The East Carolinian, July 13, 1983






Ms
Carnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 NoM �
Wednesday July 13,1983
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Campus Rapist Receives 35-Year Sentence
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Vmiuhi Sou EditiM
A Farmville man was convicted
day in Pitt County Superior
Court of second degree rape in
connection with the March 4 rape
of an ECU student. Billy Ray
Warren, 27, was sentenced to 35
years in prison after an eight-
hs omen, four-man jury took 45
minutes to find him guilty.
Warren's 35-year ser�ence is
onl five years less than the max-
imum he could have received for
:he crime. In handing out the
har.h sentence, Superior Court
Judge Charles B. Winberrv called
Warren's act a "severe crime. It's
ihe type of crime from which
coeds in our state must be pro-
tected
Warren had entered the lobby
area of Clement dorm after the 1
a.m. curfew. He forced his victim,
an ECU senior, into the lobby
bathroom where the rape took
place.
Second degree rape is defined as
a rape without the use of a
weapon and with no serious injury
to the victim, said Det. Lt. Gene
McAbee of the ECU Public safety
Department, one of the in-
vestigators who worked on the
Warren case.
Warren's trial began Wednes-
day and lasted into Thursday
afternoon. During the pro-
ceedings, several ECU students �
some of whom came from out of
town � testified to having seen
Warren around the dorm the
night of the attack. The victim's
boyfriend also testified during the
trial.
Testimony was given by the
State Bureau of Investigation,
hospital staff members who ex-
amined the victim, four ECU
police officers, including
McAbee, and the victim.
"The thing that impressed me
most about this case was the will-
ingness of the ECU students who
came down and testified
McAbee said. "If we had more
students involved like that, it
would be a lot easier to control the
crime rate on campus
McAbee noted that Warren had
been tried on four other occas-
sions and convicted once for
similar offenses. Judge Winn-
berry found Warren's previous
record to be an "aggravating fac-
tor" in the case, McAbee said.
Prior to his trial, Warren had
been free on a $10,000 bond.
Warren filed notice of appeal in
open court and has been denied an
appeal bond.
ECU students who testified, in-
cluding the victim, said they knew
Warren because he often sold blue
jeans to students on campus. At
the time of his arrest for the rape,
Warren had been ordered b' the
court not to come on ECU pro-
perty. "I knew I had seen him
before it (the attack) had happen-
ed, and I wanted him proven guil-
ty said one of the women who
testified at the trial. "I wouldn't
feel right knowing what had hap-
pened
"We saw him in the dorm after
hours said another student
witness. "We knew he was
violating the dorm regulations,
and plus I had heard that he
(Warren) wasn't supposed to be
on campus
"I never expected him to do
something like this said one stu-
dent.
McAbee said physical evidence
processed at the scene of the crime
aided the prosecution in the case.
An analysis of semen samples
taken from the victim's clothing
and from the bathroom floor in
Clement were determined to be
from a person having the same
blood type as Warren. McAbee
praised the fast and efficient work
of the SB1 Mobile Crime Lab in
processing the evidence.
Greenville Law Firm Donates
Law Books To ECU Library
ECL's University
bv the Greenville
Attorney David Stephens browses through one of the law books given to the university
law firm of James, Hite, Cavendish and Blount. Firm member Wayne Hardee looks on.
By MILLIE WHITE
Staff Writer
The Greenville law firm of
James, Hite, Cavendish and
Blount has donated complete sets
of legal reference works to Joyner
Library. The collections are the
U.S. Supreme Court Reporter and
U.S. Supreme Court Digest, both
published by Lawyers
Cooperative Publishing Co. The
works contain citations and an-
notations on all Supreme Court
decisions and rulings.
"This fine gift will complement
substantially and materially the
legal research capability in our
library said Dr. David Stevens,
university attorney and associate
professor of social work and cor-
rectional services.
Stevens expressed his apprecia-
tion to the firm. He added that the
new material will be available not
only to students in such fields as
pre-law, social work and correc-
tional services, but to members of
the legal profession in the region
as well.
According to Dr. Ruth Katz,
director of Joyner Library, the
library is interested in increasing
its collection of law materials and
its services to attorneys. Stevens
and Phillip Dixon, a Greenville at-
torney and past-president of the
ECU Alumni Association, have
agreed to take a leadership role in
this effort.
Katz said Ed Harper, an ECU
alumnus and incoming president
of the Pitt County Bar Associa-
tion, has indicated that the library
project will be one of the highest
priority goals during his term of
office.
According to Katz, she and the
library's reference department
will work with Stevens, Dixon and
Harper to determine which legal
research materials not at present
in Joyner's collection are needed
by local attorneys. They will also
consider how the library might
develop a cooperative arrange-
ment with Pitt Community Col-
lege and the Pitt County Bar
Association.
Katz hopes the donation will in-
spire other attorneys in Eastern
North Carolina to donate
materials or funds to form a
regional law library.
Katz expressed her appreciation
to James, Hite, Cavendish and
Blount and added that the library
is looking forward to ongoing
cooperative efforts with local at-
torneys.
According to Katz, the library
is unsure if they will continue the
subscription to the law books.
The price of the continuation is
estimated at $300 per month.
Moral Majority, Helms Register N.C. Voters
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
Suff Writer
A national campaign by the Moral Majority to
register 2 million new voters by October 1984 was
vtarted last week in North Carolina.
According to Harold Knowles of Fayetteville,
special assistant to the Rev. Jerry Falwell, founder
and head of the Moral Majority, North Carolina
was picked as the lead-off state because Jesse
Helms, its senior U.S. Senator and an ally of the
Moral Majority, is expected to face a stiff re-
election fight with Democratic Governor James
Hunt.
"Jerry shares the conservative ideals of Jesse
Helms Knowles said of Falwell, "and so he felt
that North Carolina would be a good state to kick
off the drive
The effort is aimed at conservative Christian
voters; therefore, it will be conducted through
sponsoring churches. Local boards of elections will
make available special, at-large registrars to sign
up people before and after church services.
Knowles says that his organization hopes to
enroll 200,000 people in North Carolina "to get the
ball rolling" on Helms' re-election bid. He adds
that the Moral Majority "will do whatever it can
to help Helms
Federal laws passed in the mid-1960s gave all
adult citizens a legal right to vote. Since then, only
slightly more than half have gone to the polls, and
many have yet to register.
Knowles explained that members of Moral Ma-
jority have known for some time that the Helms-
Hunt contest would be a battle, and both sides
would have outside-the-state help and funds. So,
they planned to stage voter registration drives in
North Carolina.
But, registered Democrats in the state out-
number Republicans by almost 3'2-l. Moral Ma-
jority believes that many of the Democrats � and
non-registered persons too � traditionally con-
sider themselves "yaller-dawg" Democrats. If they
are given a choice between the liberal Hunt and the
conservative Helms, they would go for the
Republican. In addition, Falwell suspected that
among the non-registered an especially rich harvest
of Helms voters could be found.
As the Moral Majority made final plans, another
nationwide drive, this one aimed at eligible blacks
who are expected to vote solidly Democratic, was
launched bv the Rev. Jesse Jackson of the People
United to Save Humanity (PUSH). When the
Moral Majority went public with its plan, some of
the media accused it of spiteful racial bias.
Knowles insists that the campaign is not a reac-
tion to Jackson's drive. As proof, he mentions his
organization's national efforts, which since 1979
have enrolled more than 4,000,000 people. "He
always plans well in advance to prepare for
predicted backlashes" by the media, Knowles
said.
Knowles complains that he was, "disgusted at
the media's treatment of the Moral Majority and
its registration drives He points out that the
media "never says anything about the need for
separation of church and state when talking
about the Rev. Jackson, "but. . .they say Jerry-
should stick to preaching and stay out of politics
The purpose of the Moral Majority, says
Knowles, is to register voters and educate them
about candidates and issues. As an example of the
lack of voter familiarity with office-seekers, he
points to the public shock at the strong second-
place showing in .he 1980 Democratic primary for
Attorney General by a candidate who was revealed
after the election to be a Nazi.
So from now until October 1984, registrars
across the country will find an entirely new place to
work: in front of the nation's churches.
Controversy Surrounds Slavery Measure
North Carolina farm worker
rights advocates expressed their
disappointment regarding the
heavily-amended anti-slavery bill
which passed the N.C. Senate Fri-
day.
"The version that the Senate
voted on is much weaker than the
original bill said Joan Preiss, a
member of the staff of National
Farm Worker Ministry, a Durham
based farm worker rights ad-
vocacy group.
At the center of the controversy
was the removal from the bill of
an amendment that would have
made it a felony for a fanner to
knowingly and willfully higher
slaveholders. Many Senators and
lobbyists from the N.C. Farm
Bureau objected to this amend-
Vernon E. White, D-Pitt, head
of the Senate Agricultural Com-
mittee, said he thought the
amended version of the measure
was one which everyone could live
with and go along with and that
further delays of the bill could
Bureau does not want employers possibly keep it from passing at all
to be responsible for what goes on this year.
on their farms Preiss said she and other sup-
The amendment making it a porters of farm worker rights
felony for farmers who higher groups had "very mixed feelings"
originally
ment and worked for its removal.
After the amendment was omit-
ted, the bill passed by a 44-1 vote.
