The East Carolinian, June 22, 1983






She itast (Earoltrttan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.fS- (yl
Wednesday June 22,1983
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Friday Optimistic On Budget; Praises ECU
L
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Friday
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Assistant News Editor
William C. Friday, president of
he University of North Carolina
system, has indicated his op-
timism that state universities will
receive adequate funding from the
legislature for next year.
In a Tuesday interview, Friday
pledged his support in the effort
to obtain full funding for comple-
tion of the ECU School of
Medicine. Friday said recommen-
dations to the General Assembly
have been made to approve a
"substantial sum of money" for
the completion of the medical
school.
"It's a long way from being
resolved said Friday, referring
to the final budget package for
university schools, which has still
not been approved. "We are now
negotiating for the funding of the
remaining items in our opera-
tional priorities Friday said.
Friday said efforts were being
made to make sure resources
would be distributed equally so no
single institution would have to
take the brunt of budget cuts.
For the first time in many years,
said Friday, the legislature is fac-
ing the "absolute necessity" of
reducing the budget. "This
legislature is like its predecessor
Friday said, "it has a genuine ap-
preciation for what these institu-
tions do, and I'm satisfied they
will want to be as helpful as they
know how
Friday said he would also ad-
vocate lifting the current freeze on
teacher's salaries. He said he
hoped the budget process could be
completed relatively soon.
Friday praised ECU chancellor
John Howell for doing a first rate
job. "I'm exceedingly pleased
Friday said. "I think he's doing a
first-rate job. He was a happy
choice for the position
Friday said Howell attends all
the sessions of the Board of
Governors and UNC chancellors
meetings. "He has established an
identity on behalf of East
Carolina that is very good and
very productive
Friday also praised the efforts
of Howell and officials in the
School of Education for their at-
tempts to regain accreditation
from the National Council of Ac-
creditation for Teacher Educa-
tion. The school was denied re-
accreditation by NCATE in
March. The N.C. Board of
Education also put the ECU pro-
gram on probation. Friday said he
had no doubt that the NCATE
denial had nothing to do with the
quality of the ECU program.
"He and I talked about it (the
denial) Friday said. "I know
what he was planning to do, and
I'm certainly supportive. He has a
very clear eye when it comes to
academic standards and quality
programs.
"ECU is one of the great suc-
cess stories of education in the
state in the last 25 years Friday
said. "The institution has
dramatically changed; it's now a
fully-developed, professional
liberal arts program
Freshmen Orientation
New Students Sounding An S.O.S.
By MELANIE ROGERS
Staff Writer
Have you been wondering who
all the people walking around
campus carrying undergraduate
catalogs are? Well, wonder no
more; they are the soon-to-be
1983-84 freshmen.
Freshman orientation, which
gives new students an overview of
the campus, as well as an oppor-
tunity to preregister, began June
12 and ends July 12. Orientation
is six three-day sessions for
regular freshmen and one two-day
session for transfer students.
There are 2,382 freshmen
registered for orientation so far,
but this number is expected to in-
crease considerably before orien-
tation ends.
Freshman orientation is design-
ed to give incoming freshman an
onnortunity to meet Deople, have
a brief taste of college life and
take care of preliminary planning
like preregistering. The new
students are under the guidance of
the student orientation staff,
composed this year of 14 up-
perclassmen and graduate
students.
The student orientation staff,
or S.O.S is responsible for
answering questions and making
sure everything runs smoothly.
Activities are designed so that
students can make maximum use
of their time.
The schedule is full from early
morning until after 9 p.m but,
since many activities are optional,
students have plenty of time of
their own. During the three-day
orientation, freshmen must take
math and foreign language place-
ment tests, get i.D.s made, and
preregister. In addition to these
required activities, students are
given the opportunity to meet
with advisors from their intended
major and given an overview of
campus organizations. During
orientation, female students are
housed at Tyler dorm; the males
are in Aycock dorm.
The tradition of freshman
orientation is nothing new at
ECU. For years, every summer,
freshman have passed through
campus in a brief, whirlwind tour
of college life.
I talked to several freshman to
get their opinion on freshman
orientation. Most students praised
the oriention program, with only
a few having minor complaints.
Karen Manning, an incoming
freshman from Durham, N.C,
praised the program saying she
"would be totally lost without
it Sharon Horper of Louisburg,
N.C, thinks the program is wor-
thwhile "because it gives us a
chance to meet people. Many
students praised the student orien-
tation staff for the help they of-
fered. The only complaint I found
was from Jennie Halstead who
thinks a session should be offered
immediately prior to the beginn-
ing of the fall semester for out-of-
state students.
The student orientation staff,
identified by the letters S.O.S. on
their shirts, are responsible for
helping the new freshmen in
various ways
This year's orientation staff is
made up of eight women and six
men. The orientation staff must
attend a one and a half week
training session in April. To
qualify for freshmen orientation,
according to S.O.S. Sandra
Miller, a student must be either a
junior, senior, or grad student,
have at least a 3.0 GPA, and be
involved in student activities.
Tuition Costs May Jump Next Semester
By GREG RIDEOUT
Newt Editor
ECU students will have lighter
wallets this fall after paying their
tuition if the General Assembly
approves an $8 million fee-
increase package. The proposed
increase won't be final until the
end of June, but the joint House
and Senate Appropriations Com-
mittee appears headed for agree-
ment on an overall $33 million tui-
tion bill.
Chancellor John M. Howell
said the distribution of the in-
crease would be determined by the
UNC Board of Governors. For
the in-state student attending
ECU, the increase is expected to
be $30 � $35 per semester. Out-
of-state students attending ECU
will probably pay $175 � $200
more in the fall.
The new increases would affect
all students attending the 16 con-
stituent schools in the UNC
system.
The increased tuition is a result
of the General Assembly's need to
balance North Carolina's overall
budget. Howell expressed his
regret over the proposed hike, but
he said it was either raise the tui-
tion or cut badly needed services.
One new service ECU is expected
to get is an increase in computer
hardware.
Some graduate students who at-
tend schools in the university
system from out of state will not
be affected by the increases, of-
ficials said.
Most UNC system officials are
also not happy with the increase,
but realize the General Assembly
had little choice considering the
current budget situation.
Howell feels the expected in-
crease won't prevent students
from attending ECU this fall. The
increase would be the fourth hike
in the last 10 years.
There are 88,500 in-state
students and 15,500 out-of-state
students attending North Carolina
public universities.
Members of the student orientation staff help next year's freshmen
board a bus on tbe bill. S.O.S. members teach incoming freshmen about
college life.
ECU Faculity, Students Participate
During Summer Solstice Teach-ins
Student Opinion
Reagan 9s Policies Reviewed
Monday was International
Day of Nuclear Disarmament.
Throughout the world, more
than 1,000 people were arrested
during demonstrations oppos-
ing the nuclear arms race.
Students were asked if they felt
President Reagan was doing an
adequate job handling the arms
situation.
Randy Allen, Junior, Ac-
counting � "By and large, I
support the president in most
everything he does. I don't see
what good it would do us to
completely disarm
Michelle Snyder,
Sophomore, Accounting � "I
think he should try to do
something more. Right now we
have too much of an arms race
going on
Thomas Ab'es, Junior,
Commercial Art � "I think
he's trying to be diplomatic
about it. He's being fair about
it without jeapordizing our
security
Pat Wratchford, Senior,
Fine Arts � "Hardly. He's
prompted the largest increase
in defense spending in history.
Reagan's trying to convince us
that we ca" be safer if we build
more weapons. That's warped
logic
4
Snyder
A simultaneous teach-in titled
"From Discord to Harmonies:
Can We Compose a New World
Symphony" was held Saturday at
two Greenville locations. A dozen
ECU faculty members and two
students joined several communi-
ty leaders in delivering lectures on
a variety of topics.
Faculty members George Biss-
inger and Edith Webber opened
the programs at 8:30 a.m. Biss-
inger, a physics professor, spoke
at the Willis Building auditorium,
while Webber began the concur-
rent program at the American
Legion building in West Green-
ville.
During his lecture titled "Lives
of Stars Bissinger explained in
detail the Summer Solstice. It
takes place when the sun reaches
its highest point above the earth.
Bissinger then described some
physical characteristics of stars.
"Given our heritage of stabili-
ty, if something happens to
destroy our planet it will be our
fault Bissinger said.
Webber's topic, "Rhythm of
the Sun addressed several en-
vironmental questions. Webber
teaches English at ECU.
Scott Snyder, associate geology
professor, spoke on the, "History
of Life Snyder, who gave an
overview of extinction on our
planet, noted that most of the ear-
th's ecological problems have
been caused by people. "We can
solve them he said.
Biology professor Prem
Sehgal's lecture was titled
"Interrelationships of Ecological
Problems and their Solutions
Sehgal claimed that hunger and
energy and food resource scarcity
were some of the more prevalent
problems today. "Our problems
connect us together Sehgal said.
"Sharing is necessary for
everyone's well being
Vincent Bellis, another biology
professor, remarked on the quali-
ty of life in Eastern North
Carolina. Bellis addressed several
economic and management issues
in our area, as well as en-
vironmental issues.
Newly appointed Director of
Joyner Library Ruth Katz spoke
about the present status of the
library and what changes it would
go through as it moved into a
more technilogical era.
