The East Carolinian, July 20, 1983







1

�hc �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 Hmm 7 j
Wednesday July 20,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Heat Wave Hits Area
Power Usage Reaches A11-Time Record In Greenville
ByDARRYI BROWN
Sufi Write
Hot temperatures put unusually
high demand on the Greenville
Utilities Commission Monday,
setting a new record for power
usage in the city, a spokesman
said.
Mike Waters, sut ration and
controls engineer for uLC, said
power output reached 143.400
kilowatts Monday, the highest
eer recorded by the local power
facility. The figure could have
been higher. Waters said, if
GUC's load management control
had not been in effect. He said the
program, designed to cut power
consumption during peak hours,
probably cut 8,000 to 9,000
kilowatts off power usage.
Waters said the high power con-
sumption was primarily caused by
high temperatures. "If the
weather stays like this, it could go
higher
Last week, power demand was
also unusally high, according to
Waters. Output ranged around
130,000 kilowatts and Saturday's
reading of 130,000 was a new
weekend record. Power consump-
tion is usually lower on Saturday
and Sunday.
The power output figures are
even more unusual since GUC no
longer provides power to the near-
by town of Ayden. Power figures
before 1980 included Ayden in
total consumption.
Waters said GUC should have
no trouble meeting the increased
demand, and said a good rain
storm could lower power con-
sumption to more normal levels.
But, he noted consumption could
go even higher if the weather re-
mains hot in August when
students return to school and
tobacco harvesting begins.
"If the weather stays like it is
now, we could surpass those
figures" in August, he said.
The GUC is part of the Eastern
Municipal Power Agency, which
owns a percentage of the
generating facilities of Carolina
Power and Light Co. CP'L has
reported record power consump-
tion rates in North Carolina dur-
ing the past week of high
temperatures.
Jenkins Supporters Hire Local Firm
B PATRICK O'NEILL
�.iv'an: Sf tditor
A group supporting former
ECU chancellor Leo P. Jenkins in
his bid for governor has hired a
eteran Greenville marketing
communications firm to test
North Carolina's political waters
for a possible run at the states top
spot.
The firm of Adams and Logino
has been hired to survey
Democrats across the state to
determine if there's a strong
enough support base for Jenkins
to run in the 1984 Democratic
primary.
Jenkins, 69, called "very en-
couraging" the response he's been
getting thus far from those who
have heard he's planning to enter
the race. "I think there' desire on
the part of a lot of pec Me to let
someone with experierice and
maturity be involved in this pro-
gram Jenkins said.
"Dr. Jenkins has a considerable
core support who have put up
some seed money said Frank H.
Longino Jr a partner in the firm
hired by the Jenkins group. "We
are now initally sending some let-
ters to people across the state who
are active Democrats and asking
them if they would support a
Jenkins candidacy
Longino said the survey-type
letter would not be asking for a
firm commitment or for campaign
contributions, but would only be
used to determine if there was suf-
ficient interest in a Jenkins can-
didacy. "If we receive adequate
support from the key Democrats,
we'll do some statewide polling
and see if we have a chance
Longino said. "If we do have a
pretty good chance then he will go
ahead and announce his can-
didacy and go on with it
Jenkins said more than 5,000
letters will be sent out in an effort
to find out if there's acceptance
"one way or the other" to his
plans.
Longino said his firm has a 15-1
record in political races. If
Jer'ins decides to run, Longino's
firm would then handle the adver-
tising and public relations for the
Jenkins for Governor team.
"Leo has a skill that far sur-
passes any of the other can-
didates, and that's public speak-
ing. He's an orator Longino
said, "as well as being a politician
and a statesman
Longino said that in a large race
there's a lot of interest in public
forums so the candidates can be
given an opportunity to present
their platforms. He gives Jenkins
the edge in any forums that are
conducted. "I believe he's going
to come out ahead in any forum
Longino said. "Anytime you
have a big race, what you're
Mondale Makes Stop In S.C.
NORTH MYRTLE BEACH,
S.C. (UPI) � Democrat Walter
Mondale said Tuesday he will de-
mand that Ronald Reagan live up
to "ethical standards of
behavior" if the two men debate
in the 1984 presidential campaign.
The former vice president com-
pared the Reagan campaign's
alleged possession of a Jimmy
Carter campaign briefing book in
1980 to a schoolboy swiping a
test.
"When your youngster takes a
class or exam in high school, you
don't encourage that student to
steal the exam Mondale said.
"Those are unethical standards of
behavior and you expect better
Mondale said he "would insist
on several debates so we could go
into the major issues in a strong
way with ethical standards of
behavior
The Democratic presidential
hopeful told a conference of the
North Carolina League of Savings
Institutions the financial industry
must preserve the American
dream of every family owning a
home.
"There is nothing more fun-
damental than a good house in a
nice neighborhood he said.
Mondale refused to criticize
Reagan's selection of former
Secratary of oiate Henry Kiss-
inger to head a newly created bi-
partisan advisory board on Cen-
tral American policy.
"Personalities are not the
issue he said. "Are they dealing
with the politics of the problem or
the problem itselP"
Invading the home state of the
other presidential hopeful with
the nickname "Fritz" � Sen.
Ernest Hollings � Mondale called
himself "the Pope John Paul of
the Democratic Party and
declined to attack his South
Carolina opponent.
"I don't want to get elected by
hurting Fritz he said. "I'm very
fond of Fritz. I'm going to run a
positive campaign
Mondale spent most of his
speech attacking Reagan's handl-
ing of the nation's budget pro-
blems.
ECU Women Speak
Few Go Out After Dark
Hall
df . fv
Billy Ray Warren was
sentenced on Friday to 35 years
in prison after being convicted
of raping an ECU student on
campus last spring. Women
students were asked whether
they felt safe walking around
campus at night and if they had
any suggestions to make the
campus safer.
Mollie Sue Hall, Occupa-
tional Therapy, Sophomore �
"I do feel safe just because
that's the way I am. But, I can
understand the girls who are
scared. The school offers free
karate classes. I suggest every
woman enroll
Paula Hale, Physical
Therapy, Senior � "No, I
don't feel safe when I'm alone.
Even when I'm with just one
other female, I don't feel very
safe. It's safer when women
walk in large groups. If they
have the Pirate Walk in the
fall, I'll probably use it
Wilma Case, Biology, Junior
� "I feel pretty safe because I
use my better judgment. I don't
stay out at night unless I'm
with someone or in a group.
We need to emphasize (to new
students) the need to be a little
bit more careful
Elizabeth Pope, Freshman,
Nursing � "I don't really go
out unless someone's with me.
I think the Pirate Walk is a
helpful service
Case
basically looking for is the
undecided vote Longino said.
"Most of the polls right now say
there's about 60 percent undecid-
ed. The decided vote is relatively
small, it could be a horserace
Jenkins, who has been speaking
and making public appearences
around the state recently, said
he's offering experience and
know-how to the people of North
Carolina.
Jenkins said his past record
shows that he's someone who's
"really succeeded" and someone
who knows state government
"backwards and front
"I've worked with these people
(state officials) for 35 years, so I
know exactly what goes on in state
government � how things are
achieved and how things are
defeated � I know my way
around Jenkins said.
Jenkins, who has previously
stressed the importance of educa-
tion as one of his primary con-
cerns, said he also thinks more
skills training, in technical areas
such as electronics and com-
puters, is needed in North
Carolina.
"We're not going to get
Japanese Firms, German firms,
(and) all these other people to
come to North Carolina unless we
have the manpower who are train-
ed in the skills Jenkins said.
"The state that can do that is go-
ing to be the state that wins
Jenkins retired from ECU's
chancellorship in 1978. Longino
said it would probably be late
September before the survey is
completed.
More Melons
That's right folks. The East Carolinian, in its quest to bring you the
world's most treasured watermelon pix, present to you the famous
"Melon in Love" by Stanley Leary.
Civil Rights Leader's Son
Stops Off In Greenville
The son of the late civil rights
leader Martin Luther King Jr.
stopped in Greenville Saturday as
part of his swing through North
Carolina encouraging voter
registration and gathering support
for a large peace march to be held
in Washington, D.C on Aug. 27.
Martin Luther King III joined
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference President Joseph
L .very for a short visit with
Greenville Community leaders.
Local SCLC President Bennie
Roundtree was on hand to
welcome King and Lowery. King's
father founded the SCLC in 1955.
He remained the group's presi-
dent until he was killed by an
assassin's bullet in June of 1968.
On Friday, King joined black
leaders Dick Gregory and Walter
Fauntroy while addressing au-
diences in Durham and Chapel
Hill. "No matter what anyone
thinks, we're still not free King
told his audiences. "America is
stilLa very racist nation. Our pre-
judices become racist when we use
them to oppress others
The Washington, D.C march
in August will mark the 20th an-
niversary of the Rev. Martin
Luther King's famous "1 have a
dream" speech. March leaders are
predicting more than 1 million
people will turn out for the event.
Local Noise Ordinance To Begin;
New Levels Will Affect Students'
By DARRYL BROWN
SUff Writer
The Greenville City Council
passed a city-wide noise ordinance
in May scheduled to take effect at
the end of the month, a city of-
fical said Monday, that should
drastically change the amount of
noise a household can make
without breaking the new city law.
Greenville has not had a viable
noise ordinance until the new rule
which is set to go into effect July
31, according to Assistant City
Attorney DeWitt McCarley. A
previous law prohibiting
"unreasonable or excessive
noise" proved difficult to enforce
and had no standard penalty.
Citizens complaining about a
neighborhood noise had virtually
no legal recourse, and police
could do little more than ask loud
citizens to keep noise to
reasonable levels
Analysis
McCarley said the new or-
dinance, which has been in the
making for almost a year, was
prompted primarily by citizen de-
mand for an enforceable noise
law. Areas such as the Tar River
neighborhood, between Fifth
street and the river, complained so
much about noise violations that
"we needed something that would
work McCarley said.
"Our point is not to go after
anybody he said, but "there are
sections of town where people
want a vigorous enforcement pro-
The new law sets specific noise
levels for residential, public, com-
mercial and industrial areas.
Residential neighborhoods can
not exceed 55 dB (a standard unit
for measuring sound levels) from
11 p.m. to 7 a.m. and no more
than 60 dB at other times. Sound
levels will be measured at street
curbs, fences, or other points
commonly assumed to be the pro-
perty line.
According to standard
estimates, an average conversa-
tion in 50 to 60 dB, a small air
conditioner is about 60 dB, the
average televison or vacuum
cleaner is about 70 dB, and a nor-
mal power lawn mower is about
110 dB.
No one in a residential
neighborhood may exceed the
levels of the ordinance, which car-
ries a $50 fine, but public, com-
mercial and industrial areas can
apply for a temporary "Permit to
Exceed" or an "Outdoor
Amplified Sound Permit" for
concerts or other loud events.
Thanks to cooperation between
the city and the ECU Panhellenic
and Inter Fraternity Councils,
organized and managed by Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer, fraternity and sorority
houses, normally considered
residential buildings, will be
allowed one exception to the noise
ordinance per semester. Frater-
nities and sororities are the only
residences who may be granted a
"Permit to Exceed McCarley
praised Meyer for keeping good
communication between the city
and student groups.
Even with a permit, noise levels
in any area may not exceed 85 dB.
A fine of $200 and immediate
revocation of the permit can be
levied on anyone exceeding the
noise levels of the permit. Permit
holders must be present during the
entire time permits are in use and
must assist police in making a
changes necessary at the site.
There is a $5 administration fee
to obtain a permit.
Exceptions are made in the or-
dinance for normal noise levels
exceeding the law such as daytime
construction work, safety or war-
ning signals, church bells, legal
parades, demonstrations and
street fairs, holiday fireworks,
lawn mowers and trains.
The Greenville City Police will
enforce the ordinance, and the ci-
ty is purchasing noise meters and
training officers to use them in
order to enforce the law, Mc-
Carley said. He said officers
would not randomly inspect areas
for noise, but would probably on-
ly act on complaints.
