The East Carolinian, June 15, 1983






(Bht iEaat (Earolmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 N044 (,?(
Wednesday June 15,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Education School Begins Restructuring Effort
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Assistant News hditor
The ECU School of Education
made public the first steps
towards regaining accredidation
for its teacher education pro-
grams. A planned proposal for
administrative restructuring
within the school was announced
during a faculty senate meeting
last week.
The education school, which
directly oversees nearly 40 pro-
grams in teacher education, was
denied re-accreditation by the Na-
tional Council for the Accredita-
tion of Teacher Education last
March. Less than a month later,
the North Carolina Board of
Education took similar action by
putting the school on probation.
"We have completed an ad-
ministrative and policy-making
organization that we confidently
expect the teacher education ac-
crediting bodies will feel accep-
table said Chancellor John M.
Howell in a formal announcement
last Tuesday.
"I am extremely pleased by the
cooperative effort that was put
forth by the faculty and the ad-
ministration in bringing about this
new organizational structure
said Angelo Volpe, vice-
chancellor for academic affairs.
Volpe stressed the point that ECU
officials have been working close-
ly with NCATE and state officials
to make changes in the their areas
of concern.
Volpe reinterated the fact that
the quality of ECU's teacher
education programs was never in
question, but rather the gover-
nance of such programs.
Charles Coble, dean of the
School of Education, was also
confident the restructuring would
assure ECU accreditation. "We
have put together the strongest
organization for teacher educa-
tion in the state of North
Carolina Coble said. "Dozens
and dozens of people have been
part of driving the plan
The new plan will increase the
administrative power of the dean
of the School of Education by giv-
ing them direct responsibility for
all programs within the school. It
also creates a Council of Teacher
Education to assist the dean. The
members of the faculty senate en-
dorsed the new proposals at Tues-
day's meeting.
"The document that we have
approved today stresses more ad-
ministrative power in the office of
the Dean of the School of Educa-
tion by assigning him the
university-wide function of direc-
tor of teacher education wrote
Howell in his statement.
The new council will assist the
dean in a wide variety of educa-
tional matters.
Both NCATE and the state
cited the School of Education as
lacking a centralized authority
over its programs. ECU officials
are confident the new layout will
meet the criteria of both ac-
creditational bodies.
"There is no doubt that the
Teacher Education Council,
under the leadership of the dean
of the School of Education, who
will function as the permanent
director of teacher education, will
lead to more centralized authority
and responsibility for teacher
education programs on our cam-
pus Volpe said.
Coble said a re-visit was
scheduled with NCATE for
March 18, 1984. The revisit from
the N.C. Board of Education has
not been decided.
The Council of Teacher Educa-
tion will have about 28 members,
HmH By OA�Y PATTERSON ECU P��� L��
Education students were pleased to be informed of the new guidelines set by the School of Education to
begin the process towards re-accreditation.
UNC Governors Appoint New Trustees To Board
Bv GREG RIDEOLT
Newt I dm
Trustee Sam Wornom
The appointment of two new
ECU Board of Trustees members
and the reappointment of two old
members of the board was an-
nounced by the UNC Board of
Governors Friday.
Chairman C. Ralph Kinsey Jr.
of Charlotte and board member
Harvey E. Beech of Kinston were
reappointed for four-year terms
beginning July 1. Kinsey was
elected chairman in January 1983.
The two members are Samuel J.
Wornom III of San ford and
William Riley Roberson III of
Washington.
Kinsey has served on the
Academic Affairs Committee, the
Student Life Development Com-
mittee and the board s Executive
Committee. He received a degree
in business from ECU in 1964 and
a law degree from UNC-Chapel
Hill. Kinsey is a partner in the law
office of Caudle, Underwood and
Kinsey of Charlotte.
Beech was first elected to the
board in 1979 and is currently the
secretary of the board. Beech was
the first black to receive a law
degree from UNC-Chapel Hill.
An active civic leader in Kinston,
Beech has served as chairman of
the Kinston School Board and has
been a trustee at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
Wornom, 41, is a member of
the ECU Alumnus Association
and a member of the Chancellor's
society. He received a degree in
business administration from
ECU and is owner and founder of
the Pantry Stores headquartered
in Sanford.