Associate Sociology Professor
Paul Tschetter spoke on the
political situation in South Africa.
He noted that whites living in
South Africa have the highest
standard of living in the world,
while the country's non-whites
have standards equivalent to other
African nations.
Dot Gronert, Pitt County presi-
dent of the National Organization
of Women, gave reasons why
women will continue to push for
the Equal Rights Amendment
She said that laws to protect
women's rights were often not en-
forced. "Some North Carolina
laws discriminated against
women Gronert said,
"especially in regard to property
rights
Walter Shephard. director of
the Center for Health Services at
the School of Medicine, quoted
Student Bank To Begin
24-Hour Teller Two
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Suff Writer
This fall ECU students will
have new machines on campus �
automated bank tellers. The ser-
vice will be available to students,
faculty and administrators who
bank with Branch Banking &
Trust and Wachovia Bank A
Trust Co.
The two banks proposed the
idea and are underwriting the
total cost of installing the
machines. They will pay ECU a
small rental fee which will offset
utilities and other minor expenses.
Contracts have already been sign-
ed, and construction will begin
immediately.
The two tellers will be located
directly beside the ECU Student
Bank in Mendenhall Student
Center and will be accessible from
outside the bank. The pay
telephones which currently oc-
cupy the spot will be moved in
order to make room for the new
machines.
Users will be able to perform
activities such as cash
withdrawals, deposits, money
transfers, credit card transactions
and special transactions.
"This is a real fine service for
students, faculty and visitors to
campus said Rudolph Alex-
ander, director and associate dean
of student activities, referring to
the fact service will be available
on a 24-hour basis.
"We have a teller on 10th Street
that gets a lot of action �
hopefully the one on campus will
get even more said Jerry Smith,
vice president of Wachovia.
"Students tend to enjoy the con-
venience of Teller Two machines,
and hopefully when they graduate
they will continue using them
�- .
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Or1
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 22, 1983
Announcements
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
One million dollars per minute
s being spent worldwide on the
military The Greenville Peace
Committee rejects the notions
that more weapons brings us
more security We meet every
Friday night at 6 30 p m for a
pot luck dinner and meeting
During the summer we have
several activities planned and
e need your help Come join us
in our plans for June 20th
WORLD DISARMAMENT
DAY The meetings are held at
610 S Elm St For more infor
mation call 758 4906 or 7S2 5724
Peace
STUDENTS MAKE
ADIFFERENCE
It you are a motivated in
cl'vdual who wishes to help seek
solutions to consumer and en
vironmental problems through
research and advocacy then
North Carolina Public Interest
Research Group (NC PIRG) is
tor you It is a student group
esearchmg issues such as Con
sumer Protection
Environmental Quality
Students Rights Government
Accountability Renewable
Energy Civil Rights NC PIRG
has m the past tought for North
Carolina students rights,
documented the danger of
nuciear cargo transportation
�hrougn the state, and most
recently making the student
�iratted Generic Drug Generic
Substitution Bin a law An ECU
�RG is now being formed
PiRG needs your support Get
�gether with other students
concer ned with these issues For
�nore details call Eliza Godwin
at 752 1748
SOULS
ELECTION
Anyone interested in running
souls office next semester con
tact Barbara at 758 9550.
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven
ture's Dive Coiumel Mexico on
the beautiful Yucatan peninsula
Aug. 3. 1983 to Aug 10. 1983
Group trip for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving, meals.
lodging and air fare from
Raleigh Non divers welcome
Call Ray Scharf at 757 6441
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Monday Nights Bible Study
8 30 pm 108 Jarvis Dorm
Prayer Group tor spiritual sup
port and fellowship 10 15 pm
every night 111 Fletcher For
more information contact Todd
108 Jarvis. Sheha 157 Jarvis and
Scott 111 Fletcher
BIBLE STUDY AT ECU
inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship sponsors a bible
study on Monday nights Come
to 108 Jarvis Han at 8 30p.m.for
a time of spiritual fellowship
and fun Prayer is also offered
every night at 111 Fletcher Hall
at 10:15 p.m Take a break from
studying
WZMB PRESENTS
WZMB presents classical
music Saturday and Sunday,
twelve noon to six p. m. Watch In
the upcoming East Carolinians
for weekly programs and tune in
this weekend for 'A Touch Of
Class
SENIORS
Want a central place for three
letters of reference from your
professors' If you are
graduating this summer, then
you complete a registration
packet available from the
Career Planning and Placement
Service. If you will finish in the
fall, spring, or summer of
academic year 1983 84, you may
pick up a packet and prepare it
to return in August or
September
SUMMER SOLTICE
FOR PEACE
Greenville community leaders
are joining together on June 20fh
to celebrate a Day of Peace dur
mg the Summer Solfice. The
celebration wilki be worldwide
as people everywhere work for
peace Greenville will be a
teach in on June 18. For further
information call 758 4906
COFFEEHOUSE
NEEDS MEMBERS
If you like variety entertain
ment and want a challenge,
become a member on the stu
dent union coffeehouse commit
tee For more information , con
tact the Student Union (Room
234) at 7576611, Ext 210.
COUNSELORS
WANTED
Male counselors needed tow
ork In the Lutheran Camp in
Virginia. Two resident pro
grams as well as canoeing,
backpacking, biking and beach
camp. Contact Rev. F. Wayne
Williams. Ft. Valley Rt. Box 355,
St David's Church, VA 22652
DAN FARIS
GRADUATES,
HUR- RAYI
The Brothers of Kappa Sigma
would like to congradulate Dan
Far is for graduating with a
degree in Marketing. He en
dured mat struggle that so many
of us.such as me guys still at
sophomore status In their fifth
year here, have yet to complete
Dan told the East Carolinain
that he has no definite plans as
of yet, but he is interested in
refinancing the DELOREAN
Motor company.
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers and Little
Sisters of Kappa Sigma would
like to welcome all of the
freshman visiting Greenville for
the first time. Orientation
should be a lot of fun for you , but
remember the primary reason
that your down here TO HAVE
A GOOD TIME! Come by the
Kappa Sigma house and say
hello We are located right next
to Darryl's on tenth street.
MUSIC AT THE MALL
The special concert commit
tee proudly presents two
musical events mis week.On
Monday, June 27, at 8 p. m the
Mendenhall Coffee house
presents Wilson Dubois on the
steel drums. The next day,
singer songwriter Ray Fogg is in
concert on the mall at 8 p.m.
Both events are FREE Come
out and see some good entertain
mer
WATERMELON
FEASTS
All ECU students, faculty, and
staff are invited to eat cool
delicious watermelons free! Th
je Department of university
Unions is sponsoring a
Watermelon Feast on me Mall
on Monday. June 27m at 1230 p
m. Enjoy the delicious melons,
the beautiful weather, and the
good company of your friends
The dates for the summer
Watermelon Feasts are as
follows: All are on Mondays
with the following dates June
27, July 11. July 18, July 25. Also
all feasts are at 12:30 p. m. on
the mall.
nTTTTTTmhi n i i i mi 11111 n 11 mum in
INTRODUCING . . .
ONE DAY EYEGLASS
SERVICE
Now on most single vision pListu kiws
vm i .in rn i() mi with the linisiird pni
dm i in 24 hours Allorctahk- Iris huh k
.ii i ur. hi Man i Sttnnq is Hclwrmg
!)K PETER Vk HOI.I.IS
AT BARRE,ltd
� "A
Dancewear Specialty Shop
For all your dancing needs.
422 ARLINGTON BLVD.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
(919) 756-6670
�1Z CAAE (XH1�R
O.O r A
756-9404
20
OFF
�A) Co"Bis'e P'evr.piron Eyeglasses �
0 Com�ct lesF.itiog I
I
Mi,5i 8� O'esiec � m�OtOfot
Oinei O-scouMsO Coupons Do No' lot �
I
Special Matinee: July 28, 2.15 PM
Single Tickets (Monday)SOLD OUT
Single Tickets (TuesSat.)$10.00
Season Tickets (Monday)SOLD OUT
Season Tickets (TuesSat.)$34.00
McGinnis Theatre
East Carolina University
Greenville. NC 27834
Call 757-6390 for reservations
"The East Carolina Summer Theatre is just about the best thing
to happen to Eastern North Carolina since the federal
tobacco support program'
The Chapel Hill Newspaper
Items and Prices
Effective thru Sat June 25. 1983
jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiitiiiiiniy
I BUCK'S GULF I
2704 E. 10th St. 752-3228
Across from Villa Roma, �
We do minor repairs, tune ups, brake
i alignments, and air conditioner maintainance.
We have a road wrecker service and do
service calls. 24 hr. number is 758-1033.
Keep your car looking good
Free car wash with each fill up!
We rent Jartran trucks and trailers for your
moving needs.
Come by today for your complete car needs. �
"We pull for ECU not from"
TTiit ititiiiiiiiififtf iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiitiitittiiiiiititiitiiiiitiffiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiif �iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiniiiiiT
Open Mon. Thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9am to 9pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
OPEN
24 Hrs.
EVERYDAX
rv
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
E.icn of these
tised items is
quired to be re?" .
available for sa -
each Kroger Sa :
except as spec I
iv noted in this an �
we do run out c 11
item we win offei
vou your choice oi
comparacie tern
when avafla
refiectmg the sarra
savings Or a ra -
check which wi - i
title vou to pur
tne advertised t� t
at the advert sed
price within 3C a.1.