The law also covers noise from
motor vehicles, now making it il-
legal for vehicles to have improper
mufflers that produce noise levels
over 80 to 90 dB.
The new ordinance should
make a major difference in some
city neighborhoods and in the
utestyles of many students living
off campus. Many parties and
stereos regularly exceed the new
"� and houses in some
�MlinlJJWHi are only a few feet
apart. Fraternity councils fed
they can live with the new or-
dinance, Umitint each house to
one loud eventT
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I
I HE EAST CAHOLINIAN JULY 20. IW3
Announcements
EMPLOYMENT
Application arc needed from
students wrto are interested in
becoming PERSONAL CARE
ATTENOENTS to wheelchair
students We will employ those
who have a desire to assist in
dividual with their activities of
oailyllvlno For details concern
ing duties and compensation,
contact C C Rowe. Coor
dinator. at Office of Handicap
ped Stuaent Services, 212
Whichard Building, Phone
757 6m
SUMMER SCHOOL
GRADUATES
Attention all Summer School
Graduates Remember to pick
up your cap and gown from the
student supply store,East
Carolina University before leav
ing school. These keepsake
oowns are yours providing the
graduation fee has been paid.
For those receiving the Masters
Degree the fee pays for your cap
and gown, but there is an extra
fee of n.95 for your hood
WATERMELON
FEAST
The Department of University
Unions will holds its final
Watermelon Feast on Monday.
July 25th at 12:30 p. m. on the
University Mall. Everyone is
welcome and the delicious, cold
melons are free I Its your last
chance until next summer to
join the fun at the Watermelon
Feast. Bring a friend.
COMPUTER CLASSES
Non Credit Computer
Classes 1 Small computer
Saturday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m
August 27, 19U. 2 Word
Processing Saturday 9:00
a.m. 4-00 p.m. September lo,
1903. 3. Programming in Basic
Saturday 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p m
September 24, 1903. Contact the
Division of Continuing Educa
tion at 757 6143
EARLY
REGISTRATION FOR
THE MCAT
Dr. John S. Chllders, Director,
East Carolina University
Testing Center, strongly urges
all candidates planning to take
the October 1,1903. Medical Col
lege Admission Test (MCAT) to
make absolutely sure they have
a registration packet available
In time to meet the September 2.
1903 .postmark deadline. Can-
didates may obtain a registra
tion packet by writing: MCAT
Registration, The American Col
lege Testing Program, p. o.
Box 414, Iowa 52240. Applica
tlons are also available in the
ECU Testing Center, Speight
Building, Room 105, Greenville,
NC Register Early I
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
One million dollars per minute
is being spent worldwide on the
military. The Greenville Peace
Committee rejects the notions
that more weapons brings us
more security. We meet every
Friday night at 630 p.m for a
pot luck dinner and meeting.
During the summer we have
several activities planned and
we need your help Come join us
752-1411
1011 CHARLES STREET
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� Like Gutenberg's
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type, the revolution
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and Ford ushered in
revolutions that
changed the world
drastically .
Gutenberg's invention
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took the electronic
computer to push
movable type out or
the world printing.
It is the compi.
also
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after
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NEW YORK (UPI)
� Like Gutenberg's
movable printing
type, the revolution
created by Henry
Ford's single-purpose
mass production
assembly line has run
its course, says a team
of management con-
sultants.
Both Gutenberg
and Ford ushered in
revolutions that
changed the world
drastically.
Gutenberg's invention
lasted for 500 years; it
took the electronic
computer to push
movable type out of
the world printing.
It is the computer
also that has made
Ford's one-purpose
assembly line obsolete
after only about 75
years, says Harry
Thompson, Joseph
Romano and Michael
Paris of A. T.
Kearney, Inc a large
national consulting
firm.
They concede
things will continue to
be made in large
quantities by
assembly line methods
but they say that from
now on factories can't
be run on anything
like the stark prin-
ciples Ford forced on
all manufacturers
with his famous
Model T car. Pro-
ducts turned out that
way today simply
can't compete, the
Kearney people say.
Assembly lines and,
more importantly, the
management policies
that control them, will
have to be extremely
flexible from now on.
A plant that makes
refrigerators may
have to change over-
night to making
bicycles if it is to stay
in business.
The Kearney team
believes not many
American company
managements yet
realize what is hap-
pening nor com-
prehend the long
range implications
and opportunities of
high technology and
changing world
markets.
They do not believe
American technology
is lagging significantly
but that American
management is lagg-
ing and often still is
moving in the wrong
direction.
For example,
Thompson said he
and his colleagues
have grave doubts of
the wisdom of
Detroit's talk about a
single car model made
by an international
consortium for a
Is A Better Idea'
global market. The
thinking should be the
other way, he said,
about a single
assembly line turning
out cars with different
gearing for different
terrains, different
finishes for different
climates and sizes to
suit varied needs and
enormous variations
in fuel costs around
the world.
"The big thing that
has not been grasped
by many management
people he said, "is
that you no longer
have to trade off cost
effectiveness for
speed and flexibility.
Using the computer
I
OR RED
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Located Across From The Library In
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toes
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-I


?
�lie lEaat (Earnlittian
Serving the East Caroline campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, cttaqr
Mike Hughes, vow Editor
WAVERLY MERRITT, DueclorofAdMtrtiang ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sports Editor
Hunter Fisher. 8l�w� Manager Greg Rideout, �,��
ALl AFRASHTEH, Credu Manager CARLYN EBERT, Entertainment Editor
Stephanie Groon, circular Manager Lizanne Jennings, mBm
Clay Thornton, Tec�! sp� David Gordon, production Manager
&v&cwiaXo�xjuAm&
July 20. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Sexy Scandal
House Reprimand A 'Sad Joke9
On July 18, Rep. Newt ed.
Gingrich, R-Ga called on the But raise congressional hell as he
House to expel two fellow may, the sad part is, Gingrich's at-
representatives who had sex with tempt to clean up the House will
teenage pages and complained it no doubt be stifled in its early
would be a "sad joke" merely to stages. History � especially recent
reprimand them as proposed by history � has shown us that our
the ethics committee. beloved lawmakers are extremely
"This is not a question of sexual hesitant to dismiss their brethren
relations between consenting for anything short of murder.
adults Gingrich said. "This is a It is unfortunate that some of
question of the powerful exploiting our nation's legislators feel they
the powerless, of an adult preying are above the same laws we must
upon schoolchildren live by. After all, what would hap-
After the affairs were revealed pen to a high school teacher or
last Thursday by the ethics com- perhaps an employer if he or she
mittee (following a yearlong in- were found to have engaged in sex-
vestigation into allegations of sex- ual activity with a 17-year-old stu-
ual misconduct on Capitol Hill), dent or employee? It's pretty safe
VOO HAP TO 00 AN ACID RAIN PANCE ��
A Lifetime Of Advising
My Memorable Letters
both representatives � Daniel B
Crane, R-Ill and Gerry E.
Studds, D-Mass. � admitted to
having engaged in past sexual ac-
tivity with former pages: Studds,
10 years ago, had a homosexual
liaison with a 17-year-old; Crane,
to say the incident wouldn't end
with a mere slap on the wrist.
Indeed, Gingrich is right. The
ethics committee's simple repri-
mand is a mockery of justice. Sure,
the two representatives have
received their fare of bad press in
(-Campus Forum�
En Garde!
three years ago, had an affair with the past few days, but when all is
a female page of the same age. said and done, their biggest worry
Crane, with his wife and three- will be how to lie their way back in-
year-old daughter at his side, to the public trust before the
apologized for his misconduct at a next election, of course,
tearful weekend news conference.
Studds, on the other hand,
declared his homosexuality in a
House speech after the report was
made public. He acknowledged a
"serious error in judgment" but
said that because the relationship
was mutual, private and between
consenting adults, it did not
deserve House action.
Nonetheless, Gingrich called for
the expulsion of both men, claim-
ing that Studds' statement "lacks
any remorse and is an arrogant
assertion of mistruth
"Both men abused power
Gingrich stressed. "In this setting,
the ethics committee's proposals
for reprimand are a sad joke
A sad joke, indeed. A congres-
sional reprimand entails no loss of
privileges or standing whatsoever,
amounting to nothing more than a
proverbial slap on the wrist.
"Isn't it time that we police
ourselves so the country doesn't
have to police us?" Gingrich ask-
Editor's Note: Since it seems no one
has had any problems in recent weeks,
and, of course, since this page would
look pretty stupid with a big white space
right in the middle, I figured I'd better
fill it as best I can. Here, then, is a col-
lection of some of my most memorable
letters over the past 10 years. Some let-
ters may be familiar to faithful readers;
others may not.
Dear Son: (This is probably one of the
ones that most readers won't recognize,
as it was written when I was 11, and
since I didn't start writing this garbage
until last year.) It was nice talking to you
over the phone the other day. Sorry you
had to waste your weekly call on ol' M &
D. But anyway, how is reform school
Reply to Ms. Maughan:
Apparently, you are so blinded by
your loyalty and devotion to Patrick
O'Neill (a good managing editor, ha!)
and his rebel, anti-governmental causes
that you are unable to appreciate the
humor of Mike Hughes, Stan Landers,
et al.
I personally find it refreshing to be
able to read the editorial page and en-
joy a column that makes me laugh,
especially about issues dealing with
human interactions. It certainly is
more appealing than Patrick's constant
whimpering about the plight of com-
munist rebels in Central America, and
his "protest trip of the week" to op-
pose our own democratically elected
government.
I do not know Mike Hughes per-
sonally, but he has made a magnificent
contribution to the editorial content of
The East Carolinian. Open your mind,
'Safely Behind Bars?'
The Statistics Say No
n
By PAT O'NEILL
On July 8, Billy Ray Warren was
sentenced in Pitt County Superior Court
to serve 35 years in prison for the rape
last March of an ECU student.
I imagine many people at ECU �
especially women � gave a great sigh of
relief in knowing that a man like Warren
is now, as the saying goes, "safely
behind bars I, too, would agree; War-
ren definitely needs to be segregated
from the rest of society. He's dangerous.
Unfortunately, the problem is much
more complex. Putting this young man
in prison has only temporarily solved
our most immediate problem � getting
him off the streets.
But the real question should be: What
will happen when Billy Ray Warren gets
out? Will he be rehabilitated? Will he
rape the first woman he sees?
First of all, BiUy Ray Warren will get
out. Unless he's killed or dies while in
prison, in all likelihood, he'll be out
sometime in the late 1990s. He'U pro-
bably only serve about one-third to one-
half of his actual sentence. (It's impor-
tant to remember that 98 percent of all
people sent to prison eventually are
released.)
During his prison stay, Warren is not
likely to receive very much rehabilitative
care. Let's face it, prisoners are viewed
as "the worst of the worst" in our socie-
ty we don't even have enough buildings
to keep them in, much less rehabilitate
them!
While in prison, it is also likely that
Warren will be subjected to violence;
maybe he'll be raped himself. Some may
call this justice; I call it state-sanctioned
criminality.
The short-sightedness of our society is
absolutely and unexplainably mad. We
cry out for justice and demand that the
criminal be dealt with as harshly as
possible. Yet we make no provisions for
what will happen when the release date
comes up.
When some insightful politician or
judge comes up with an alternative plan
for these criminal outcasts, the cry rings
loud: "You're being soft on crime
While at the same time, we are imposing
cruel and unusual punishment �
without rehabilitation � on these peo-
ple. Will they be "soft" on society when
they get out?
In North Carolina, there are almost
17,000 people crowded like cattle in our
prisons and jails. They're lonely; they're
angry, often unskilled and abused. They
are not "safe" behind those bars of in-
justice, and when they get out, we won't
be safe either. Come on folks, let's be
realistic. Stop all this nonsense about the
horrors of crime. Let's put our tax
dollars into alternatives and true
rehabilitation � not simply into
building more prisons.
Ms. Maughan, and laugh a little; life is
not as serious as Patrick O'Neill has
brainwashed you to believe. Mike,
keep up the good work. I'll miss your
column upon my graduation.
