � Junior
� was available for
comment and neither
he or the three teams
affected by the
suspensions protested
the ruling.
"The commissioner
made a decision in the
best interest of the
fans and the NFL
said Junior, en route
from Charleston, HI.
to St. Louis. "I accept
the decision and look
forward to returning
to the football Car-
dinals
Junior, a third-year
linebacker from the
University of
Alabama, was ar-
rested on April 6,
1982 at his apartment
in Tuscaloosa, Ala.
and charged with
possession of cocaine
and marijuana. He
entered a plea of guil-
ty to the cocaine
charge and was placed
on probation.
"We still continue
to be supportive of
E.J. Junior in his
(rehabilitation) pro-
gram and look for-
ward to his return to
fulltime duty Car-
dinals owner Bill
Bidwell said.
Stemrick also was
arrested on cocaine
felony charges, plead-
ed no contest, was
convicted and releas-
ed on probation.
The Saints corner-
back played at Col-
orado State before
moving into the NFL
with Houston in 1975.
He was released by
the Oilers fottowinf
his drug problems and
claimed on waivers by
the Saints.
Phillips said team
rules would have dealt
harshly with Stemrick
if he had been caught
with cocaine while a
member of the Saints.
"If it had been on
our team, it wouldn't
have been up to the
commissioner. He
would have been gone
before it got that
far Phillips said.
"We're not going to
tolerate it, and the
players know it
Triple Crown Remains Elusive Even
For Today 9s Major League Players
Cont'd From Page 8
Cobb banged out a
meager nine home
runs to go along with
his more respectable
115 RBI's and a .377
average.
Although this was
the only home run ti-
tle of his career, no
one could rightfully
call Cobb's feat a
fluke. Let's not forget
he did manage to win
"other batting titles
and three more RBI
titles during his il-
lustrious career.
Cobb's combined
career totals for
leading the league in
any of the three Triple
Crown categories is
17, which ranks only
second to Babe Ruth's
19 titles.
The next man to
win the Triple Crown
had a career total of
13 league titles in Tri-
ple Crown categories.
That player was
Roger Hornsby of the
St. Louis Cardinals.
He's the only national
player who managed
to lead his league in
all three categories
twice. In 1922, Horn-
sby finished the
season with 42 home
runs, 152 RBI's and a
.401 batting average.
In 1925, Hornsby
took his second triple
crown with 39
homers, 143 RBI's
and a .403 average.
Like Cobb, Horn-
sby was best known
for his light hitting
skills, he won seven
batting titles and four
RBI titles during his
career. Fortunately
for him, his only two
homerun titles came
in the same years he
led the league in the
other two Triple
Crown categories. On
two other occasions
Hornsby managed to
win two legs of the
Triple Crown.
Fans didn't wait
long for the next Tri-
ple Crown which was
captured during the
1934 season by the
famed Lou "Iron
Horse Gehrig of the
New York Yankees.
Gehrig hit .363 that
year for his only bat-
ting title. To go with
it, he banged out 49
ANNOUNCING �
home runs and drove
in 165 runs. Gehrig
won two other home
run titles on four
other RBI titles for a
career total of nine
Triple Crown
category league leads.
Keep in mind that
Gehrig played on the
same team with none
other than the "Great
Bambino Babe
Ruth. A player had to
be pretty good to beat
out the Babe.
St. Louis Cardinal
Joe Medwick surpris-
ed a lot of people
when he won the Tri-
ple Crown in 1937.
Medwich hit 31 home
runs and drove in 154
runs to go along with
his .374 batting
average. Besides two
other RBI titles, Med-
wich never led his
league in any other of
the Triple Crown
categories.
In 1942. Boston i
Red Sox outfielder
Ted Williams won his
first of two Triple
Crowns. Williams
pounded out 36
homers, 137 RBI's
and hit .356 that year.
He won the Triple
Crown again in 1947
when he hit .343 with
32 home runs. His 114
RBI's was the lowest
total in that category
for any Triple Crown
winner.
It's hard to dispute
that Williams was the
most versatile of the
Triple Crownefs.
With his six batting
titles, four home run
titles and four RBI
titles for a total of 14,
Williams showed that
he possessed excep-
tional skills in all
three Triple Crown
categories.