Limit one rr? u
turer s COupor p�
item
Green
Coat. From Page 1
several significant statists
cerning health care amongj
population of Eastern N
Carolina. He said Put Count!
a Tuberculosis rate 200 pej
Green In
Lt. Go. James Green
the first official elected state
to be indicted in the las! 3 i
A Wake Counts Gni
handed down an mdictr
day charging Green - I
bribery-related counts.
Green was charged
counts of bribers and one o
spiring to receive a bribe r
ben charged with
S000 bribe and c
receive two SI0.000 an I
for $2,000. If con
could receive I � j
for each bnberv cou
.� PAY IM
CLASS RINi
ALL
s;
CH
F!
of Sl
401 S. EVANS ST
(HARMONY HOUSE SOU
YOURPROFESSIOI
�Irtffiau
?
BICYCte
90S
QUALITY BIKE
SALES & SERVICE
"Greenville's Most
Complete Bicycle Shop"
�Fuji oTREK
� Puegeot � Raleigh
10 speed129 and up
CRUISERS SI 49.95 and up
We have
Peugot Pipeline Cruisers $149.95
ii
ste a. rc
�,
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SWEET, RIPE
Southern
Peaches
l 4 -
i 1LV
RECULAR OR LIGHT
Hamm's
Beer
6 $199
S30CONTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27134
757316
Lb.
12-0? �
Cans �
DIET COKE,
TAB OR
Coca cola
ALL NATURAL
Breyer's
ice cream
12-
Ctn.
Greenvill
Now B
Mcst delivery pi
true quality and
delivery costs in
PIZZA INN ha:
all that!
We sell ol
pizzas a?
No Surd
give FR
our largi
pizzas.
CALL 758-6266
SOUR CREAM
I
SAny Foot
DOZ
Cake
Donuts
$69

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�LLjn
12 E 14th Street
e�nv�lle. North Carolina
"1 iw-
9 Doily Special
1 Meat
Vegetables
I Bread
tart:
UQom-9:00pm Daily
THE FAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 22. 1983
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Caroliai University
9NC 27834
7-4390 for reservations
about the best thing
the tederal
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JT
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6
Hamms
Beer
$"99
29r
UJJf
unite
Potato
Chips
99
7-OZ
Bag
ONE INGREDIENT
Pizza 78c
Bread
For
3
Greenville Teach-in Marks Summer Solstice
Cont. From Page 1
several significant statistics con-
cerning health care among the
population of Eastern North
Carolina. He said Pitt County has
a Tuberculosis rate 200 percent
higher than the United States as a
whole.
Patrick O'Neill, ECU student,
gave a brief history of civil disobe-
dience, mentioning such practi-
tioners as Thoreau, Martin Luther
King, Gandhi. Dorothy Day and
Daniel and Phillip Berrigan.
O'Neill gave the reasons for his
own decision to perform civil
disobedience, which came after
four years of thinking and reflec-
ting on it.
Jay Stone, ECU student, spoke
Green Indicted By Grand Jury
Lt. Gov. James Green became
the first official elected statewide
to be indicted in the last 50 years.
A Wake County Grand Jury
handed down an indictment Mon-
day charging Green with five
bribery-related counts.
Green was charged with four
counts of bribery and one of con-
spiring to receive a bribe. He has
been charged with accepting a
$2,000 bribe and consenting to
receive two $10,000 and another
for $2,000. If convicted, Green
could receive five years in prison
for each bribery count and three
years for the conspiracy charge.
Green's participation in the FBI
probe, dubbed Colcor, became
known when the grand jury
released written presentments that
accused Green of the crimes.
Wake County acting district at-
torney C. Colon Willoughby was
instructed to study the facts and
decide if an indictment was
necessary.
A transcript of a secretly-
recorded conversation between
Green and an undercover FBI
agent was released Thursday by
the Favetteville Times. In the
transcript, Green discusses several
ways in which the agent, posing as
a businessman, can make illegal
contributions to Green's 1984
gubernatorial campaign.
Green's case will be treated like
all the other cases, Willoughby
said. Chief prosecuter in the case
James Blackburn said he would
expedite the proceedings.
about .social and personal
transformation. He elaborated on
the expansion of one's con-
sciousness in order to achieve
enlightenment and discover one's
essential self. "While trying to
come up with new solutions, we
have to come to a more fun-
damental understanding of
ourselves and our species Stone
said.
Charles Coble, dean of the
School of Education, spoke about
the impact of radical movements
on the mainstream of our culture.
He noted that the two most
significant radical movements of
the past 20 years have been the
radical left movement of the 60s
and the radical right movement of
the 80s.
Art Haney, an art professor,
stressed the need for individuals
to think through issues and decide
at what level they can be most ef-
fective. He stressed that nothing
can be accomplished in improving
society without a firm commit-
ment.
Other speakers on the program
were Roy Schaal, co-op advisor
for the Rural Fund for Develop-
ment, who spoke about farming
cooperatives. Lokenath Debnath.
professor of mathematics atldi
ed the topic. "Mathematics and
Human Needs and medical dot
tor Albert Warshauer spoke abou
the United Nations and all
natives.
The Solstice Teach-In wa
dinated by retired math profc
Carroll Webber with assists
from Bennie Roundtree. Souih
Christian Leadership Confcu
coordinator.
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Mie �aat (EarnHman
Serving the East Carotin campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller. ����,
Mike Hughes, mmnmam
WAVERLY MERRITT. DvTCior of Adytum,
Hunter Fisher, 8M���MglMr
ALI AFRASHTEH. cmfci .m.�
Stephanie Groon, - - � ua
Clay Thornton, rft��s-p�rvwK
Cindy Pleasants. ��, ��
Greg Rideout, vw &,�
CARLYN EBLRT, Entertainment Editor
Lizanne Jennings, ��.
David Gordon, production Manager
June 22. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Reaganomics
Plan Showing Signs Of Promise
Despite widespread fears and
criticisms of how the Reagan ad-
ministration is handling the United
States' economic woes, recent
statistics indicate that the presi-
dent's plan for economic recovery
is at least beginning to work.
For instance, according to a
Commerce Department report
released Monday, Americans got a
1.2-percent income boost in May.
That marked the biggest increase
in nearly two years. Commerce
Secretary Malcolm Baldridge was
delighted with the most recent
statistics, adding that the increases
"will fuel further vigorous
economic growth this summer
In addition, original predictions
about the gross national product
� the broadest measure of
economic activity � for the second
quarter of 1983 have risen from a
conservative annual estimate of 3.4
percent to a promising 7.5 percent.
Also, with the resurgence of de-
mand in American production,
especially in the U.S. automobile
and housing industries, unemploy-
ment figures have dropped con-
siderably in recent weeks.
And finally, a combination of
lower inflation, a rapidly growing
money supply and tax cuts for
businesses and individuals � in-
cluding the reduction in personal
income tax rates scheduled to take
effect July 1 � are pushing the
United States economy further and
further toward recovery.
What all these numbers and
figures mean, plain and simple, is
that for the first time in the last
few years, the American economy
BELIEVE ME MV NEW
AMBASSADOR TO
CENTRAL AMERICA
ISNOTAGET-T0U6H
POLICY CHANGE ,�
is actually showing a fairly consis-
tent pattern toward reasonable
economic stabilization.
A good deal of credit must go
out to the Reagan administration,
or more precisely, to federal
Reserve Board Chairman Paul
Volcker, who was just reappointed
by Reagan to another four-year
term at the helm. Although his
first term as chairman was by no
means without obstacle � in fact,
his critics blame him in great part
for the country's worst recession in
more than 40 years � Volcker has
since proven himself a capable
economist, bureaucrat and
strategist.
Perhaps the main advantage of
Volcker's reappointment is that he
has learned the ropes of the
Federal Reserve Board. He
understands the fine line between
battling inflation and stimulating
economic growth. He knows that a
harsh anti-inflation policy causes
other areas of the economy to suf-
fer (i.e increased unemployment,
federal deficit spending, etc.).
But even with the recent
economic indicators pointing
toward recovery, the United States
is by no means over the hump. In
fact, no matter what the
"indicators" indicate, most of us
will remain just as skeptical now as
ever.
Nevertheless, it's good to know
that for at least this one fleeting
moment, the word on the U.S.
economy is somewhat promising.
And nowadays, you have to take
what you can get.
iuwuu�AOmuea&-
i-Campus Forum
'Disgusting Fixations'
Dear Mr. Hughes:
Many of us here at ECU are sadden-
ed by your inability to grow up and get
your mind off your disgusting fixa-
tions. Still, if you will at least refrain
from describing them to us, via the en-
tire editorial page, we shall all take it as
a kindness.
Most sincerely,
Kim Albin
Alumnus, English
tion.
Mike Hughes
Stan Landers
Co-Editors in Question
Dear Ms. Albin:
I'm sorry my disgusting fixations
sadden you. I guess I get carried away
from time to time. But I didn't realize
so many people dislike my writing.