Charles D. Shavitz
Senior, Management
Encore, Encore
In response to Melanie Bentley-
Maughan's letters:
I must say that your first letter was,
indeed, amusing, but your iatest reply
to Mr. Baker was simply too
outrageous to go without comment.
"Constructive criticism?" Come on,
now. As an English alumnus, you cer-
tainly must have critiqued a few papers
in your time. I think "vicious attacks"
would be a more accurate summation
of your letters to the editor.
Obviously, what you perceive as be-
ing so crude differs from how others
interpret the material in Mr. Hughes'
columns. That is understandable,
however. There is definitely a fine line
between between banal humor and
mild crudity.
But frankly, I think you are forget-
ting the most important element here.
This is a student newspaper � first and
foremost. Art Buchwald writes for his
audience, and we write for ours. Where
else is a humorous (yes, even a mildly
crude) piece more appropriate?
Everyone has been made fully aware
that you think Mr. Hughes' columns
are unappropriate, but then again,
that's your opinion. To be perfectly
honest, I believe the majority of the
students on this campus not only read
Mr. Hughes' column but also look for-
ward to it as well.
Yes, anyone can develop penman-
ship. You demonstrated that. But be a
good sport, Ms. Bentley-Maughan,
and please stifle yours. I think myself,
as well as the entire East Carolinian
staff, have heard quite enough of your
so-called "constructive criticism" of
our managing editor and editorial
page.
Cindy Pleasants
Sports Editor
treating you? Keeping out of trouble?
Ha! Ha!
Boy, oh boy, is there news to tell.
Your Aunt Melba is pregnant again.
With four girls already, she says she's
hoping for a little boy, which made me
think of you
I told her girls ain't so bad. Anyway,
do you think they'll give you a weekend
off for good behavior, so's you can
come home for her wedding? Just let us
know ahead of time, so's we can get
your sister's hamsters out of your old
room and clean in up a bit.
Oh yeah, speaking of pets, your dog's
at it again. Why, just last week alone, it
was twice in the house, three times in the
car and once on Mrs. Dunleavy's
Chicuahua, Felipe. Too bad you missed
it. It was truly a sight to behold, your
dog being a St. Bernard and all. But
don't worry, this time your father got
some good shots with the Polaroid.
Oh yes, Grandpa's lumbago is acting
up again too. The poor old codger. We
take him in for therapy twice a week, but
he swears the only things that help are
Scotch and Nilla vanilla wafers. But Dad
�miiji urn
memmmm
STAN LANDERS
Sex, Drugs A Slim
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
and I think most of his problems are
slightly higher than his back. The other
day I went out to the store, and when I
came back, he was under the coffee
table, barking and growling at a TV
commercial with Lome Green. And
what's worse, he won't eat potatoes
anymore either. Remember how Grand-
pa loved his potatoes? He says it
reminds him too much of happier times.
(You probably recall from old pictures
how Grandma looked a lot like a tater
tot in her yourger days.)
Oh well, son, I'd love to stay and
write all day, but General Hospital is
coming on in five minutes, and I have to
coax Grandpa away from Tom and
Jerry so's I can watch it. Take care, son,
and stay out of trouble.
Love and Kisses
MOM
P.S. Mr. Bottleman, across the street,
told me to tell you not to worry, since his
insurance covered the tires, fender and
mailbox, and since he didn't really like
Mrs. Bottleman's cat anyway.
Dear Mom: Received your letter this
afternoon, and paid the mailman his 13
cents. Postage due! That's one even I
hadn't thought of. Too bad about
Grandpa and the potatoes, but I was
glad to hear that Aunt Melba and Alon-
zo are still perky. Right on Mrs.
Dunleavy's Chihuahua, huh? I sure
hope the pictures turn out. Well, Mom,
I'd love to stay and chat all day, but in
about 10 minutes, the girls are going to
be taking showers, and it's my turn to
collect ticket money at the peep hole.
Love
SON
P.S. Thanks for your letter. I may be
able to use it some day for filler if I
should ever write a column for a
backwoods student newspaper in eastern
North Carolina like I've always wanted
to.
Dear Stan Landers: (This is another
letter which may not be familiar to
readers, because I lost it about a year
ago and just discovered it last week,
when I cleaned out my mailbox.) I am a
44-year-old, full-figured gal from Out
Yonder, N.C and I have recently ex-
perienced a terrible problem I'm sure
some of your readers share. Ever since I
was 14, I've been wearing 18-hour bras;
you know, the kind that lift and
separate. You've probably already
figured it out and think I'm some kind
of moron. But just so none of your
readers get into a similar mess, I'll tell
you what happened anyway. My hus-
band, Zeb, and. I were at the Hollerin'
Festival over in Spivey's Corner a few
weeks back. Zeb was in the men's com-
petition, and I, of course, in the
women's. Anyway, to make a long story
short, I got extremely caught up in the
festivities and forgot that my bra had
been on for more than the allotted time.
(I think it was 19 hours or so.) I was so
embarrassed. Everyone was laughing at
me even Zeb.
Now, of course, I've been branded-
Why, I can't even walk into JethrVs
Pool Room without some smartass pum-
ping a quarter into the jukebox and
playing "Hey Nineteen" every five
minutes. It seems unfair, but I'm finish-
ed. However, I'm not asking for sym-
pathy. I just thought your readers might
benefit from my terrible experience.
BULGING BEULAH
Dear Bulging: I agree. I've been say-
ing for years how 1 wish the federal
government would impose stricter warn-
ings on 18-hour bra labels. And you're
right about another thing too. I do think
you're a moron.
Dear Stan Landers: My name is Jim
Borinski, but please, please, please don't
print that, because it would be quite em-
barrassing if my friends ever found out
about me.
Anyway, about my problem. To make
a short story long, it all started when I
was seven. I was always an effeminate
child, dressing up my GI Joe in my
sister's Barbie doll clothes and playing
house until 1 was 18. None of the other
kids liked me. Once, a bunch of bullies
on my street even put a frog in my Suzy
Homemaker oven just because I refused
to play kick ball. I was baking a lemon
merangue chiffon. Oh! It was going to
be scrumptious until those mean old
boys had to go and ruin it.
Then there was the time in junior high
when I tried out for the cheerleader
squad. I figured if girls can play basket-
ball, why can't I put on a mini-skirt and
some spiffy saddle shoes and do the
splits. Naturally, Miss Cludzig, the
cheering supervisor, would have nothing
to do with me.
All in all, that's been the story of my
life. People have always tried to change
me, never accepting me for what I am.
Which, of course, brings me to the pre-
sent.
I came to college here to start a new
life. And right now, I don't think my
friends know about me. They don't
know that I was prom queen in high
school. They don't know that I still like
wearing underwear from Frederick's of
Hollywood and that I loathe Anita
Bryant. They treat me like just another
one of the guys. I guess what I'm
wondering, then, is how can I tell them
that I'm not just another one of the
guys? I want to make sure I do it tactful-
ly, because if they find out before I get a
chance to explain it to them, I'll be ruin-
ed.
STILL IN THE CLOSET
Dear Closet: Before I answer your
question, there's just one thing I need to
know. What was it you didn't want me
to print?
Editor's Note; Stan Landers, who is
no relation to Stan Laurel, Stan Smith,
or for that matter, anyone else named
Stan, sometimes wonders if Siskel A
Ebert are planning to review the con-
gressional porno videos for a future
show. And if so, will they agree on the
verdict?
warn
�an
� mum
Price
HELSINKI. Iraqi
Finland (UPI) � At
OPEC decided Tues- ferenc
day to keep the oil two-
cartel's price and pro- United
duction at present Oil
levels, but deferred Saeec
selection of a new he
secretary-general for OPE
fear of an Iranian secret
United
Fifteen North The
Carolinians and 135 their
other citizens of the small!
United States return- JalapJ
ed home from a five- the
day trip to Nicaragua that rj
Friday. betw
The 150 people troopl
from 31 states had r f
gone to the Central Hone
American nation to Ja
call attention to what the
they termed "United two
States intervention" nalistj
in the small countrv. land
Webber
While most people retin
have difficulty finding prof
the time to write a let- is tal
ter or make a phone learnl
call to their legislators sion
in Washington, DC, and
there are others who sions
take an active role in D
trying to find out treml
what the reps are do- tionl
ing up there. weel
Such is the case of hop
Dr. Carroll A. Web- mile
ber, who embarked his
on 300-mile bicycle dur�
ride to Washington, and
D.C Friday morn- time
ing. ning
Webber, 56, is a
Wed
J� sacr Tiekrts i ���
Record b�r tirr
!
July
Moii-
Buy any
pay only hi
of
All Meals Se
Potato or Fi
-Li
Moi
4 l2oz. Jr. Siri
8oz. Chopped Sii
Served with
or Frenci
2 Local
500





im FASI k r i i INIAN
JULY 20, 1983
'JOmu&T:
HI
ters
I f-hour bras;
lift and
already
Hime kind
none of your
ness, I'll tell
My hus-
� ihe Hollerin'
'ner a few
the men's ;om-
I. arse, in the
?.ea long story
I ighr up in the
that my bra had
nan the allotted time.
5 19 hours or so.) I was so
Eervone was laughing at
eb.
:ourse. I've been branded.
even ualk into Jethro's
hour ome smaru pum-
lto the jukebox and
Vneteen" every five
ntair, but I'm finish-
m not asking for sym-
�ught vour readers might
nbie experience.
BL'l.GINC. BEUl AH
I ig: i agree I've been sav-
ior i wish the federal
lid impose stricter warn-
bra labels. And you're
Inoiher thing too. I do think
r
Landers: M name is Jim
e. please, please don't
J be quite em-
� lends ever found out
I out my problem. To make
long, it all started when I
was always an effeminate
ig up my Gl Joe in my
Idoll clothes and playing
.as 18 None of the other
Once, a bunch of bullies
�en put a frog in my Suzy
I ven iust because I refused
as baking a lemon
l ' r ' It was going to
. . until those mean old
and ruin it.
wa the time in junior high
out for the cheerleader
red if girls can play basket-
I't I put on a mini-skirt and
saddle shoes and do the
I railv. Miss Cludzig, the
r, ould have nothing
le
thats been the story of my
lave always tried to change
Jcepting me for what I am.
)urse. brings me to the pre-
college here to start a new
kht now, I don't think my
about me. They don't
��.as prom queen in high
don't know that I still like
;rwear from Frederick's of
md that I loathe Anita
treat me like just another
guys. 1 guess what I'm
�ten, is how can I tell them
just another one of the
Ito make sure I do it tactful-
ihey find out before I get a
lain it to them, I'll be ruin-
STILL IN THE CLOSET
H: Before I answer your
lie just one thing I need to
was it you didn't want me
pie; Stan Landers, who is
Stan Laurel, Stan Smith,
tatter, anyone else named
wms wonders if Siskel A
inning to review the con-
nno videos for a future
' so, will they agree on the
Remain
HELSINKI,
Finland (UPI) �
OPEC decided Tues-
day to keep the oil
cartel's price and pro-
duction at present
levels, but deferred
selection of a new
secretary-general for
ear of an Iranian-
Iraqi deadlock.
At a news con-
ference ending the
two-day meeting.
United Arab Emirates
Oil Minister Mana
Saeed Al Otaiba said
he would act as
OPEC's temporary
secretary-general until
a permanent choice is
named.
Otaiba said the con-
ference took note of
the "further stabili-
ty" in the oil market
since the oil cartel
decided last March to
cut the base price
from $34 a barrel to
$29 and set an overall
production ceiling for
the 13 member na-
tions.
"We decided to
keep the ceiling at its
present level of 17.5
million barrels a
day he said. "We
decided also to keen
the price level as it
is
"As for the
secretary-general
said Otaiba, "we in
the conference decid-
ed to postpone or
defer the decision
The UAE oil
minister, who was
chosen OPEC presi-
dent at Monday's ses-
sion, said fellow
ministers had
authorized him to
"supervise over the
secretariat of the
organization, which I
shall do with
pleasure
United States Policy Receives Criticism
Fifteen North
Carolinians and 135
other citizens of the
United States return-
ed home from a five-
day trip to Nicaragua
Friday.
