The East Carolinian, June 29, 1983






&hz iEast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.ftf A
Wednesday June 29,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Professor Emeritus
Henderson Receives His Due
I


By MELANIE ROGERS
Surf Writer
E. L. Henderson, 98, is an im-
maculately dressed, articulate,
educated man. These facts are not
too surprising since he received his
doctorate from Columbia Univer-
sity. Wednesday, the rank of pro-
fessor emeritus was bestowed
upon him by university officials
for his "significant and endur-
ing" contributions to ECU.
Charles Coble, dean of the
School of Education and neighbor
of Henderson's, initiated the pro-
cess to have the honor given to
him after learning of Henderson's
background.
Henderson came to what was
then the East Carolina Teacher's
College in 1923. He retired in 1944
after holding such positions as
director of student teaching,
chairman of the Department of
Administration and Supervision,
and finally in 1939, chairman of
the graduate committee.
With his help, the graduate pro-
gram at ECU was one of only six
accredited in the state.
For all of his work at the
university, Henderson was
dismissed for disloyalty 13 days
before he became eligible for
retirement by university President
Leon R. Meadows. Meadows was
later convicted and imprisoned
for three years for misuse of
funds.
When I talked with him Mon-
day, Henderson described
Meadows as a good friend.
"When he was sick, I visited him
up to four times a day. We went
bird hunting together, and even
attended a year at Columbia
University together
Henderson, while reminiscing
about Meadows, recalled an inci-
dent when he helped avert a plan-
ned student strike. He told the
student who came to him that in-
stead of going on strike he should
form a committee and talk to
Meadows. "The students formed
a committee Henderson quip-
ped, "and I was fired for disloyal-
ty
After Meadows' conviction,
Henderson's retirement benefits
were restored. Although he lives
less than a block from ECU, he
has only been on campus twice
since his retirement: once for a
reunion of a class he was especial-
ly close to, and once for a lun-
cheon. Although he said being
given the rank of professor
emeritus was the "biggest surprise
of my life he still doesn't want
to be involved with the university.
Henderson said he was never
reinstated after the disloyalty inci-
dent and only received his retire-
ment benefits because of legisla-
tion passed prior to the incident
and not because of university of-
ficials. "As far as I'm concerned,
they wanted me out and never
asked me back. According to
them, I'm still out Henderson
said, adding that he considers the
conferral of professor emeritus a
partial reinstatement.
Henderson came to ECTC in
1923, when the university was 16
years old. Henderson's amazing
memory for detail was evident as
he described the campus as it was
in 1923 � Austin was the main
classroom building, Wright was
under construction, and there was
a science building across from
Wright.
Jarvis was the only dorm,
Henderson remembered, although
Cotton Hall was under construc-
tion. There was a dining hall and a
post office east of where the infir-
mary is today. According to
Henderson, it was difficult to find
places to live in Greenville, so
there were four houses on campus
for the faculty. There were no
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Pftoto Ceurtny ei ECU NEWS BUREAU
Dr. E. L. Henderson received the rank of professor emeritus from Chancellor John M. Howell last
Wednesday. Henderson, 98, is the oldest living former faculty member.
paved roads on campus and only a
few sidewalks.
There was no library when
Henderson first came to ECU, but
later the first library opened in the
basement of the Austin building.
The first year he taught the cost of
tuition, room, board, infirmary
fee, laundary and books was only
$60 a Quarter.
When I met Dr. Henderson, he
told me he was "blind, deaf and
about half dumb He has an
amazing memory and still keeps
up with current events. A former
avid reader, visual impairments
have prevented him from reading
for the past 15 years, so his sole
source of information is the radio.
He is very knowledgeable of
government and told me that
"there has been very few change
in the last 30 years but he
predicts great changes as the
"government moves toward
socialism He foresees the
"government taking over
everything His biggest concern
is the lack of public interest and
knowledge of government.
Henderson lives on Fifth Street
with his wife of 63 vears.
Hopeful
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Assistant NWN dilr
Recent speculation that civil
rights leader the Rev. Jesse
Jackson might seek the 1984
Democratic presidential nomina-
tion is being greeted by mixed
reactions from black and white
leaders at the national level. Some
leaders suggest the time is right
for a black candidate to break the
color barrier, while others are re-
maining cautious, fearing that
Jackson or any black candidate
might split the Democratic party
and pave the way to victory for a
more conservative white can-
didate.
For many, the 1972 candidacy
of congresswomen Shirley
Chisholm is still remembered.
Chisholm split the black vote with
Terry Sanford in the North
Carolina Democratic primary.
Sanford, a liberal, lost, and
George Wallace won in the five
candidate field.
Among black ECU faculty and
staff members there is similar
mixed feeling regarding the
possibility of a black presidential
candidate in 1984.
Jasper C. Register, assistant
sociology professor, said that
coalition building among
minorities was an essential first
step before the mood would be
right for a viable black candidate.
"It's a little too early to be en-
dorsing a particular black to run
for president Register said.
"Realistically, I don't think a
black would have a chance of get-
ting the nomination
"I don't think the general
population is ready to accept a
black candidate. I would hope
that they would be, but being
realistic, I don't think they are
said accounting instructor Delano
H. Berry.
Berry said the emergence of a
black presidential candidate could
cause problems for the national
political parties � particularly the
Democrats. Berry hopes the
presence of a potential candidate,
such as Jackson, will convince the
Democrats of the need to address
issues of concern to black
Americans. "They (Democrats)
have to become more in tune to
the concerns of the black
populace Berry said. "If they
don't, the emergence of a black
candidate will take away a strong
voting block that traditionally has
gone Democratic
Berry feels there is also a
possibility of a black presidential
candidate running on an indepen-
dent ticket, an action he claims
could cause the Democrats to lose
the election in 1984. Register sees
such a move as being dangerous
for blacks. He said he would not
support a black candidate running
on a third-party platform.
Donald E. Ensley, an associate
professor of community health,
said strong voter registration
drives are necessary before a black
candidate can be elected to office.
"Jesse Jackson's efforts are
good in creating motivation to get
more blacks registered to vote
Ensley said. "But, I think the tim-
ing for Jesse Jackson or any other
black isn't quite right. There's
just too many things that aren't in
place yet
"There is a feeling from blacks
that there is a need for change
said librarian Mary P. Williams.
"I think the timing is right not on-
ly for a black candidate, but
another women candidate as
well
Williams praised Jackson's cur-
rent efforts to get more blacks to
register. "I'm feeling positive
about the effort he's making to
get more blacks on the books
Williams said, adding that she had
been hearing more talk among her
friends about the importance of
registering and votinR.
Williams feels the present ad-
ministration has not been recep-
tive to the needs of black people.
"Whether or not Jackson runs
isn't the issue Williams claims.
"Whatever he chooses to do, it
will still get the message across to
the nation that blacks want
representation
Ensley sees Jackson's efforts as
a means of creating a "positive
consciousness" that will get black
voters to become more aware of
the need to support candidates
sensitive to the needs of black
people. "I think there are
segments of the white population
that are somewhat ready (to sup-
port a black candidate), but I
think overall white America is not
ready Ensley said.
Ensley pointed out that
Jackson's effectiveness with Con-
gress could be hurt by the poor
representation of blacks in the
House and Senate.
Register sees the presence of a
black candidate as being helpful
in encouraging more blacks to
register. He also feels it will in-
crease the influence of blacks at
national conventions.
Berry said that depending on
who the choices are, he would not
rule out the possibility of voting
Group Against Food Tax Lobbies
General Assembly On New Tax Bill
�AY FATTMSOM - 1CU
Watermelon Feast
This student enjoys a nice, cool piece of watermelon Monday at the
Watermelon Feast sponsored by Mendeuhal! Student Center's Stu-
dent Union.
A student who spends $25 per
week on food is at present paying
an additional $48 per year in sales
tax on these purchases. Because
North Carolina is among the few
states which tax food purchases,
consumers must pay a 4 percent
tax on food purchases. A bill now
before the state Senate would
raise the tax to 414 percent.
The bill, which passed the N.C.
House on Friday, allows counties
to raise the local sales tax by Vi
cent. Food is also considered a
taxable item under the new bill.
The measure has been met with
strong criticism from food-tax
abolitionists across the state.
"The tax on food is a heavier
burden on those of lower and
moderate incomes said H.
Edger Pray, a member of the
Board of Directors of the N.C.
Consumers Council. The council
is an arm of the National Federa-
tion of Consumers, a non-profit,
consumer action group. Pray said
the consumers council made the
abolition of the food tax it's
number one priority for 1983.
Groups such as the Consumers
Council and the North Carolina
Council of Churches point out
that the food tax as well as all
sales taxes are regressive, which
means they levy the same burden
on all citizens regardless of their
income.
Pray explained that a family
spending $75 per week on grocery
bills will end up paying $156 per
year in tood taxes. The new bill, if
approved, would raise the total to
$176 a year.
"It penalizes people who are
least able to pay taxes said ECU
community health professor
William C. Byrd III. "It's one of
those kinds of taxes that is grossly
unfair
Byrd, who is also president of
the Greenville-Pitt County
Chapter of the North Carolina
Civil Liberties Union, said the
food tax is especially burdensome
for students and people in lower-
income brackets.
"Many students are already
badly strapped. It's very difficult
for many of them to make it
Byrd said. "Increasing numbers
of students seem to be working in-
creasing numbers of hours. It's as
if they're becoming part-time
students and full-time workers. A
tax like the food tax is for them
very unfortunate and unfair, like
See, FOOD, Page 5
for Jackson in the primary.
Williams said that because
Jackson is well known, he will be
able to have alot of influence on
blacks and the political system.
"Whatever his intentions are, 1
think the results will be positive
Williams said.
Black Leader
Speaks About
1984 Election
By PATRICK O'NEILL
"I'd like to see a black person
seeking office said D.D. Gar-
rett, president of the Pitt County
chapter of the NAACP, in
reference to a question on the
1984 presidential election. "1
reckon (the Rev. Jesse) Jackson
would be as good a candidate as
we could locate
Garrett said he has no qualms
with a Jackson candidacy, but he
knows the road to the presidency
for Jackson would be an "up-hill
battle. Not because he's not
qualified; 1 don't think the mood
of the country would be receptive
to a black president
Garrett said a black candidate
must first be accepted by the
whole country before he has a
chance of winning. Two or three
black candidates might need to
run in upcoming elections to
achieve acceptance, Garrett add-
ed.
Garrett sees no immediate
dangers if Jackson decides to run
in 1984. "I don't think he'll do
any harm Garrett said.
Ricky Seabolt Finally Comes Home
Ricky Seabolt was released
from Charlotte Rehabilitation
Hospital June 10 after spending
more than three months in three
different hospitals recovering
from injuries he received in the
March 2 Village Green apartment
explosion.
Seabolt was critically injured in
the explosion that took the life of
one ECU student and injured 12
others. ECU student David Mar-
tin, a friend of Seabolt's, was loll-
ed in the explosion. Seabolt suf-
fered severe head and liver in-
juries.
"I'm getting more and more en-
durance all the time Seabolt
said in a Tuesday interview from
his parents home in Durham.
Seabolt is at present participating
in six hours a week of out-patient
therapy at Memorial Hospital in
Chapel Hill. His treatment in-
cludes work with occupational,
physical and speech therapists. He
is also taking part in a rigorous
daily exercise program.