Believe it or not, I started writing the
columns in question at the suggestion
of a co-worker, not on my own
"disgusting" impulse. A little
(attempted) humor would lighten up an
otherwise depressing page, he said. Ap-
parently, this is not always the case.
Thank you for bringing it to my atten-
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
r�
Uil i
JUSTICE BURGER1HER6 A G0JHEMAN HERE WHO WAN15 W
TO RKONSIPER YOUR DECISION BARRING MWTARV IPUim,
Investigating Criminals Or Creating Them?
Crime And The FBI
By PAT O'NEILL
Well, here we go again. Now it's
North Carolina Lt. Gov. Jimmy Green
who's been indicted for criminal miscon-
duct. It seems politicians can't seem to
keep themselves out of trouble.
Remember Watergate? With Nixon
stating emphatically, "I'm not a
crook and Spiro Agnew calling
bribery accusations against him
"damned lies?" Well, now we have
Green, who's claiming he's been falsely
accused of engaging in criminal activity.
So far, the Colcor investigation has
turned up a number of crooked North
Carolina public servants. But Green is
the biggest catch yet.
If you read the FBI transcript of the
conversation between Green and the
undercover agent, it becomes quite clear
that Green was more than casually in-
terested in picking up a little extra cam-
paign money for his 1984 governor's
campaign. Green discusses ways in
which the money can be delivered so as
to avoid checks by state election of-
ficials.
Frankly, it looks like Green's in bad
shape. Even if he didn't take any money,
he has clearly violated the ethics of his
position. The public trust has once again
been violated.
Because of the nature of the case,
Green could be found innocent. His at-
torneys are sure to argue several legal
questions. Their strongest argument, of
course, is entrapment (the implantation
of criminal ideas in innocent minds).
Having very limited love for both
politicians and the FBI, I have a hard
time siding one way or the other. Never-
theless, being that I consider the FBI one
of this nation's least trustworthy institu-
tions, I must bring into question the
bureau's tactics.
Past abuses of power by the FBI are
clearly documented. Former N.C. Sen.
Robert B. Morgan, in an Associated
Press interview Saturday, likened the
FBI actions in the Green investigation to
that of a "secret police
Based on evidence revealed thus far, it
appears that Green was, indeed, entrap-
ped. During dialogue with the under-
cover agent, Green is extremely cautious
� sort of interested and skeptical at the
same time. The agent goes to great
lengths to tempt him; he talks big
money, and Green's interest awakens
even more. But personally, I have a hard
time believing Green would have sought
out illegal campaign donations (am I
naive?) if the FBI hadn't dumped them
in his lap.
What this issue all boils down to is
that the FBI has virtually boundless
authority, powers that are not, but
should be, limited. Instead of going out
and creating crime, the agency would do
well to try preventing it for a change. As
Morgan said Saturday, "I don't think
it's right for public officials to procure
people to commit crimes unless ihe
think crime has been committed in the
past The judicial body hearing
Green's case would do well to remember
that.
In its Sunday edition, the Sews and
Observer called for Green's resignation.
On the other hand, Gov. Hunt has
counseled Green to remain in office until
his innocence or guilt has been determin-
ed in court. "The law provides that you
are innocent until proven guilty Hunt
said Thursday. "It's a fundamental
principal
The ens and Observer claims that
Green, because he's a public servant.
should adhere to a higher standard than
that which is merely legal. The editorial
also points out that questionable ethics
is not a new situation for Green. He's
been there in the past.
Of course, the decision rests entireK
on the shoulders of Green himself. Both
Hunt and the Newt and Observer have
stressed important points. But now. it's
not only a court case but a game of cons-
cience. Perhaps Green will be found
guilty. Perhaps he will be acquitted on
the entrapment issue or on a technicali-
ty. Hopefully, if the latter arises. Green
should nevertheless resign. Because
when dealing with the ethical and legal
principals of our state's No. 2 legislator.
acquittal is not enough.
Questions For Minds Great And Small
Life's Many Mysteries
You know, for as long as I've been
around, for as long as I've been asking
stupid questions about this and that, for
as long as I've been trying to figure
things out for myself there are still a
lot of things I just don't understand:
MIKE HUGHES
Food For Thought
Take averages, for example. Now,
I'm pretty sure I grasp the underlying
concept and all that garbage. But what I
don't understand is when Dan Rather
comes on the nightly news and says the
Census Bureau has released new figures
indicating that the average married cou-
ple in the U.S. has 2.34 children. Does
that mean that most married American
couples have two regular-sized kids and
a midget? Does it mean the average wife
gets pregnant twice and almost a third
time? I've always thought the term
"almost pregnant" was only used by
nervous, yet relieved, college students.
Or how about in football, when the
punter for one team gets off a good,
high kick, and Brent Musberger (I've
always liked that name) says something
like: "Boy, Irv, he sure got good 'hang
time' on that one Does that mean it
was a well-hung punt?
And I still want to know why people
in New Jersey always have to call a dif-
ferent phone number to order pocket
fishing poles, Ginsu steak knives and
Slim Whitman albums. Is it because peo-
ple from New Jersey need an inter-
preter? Is it just because they smell bad?
It just doesn't make sense. I mean, talk
and smell as they do, people from New
Jersey are still people. Well some are
anyway.
And I sometimes wonder why we
Americans make so much of our every-
day terminology so confusing. You
know, like one term means one thing,
and another term that looks and sounds
a lot like the first one means something
entirely different. Sometimes it gets em-
barrassing. I mean, a friend of mine told
me the other day that his girlfriend,
Melba, had just gotten an IUD.
"Geez I said, "that's too bad. Did
they take her driver's license?"
Another thing that puzzles me is when
I see that Toyota man (amid his inces-
sant jumping for joy) boasting about the
great gas mileage estimates on his new
car. I guess the ad's plain and simple
enough, but what I don't understand is
why, when the voice in the background
whispers, "Actual mileage may vary
does it always mean that yours will be
about 20 miles per gallon lower?
And I sometimes wonder whether
Donny and Marie Osmond would con-
tinue to do Hawaiian Punch commer-
cials if they knew most college students
"go Hawaiian" by mixing it with
Everclear.
Another thing 1 don't understand too
well are those legalized houses of pro-
stitution, like in Las Vegas, where
businessmen and gamblers can pay cash
for favors or even charge it on their
credit cards. Can you believe thaf
American Express prostitution! I guess
that's so a guy can leave home without
it and still get it.
I just don't know.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a noted
sports analyst and armchair quarterback
since way back in '63, has heard a lot of
baseball rumors floating around lately
but stilt finds it hard to believe that
George Steinbrenner is realty consider-
ing hiring Pope John Paul II as manager
for the 1984 Yankees.
mu utmm
'�-

A dancer in an aerohu w
Police D
'Synchro
B MIKE HUGH1 S
For most of us die: u
tans, those of us who e
and sleep (et nee: seem I
of) the terrific trio's neo-reggal
rock riffs, the group's
fort, Synchronicit). as I
time coming.
In fact, a'r
ago, the word in the j
foretold a dreadful rock b
Rumors had
bassist songwriter - v
and guitarist And v
would soon be calling
The Police and pun
careers. Fortunately,
rumors never material
Nevertheless, keep
"close call" (whether oi
really was a "dose call' i
while listening to Synchr
makes The Police's I
the more worth waiting
The title Synchroniat
from the psychoanalytic wri
of the late Car: June. �
troduced the theories o
sal collective unconsci us,
chetypes and deep-rooted s
natural influence on the
cience (i.e the spintus mund
Like I say, that's where the l
comes from. What th� hd
supposed to mean, I'm not eav
sure. And judging from rrevu
Police album titles. I'm
sure it is supposed "j
anything.
Like its predecessor, Ghost
the Machine. Synchrony
boasts a range of sounds
the familiar, uniquely Polia
in "O M God to the 41
Oriental "King of Pain
jungle tunes of "Walking
Footsteps A tew
sones
Martin C
Help Sta,
'Pippin'
It was announced todav th
Friends of the East Carolina
mer Theatre in Martin Cc
have gone over their quot
55,000 in donations to the th
one year ahead of schedule 1
last two years, the Friends of
tin Countv organized seera.
raising events for the theati
eluding their "An Evenin
Broadwav" benefit pro
and a champagne bi
breakfast. Putting Martin C
over the top was Rob�j
Products with its second dor1
of $1,000 in as many years
Edgar R- Loess.n,
ducer Director of the Uree
based Summer Theatre,
mented, "Martin County
first Eastern North Lai
county to go over its quota
kind of support is indicative
theatre spirit in Martin u
and of the organizers ot the
drive. We are most gratefuj
Chairing the Friends of M
County are Elbert5.ro
WiUiamston and Bn
Highsmith of RobersonvuU
Scheduled for Poductio
summer are Pipp (� '
Link fr Musk (July
1HIPi�ii"j"M mm





AjeU&ezm-
IT
f WHO IMAN15 W
IUTARY WWSUIT5,
Them?
FBI
for public officials to procure
o commit crimes unless they
unk crime has been committed in the
The judicial body hearing
Ireen's case would do uell to remember
Sunda) edition, the News and
Observer called for Green's resignation.