The 150 people
from 31 states had
gone to the Central
American nation to
call attention to what
they termed "United
States intervention"
in the small country.
The group also hoped
their presence in the
small border town of
Jalapa, would stop
the recent fighting
that has been going on
between Nicaraguan
troops and Counter-
revolutionists from
Honduras.
Jalapa is close to
the location where
two American jour-
nalists were killed by a
land rrine last month.
"We also wanted to
draw attention to the
fact that the
Nicaraguan people
want peace said
Gail Phares, the direc-
tor of the Carolina In-
terfaith Taskforce on
Central America, the
group which spon-
sored the trip.
Phares claims the
United States is
violating U.S. and in-
ternational laws by
Webber Cycles to D.C.
While most people
have difficulty finding
the time to write a let-
ter or make a phone
call to their legislators
in Washington, D.C,
there are others who
take an active role in
trying to find out
what the reps are do-
ing up there.
Such is the case of
Dr. Carroll A. Web-
ber, who embarked
on 300-mile bicycle
ride to Washington,
D.C, Friday morn-
ing.
Webber, 56, is a
retired ECU math
professor. He said he
is taking the trip to
learn about the deci-
sions now being made
and how these deci-
sions come about.
Despite the ex-
tremely hot condi-
tions during the
weekend, Webber had
hoped to cover 120
miles of territory on
his 10-speed bicycle
during the first day
and arrived in D.C. in
time for Sunday mor-
ning church services.
Webber hopes to
visit several North
Carolina and national
legislators as well as
the headquarters of
organizations such as
the Federation of
American Scientists,
the Council for a
Liable World and the
League of Women
Voters.
"I want to unders-
tand, more than I do,
the decision making
process and how to
affect it usefully and
helpfully Webber
said before he left.
helping to train and
arm the counter-
revolutionaries in
Honduras to attack
Nicaragua. "We feel
that we should be
helping these coun-
tries to seek
negotiated settlements
to ease the tensions in-
stead of sending
military aid Phares
said.
The group spent
two days in Jalapa
and claimed their
presence did result in
a cease fire. Phares
said the group also
participated in a
candlelight vigil in
front of the U.S. Em-
bassy in Nicaragua.
Phares described the
ordeal as "very
tense" for the par-
ticipants. "They were
constantly aware of
the danger they were
in
"We traveled
through a war zone
said C1TCA Assistant
Director Joseph
Moran, who led the
delegation on the
Nicaraguan trip.
Moran said the
group traveled down a
road in a hilly area
near the border where
much of the fighting
has taken place. "Our
convoy could have
been a sitting duck for
mortar and rocket at-
tacks � we were
definitely frighten-
ed Moran said.
"One of the basic
premises we have
Moran said speaking
for the group, "is that
this is not a border
war between Hon-
duras and Nicaragua,
It's basically a
paramilitary group
being funded by the
United States which is
antagonizing already
critical economic
situation that the
country of Nicaragua
is facing
Moran said that a
rocket and mortor a
few days prior to the
group's arrival had
killed a number of
civilians living in a
small boarder town.
Moran said that the
international media
only covers news of
death when it involves
other journalists or
officials, but not the
deaths of innocent
civilians.
The Reagan Ad-
ministration has held
a stead-fast position
that Nicaragua is in
the Soviet camp and is
allowing military sup-
plies to come through
their country and on
into anti-government
forces in El Salvador.
"The U.S. should
definitely cease its
financing of these
paramilitary groups
Moran said. "We sug-
gested to the
American am-
bassador (Anthony
Quainton) that he be
responsible for a
moral revolution in
foreign policy and
replace open hostility
with tolerance.
Otaiba said a
special committee had
been created to frame
the producer group's
long-term price and
production policies,
review the oil markets
and promote contacts
with the non-OPEC
producers � such as
Britain, the Soviet
Union, Mexico and
Norway.
OPEC sources said
the move was to rein-
force the agreements
reached in London in
March and at the
same time guarantee a
wider role for OPEC
when an anticipated
increase in demand
takes place in the
quarter ol
fourth
1983.
Earlier, the
ministers split in
groups to try to per-
suade Iran and Iraq to
give up their dispute
over the post of
secretary-general. But
the meetings ap-
parently ended in
failure, leading to the
deferment of the
selection of the
secretary-general.
The post has been
vacant since Marc
Nan Nguema of
Gabon ended his term
in June.
Saudi Arabian Oil
Minister Sheikh Ahm-
ed Zaki Yamani said
earlier the producer
group had decided to
end the meeting
without waiting for an
outcome of the race
for secretary-general.
Although the
secretary generalship
is an administrative
post, both Iran and
Iraq hoped to get the
post to widen their in-
fluence in the pro-
ducer group, OPEC
analysts said.
OPEC moderates
said they fear the
choice of either Iraq
or Iran
could turn OPEC into
an arena for
diplomatic wrangling
by the two.
New Person Joins Fast
A ninth person re-
quested and has been
accepted as a partici-
pant in next month's
"Fast for Life an
open-ended fast
modeled on the prin-
ciples of Indian peace
leader Mohandas
Ghandhi.
The ninth person is
Jo Jorban from West
Germany. She will be
joining eight others,
including two
Americans.
The nine fasters will
drink only water until
action has been taken
that will break the
momentum of the
nuclear arms race.
The fast will begin
August 6, the 38th an-
niversary of the
nuclear bombing of
Hiroshima and will be
held simultaneously in
three locations in-
cluding Paris, France;
Bonn, West Germany
and Oakland, Calif.
"They are risking
their lives, and they
may offer their lives,
but I still think that's
a long way from
suicide said Fast-
for-Life supporter
Ellen Wilson. "It's
(the mood) definitely
hopeful � none of
the fasters are expec-
ting to die
Wilson said the
question of whether
the fast can be inter-
preted as suicidal is
commonly asked.
People who are sup-
porting the fast are
sometimes challenged
with the question:
"Am I doing
enough?" Wilson
said. "That challenge
is part of the effec-
tiveness of the fast,
but I think it has to be
done � and I believe
that it is beine done �
in a spirit of love
rather than for pride
or any other kind of
attitude
P�
-�� IN PERSON
Wed July 27, 1983
Doors Open
6:00 p.m.
Band Starts
8:00 p.m.
S8.00 in Advance; S 10.00 at the Door
- includes hors d'oeuvrcs
In addition thr music
ofinr Dynamic I psetters
1 GreenLeaf Restaurant and
lm Entertainment Center, Inc.
� 1 HsfclMfrnorml Dr U.S. 13
ftY& -�" Airport Greenville. N.C )
PHONE
757-3107
Adtancr Tickets aviiiabte �'
Record bars Greenville � Apple Records
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat July 23. 1985
July Dinner Specials
Mon-Thurs. 5pm-10pm
Buy any Steak at Reg. Price and
pay only half price for second steak
of same or less value
All Meals Served With King Idaho Baked
Potato or French Fries and Texas Toast
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED item
POLICY
Each ot these adv�i
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4 l2oz. Jr. Sirloin $2.19 with Salad Bar $3.19
8oz. Chopped Sirloin $2.49 with Salad Bar $3.49
All Meals
Served with King Idaho Baked Potato
or French Fries and Texas Toast
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REGULAR
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Potato Chips
7. - - lu
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TAB
DIET COKE OR
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Miller Beer
$29
2-Ltn
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REGULAR OR LIGHT
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Canned Foods
Whole Kernel corn.
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002 m
i j






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JULY 20, 1983
Page 6
Travolta Goes Nautilus For Staying Alive
By GORDON IPOCK
Staff W ritff
The Plitt Theater is having a nightly special on
beefcake � all you can stomach for four bucks,
and the main course is John Travolta served up raw
and randy in Staying Alive. Travolta flexes more
muscle, all tanned, body-shaved and oiled, than a
Mr. Olympia finalist in a pose down.
Touted as a dance film, Staying Alive will pro-
bably be a bigger hit with the Conan the Barbarian
crowd than among All That Jazz or Flashdance
fans. The movie's plot has the same logic as a
Charlie's Angels episode: construe scenes that
allow the stars to show as much meat as possible.
Ever notice how the Angels constantly face crime
waves at Waikiki or the Bahamas, the sort of
places where a bikini is the standard undercover
uniform? The same success formula is at work in
Staying Alive � to show as much of Travolta's
new Body-By-Stallone as a PG rating will allow.
The fiim is a tale of bathos and braggadocio in
which Travolta, as Tony Manero, struggles for the
same sort of recognition as a Broadway dancer
than he once had as a disco stud in the Bay Ridge
area of Brooklyn. A little older, but not much
wiser. Manero retains his thick Brooklyn accent:
"1 was tinkin, dat, maybe 1 cou' meet wid youse
he raps to Laura, the film's blue-blooded British
vixen. He also retains his cocky attitude about
women, motivated by his glands and governed by
expediency.
Two-timing Tony with his armor-plated ego acts
like an urban guerilla waging a one-man war with
the opposite sex. One hunk-hungry doll spurned by
Manero retorts, "Guys like you aren't relation-
ships � you're exercise I felt no empathy with
the wounded Tony as he later pondered the truth of
her remark.
Then Tony meets the ultimate Cosmo girl,
Laura, played by Finola Hughes. Laura, who
makes Bo Derek look like a three, is a star dancer
who possesses immense wealth in the same
mysterious way that Wicked Wanda of Penthouse
comics does. Arriving for rehearsals in a 40-foot
Lincoln land yacht, she contrasts sharply with
hand-to-mouth Tony and his steady girl, Jackie,
played by Cynthia Rhodes.
Like Hillary struggling blindly up through the
mists of Everest, Tony struggles after Laura in the
rarefied world of the jet set, repeatedly dumping
on faithful Jackie in the process. Tony shows up at
Laura's penthouse party in his old polyester Satur-
day Night Fever suit. In this, the only poignant
scene in the movie, Tony appears absurd and
pathetic. The double-knit outfit that made him a
white knight among blue collar kids at Fever's 2001
looks like a caterer's uniform amid the trendy
tweeds worn by the Manhattan chic.
Having had her sport, Laura dismisses Tony as if
he were a pimple-faced boy delivering pizza, giving
him a verbal tip at the door: "Everybody uses
everybody, don't they That line, about as meaty
as a vegi-chef salad, is as heavy as the script gets.
The remainder of the film is Tony's vendetta.
With wounded pride, Tony piques himself to go
after the leading male role in his first Broadway
show, "Satan's Alley The production has the
lighting, staging and costuming of a Kiss concert,
and the choreography looks to have been snatched
from Marvel Comics.
During rehearsals, his tight-collared, sleeveless
black T-shirt frames bulging pairs of deltoids,
biceps and triceps. Tony looks more like a biker
than a dancer and comes across with the petulance
of a spoiled beach bully.
In the opening night performance, loinclothed
Tony, hurling demonically costumed women and
whip-wielding men aside, busts across the stage like
a run-amok Comanche. With a damn-the-
choreography attitude, Tony tosses Laura on her
fanny and tears into a frenetic muscle-pumping
solo that the Broadway crowd of tasteless
bourgeoisie laps up. I felt like throwing up. The
anti-climactic backstage ending which follows is
too sickeningly narcissistic to comment on.
Travolta, however, can't be blamed for this
Walter Mitty daydream of a movie. As the credits
proudly proclaim, this is a Sylvester Stallone film,
directed, co-written ad co-produced by Stallone.
Sly even makes a tacky appearance in Staying
Alive, bumping into Tony on a crowded New York
street at the film's beginning. After that, I kept ex-
pecting to see him casually drinking a beer in the
hazy recesses of a bar scene, or sitting in the
"Satan's Alley" audience wearing a tux with a
blonde at his side.
Stallone described himself in a recent Rolling
Stone interview as "a self-aggrandizing asshole
Too bad he casts Travolta as one in this film.