"My recovery's going too
slow Seabolt said in a reference
to the partial paralysis he is still
experiencing in his left side.
But over the long run, Seabolt
admits that he has seen a steady
improvement in his motor skills.
"I can almost swing a golf dub
now, and 1 couldn't two or three
weeks ago when I first got out of
the hospital Seabolt said.
Seabolt would have graduated
this summer. Counting the 11
hours of incompletes he has from
the spring, Seabolt only needs 14
hours to earn his degree in
marketing. "I hope to come back
to school next spring Seabolt
said. "I'm ready to get finished
up
Both Seabolt and his mother
Doris Seabolt thanked the friends
and family members for their love
and support. "His friends haven't
forgotten him Mrs. Seabolt
said. "They have stood by him
faithfully. A major part of his
rehabilitation has been his friends
treating him like they always
have
"All my friends are keeping up
with me Seabolt said. "I thank
them all for their support
Seabolt says he is planning to
make a trip to Greenville soon to
visit with the many people who
have helped him through this ex-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 29. ISO
-�fc-

Announcements
STUDENTS MAKE
A DIFFERENCE
if you are a motivated in
dividual who wishes to help seek
solutions to consumer and en-
vironmental problem through
research and advocacy, then
North Caroline Public Interest
Research Group (NC PIRG) Is
for you It Is a student group
researching issues such as Con-
sumer Protection
Environmental Quality
Students' Rights Government
Accountability Renewable
Energy Civil Rights NC PIRG
has. in ltd past, fought for North
Carolina student's rights,
documented the danger of
nuclear cargo transportation
through the state, and most
recently, making the student
drafted Generic Drug Generic
Substitution Bill a law An ECU
PIRG is now being formed.
PIRG needs your support. Get
together with ot��r students
concerned with these issues Por
more details call Eliia Godwin
at 7� 174i.
SOULS
ELECTION
Anyone interested in running
souls office next semester con
tact Barbara at 751 9550
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Monday Nights Bible Study
I 30 pm 10i Jarvis Dorm
Prayer Group tor spiritual sup
port and fellowship 10:15 pm
every night 111 Fletcher. For
more information contact: Todd
10S Jarvis, Shelia 157 Jarvis and
Scott ill Fletcher
BLOOD DRIVE
Alpha Epsilon Delta (the pre
medical honor society) an the
ECU Biology Club will be spon
soring a blood drive for the
Americasn Red cross on Tues
day, July 5. in the AAendenhall
Student center from 10 to 4 p. m.
Please come and donate blood!
BIBLE STUDY AT ECU
Inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship sponsors a bible
study on Monday nights Come
to lot Jarvis Hall at �:30 p.m. for
a time of spiritual fellowship
and fun Prayer is also offered
every night at 111 Fletcher Halt
at 10:15 p.m. Take a break from
studying.
WZMB PRESENTS
WZMB presents classical
music Saturday and Sunday,
twelve noon to six p. m. Watch in
the upcoming East Carolinians
for weekly programs and tune In
this weekend for 'A Touch Of
Class
WATERMELON
FEASTS
All ECU students, faculty, and
staff art invited to eat cool
delicious watermelons free! Th-
ie Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a
Watermelon Feast on the Mall
on Monday, June 27th at 13:30 p
m. Enjoy the delicious melons,
the jeautiful weather, and the
good company of your friends.
The dates tor the summer
Watermelon Feasts are as
follows: All art on Mondays
with the following dates June
27, July it, July 11. July 25, Also
all feasts art at 1230 p m on
the mall.
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
One million dollars per minute
i being spent worldwide on the
military. The Greenville Peace
Committee rejects the notions
that more weapons brings us
more security. We meet every
Friday night at 6:30 p.m. for a
pot-luck dinner arK meeting.
During the summer we have
several activities planned and
we need your help. Come join us
in our plans for June 20th
WORLD DISARMAMENT
DAY. The meetings art held at
610 S. Elm St For more Infor
mation call 751 406 or 752 5714.
Peace.
SENIORS
Want a central place for three
lettert of reference from your
professors If you are
graduating this summer, then
you complete a registration
packet available from the
Career Planning and Placement
Service. If you will finish in the
fall, spring, or summer of
academic year 193 84. you may
pick up a packet and prepare it
to return in August or
September.
MATH FOR PEOPLE
Professor Lokenath Debnath
will speak on 'Mathematics for
Human Needs' Thursday even
ing June 30th at 7.30 p. m. in the
Austin Auditorium which hap
pens to be Room 132 in Austin.
His talk will last for about forty
five minutes, after which he will
open for questions and discus
sion n 3 Debnath is Professor
of Mathematics and Physics,
and is the Managing editor of the
International Journal of
Mathematics and Mathematical
Science as well as overseas
editor of the Bulletin of the
Calcutta Mathematical Society
Students, Faculty and the public
are Invited
CATHOLICS
Note. Sunday Mass in the
Biology building has been
cancelled for the summer
Students art welcome to attend
Mass at St. Peters and St
Gabriel's Catholic Churches.
Call 7511504 for Mass schedules
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven
ture's Dive Coiumel, Mexico on
the beautiful Yucatan peninsula
Aug. 3, 1�3 to Aug 10, 1913
Group trip for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving, meals,
lodging and air fare from
Raleigh Non-divers welcome.
Call Ray Scharf at 757 6441
PROFESSIONAL
BROADWAY
MUSICALS
The East Carolina Summer
Theatre opens July 4th with
'PIPPIN' . PIPPIN runs nightly
until the 9th.Save 10.00 on ad
mission by signing up to usher
and you can see the spectacular
show for free! Simply go by the
Drama Dept. and sing up on the
usher sheet. No experience Is
needed. Hurry because only
twelve ushers art needed for
each performance. Don't miss
out!III
COUNSELORS
WANTED
Male counselors needed tow
ork in the Lutheran Camp in
Virginia. Two resident pro
grams as well as canoeing,
backpacking, biking and beach
camp. Contact Rev F Wayne
Williams, Ft. Valley Rt. Box 355,
St. David's Church, VA 22652.

� C . I B ' SI
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We Buy, Sell, Trade, and Repair?
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For your convenience we will be open
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p.m. Affordable fees, quick, accurate
service. Convenleat Hours. Seeing is
Bettering.
DR PETER W. HOLLIS
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U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
FRYER
June 19 marked the
30th anniversary of
one the most well-
known executions in
the nation's histor
On that da in I �
Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg were elec-
trocuted in New
York's Sing Sing
Prison after the being
convicted of selling
secrets on the at
bomb to the Soviet
Union.
Pegged the 'atomic
spies the couple wa
tned for heading a
band of spies who
stele and pa
secrets to the So
At the rime
drew worlds
public attention i
to this day, mar
pie are still deba
Fletc
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RED RIPE
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ayonnaise
ANN PAGE
I
32 oz
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 29, 1983
The Rosenberg Case Still Far From Settled
By PATRICK
O'NElll
N�wt Editor
June 19 marked the
30th anniversary of
one the most well-
known executions in
the nation's history.
On that day in 1953,
Julius and Ethel
Rosenberg were elec-
trocuted in New
York's Sing Sing
Prison after the being
convicted of selling
secrets on the atomic
bomb to the Soviet
Union.
Pegged the "atomic
spies the couple was
tried for heading a
band of spies who
stole and passed
secrets to the Soviets.
At the time, their case
drew world-wide
public attention and,
to this day, many peo-
ple are still debating
whether the couple ac-
tually committed the
crime. Some claim
their case was a large-
scale conspiracy
designed to incite
anti-communist senti-
ment.
The couple is
perhaps best
remembered for their
stead-fast refusal to
admit any guilt in the
case. Even when of-
fered the chance to
avoid death only days
before their execu-
tion, the Rosenbergs
refused the govern-
ment's request that
they admit their guilt.
"History will
record that we were
victims of the most
monstrous frame-up
of our country the
Rosenberg's wrote in
their refusal to accept
the offer of the
government. "We die
with honor and digni-
ty � knowing we
must be vindicated by
history
Today, there is a
organization called
the National Commit-
tee to Reopen the
Rosenberg Case.
There is also an effort
being coordinated by
the two surviving sons
of the Rosenbergs to
vindicate their
parents.
On June 17 in
Chapel Hill, a group
believing the
Rosenbergs were in-
nocent gathered for a
noon-time vigil at the
Franklin Street Post
Office. In the even-
ing, the same group
showed a 90-minute,
1975 documentary
film on the case. After
the film, co-defendant
in the case Morton
Sobell spoke on the
events surrounding
the case. Sobell serv-
ed I8V2 years of a
30-year sentence for
his role in the spy
ring.
"Ethel, Julius and
myself were inno-
cent Sobell said.
"The government
framed us, using per-
jured, intimidation-
induced testimony
Sobell said the im-
pact of the case
strongly contributed
to the lack of political
dissent that lasted
through the 50s.
"There is a long list
of abuses which lead
to the conclusion that
the Rosenbergs didn't
get a fair trial said
Rob Gelblum,
organizer of the
Chapel Hill events.
"There was never
much to connect them
to the theft of anv
kind of atomic
secrets, and much has
been pried loose
under the Freedom of
Information Act that
tends to throw their
conviction into even
greater doubt
Despite doubts in
the case, the final fate
of the Rosenbergs was
sealed when President
Dwight D.
Eisenhower refused to
commute their death
sentences. The film
also shows that some
of the jurors in the
case were still con-
vinced of the
Rosenbergs' guilt.
In 1979, the
Rosenbergs' sons,
Michael and Robert
Meeropol (their
adopted parents'
names), discovered a
memo written by
General Leslie Groves
to the Atomic Energy
Commission about
the Rosenberg data
being "of minor
value adding, "I
would never say that
publicly
The two men found
the memo in a file
about their parents
case which they re-
quested through the
Freedom of Informa-
tion Act.
Sobel, who spoke
to more than 100 peo-
ple in Chapel Hill's
Community Church,
called the case a large-
scale conspiracy. "It
was a political trial
whose idea was to sti-
fle dissent here at
home. It was a show
trial put on for that
expressed purpose
and it succeeded
Sobel said.
Sobel said
Watergate was a
heavy factor in con-
vincing Americans to
question more closely
the actions of govern-
ment officials. "No
defense was possi-
ble Sobel said,
referring to his case.
"We couldn't have
gotten a fair trial
Sobel also made ap-
pearences in several
classrooms at UNC-
Chapel Hill. "I think
there is enough
evidence that
reasonable people will
conclude that we've
been framed he
said. The effort to
reopen the Rosenberg
case is focused on
Judge Irving R. Kauf-
man, the original
judge in the trial.
Kaufman recently
retired. Members of
the committee to
reopen the case have
asked Kaufman to
state that he made an
error in the case. The
committee is also re-
questing that the
President appoint a
commission of in-
quiry to investigate
new evidence in the
case.
"Thirty years have
passed since the case
began, and the
American people have
waited long enough
for the full truth
claims the committee
in one of their
statements.
Fletcher Gets New Roof
ByDKNNIS
KILCOYNE
Staff Writer
A roof is the least
interesting architec-
tural feature of a
building. In fact, they
are to buildings what
toe joints are to
bodies � items people
usually ignore. Too
bad the subject isn't
basements, or a
discussion on spooky
places would be in
order.