"The Senate version of the bill
says, in essence, that it's okay to
hire a slaveholder, just don't be
one Preiss said. "The Farm
regarding the amended version of
the bill. "Certainly we need the
protection of an anti-slavery
law Preiss said. "What we in-
itially had was a strong bill com-
parable to a two-by-four. We've
had the strong bill wittled down so
that all we have now is a
toothpick. It's certainly disap-
pointing The new Senate ver-
sion of the bill has now been
returned to the House.
slaveholders originally was ap- �� � � �
Fall Tuition Increase Certain;
On The Inside
AnnouncementsPage 2
EditorialPage 4
Just The Way It IsPmt� 4
1 EntertainmentPage 5
I SportsPafe 7
I ClassifiedsPar 8
proved in the House. It is ex-
pected that the House will now
vote to adopt the new format.
Those opposed to the amendment
argued that it unfairly placed
farmers in criminal jeopardy for
acts beyond their control.
Although slavery cases are
covered under federal laws, the
Total Amount Still Unknown
Tuition bills for the fall
semester, which were scheduled to
be mailed this week, will be
large number of slavery cases in delayed and sent with only
North Carolina has convinced estimated figures according to
many people that a state statute is ECU Business Manager Julian
badly needed to help law enforce- Vainnght.
ment agents better deal with the A stalemate in the General
problem. There have been 10 Assembly's state budget process is
sets tuition rates for all state cam-
puses, in accordance with ap-
propriations by the legislature.
An increase in tuition rates is
expected for all campuses in the
UNC system in 1983-84. Rates for
in-state students will go up $70 to
out-of-state
cases of slavery prosec ted in
North Carolina in the la two
years.
"The bill would also mak a
public statement from the General
Assembly that we will not tolerate
slaveiy in North Carolina Preiss
said.
$85, while out-of-state tuition
o r should increase between $340 and
blamed for the delay. State expen- $390, according to UNC President
ditures, including appropriations William C. Friday.
for the UNC system, have not
been Finalized, leaving education
officals in the dark as to how
much tuition rates will be this
year.
The UNC Board of Governors
Vainright said tuition bills will
be mailed with the most accurate
estimate possible, and any dif-
ference will be made up in the Spr-
ing semester tuition bill.
�av parraasow-acv
Wheelin9 Around
ECU student Brian Rangdey catches a ride from the ECU
ped student van. The van takes whuk halrfd-ttodeats to and from
where they need to go.
��
?
ft





�he iEaat Caruitntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 Nojft 'V
Wednesday July 13,1983
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Campus Rapist Receives 35-Year Sentence
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Auisum No�� KdiUM
A Farmville man was convicted
Friday in Pitt County Superior
court of second degree rape in
connection with the March 4 rape
of an ECU student. Billy Ray
Warren, 27, was sentenced to 35
ears in prison after an eight-
women, four-man jury took 45
minutes to find him guilty.
Warren's 35-year sentence is
only, five years less than the max-
imum he could have received for
:he crime. In handing out the
harsh sentence, Superior Court
Judge Charles B. Winberrv called
Warren's act a "severe crime. It's
ihe type of crime from which
coeds in our state must be pro-
tected
Warren had entered the lobby
area of Clement dorm after the 1
a.m. curfew . He forced his victim,
an ECU senior, into the lobby
bathroom where the rape took
place.
Second degree rape is defined as
a rape without the use of a
weapon and with no serious injury
to the victim, said Det. Lt. Gene
McAbee of the ECU Public Safety
Department, one of the in-
vestigators who worked on the
Warren case.
Warren's trial began Wednes-
day and lasted into Thursday
afternoon. During the pro-
ceedings, several ECU students �
some of whom came from out of
town � testified to having seen
Warren around the dorm the
night of the attack. The victim's
boyfriend also testified during the
trial.
Testimony was given by the
State Bureau of Investigation,
hospital staff members who ex-
amined the victim, four ECU
police officers, including
McAbee, and the victim.
"The thing that impressed me
most about this case was the will-
ingness of the ECU students who
came down and testified
McAbee said. "If we had more
students involved like that, it
would be a lot easier to control the
crime rate on campus
McAbee noted that Warren had
been tried on four other occas-
sions and convicted once for
similar offenses. Judge Winn-
berry found Warren's previous
record to be an "aggravating fac-
tor" in the case, McAbee said.
Prior to his trial, Warren had
been free on a $10,000 bond.
Warren filed notice of appeal in
open court and has been denied an
appeal bond.
ECU students who testified, in-
cluding the victim, said they knew
Warren because he often sold blue
jeans to students on campus. At
the time of his arrest for the rape,
Warren had been ordered by the
court not to come on ECU pro-
perty. "I knew I had seen him
before it (the attack) had happen-
ed, and I wanted him proven guil-
ty said one of the women who
testified at the trial. "I wouldn't
feel right knowing what had hap-
pened
"We saw him in the dorm after
hours said another student
witness. "We knew he was
violating the dorm regulations,
and plus I had heard that he
(Warren) wasn't supposed to be
on campus
"I never expected him to do
something like this said one stu-
dent.
McAbee said physical evidence
processed at the scene of the crime
aided the prosecution in the case.
An analysis of semen samples
taken from the victim's clothing
and from the bathroom floor in
Clement were determined to be
from a person having the same
blood type as Warren. McAbee
praised the fast and efficient work
of the SBI Mobile Crime Lab in
processing the evidence.
Greenville Law Firm Donates
Law Books To ECU Library
ECL's University Attorney David Stephens browses through one of the law books given to the university
bv the Greenville law firm of James, Hite, Cavendish and Blount. Finn member Wayne Hardee looks on.
By MILLIE WHITE
Staff Writer
The Greenville law firm of
James, Hite, Cavendish and
Blount has donated complete sets
of legal reference works to Joyner
Library. The collections are the
U.S. Supreme Court Reporter and
U.S. Supreme Court Digest, both
published by Lawyers
Cooperative Publishing Co. The
works contain citations and an-
notations on all Supreme Court
decisions and rulings.
"This fine gift will complement
substantially and materially the
legal research capability in our
library said Dr. David Stevens,
university attorney and associate
professor of social work and cor-
rectional services.
Stevens expressed his apprecia-
tion to the Firm. He added that the
new material will be available not
only to students in such Fields as
pre-law, social work and correc-
tional services, but to members of
the legal profession in the region
as well.
According to Dr. Ruth Katz,
director of Joyner Library, the
library is interested in increasing
its collection of law materials and
its services to attorneys. Stevens
and Phillip Dixon, a Greenville at-
torney and past-president of the
ECU Alumni Association, have
agreed to take a leadership role in
this effort.
Katz said Ed Harper, an ECU
alumnus and incoming president
of the Pitt County Bar Associa-
tion, has indicated that the library
project will be one of the highest
priority goals during his term of
office.
According to Katz, she and the
library's reference department
will work with Stevens, Dixon and
Harper to determine which legal
research materials not at present
in Joyner's collection are needed
by local attorneys. They will also
consider how the library might
develop a cooperative arrange-
ment with Pitt Community Col-
lege and the Pitt County Bar
Association.
Katz hopes the donation will in-
spire other attorneys in Eastern
North Carolina to donate
materials or funds to form a
regional law library.
Katz expressed her appreciation
to James, Hite, Cavendish and
Blount and added that the library-
is looking forward to ongoing
cooperative efforts with local at-
torneys.
According to Katz, the library
is unsure if they will continue the
subscription to the law books.
The price of the continuation is
estimated at $300 per month.
Moral Majority, Helms Register N.C. Voters
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
Suff Writer
A national campaign by the Moral Majority to
register 2 million new voters by October 1984 was
started last week in North Carolina.
According to Harold Knowles of Fayetteville,
special assistant to the Rev. Jerry Falwell, founder
and head of the Moral Majority, North Carolina
was picked as the lead-off state because Jesse
Helms, its senior U.S. Senator and an ally of the
Moral Majority, is expected to face a stiff re-
election Fight with Democratic Governor James
Hunt.
"Jerry shares the conservative ideals of Jesse
Helms Knowles said of Falwell, "and so he felt
that North Carolina would be a good state to kick
off the drive
The effort is aimed at conservative Christian
voters; therefore, it will be conducted through
sponsoring churches. Local boards of elections will
make available special, at-large registrars to sign
up people before and after church services.
Knowles says that his organization hopes to
enroll 200,000 people in North Carolina "to get the
ball rolling" on Helms' re-election bid. He adds
that the Moral Majority "will do whatever it can
to help Helms
Federal laws passed in the mid-1960s gave all
adult citizens a legal right to vote. Since then, only
slightly more than half have gone to the polls, and
many have yet to register.
Knowles explained that members of Moral Ma-
jority have known for some time that the Helms-
Hunt contest would be a battle, and both sides
would have outside-the-state help and funds. So,
they planned to stage voter registration drives in
North Carolina.
But, registered Democrats in the state out-
number Republicans by almost 3 Vi -1. Moral Ma-
jority believes that many of the Democrats � and
non-registered persons too � traditionally con-
sider themselves "yaller-dawg" Democrats. If they
are given a choice between the liberal Hunt and the
conservative Helms, they would go for the
Republican. In addition, Falwell suspected that
among the non-registered an especially rich harvest
of Helms voters could be found.
As the Moral Majority made final plans, another
nationwide drive, this one aimed at eligible blacks
who are expected to vote solidly Democratic, was
launched bv the Rev. Jesse Jackson of the People
United to Save Humanity (PUSH). When the
Moral Majority went public with its plan, some of
the media accused it of spiteful racial bias.
Knowles insists that the campaign is not a reac-
tion to Jackson's drive. As proof, he mentions his
organization's national efforts, which since 1979
have enrolled more than 4,000,000 people. "He
always plans well in advance to prepare for
predicted backlashes" by the media, Knowles
said.