�n the other hand. Gov. Hunt has
d Green to remain in office until
cence or guilt has been determin-
court. " the lavi provides that you
nnocent until proen guilty Hunt
Thursda "It's a fundamental
cipal
Venn and Observer claims that
. because he's a public servant,
:�uld adhere to a higher standard than
which K merely legal. The editorial
nts out that questionable ethics
new situation for Green. He's
?en there in the past
rse, the decision rests entirely
I the shoulders of Green himself. Both
JHunt and the News and Observer have
I ressed important points. But now, it's
onl a court case but a game of cons-
Perhaps Green will be found
iiltv. Perhaps he will be acquitted on
the entrapment issue or on a technicali-
Hopefully, if the latter arises. Green
ould nevertheless resign. Because
when dealing with the ethical and legal
tcipals of our state's No. 2 legislator,
h tal is not enough.
�all
ysteries
nue to do Hawaiian Punch commer-
ials if they knew most college students
Hawaiian" by mixing it with
tverciear.
Another thing 1 don't understand too
well are those legalized houses of pro-
tution, like in Las Vegas, where
businessmen and gamblers can pay cash
or favors or even charge it on their
:redit cards. Can you believe that?
American Express prostitution! 1 guess
� hat's so a guy can leave home without
it and still get it.
I just don't know.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a noted
ports analyst and armchair quarterback
since way back in '63, has heard a lot of
baseball rumors floating around lately
but still finds it hard to believe that
IGeorge Steinbrenner is really consider-
hie hiring Pope John Paul II as manager
tor the 1984 Yankees.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 22, 19S3
Pate 5
Aerobic Dancing Has Fitness
Buffs Boogeying To The Beat
OARV FATTHSON - ICU PIMM I
A dancer in an aerobics workshop limbers up with exercises to increase strength and flexibility.
Police Deliver Fifth Album;
'Synchronicity9 Worth Wait
By MIKE HUGHES
Miaigmg tdilor
For most of us diehard Police
tans, those of us who eat, drink
and sleep (yet never seem to tire
of) the terrific trio's neo-reggae-
rock riffs, the group's latest ef-
fort, Synchronicity, was a long
time coming.
In fact, about six months or so
ago, the word in the music world
toretold a dreadful rock obituary.
Rumors had it that
bassist songwritersinger Sting
and guitarist Andy Summers
would soon be calling it quits with
The Police and pursuing solo
careers. Fortunately, those
umors never materialized.
Nevertheless, keeping this
close call" (whether or not it
really was a "close call") in mind
while listening to Synchronicity
makes The Police's fifth album all
the more worth waiting for.
The title Synchronicity comes
from the psychoanalytic writings
of the late Carl Jung, who in-
troduced the theories of a univer-
sal collective unconscious, ar-
chetypes and deep-rooted super-
natural influence on the cons-
cience (i.e the spiritus mundi).
Like I say, that's where the title
comes from. What the hell it's
supposed to mean, I'm not exactly
Nure. And judging from previous
Police album titles, I'm not even
sure it is supposed to mean
anything.
Like its predecessor, Ghost in
the Machine, Synchronicity
boasts a range of sounds: from
the familiar, uniquely Police beat
in "O My God to the quasi-
Oriental "King of Pain to the
jungle tunes of "Walking in Your
Footsteps A few songs have
familiar origins � the guitar work
in "Miss Gradenko" comes right
out of "Bring on the Night" from
Regatta de Blanc � but without a
doubt, this is a new album with
new songs.
Gone, for the most part, are the
big-band horns from Ghost in the
Machine. But back for a second
showing (in the album's first pop
release, "Every Breath You
Take") are the orchestral flavors
from "Every Little Thing She
Does is Magic And back again
(in "Walking in Your Footsteps")
are the nonsensical, Ogden Nash-
ish lyrics from the likes of "Any
Other Day" and "Be My Girl Sal-
ly
review"
All but two of 10 songs were
written by Sting. And not taking
anything away from the fine musi-
cianship of Summers and drum-
mer Stewart Copeland, but Sting
should have gone ahead and writ-
ten the other two.
Summers seems to be carrying
out some sort of John Lennon
motif, posing with an Oriental
woman and wearing half-dollar
sunglasses on the cover and
writing a song that sound in-
credibly like the Plastic Ono Band
at its worst. Anyone familiar with
the two-minute screech session in
Lennon's "Cold Turkey" will get
my meaning. But to top off the
rampant lyrics and unruly sounds,
he even goes so far as to borrow
an old Lennon song title,
"Mother If, indeed, there is a
wasted cut on the album �
although in most previous Police
albums, there is not � "Mother"
is certainly my choice.
I must admit, however, "Miss
Gradenko written by Copeland,
is a pretty sassy, upbeat tune, the
kind that stays with you all day.
Perhaps, in future efforts, Sum-
mers should stick to his guitar and
bequeath his one song an album
to Copeland.
The title cuts are probably the
album's best offerings:
"Synchronicity I a snappy go-
getter with its lyrical correlation
(more or less) to Jung's
psychoanalytical writings, and
"Synchronicity II a quick-
moving, yet heavy-handed,
parodycommentary on 20th cen-
tury society.
On side two, ironically
(considering America's usually
discouraging taste in music), the
best cut is the pop ballad single
"Every Breath You Take The
other three � "King of Pain
"Wrapped Around Your Finger"
and "Tea in the Sahara" � are
definitely the kinds of songs that
grow more appealing with every
listen, but quite frankly, I find
them just a bit depressing.
But all in all, like I said before,
if you like Sting, Andy and Stew,
Synchronicity was well worth
waiting a year and a half for.
Unlike a lot of albums released
these days, the more you listen to
Synchronicity, the more you'll
like it. All 10 songs are unique in
musical style, yet each is has that
deep-down sound that is unique-
ly The Police.
Albums courtesy of Record Bar.
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Writtr
With summer well under way,
you're likely to see a vast number
of people jogging and biking
across campus. If you ask these
folks what motivates them during
such a hot season of the year,
you're likely to get such responses
as "to stay in shape "for relax-
ation and enjoyment or "as a
way to get to and from class
So what about the other 36
million Americans who exercise
three or more times a week? How
do they stay in shape? Many par-
ticipate in aerobic dancing, an ex-
ercise program which focuses on
cardiovascular fitness and fun.
According to Ted Kreiter of The
Saturday Evening Post, this
fitness craze is "a unique hybrid
of pure exercise and chorus line
dance steps
Aerobic dancing was created in
1969 by Jacki Sorenscn. While liv-
ing in Puerto Rico, she was asked
to prepare an exercise program
for the wives of the Air Force men
stationed there. Sorensen studied
the aerobics program developed
by Dr. Kenneth Cooper and later
took his 12-minute running test.
After performing well on the test,
she realized that her lifetime of
dancing had kept her heart and
lungs, as well as her figure, in
shape. That conclusion gave her
the idea of combining dance with
aerobic exercise.
Technically, aerobic dancing is
a physical fitness program that
conditions the muscles, heart,
lungs and blood vessels by deman-
ding that this internal life-
supporting system strengthen
through healthy use.
The program involves vigorous
jumping, kicking and bending to
the beat of music; it offers a
stimulating and challenging
workout with many of the same
benefits that jogging, bike riding
and swimming provide.
There are several reasons
aerobics is so appealing � and
popular. First, aerobic dancing is
an individualized progam.
Workout participants decide for
themselves when to walk, jog or
run the dances. Students are en-
couraged to "do-your -own-
thing" in regard to both style and
intensity level.
Second, progress can be easily
observed by monitoring the three
heart rates of interest in aerobic
dancing: resting heart rate, work-
ing heart rate and recovery or
cool-down heart rate.
Resting heart rate indicates how
hard the heart is working normal-
ly. The average RHR is 78-84
beats per minute for women and
72-78 for men. Healthy persons
may find that as they become in-
volved in aerobic dancing,their
resting heart rate decreases
significantly, indicating that the
heart has become stronger.
Working heart rate indicates
the intensity and effectiveness of
the workout. As the exercise
becomes vigorous, the heartbeat
increases to supply more oxygen
to the muscles. This develops
aerobic fitness.
The cool-down heart rate is
taken five minutes after exercise
has stopped. It indicates how the
intensity level has affected the
body.
Perhaps the most encouraging
reason to "aerobicise" is for the
visible changes � the loss of un-
wanted inches and a firmer phisi-
que.
If combined with a sensible
diet, weight loss may occur
because the workouts are high col-
one burners and demand a lot of
energy. Participants burn about
500 colories in a vigorous
45-minute class, which compares
with swimming for one hour at 30
yards per minute. For as long as
six hours after the workout, one
can expect to burn twice as many
calories resting as would normally
be used up at rest.
Hunger is also regulated as
blood is "borrowed" from the
less active blood systems such as
the stomach and is delivered to the
more active skeletal muscle
system. Until the blood supply
returns to the stomach, the desire
for food is diminished.
Aerobic fitness produces other
beneficial results besides the loss
of inches and pounds. As par-
ticipants progress, they build up
tolerance and can continue ac-
tivities for reasonably long
periods of time without becoming
breathless or overly fatigued. The
body also recovers more quickly
from active workouts.