But roofs are
necessary, so at ECU
the Physical Plant
Department is com-
pletely refurbishing
two: Rawl building
and Fletcher hall,
which will be com-
pleted this week. In
addition, sections on
the School of Nursing
and home economics
building will be partly
redone. The six-step
process requires
almost four weeks of
work if the weather is
favorable.
"The General
Assembly ap-
propriated this money
a while ago, so it's not
an emergency job
said Jim Lowry,
physical plant direc-
tor. The $300,000
granted to the univer-
sity was
"considerably less
than what we had ask-
ed for So, Lowry
decided Fletcher and
Rawl were more in
need of repair than
the other buildings on
campus.
So onto the roofs
go tons of material
laid out by crews from
a contracted com-
pany.
"When the weather
is hot, the work goes
more slowly Lowry
observed. That's
understandable. Dur-
ing the past few days
the temperature on
top of the two
buildings has been
more than 100
degrees.
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�t?e �aat (HarDlintan
Serving the Ernst Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, am
Mike Hughes, ��,�,�
WAVERLY MERRITT, nncor of Adnm�, ClNDY PLEASANTS. sports Eto,
Hunter Fisher, �,� i, Geg Rideout, mm &,�
ALI AFRASHTEH. CftdU Master CARLYN EBERT. �I I Eduor
Stephanie Groon . on.� M�tr Lizanne Jennings, m,�
Clay Thornton, iwm s. David Gordon. v�� m�-
June 29, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Dr. E. L. Henderson
Former Professor Finally Recognized
Sometimes, it seems, deserved
recognition is a long time in com-
ing. Just ask Dr. E. L. Henderson,
a retired ECU history professor
and administrator. His took about
39 years.
Last Wednesday, June 22,
Chancellor John Howell bestowed
upon Henderson the honorary
rank of Professor Emeritus in
Education. In a simple ceremony,
Howell praised the retired pro-
fessor for his "significant and en-
during" contributions to ECU.
At age 98, Henderson is ECU's
oldest living faculty member. He
came to ECU, then East Carolina
Teachers College, in 1923. Three
years later, he became director of
student teaching, and three years
after that, in 1929, chairman of the
Department of Administration and
Supervision.
Strangely enough, especially for
a man who was instrumental in the
founding of the university,
Henderson was dismissed for
"disloyalty" in 1944, during the
stormy reign of President Leon R.
Meadows.
Henderson's dismissal came 13
days before he would be eligible
for retirement. His benefits,
however, were restored following
Meadow's conviction and sentence
to three years in prison.
With all this in mind, it's easy to
understand why Henderson pro-
bably doesn't consider June 22,
1983, the greatest day of his life.
Sure, having the rank of professor
emeritus conferred upon oneself is
a tremendous honor, but consider
a ucmciiuvua uuuui , uui wumm-
m!threeu?lme�fi035ssgo Governor Opposes New Cigarette Warning
Hunt's Lethal Choice
Henderson has a legitimate gripe
He was never reinstated after the
"disloyalty" incident and says
university officials at the time
showed little or no interest in him
thereafter.
And despite living just a block
from ECU, Henderson has been
on campus but twice since 1944.
It's a shame that a man who
contributed so much to East
Carolina � Henderson's posts in
the late 20s preceded the establish-
ment of the present School of
Education � would feel so
alienated from his university and
would have to wait 39 years for the
recognition he deserves. But,
logically, who's to blame? Without
a doubt, the university officials
from his day have long since
retired.
Although we do regret the delay
in the honoring of this fine man,
we, nonetheless, commend Dr.
Henderson on his career, his
dedication to and his ac-
complishments at ECTC and wish
him the best of fortune in the years
to come.
By PAT O'NEILL
In November 1980, East Carolinian
cartoonist John Weyler hit the nail on
the head with his sketch of a Pitt County
tobacco farmer poised in front of his
lethal field, hacking and coughing on a
lit cigarette The caption showed the
farmer decrying the evils of liquor-by-
the-drink.
Once again, the inconsistency ex-
hibited by North Carolina political
leaders has emerged regarding these two
issues. On Thursday, Gov. James B.
Hunt � the same governor who
authored legislation that raised the
state's minimum drinking age to 19 �
called the proposed new stricter warn-
ings on cigarette packages "overly
harsh" and "unfair to tobacco
farmers
The current wording on cigarette
packages reads as follows: "Warning:
The surgeon general has determined that
cigarette smoking is dangerous to your
health
The proposed new message, selected
by a 15-1 vote of members of the Senate
Labor and Human Resources Commit-
tee, states: "Warning: Cigarette smok-
ing causes cancer, emphysema, heart
disease; may complicate pregnancy; and
is addictive
To tell the truth, I'm not really con-
vinced that warnings on cigarette
packages make a damn bit of difference
to the addicted millions. I know smokers
who wouldn't give up the habit if
cigarette packages stated: "Warning:
Cigarettes have been shown to cause
long, agonizing, painful suffering and
death The problem is that once a per-
son's addicted to them, it's often too
late.
My bet is that most tobacco farmers
would prefer to see no warning at all.
Better yet, they'd probably be in favor
of warnings that go something like this:
"Warning: Beware of anyone who
'Damned If You Do &
Damned If You Don't'
As much of a surprise as this may
come to my noted and devoted adver-
saries (an organization whose number
seems to increase hourly), I have been
doing a lot of thinking lately. Yes,
believe it or not, girls, once a month,
when the moon is at just the right point
in its orbit, I am capable of semi-
intelligent thought
MIKE HUGHES
-& &
I was trying to decide on something to
write about, something, preferably, that
would appeal to everyone who reads it
(all 14 of you), something that, perhaps,
would evoke a grin (however small
andor shortlived) without offending or
enraging anyone.
Needless to say, any two-bit writer
(myself, of course, included) knows this
simply can't be done.
I mean, if I write about fat people,
they get offended and sweat on me. If I
criticize Reaganomics, I have a hundred
little militant college Republicans
breathing down my neck and screaming
"Blasphemy If I write about illiterate
football players, I have to carry a
baseball bat with me for a month and
buy new tires for my car. (I can't figure
this one out anyway. I suppose they have
someone else read it to them.)
If I write about the food at
Mendenhall (admittedly, a conflict in
terms), my apartment is bombarded
with fungus burgers and soybean hot-
dogs. If I write about something with
real societal impact, like say social in-
justice, racial inequality and repression,
I get obscene phone calls from angry
Greenville legislators and bomb-threats
from the ECU Nazi Society & Chess
Club (NSCC).
When I write on the bathroom walls,
they tell me to put it in my column. Put
it in my column, and they say save it for
the little boys' room.
If I write about pretty girls on the
beach, women with outie belly-buttons
and Brillo-pad hair want coverage too.
If I write about the morality of
premarital sex andor cohabitation, I
get nasty letters from some 6' 2" squad
leader of "Dykes on Bikes" demanding
equal time.
But what I don't understand are those
people who know they'll hate what I've
got to say beforehand but read it
anyway Naturally, then, they bitch at
me for writing it. On the whole, I'd say
it's a damned-if-I-do, damned-if-I-don't
situation.
Hell, I even wrote one column a while
back on something as universal as nose-
picking and got a few angry letters back.
I guess some people thought I'd revealed
their identities. I don't know; perhaps it
hit just a little too close to home.
IM (COUGH!HACK') A&AINST LJQUOR-8Y- THE-PRJNK IN (CHOKE'
GASP!) PITT COUNTS BECAUSE (COUGH!) ALCOHOL. IS
(HACK') BAP FOR. yOU (COUGH! ChOKM!)"
r-Campus Forum
criticizes the tobacco industry or,
"Attention: Smoking cigarettes is as
wholesome as mother's milk
The governor, who incidental
doesn't smoke, is supposed to be con-
cerned about the overall welfare o his
constituents. Apparently, this is why
Hunt and practically the entire General
Assembly supported raising the drinking
age in North Carolina to 19. The new
law is supposed to keep teenagers from
being able to buy beer and wine, thus
keeping those who would drink and
drive off the roads. Why, then, do Hum
and members of the General Assembly
feel differently about protecting their
constituents from the often lethal effects
of smoking?
Cigarette smoking has been proen to
cause more than 300,000 deaths each
year from cancer, heart disease and
respiratory ailments. Subsequent!
medical care from smoking costs
Americans in the neighborhood of $13
billion a year.
With these facts in mind, I would like
to call into question the statement by
Hunt that the new warning would be
"unfair to tobacco farmers vvha:
about the rest of the citizens in the stat?"
Don't we have rights too? Does Hunt
really want to see more North Caroli-
nians taking up the habit?
Hunt was elected on a platform tha:
spoke strongly of the need to upgrade
education in North Carolina. One aspect
of education is informing young people
of the importance of good health care
This information would have to include
the advice that one shouldn't smoke if
one desires good health. I think it's
about time Hunt and members of the
General Assembly stopped complaining
about the warnings issued by the Depart-
ment of Health and Human Services and
other agencies regarding the dangers of
smoking. These agencies are doing their
jobs. It's time Hunt and the legislators
did theirs.
Column Stoops To 'All-Time Low9
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a win-
dow gardener from Selma, recently took
third place in the North Carolina Mr.
Banal Pageant.
Dear Mr. Hughes:
In re to your reply to Kim Albin,
BELIEVE IT � many people do not
share your enthusiasm for your in-
famous column. It is beyond me how the
managing editor of ECU's only student
newspaper managed to slip such a banal
article (re fixations) into the paper,
much less on the editorial page. Humor
is one thing, but sheer "disgusting fixa-
tions" (as Kim so accurately described
them) belong in a private journal or,
perhaps, on a bathroom wall
somewhere.
The East Carolinian is distributed not
only throughout the ECU campus, but
also in the Brody Building where many
physicians and other professionals fre-
quently pick up their copies of the
paper. Don't you have more pride in
your paper (which not only represents
you but the student body as a whole and
the English department in particular)
than to stoop to this apparent all-time
low for material? If you are short of
material or writers during the summer,
then why don't you save yourself some
time, and the students some money, and
just shut down for the summer?
Hopefully, this fall, we'll see quality
journalism returning to The East Caroli-
nian.
Melanie Bentlcy-Maughan
Alumnus, English
Teach-In Coverage
Many thanks for the considerable
space given given the June 18 teach-ins.
Your readers may be interested in a few
more aspects of that occasion:
For tiie first time in Greenville, a
white "peace" and a black "survival"
group formally collaborated on a major
project. For the first time in Greenville,
a multi-theme conference was attemp-
ted. For the first time in Greenville, a
teach-in was tried (in fact, two teach-ins
at once).
Attendance at the Willis Building met
our minimal expectations for a Saturday
in beach season. Recognition is due to
Diane Maisel, Mary Rider, Mike Hamer
and Patrick O'Neill for the design and
distribution of handbills and for writing
news stories about the Solstice events.
Thanks to Roy Schaal and Charles Co-
ble for moderating the two meetings.
Also not publicly acknowledged before
were those who advised, arranged or
contributed to the various tables:
Wendell Allen, Carl Adler, Philip Adler,
Kenneth Dews, Rhea Markello, Calvin
Kervin (of Sen. East's office), Charles
Cain and myself. Finally, Walter Dorsey
of the N.C. Employment Security Com-
mission thoroughly prepared an up-to-
date overview of job prospects in 1983,
nationally and in Pitt County.