Stallone has also invented a new method of ac-
ting, nothing like Stanislavsky's � or anyone
else's. It relies on weightlifting. Stallone perfected
Nautilus acting in his Rocky series and coached
Travolta in it for this film. Unfortunately, Tony
looks and moves no more like a dancer than Rocky
looks and moves like a boxer. Stallone should get
out of Hollywood and team up with Joe Weider, or
maybe start a television exercise program in a mor-
ning network spot opposite Richard Simmons.
But the athlete-actor does seem to be catching on
these days. Perhaps over-built bodies are the
special effects of contemporary film drama. Is a
splashy plot with ample helpings of beefcake and
cheesecake the only way to compete with the
See TRAVOLTA, Page 7
Lush Costumes Highlight 'Nanette
Roaring Twenties Never Looked Better
nM by CHRIS MENNOT-
Jay Fox makes Melodie Wolford � and everybody eke � very happy
in 'No, No, Nanette
Summer Theatre Brings
Simon's 'Song' To Life
By CARLYN EBERT
haimajanwai Editor
The script is old hat and the
music a combination of som-
nolent love songs and peppy
jingles like "Tea For Two but
the East Carolina Summer
Theatre's No, No, Nanette over-
came these built-in obstacles with
eye-popping color, poofy
costumes and brashly energetic
performances by its stars.
The original script dates back to
a 1919 novel by May Edington,
His Lady Friends. The musical
version of No, No, Nanette open-
ed on Broadway in 1925, played
665 performances to toe-tapping
critics and received the standard
politely glowing reviews. A sliver
of sparkly fluff about flappers,
millionaires and the ever-widening
morals of the wealthy, No, No,
Nanette reflected the popular im-
age of the Twenties like a mirror
ball picking up iridiscent flashes
of satin and sequins from the
dance floor.
But when Broadway mounted
the 1971 revival of No, No,
Nanette, billing it as "The New
1925 Musical Hit audiences
practically stampeded the 46th
Street Theater to grab a handful
of simple, happy nostalgia. Far
from unsophisticated, 1971 au-
diences readily embraced the new
Nanette as much for its lack of
shock value or timely social
message as for the stellar presence
of Busby Berkeley. Berkeley, the
era-defining choreographer of
scads of Hollywood musicals
from the Jazz Age, supervised the
revival, which also featured two
stars not seen on the New York
stage since the early 1930s: Ruby
Keeler and Patsy Kelly.
In brief, No, No, Nanette tells
the story of a properly bored
young lady living with her
generous-to-a-fault, Bible-
publishing Uncle Jimmy and his
prudent wife, Sue. Around them,
the prosperous Twenties are in
full bloom, beckoning Nanette
out to Charleston on the beach in
Atlantic City while Jimmy and his
cohort Billy Early try to dodge
three sexy fortune hunters who
are after the bighearted
publisher's bucks. It's all mass
confusion, of course, as all the
parties wind up at Jimmy's beach
bungalow at the same time but
still manage to break out in happy
feet at least once an act.
One high-energy dance number
per act, however, was not enough
to really offset the restrained soft-
shoe posturing that accompanied
most of the singing numbers. Act
One, for instance, didn't really
come, alive until the ensemble
brought out the ukeleles and the
tap shoes for "1 Want To Be Hap-
py The audience anticipated the
remaining showpiece numbers �
Act Two's "Tea For Two" and
"You Can Dance With Any
Girl a collection of Roaring
Twenties ballroom dance; Act
Three's "Take A Little One-
Step" � and responded with
wildly pent-up applause.
John Claassen's bustling, busy
An Deco sets added much piz-
zazz, with a trompe 1'oeil New
See NANETTE, Page 7
New Volumes Present
Two Views Of Terror
ByMIKEHAMER
Isn't there a psychological
theory out that accounts for
things happening at just the right
time? Sometimes it's coincidence,
and yet sometime the way things
happen is purely eerie.
This week I happened to read
two books that complement each
other: Joan Didion's journalistic
report Salvador and J.M.
Coetzee's novel Waiting for the
Barbarians. Aside from both
works being relatively short, there
is little that would make one want
to speak of both at the same time;
however, a common theme ties
them together, and that theme is
terror.
Didion deals with the constant,
current presence of terror in El
Salvador in her piece � one en-
counters the terror from the
beginning of her account to the
very end. Coetzee deals with ter-
ror in a more abstract way in his
novel. He never condones terror;
rather, he makes the reader fed
some of the hopelessness of the
victims of terrorist tactics. But he
does get the reader to get to a
point of asking several questions,
among them, Why do people use
torture in the 20th century?
Joan Didion is an accomplished
prose writer. She has written
several novels, but she is perhaps
best known for her collections of
essays Slouching Towards
Bethlehem and The White Album.
Her esssays show up in many
See NEW, Page 7
Put America's premiere funny
man (Neil Simon) and the Tony
Award-winning composer of A
Chorus Line (Marvin Hamlisch)
together, and you get the Broad-
way musical success They're Play-
ing Our Song, at the East
Carolina Summer Theatre this
Monday, July 25 through Satur-
day, July 30 at 8:15 each evening.
A special matinee performance
has been scheduled for Thursday,
July 28 at 2:15 p.m.
This recent Broadway hit rated
high marks with New York City
critics and won Lucie Arnaz her
debut on The Great White Way.
�The story line revolves around the
personal and professional lives of
composer Vernon Gersch and
lyricist Sonia Walsk. Together
they write some of the most
popular love songs in the country
but have a rough time making
their own lives as harmonious as
the music they create.
Based on the widely-publicized
real life courtship of composer
Marvin Hamlisch and lyricist
Carole Bayer Sager, They're Play-
ing Our Song is zany, full of blithe
good humor and delightful music.
Sara Riva Krieger and John
Kuhn will play this musically
talented couple who discover they
have much more in common than
making music.
! Miss Krieger has a number of
jnusical and New York City club
jtcts to her credit. She was
pominated by the National
Academy of Concert and Cabaret
Acts for Best Female Vocalist and
Performer of the Year. Coin-
Hdentally, she is, in real life, also
lyricist. According to the play's
director Edgar Loessin, "We
found Sara during auditions in
New York, immediately saw that
she was perfect for the part; but it
was not until later that we realized
how natural it is for her to play
the role Sonia. Not only is she a
wonderful singer, dancer and ac-
tress, she also has an insider's
knowledge of how hit songs are
created. We're very fortunate to
have her featured in the show
Summer Theatre audiences are
already familiar with the talents
of John Kuhn. He was featured as
the Leading Player in the season
opener Pippin, and more recently
received excellent notices for his
portrayal of Carl Magnus
Malcolm in A Little Night Music.
Also appearing in They're Play-
ing Our Song will be six actor
singers who represent Vernon and
Sonia's alter egos. Personifying
Vernon's innermost thoughts will
be Vince Kelly, Bob Sharpe and
Bob Filipowich. Sonia's inner
voices will come from Sharon
Lawrence, Melodie Wolford and
Babs Winn.
"When season tickets first went
on sale in November, we realized
this was going to be a very
popular show said Summer
Theatre General Manager Scott
Parker. "So we arranged to offer
a special matinee performance at
reduced rates on Thursday, July
28 at 2:15 p.m Those tickets are
$7 each, a 30 percent discount off
the regular leserved price. "There
are still many excellent seats
available for that performance
said Parker.
Tickets may be purchased at
McGinnis Theatre, Monday
through Saturday, from 10 a.m.
until 8:30 p.m or reserved by
calling 757-6390.
mmmmmimmmmmm
This Week 9s Special: Pods and Tomatoes, Hollywood-Style
Health inspector Dr. Matthew Bennett (Donald Sutherland)
discovers some strange growth In a friend's garden in 'Invasion of
the Body Snatchers Philip Kaufman's remake of the 1956 science-
fiction classic is next Monday's flint at Mendenhal's Hendrtx
Theatre; showtime, 9 p.m. Tonight, Moodthinty vegetnhiei go for
the jugular in 'Attack of the Killer Tomatoes' nt t p.m.
New Bo
Cont. front Page 6
freshman composi-
tion books as ex-
amples of good
writing. An essay of
hers is, in fact,
printed in the current
East Carolina
freshman essay
reader. She has ac-
quired the skill of be-
ing able to describe
something in a unique
and enjoyable way.
In Salvador (Simon
ad Schuster), Didion
investigates the terror
in that country; she
lets it bubble up to the
surface in a surrealist
fashion, and she also
points a finger at the
LSbacM
ment trc
S a 1 v a d o i
primary cl
terror
book she
Terror
of the pA
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cruise in
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dom, sole
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taken as i
Travolta
Cont. from Page 6
special effects of Star
Wars and its spin-
offs?
Indeed, Travolta
spent weeks busting
his butt, learning to
ride the mechanical
bull for his role as
Bud Davis in Urban
Cowboy. And he
learned disco dancing
from scratch, working
out several nights a
week for months
perfecting the Latin
Hustle for Fever.
Travolta even hung
Believe me, 1 know all His leaps
Aflit
SATdj 23rd
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and weaitl
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Shrimp lovt
Why travel h
to the beach at
high prices
fresh shrimp?
PO
Shi
Dii
$:

�C
"amily Restaurants
A WHALE .T A ME-
Tarlanding set
is offering a si
popcorn shrimp
at only $3.
Wednesday and Thu j
inquet Facilities Aw
758-0327
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� U . Payt- 7
Hollywood-Style
k! Monday's film at Mendenhall's Hendrix
m onight. hloodthirstv vegetables go for
I the Killer I'omaloes' at 8 p.m.
New Books Focus On Modern Terror
Cost, from Page 6
�reshman composi-
tion books as ex-
amples of good
anting An essav oi
hers is, in fact,
printed in the current
1 ast Carolina
oshman essay
reader She has ac
quired the skill of be-
ing able to describe
something in a unique
and enjoyable wa
In Salvador (Simon
ad Schuster). Didion
investigates the terror
in that country; she
lets it bubble up to the
surface in a surrealist
fashion, and she also
points a finger at the
U.Sbacked govern
ment troops in El
Salvador a5 the
primary cause of the
terror Earl) in the
book she says,
Terror is the given
of (he place Black-
and-white police cars
cruise in pairs, each
with the barrel of a ri-
fle extruding from an
open window.
Roadblocks
materialize at ran
dom, soldiers fanning,
out from trucks and
taking positions,
fingers always on trig-
gers, safeties clicking
on and off. Aim is
taken as if to pass the
time.
1 have t w o
criticisms of
Salvador. Foi one
thing, it is over-
priced. Secondly, Di
dion seems to have
only scratched the
surface in some cases.
and she lea es the
reader wanting more
depth to her investiga-
tions. She does,
however, let the
reader feel the pain
and frustration of the
situation in El
Salvador.
In Hailing for the
Barbarians (Penguin
Books), which is J.M
Coetzee's third novel,
we get a look at terror
from another perspec-
tive � from the
perspective of the em-
pire inflicting it.
Somehow when
reading this book, one
can't help but ask,
"Are we an empire?
Do we inflict hardship
on cultures which we
do not understand?"
(William Appleman
Williams's Fmpire As
A Way of Life � Ox
ford University Press
� has been recom
mended for answers
or more questions
along these lines.) Of
course there are no
easy solutions, but 1
think it is a credit to
Coetee that he leads
the reader to ask such
questions in the first
place.
Waiting for the
Barbarians is the story
of a Magistrate who
has run the affairs of
a tiny frontier settle-
ment. The Magistrate
works for the Empire,
which is very nervous
about the barbarians
who live in the
o-itlands When inter-
rogation experts ar-
rive at the settlement
and torture two of the
barbarians, the
Magistrate befriends
the woman who was
tortured and sets
himself on a path con-
trary to the Empire's,
which gets him im-
prisoned as an enemy
of the state
I hroughout the novel
the Magistrate tries to
understand the tor-
ture and the minds of
the men who carry out
the torture for the
F-mpire.
I recommend ihis
novel as a piece of ex-
cellent reading and as
a means to think
about the mentality
behind today's
brutality and injustice
uhich, as Joan Didion
has pointed out in her
report, certainly does
exist in today's world.