Wornom was named ECU's
outstanding alumnus in 1980.
Roberson is vice president for
sales of the North Carolina Dr.
Pepper Bottlers Inc. The 36-vear-
old attended ECU and is a
graduate of the UNC-Chapel Hill
Young Executive Institute. Rober-
son is a member of the executive
boards of the ECU Foundation
and the Educational foundation.
Roberson is also a Navy veteran
and a past member of the
Washington Chamber of Com-
merce.
The ECU Board of Trustees
oversees the university's actions.
World News
Reagan Feeling The Heat
CHICAGO � June's first heat wave baked the
East Coast for the fourth straight day today, and
forecasters said the scorching temperatures would
linger through the week. Dozens of tornadoes
roared through the Plains, knocking out power and
injuring eight people.
WASHINGTON � The U.S. Civil Rights Com-
mission releases a draft report Tuesday that
criticizes President Reagan for failing to appoint
more blacks, women and Hispanics to high-level
federal positions, a spokeswoman for the agency
said. The commission met Monday to discuss its
draft statement on minority hiring, three weeks
after President Reagan announced his intention to
replace three members of the commission.
WARSAW, Poland � The Solidarity
underground warned Poles Tuesday not to expect a
miracle from Pope John Paul IPs upcoming visit.
Authorities indicated the pope would not meet with
labor leader Lech Walesa.
WASHINGTON � President Reagan starts a
two-day trip to push for his key education goals in-
cluding merit pay for teachers, to educators,
government officials and tax-paying parents.
Reagan's trip includes lunch today with teachers in
Tennessee and an address Wednesday to a PTA
convention in New Mexico.
WASHINGTON � West Virginia, at 19 per-
cent, remained the highest unemployment state in
the nation during April, despite an improved level
from the previous month, the Labor Department
reported Tuesday. Johnstown, Pa also retained
its status as having the highest jobless rate among
metropolitan areas at 24.4 percent.
MOSCOW � Politburo member Konstantin
Chernenko Tuesday delivered a keynote address to
the Communist Party Central Committee.
Chernenko, 71, broke a seven-month public silence
Kremlin watchers interpreted as a sign his influence
was on the wane.
MINNEAPOLIS � Negotiators for struggling
Republic Airlines and union mechanics met
through the night with a federal mediator, trying to
avert a nationwide strike set to begin at midnight
last night. Republic executives prepared contingen-
cy plans to keep the financially ailing airline aloft.
CHICAGO � Former All-Pro guard Gene Up-
shaw, the new executive director of the NFL
Players Association, says there will not be a strike
this season. Upshaw, a 16-year veteran of the
Oakland Raiders, was named to succeed controver-
sial Ed Garvey, who took a job as deputy Wiscon-
sin attorney general.
CHICAGO � The NHL, trying to guarantee
continued membership of St. Louis in the NHL,
terminated Ralston Purina Cos ownership of the
St. Louis Blues with an eye on securing new owner-
ship for the franchise. The NHL Board of Gover-
nors assumed control of all Blues' player contracts
until a new owner is found.
�y OAKY PATTERSON ECU Po L�
Calling Home
Next year's freshmen line up at the phone booths on the hill to call mom. The first in a series of five orien-
tations were conducted this week to give the new students a overview of the campus.
World Harmony Is Theme For Symposium
A dozen ECU faculity members
will be joining two ECU students,
the chapter president of the Na-
tional Organization of Women
and a local specialist in farm
cooperatives on the platforms of
two simutaneous teach-ins being
held in Greenville Saturday.
The conference is being held as
part of the international recogni-
tion of the Summer Solstice, the
time when the sun is at its yearly
highest in North America, Europe
and A�a. The Solstice occurs on
Monday June, 20, but activities in
preparation for the event will be
held on Saturday and Sunday.
In Greenville, the conference
will be held at two locations. One
teach-in will take place in ECU's
Willis Building and the other at
the American Legion Post 160
building at the corner of Chestnut
Street and Skinner Avenue.
The latter program is believed
to be the first academic program
to be held in Greenville's Higgs
neighborhood.