The idea of a teach-in to mark the
summer Solstice derives from the Liver-
more Action Group of the Mobilization
for Survival. The idea of sampling from
every major social problem, daring us to
embrace the tremendous challenges of
(e.g.) nuclear blow-up and of "They
blow me up every day" (poverty) derives
from a reported remark of John Howell.
Each speaker proved excellent,
sometimes in unexpected ways. One
speaker, detained on returning from
Florida, wasn't heard on the 18th and
will speak this Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in
132 Austin. Again, an ambitious subject
will be sampled in a new way.
Carroll Webber
Assoc. Prof. Math
Retired
Abortion Ruling
According to the latest Supreme
Court ruling concerning abortion, it is
now legal in the United States for a
woman to have an abortion at any time
during her pregnancy before the fetus,
infant or child is born. In other words, a
woman may have an abortion fie
minutes before the child is born, and it's
legal; however, if a child is born and
strangled, it's called murder and is il-
legal. So, now it comes down to this.
five minutes before birth is legal; five
minutes after birth is illegal.
In third-trimester abortions, an inci-
sion is made into the uterus, and the um-
bilical cord is wrapped around the
child"s neck and tightened until the
fetus no longer moves. I believe this is
also known as strangling.
A woman should know prior to the
fourth month if she is pregnant. She
should also know if she wishes to keep
the child by that time. A child is
developed completely by the ninth
month. If ever, the decision for an abor-
tion should be made during the first
three months.
I am not anti-abortion; I am anti-
murder. Abortion and murder may or
may not be the same thing, but abortion
after the seventh month is definitely kill-
ing a fully developed individual.
I sympathize with the victims of rape,
incest and financial insecurity, who find
themselves in the position of having an
unwanted child. But I also feel that deo-
sion can be made during the first
trimester.
It would be ideal for female victims of
rape or incest to have an abortion after
completing a police report. The finan-
cially insecure woman should place the
child up for adoption.
I would like to have a petition cir-
culated throughout the campus inform-
ing our legislators and the Supreme
Court that those who sign it oppose the
recent ruling. This petition could be
sponsored by the SGA and could be cir-
culated this fall.
Kimberly Cox
Freshman, Biology
Food
Coat. From Page 1
it is for other poor people "
Both Pray and Byrd say lobbv
ing is the critical factor in convin
cing the General Assembly U
abolish the tax.
In a recent issue of Raleigl
Report, a lobbying newsletter oj
the N.C. Council of Churches.
suggestion was made that citizer
endorse and lobby for Senate Bil
51 introduced by Sen. Kenneti
Roy all, D-Durham, which uouk
eventually eliminate the food
Royall's bill would lmtiallj
nse the overall sales tax by oi
Taxiag Melons?
HuntN
New TV
ECU Sens Bru
In action taken last week
Hunt Jr. named Beaufort Cou
Singleton to the ECU Board
also reappointed James
Greensboro to another four-y
Singleton is a graduate ol
UNC-Chapel Hill La Schoo
ed law in Greenville since 1
will be the second one for Su
first appointed to the ECU
1977. He served until 1981.
Dixon, who has been on
1979, is president and own
Inc and JMD Contractor
development and general oof
Greensboro.
Dixon has a special interest
gram for hearing-impaired stt
one of the best in the south. "
man of the committee whicj
Central Carolina School for
been director of the N.C Sd
14 years.
Dixon has established
endowed $50,000 scholarshi
deaf students. He is a gradual
Hill.
ECU Catholic campus
Girard Sherba has announce
on campus will be discontn
mer. The Sunday service is usj
p.m. in the first floor Biology
ba said the cancellations werel
of the low turnout of student
mer months. In the meantij
wishing to attend Catholic sej
St. Gabriel's or St. Peters '
St. Gabriel's, located at !
holds services at 6 p.m Sat
and 11 a.m. on Sunday. St
2700 E. Fourth St holds sej
Saturday and 8 a.m. and 10
ECU mathematics profes
nath will be presenting a lecrj
30 titled "Mathematics an
Dcbnath is the managing edj
tional Journal of Ml
Mathematical Science as wel
of the Bulletin of the Calc
Society.
Debnath was originally s
his lecture during the recent
a New World Symphony"
withdrew on account of ilh
The lecture will be held in I
(Room 132 Austin Building
"Hot Fun in the Sumnu
hibit in the East Carolina
tion at Joyner Library, pn
how Americans spent sumi
the 19th century.
The exhibit, which is
features old letters. phot
engraved sheet music am
material pertaining to evr
the waters to celebrating
on display.
Francis M. Eddings, chiej
has been elected president
of the FBI National Acac
elite organization of law
ment and supervisory persj
Eddings was elected an
annual retraining session
June 8-10 in Charlotte. H
Dec. 31, 1984.
� �' wi
(HI
?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 29. 1913 5
3S
vVarning
Choice?
tcco industry or,
Sn king cigarettes is as
's milk
who incidentally
ipposed to be con-
: the overall welfare of his
ueni Apparently, this is why
the entire General
� � a Mng the drinking
N na to W. The new
keep teenagers from
i a beer and wine, thus
would drink and
Is Why, then, do Hunt
Genera Assembly
tou! protecting their
ften lethal effects
ng has been proven to
JO CO deaths each
earl disease and
Subsequential
smoking costs
i ghborhood of $13
ind, 1 would like
n the statement by
warning would be
farmers What
xns in the state?
too7 Does Hunt
re North Caroli-
tkinf he habit?
� a platform that
the need to upgrade
arolina. One aspect
' timing young people
good health care.
vould have to include
. shouldn't smoke if
I d health. I think it's
Hunt and members of the
topped complaining
tigs issued by the Depart-
and Human Services and
ng the dangers of
?se agencies are doing their
time and the legislators
.
-Time Low9
a
l. In other words, a
an abortion five
child is born, and it's
ie?a. hild is born and
ran� murder and is fl-
ies down to this:
min birth iS legal; five
is illegal.
rimester abortions, an inci-
c uterus, and the urn-
wrapped around the
� and tightened until the
tus no longer moves. 1 believe this is
known as strangling.
woman should know prior to the
i month if she is pregnant. She
auid also know if she wishes to keep
child by that time A child is
developed completely by the ninth
� If ever, the decision for an abor-
on should be made during the first
three months.
I am not anti-abortion; I am anti-
Abortion and murder may or
nay not be the same thing, but abortion
the seventh month is definitely kill-
ing a fully developed individual.
I sympathize with the victims of rape,
ncest and financial insecurity, who find
themselves in the position of having an
unwanted child. But I also feel that deci-
sion can be made during the first
trimester.
It would be ideal for female victims of
rape or incest to have an abortion after
completing a police report. The finan-
VL , msecure oman should place the
child up for adoption.
J would like to have a petition cir-
culated throughout the campus inform-
ing our legislators and the Supreme
-ourt that those whe sign it oppose the
recent ruling. This petition could be
sponsored by the SGA and could be cir-
culated this fall.
Kimbcrly Cox
Freshman, Biology
i
Food Tax Hits Poor
Co�t. From P�Rf i
it is for other poor people
Both Pray and Byrd say lobby-
ing is the critical factor in convin-
cing the General Assembly to
abolish the tax.
In a recent issue of Raleigh
Report, a lobbying newsletter of
the N.C. Council of Churches, a
suggestion was made that citizens
endorse and lobby for Senate Bill
51 introduced by Sen. Kenneth
Royall, D-Durham, which would
eventually eliminate the food tax.
RoyalPs bill would initially
rfise the overall sales tax by one
Taxing Melons?
percent while phasing out the tax
on food over a three-year period.
The bill would also raise the limit
for sales tax on motor vehicles
from $120 to $300 and would tax
them at three percent instead of
the current two percent.
Royall claims the food tax
could be eliminated without loss
of revenue to the state. "The sales
tax as a whole is regressive, but it
is unlikely that it will not be raised
one penny this session wrote
Sister Evelyn Mat tern, editor of
the Raleigh Report. "Sen.
Royall's bill establishes the princi-
ple that food is a necessity that
should not be taxed and does in
fact result in fewer taxes for
lower-income families
Mattern claims that Fiscal
research on Royall's bill shows
that families with an income of
under $15,000 would have a
decline of 10 to 15 percent in sales
taxes if the tax on food were
eliminated. Families between
$15,000 and $25,000 would ex-
perience no appreciable change
and upper-income families would
bear a 10 percent increase in the
tax burden.
Pray points' out that people on
low or fixed incomes spend almost
one-half of their income on food
and food taxes while people in
higher income brackets spend
much less of their income on
food.
McNeil Smith .former N.C.
state representative, said North
Carolina is the only state to enact
a food tax in recent years.
"Two-thirds of the people in
America do not pay a food tax'
Smith said, adding that states with
a food tax are largely concen-
trated in the south. North
Carolina initiated its food tax in
1961.
N.C. Council of Churches
claims that because of hard
economic times and greater
unemployment the tax on food
should be repealed. Their
statistics show that a family of
four that earns less than $8,000
per year will spend 46.8 percent of
their income on food, while
another family with an income of
$34,000 per year will only use 16.5
percent of their funds for food
purchases.
The Council of Churches' Ex-
ecutive Director S. Collins
Kilburn called the food tax "the
most blatent and clearly unjust
tax" in North Carolina.
A Black President in '84?
The Rev. Jesse Jackson is
considered by experts to be the
first viable black presidential
candidate. We asked students
their feelings on Jackson runn-
ing, and their thoughts on a
potential black president.
Teresa Moore, Junior,
Political Science � 1 think that
it's fine. He would be setting a
precedent. It's a good possibili-
ty that he could be elected. He
would have to run in-
dependentlv, though
Rick Brown, Senior, History
� "I really question Jackson's
qualifications, He would do a
greater service if he helped
deliver the black vote as a solid
block to a viable candidate
Michael Purvis, Junior,
Computer Science � "I don't
think he'll have a chance of
winning, but he'll have a big
chance of influencing who gets
the Democratic nomination
Pom Washington, Junior,
Nursing � "I would vote for
him. I would love to see so-
meone black be president. But,
there are other more qualified
candidates
Moore
Washington
I Hunt Names
I
I New Trustee
ARMVSUHPLU
Vu � AH 1 .A'
From Suff Reporu
ECU News Briefs
In action taken last week Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. named Beaufort County native Louis
Singleton to the ECU Board of Trustees. Hunt
also reappointed James M. Dixon of
Greensboro to another four-year term.
Singleton is a graduate of ECU and the
UNC-Chapel Hill Law School. He has practic-
ed law in Greenville since 1961. The new term
will be the second one for Singleton who was
first appointed to the ECU board by Hunt in
1977. He served until 1981.
Dixon, who has been on the board since
1979, is president and owner of J.M. Dixon
Inc and JMD Contractors Inc real estate
development and general contracting firms in
Greensboro.
Dixon has a special interest in the ECU pro-
gram for hearing-impaired students, considered
one of the best in the south. He served as chair-
man of the committee which established the
Central Carolina School for the Deaf and has
been director of the N.C. Schools for Deaf for
14 years.
Dixon has established a permanently-
endowed $50,000 scholarship trust fund for
deaf students. He is a graduate of UNC-Chapel
Hill.
ECU Catholic campus Chaplain Father
Girard Sherba has announced that all masses
on campus will be discontinued for the sum-
mer. The Sunday service is usually held at 12:30
p.m. in the first floor Biology lecture hall. Sher-
ba said the cancellations were necessary because
of the low turnout of students during the sum-
mer months. In the meantime ECU students
wishing to attend Catholic services may do so at
St. Gabriel's or St. Peter's Catholic churches.