Knowles complains that he was, "disgusted at
the media's treatment of the Moral Majority and
its registration drives He points out that the
media "never says anything about the need for
separation of church and state when talking
about the Rev. Jackson, "but. . .they say Jerry
should stick to preaching and stay out of politics
The purpose of the Moral Majority, says
Knowles, is to register voters and educate them
about candidates and issues. As an example of the
lack of voter familiarity with office-seekers, he
points to the public shock at the strong second-
place showing in the 1980 Democratic primary for
Attorney General by a candidate who was revealed
after the election to be a Nazi.
So from now until October 1984, registrars
across the country will find an entirely new place to
work: in front of the nation's churches.
Controversy Surrounds Slavery Measure
North Carolina farm worker
rights advocates expressed their
disappointment regarding the
heavily-amended anti-slavery bill
which passed the N.C. Senate Fri-
day.
"The version that the Senate
voted on is much weaker than the
original bill said Joan Preiss, a to be responsible for what goes on
member of the staff of National on their farms '
Farm Worker Ministry, a Durham
based farm worker rights ad-
vocacy group.
At the center of the controversy
was the removal from the bill of
an amendment that would have
made it a felony for a farmer to
knowingly and willfully higher
slaveholders. Many Senators and
lobbyists from the N.C. Farm
Bureau objected to this amend-
regarding the amended version of
the bill. "Certainly we need the
protection of an anti-slavery
law Preiss said. "What we in-
itially had was a strong bill com-
parable to a two-by-four. We've
had the strong bill wittled down so
that all we have now is a
toothpick. It's certainly disap-
On The
Announcements
Editorial
Just The Way It Is
Entertainment
Sports
Classifieds
Page
Page
Page
Page
Page
Page
2
4
4
5
7
S
ment and worked for its removal. Vernon E. White, D-Pitt, head
After the amendment was omit- of the Senate Agricultural Com-
ted, the bill passed by a 44-1 vote, mittee, said he thought the
"The Senate version of the bill amended version of the measure
says, in essence, that it's okay to was one which everyone could live
hire a slaveholder, just don't be with and go along with and that
one Preiss said. "The Farm further delays of the bill could
Bureau does not want employers possibly keep it from passing at all
this year.
Preiss said she and other sup- pointing The new Senate ver-
The amendment making it a porters of farm worker rights sion of the bill has now been
felony for farmers who higher groups had "very mixed feelings" returned to the House,
slaveholders originally was ap-
proved in the House. It is ex-
pected that the House will now
vote to adopt the new format.
Those opposed to the amendment
argued that it unfairly placed
farmers in criminal jeopardy for
acts beyond their control.
Although slavery cases are
covered under federal laws, the
Fall Tuition Increase Certain;
Total Amount Still Unknown
Tuition bills for the fall
semester, which were scheduled to
be mailed this week, will be
large number of slavery cases in delayed and sent with only
North Carolina has convinced
many people that a state statute is
badly needed to help law enforce-
ment agents better deal with the
problem. There have been 10
cases of slavery prosec ed in
North Carolina in the la two
years.
"The bill would also mak a
public statement from the General
Assembly that we will not tolerate
slaveiy in North Carolina Preiss
said.
estimated Figures, according to
ECU Business Manager Julian
Vainright.
A stalemate in the General
Assembly's state budget process is
sets tuition rates for all state cam-
puses, in accordance with ap-
propriations by the legislature.
An increase in tuition rates is
expected for all campuses in the
UNC system in 1983-84. Rates for
in-state students will go up $70 to
$85, while out-of-state tuition
should increase between $340 and
blamed for the delay. State expen- $390, according to UNC President
ditures, including appropriations William C. Friday
for the UNC system, have not
been finalized, leaving education
officals in the dark as to how
much tuition rates will be this
year.
The UNC Board of Governors
Vainright said tuition bills will
be mailed with the most accurate
estimate possible, and any dif-
ference will be made up in the Spr-
ing semester tuition bill.
MIT f�ATTaow-acu
Wheelin9 Around
ECU student Brian Rangeley catches a ride from the ECU
ped student van. The van takes waeekhaired-ctooents to and front
where they need to go.
-�-1�
?
f
.
� ��� ���"� � ' . I





mi EAS1 CAROl IS1AN J
inn ws JiMHWWiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiimiiiiiimmmimiimiiiimiminiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniHMmiiiin�iMMiiiiHHHMHiUMi�iMi
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BUCK'S GULF
2704 E. 10th St. 752-3228
BIBLE STUDY AT ECU
11 � I V a r v t y Christian
PeMowship sponsors a bible
s'udy on Monday nights Come
to 108 Jarvs Hall at 8 Kip m tor
a time or spiritual fellowship
and ton Prayer is also ottered
eery night at 1U Pletcher Han
I I5pm TaKe a break trom
StuOv
WZMB PRESENTS
WZMI presents . assical
x �� -1. . Sunday,
to six p re Aatch in
.x - - t as' roi "as
CATHOLICS
s �� S� K)ay va�
me
t
v if St I � Kl 51
v . �- � hes
EMPLOYMENT

- ted n
Pf RSONAt Ci�t
rTENOENTS " �"�
. . mos
� . ies � issisi
activities ol
� � �
- �
� � . � - . �.
SENIORS
Want a central place tor three
letters ot reference from yCHjr
professors If you are
graduating this summer then
you complete a registration
packet available from the
Career Planning and Placement
Service It you will finish in the
tall spring or summer of
academic year 1983 84 you may
Puk up a packet and prepare it
to return in August or
Septemte'
WATERMELON
"EAST
The Department of Universi'v
unions will sponsor another
lvpc .r Watermelon Feast a'
I 30 p m on Monde) July, t8fr
� � �� Everyone Is
At on e .v I s tree' EniOv
m� le k ous colod melons and
me beautif) urea fter Tell a
GREENVILLE PEACE
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JULY 13,1913
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Dr. William E.
Laupus, vice
chanceUor and dean
of the ECU School of
Medicine, has been
elected president-elect
of the American
Board of Medical
Specialties.
Laupus will serve a
one-year term as
president-elect and
automatically will
become president for
a two-year term at the
group's annual
meeting in March
1984.
The American
Board of Medical
Specialties is a federa-
tion of the 23 medical
and surgical boards
which have establish-
ed the national educa-
tional standards and
training requirements
for certification in
each of the specialties.
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and oral examinations
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and resolving dif-
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operation of the
boards to maintain
professional stan-
dards and avoid
duplication of effort.
Laupus has been an
active member of
ABMS for the last 10
years, serving as vice
president and member
of the executive com-
mittee and as one of
the representatives for
the American Board
of Pediatrics, the
specialty organization
for which he served as
president for two
terms.
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Medical Affairs, a
forum for represen-
tatives from five
medical organizations
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cerns in medicine and
medical education.
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applications for
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3Ilje iEaHt (Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fitt ding Miller, omi um?
Mike Hughes, Mmulym
NN fcVERI Mt-RRITT. Dnaoroj Ww�m� ClNDY PLEASANTS, �p�rtt�iar
Hi MIR FlSHLR. imm Mm GREG HIDEOUT. MwUw
Al 1 AFRASHTEH,wtfu Wj-w- CARLYN EBERT. CnmtainmfHtEdUw
Stephanii Groon, cirorf�MMmm� Lizanne Jennings, &����
v n iiioRNios, ;Mia,taw David Gordon, i mm
JuU IV 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Campus Rape
Student Action Gains Conviction
On JuK 6 and 7, Billy Ray War-
ren of Farmville was tried in Pitt
counts Superior Court for the
second-degree rape of an ECU stu-
And thanks to the
testimonies o a handful of other
U students. Warren was con-
victed to 35 years in prison.
The charges stem from an inci-
vient which occurred in Clement
dorm in the wee hours of March 4.
According to' testimony, Warren
was a pretty familiar face around
he dorm after visitation hours.
Students said they'd seen him on
campus from time to time peddling
blue 'cans.
What these and other students
t have known before,
eer. was that Warren had
.nned from campus by a
- ourt order. He had been
tour other occasions for
similar offenses and had even been
convicted once of assaulting a
woman.
Bur ecu with his seemingly
erw helming past record of
lilar offenses and the findings
ii to the court by the SB1
other investigative bodies,
Warren's case was no open-close
Anyone familiar with the
U.S. legal system knows that no
e cases ever are. And according
to Detective It. Gene McAbee (an
investigator working on the
e), was the voluntary
timon) of the woman's fellow
udents which proved to be a
rCampus Forum
decisive factor in Warren's convic-
tion.
Those students and others who
took time out to testify in the trial
against Warren deserve our com-
mendation and respect. Far too
often, we opt for the easier route
of issuing idle complaints about
"the way things are never ac-
tually caring enough about the in-
justice to move a muscle.
Indeed, rape must be a horrify-
ing experience. Fortunately, it's
also an experience that most of us
will never encounter. But equal to
that fortune is the misfortune
should we disregard rape and other
serious crimes simply because
it didn't happen to me
It's probably pretty safe to say
that none of us enjoys hearing
news of a crime of this nature.
Rape, assault and other serious of-
fenses are � to say the least �
unpleasant subjects. The dif-
ference, it would seem, is that
some people care enough about
putting the crime to an end-to do
something about it.
Perhaps McAbee summed up
the whole situation best when he
commented on the Warren trial:
"The thing that impressed me
most about this case McAbee
said, "was the willingness of the
ECU students who came down and
testified If we had more
students involved like that, it
would be a lot easier to control the
crime rate on campus
Our Continuing Saga
Reply to Mr. Baker:
Since you left yourself open for a
repl. even though you "won't read it
anyway" (and you said I was
spiteful), I won't feel inhibited in do-
ing so, and I'm sure someone will be
kind enough to tell you about it. Ob-
viously, you have exaggerated andor
onceived the point behind my con-
tctive criticism of Mr. Hughes'
editorials.