Most aerobic dancers report
having more daily energy and
healthier complexions; this is at-
tibuted to improved blood circula-
tion. Aerobic dancing increases
flexibility, balance, coordination,
body control, rhythm and dancing
ability. The conditioning program
itself combines flexibility training,
muscle toning and endurance.
A typical dance class begins
with a 10- to 15-minute period of
stretching exercises and sit-ups
followed by six to 10 aerobic
dances. Heart rates are monitored
after each dance to ensure that
they reach working level but do
not exceed safe limits. After about
45 minutes, class ends with a slow
cool-down dance and some post-
See AEROBICS, Page o
Park Concerts Swing
By PHER RING
Staff Writer
What contains people of all
ages, an assortment of dogs, and
is surrounded by kudzu? The
answer is the amphitheater
located on the corner of Reade
and Fourth Streets, which once a
week becomes the setting for A
Sunday In The Park. If you have
not found time to go by and see
any of this summer's perfor-
mances, perhaps you should.
There is a little something for
everyone.
Last Sunday's performance
featured a popular local group
known as The Rutabaga Brothers
and The Lemon Sisters. During
the evening it was obvious that
their style of jazz and swing ap-
pealed to everybody in the au-
dience � even the dogs who
lounged contentedly by their
owners' sides. At intermission the
crowd was treated to a few selec-
tions performed by Wilson
Dubois on a set of steel drums.
The final set ended the evening on
a pleasant note as parents retriev-
ed their children from the kudzu
and directed them toward the
parking lot.
Now in its 11th summer, Sun-
day In The Park is a series of per-
formances sponsored by the
Greenville Department of Parks
and Recreation. It was originally
the idea of Boyd Lee and Stuart
Aronson, who felt that Greenville
needed some type of cultural ac-
tivity that would bring together
members of the local community.
"At first it was hard to get
funds said Aronson. "But as
the city began to make more
money available, we were able to
line up a greater variety of acts
In the past years, the Sunday In
The Park series has presented a
number of different acts such as
the Marine Corps Band and
various symphonies from around
the state. One year, there was een
an ice show performed onstage us-
ing a layer of synthetic ice.
There will be four more pro-
grams this summer, with the jazz
group The Monitors lined up for
the 26th. On July 3, Sunday In
The Park will feature a swing
ensemble along with a jitterbug
contest, followed by the Green-
ville debut of the Sweet Adelines
with an accompanying barber-
shop quartet on July 10. The
series will conclude on July 17
with the Eastern Symphonet,
directed by East Carolina's
Robert House.
Martin County Funds
Help Stage Musicals;
'Pippin' Opens July 4
It was announced today that the
Friends of the East Carolina Sum-
mer Theatre in Martin County
have gone over their quota of
$5,000 in donations to the theatre
one year ahead of schedule. In the
last two years, the Friends of Mar-
tin County organized several fund
raising events for the theatre in-
cluding their "An Evening of
Broadway" benefit production
and a champagne buffet
breakfast. Putting Martin County
over the top was Robersonville
Products with its second donation
of $1,000 in as many years.
Edgar R. Loessin, Pro-
ducerDirector of the Greenville-
based Summer Theatre, com-
mented, "Martin County is the
first Eastern North Carolina
county to go over its quota. This
kind of support is indicative of the
theatre spirit in Martin County
and of the organizers of the fund
drive. We are most grateful
Chairing the Friends of Martin
County are Elbert S. Peel of
Williamston and Brownie
Highsmith of Robersonville.
Scheduled for productioni this
summer are Pippin (July 4-9) .4
Little Night Music (July 1M6),
So, No, Nanette (July 18-23) and
They're Playing Our Song (July
25-30).
In discussing this season's com-
pany, Loessin said, "We have a
top-notch group of performers
this year. The veterans have very
impressive and distinguished
credits in musical comedy both on
stage and film but also on televi-
sion, and our younger performers
come from 23 different univer-
sities throughout the nation
In addition to the actors,
singers and dancers, the company
includes an orchestra of 25 musi-
cians, some 30 technicians and a
business and front-of-the-house
staff of 10, making a total of
more than 100 people who make
the large musicals happen each
week.
Season tickets are still available
for Tuesday through Saturday
evening performances at 8:15.
Monday evenings are sold out.
Telephone reservations are being
accepted for individual tickets as
well. Reservations and further in-
formation may be obtained by
visiting the Box Office in McGin-
nis Theatre or by calling 757-6390.
Shoot 9Em Up, Boys
With furn Mazing aad dust flying, the Jam
saaall jridweat towa to stage a baak robbery hi 'The Long Utters edy
Ml Monday's f p.m. flat at Mraieaaal. Toaagat at Nkfc Kafhj oaJoha

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 22. IY�i
t
July Preview: Films Due To Hit
By STEVE
BACHNER
Staff Writer
Looking ahead to
July on the summer
movie slate, this is
what the trade
publications are tell-
ing us we can look
forward to � all of
them major studio
releases:
COMING IN JULY
Brainstorm
(MGM): Christopher
Walken, Cliff Robert-
son, Louise Fletcher
and the late Natalie
Wood. Suspense story
about a research team
that creates a revolu-
tionary communica-
tions device.
Porky's 11The
Next Day (Fox): The
original cast returns
for the further raun-
chy highjinks of high
school students grow-
ing up in Florida in
the midSOs.
Mr. Mom (Fox):
Michael Keaton and
Teri Garr. Role rever-
sal comedy "in which
the wife brings home
the bacon and the
husband burns it
Class (Orion): Jac-
queline Bisset, Cliff
Robertson and Rob
Lowe. Comedy about
awakening sexuality
and the friendship of
two prep school
seniors.
Krull (Columbia):
A kidnapped princess,
a powerful beast and
a brave warrior meet
on a distant planet in
this fantasy adventure
starring Ken Marshall
and Lysette Anthony.
Directed by Peter
Yates.
Staying Alive
(Paramount): The
return of Saturday
Sight Fever's Tony
Manero (John
Travolta) as he pur-
sues a career on
Broadway. Directed
by Sylvester Stallone.
Stroker Ace
(Universal): Burt
Reynolds is a flam
boyant stock car
driver. With Loni
AnderbO and Ned
Beatty as a fried
chicken minimagnate.
Jans 3-D
(Universal): And yet
another Great White
loose, this time ter-
rorizing unwitting
tourists at Sea World.
Dennis Quaid, Bess
Armstrong and Louis
Gossett Jr.
Private School
(Universal): Raucous
goings-on in a girls'
prep school. Phoebe
Cates.
Snow White and
the Seven Dwarfs
(Buena Vista): The
sixth reissue of the
1937 Disney classic.
National Lam-
poon's Vacation
(Warner Bros.): Dad
(Chevy Chase) decides
to take his family on
the best vacation
they've ever had � a
cross-country tour of
America. Beverly
D'Angelo.
Zelig (Warner
Bros.): Says a shy
studio publicist about
Woody Allen's latest,
"A daring,
outrageous new Film
in a never-before-seen
format Mia Farrow
co-stars.
Mike's Murder
(Warner Bros.):
Director James
Bridges' love story
about a young
woman's obsession to
learn about her
boyfriend's murder.
Debra Winger.
Aerobics Tones Bodies
Continued From Page 5
cool-down stretches to gradually
bring heart rates down.
Classes have popped up all over
the United States. Each year
several aerobic dance workshops
are offered to ECU students for a
small fee. Several classes are of-
fered to girls' dorm residents.
And PL 1000 offers aerobic dance
as an elective. The class, taught by
Jo Saunders, emphasizes
cardiovascular-respiratory fitness.
If you're hooked into the cable
television system, you've pro-
bably caught a glimpse of The
Richard Simmons Show, Aerobic
Dancing or Aerobicise.
If you're willing to pay a little
more to get a little extra, you can
join local fitness centers such as
The Aerobics Workshop, The
Body Shop or The Spa. Besides
taking their choice of several
aerobic dance classes per day,
members can work out individual-
ly with weight equipment. Some
establishments offer luxuries such
as saunas and whirlpools.
Aerobic dancing can also be
done in the privacy of the home.
All that's neded is an open space
and a favorite record. Because of
its adaptability, aerobic dancing
appeals to people of all ages.
r
I.AITARES JEWELERS
EtT�.�. SHHJ 112
jr?�yrefe ted fe�e(t 4mewa $�m Stvu I
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6 oz. Beef Tips and Salad Bar $3.99
8 oz. Chopped Sirloin and Salad Bar $3.99
4 oz. Sirloin and Salad Bar $3.99
Served with King Idaho Baked Potato
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Lunch Specials 11-2
4 oz. Sirloin $2.19 wSalad Bar $3.19
6 oz. Cubed Steak $2.49 w Salad Bar $3.49
lb. Hamburger and Salad Bar $2.79
I
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WEEKEND SPECIALS
(Tints Extra) No Other Coupon� AdpIicable;
THIS AD MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER
(OFFER GOOD THRU Junr 30, 1983
w
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CAl P AN
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June 24th, 25th, 26th
Buy one 8 l2oz. N.Y. Strip Reg. Price $5.89
Get Second 8 l2oz. N.Y. Strip 12 Price $2.95
11 Steak Dinners Served With King Idaho Baked
Potato or French Fries and Texas Toast
!
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Now Serving Surf and Turf
Also Prime Rib every Friday and Saturday Night
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W.Greenville Blvd.