St. Gabriel's, located at 1120 W. Fifth St
holds services at 6 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m.
and 11 a.m. on Sunday. St. Peter's, located at
2700 E. Fourth St holds services at 5:30 p.m.
Saturday and 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on Sunday.
ECU mathematics professor Lokenath Deb-
nath will be presenting a lecture Thursday June
30 titled "Mathematics and Human Needs
Debnath is the managing editor of the Interna-
tional Journal of Mathematics and
Mathematical Science as well as overseas editor
of the Bulletin of the Calcutta Mathematical
Society.
Debnath was originally scheduled to deliver
his lecture during the recent "Can we Compose
a New World Symphony" symposium. He
withdrew on account of illness.
The lecture will be held in Austin Auditorium
(Room 132 Austin Building) at 7:30 p.m.
"Hot Fun in the Summertime a new ex-
hibit in the East Carolina Manuscript Collec-
tion at Joyner Library, provides a glimpse of
how Americans spent summer holidays during
the 19th century.
The exhibit, which is open to the public,
features old letters, photographs, post cards,
engraved sheet music and other manuscript
material pertaining to everything from taking
the waters to celebrating the Fourth of July is
on display.
Francis M. Eddings, chief of police for ECU,
has been elected president of the N.C. chapter
of the FBI National Academy Associates, an
elite organization of law enforcement manage-
ment and supervisory personel.
Eddings was elected and took office at the
annual retraining session of the state chapter
June 8-10 in Charlotte. He will serve through
Dec. 31, 1984.
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?
f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 29. 19S3
Pat 6
Ml
w�� H
Sending Your Message With A Flair:
Stall Scribblers Revive Art Of Graffiti
By PATRICK O'NEILL
GARY FATTIRtON - ICU
A would-be graffiti artist turns to other literary pursuits for lack of
wall space.
From racism to sexual solicita-
tion and political rhetoric to
nonsense. That's the story of the
writings on the walls of the
restrooms at ECU. Unless you
manage to avoid using public
restrooms altogether, you're
already familiar with the various
tidbits of information filling the
walls of toilet stalls on campus.
During my early morning trek
from stall to stall, I discovered
that some ECU majors produce
more graffiti than others; that
women's restroom writings are
far less interesting than men's;
and for the best in wall writing,
you should try Joyner Library's
main floor West wing men's
room.
Trying to look discreet while
walking in or out of a women's
restroom was a major problem I
encountered on this adventure. I
only entered the most isolated
ones during the usual class hours.
My safety valve was a roll of toilet
paper which I carried while
visiting the women's rooms. I was
prepared for any encounter I
might have had with a confused
woman. "Oh, the men's room is
out of toilet paper so I came here
to borrow some was my
rehearsed response to a woman
ready to yell "pervert as loud as
she could.
My first stop was the Jenkins
Fine Art Center. I expected this
place to be a gold mine of creativi-
ty, but 1 was quite wrong. "I'm
not an art major, I just like to shit
in your yard instead of mine.
Thanks alot was the first thing I
read in the first floor men's room.
"I'm a drama major on a brief
emergency stop said another
visitor. And "After seeing these
walls' graffiti 1 have come to the
conclusion that art majors may be
able to draw and paint, but their
penmanship stinks
Another writer said, "If you
enjoy hard work, spending money
that you don't have (and) all
nighters get into C.A it's
great C.A I discovered, stands
for Commercial Art.
Mendenhall's men's room walls
sported "1 oe is indispensible for
heterosexuals" and "God is all
All over campus 1 kept seeing
references to the tcond floor
men's room in Austin Building.
"Big hole in wall was the
message. Sure enough, there is a
hole in the ail between two
stalls. The walk were full of times
and dates when interested parties
cold meet in the future. Up on the
third floor, the men's room stalls
sported no holes and "Reality is a
figment of your imagination
UNCChapcI Hill received
much criticism on ECU's toilet
walls. "UNC, where men are
men, women are scarce, and sheep
are nervous" wrote one wit on
Austin's third floor. And scrawl-
ed on the door: "The Greenville
Peace Committee is a Communist
front
Knowing that English majors
frequent Austin, my hopes were
high that I would find top-grade
graffiti � possibly, even, a little
poetry. But my hopes were soon
dimmed when I came across lcss-
than-interesting, rather drab
chicken scratch. "Why are these
walls so clean?" wondered so-
meone in the ladies' room.
don't know, let's do something
about it was the response.
When I visited faculty
restrooms, I was amazed � not
one mark on their walls. I can on-
ly wonder if they just don't have
anything interesting to say or if
the janitors are advised to
See GRAFFITI.
Jazzy Guitar Licks From
Larry Carlton Lend Sass
Soa? Fans Tune In For Sexy Thrills
By ROBIN AYERS
Miff Writer
Last week, Whit McCall found
out he is married to a former Las
Vegas showgirl � in addition to
his wife, Lisa. The wedding took
place when he was drunk five
years ago. Lisa is not going to like
this.
Wally McCandless needs a
kidney transplant because
gangster Danny DeNato had him
run off the road. Danny doesn't
want his daughter Veronica dating
Wally because Wally isn't good
enough for her.
Patti Abbot wants a baby. Her
husband Jack wants a vasectomy.
He married her only because he
wanted the presidency of his
father's cosmetics firm. When
Patti found this out, she shot him.
No, this isn't local gossip.
These incidents of life can be seen
every weekday on television soap
operas.
The term "soap opera" was
derived from the products adver-
tised by sponsors during the show
and from the melodramatic plots.
A popular soap, now in its 46th
year, is The Guiding Light. In
1982, The Guiding Light won an
Emmy as best daytime series.
The Guiding Light was first
heard on WGN radio in Chicago
in 1937. Created by Irna Phillips,
The Guiding Light ran for 12
minutes with the sponsors getting
two minutes to advertise their
soapy products.
The Guiding Light centered
around a Reverend Rutledge and
the make-believe town of Five
Points. GL now airs an hour from
the town of Springfield,
somewhere in the Midwest.
Several other soap operas are set
in the Midwest as well, and the
East Coast has its share of soap
settings.
Miss Phillips initiated the use of
organ bridges for transition and
suspense-oriented plots to grab
listener attention.
On June 30, 1952, The Guiding
Light debuted on CBS, where it
has resided ever since. GL was
CBS's third soap on the air. Its
first, Search For Tomorrow,
began Sept. 3, 1951 and is still
running on NBC.
Miss Phillips was the first writer
to" stir up fans' fascination with
professional people as characters.
Doctors, lawyers and ministers
were and are the heroes and
heroines of the soap opera. More
now than in the past, members of
the middle class are also getting
into the act.
Daytime serials are a mixture of
fun, fantasy and mystery. Love is
a major theme.
All the action and excitement
takes place in fictional tov ns with
names like Oakdak Port Charles
and Llanview. No matter the
show or the network, all soap
towns have a feu things in com-
mon. All seem to have a small
town atmosphere uith all the con-
veniences of a metropolis. A body
of water, usually a lake, is not far
away. Blizzards are a ea:ly oc-
curence to add danger and
See SOAPS, page 7
By JAN E. BLOUNT
Staff Writer
More often than not, when so-
meone is good at something, he
usually makes it appear easy.
Larry Carlton's Sleepwalk LP is a
pretty fair illustration of someone
taking a difficult task (holding a
listener's interest for the duration
of an instrumental album) and
making it look as easy as convers-
ing with friends.
While listening to this album, I
was reminded of an old saying
from the world of fashion: "Less
is more Carlton's lead guitar
succeeds in dominating the music
without overwhelming it. Nuances
of mood are created which are
vivid without being harsh the
moods are suggested, but not in-
sisted upon (as in the title cut,
which is rife with classy nightclub-
like atmosphere).
rwwwvywwwwwwww
REVIEW
WWWWWWWWWWWWWVW
Most of the eight compositions
on Sleepwalk are mellow and easy
to listen to. This is not to say that
there is no diversity on the album.
A variety of fast and slow settings
is represented, from the hypnotic,
almost bluegrass of "Senator
Katie" to the funky, motivating
drive of "You Gotta Get It While
You Can
It is along these lines that I have
my only real complaint with
Sleepwalk. At times, there is a lit-
tle too much mixing of theme.
"Upper Kern" and "Last httte"
try to do too much � as if
Carlton had mor to say than he
found he had lime for. The pace
changes erratically from a
breakneck dancing rhythm to a
romantic, thoughtful melody, and
instead of conveying the feeling of
covering a lot of area quickly, the
effect is a monotonous spinning
of wheels.
In the overview, though,
Carlton and his supporting
players (Terry Trotter, keyboards;
Pops Popwell, bass; Steve Gadd.
drums; and Paul hi no Da Costa,
percussion) have put together a
very good jazz album. They enjoy
what they do, and it shows.
Carlton manhandles the electric
guitar like a child at play. 1
recommend Sleepwalk.
Those Dancin' Romans
'Pippin' Opens Monday
Pippin, the musical extravagan-
za that ran for four and a half
years on Broadway and garnered
four Tony Awards, is the first
musical comedy production of the
East Carolina Summer Theatre
season. It will be presented this
Monday through Saturday at 8:15
p.m. on the campus of East
Carolina University.
No American musical ever had
so immediate and extensive an in-
ternational success as Pippin.
Called "the show that runs like a
racehorse" by The New York
Times, Pippin is a story based
loosely on the life of
Charlemagne's eldest son who is
an idealist searching for himself
and the pleasures of court, the
pandemonium of battle and the
aggravation of being Holy Roman
Emperor.
Scott Evans will play the title
role of Pippin, whose story is con-
jured up by a colorful troupe of
traveling actors led by John Duhn
in the role of a fast-talking, high-
stepping master of ceremonies,
who promises "a stunning exam-
ple of magic and merriment
Joey Pollock will be seen as the
hard-living, hard-praying
Charlemagne, whose council of
war is done as a lively minstrel
shr His wife Frastrada (Babs
Scott Evaas leads the cast as Pippin, Charlemagne's
ofasoa.
Winn) sings and dances "Spread
A Little Sunshine another of
the musical's showpieces compos-
ed by Stephen Schwartz, whose
credits include the score for
Godspell.
Director Jay Fox will guide the
company through the cheerful
anachronisms of a plot derived
from history, but the show dances
and sings in a modern mode. The
choreographer will be Broadway
veteran Mavis Ray, creating
dances that range from soft shoe
to sultry acrobatics. The profes-
sional cast of 25 singers and
dancers have been in rehearsal for
several weeks on the ECU cam-
pus.
Summer Theatre Technical
Director Leonard Darby has
assembled and installed a com-
pletely new and enlarged stage
floor for McGinnis Theatre that
has motorized wagon units for
scenery which run in special tracks
recessed in the surface. Also hid-
den within the new stage floor are
unique lighting, mirror and smoke
effects which all promise not to
disappoint Summer Theatre au-
diences who have come to expect
lavish productions numbers from
the popular musical theatre,
which this year celebrates its 16th
year in operation.
Tickets are still available for
Pippin and may be purchased at
McGinnis Theatre, corner of Fifth
and Eastern Streets, Monday
through Friday from 10 a.m. until
4 p.m and on Saturdays from 10
a.m. until 1 p.m.