I'm al! for humor � yes, even banal
humor at times. It will probably amaze
you that I am about to admit, before
multitudes of readers, that I have even
voluntarily seen Blazing Saddles not
once, not twice, but three times! To
this day. I cannot open a can of pork-
and-beans without a chuckle.
But let's face it, Mr. Baker, Mike
Hughes is no Art Buchwald. True,
even professionals, as you say, may
have their own "disgusting fixations"
but they generally don't publish them
on the editorial page, do they? I enjoy
satire and parody as much as the next
person, but consistent crudity is not ex-
actly what I'd call "dry wit
Nav as you would say, Mr.
Baker, spitefulness was not the motive
for mv comments on the quality (or
lack of it) in Mr. Hughes' articles. I ap-
preciate freedom of the press as much
as the next First Amendment advocate.
Further, I did not implore the paper
to shut down on a permanent basis
because of my "inability to accept
another person's views Rather, if
lack of material andor summer staff
prohibit quality journalism during
summer school editions, then tem-
porarily closing the press during sum-
mer school would be a viable option.
ECU wouldn't be the First campus
without a summer press. However, I
don't think there is a problem with the
entire staff. In fact, 1 have no quibble
with the rest of the staffs efforts to
produce an end product that is
respected and sought after. For exam-
ple, Patrick O'Neill would make an ex-
cellent candidate for the next managing
editor opening. Lord knows, he has the
flair and the diversified background re-
quired for intelligent editorials.
"Penmanship as you put it, Mr.
IHl I
Baker, is not the same as quality.
Anyone can develop penmanship, but
not anyone can achieve the maturity
and journalistic excellence inherent to
an editorial position.
Melanie Bentley-Maughan
Alumnus, English
You Done Good
I'd like to take some time to offer
my praise the medical staffs of the
ECU Student Health Center and the
emergency room of Pitt County
Memorial Hospital. Normally, I try to
keep my distance from these folks, but
I sure did need them last week.
Not one known for bicycle safety, 1
managed to wreck my bike last
Wednesday night. In the process, I
picked up a face-full of asphalt that
had to be scrubbed out. An ECU nurs-
ing student (thanks, Diana) working in
the PCMH emergency room did a fine
(though not painless) job.
I'd also like to thank the staff of the
campus SHC as well as the several peo-
ple who aided me at the scene. I must
admit, I've forgotten all your names,
but please know that I'm grateful.
Patrick O'Neill
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Can I Say That Word On TV?
The Evolution Of Sex
Recently, a lot of people have come
up to me and asked my views on sex.
Well, actually, no one really asked
me. In fact, no one ever asks my opinion
on anything. I guess I just thought it was
a good way to start this thing off. You
know, a good attention-getter. Hell, 1
don't want to write about sex anyway;
it's a little too controversial for my taste.
MIKE HUGHES
My Sexpertise
Besides, what could 1 possibly say
about sex that hasn't already been ade-
quately discussed on a Calvin Klein com-
mercial? Whew! Not a whole lot.
But just say, for instance, 1 did want
to write about sex � which I don't. But
if I did, I'd probably say something
about sex being the single most decisive
factor in the evolution of modern man. 1
think even you bible-belters would have
to agree with that one.
In the history of mankind, there has
probably never been an issue � or more
precisely, an event � with as much im-
pact on society. Quite literally, we
Americans eat, drink and sleep sev
But it wasn't always that way. Think
back to your favorite television shows oi
the 60s. Talk about your taboo subject!
1 mean, even America's "favorite cou-
ple Ozzie and Harriet, had separate
beds. And in Father Knows Best, which
ran for five or six years, it seems even
father knew very little about some
things, like just where in the hell Kitten.
Princess and oV Bud came from.
But I guess it was best that way. 1
mean, just try to imagine Ward Cleaver
swapping wives with Lumpy Ruther-
ford's father for a holiday weekend. Or
how about June Cleaver in a skimpy
tiger-skin negligee, waiting by the door
to pounce on her husband when he came
home from a tough day at the office?
Somehow, without the familiar milk-
and-cookies greeting, the show just
wouldn't have been the same.
Super-Maughan Trades In
Phone Booth For Flagpole
By PAT O'NEILL
ECU education student Glenn
Maughan is at it again. It appears that
Maughan has become quite a powerful
figure in Pitt County and Greenville city
politics. And he's done it all for the price
of a few postage stamps and some well-
researched letters.
As a result of Maughan's letters to of-
ficials, the county of Pitt has agreed to
remove the segregated listings that ap-
pear above the names of non-whites
from the war memorial on the lawn of
the Pitt County Courthouse.
The word "colored" appears twice on
the monument to denote blacks killed in
both the Korean War and World War II.
In his letter to county officials last
March, Maughan called the segregated
listings an "ultimate insult to the black
men and women who served and died,
but because of their race, are not allow-
ed the dignity, even in death, of being
recognized as equal citizens
More recently, the city of Greenville,
under the authority of City Manager
Gail Meeks, has agreed to stop flying the
Confederate and British flags over the
town common. Again, Maughan's let-
ters prompted the action.
"Looking deep into history
Maughan wrote, "one may realize that
this symbol (the Confederate flag) is not
and can never be a true representation of
the South The Confederate flag, he
said, is more a symbol of violence and
racism.
Meeks, who referred to Maughan as
"a very persistent young man decided
to simply remove the Confederate and
British flags without checking the validi-
ty of Maughan's contentions. It seems
she wanted to take care of the problem
before it "ballooned
Meeks was, indeed, right; Maughan is
a very persistent young man. He is also a
man of principle who is willing to take
the time to be a responsible citizen. For
this I laud him. As a matter of fact, since
Maughan has managed to convince of-
ficials to remove a few symbols of the
Old South, I'd like to suggest he branch
out. Perhaps Maughan can convince of-
ficials to improve housing and health
care for the poor. How about better
roads and schools, more jobs, etc.? The
possibilities are unlimited.
Go get 'em, Glenn!
Nowadays, of course, it's a different
story. Not only is sex no longer a taboo
subject, but it's big business. It sells
everything: jeans, 18-hour bras.
decafinated coffee, diet colas,
weapons even toilet cleaners.
The fact of the matter is. society has
been perverted. Now, I'm not saying
perversion is bad or good. 1 mean. I'm
no saint (sorry for the shock, mom). I
suppose 1 adhere to a few liberal biases
myself. Nevertheless, 1 do find it a little
hard to accept some of our sexual ex-
ploitations nowadays.
Take movies, for example. Remember
when the big money makers were the
likes of Cone with the Wind, The
H izard of Oz or even more recently The
Sound of Musicl Well, needless to say.
things are different today. Nowaday,
the big blockbusters, the films that rake
in the cold cash, are the likes of I'm Just
a love Machine. Have Whip, Will
Travel, Measure for Pleasure (a moder-
nized version of the Shakespeare classic)
and Irene, I.averne and what the Parrot
Saw. Granted, a lot of heavy
breathing but definitely no Gilbert &
Sullivan.
Remember when the big pictures were
filmed entirely on location in scenic set-
tings, like Vienna, Zurich, Paris and
London, to give an audience the total
emotive impact? Well, today's big pic-
tures are also filmed on location
mostly in the garage of some guy named
Zeb when his wife's not home.
And it seems to say something about
our society when a book titled The Joy
of Lesbian Sex rests high atop the na-
tion's best-seller list for four months?
Imagine June Cleaver reading that one
while Wally and Beaver are at school!
And what trip to the supermarket
would be complete without a gaze at Sex
Lives of the Stars magazine in the check
out line? And did you ever wonder what
would happen to a Cosmopolitan cover
girl if she so much as coughed?
Yes, society is not well not well at
all. We've got sex aids in supermarkets,
"love" stimuli in drug stores and so
many other back-of-the-book (er
magazine) devices that it makes one
wonder how did we ever survive
without them?
But like I said before, I don't want to
write about sex; it's just too controver-
sial.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a senior
library science major from Udder-Pull,
N. C (just east of Hoglips), sometimes
wonders if scientists in the late 17th cen-
tury considered dodo bird droppings
endangered feces?
'Night
B MULEHAMEH
MiDAMRY BROUN
"How complicated the
state seems to be
virginal wife Anne ii
Sondheim's A I ittle tthi 1uu
which opened Monda
the Fa' arolina
Theatre
The exclamation
the understatemei I
ing. The musical, wl
six Tony awards and rai
600 performances on Broadw
proves to be half roma
edy, half bitterwee: exan
of the pitfalls, compile i
disillusions of mar-
fidelity. Inspired b B
Smiles of a Summer Xigl
in turn-of-the-sc: .
I ittle ight Wusii
study of contempt
ships and fickle, wh
nature a - other s
musicals, especially lollit-
Companx
SondheitT
lyrics and hi
Living It
Basks In
BARl W 1B1RI
New Jersev �
soaked up the nai
and the ra-
the white cement
Hirschorn and the M
Historv and Techn -
Forth of Jul weekei
state that pirated cheese
of Philadelphia a
singlehandedl) inven
Jewish merican Pi ncess
ed us due oi
Washington. D.C as the '
nual Festival of Amc
saluted the culture
The Festival also honored the
tributions of France on mei -
folklife. but esca
cream paled in the
Springsteen and ej
inc.