It was 1956 before
baseball saw its next
Triple Crowner in the
form of a young New
York Yankee center-
fielder by the name of
Mickey Mantle. On
two occasions (1058
and 1960), Mantle
took home both the
home run and RBI
titles for two legs of
the Triple Crown.
It only happened
once and Frank
Robinson of the
Baltimore Orioles was
the beneficiary. In
1966, it all came
together for Robin-
son. His 49 home
runs, 122 RBI's and
.316 average led the
American league in
each category. Robin-
son never led the
league in any of the
Triple Crown
categories either
before or after his
monumental season.
One year
later�and 16 seasons
ago�Red Sox out-
fielder Carl Yastrzem-
ski took another Tri-
ple Crown title. Yaz,
like Robinson, put it
all together in 1967.
His 44 homers, 121
RBI's and .326
average led the
American league in all
these areas. And like
Robinson, Yaz also
has only won the
home run and RBI
titles one time each
during his career. His
two other batting
titles in 1963 and 1968
gave Yastrzemski a
career total of five
Triple Crown
category titles. Yaz is
the only former Triple
Crown winner still
playing the game.
iatraararal services have drawn to a done. During the apcomiag interim period,
the Memorial Gym courts will be rcfinbaed. Bat doa't despair! Two aerobics classes will be
offered. Registration will take place on Aug. 1 aad 2 from 8:3d a.m. to 4:3d p.m. in Room
204, Memorial Gym.
WEDNESDAY
NITE
,
'�vox
m�
Now Playing
Top Forty and
Dance Mask
Mixed Beverages
Happy Hour Tues-Fri 5-7
HAPPY HOUR 8:30-10:00
FREE DRAFT
SPECIALS ALL NIGHT
TuesBeach Night
ThursLadies Night
FreeAdm. Free Draft for Ladies
All Night Long
PRIVATE CLUB
MEMBERS AND GUESTS
Starting FriJuly 29th
And Continuing for Four Weeks
Couples Dance Contest
$400.00 Cash Prize
plus other prizes-
Every SatPenny Draft for All
200 West Tenth Street 752-1493
TAKE A
BUCK'S GULF
2704 E. 10th St. 752-3228
rMnwtrn
s��
SATURDAY OFFICE
HOURS
For your convenience we wlfl be open
for examination and optical �f�Jf�
every Saturday from fcOO a.m. to 1:00
p.m Affordable fees, quick. �ccurate
tervtce. Cwnnlial mmtfa. Siting is
BeUeving
DR. PETER W. HOLUS
OJC.P.A.
i. rm qmcnvilU h.vo
756-9404
��
i
i
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i
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i
20
OFF ST5ST
Across from Villa Roma,
We do minor repairs, tune ups, brake
alignments, and air conditioner malntotnance
We have a road wrecker service and do
service calls. 24 hr. number is 758-1033.
Keep your car looking good
Free car wash with each till up!
We rentlartron trucks and trailers for your
moving neeas.
CoiTiebytooayToryoiirconipletecarneedi
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it
We pull for ECU not from

2 FOR
THE PRICE OF
WITH TIM COUPON
e�iu�m�iw.ima
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757-1SSS S
AWYfttZALTrr-��
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-T"
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UWfcHW����
�inmnwnii iiw
w
w





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 27, 1983
Cain Upset By
Lack Of Carries!
SUWANEE, Ga.
(UPI) � Lynn Cain is
so upset by his ap-
parent status in the
Atlanta Falcons' new
offensive scheme, he
doesn't want to talk
about it.
Although a starter,
along side William
Andrews, in every
game the past three
seasons, Cain carried
the ball less than
rookie Gerald Riggs
in 1982, and with new
Coach Dan Henning
going t, a "one-back"
offense this year,
there's a likelihood
he'll carry it a lot less
in 1983.
There have been
reports that Cain has
been "trade bait"
since early spring, but
a scarcity of takers.
The resulting
doubts are evident.
Cain becomes more
withdrawn every day.
He'll answer ques-
tions about his siua-
tion if pressed, but it
is obvious he'd rather
not.
"I'm just trying 3to
understand my role
he said softly. "1
realize there is always
a chance of being
phased out.