Also available are season tickets
to all four musical productions:
Pippin (July 4-9), A Little Night
Musk (July 11-16), No, No,
Nanette (July 18-23) and They're
Playing Our Song (July 25-30).
For further information and
ticket reservations call 757-6390.
The Jury9
Arm and Assante stars in 'I, The Jury tonight's
Twentieth Century-Fox release also features
Alan King, and airs at 8 p.m. Admission b by
Hendrix will be dark next Monday to
Fie of
band -i
Jul 2. at
benefit n
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Lemon
Sting Raj
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T
Page t
Flair:
f Graffiti
poetr) But mv hopes were toon
dimmed when i came across less-
than interesting, rather drab
chicken scratch "Why are these
alU so clean wondered so-
meone in the ladies' room. 'l
don't know, let's do something
about it was the response.
When 1 mted faculty
ooms, I was amazed � not
one mark on their walls. I can on-
wonder if they just don't have
am thing interesting to say or if
the janitors are advised to clean
See GRAFFITI, page 7
icks From
Lend Sass
there is no diersity on the album.
variet) of fast and slow settings
- represented, from the hypnotic.
almost bluegrass of "Senator
Katie" to the funky, motivating
wme of "You Gotta Get It While
ou Can
It is along these lines that 1 have
rm onl real complaint with
Sleepnalk At times, there is a lit-
tle too much mixing of theme.
"Upper Kern" and "Last Nile"
tr to do too much � as if
Carlton had more to say than h
found he had time for The pace
changes erratically from a
breakneck dancing rhythm to a
romantic, thoughtful melody, and
:ead of conveying the feeling of
enng a lot of area quickly, the
effect is a monotonous spinning
of wheels.
In the overview, though,
Carlton and his supporting
plaers (Terry Trotter, keyboards;
Pops Popweil, bass; Steve Gadd,
urns; and Paulhino Da Costa,
percussion) have put together a
ver good jazz album. They enjoy
what they do, and it shows.
Carlton manhandles the electric
guitar like a child at play. 1
recommend Sleepwalk.
Bfc
leadeaaal! s HearirU
Laadoa, Paul
ictirity card or MSC
Tacatre. Tfct
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 29. 1983
Soaps Bring Fans9 Seamier Fantasies To Life
Five of Greenville's hottest jazz and blues
bands will be featured this Saturday night,
July 2, at 6:00 when WVSP (90.9 FM) airs a
benefit concert played recently at The Attic.
Music from the Rutabaga Brothers and
lemon Sisters, Lightning Wells with the
Sting Rays, Big Boy Henry, Jazz Plus and
Proteus will highlight the three-hour broad-
cast. Above, Bob Tunnell of the Sting Rays
grins through his band's set.
Continued from P.6
photographic excite-
ment.
These shared
devices are used to
lend not only excite-
ment but familiarity
and hooks to hang
storylines on. The
physical
characteristics of a
soap opera city also
provide vicarious
thrills for viewers who
don't live in a city or
near a lake or where
snow is an every-
winter occurence.
What makes The
Guiding Light so
popular with soap
opera audiences and
especially the campus
soap fanatic crowd?
One fan says it's the
diverse lifestyles of
the characters.
Viewers can sample
the life of the filthy
rich or the deceitfully
criminal. The sets,
once rather plain, are
highly realistic � fan-
tastic, some might
argue. For with soap
opera's rising
popularity has come
bigger budgets; pro-
ducers are spending
the extra revenue on
location for greater
authenticity.
But it's people and
relationships that
ultimately draw
viewers to their sets
every day. Fans tune
in to see who's doing
what to, for, and with
whom. Soap operas
provide temporary
escape from real life.
Action is an in-
tegral part of a soap
opera. Every week it
seems someone falls
into or out of peril.
One ardent viewer of
four and a half years
recommends Friday
as the best day to
watch for plot-turning
and hair-raising ac-
tion.
Social issues are
realistically written in-
to soap opera scripts
with a certain amount
of frequency. Abor-
tion, unwed
motherhood and
alcoholism � and
other formerly taboo
subjects � are sen-
sitively portrayed.
'Fans tune in to
see who's doing
what to, for, and
with whom, �
Devoted viewers
laugh and cry with
their favorite
characters. Fans can
suffer along with a
character who has a
mysterious disease,
often witnessing
amazingly swift
recoveries � depen-
ding on whether or
not the actor's con-
tract was successfully
re-negotiated.
Absurdity, in fact,
is prevalent in the
world of soap opera.
Villainous schemes
and evil mind games
are played out to the
hilt. Everything's
done bigger than life,
even though soaps are
supposed to be life.
Weddings, for ex-
ample. No simple
horse-drawn carriage
(like Nina's on All My
Children) for GL's
Quint and Nola. They
arrived at their wed-
ding reception in a hot
air balloon.
And viewers, of
course, have their
favorite heroes,
heroines and especial-
ly villains. Favored
"bad guys" in a re-
cent informal poll
ranged from The
Guiding Light's
millionairess socialite
Vanessa Chamberlain
to the vicious Arid
Aldren and Karen
Stenbeck of As The
World Turns. Soap
opera villains are
usually rich, powerful
schemers who think
money is the answer
to everything, and
they appeal to fans'
seamier sides fans
who might fantasize
about being rich,
powerful, or even a
little manipulative.
Certain soap opera
storylines seem to
recur frequently as
one flips the dial.
Murders are always
popular, as are
characters who have
accidents and leave
the world to assume
that their character
has died. Later, when
the time is right, the
character returns
from the dead after
fooling his enemies
and finding out who,
if anyone, mourned
him.
Lately, a popular
storyline involves a
young politician's
career being threaten-
ed because the woman
he loves has a tainted
past. This plot has oc-
curred recently on As
The World Turns as
well as on The
Guiding Light.
Characters and
storylines are so
realistically and con-
vincingly presented
that soap opera actors
report being hit and
cursed at by people on
the the street who
forget that what they
see on television is on-
ly fiction or fan-
tasy. Fans rate The
Guiding Light high on
the believability scale.
But soap opera is
entertainment, pure
and simple. Escapism,
humor, sex, suspense
� tune in tomorrow!
Millions do; The
Guiding Light and
company are where
it's at this summer.
Graffiti Art Surfaces In ECU's Finest Stalls
AT BARRE,ltd
Continued from P.6
their restrooms more
often.
A first floor men's
room in the Brewster
Building boasted a
series of comments
about Rebels and
Yankees, and several
about the quality of
life in the North ver-
sus the South. But a
Northerner got in the
final word: "Has
anyone ever retired up
North?" wrote one
Rebel. "Nixon
replied a Yankee.
During my visit to
Fletcher, I hoped to
find some good lyrics,
but the stall walls
were short on musical
arrangements. Just
more of the same old
sour notes. In one
women's room I
found that
"Musicians make bet-
ter lovers "They
know how to play
shot back another
music student.
In some restrooms,
marble stall dividers
and darkly painted
doors didn't foil hid-
den scrawlers.
Creative and deter-
mined graffiti-ists
then turned to the til-
ed walls as their
tablets.
"I have herpes
lamented one scribe
on the biology side of
the Science Complex
Building. "Me too
claimed another.
But nowhere on
campus was the
restroom writing
more interesting than
in Joyner Library.
Joyner's first floor
men's room walls
must be filled with the
oldest graffiti on cam-
pus. There's a long
discussion of the 1980
presidential race, with
former president
Carter taking the
brunt of the com-
ments, numerous
criticisms of Iran, and
wisdoms ranging
from "Flush twice,
it's a long way to
racist writers;
negative comments
about most minorities
filled the walls.
Finally, I came
across a jolting
reference to yours tru-
ly: "Pat O'Neill is a
commie fag wrote
not, that ye may not
be judged respond
ed another.
And above it all, in
big block letters:
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Work
r Dancewear Specialty Shop
For all your dancing needs.
422 ARLINGTON BLVD.
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Chapel Hill" to "Bob one person who chose
Dylan is
messiah
the Jewish
to
anonymous
When one person
wrote "Communisum
for America a critic
responded "Commies
can't spell
Joyner seemed to
attract the majority of
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Directed by
Richard T. Heffron
Mendenhall's film tonight is 'I, The Jury
It airs at 8:00 in Hendrix Theatre.
Across from Villa Roma,
We do minor repairs, tune ups, brake
alignments, and air conditioner maintainance.
We have a road wrecker service and do
service calls. 24 hr. number is 758-1033.
Keep your car looking good
Free car wash with each fill up!
We rent Jartran trucks and trailers for your
moving needs.
i Come by today for your complete car needs.
Shrimp lovers
Why travel 100 miles
to the beach and pay
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Popcorn
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amily Restaurants
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a





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 29, 1983
Page 8
Connors Ousted By Curren's Aces
W 1MBLEDON, England (UPI)
South African Kevin Curren
�lasted No. 1 seed Jimmy Con-
5, the defending champion,
of the Wimbleuon Tennis
ion ships Monday,
ileashing an incredible 33 aces,
ording a 6-3, 6-7, 6-3, 7-6
th round upset victory.
Connors, uith reputedly the
return of service in tennis,
5 overwhelmed by Curren's
kel serve. The 25-year-old
University of Texas star,
is seeded 12th at Wimbledon,
more than 70 service winners
: the two-hour, 55-minute duel
the No. 2 court, a traditional
graveyard for so many tourna-
ment favorites in the past.
lthough Curren defeated Con-
- when thev last met in
Brussels, he had never beaten
Connors on grass.
"I knew if I served well, I was
in there Curren said. To beat
Connors at Wimbledon must be
the finest win of my career. Jim-
my Connors had probably the
best return of serve in the game.
Wimbledon
'83
but he was having a lot of trouble
today.
'T wasn't really under much
pressure in the first two sets.
Through the first set, I knew right
then that if 1 kept up that serving,
I had him under a lot of pressure.
He didn't know where the serve
was going. At one point, I heard
him say that even I didn't know
where the serve was going
Curren's explosive serve was
the key to his success against Con-
nors, who never got into his
rhythm and uncharacteristically
stayed back on his own service for
most of the time.
Connors, who won the title here
for the first time in 1974 and
regained his world No. 1 status
last year with triumphs at the U.S.
Open and Wimbledon, was so
disappointed after the defeat that
he left without making any com-
ment.
Curren, the 1979 NCAA singles
champion, kept the pressure on
Connors throughout. "He had a
lot of trouble anticipating my ser-
vice, which I control with my
wrist to keep my opponent guess-
ing up until the last moment
Curren said.
He refused to be psyched out by
Connors, who was warned for an
audible obscenity after Curren
blistered an ace past him.
"It's no good putting these
guys on a pedestal he said.
"You have got to have a positive
attitude
Curren's unexpected victory
earned him a quarterfinal berth
against 16th-seeded Tim Mayotte
of the U.S who outplayed
Australian John McCurdy, 6-0,
6-2, 6-4.
Second-seeded John McEnroe,
unaware of the drama involving
his major rival, also had a testing
workout, needing 3 hours and 15
minutes to eliminate 14th seed Bill
Scanlon of the U.S 7-5, 7-6, 7-6
on center court.
McEnroe, the 1981 champion who
has reached the last four finals
here, was told the news of Con-
nors' defeat as soon as he clinched
his second tiebreaking game. He
and Connors had been huge
favorites to meet in the finals.