TACKY
TRAVEL
New J e r s e
synonvmous. .
of 60 Minutes and V
with toxic wasu
and hucksters .
tion ckages
guff and a lot oi
spits it right back in t
Jersey tough trad x-
Jersey native thai
New Jersev Tump fc
fart cut by Divine (a
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Wltk $40,000 worth of maritime
Base beads into Swansboro H�





BRIEFING
BOOK

I
7
fCWf
unm
)f Sex
Nowadays, of course, it's a different
r. Not only is sex no longer a taboo
Subject, but it's big business. It sells
everything: jeans, 18-hour bras,
lecafinated coffee, diet colas,
.eapons even toilet cleaners.
The fact of the matter is, society has
een perverted. Now, I'm not saying
erersion is bad or good. I mean, I'm
K) saint (sorry for the shock, mom). I
?uppose 1 adhere to a few liberal biases
nyself. Nevertheless, I do find it a little
hard to accept some of our sexual ex-
loitations nowadays.
Take movies, for example. Remember
Iwhen the big money makers were the
Hikes of Gone with the Hind, The
H izard of Oz or even more recently The
Sound of Music? Well, needless to say,
things are different today. Nowadays,
the big blockbusters, the films that rake
in the cold cash, are the likes of I'm Just
a love Machine, Have Whip, Will
Traxel, Measure for Pleasure (a moder-
nized version of the Shakespeare classic)
and Irene, Laverne and what the Parrot
Sa� Granted, a lot of heavy
breathing but definitely no Gilbert &
Sullivan.
Remember when the big pictures were
filmed entirely on location in scenic set-
tings, like Vienna, Zurich, Paris and
ondon, to give an audience the total
�motive impact? Well, today's big pic-
ures are also filmed on location
mostly in the garage of some guy named
Zeb when his wife's not home.
And it seems to say something about
our society when a book titled The Joy
of I eshian Sex rests high atop the na-
ion's best-seller list for four months?
Imagine June Cleaver reading that one
while Wally and Beaver are at school!
And what trip to the supermarket
would be complete without a gaze at Sex
I ives of the Stars magazine in the check-
out line? And did you ever wonder what
would happen to a Cosmopolitan cover
girl if she so much as coughed?
Yes, society is not well not well at
all. We've got sex aids in supermarkets,
"love" stimuli in drug stores and so
many other back-of-the-book (er
magazine) devices that it makes one
wonder how did we ever survive
without them?
But like I said before, I don't want to
write about sex; it's just too controver-
sial.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a senior
library science major from Udder-Pull,
N.C. (just east of Hoglips), sometimes
wonders if scientists in the late 17th cen-
tury considered dodo bird droppings
endangered feces?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JULY 13, 1983
Page 5
Night Music Orchestrates Marriage Pitfalls
By MIKE HAMER
and DARRYL BROWN
"How complicated the marital
state seems to be concludes the
virginal wife Anne in Stephen
Sondheim's A Little Night Music,
which opened Monday night at
the East Carolina Summer
Theatre.
The exclamation proves to be
the understatement of the even-
ing. The musical, which garnered
six Tony awards and ran for over
600 performances on Broadway,
proves to be half romantic com-
edy, half bittersweet examination
of the pitfalls, complications and
disillusions of marriage and in-
fidelity. Inspired by Bergman's
Smiles of a Summer Night and set
in turn-of-the-century Sweden, A
Little Night Music is as much a
study of contemporary relation-
ships and fickle, whimsical human
nature as other Sondheim
musicals, especially Follies and
Company.
Sondheim's astringent, acrid
lyrics and his dazzling gift with
words rarely give modern life a
break. He is responsible, really,
for bringing a realistic, contem-
porary vision to American
musical theater, abandoning the
old escapist, romantic idylls of,
say, Rogers and Hammerstein.
Sondheim looks at life more
through the eyes of John Updike
or John Cheever than Lerner and
Loewe. A Little Night Music is a
modern comedy of manners, not-
withstanding the turn-of-the-
century setting.
Marriage and infidelity have, it
seems, as many consequences as
rewards. The aging leading man
Fredrik Egerman, confronting a
mid-life crisis, is "busily renewing
his unrenewable youth" by mar-
rying Anne, an 18-year-old who is
still a virgin after 11 months of
marriage, and rekindling an old
affair with stage actress Desiree
Armfeldt. His grown son Henrik,
meanwhile, is unsuccessfully stav-
ing off carnal desires with his
studies for the priesthood. Petra
the maid has no such compunc-
tions as she enjoys an active love
life and tries to lure Henrik out of
his guilt-induced impotency. The
pompous hypocrite Count
Malcolm, moreover, is outraged
when he discovers Fredrik with his
mistress Desiree. One can tolerate
infidelity, he says, from one's
wife, but never from one's
mistress. The entire scenario is
overseen by Desiree's aged
mother, a veteran adulteress who
"has numbered kings among her
lovers
To make a delightful story
short, the two chaste youths Anne
and Henrik elope, Desiree and
Fredrik discover their true love
for one another, and the Count,
somehow, returns to his wife. The
ending is happy, at any rate, if a
touch bittersweet.
Special plaudits go to the
leading players, Lee Evans and
Amanda Muir, who charmed their
way into the hearts of the au-
dience and turned in strong per-
formances as Fredrik and Desiree.
Also deserving special recognition
are Susan Marrash-Minnerly as
Mme. Armfeldt and Sharon
Lawrence as Anne, Babs Winn as
Petra, John Kuhn as Count
Malcolm and Jane Barrett
Underbill as his wife.
The lavish sets by Gregory Buch
were somewhere between effective
and dazzling, and the production
crew ran them flawlessly. Stage
and musical directors Edger R.
Loessin and Joe Distefano,
respectively, deserve praise for a
well-paced production.
The show's music, all in waltz
time, includes many wonderful
songs, the most famous being
"Send In The Clowns which,
incidentally, was written in one
night during rehearsal and put in
the show just before the opening.
It has become perhaps Son-
dheim's best-known number; even
K-Mart muzak can't seem to ruin
it.
A Little Night Music is certainly
an improvement over last week's
Pippin, and we highly recommend
it. The production runs through
Saturday in McGinnis Theatre.
Tickets may be purchased at the
box office or reserved by calling
757-6390. Most performances
play to near-capacity houses, so
hurry.
Living It Down Up North: Garden State
Basks In Glory At D.C. Folklife Fest
By CARLYN EBERT
EatertaimMX fctor
New Jersey � yes, Joisey �
soaked up the national spotlight
and the rays of sun refracting off
the white cement walls of the
Hirschorn and the Museum of
History and Technology over the
Forth of July weekend. The noble
state that pirated cheesesteaks out
of Philadelphia and almost
singlehandedly invented the
Jewish American Princess receiv-
ed its due on the Mall in
Washington, D.C. as the 17th an-
nual Festival of American Folklife
saluted the culture of New Jersey.
The Festival also honored the con-
tributions of France on American
folklife, but escargot and ice
cream paled in the wake of Bruce
Springsteen and legalized gambl-
ing.
TACKY
TRAVEL
New Jersey � a place
synonymous, at least to avid fans
of 60 Minutes and Newsweek,
with toxic waste dumps flambe
and hucksters selling bogus vaca-
tion packages � takes a lot of
guff and a lot of ribbing, but it
spits it right back in time-honored
Jersey tough tradition. Tell a New
Jersey native that you think the
New Jersey Turnpike smells like a
fart cut by Divine (a Baltimore
gal, by the way) and you'll reel
under a blanket of insults to your
state highway system that would
make Jim Hunt's mother blush.
Mention that you think of the
culture of New Jersey as a con-
tradiction in terms, and you can
kiss your eardrums goodbye.
The Garden State, as its licence
plates proclaim it, boasts the
varied cultural influence of nearly
100 ethnic groups who came from
nearby New York and faraway
Puerto Rico and Italy to make
New Jersey a leading producer of
blueberries, Jersey corn, silk,
ships, pharmaceuticals and shop-
ping malls. Not to mention a
thriving industry in
"persuaders the carved clubs
fearless New Jerseyans carry
under bucket seats on a drive into
the city.
But the Festival, with its happy
demonstrations of lobster trap
making and glass blowing, missed
the real cultural flavor of New
Joisey. Jersey's shoreline does
dish up succulunt lobster, but a
more typical shore town lunch is
stromboli with peppers served by
a sweating, shouting, rude Sicilian
muscle man in an apron. If it
isn't, it's not authentic, or not
very good. And its urban in-
dustrial centers, like Newark and
Trenton � towns a foot of snow
does little to beautify � feed a
steady stream of stinky sludge in-
to Jersey's rivers and send up
puffs of charcoal haze visible
from jets aiming for LaGuardia.
But cities, on the whole, are
unpleasant and ugly: overcrowd-
ed, polluted, noisy. It's just that
New Jersey is proud of hers,
strung together as they are by
asphalt and toll booths. Few
travelers dare glance out of their
air-conditioned Honda Preludes
to the jeweltone swamps along the
shore, the bird sanctuaries and
abandoned orchards between
overpasses.
Had the Folklife Festival cap-
tured the true spirit of New
Jersey, it wonld have
reconstructed the state's real
cultural heartbeats and gathering
places: the Carvel stores, the
diners, the casinos, the drive-ins.
Instead of nodding politely to a
concert of Afro-Puerto Rican
bomba music, folklife fans could
have practiced making a left-hand
turn by following signs to the
right of the roadway, prating that
iuck and centrifugal force would
land them at their left-turn
destination. New Jerseyans like
their pastimes tough, and the
right-hand left-hand turn makes
driving � a sport of high impor-
tance � more difficult and ex-
citing.
New Jersey has long suffered
the fate of being labeled New
York City's nasty little next door
neighbor. Its punishment �
ultimate suburbia � just flowed
in naturally with the spillover
from New York's crowded
suburbs, and New Jersey started
to sound like a pretty funny place.