Travolta Beefs Up For 'Fever' Sequel
t ont. from Page 6
special effects of Star
H ars and its spin-
Indeed, Travolta
-pent weeks busting
hits butt, learning to
-ide the mechanical
bull for his role as
Bud Davis in Irban
Cowboy. And he
learned disco dancing
from scratch, working
out several nights a
week for months
perfecting the Latin
Hustle for Fever.
Travolta even hung
Believe me. 1 know all Hi leaps barely clear
too vsell that torturing
mixture of pain, anger
and embarrassment
you get uhen the girl
you're crazy about
says, Bug off,
lout Travolta cap-
tures n perfectly
But there do seem
to be limits to athletic
prepping for a part,
and Travolta hits that
limit in Staying Alive
In Fever his dancing
was spectacular
unabashedly sexy. In
Alive it's amateurish
and weak, with hardly
a trace of technique
ATTIC
out in 1 exas honky
tonks and Brooklyn
discos studying the
speech and manners
of the characters he
was ici plav. He is
known as a worrying
perfectionist, but his
horn ework gets
results. He has the
sensitiv ity and instinct
to lose himself and
become his character
The best example of
his acting talent in
Staying 4 live is a
scene in which Tony
first puts the make on
1 aura, only to get a
dressing room door
slammed in his face.
SAT
23rd
DIAMOND
ti.e tloor. and he
manages but one
lousy pirouette. His
overabundance of
muscle is good only
for lifts and dramatic
posturing. Travolta,
however, can't be
condemned. He tries
hard to look profes-
sional, gives a lot �
but it's just not
enough. Stallone
should have taken a
lesson from
Flashdance and hired
a dancer double for
his star.
Com paring Staying
Hive to Saturday
'sight Fever is like
listening to the flip
side ol a hit record.
It's not much ol a sc
quel. (Incidentally,
much of the sound-
track is written and
performed by Slv's
brother, Frank
Stallone.) Fever had a
meaningful plot about
a kid getting his head
out ot his ass and
discovering there's
more to life than gang
wars, gang banes and
dance contests There
was even some slick
symbolism at work
with the Brooklyn
Bridge. Travolta's
disco dancing was
unexpected, like get-
ting ice cream with
your pie. In com-
parison, Staying Alive
has a weak plot, a
limp script and disap-
pointing dancing.
But: It does have
more lean muscle than
any butcher shop in
town, and that may be
enough to make it a
box-office success.
ON STAGE AT THE
MM�M
jvy
July 18-23 -8:15 pm-McGINNIS THEATRE .comer ofSth and Eastern.
Tickets Still
Available
Call
757-6390
For Reservations
And Information
HSWrWMUS
Starring
Mavis Hay &
Jay Fox
A gorgeous musical ot the roaring 20 s A glossy bubble tull of flappers with fluttei-
ing eyelids, boys in knickers, pretty girls in knee-length bathing suits all lap dancing
in the days ot Mercy Me' and Whats the dif? Foi the ENTIRE FAMILY
Shrimp lovers
Why travel 100 miles
to the beach and pay
high prices for
fresh shrimp?
Popcorn
Shrimp
Dinner
$3.25
�'amily Restaurants
0
A WHALE .T A MEAL
j
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
popcorn shrimp dinner
atonlv $3.25
Wednesday and Thursday Only
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327
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WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
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1 2704 E. 10th St. 752-3228 I
Across from Villa Roma,
We do minor repairs, tune upsf brake
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We have a road wrecker service and do
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Keep your car looking good
Free car wash with each fill up!
We rent Jartran trucks and trailers for your
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Come by today for your complete car needs.
'Nanette'A Dazzler
Com. from Page 6
York skyline framed
by a succession of
deliberately angular
proscenium arches
and columns balanc-
ing vases full of lilies.
In several numbers,
flappers posed
delicately on a
shallow central stair-
case lent the show a
bit of Florenz
Ziegfeld, the Broad-
way mogul of the
Twenties whose lavish
productions featured
beautiful chorus girls
in elaborate costumes
simply walking down
stairs en masse.
The neon orange-
and-green argyles,
swishy silks and
"oodles of chiffon"
in the costumes pro-
vided visual excite-
ment and luxury dur-
ing some of the more
languid moments; an
audible whistle skit-
tered through the
opening-night crowd
when leading lady
Mavis Ray threw cau-
tion to the winds in
the finale and march
ed downstage in a
wash of silvery fring
ed frou-frou Sensual
lighting by Gary
Weathersbee abl im-
itated twinklv
nightfall at the shore
And amid these
lush settings, the cast
turned in, for the
most part, fine per-
formances. Whenever
director Jay Fox
(Jimmy) rushed
onstage, the shoe's
occasionally lagging
energy level i m -
mediateh shot up-
ward, and his com-
ically brisk lapping
and mugging proved
one of anette'
highlights Susan
Marrash - M 1 n nerly
(Pauline, the maid)
shuffled superbly
from scene to scene
with her feather
duster tucked in her
outfits; costumiere
Eaves-Brooks
deserves special men-
tion for Pauline'
subtly humorous
costume changes.
especially, her glitterv
beach shoes and
idy, fluorescent
green party dr
( atherine Rriea H
trom 'F-nsco) used her
booming hoop1
eee-do vibrato anJ
lurching hips to fine
advantage Scott
Fvans. as Nanette
young suitor, danced
with rubber-legged
abandon, although
his voice stretched
little thm in the low
register And Melodie
Wolford minced
smiled very nuelv
thank u.
Nanette, hut her ;
soprano occa-
sionally failed to .
it over the or
chestra
"Why can't thii
be sweet and dear, the
wav they used to I
mourned Jimmy
rare moment
pair Indeed,
not; with revivals
Vo, o. anette
around, there's little
excuse for moderr
pessimism
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I,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JULY 20. 1983
Page 8
Campers Enjoy Coaches' Clowning
Hs CINDY PLEASANTS
Sporti CaVlor
"What do you think we're do-
ing out here? 1 want 10
pushupsNOW The campers
obeyed without hesitation, listen-
ing to their counselor bellow out
order after order.
Their faces were baffled. They
didn't understand why they were
being treated so harshly all of a
.udden. "Okay, 1 want you the
counselor said, pointing to a
sweaty group of youngsters
praw!ed out on the ground, "to
an to the track field. NOW
The group quickly sprinted over
to the track field while the others
oon followed. After all the
ampers reached the designated
urea, their curiosity was satisfied
en they saw the firetruck,
reman and a huge waterhose.
mping on each other's backs,
he campers hooped and hollered
hile they danced around in the
ater.
The football practice field is not
he only site where campers can be
een listening attentively to lec-
ures or practicing new drills. In a
leighboring field, pint-sized
i, hildren donned in baseball caps
a ait eagerly for their turn at bat,
.hile overgrown boys show off
;heir one-on-one moves in Minges
( oliseum.
According to Head Football
. oach Ed Emory, this year's
.amp has been his most suc-
cessful. "There are 69 seniors here
ind 25 are top prospects he
aid. Approximately 300 campers
are attending the three and-a-half-
day camp. The youngsters range
trom fourth graders to twelfth
graders.
Offensive Tackle Coach Charlie
Elmquist explained that the
J&U- �;
camp's main objective is to teach.
"It's not a fundamentals camp
he said. "We're here to teach
them about the game of foot-
ball
Because of the recent heat
wave, the counselors have been
unable to do anything but teach.
"We're very careful Elmquist
said. "It's been unbearable out
here, so wr've slowed things down
quite a bit
The counselors are sure to keep
a watchful eye on the "shakhV
bakers a nickname they've
given for the younger campers.
"So far, everyone has held up
well Elmquist said. "No one
has gotten sick from the heat
Rex Kipp, defensive line coach
and camp director, described this
year's campers as the "best group
of men I've worked with
"They've just been excep-
tional he said. "We try to make
a good camp, but the kids are the
ones who sell our program. They
go back and tell other kids just
how much they enjoyed it
Meanwhile, across the field,
Coach Harrison lectures an awe-
struck crowd about the impor-
tance of defense. "Great players
make difficult plays look easy
he tells them. "Muff players make
easy plays look difficult
Teams from New Jersey, New
York and Virginia have come to
attend Coach Harrison's team
camp � a camp that Harrison
describes as a real bargain. "A
team concept is better than the in-
dividual concept he said. "The
players get a chance to play with
their teammates. It's like a con-
densed summer league. They have
a chance to play in different styles
of play, and we can expose them
to our ideas. We also meet with
the coaches for an hour each
night
Besides that, Harrison says the
camp is cheaper than most.
"We're by far the least expensive
camp in the state of North
Carolina he said, "but you can
bet that we give them more
basketball for the money
Harrison would like to see the
camp become a more lucrative
program, but that's only because
he would like to pay his assistant
coaches more. "My assistants
don't get paid enough. That's my
personal feeling he said. "I'd
just like to seem them make
more
One might expect Harrison to
be a little less abrasive toward his
summer campers, but that's not
the case. And that's why his
campers like him so much.
"You know what my biggest
pet peeve is?" Harrison yells, en-
circled by a gym full of impres-
sionable eyes. "It's when a player
doesn't get the ball thrown to him
or he doesn't score. Then what
does he do? He drops his head
down and walks slowly the other
way.
"Now what do you think I'm
gonna say to him?" Harrison then
chooses a camper to make his il-
lustration more effective. "I'm
gonna put my arm around his
shoulder and I'm gonna say, 'are
you sick?' The camper says no.
'Then are you hurt?' The camper
again says no. 'Are you tired?'
The camper says no once more.
"Then get your ass down that
court and get in position The
campers roar with laughter.
Harrison knows that some of
these campers could be future
recruits, and he also gives advice
in that area. "Don't show an at-
tiude he says. "If somebody
shows an attiude on the court, I
don't want to recruit him
Even though recruiting is in-
cluded in lectures, Harrison
quickly points out that he does
not use summer camps as a
recruiting tool. "We use this as
more as an exposure tool he
said. "If you see someone who is
a top prospect, then you start
catering to him, and we don't
want to do that
So Harrison doesn't pick
favorites. Instead, he treats all the
players the same. Even if he
sometimes has to be a little blunt.
"Now we're all gonna work on
some things that I think suck right
now. And if I see any o! you mop
ing, do you know what I'm gonna
say?"
Harrison then puts his arm
around a camper's shoulder. "I'm
gonna say, 'Are you sick? Arc you
tired? Are you hungry?"
The campers began snicker
ing.They knew what was coming
OARV PATTERSON ECU Pftoto Lab
Coach Charlie Harrison and Assistant Rick Shoof demonstrate defensive tactics to attentive campers.
Aaron's Mark Appears To Be Solid
OARY PATTRRSOM-aCU
These football campers worked hard and then enjoyed a "nosing-down" party to help cool them off.
Pirates Attend Ail-Star Game
J
Pirate .Sews
After leading a once wandering
team to a 16-13 finish last year,
ECU Head Coach Charlie Har-
rison will again have his work cut
out for him this season.
Harrison has three starting
plavers returning, but he lost two
valuable inside men � Charlie
Green and Johnny Edwards.
Replacing those two won't be an
easy task, and Harrison will be
depending on quite a few
freshmen to fill the void.
"We had an okay year, but
now we've got to build on that
and repeat it Harrison said.
"It's not gonna be easy.
"We've got more question
marks this year than we had last
vear. I think scoring will take
care of itself, but our big ques-
tion mark is inside defense
Harrison will bring in one of
the best recruiting classes ECU
has ever had, but he's not too
sure at this point just how effec-
tive they will be. "I'm going to
have to depend on them a lot
he said "but I don't know how
they're going to act
Speaking of incoming
freshmen, three ECU basketball
.recruits and eight Pirate football
players will play in the East-West
;A11-Star games next week in
Greensboro.
Roy Smith, a 6-7 forward-
center from Gastonia, will play
on the West squad. Playing for
the East will be Derrick Battle, a
6-6 forward from Northern
�Nash, along with Jack Turnbill, a
69 center from Wilmington.
:ECU hasn't had three basketball
players participating in the games
i since the mid-1960's.