McEnroe was worried about
certain aspects of his player after
beating Scanlon. "It was a tight
match he said. "I'm just glad I
got through it. I can't worry
about Connors. I'm just worried
about myself
McEnroe's service lacked its
usual penetration and he double-
faulted twice in the third-set tie-
breaking game.
"I was surprised, but Curren is
a dangerous grasscourt player;
there's no doubt about that. It
doesn't affect my game what-
soever, however. I've got a tough
road ahead anyway said
McEnroe, who next meets Sandy
Mayer, a 6-1, 7-6, 6-1 winner
against fellow American Mike
Leach.
The women's competition also
produced its share of surprises,
but Navratilova and Jaeger both
won in convincing fashion. Na-
vratilova, chasing her third
Wimbledon crowd, reached the
peak of her power in destroying
West Germany's Claudia Kohde in
only 39 minutes for a quarterfinal
berth against Jenny Mundell of
South Africa.
Bragg Shows Off Pirate Stuff M
A t National Sports Festival
i l basketball forward Sylvia
; ored 12 points and grabb-
rebounds Sunday night
ing the East squad's opening
nd in the National Sports
tival.
g, who is co-captain of the
-quad along with Virginia's
v Mayer, was limited to just
minutes of playing time
al rule). However, she still
ed to make two out of three
oals and sink eight of 10
'WS.
East squad lost to the
rth team, 91�90. Bragg's team
iv again tonight in the four-
Neries.
Bragg, a native of Richmond,
is the only player from a
rth Carolina school to make
festival squad.
It took the Houston Rockets
seconds to open Tuesday's
N'BA's draft with the selection of
nia's all-America center
Sampson. The 7-4 athlete
been college player of the year
e last three seasons.
Sampson said, "I'm not just
down to play basketball,
ts can give me all the com-
;nts in the world, but they
nothing to me if I don't play
my capabilities
pson ended his career
mg 17 points and nearly 12
mds to lead the Cavaliers to
v ictories.
Along with Sampson, Houston
picked up Louisville's Rod
jv , a third-selection first-
round draft choice. The second
selection in round one draft
choice was Missouri forward
Steve Stipanovich, who will be
playing for the Indiana Pacers.
The fourth pick in the first
round was Arizona State guard
Byron Scott, who was selected by
the San Diego Clippers.
N.C. State forward Thurl
Bailey was a seventh pick in the
first round by Utah, while his
teammates Dereck Whittenburg
(third round, 4th) will head to
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
Phoenix, and Sidney Lowe
(second round, 1st) will make his
new home in Chicago.
Defending Champion Martina
Navratilova and veteran Billie
Jean King both advanced to the
women's semifinals of the
Wimbledon tennis champion-
ships.
Navratilova used her awesome
power to overwhelm unseeded
South African Jennifer Mundel,
6-3, 6-1. Navratilova needed just
47 minutes to win the match.
King, once again making a big
showing at Wimbledon, reached
the semi-finals for the 11th time
with a 7-6, 6-4 victory over fellow
American Kathy Jordan.
Yvonne Vermaak, another
unseeded South African, earned
the unenviable task of facing
Navratilova with a 6-3, 2-6, 6-2
triumph over Britain's Virginia
Wade. King will face third-seed
Andrea Jaeger, who advanced
with a 6-4, 6-1 triumph overllth-
seed Barbara Potter.
Third-seed Ivan Lendl of
Czechoslovakia, seeking his first
major tennis title, became the first
player to reach the men's semi-
finals with a 7-5, 7-6, 6-3 victory
over American Roscoe Tanner.
New Zealand's Chris Lewis,
ranked only 91st in the world, also
advanced by outlasting American
Mel Purcell, 6-7, 6-0, 6-4, 7-6.
The NBC network will provide
live coverage of the Wimbledon
women's singles final Saturday at
9 a.m. and of the men's singles
final Sunday at 9 a.m. Highlights
of the matches will air tonight
through Friday at 11:30 p.m.
Former N.C. State basketball
star Ronnie Shavlik died Monday
of cancer. He was 49 years old.
Shavlik, who was an all-
America while playing for the
Wolfpack in the mid-1950's,
played professional basketball for
a couple of seasons with the New-
York Knicks before returning to
Raleigh in 1956. In the next few
years, Shavlik started a janitorial
service, and in 1957, Carolina
Maintenance Co. was incor-
porated.
Among many of the honors he
received, Shavlik was said to have
been most proud of the NCAA's
1980 Silver Anniversary Award,
which is given annually to five
fowmer athletes who have
distinguished themselves in
business careers and community
service.
Shavlik was also inducted into
the North Carolina Sports Hall of
Fame in 1979.
Tom Kite and John Cook have
withdrawn from this weekend's
Western Golf Championships
outside Chicago. Top money win-
ner Kite withdrew for personal
reasons, and Cook has an injured
wrist.
In the USFL Monday night, the
Tampa Bay Bandits played by the
motto of the U.S. Post Office.
Neither hail nor rain nor lightn-
ingin this casecould keep
them from their appointed round.
The Bandits kept their playoff
hopes alive with a 26�23 win over
the Denver Gold in a game
suspended 50 minutes in the
fourth quarter because of lightn-
ing.
But just two plays later, after
nature took a rest, Bandit quarter-
back Jimmy Jordan zipped a
44-yard touchdown pass to wide
receiver Eric Truvillion. The
touchdown capped the comeback
victory for the home team and im-
proved its record to 11 �6 for the
season.
Tampa is now tied with
Chicago and Michigan in the
league's central division. Denver's
mark fell to 7-10.
ECU's Sylvia Bragg (center) looks on as former teammate Dariene
Chaney grabs a rebound. Bragg is serving as co-captain on the Na-
tional Sports Festival's East squad.
After 21 Years On Mound, Gay lord
Perry May Have Thrown His Last Ball
N C. Stale's Thurl Bailey goes up against former Pirate Johnny Ed-
wards. Bailey was a first-round draft pick in the NBA Draft Tuesday.
After pitching for 21 years in
the major leagues, Gay lord Perry
may have taken the mound for the
last time. The Williamston native,
who is 10th on the all-time list
with 310 victories, was put up for
assignment by the Seattle
Mariners on Saturday.
This marks the fourth time in
the last four seasons that Perry
has been released by a major
league team. In 1980, the San
Diego Padres released him and he
was picked up by the New York
Yankees. After the Yankees
released him in 1981, Perry was
picked up by the Atlanta Braves.
Then, in 1982 the Yankees releas-
ed him and he was picked up by
the Mariners, where he pitched
career victory No. 300 on May 6th
of last year.
It is possible that Perry will be
picked up by another club, but it
is unlikely since the Mariners had
the worst record in baseball and
still didn't have room for him on
their squad. So, it's possible that
the man famous for his alleged
"spitter" has thrown his last
game.
Next Wednesday, July 6th, the
54th All-Star game will be played
at the same park as the first All-
Star game back in 1933 �
Chicago's Comiskey Park. When
the top vote-getters clash next
week, it will be exactly 50 years
since Babe Ruth hit a two-run
homer to give the American
League a 4-2 victory in the in-
augural contest.
The National League will try to
continue one of the most amazing
records in sports. They will be
shooting for their 12 consecutive
win and 19 of their last 20. In last
year's contest, Cincinnati short-
stop Dave Concepcion was voted
the MVP after his second-inning
two-run homer boosted the Na-
tional League to a 4-1 victory.
As the All-Star break nears,
two unfamiliar names sit atop the
American League's two divisions.
The Toronto Blue Jays, who
finished in the Eastern division
cellar last year, are leading the
Baltimore Orioles by one-half
game, as of Tuesday morning.
with his eighth consecutive pinch
hit. Staub holds the record along
with Dave Philley, who set the
mark in 1958.
This week's trivia question:
Who has the highest winning
percentage among active major
league managers'
Answer to last week's question:
Hank Aaron is the Atlanta
Braves' all-time leader in stolen
bases with 240. Aaron also leads
the Braves in nine other offensive
categories.
Cards Trying Hard
KEN BOLTON
Baseball Today
The Texas Rangers, who won only
64 games last year, are tied with
the California Angels for first
place in the West.
The major leagues' hottest
club, the Pittsburgh Pirates,
defeated the St. Louis Cardinals
6-1 Monday night for the Pirates'
ninth consecutive victory � the
longest winning streak in baseball
this season. The surge has pulled
the Pirates to within five and one-
half games of the Montreal Expos
in the National League East.
Rusty Staub, a 39-year old utili-
ty player for the New York Mets,
tied a major league record Sunday
ST. LOUIS (AP) - The St.
Louis Cardinals are trying, says
Manager Whitey Herzog. Very
trying.
Last year they were baseball's
champions. This year they have
suddenly fallen on hard times.
They took a six-game losing
streak into Monday night's game
against the resurgent Pittsburgh
Pirates.
"You don't get mad, because
they're trying said Herzog.
"You get awful disgusted wat-
ching it. If you don't get pit-
ching well, I don't know. What
can you do?"
They can try and stay within
grasp of the lead in the National
League East. "If we can just stay
close until the All-Star break, we
should be all right Herzog said
after watching St. Louis drop
three and one-half games behind
the first-place Montreal Expos.
The All-Star break comes a week
from now.
Pitching � or, more precisely,
the lack of it � has been the Car-
dinals' primary problem. The St.
Louis staffs collective earned-run
average is 3.88, ninth in the
league. Cardinals pitchers have
given up 53 home runs in 69
games compared to the 94 they
allowed in all of 1982.
"I can't believe some of the
balls flying out of here Herzog
said after the Pirates belted six
home runs out of spacious Busch
Stadium in a 24-hour span.
There are bright spots in the
Cardinals' lineup � George Hen-
drick, now at first base, is batting
a league-high .342, and Willie
McGee is at .318 � but the best
pitching record is 7-4 by John
Stupcr, recently relegated to the
bullpen. Because the Cards rarely
have held a late inning lead in
their swoon, their ace reliever,
Bruce Sutter, has sat idle.
"I'm going to have to start
mm, said Herzog only half jok-
ingly. "Hopefully we'll be in a
game for six or seven innings that
way
Festival
Of Track
COLORADO SPR-
INGS, Colo. (UPI) -
Rain and
unseasonably chilly
temperatures plagued
the National Sports
Festival once agajn
Monday, but
organizers of the
massive event were
saddled with a pro-
blem potentially
larger than the
weather.
Thousands of
tickets have been sold
for the weekend's
track and field com-
petition � as alwa
the top attraction at
the Festival � and as
of Monday afternoon
there were nowhere
near enough seats for
those ticket hold?
sit in.
The track and field
events will take place
al the Air Forl
Academy and th(
are no-
bleachers at tin j
accomodate on
about 3,000 peoj
So the Spor I e
officials arrang
with a Denver c
pany to
bleachers for 7
additionaJ spe.
But the
operation
' tival, J
It
received a
stall at ion la
the compa-
"We �n
sea: here
V. .
N
He .
m:
KM
Celtics
Suns' D
BOSTON (UPI) -
The Boston Ce
announced Mondaj
they had traded
backup center Rick
Robey to the Phoenix
Suns for veteran
guard Denn. -
Johnson, a former all-
star, in a deal that
also involved a wap
of draft choice
The deal give
Boston the 198? first-
round pick
Phoenix � No 21
overall � as well a
the Suns' second pick
The t .