Maybe that's why Festival
organizers decided to fete the
seafaring traditions and the truck
farmers who spawned the current
media misconception of the Jersey
dolt.
Or maybe they just did it as a
joke
������ by CHUIS �EMMCTT
"It's intolerable being tolerated Henrik, patronized by everyone as
a lustless saint and bound by his dedication to the priesthood, con-
templates his rising carnal desires in 'A Little Night Musk
Mercy Me! Roaring Twenties Tap
Onstage In Effervescent 'Nanette9
One of the most spectacular Broadway stage suc-
cesses in the early 1970s was not a new show, but a
sassy new version of an old one � the outstanding
musical hit of the fabulous 1920s, No,No, Nanette.
It is this modernized version of carefree America
that is to be presented by the East Carolinia Sum-
mer Theatre on the ECU campus in Greenville for
six performances � Monday, July 18, through
Saturday, July 23, at 8:15 each evening.
Teaming up to double in brass for this splashy
musical of tap dancing and song will be two
veteran Broadway performers who are also no
strangers to theatre-goers in Eastern North
Carolina: Mavis Ray, who will perform the lead
role made famous by Ruby Keeler, also serves as
the production's choreographer; and Jay Fox, who
will not only play the male lead but also direct.
Miss Ray's role is that of the exuberant tap-
dancing wife of a cheerful manufacturer of Bibles
whose eagerness to make everybody happy gets
him into some tight squezes. Fox plays this
generous fellow, who gets trapped in embar-
rassments by his willingness to be an innocent
sugar-daddy to three trollops.
Miss Ray has been with the East Carolina Sum-
mer Theatre on and off since its inception and has
choreographed most of the productions. She has
appeared in the Broadway production of
Ballroom, the national tour of DA, ABC's All My
Children, My Body, My Child starring Vanessa
Redgrave and the highly acclaimed movie-musical
Annie.
Fox captivated Summer Theatre audiences last
year as the Emcee in Cabaret, a role he has played
with equal success on Broadway. Previously, New
York audiences had seen him in Applause, The
Magic Show and Fiddler On The Roof.
Also starred is Susan Marrash-Minnerly as a
comic housemaid constantly grumbling as she
heads for the door or the telephone, one of which is
ringing all the time. Melodie Wolford will be seen
as the demure Nanette everyone says no to and
Scott Evans (star of the recent Summer Theatre
production of Pippin) as a gallant suitor pursuing
her with an engangement rin.
No, No, Nanette is an endearing slice of
musicanna from the Roaring '20s, a glossy bubble
full of flappers with fluttering eyelids.boys wearing
knickers and pasted-on smiles, pretty girls n knee-
length bathing suits balancing on oversized
See NANETTE, Page 6
Underwater Digs
ECU Students, Faculty In Search
Of Sunken Wrecks In Harbor
With $40,000
into
of maritime equipment
Swansboro Harbor.
ob board, ECU
robin Avnns
's Murphy
ByPHERRING
Mi Writer
For many, summer is a time
when academic studies are put on
the back burner until regular
classes resume in the fall, but this
is not the case with East
Carolina's School of Maritime
History and Archaeology. During
the warmer months of the year,
both students and their teachers
can be found combing the waters
off the East Coast in search of
sunken vessels and evidence of
piers or wharfs that have been
reclaimed by the sea in the past
centuries.
The Maritime History program
has been offered at East Carolina
for five years after it was discon-
tinued from UNC-Wilmington's
curriculum in 1978. Right now,
Dr. William Still and his associate
Dr. Gordon Watts direct their
students' research and the proper
maintenance of the equipment us-
ed during their long hot days on
the water.
Twenty-two students are now
enrolled in the program, with 14
of them taking part in graduate
studies and field work. Most of
the students involved have
backgrounds in history, an-
thropology or marine science.
Last week I was fortunate
enough to watch Watts and some
of his students at work in
Swansboro Harbor, where for the
past three weeks they have been
searching for artifacts at the re-
quest of the Swansboro 200th An-
niversary Committee. So far their
efforts have not revealed any
evidence of a shipwreck site, but
there is always a chance that
something could turn up. "A har-
bor bottom is like a garbage
dump said Still. "There's all
kinds of junk down there
One may think that the
possibility of discovering gold or
chests of pirate booty would be an
incentive for entering this unique
field of study. But archaeology
and treasure hunting are two
totally different things.
"Everything we do explained
Watts, "is in the interest of
history
Of course, it takes sophistical d
equipment to detect a sunken
vessel buried deep in water and
silt. Along with sonar depth
recorders, one of the most
valuable pieces of equipment used
to detect sunken wrecks is the pro-
ton magnetometer, which locates
metal or porcelain by measuring
the disturbances they create in the
Earth's magnetic field.
Watts and his students placed
the magnetometer on the deck of
a fiberglass boat. Watts then guid-
ed the boat over a predetermined
area by an electronic tracking
system, an infrared light transmit-
ted by a computerized beacon
located on an island across the
harbor. As the magnetometer
scanned the harbor bottom, it
recorded its findings with peaks
and valleys on a strip of graph
paper. Unfortunately, the
readings gathered on my trip did
not show any promise of a find.
When a reading does indicate the
possible location of a wreck, a
diver is usually sent down to in-
vestigate.
The Maritime History Depart-
ment owns two vessels used exten-
sively in its research: the Murphy
Base, stored in Washington,
N.C and the Privateer, which is
kept on campus. The Murphy
Base, a modified army landing
craft, was purchased from army
surplus for a modest sum and then
outfitted with over $40,000 worth
of equipment. In the past five
years, the Murphy and its crew
have explored harbors and inlets
from Bath, Edenton and New
Bern, N.C. to the coastal waters
of Virginia and Georgia.
If funding allows, future plans
include research in locations such
as Bermuda. A separate grant
must be obtained for each field
school project, so there is always a
possibility that a project may have
to be tabled until proper financial
backing can be obtained. "We
were lucky to have grants for each
of our field school projects said
Watts.
Still and colleagues hope to
continue to obtain grants to keep
their research going. Through the
Maritime History Department's
efforts, historians have been able
to enrich their knowledge of the
nautical history behind the col-
onization of North Carolina and
the United States.
r4p-
��,�m m inn
�� - -4b- m � �





THE EAST CARP 1 1NIAN
II I 13, IYM
from the people whu brought you "Animal House
NATIONAL
IAMPMNS
to class
has less class
than this class
Bizarre fare from
AAendenhall this week:
Tonight at 8.00, attend
National Lampoon's
'Class Reunion Next
Monday at 9 p.m join
Malcolm McDowell and
the rest of the droogs for
Stanley Kubrick's 'A
Clockwork Orange
Admission, as usual, is
by student ID and ac
tivity card or MSC
membership, and both
films will rol I in
Mendenhall's Hendrix
Theatre.
en ��
R
.o 3
BEST FILM
OF THE YEAR
BEST DIRECTOR
OF THE YEAR
� I Ml
tanics
From Afcrner BOS
'No, No, Nanette'
Brings Tap Dancing
To McGinnis Stage
( ont. from Page 5
oranges, and people
exclaiming "Mercy
me and "What's
rhe diH"
This show brings
back such dances as
the Castle Walk, the
Bunny Hug, the Max-
ie, the Tango and the
Charleston. There is,
of course, a good deal
jubilant tap danc-
performed by the
npeding herd of 25
ipers and sheiks as
the show chorus.
The winner of four
Ion Awards, No,
So, Sanette
sports two o the most
famous show tunes
ever written: "Tea
lor Two" and "1
Want To Be Happy
The Fast Carolina
Summer Theatre
follows this produc-
tion with They're
Playing Our Song,
scheduled for six
evening performances
(Jul 25 through July
30, all at 8:15) and
one matinee at 2:15
p.m. on Thursday,
ul 28.
Tickets niav be pui -
chased at McGinnis
Theatre in Greenville,
corner of Fifth and
Eastern Streets, Mon-
day through Satur-
day, or reserved b
calling 757-6390.
$1.00 OFF
Any Foot Long Sub or Saladj
with Purchase of a Medium Drink
this coupon good
July 13th thru July 20thj
758-7979
208 E. Fifth Street
Greenville, N.C.
1
i
i
i
Copyright 1963
Kroger Savor
Quantity Rights Reserved
Nona Sold To Dealers
II.
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
AOVERTiSED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these adver
tised items ,s re
quired to be '�ac �
a�a at e for sae
each Kroner Sa or
eicept as speoficaJ �
noted th.s ad II e
do rjr 0t of an item
e mU offer yoo fOm
items and Prices choice of a com
Effective Thru Sat July 16 1983 DafaQ,e !err �"
aaiiab;e e act n g
the same sangs or a
ramchec fi.ci
entitle yOu 'C Our
chase the ad.e't sed
� lem at the ad�esed
pr.ee � " V 3arS
KROGER
Cottage
Cheese
STEAK HOUSE
i
i
i
i
July Dinner Specials
Mon-Thurs. 5pm-10pm
Buy any Steak at Reg. Price and
pay only half price for second steak
of same or less value
All Meals Served With King Idaho Baked
Potato or French Fries and Texas Toast
i
I
Lunch Specials
Mon-Sat. Mam-5pm
4 l2oz. Jr. Sirloin $2.19 with Salad Bar $3.19 J
8oz. Chopped Sirloin $2.49 with Salad Bar $3.49
All Meals
Served with King Idaho Baked Potato
or French Fries and Texas Toast
L
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W.Greenville Blvd.
2903 E. 10th St.
!4-0z.