The themes of the programs are
harmonies in the world.
The programs were an inspira-
tion of activists in Berkeley Calif
who spread their idea to areas
worldwide. The Mobilization for
Survival, a peace organization
with ISO affiliates in the United
States, is running the project.
Groups from West Germany and
Canada are also participating.
June 20 is expected to be the
day of focus, and a worldwide
prayer at sunset will mark the
solstice, said former ECU math
professor Carroll Webber, the
local organizer.
"It's important to raise con-
sciousness for wise action by
larger numbers of people on the
multitude of serious problems
that overhang us Webber said.
"The very best available
specialists in Greenville have ac-
cepted the invitation to share their
knowledge and experience
The list of conference par-
ticipants reads like an ECU Who's
Who. The Willis teach-in will
open with what Webber calls the
"cosmic background to be
presented by physics professor
George Bissinger.
Then, palentology specialist
Scott Snyder, a geology professor,
will sketch a billion-year story of
life on our planet. Following this,
biology professors Prem Sehgal
and Vincent Bellis will begin the
presentation of problems; they
will discuss global and regional
ecology, and offer a few direc-
tions for possible solutions.
Other tools for solution will in-
clude informationlibrary science
presented by newly appointed
Director of Joyner Library Ruth
Katz, energy conservation devices
presented by Greenville physicist-
inventor Charles Cain and
mathematical techniques by Math
and Physics professor Lokenath
Debnath.
Under the topic of synthesis
and reconciliation, art professor
Art Haney and Dean of the
School Education Charles Coble
will speak. PoUtical science stu-
dent Jay Stone will discuss new-
age transformation.
South African problems will be
discussed by sociology professor
Paul Tschetter and women's
lights by NOW president Dot
Gronert. Other proposed "tools"
will be suggested at tables adja-
cent to the Willis Auditorium �
including worker codetermina-
tion, molecular biology and
nuclear energy.
The prospective at the
American Legion Building will be
presented by English faculty
member Edith Webber. There,
connections between the military
budget, the economy and jobs will
be presented in a 20-minute slide
presentation "Jobs and the
Military and a discussion on
Jobs and the Economy in 1983 by
economics professor Vito Blomo.
History professor Charles Price
will discuss Black Roots and Their
Records, co-op advisor Roy
Schaal will discuss conditions for
successful cooperation. Several
speakers will double-up, speaking
at both programs. Tables on
possible new industrial jobs, on
nutrition, on the United Nations
by several organizations are also
expected at the westside teach-in.
Both programs are scheduled to
begin at 8:30 a.m. Lunch will be
at noon. (Bag lunch is recom-
mended to facilitate follow-up
discussion.) For more informa-
tion call 758-4906.
I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 15, 1983
Announcements
Students
STUDENTS
MAKE
A
DIFFERENCE
l� you are a motivated in
dividual who wishes to help seek
solutions to consumer and en
vironmenta! problems through
research and advocacy, then
North Carolina Public Interest
Research Group (NC PIRG) is
for you. It is a student group
researching issues such as Con
sumer Protection
Environmental Quality
Students' Rights Government
Accountability Renewable
Energy Civil Rights NC PIRG
has. in the past, fought for North
Carolina student's rights,
documented the danger of
nuclear cargo transportation
through the state, and most
recently, making the student
dratted Generic Drug Generic
Substitution Bill a law An ECU
PIRG is now being formed
PIRG needs your support Get
together with other students
concerned with these issues For
more details call Elixa Godwin
at 753 174
BINGO�ICECREAM
PARTY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a
BingoIce Cream Party this
Tuesday. May 24. 1983 at 7:00
pm in the Mendenhall Student
Center Multi Purpose Room All
ECU students, faculty, staff,
their dependents and guests are
welcome. Admission is still only
25 cents. Eight types of Bingo
games will be played. Try your
luck at Bmgo, eat delicious ice
cream, and have some fun!
Following is a schedule for the
summer BingoIce Cream Par
ties All parties are held at 7:00
pm in the Multi Purpose Room
Tuesday. May 24, 1983. Tues
day. May X, 1983. Tuesday,
June 7, 1983. Tueday, June 14,
1983
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Monday Nights Bible Study
8:30 pm 108 Jarvis Dorm.