S u r. �
28 as
Rob
well
backup �
- fc
but sa r
p
time
because
center-1
Mc Ha
average -
points a
'Jik
JLi
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� '� & �





1
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 29, I9t3 9
ces
Mpned. but Curren is
angerous grasscourt player;
doubt about that. It
ccl m game what-
m evci I've got a tough
cad anyway said
who next meets Sandy
6 1 7-6, 6-1 winner
v mencan Mike
- competition also
share o surprises,
Sa ova and Jaeger both
i 'ashion. Na-
ng her third
wd, reached the
K)wer in destroung
� sClaudia Kohde in
a quarterfinal
- Jenm Mundell of
&


P
�P

� V
OLlt

t
� �
as former teammate Dariene
Imnu as co-captain on the Na-
ylord
ast Ball
manager.
week's question:
the Atlanta
time leader in stolen
with 740. Aaron also leads
in nine other offensive
fng Hard
rimary problem. The St.
- staff's collective earned-run
I erage is 3.88, ninth in the
Wue. Cardinals pitchers have
�en up 53 home runs in 69
unes compared to the 94 they
ed in all of 1982.
an't believe some of the
lying out of here Herzog
id after the Pirates belted six
me runs out of spacious Busch
tadium in a 24-hour span.
There are bright spots in the
ardinals' lineup � George Hen-
frick, now at first base, is batting
league-high .342, and Willie
FlcGee is at .318 - but the best
bitching record is 7-4 by John
btuper, recently relegated to the
ullpen. Because the Cards rarely
lave held a late inning lead in
ieir swoon, their ace reliever,
Jruce Sutler, has sat idle.
"I'm going to have to start
Hm, said Herzog only half jok-
iglv 'Hopefully we'll be in a
ame tor six or seven innings that
Festival Plagued By Lack
Of Track & Field Seats
COLORADO SPR-
INGS, Colo. (UP1) �
Rain and
unseasonably chilly
temperatures plagued
the National Sports
Festival once again
Monday, but
organizers of the
massive event were
saddled with a pro-
blem potentially
larger than the
weather.
Thousands of
tickets have been sold
for the weekend's
track and field com-
petition � as always
the top attraction at
the Festival � and as
of Monday afternoon
there were nowhere
near enough seats for
those ticket holders to
sit in.
The track and Field
events will take place
at the Air Force
Academy and there
ar� normally
bleachers at the site to
accomodate only
about 3,000 people.
So the Sports Festival
officials arranged
with a Denver com-
pany to supply
bleachers for 7,400
additional spectators.
But the director of
operations for the
Festival, Jim Warsin-
ske, said he had not
received a Firm in-
stallation date from
the company.
"We wanted the
seats here last week
said Warsinske.
"Now we're in lim-
bo
He said if the pro-
mised bleachers were
not delivered, tem-
porary seating being
used at other venues
around the academy
would be brought into
play.
For the second
straight day, occa-
sional rains peppered
down on Colorado
Springs, hampering
outdoor activities.
A thick fog settled
in over the rowing
course at the Cherry
Creek Reservoir early
Monday, but the
North eight-oared
crew � containing
three members of
Brown University's
national champion-
ship squad � won the
gold medal by a nar-
row margin in its
event.
The North crew,
stroked by Brown
senior Nick Justicz of
Atlanta led from start
to finish, but never by
more than a few feet.
About three-quarters
of a boat length
seperated the four
boats at the finish.
Monday's highlight
was expected to come
during the third and
last evening of swim-
ming competition,
where SMU's Steve
Lundquist had
already won three
gold medals.
It was also the final
day of practice for the
24 boxers left in the
Festival, all of whom
will be in action
tonight in the cham-
pionship round. The
Festival boxing com-
petition is being used
as trials tor the Pan
American Games.
Among Tuesday
night's top bouts
should be the ban-
tamweight confronta-
tion between defen-
ding world champion
Floyd Favors of
Capital Heights, Md.
and national Gold
Gloves champ Jesse
Benavides of Corpus
Christi, Texas.
The super-
heavyweight division
will bring together
two sluggers who
disposed of their op-
ponents in convincing
fashion during the
semifinals. Al Evans
of Chicago stopped
Craig Payne in 44
seconds of the first
round in their fight
and Tyrell Biggs of
Philadelphia put Kim-
muel Odum away 58
seconds into the se-
cond round.
Celtics Deal Robey For
Suns' Dennis Johnson
BOSTON (UPI) �
The Boston Celtics
announced Monday
they had traded
backup center Rick
Robey to the Phoenix
Suns for veteran
guard Dennis
Johnson, a former all-
star, in a deal that
also involved a swap
of draft choices.
The deal gives
Boston the 1983 first-
round pick of
Phoenix � No. 21
overall � as well as
the Suns' second pick
in the third round in
the college draft.
The Celtics gave the
Suns their two picks
in the second round,
Nos 28 and 54 overall.
Robey, 6-10, was
well regarded as a
backup to All-Star
center Robert Parish,
but saw increasingly-
diminished playing
time last season
because of the play of
center-forward Kevin
McHale. Robey
averaged only 4.2
points a game last
season.
McHale was
rumored to be on the
verge of accepting a
multi-million dollar
offer sheet from the
New York Knicks
which the Celtics had
promised to match.
Johnson, 6-4
guard, averaged 14.2
points per game and
shot 46 percent from
the floor for Phoenix
last season.
The former Pepper-
dine College star, a
veteran of seven years
in the NBA, played
four years with the
Seattle Supersonics.
He was named to the
All-Star team and was
the most valuable
player in 1978-79
NBA championship
series when Seattle
won the title.
Aerobic exercising has quickly become one of the most exciting ways to get in shape around the
ECU campus. Aerobic classes began Monday and will end July 28.
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat July 2 1983
vVui.V
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of the.se aciver
tiseci items is re
quired to oe readiiv
available for sale in
each Kroger sav-on
except as specificai
iv noted in this ad if
we do run out of an
item we win offer
von your choice of a
comparable item
when avanacie
reflecting the same
savings or a ram
check which will en
title vou to purchase
the advertised item
at the advertised
price within 3C days
Limit one manufac
turers coupon pe�
item
�� -
�AYMMMEDIATE cash for
LCLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHNA& CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
& RING
401 S. EVANS ST. openon sat
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER.
Pizza irun
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL ggg Greenville Blv
PREMUIM
coors
Beer
12-02.
Cans
SPRITE, TAB, OR
PLUS DEPOSIT
Ret.
Btls.
KROGER
Natural Flavor
ice Cream
a
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ctn.
FREE!
VLB POTATO SAIAD
OR C0U SlAW WITH
PURCHASE OF
12-Pc. Wishbone
Fried Chicken
BUY 2
Bags Dell
Nacho
Chips
Get 1 Bag
14-OZ
Bag
12 PC
Bucket
includes
rohs
-





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 29, 1983,
Ayako Beats
Whitworth
At Rochester
PITTSFORD, N.Y.
(AP) � For Kathy
Whitworth, one more
golf tournament title
will end her quest, but
for Ayako Okamoto,
who is bidding to
become the Japanese
version of Whitworth,
the pressure never
stops.
Okamoto recovered
from a 4-over-par 76
to win the $200,000
Rochester Interna-
tional in a playoff
Sunday.
After pocketing the
$30,000 first prize,
she said she enjoyed
the fact that she is not
well-known in the
United States.
"In Japan, a
celebrity's private life
can get disturbed
she said through an
interpreter.
Okamoto, Whit-
worth and Donna
White tied for first at
6-under-par 282 after
72 holes.
All three made par
on Nos 1 and 2, but
Okamoto cut short
the tournament on No
18, the third playoff
hole, with a 10-foot
birdie putt.
Whitworth, 43, was
shooting for her 85th
Ladies Professional
Golf Association title,
which would put her
one ahead of Sam
Snead as the winn-
ingcst American
golfer of all time. She
is tied with the Profes-
sional Golfers'
Association veteran
with 84 champion-
ships.
White, whose
8-under 208 after Fri-
day trailed Okamoto
by two shots, also
staggered home with
an over-par finishing
round of 74. The day
before, she tied a
course and tourna-
ment record with a
6-under 66.
Okamoto generated
steady rounds of 68,
71 and 67 before her
controlled collapse,
which included three
bogeys on the front
nine, a birdie just
before a double
bogey-6 on No 13 and
another bogey on 15
before a saving birdie
on 17. Vicki Fergon
shot a 69 to claim
fourth place at 283 on
the par-72, 6,162-yard
Locust Hill Country
Club layout. Jo Anne
Carner and Jane
Blalock were two
shots out of the
playoffs at 284.
Betsy King fashion-
ed a 285 with another
finishing round of 69,
one shot ahead of a
six-player cluster at
286.
Okamoto, who at
32 has been playing
golf for only 10 years,
is a major celebrity in
Japan, said free-lance
journalist Duke
Ishikawa.
Overton Breaks
Slalom Record
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Saturday, July 2, 1983
Lb,
USDA Chalet Beef Rib
Rib-Eye
Steak
Tib.
SaithfitM - U-20 Ut. A��.SIieH FREE
Smoked
4 Lbs.
Slie.d FREE
Etch
Jmfc
9 Size
Cantaloupes
1 Liter
1.S Liter � LiMbmtee, Biaoeo Rosito
Riunite
Wine
Pkf. of 12 � 12 Ox. Cats
Miller
Ph. of 11 � 12 Ox. Coot
Old Milwaukee
Pb. of 11 -12 Oz. Cats
Stroh's
L
?
TAMPA, FLA �
Kristi Overton broke
her own junior girls
national slalom
record with a score of
57 and one-half buoys
this weekend.
She was one of nine
female and eight male
skiers from across the
country who qualified
to compete for a
coveted position on
the six-member team
to represent the
United States in
Sweden in late August
at the semi-annual
World Champion-
ships.
Overton, 13, was
the youngest of the
qualifiers and had the
highest score of the
females in three
rounds of the trick
event.
Those chosen for
the team were: Cindy
Todd, Deena Burch,
Carl Roberge, Sammy
Duvall, Camille
Duvall and Cory
Pickos, all of Florida.
Yugoslavia Wins
KANSAS CITY,
Mo (UPI) � Center
Ratko Radovanovic
and guard Petar
Vilfan combined for
47 points to carry
Yugoslavia to a 93-82
victory over Cuba in
the International
Basketball Tourna-
ment Monday.
In games on the
night card, the United
States Pan American
team met the U.S.
University Games en-
try in the women's
competition and the
U.S. men took on
Mexico.
Radovanovic, the
only holdover from
Yugoslavia's 1980
gold medal-winning
team, scored 28 points
and had 10 rebounds.
Vilfan finished with
19 points and three
assists as the Yugosla-
vians completed the
tournament with a 2-1
record.
Vilfan scored eight
of his points in the
final five and one-half
minutes of the first
half to help
Yugoslavia rally from
deficits of as many as
10 points and claim a
37-35 lead at intermis-
sion.
Classifieds
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tu-m.
KIIP YOU� TAN THIS IUM-
Mll AMO M A VACATION
COUNSELOR AT MAUTINUL
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CCUO Of AMINICA 141
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IS4.I, NC:
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69
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Chicken Of The Sta
399.
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Pork & Beans
399
$
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Half Gallo
49 0; W Softens
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. .f





Title
The East Carolinian, June 29, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 29, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.274
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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