"I may be forced to
make a decision
said Cain, refusing to
devulge if he is think-
ing trade or retire-
ment. "My family (in
California) is con-
cerned about me and
would like to see me
coming back that
way
Lynn Cain is used
to playing in the
shadowof other runn-
ing backs. Although
he gained more yar-
dage (887) his senior
season than any
Southern Cal fullback
before him, he spent
most of his Trojans
career as a blocker for
Heisman Trophy win-
ner Charles White.
Cain was a fourth-
round draft choice in
1979 (the Falcons
took Andrews, their
all-time leading
rusher, in the third
round that year) and
after missing half his
rookie season with a
knee injury hit his pro
peak in 1980 when he
rushed for 915 yards.
Those � are days of
wine and roses for
Lynn Cain. He and
Andrews were rated
the best 1-2 punch in
the NFL and the
future seemed
limitless.
But although An-
drews had another
1,300-yard season in
1981, Cain's produc-
tion was cut almost in
half and the Falcons
obviously had that in
the back ot their mind
when they made Riggs
their first round
choice in the '82
draft.
In last year's strike-
shortened season,
Cain, a 6-foot-l,
205-pounder, con-
tinued to start, but
Riggs, 6-1, 225, car-
ried the ball 24 more
times and gained 126
more yards.
Classifieds
TYPING: TERM PAPERS.
ESSAYS and RESUMES. IBM
SELECTRIC TYPEWRITER
and CAMERA-READY
RESUME SERVICE. Call
MlME at 7H-W4.
FOR SALE: TWIN BED with
mattress and boxiprings. Good
condition Only SIS. Call AMY
attar a:Mat 7S-WS.
"SPANISH, SPANISH.
SPANISH � God. do I hate
Spanish Aw. coma on, it's not
so bad. Coma to ma tor all your
Spanish tutoring noods. Call
KERRI at jg-ttat.
"MONEY IS LIFEII" I said it,
but boy and I sorry. Now, site's
cut ma oft. Whan she said I'd ba
in troubta, site maant itn
EARN I2SS.Mwaakly working, in
your home part or full time
For application, mall a sell
addrassod, stamped envelope
to: B.M.M. Burrus Placa,
Meadows Trailer Park, Tar-
boro. N.C 27
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR
FALLspring. Cannon Court
condos. SllSmonth plus 12
utilities, con air wd DW bus
route. Call 7S2-t711.
WANTED FRIDAY: Two male
students to move 10 items at
t:M, including small dorm
refrigerator. Will pay $11 each.
Call 7S1-QH3.
TO FAT ALICE: MOW many
times have I got to tell you not to
scratch like that in public? If
so embarrassing when my
friends suggest I buy you a flea
collar. Let's try to improve,
love. Whaddya sayT Skinny Rod
r
LAITAKKSIEWELFRf
ESTAJLOHtD 1912
T. �r,m-� femeen muilc� em "��.
GGFFNVIlie '�' C
414
l
Remnants
Custom Design
Repair
All Work Done On Premises
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ABORTIONS UP
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Me-m-lSMl bahaaaa � AJst.
and S P.M.
RALIIGMS WOMINJ
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�" Wart Morgan It
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ftaomtot a darned a�c
DEFEND ON. Itontrwrtrr. Galoot by
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MMC1. � TuoBdoy - Saturday Abortton o
18 vVooto � Fpm Pfoonancv Torts � Vory Earty
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itaJMicom wunmH'm THf II flaHtisVC
cpGdLeoHontorwo. ,wm ixewnriv"
5 lb. Net Or ��
FOOD LION
Thtst ptices good thru
Saturday, July 30,1983
Ground
Fresh Oilly
Lb.
Lb.
�SM Cktlce B.m I.
Chuck
Roast
If fc
Food Toivn
Bacon Watermelons
2 Liter
Pk�. of 12 -12 Oi. Caes
Pke, iU 12 Oz. ����
1.5 lifer � Barku.y ChiMis Rbia. R�s.
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11 Ounc
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Liquid gX
Why Pay 1 19
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Wiy Pay M.29
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19 StiitHs 2 PI, U UK'
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Why Pay 59
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20 Oz. - Cb.gk. Crgtbai S!i,
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24 Cl. - F�B)liy Sin
Tetiey Tea Bags
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Bright Eye Cat Feed
69
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Hot Dog Sauce Po,vny
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titum a mtm,um





Title
The East Carolinian, July 27, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 27, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.278
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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