Cup
REGULAR
wise
Potato Chips
7-OZ.
Bag
2-Ltr.
N.R.
Btl.
MT. DEW,
PEPSI FREE OR
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$-119
PREMIUM
Miller Beer
$239
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Hamm's Beer
$909

j
GINGER ALE,
CLUB SODA OR
Schweppe's
Tonic
KROGER
Multigrain
Bread
28-Oz.
N.R.
Btl.
1VH.D.
Loaf
SERVE N SAVE
SLICED
Luncheon
Meat
�ZZU
m

ectv
1-Lb
Pkg.
him t
ssSS
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PUFF
PASTRY
iSySfS MEAT ENTREE,
2 VEGETABLES AND ROLL
DAILY
Eclairs Luncheon Special
2.89
Only
$219
Pir
Pira '
arolina
to rq
the V
Johi
la
World
ll-
l
I -
-
-
Cow be
k
ha
pla
VCTC
te
d stra
me a a
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pla
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-
da
LUC
-
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These FCT studenj
courts beside Belk


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� ��





oumtrv Cowcine
. 2 t I 4ch Street
iviiie North Carolina
U- Haiti Mntij ?5
Doily Special
Meat
eoetables
1 Bread
U:OfkinV:OOrrn Diiiiv
lllllllirTTT
AlHfc it 5th and E
4SM
Glamorous U�o "A Weekend in the
tm turn ot this century, during on of those
set and people go joyfully mad with music
ERT SET �M
POLICY
Each cri "ese adver
� sea ,tems ,5 re
9u -e3 to be rgadtiy
a�a aDie :or sale in
eac Kroger Sav on
e�cept as speci'icaiiy
oteo m th!s ac if we
Oc run cat ot an item
�e otter you yovir
choice ot a com
jjj s'ate ism when
�tMd reflecting
Je sa� ngs or a
-
I e " sea
advertised
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PREMIUM
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239
ERVE N SAVE
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cheon
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Special!
19
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JULY 13. 1983
Page
Pirate Recruit In Friendship Games
Pirate News
Steve Sides, who will attend
East Carolina this fall on a
baseball grant-in-aid, was chosen
to represent the United States in
the World Friendship Games in
Johnstown, Pa from Julv 9
through July 17.
The United States, Canada and
Taiwan posted victories Mondav
night in the third round of the
World Games. The U.S. had 14
hits in five innings en route to an
11-0 romp over Holland.
Sides, who played his high
school ball at Eastern Wayne in
Goldsboro, became one of only 18
U.S. players selected from the 72
participants at the National
Sports Festival games, which were
held last week in Colorado Spr-
ings, Co.
Sides was five-for-nine, with
four runs batted in and a double
in leading the South squad to a
berth in the finals. The Gold
Glove-winning second baseman
did not commit an error during
the games.
The World Friendship Games
will include eight teams, with the
United States and the Korean Na-
tional teams expected to reach the
finals.
"We're just absolutely thrilled
about the news concerning
Steve said ECU baseball coach
Hal Baird. "He was our first
recruit for 1984, and we were ex-
cited about his prospects then.
Now, he's playing some of the
best ball in the country for his age
group
National Update
Two lop University of South
Carolina officials have renewed
efforts to have a 75 million-dollar
libel suit against them and Sports
Illustrated thrown out of court.
The suit was filed by former
women's basketball coach Pam
Parsons. She claimed that the
University President, James
Holderman, and one of his
assistants made accusatory lesbian
statements about her to Sports Il-
lustrated.
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
In legal briefs filed in a Colum-
bia court, the two officials deny
making the statements. Their
lawyers also claim that as public
officials, they are immune from
libel suits in matters pertaining to
the public interest, and asked that
the suit be dismissed.
Parsons resigned from the
university under pressure in 1982
after an article in the sports
magazine depicted her as a les-
bian.
Soviet Diver Sergei Shlibashvili
is reportedly in critical condition
after suffering multiple head in-
juries at the Wold University
Games in Edmonton, Alberta.
The 21-year-old Soviet under-
went brain surgery following his
accident Saturday in the men's
10-meter platform dives.
British distance stars Sebastian
Coe and Steve Ovett want to run
in both the 800 and 1500-meter
events in next month's World
Track and Field Championships
in Helsinki.
This gives the selectors a major
problem. Britain's top track starts
want to repeat their double-up of
three years ago at the Moscow
Olympics. Ovett upset his rival in
the 800-meter race, and Coe then
won the longer event.
The pair's decision is a
headache for the selectors, who
must pick the bulk of the team on
Cowboys On Drugs?
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif.
(AP) � Dallas Cowboys veterans,
who report for training camp in
less than two weeks, probably
have been distracted by news of a
federal investigation linking five
players with cocaine use. Cowboy
coach Tom Landry said.
"If I was in a player's shoes,
sure I'd be distracted Landry
said. "I wouldn't be able to put
my complete concentration on
business
Training camp began Sunday
and reports that running backs
Tony Dorsett and Ron Springs
and defensive ends Harvey Martin
and Larry Bethea have been men-
tioned by federal officials in con-
nection with cocaine use. Wide
receiver Tony Hill and Martin
were subpoenaed last week to
testify in a trial of a man indicted
on charges of cocaine smuggling.
Landry himself admitted being
distracted by the reports and
media attention. He said,
however, he doesn't plan to
discipline or dismiss any of the
players, only to closely monitor
the situation.
"Obviously, I don't plan to
take any action against them at
this time Landry said. "Really,
I don't have much reaction to
this. There isn't much here that I
didn't really already know
The New York Times reported
the players' connection in Satur-
day's editions. Cowboys Presi-
dent Tex Schramm later confirm-
ed it.
The Dallas Times Herald
reported Su. day federal agents
also threatened to charge Dorsett,
the team's star running back, with
possession of cocaine unless he
testified against his teammates.
Dorsett refused to cooperate.
Landry said he had been aware
of cocaine use on his team
through NFL Security last season,
when Cowboy names were men-
tioned in connection with con-
victed cocaine dealer John Russell
Webster Jr. and Elias Murback, a
Brazilian who pleaded guilty to
drug smuggling in Dallas.
"It was a few days after the
NFL championship game Lan-
dry said. "NFL Security sent us a
list of names. That was the begin-
ning of the program we've
established to take care of our
own house. But we've known
about this problem for some
time
On Wednesday, Hill and Mar-
tin were subpoenaed by U.S. Mar-
shall Clint Peoples to appear as
witnesses in next month's case of
Lauriberto Ignacio, who was in-
dicted by a federal grand jury in
April on charges of allegedly con-
spiring to smuggle cocaine from
Brazil to Texas.
For all of Landry's efforts to
get to the root of the possible drug
use by his team, he had doubts
about how much he could help.
"Obviously you say to yourself
that you could have done more
he said. "If we would have been
set up to handle it, we might have
been able to prevent it. Hopefully
we're now in a position in which
we can do that.
"Bigger people than me can't
handle it in this country. They
can't even keep it (cocaine) from
coming over the border he said.
Landry has also done his
homework, but admits he has a
lot to learn.
"According to my bried educa-
tion there are recreational users
and then there is a group that is
very close to being dependent on
it. Then there are the chemical
dependents.
"There is nothing here that
would make me believe that any
of our players would need to go
into a rehabilitation clinic for the
28-day program he said. "But I
don't know all of the mechanics
of how this drug situation still
works. I'm still learning
It's not the first time past or
present Cowboy players have been
associated with drug use. Bob
Hayes was convicted of
distributing cocaine and spent six
months in prison. Former
linebacker Thomas Henderson
admitted to having a heavy co-
caine habit, spending up to $1,000
a day.
"I think the public must be
thinking right now that there are a
bunch of Cowboys on drugs
Landry said. "But I don't think
that is true. It may be the other
players have used drugs recrea-
tionally. But 1 don't even know
how many of my players even
drink beer
Saturday. Observers feel Coe
should concentrate on the
800-meter event, while Ovett
should compete in the 1500-meter
race. That would mean that Bri-
tain's other wold class middle-
distance runners could take part
in the championships.
Pittsburgh Steeler Terry Brad-
shaw was placed on the NFL's
physically unable to perform list
yesterday. Bradshaw is slow to
recover from off-season elbow
surgery, but can return to the ac-
tive roster later in the season.
Quarterback Doug Williams
was expected to be a no-show
when the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
open the NFL training camp
Thursday night.
Williams and the Bucs are in-
voled in a salary dispute. The star
quarterback reportedly asked for
$875,000 a year originally but
lowered that figure to $600,000.
The Bucs say they have two of-
fers on the table, but both will be
withdrawn if Williams doesn't
sign and practice Friday.
The NCAA suffered another
setback in its bid to retain e
elusive control over college foot-
ball telecasts when the 10th C i:
cuit Court of Appeals in Denve'
refused to stay an order that void-
ed $281.1 million in television
contracts and would allow col
leges to make their own deals
Clemson Senior Jane Forman is
off to a good start as a tennis pro
fessional.
In her first pro tournament,
unseeded Forman upset eight-
seeded Heather Ludloff, 6-4. 7-6,
6-4, in the first round of the
Virginia Slims S 100.000 Hall
Fame Tournament at Newpn
Rhode Island.
Yaz Nearing End Of
Spectacular Career
Carl Yastremski, who broke in-
to the major leagues during John
Kennedy's first year as President,
is currently in the midst of what
he says will be his last season in
baseball. At the end of the 1983
season, "Yaz" will have played 23
years for the Boston Red Sox,
making his No. 8 as familiar a
sight in Boston as The Old North
Church.