2903 E. 10th St.
L.
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Each of thM tdvftiMd fnt � r�quwd to &� '��driy availabt tor ���� �' or
bolow the advofti�d prc m �ach AAP Storv aicapt a �paciftcally notad
in ttiis ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT JUNE 25 AT A4P IN
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILAbLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLES
Greenville Square Shopping Center
703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N.C.
TOUR fl&P COUNTRY STORE
DOUBLE COUPONS
FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND WE WILL DOUBLE
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ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
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GOOD THRU SAT JUNE 25 AT AAP m66Q
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OLE CAROLINA
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WESTERN
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WHOLE
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ith Quality
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WESTERN GROWN
RIPE
each
only
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OAKMC
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Susan Rime
Four
Intrai
Aerobic Fitnt
tion
Reg:raon
sion of aer,
continue througl
in Memorial Gl
The cost foi I
for student ani
ty, staft and 9
begin Mondav
July 28 The fol
the classe offq
5:15 to 6 15 �
dance roo
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same room. Lumj
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TAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALE'S
oping Center
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 22, 1983
Pa�e 7
Nelson Conquers Oakmont For Title
OAKMONT, Pa. (AP) � u
would be easy to lose Larry
elson in a crowd. No trouble at
all.
He is 5-foot-9. 155 pounds, a
soft-spoken, slight man, 35 years
old and fighting a rececding
hairline. He looks exactly like
your next-door neighbor.
1 xcept for one thing. Your
next door neighbor isn't the reign-
ing United States Open Golf
Tournament king.
I arry Nelson is.
Nelson captured one of golf's
most treasured crowns, shooting a
t'our-under-par 67 for the rain
delayed final 18 holes at the Oak-
mont Country Club to finish at
280, one stroke ahead of defen-
ding champion Tom Watson.
It was not as easy as it sounds.
Nelson neede a spectacular
62-foot putt to take the lead, then
survived a bogey on his final hole
of the day when Watson obliging-
ly bogeyed No. 17.
After a torrential rain storm
suspended the tournament's last
round action Sunday, the two
men went into their final holes
Monday tied for the lead at four-
under. Watson was putting at No.
14, Nelson teeing off at No. 16
when play resumed.
"When I went to the practice
tee, 1 knew the distance (228 yards
on the par-3 16th) and I would
have to hit a 4-wood Nelson
said. "I hit a few more than
usual
Still, his drive didn't seem to
leave him in particularly good
shape.
"I hit to the left of the green
he said. He was some 60 feet away
from the cup. "Not an easy
putt decided Nelson.
The 16th at Oakmont is
somewhat of a roller-coaster hole.
"There are three terraces and I
was on the one Nelson explain-
ed. "They're all downhill with lit-
tle left and right breaks. It's the
fastest green on the whole
course
Nelson, not one to challenge the
course, figured he'd play the hole
conservatively.
"I wasn't thinking about
anything except getting close
enough to the hole to make the
next putt he said. "You can't
make it from 60 feet
Nelson putted and the ball
started its roller coaster ride
toward the hole.
"Close to the hole, it started
slowing down, but it had the right
speed over the last rise said
Nelson.
As the ball slid smoothly over
the grass, Nelson's caddy, Russ
Craver, shouted "Break! Break
The putt obeyed, breaking soft-
ly into the hole as both Craver and
Nelson did a little dance.
�'I couldn't just stand there and
wait explained Nelson. "You
don't hit many of those
Armed with the lead, Nelson
very nearly gave it back. After
parring No. 17, he ran into trou-
ble with a bogey on the 18th hole.
It left him at 280, 4-under for the
tournament. Now, Watson, who
had played par golf on 14-15-16,
controlled his own fate.
"I was through said Nelson.
"It was up to him. I had finished
72 holes 4-under. If he's 5-under,
he beats me. Four-under, we tie.
Three-under, 1 win
Nelson figured there was
nothing he could do but just sit
back and wait. But he didn't have
to wait long, because on 17, Wat-
son found problems of his own.
His second landed in a bunker on
the right side of the green.
A year ago, in a similar situa-
tion in the Open at Pebble Beach,
Watson had hit a spectacular chip
shot for a birdie that clinched the
championship for him.
"Yeah, I thought about making
it he said. "1 thought about
Pebble Beach
He did not drop this shot but he
had no complaints with it. "I hit
one of my best bunker shots he
said.
It left him with a seven foot par
putt, but he missed it. leaving
himself almost the same distance
coming back. This one dropped
for bogey, but still he was just a
shot away with one hole to go.
"It was the bottom of the ninth
and I had to hit a home run. I
didn't do it
Instead, he made par. .com-
pleting his round with a dazzling
50-foot putt that still left him one
shot behind.
"I thought I would have to
shoot 68 to win and that's exactly
what it took sighed Watson.
who had a 69. "A good guess
U.S. Open Highlights Week In Sports
Roberto Daran defeated Davey Moore last week to capture the WBA
junior middleweight title. With the victory, Duran returned to the
form that helped him rule the lightweight division in the 70s.
GOLF: Larry Nelson rolled in
a 60-foot putt on the 16th hole
Monday morning to capture the
1983 U.S. Open with a one-shot
victory over defending cham-
pion Tom Watson.
Nelson's four-round score of
280 included record-breaking
scores of 65 and 67 over the last
two rounds. The two-round, 132
finish broke the old mark by
four strokes.
Sunday's fourth round was
suspended due to a
thunderstorm that rolled into the
Oakmont, Pa. countryside.
Nelson had three holes to play
on Monday morning, and
started things off with the
60-foot shot � his first putt of
the day.
BASEBALL: The Montreal
Expos crept past the St. Louis
Cardinals this week to take over
the top spot in the National
League East division. The Expos
join the Los Angeles Dodgers,
Baltimore .Oriojes and Califor-
nia Angels as division leaders, as
of Tuesday morning.
A look back at the standings
at this same point last year
shows that the Angels are the on-
ly team who were in first place
on June 21. The Angels had a
one-game lead over Kansas City
last year in the American League
West and are currently enjoying
a two and one-half game lead
over the Royals.
Sports Update
At this point last year in the
American League East, the
Orioles were in fourth place, five
games behind the Boston Red
Sox. Last year's pennant win-
ners, the Milwaukee Brewers,
were four games back last year
and are now eight games behind
the front-running Orioles.
The Cardinals, who went on
to win the World Series last year,
were one game in front of the
Expos in their battle for the Na-
tional League East crown. In the
West, the Atlanta Braves were
still stunning the baseball world
as they had a three and one-half
game lead over the San Diego
Padres and five and one-half
over the Dodgers.
This season, the Expos are
one-half game in front of the
Cardinals and the Dodgers have
stretched their lead to four and
one-half games over the Braves.
BOXING: Roberto Duran
helped erase the memories of the
infamous "no mas" fight with
Sugar Ray Leonard as he
defeated Davey Moore Thursday
night to capture the World Box-
ing Association junior mid-
dleweight title.
Duran, who celebrated his
32nd birthday with the eight-
round victory over Moore, now
has a career record of 76-4 with
57 knockouts. He is only the
seventh man in history to win the
title in three divisions �
lightweight, welterweight and,
now, junior middleweight.
TRACK AND FIELD: In this
weekend's USA-Mobil Outdoor
Track and Field Championships,
Carl Lewis won the 100-meter
dash, 200-meter dash and the
long jump. All three perfor-
mances are the best ever at sea
level, since all three world
records were set in the high
altitudes of Mexico City.
Lewis is the first man to win
both sprints and the long jump
since Malcolm Ford did it in
1886.
AUTO RACING: Cale Yar
borough took over the lead with
12 laps remaining and never
relinquished it Sunday on the
way to capturing the NASCAR
Michigan 400. Yarborough
finished 1.01 seconds ahead of
Bobby Allison to win the race
for the second straight year.
BASKETBALL: On Monday.
the official all-NBA team was
announced. The guards were
Earvin "Magic" Johnson of Los
Angeles and Sidney Moncrief of
Milwaukee. The forwards were
Julius Erving of Philadelphia
and Larry Bird of Boston. The
center was, of course, Moses
Malone. Earlier, Malone had
been named the league's Most
Valuable Player.
BASEBALL TRIVIA: Who is
the Atlanta Braves' all-time
leader in stolen bases? Answer
in next week's paper.
Wimbledon's Top Seeds Win First Rounds
Martina Navratilova, Chris
Evert Lloyd and Andrea Jaeger,
the top three seeds at Wimbledon,
notched three straight-set victories
Tuesday against their opening-
round opponents at the
Wimbledon Tennis champion-
ships.
Defending Champion
Navratilova breezed through her
opening round, taking just 32
minutes to beat South African
Beverly Mould, 6-1, 6-0.
Navratilova conceded only 17
points in the match.
Evert Lloyd, who says she's
hungry for Wimbledon and is not
concerned about Navratilova,
beat U.S. opponent Alycia
Moulton, 6-2, 6-1.
Third-seeded Jaeger nailed
Susan Rimes, 6-1, 7-6.
Fourth-seeded Tracy Austin
was the only major casualty at
Wimbledon. The 20-year-old
Californian was forced to
withdraw because of a pulled
muscle in her right shoulder.