Eight of 11 North Carolina
freshmen who signed with ECU
will attehd the prestigious East-
West all-star event. Those players
are: Ellis Dillahunt, Ron Gilliard,
Terry Paige, Bruce Simpson,
Vinson Smith, Darrell Speed,
Bubba Waters and John William-
son.
National Update
The ACC and officials of the
Raycom Sports television network
are taking a wait-and-see ap-
proach to the development in a
legal battle over the NCAA's con-
trol for television football rights.
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
The conference and Ray come
are set to produce their own
regional telecasts of games, but
Supreme Court Justice Byron
White has issued a temporary
order that leaves the current
NCAA television contract intact.
The lower courts have ruled
against the NCAA leaving the
door open for colleges and con-
ferences to negotiate their own
deals if the rulings stand. ACC
and network officials said
White's action could not be inter-
Dreted for or against the league's
plans to set up its own football
network.
The body of Soviet diver Sergei
Chalibashwili was flown from
Edmonton Monday on the first
leg of a somber journey that end-
ed Tuesday in Moscow. The
21-year-old diver died this
weekend of massive head injuries
at Edmonton's University
Hospital. He injured himself in a
diving accident during the World
University games.
Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini
will defend his WBA lightweight
title against unbeaten number
one contender Orlando Romano
of Peru. The bout is slated for
Sept. 15. In Mancini's last fight,
he scored a 10-round decision
over George Feeney in a non-title
contest in February.
World record-holder Calvin
Smith broke away from the pack
to win the 100 meters race at an
international track and field meet
in Nice, France. Smith set the
world mark last month at the Na-
tional Sports Festival with a time
of 9.93 seconds. His winning time
yesterday was 10.44 seconds.
Defending Champion United
States had an easy victory over
inexperienced Norway � winn-
ing all three matches at the
Women's Federation Tennis Cup
in Zurich, Switzerland.
Because of injuries to Tracy
Austin and Kathy Jordan, the
Americans were forced to give a
singles debut to Candy Reynolds.
She responded by beating her op-
ponent, 6-4, 6-2 in the first
match.
Andrea Jaeger needed under 40
minutes to earn the United States
a second singles victory, then
Reynolds and Paula Smith team-
med up for the double triumph.
Hard times appear to be over
for Jose Luis-Clerc. Last night,
the 24-year-old Argentine won
his first tennis tournament since
January by thrashing Jimmy
Aria, 6-3, 6-1, in the final of the
U.S. Pro Tennis Tournament at
Brookline, Mass. The second-
seeded Clerc needed only 76
minutes to dispose of his 18-year-
old challenger and win $34,000.
What is the probability that so-
meone will someday break Hank
Aaron's record of 755 career
home runs? Is there anyone play-
ing the game today with even the
remotest chance of hitting 700
home runs? The answer to both of
these questions appears to be no.
Bill James, author of The
Baseball Abstract, has done ex-
tensive research on the sport of
baseball in an attempt to answer
questions such as the preceeding
two. James has developed a for-
mula that shows the most-likely
candidates for reaching the 500
600- and 700-homer plateau.
James' formula includes such
factors as the hitter's age, number
of career home runs and an
established HR level for each
player.
His research shows that it is
highly unlikely that anyone will
ever break Aaron's mark. For ex-
ample, Mike Schmidt, who is the
leading candidate, had 349 career
home runs at the beginning of the
1983 season. Aaron, on the other
hand, already had 442 at the same
age (32).
No major leaguer at any age has
hit as many home runs as Aaron
had at the same age. Nobody is
even close. Just in order to hit
700, Schmidt would have to keep
blasting 40-45 home runs a year
until he was 40.
The top five players with a
chance of hitting 500 homers are:
1.Mike Schmidt.28
2.Eddie Murray.12
3.Bob Homer11
4.Reggie Jackson.10
5.Dale Murphy.03
The only players that James
lists with a shot at hitting 700 are
Schmidt (6?o) and Murray (lVo).
With the increasing use of
"specialists" such as relief pit-
chers, pinch hitters and pinch run-
ners, it is becoming a rare sight to
see a player play as many innings
and as many games as was the
case in the past.
With these factors and the
statistics supplied by The Baseball
Abstract, it appears that Aaron's
long-ball mark is safe. Just don't
tell Dale Murphy about it.
Baseball Today
HB, Chance Of
Hitting 5�0
1. Reggie Jackson464 .92
2. Mike Schmidt349 .80
3. Eddie Murray165 .31
4. Bob Horner138 .24
5. Dave Kingman329 .22
As expected,the percentages
drop dramatically when listing the
top five possibilities of hitting
600:
Even though they are in the
thick of the first-place battle in
the National League East, the
Philadelphia Phillies decided it
was time for a change so they
fired manager Pat Corrales on
Monday.
Corrales, who managed the
Texas Rangers for three years,
was signed to a two-year contract
on Nov. 4, 1981 and had the con-
tract extended by a year after the
1982 season. He led the Phillies to
an 89-73 record and second place
in the NL East last season.
Corrales has been replaced by
General Manager Paul Owens,
who will take over a team with a
43-43 record as of Tuesday.
Owen, 59, said he will just be in
the dugout for this year and will
return to the front office next
year.
Boston's Wade Boggb. who had
15 hits in 28 at-bats for a .536
average, was named Monday as
the American League Player of
the Week. Dusty Baker of the Los
Angeles Dodgers, who hit .500
with three home runs and 12 RBls
last week, was chosen as the NL
Player of the Week.
Los Angeles reliever Steve
Howe was reinstated by the
Dodgers Sunday after providing
the team with the results of a test
for drug use. Howe's brief
suspension came after he arrived
late for a game Friday night and
later refused to submit to team-
supervised tests for drug use.
In a Monday night game
against Detroit, the Oakland A's
executed a triple play in the third
inning.
Detroit DH John Wockenfuss
lined a ball to right fielder Rick
Peters who doubled up Lance
Parrish on second base. Oakland
second baseman Tony Phillips
then relayed the ball to first to
catch Glenn Wilson before he
could get back.
� ��
This week's trivia question:
1983 is the fourth season that the
Game-Winning RBI has been kept
as an official statistic. Which
major-league player has had more
GWRBIs in those three and one-
half years?
Answer to last week's question:
Amos Otis, Kansas City Royals
center fielder, has been playing
the same position for the same
team for more years than anv
other active player.
Telvision Sports Telecasts To Be
Offered For Monthly Fee Charge?
By RON BERGMAN
Los Angeles offers a glimpse in-
to the future of sports and televi-
sion.
It started last July when ON TV
offered the Sugar Ray Leonard-
Roberto Duran fight as a loss
leader to attract new customers to
its service, which provides uncut
and uninterrupted movies and
sports telecasts to homes for a
monthly fee.
He anticipated that 50,000
subscribers would pay $10 each to
watch the welterweight title bout.
Instead, 126,000 paid ON TV
$1.26 million, half of which went
to the fight promoters.
And i, 500 more customers than
usual hooked up that month.
The service costs each
subscriber $227.40 a year, plus
$39.95 for installation. The
15,000 extra customers therefore
will pour another $4 million into
ON TV during a 12-month period.
ON TV's competitor in the Los
Angeles area, SelecTV won the
right to offer its subscribers the
heavyweight title fight between
Muhammad Ali and Larry
Holmes in October. An amazing
40,000 of the 65,000 SelecTV
subscribers paid $10 each to watch
it.
When the Duran-Leonard
rematch was set for November,
botn ON TV and SdectTV were
allowed to show the fight, and
they raised the charge to $15 Of
ON TV's 350,000 subscribers, and
29455 plugged in, paying
$441,825. That means the second
fight grossed $2,781,825 in one
market along.
The money made from these
three events is only one television
market could portend something
about what's around the corner
tor sports on the tube.
By the end of this decade it
m?i,nOul0nger Possible'to
watch the World Series or the
Super Bowl or the Kentucky Der
by at home by merely swhehing
on the set. You may have to pal
for what used to be free.
S� TV, P io
�tSf�� . ��,
I
Head Football Coach K.d Fmonj
football camp.
Sneak
Golf Classic Cham-
pion Crowned
Ricky Ratley cap-
tured the Golf Classic
title this session with a
score of 84. In a sister
event to the golf
classic, it was Chip
Hendrix capturing the
Putt Putt tournament
by defeating his oppo-
nent by one stroke.
Softball Tournament
Finals Tonight
The men's softball
tournar
final M
the
T-shi
Inv
5 30 p
are strl
as I
ar
del j
ponenl
16
run
Britt De
By DAVID MOFFIT
ll�IS�an��in�
SUWANEE, Ga.
(UPI) � James Bntt
is playing catchup
after drawn-out con-
tract negotiations
delayed his arrival at
the Atlanta Falcons'
preseason camp, but
the rookie defensie
back says that won't
be a factor by time the
regular season beginv
"I'm a little behind
in the learning pro-
cess, but six week-
from now you won't
be able to tell said
Britt, former Loui-
siana State star and
the Falcons' second
round draft choice.
The Falcons didn't
get around to signing
Britt until after first
coming to terms with
their No. 1 draft
choice, defensive end
Mike Pitts (Alabama)
and that, under NFL
rules, prevented the
6-foot, 185-pounder
from reporting until
several days later than
the other rookies.
"I had hoped that
we'd have all the
details worked out in
time for me to report
when 1 was supposed
to said Britt. "It
just didn't work out
that way
Braves general
manager Tom Braatz
blamed the delay on
Britt's agent, Ray
Anderson, saying that
in the case of both
Britt and Pitts, "We
hit on two agents who
were doing their first
NFL contracts and
they waited to get all
the information they
wanted. That was the
unfortunate thing
about it
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hit .500
and 12 RBIs
. as the NL
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reithe
aft� ding
ol a test
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a samet. night and
:used to:o team-
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Deuthe Oakland Vs
1in the third
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.bj Phi! ips
to first to
jbefore he
B 1 �
�e?k trivia question:
I fourth season that the
Vmning RBI ha been kept
I official statistic. Which
igue plaer has had rrore
Is in those three and one-
Irs1
�a to last week's question:
pus. Kansas City Rovals
Fielder, has been playing
be position for the same
r more ears than any
ttive pla.
To Be
harge?
ed the charge to $15. Of
350,000 subscribers, and
Plugged in. paing
That means the second
lossed $2,781,825 in one
Mong.
loney made from these
cms is only one television
could portend something
ghat's around the corner
' on the tube
end of this decade, it
longer be possible to
e World Series or the
w! or the Kentucky Der-
me by merely switching
�� You may have to pay
used to be free.
TV, Page 10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 20. 1983
Appling Falls Short This Time
ftv MILTON
RICHMAN
UFI
Head Football Coach Ed Emory stands guard over this group of young men attending the ECU
football camp.
Sneaker Sam Sez
WASHINGTON
(UPI) � Not tonight,
Josephine. Not in
sweltering 93-degree
heat, anyway.
As one wag in the
RFK Stadium press
box suggested �
maybe Luke Appling
is over the hill.
You had to say this
for the sprightly
76-year-old, a one-
time Chicago White
Sox shortstop: he
nearly busted his
bridgework trying to
do the same thing in
Monday night's se-
cond annual Old
Timers' Cracker Jack
Classic as he did in
last year's contest
when he came out of
the pages of the past
to re-endear himself
to the whole country
with a dramatic first-
inning home run into
the left-field stands
off fellow Hall-of-
Famer Warren Spahn.
They did everything
they could to recreate
the situation in Mon-
day night's five-
inning frolic at RFK.
Appling led off
again for the
American Leaguers
and Spahn started for
the National
Leaguers, who won
the game, 5-3.
Spahn's first pitch
was way outside for a
ball and the crowd of
31,160, who paid as
much as $15 a ticket
to see their old heroes
perform, booed lusti-
ly. His second pitch
was in the dirt and the
crowd, all hoping to
see Appling reach the
seats again, booed
some more.
Spahn then came in
a few feet from the
rubber on the mound
in an effort to get the
ball over the plate.
Quite honestly, he
wanted to see Appling
hit one also.