Yastremski began his career in
1959 playing for Raleigh in the
Carolina League. That year, he
was named the league's MVP
after batting .377 and driving in
100 runs. Two years later,
Yastremski was replacing Ted
Williams in left field for the Red
Sox.
KEN BOLTON
Baseball Today
OAEY PATTERSON-ECU Photo Lab
On The Move
This gentleman is just one of many joggers seen around Greenville and
the ECU campus. Most people seem to agree that jogging is certainly
one of the top recreational activities in the summertime. If nothing
else, running is a sure way to release all that tension from summer
school classes.
Even though he has announced
that he will retire at the end of the
1983 season, Yastremski has not
let up in his final season. As of
Tuesday, Yaz had hit safely in 18
of his last 20 games and had raised
his batting average to over .300.
With only a little over a month
to go before his 44th birthday,
Yastremski ranks in the top 17 in
11 offensive categories. When he
plays in his 110th game of the
1983 season, he will pass Hank
Aaron as the all-time leader in
games played with 3299.
Yastremski, who was playing
for the Red Sox before there ever
was an American in space, is first
among active players in games
played, runs batted in (1788),
total bas;s (5384), walks (1791)
and extra-base hits (1123).
He is second among those still
playing in at-bats (11,608), runs
(1778), hits (3318), doubles (622).
home runs (442) and singles
(2195).
Since he replaced Williams in
1961, Yastremski has won three
batting championships, seven
Gold Gloves, and was the last ma-
jor leaguer to win the Tr
Crown (1967). In addition.
Yastremski is only the fourth
player in major league historv
with over 400 home runs and 3000
hits.
But it appears that after 2?
record-breaking years in a Red
Sox uniform, a Boston landmark
will soon be gone. In anticipation
of this historic happening.
Boston's last game of the year
Oct. 2nd against Cleveland � has
already been sold out.
Gaylord Perry returned to the
major leagues after a bi
absence Monday night, but
return was spoiled by fhe Toronro
Blue Jays, who defeated Perry
and the Kansas City Royals 7-4.
Perry, who was released by the
Seattle Mariners shortly before
the All-Star break, pitched six in-
nings, giving up eight hits and two
runs.
Kansas City manager Dick
Howser said he hoped Perry pit-
ches as well as he pitched Mondav
night the rest of the season.
Howser said Perry pitched better
than expected.
Major league umpire Joe West
wore the shoe on the other foot
last week after shoving Atlanta
manager Joe Torre on June 28.
West was suspended for three
days and fined $500 by NL Presi-
dent Chub Feeney.
Many managers have been fin-
ed for pushing umpires, but this is
the first time in major league
history that an umpire has been
fined for shoving a manager.
This week's trivia question:
Which major league player has
been playing the same position for
the same team longer than anyone
else (excluding pitchers)?
Answer to last week's question:
California catcher Bob Boone led
the majors in 1982 in percentage
of opponents caught stealing.
Tourney Begins Thursday
Sneaker Sam Sez
Golf Registration Continues
Registration for the Intramural
Golf Classic continues through
the day of the event, which is
Thursday, July 14. The Classic
will be held at the Ayden Golf
Course. All participants should be
sure to return their scorecards to
the Intramurals-recreation office
by Friday, July 15, at 2 p.m.
For
Tennis Players 'Matched
Tournament Action
Five participants will enter into
Pthe single elimination tennis tour-
, M nament after completing the
� �-?��� .jl � .fliijSij I season Monday. Finals actions is
Z0n&?' , jJmttM�A W! I se! to finish Monda Juy 25
oary patteesoh ecu PMi uk Favorites in this single elimination
These ECU students pass the summer hours by engaging In a friendly game of four-on-four on the asphalt event look to be Raymond Song
courts beside Belli Dorm. and Ray McKeithan, who both
sport winning records.
'Swinging' Single Tourney Starts
Tonight
The single elimination softball
tournament get underway today
as seven teams will be vying for
the title. This hard-hitting action
is set to begin at 4:30 p.m.
tongiht, with semi-final action
Monday, July 18 and finals
Wednesday, July 20 at 5:30 p.m.
Favorites at bat look to be Pi Kap-
pa Phi and the Field Generals.
Co-Rec Volleyball Season Win-
ding Down
Six strong volleyball teams will
Finish up season play next week.
Play-offs are set to begin Thurs-
day, July 21. Tournament play
should prove to be exciting, as all
teams sports skill and enthusiasm.
Aerobic Fitness Classes
Two aerobic fitness classes will
be held in Memorial Gym dance
room beginning, Monday, August
1, and ending Thursday, Sept. 1.
The classes are scheduled to meet
Monday through Friday from
5:15 to 6:15 p.m and Tuesday
through Thursday at the same
time. The cost will be $8.00 for
the session. Registration will be
Monday, Aug. 1 and Tuesday,
Aug. 2, in Memorial Gym, room
204, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The instructor will be Lucy
Mauger.
-�.���.� ���





�.
8 THE fast CAROLINIAN JULY 13. 1903
Classifieds
TYPING TERM PAPERS.
ESSAYS and RESUMES. IBM
SELECTRIC TYPEWRITER
,�� CAMERA READY
RESUME SERVICE Call
MIKE at 7$2 n4.
ACADEMIC AND PROPES
SIONAL TYPING. IBM Selec
trie III �� Bloodworth
7S�-7�'�
I NEED A TUTOR Hr Ad
m.m�tr�liv� Law Coure Call
7S2-4SA �nv�il"� .
YOU'RE NOT REALLY
STUPID! Youe tu�t having a
little trouble learning Spanish!
Call me; I can help. Tutarina;
available for all levels. A�h for
Karri. 757-MSS.
LABRADOR RETRIEVCR
PUPPIES. AKC. Black. Sire
chocolate with large broadfcead
Oamt yellow. Vat. eKam and
wormed, sm male, $IM
female. Chris Smith. Beech
Bay Kennel. TtS-fias
HELPWANTED: The AeroO
Workshop is accepting applica-
tions tor instructors. No ex-
perience necessary. We ��'
train. Apply l:M p.m. 7.M P m.
Mon Fri. 417 Evans Street mall.
Downtown. 7S7-140B.
LAITARES EWELIRS
BT H.CHIO 1911
HIE N C
j&anfjricel fmmkm
n
Dm Pi 1JIJ1
Remnants
Custom Design
Repair
All H ork Done On Premises I
ANNOUNCING � . �
SATURDAY OFFICE
HOURS
For your convenience wc will be open
tor examination and optical services
every Saturdav from 9:00 a.m. to 100
p.m' Affordable fees, quick, accurate
sen, ice. Convenient Hoar. Seeing is
BrtteHng dr. pETCR W. HOLUS
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O.O 9.A.
TlPI MMPKX :?8 3B��NV'lLi BLVO
756-9404
$
20
OFF
Any Complete Prescription
Eyeglass Or Contact Lens
Fitting
Must Be Presented At
TtnteOtOrda
Other Discounts Or Coupons
Do Nol Apply
I
I
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
St9s.pt prianary Test.
Centre, and PraMaes
,�re�e�cy CevneeHne, Per
turtr -Mermatn call
I3i4i� (Tan f-roe Mweaoor
M�-Hi-MM) Between � A.M.
and P.M. Wee.
� ALEIOMS WOMEN $
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
01T Wast A rg��� $t.
iaMaj
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN A�oeriON:acjtfricuttdeo
DEPEND ON. Bum�saftmuJumatmtH
I he women of the r leming Center. Com ttetors are
available aav and night to support and under-
stand you Your safety, exxrtfort and privacy are
assured by the caring star? of the Roming Center
SEWICES. � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st ft. 2nd Trimester Abortion, up to
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Ptegnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
Accepted � CAU 711-5550 DAY Ot MIGHT �
Healthcare.coureelmg W FLEMING
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and education for wo-
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Motol RimMrss
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$44S
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Complete
GLASS OR
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ANY USABLE
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USDA Choiea Baa Rotw hoU
FOOD LION
(choice) V
(Tints E�tr�) (No Other Coupons Applicable.
THIS AD MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER
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3�
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H$ PajtiloN Commons
Across From Ooetors fort
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Iae�hBrr;p�o,0�p�vH0o�iee�. J
r
CALLUS
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Of YOU
These prices good thru
Saturday, July 16,1983
10-12 Lb. Average
Slieed FREE
Lb.
USDA Choice Beef Round - Bottom
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Cube
Steak

Seedless
Thompson
Grapes
$2?9
1Liter - Mm I CbbbIW Bareaaa. Vis Reel I Pkf. ef 12 - 1 Oi. NR BoHlet
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Carlo
Rossi
Miller
Beer
fk. of 12 12 0z. Can
Old Milwaukee
Pkf. of 11 12 Oz. Caat
Stroh's Beer
2 War
n
22 Ounea
laihy Pay �1.39
T"
i.soi.it.eiiMiitMt.uoii
Chicken
Of The
Sea
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Oairt
Way Pay M.19
119 Sweats laro,a Roll
Scott
Towels
Why Pay 87'
Le
twaooovouxi
1b�W
389

HalKa.
14 Oz. - Cfcs�M� BaafLWar I Basf - Pag Foot
Kal Kan
4 Lb. - letltat Lita
Embers Charcoal
399
489.
4.S Oz. - LivorKieaoy Noerty Stae - Cat Fooi
Vienna Sausage EH Purina 100
39.
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Pork & BeansA N� Toilet Tissue
Margarine Quarters
Hall Sail - Malta Haai.
Apple Juice
k4i
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3V1
10 Ounce
Jeno's
Pizza
Wny Pay ;1 29
i'3&i
Del Monte Irif
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 13, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 13, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.276
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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