A semifinalist in 1979 and 1980,
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
Austin hurt her shoulder during
practice nine days ago. Austin
says it will take six to seven days
to heal completely.
In men's singles, third-seeded
Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia,
overcame his dislike for grass with
a straight-set win over South
African Bernie Mitton. Vitas
Gerulaitis, however, had to strug-
gle to beat India's Ramesh
Krishman. The New York native
finally won in five sets; 5-7, 7-5,
7-6, 5-7 and 6-3. In another
match, Johann Kriek scored a 6-4,
6-3, 6-2 victory over Sammy
Giammalva.
Competition begins on a very
limited scale today at the National
Sports Festival in Colorado Spr-
ings, Colo. The opening-day
agenda features figure skating and
the preliminaries in the three-
meter diving.
Former Wisconsin Basketball
Coach Bill Cofield died in a
Madison Hospital late Monday
night of cancer. He was 43 years
old. Cofield spend six seasons as
the Badgers' head coach before
resigning under fire last year. His
overall record at Wisconsin was
61 � 103.
Michael Gross of West Ger-
many set a world record in the
200-meter freestyle during the
West German Swimming Cham-
pionships Tuesday. Gross was
clocked in one minute, 48 and
28-hundredths seconds � 65 hun-
dredths of a second faster than the
previous mark held by American
Randy Gaines.
Former Duke Basketball Star
Bob Bender has been named assis-
tant coach for the Blue Devils.
Bender played point guard for
Duke from 1978 until 1980. Dur-
ing that time, Bender helped the
Blue Devils capture two con-
ference championships and an ap-
pearance in the 1978 NCAA
championship game. For the past
two years, Bender has served as
assistant director of Duke's
athletic fund-raising organization
� The Iron Dukes.
The NBA Board of Governors
adopted a resolution today that
will expand the playoff field from
12 to 16 teams.
Beginning next season, eight
teams from each conference will
make the playoffs. The best-of-
three mini series will be abandon-
ed in favor of a best-of-five
match-up, and division winners
will no longer be entitled to first-
round byes.
In matters of player movement,
the board said no sale or trade of
a first-round draft pick will be
permitted if it leaves the team
without a first-round pick in two
consecutive years. It was also
decided that between Dec. 15 and
the end of the playoffs, no player
can be sold for more than
$300,000.
The board also approved the
sale of the Kansas City Kings to a
group of investors from
Sacramento, Calif. Joseph
Benvenuto will own 50 percent of
the team.
Tony Ayala, the World Boxing
Association's top-ranked junior
middleweight, was sentence to 35
years in prison Tuesday for the
rape of a New Jersey woman on
New Year's Day. The 20-year-old
fighter must serve at least 15 years
before he is eligible for parole.
His attorney says he will appeal.
Intramural Services
Sneaker Sam Sez
Aerobic Fitness Class Registra-
tion
Registration for the second ses-
sion of aerobic fitness classes will
continue through Friday, June 24
in Memorial Gym, Room 204.
The cost for the classes is $8.00
for students and $10.00 for facul-
ty, staff and spouse. Classes will
begin Monday, June 27 and end
July 28. The following is a list of
the classes offered: Mon Wed.
5:15 to 6:15 in Memorial Gym
dance room (108) and
TuesThurs. 5:15 to 6:15 the
same room. Lucy Mauger will be
the instructor for both of the
classes.
Co-Rec Volleyball Champs
Intramural volleyball came to a
close as the predicted favorite,
One Last Snatch, successfully
defended the race for the crown.
The fierce GMR All Stars fought
their way into the playoffs with
exciting play. Even though play
was tough, the All Stars could not
keep up the pace against the
smooth, mechanical team, One
Last Snatch.
3-on-3 Basketball
3-on-3 basketball came to an
exciting finish as B-Loose and The
Enforcers met for the slam, bam
finals. Both teams possessed ex-
cellent ability but only one team
could be crowned the champions.
B-Loose led throughout the game
until the score was 19-13 in favor
of B-Loose and the game ap-
peared to be all but over. The En-
forcers, however, began to catch
fire and the ball began falling
through the hoop. B-Loose was
up to the final challenge even
though the final drive by the En-
forcers was strong and B-Loose
held on to capture the 3-on-3
basketball championship.
SECOND SESSION ROLLS
IN
The second of summer school
begins with a bang for
Intramural-Recreational Services.
Tomorrow night, June 23,
Memorial Gym will be the place to
be for fun and enjoyment. Video
Games Rec Night starts off the se-
cond session. This is a unique op-
portunity to play the machines for
free, recreate playing volleyball,
badminton and basketball, take a
dip in the pool, and socialize with
friends. All this action will take
place at Memorial Gym beginning
at 7 p.m. and ending at 9 p.m.
tomorrow night. You can also fill
up on popcorn and soft drinks.
Throughout the second session
there will be opportunities to par-
ticipate in your favorite activities.
Tennis, co-rec volleyball, tube
water volleyball, putt putt golf,
one-on-one basketball, Prediction
Run, softball tourney and golf
will be offered for your enjoy-
ment. Stop by the Intramural-
Recreational Services office in
Memorial 204 for all the informa-
tion about the summer
intramural-recreational program.
The ECU Intramarals
one-on-one basketball.
, � .1 I � �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 22. 19t3
Billy C. Signs
PHILADEPHIA
(AP) � BiUy Cunn-
ingham has reaped his
reward for leading the
Philadelphia 76ers to
the National Basket-
ball Championship �
a three-year contract
making him the
highest paid coach in
the history of the
league.
Cunningham has
signed a contract
estimated at $400,000
per year, which ended
speculation he in-
itiated that he might
give up coaching.
Club owner Harold
Katz told a news con-
ference Monday,
"Billy is the highest
paid coach in the
NBA, and probably in
the history of the
NBA
Katz said the only
reason it took so long
to agree on the con-
tract was Cunn-
ingham's decision on
whether he wanted to
come back and devote
another three years to
basketball.
"He took his time
and as far as I'm con-
cerned the best thing
Billy does is coach,
and I told him that
people should stay in
the profession that
they do best
Cunningham, 40,
said that the most im-
portant thing in his
deciding to return was
Katz.
Classifieds
TYPING: TERM PAPERS.
ESSAYS and RESUMES. IBM
SELECTRIC TYPEWRITER
and CAMERA-READY
RESUME SERVICE. Call
MIKE at 7H-�ft4.
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SIONAL TYPING. MM Sete-
trie III. Julia Bloodworth
7S-7l74.
NCEO A tutor? I am an ECU
graduate. I graduated with a
3 so GPA. I have the ability to
tutor Matti 1043 and IMS at wall
as Spanish ). I will work around
your schedule and I charge
below the going rate If you are
interested, call Mary at 7U-S3U
betw�n I a.m. and H p.m.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
1 bedroom apartment an lt
Street Rant tm.Mme ptwa 11
utiimes Now or fall semester.
Call 7Sa-�m.
YARD SALE. S14 East 1st
Street on Saturday morning
EVERYTHING GOES.
FOR SALE: SURFBOARD
twin-fin Sunshine Excellent
condition. HH.M negotiable
Call KEN. 7SI-S13S.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
5 P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
�LASAGNA
�SPAGHETTI
(Choice of 3 Sauces)
with Garlic Bread
i ati you can tat soup i
$3.99
$4.99
cveey-woa 1 OQ
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT oWmW
FLOUNDER DINNER
also Optn Fri. and So.
I nights midnight-3 a.m.
breakfast Bar open 6:00am
SHONEYS
205
Shrimp lovers
Why travel 100 miles
to the beach and pay
high prices for
fresh shrimp?
Popcorn
&A Shrimp
vo�d $3.25
TO &z&
:amily Restaurants

J9L.7

A WHALE OF A MEAL
Whole Baby
Flounder
$3.25
Wednesday and Thursday Only
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327
USOA Chalet Beef Cheek
Beee-le
USOA
CHOICE
These wieet good
thra Saturday,
Jaae 25,1983
lb.
USOA Ckoici tttf Roari - BoHon
Round
Roast
Lb.
4-8 Lbs. Averse
Fresh
Picnics
$����
Peaches
2 LiUr
Phf. 11 � It 0i. CMS Caiklli Blue. Pitk Ca�li. OiImi, IUJIUm
Pk. �f 11 -1 0i. H ���"
Miller
Beer 1 Milwaukee I Wine
Gallo
k. am. A
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52 Onmci
22 Ounce
Self Otll.t
x

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Why Pay M 19
Why Pay 1.19
Donald Duck
Orange
Juice
119 Sheets 2 Ply
oowuo "�
: sodri
HniiN
Towels LSODRJ
Why Pay S9
0rJS
49 0mm
Cold Power
10 Oaate
Jeno's Pizza
Naif OtllM � Wkltt Hem
js Juico
99
U Ot. - UMf �
Luncheon H
489.
4.5 Oi. � lrd�rKW��fSttrtf $�� � Cat f�4
Purina 100
289
1? St. � WMeertN. $��
MMoirtiOoMMCwa
59
14 Ot. Ca� - CMHii �HVk�ttttammH
Alfro Doe Food
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1.09
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White
Cloud
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Duke's
Vur�triM QiMntft
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 22, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 22, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.273
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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