Luke did � but it
was a soft popup to
third baseman Ron
Santo. Appling got
one more chance to
hit in the third and
walked, after which
he drew a warm ova-
tion when he was
removed for a pinch
runner by former
Philadelphia Phillies'
manager Eddie Sauer,
handling the winners.
This time it was Al
Kaline and Brooks
Robinson who
pumped home runs
into the left-field
seats, only about 260
feet from home plate.
Appling wasn't all
that disheartened
about his failure to
repeat last year's spec-
tacular performance.
"Someone asked
me if I expected to hit
another one he
LAUTARES JEWELERS
ISTA3USHED 1912
GREENVILLE N C
4141
Dwnuni
Golf Classic Cham-
pion Crowned
Ricky Ratley cap-
tured the Golf Classic
title this session with a
score of 84. In a sister
event to the golf
classic, it was Chip
Hendrix capturing the
Putt Putt tournament
by defeating his oppo-
nent by one stroke.
Softball Tournament
Finals Tonight
The men's softball
tournament will see
final action today as
the Kingpins and
T-shirts go to bat at
Intramurals
5:30 p.m. Both teams
are strong offensively
as the Kingpens ad-
vanced to the finals
defeating their op-
ponents by an average
of 16 runs and 6 home
run per game. The
T-shirts made their
way to the finaL in a
similar fashion,
averaging 3 home
runs per game
defeating their op-
penents by an average
of 8 runs per game.
Good defensive play
will be a key determi-
nant in this cham-
pionship game today.
Co-Rec Volleyball
Tournament Set
The co-rec
volleyball tournament
starts tomorrow as six
teams will be volley-
ing for the title. Play
is single elimination,
with the first two
rounds being played
tomorrow, Thursday
at 5:30 p.m. and 7:00
p.m. Finals are
scheduled for Tues-
day, July 25 at 6:30
p.m. Tournament
schedule is posted
outside Memorial
Gym 204.
Remnants
Custom Design
Repair
All Work Done On Premises
V� CMM.
Britt Delayed By Contract
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By DAVID MOFFIT
t'PI Spar Writer
SUWANEE, Ga.
(UPI) � James Britt
is playing catchup
after drawn-out con-
tract negotiations
delayed his arrival at
the Atlanta Falcons'
preseason camp, but
the rookie defensive
back says that won't
be a factor by time the
regular season begins.
"I'm a little behind
in the learning pro-
cess, but six weeks
from now you won't
be able to tell said
Britt, former Loui-
siana State star and
the Falcons' second
round draft choice.
The Falcons didn't
get around to signing
Britt until after first
coming to terms with
their No. 1 draft
choice, defensive end
Mike Pitts (Alabama)
and that, under NFL
rules, prevented the
6-foot, 185-pounder
from reporting until
several days later than
the other rookies.
"I had hoped that
we'd have all the
details worked out in
time for me to report
when I was supposed
to said Britt. "It
just didn't work out
that way
Braves general
manager Tom Braatz
blamed the delay on
Britfs agent, Ray
Anderson, saying that
in the case of both
Britt and Pitts, "We
hit on two agents who
were doing their first
NFL contracts and
they waited to get all
the information they
wanted. That was the
unfortunate thing
about it
However, Ander-
son said the delay was
caused by the Falcons
failure to get back to
him as soon as he had
expected. "The ball
he said, "was in their
court
Whatever, Britt, a
college cornerback
who doesn't know yet
whether he'll play
cornerback or safety
in the pros, finally ar-
rived and Falcons
Coach Dan Henning
says he's liked what
he's seen so far.
"Conditioning is
no problem said
Britt. "I kept in shape
by running a mile and
a half every day and
doing some other
work on my own. My
biggest job is learning
as much as I can as
quickly as I can.
"Defense, whether
you are playing col-
lege or pro ball, is
about the same. At
least it has seemed
that way so far
although I suppose it
will get more com-
plicated later on.
There's no substitute
for the experience that
some of the (Falcons)
veteran defensive
backs have. You
don't learn in one
summer what some of
the people I'm con-
tending against have
learned in three to six
years
Britt noted that
LSU ran a pro-type
offense more than
most of the teams the
Bengals played
against and he feels he
got more of the type
experience he needs
during intra-squad
practice sessions than
he did during actual
games.
Britt says he follow-
ed the Falcons,
especially the past
couple of years when
his former teammate
and friend, linebacker
Lyman White (who
spent last season on
injured reserve), was
Atlanta's No. 2 pick
in '81.
"I prefer playing an
aggressive defense
he said. "I like the
way the Falcons used
to get after people
before the league
changed the bump
rule. You can't do
that as much now so
you have to use your
head more
Britt has 4.6 speed
in the 40-yard dash
and he thinks that's
quick enough to get
the job done even
though there are
receivers in the NFL
who have been clock-
ed at 4.3.
"The important
thing is that I have to
be 4.6 all the time
he said. "I can't af-
ford to drop off to 4.7
by the end of prac-
tice
The Falcons were
rated one of the better
pass defenders in the
NFL back in the days
when they were able
to knock receivers
around, but that has
been one of their
weaknesses the past
few years.
"The nature of the
game is that it's ag-
gressive and
physical said Henn-
ing. "We want to be
as aggressive and as
physical as we can
without causing
ourselves to commit
errors. We don't want
to overextend
ourselves defensively
so that we give up big
plays and cause the
game to get out of
hand
John Marshall,
who was picked by
Henning this past
winter as his defensive
coordinator, says
after the Falcons new
staff has had time to
evaluate the players,
"We hope to install
some things that will
make us an effective
defensive unit
Henning, who suc-
ceeded Leeman Ben-
nett on Feb. 1, says
even though a half
dozen veteran defen-
sive backs returned,
"every job is wide
open. Things that
were taken for
granted in the past
can't be taken for
granted now. We have
no preconceived no-
tions. Everybody
needs to show us what
they are capable of
doing
"I know I've got to
work hard if I'm to
have a shot said
Britt. "But hard work
has never bothered
me. I'm prepared to
do whatever it takes
Britt was asked
about his reaction
when 19S9 Heisman
Trophy winner Billy
Cannon, one of
LSU's biggest heroes,
was recently accused
of being one of the
principals in a $5
million counterfeiting
ring.
"It was t shock
said Britt. "I just
hope people also will
remember all the good
things he did
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THE FLEMING
said. "I said, 'heck,
no I told him, 'Babe
Ruth hit 60 home runs
one year in 600 times
at bat. How do you
expect me to hit two
of them in two at
bat?
Appling works as a
batting instructor for
the Atlanta Braves in
their minor-league
system. He injured his
shoulder showing one
of the Braves' minor-
leaguers how to swing
the bat a few weeks
ago, but he didn't use
that as an alibi for his
failure to hit a home
run.
"I'm all right he
said, laughing at his
own joke. "It'll never
get well. When it's hot
like this, it doesn't
bother me. I'm like an
old dog. When it gets
cold, he limps
Over in the Na-
tional League
quarters, Spahn, a
20-game winner 13
different times during
his career, seemed a
bit disappointed that
Appling had not con-
nected off him again.
"It wouldn't have
been the worst thing
in the world if Luke
hit another one he
said. "It's kinda fun
doing the things you
used to do. You can't
run like you used to
and you can't throw
like you used to. We
all know that but we
all want to do a decent
job. We don't want to
embarrass ourselves
Harmon Killebrew,
another veteran
remembers his move
from backyard
baseball to the big
leagues well. "I was
only 17 when I signed
with Washington and
this was where I grew
up he said. "I join-
ed the club in
Chicago, and the se-
cond day I was there I
was put in as a pinch
runner, I could really
run in those days he
went on, mindful of
how much he slowed
up near the end.
"Walt Dropo was
playing first base for
the White Sox and
when I got there he
looked nine feet tall.
When I moved up to
second, here was
Nellie Fox and Chico
Carrasquel and I
wondered what I was
doing there. I thought
1 was in another
world
Everyone who par-
ticipated in the game
had a good time and
went away with
$1,000 plus all his ex-
penses paid.
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 20, 1983
-H-

Television Sports
Produce Revenue
For Top Networks
Cont'd From Page 8
No one knows
when this will happen,
and a few doubt that
it will be allowed to
happen.
But Bob Arum, the
head of Top Rank
Productions, thinks
the time is ripe for
boxing. "There are
sufficient pay-TV
outlets, especially per-
view pay TV, that in
three years on the out-
side there will be a
complete turnover
he said.
"Boxing will be
eliminated from net-
work TV because
revenues will exceed
what free TV can buy.
Even the middle fights
will be gone. Assume
you have 16 million
homes with pay-TV.
If 25 percent of those
homes can charge $5,
you could make a
bundle�$20 million
for one fight. We
realized $20 million
from (theater) TV for
Leonard-Duran. The
networks can offer
$5.5 million, tops, for
a fight
And if title fights
are out of the reach of
commercial televi-
sion, then the net-
works might not want
to show any fights at
all.
"We've invested
millions of dollars in-
to boxing said Jim
Spence, senior vice
president of ABC
Sports. "If we know
that plums aren't go-
ing to be available,
are we as an industry
going to be willing to
invest in future fights
that are less than
plums? 1 think the
answer is no
Projected pay-TV
revenues can be mind-
boggling.
Say, for instance,
the World Series was
offered for a modest
$1 a game to the 22
million homes that,
on the average, are
tuned in each Oc-
tober. The money
from a four-game
series would then
equal the radio and
TV rights currently
paid to all 26 major
league baseball teams
every year for all their
games, regular
season, playoff and
World Series.
Mancini Fights
Mystery Man
NFW YORK (AP)
� Lightweight Orlan-
do Romero, a mystery
man from Peru, has
burst upon the big-
time boxing scene to
fight for the World
Boxing Association ti-
tle.
Though ranked as
the WBA's No. 1 con-
tender, Romero is vir-
tually unknown in the
United States. His 31
fights all have taken
place in either his
country or the
Dominican Republic
against opponents
most of whom were as
little-known as he.
"I know enough
said Ray "Boom
Boom" Mancini, who
will make a man-
datory defense of his
WBA crown against
Romero Sept. 15 at
Madison Square
Garden
"I know he is
unbeaten, so he must
be pretty good. I
know he is a good-
looking fighter from
the films I've seen
Mancini also knew
the 23-year old South
American was a left
hander.
"That should be no
problem Mancini
said Monday at a
news conference at
which promoter Bob
Arum announced the
fight. "The only time
left handers are a pro-
blem is if they move
around the ring a lot.
Then, they're hard to
pin down. But he's
going to be coming at
me. He wants to take
my title
Romero, who
speaks no English,
smiled when an inter-
preter explained what
Mancini had said.
The fight, to be
televised on closed cir-
cuit and cable outlets,
will be Mancini's first
since Feb. 6, when he
won a 10-round deci-
sion over George
Feeney in Italy, and
his first title defense
since Nov. 13, when
he knocked out Duk
Koo Kim in the 14th
round in Las Vegas.
The South Korean
challenger died of
brain injuries.
Mancini
acknowledged that he
was not as sharp as he
would like because of
his inactivity. But he
said he was in good
physical shape except
for the after-effects of
a viral infection
earlier this month.
"The infection
knocked me out
said Mancini, who
described the illness as
"worse than a bad
cold. My white blood
cell count was low and
they wanted me to
rest.
"Now I'm
underweight he
complained. Mancini
said he weighed only
one or two pounds
over the 135-pound
weight limit. "At this
stage, I should be 141
or 142, but I'll be all
right when I get to
training camp
The Youngstown,
Ohio boxer said, "I
always stay in condi-
tion. Even when I had
my broken collar-
bone, I ran.
The injury to Man-
cini's right collarbone
cancelled his May 27
title fight with Ken
Bogner in
Bophuthatswana.
Mancini, 22, has a
record of 26-1, his on-
ly loss a knockout at
the hands of Alexis
Arguello in a World
Boxing Council
lightweight title fights
on Oct. 3, 1981. He
has scored 20
knockouts.
professional fight on
July 21, 1979. He has
12 knockouts.
Classifieds
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 20, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 20, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.277
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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