Prayer Group for spiritual sup
port and fellowship 10:15 pm
every night 111 Fletcher. For
more information contact: Todd
108 Jarvis, Shelia 157 Jarvis and
Scott 111 Fletcher
SENIORS
Want a central place for three
letters of reference from your
professors If you are
graduating this summer, then
you complete a registration
packet available from the
Career Planning and Placement
Service. If you will finish in the
fall, spring, or summer of
academic year 193 84, you may
pick up a packet and prepare it
to return in August or
September.
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
One million dollars per minute
is being spent worldwide on the
military. The Greenville Peace
Committee rejects the notions
that more weapons brings us
more security. We meet every
Friday night at 6 30 p.m. for a
pot luck dinner and meeting.
During the summer we have
several activities planned and
we need your help. Come loin us
in our plans for June 20th
WORLD DISARMAMENT
DAY. The meetings are held at
610 S Elm St For more infor
mation call 75a 406 or 757 5714.
Peace.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may woo flat form ot rMjfct or
� ooporsto ohooi of sopor M
ooa moro ilnoo. Thoro oro 3)
units aar Una. lac lottar, punc-
tuation m&rk and wort tpaco
count as ono unit. CaattaNso 00
nypnanata war as proportv- Loava
tpaco at on of Mno H war
aoasn't fit. No aao will bo ac-
coptoo ovor tno phono. Wo
rosorvo tno rtptit taratoct any a.
AN as must oo propaM
7S� par bm or frorttoo of s
PkoM prwrt kfjBM USt copfcol
Name
CkyStstc.
No
�p.
.stTSSporlatS.
1 to THE CAST C AftOUNI AN
offtot Bf 3:Bf Toosfoy Boforo
2
WZMB PRESENTS
WZMB presents classical
music Saturday and Sunday,
twelve noon to six p. m. Watch in
the upcoming East Carolinians
for weekly programs and tuna in
this weekend for 'A Touch Of
Class
COUNSELORS
WANTED
Male counselors needed tow
ork in the Lutheran Camp in
Virginia. Two resident pro-
grams as well as canoeing,
backpacking, biking and beach
camp. Contact Rev. F. Wayne
Williams. Ft. Valley Rt. Box 355,
St David's Church, VA 23653.
SUMMER SOLTICE
FOR PEACE
Greenville community leaders
are joining together on June 20th
to celebrate a Day of Peace dur
ing the Summer Soltice. The
celebration wilkl be worldwide
as people everywhere work for
peace. Greenville will be a
teach-in on June II. For further
information call 75t 4906
COFFEEHOUSE
NEEDSMEMBERS
If you like variety entertain
ment and want a challenge,
become a member on the stu
dent union coffeehouse commit
tee. For more information . con
tact the Student Union (Room
334) at 7576611. Ext 310
BIBLE STUDY AT ECU
inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship sponsors a bible
study on Monday nights Come
to 108 Jarvis Hall at I 30 pm for
a time of spiritual fellowship
and fun Prayer is also offeree
every night at 111 Fletcher Mall
at 10 15 pm Take a break from
studying
The East Carolinian
� mbj ihtiompits tmmamtmt
uncr ��
Punished every 'jeioa,
jnd Thuraa am , the
d io� ear end (Mary
Wedr Ja� during the suf
m
East Cdoiinan the
u �� newspaper of East
Caroling University Ownec
oparoto arm pubiisheo .q,
and D� the students of East
Carolina university
Subscription Kate: tM yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located hi tue Old Seut
Building on me campui of
ECU. Greenville. NC
POSTMASTER Senc M
oross changes to The Eav
Carolinian. O'c Sou'h
ilc.ng. ECU G-
- 27834
Telephone 'i? 6064 J47
�i0�
Read
I
SOULS
ELECTION
Anyone interested H mm
souls office next senester c
tact Barbara at 758 955C
or
ARMY SURPLUS
wiiAHt i,ii;
ARMY NAVY STORE
1 iG ' b t van
ANNOUNCING � � �
SATURDAY OFFICE
HOURS
For your convenience we will be open
for examination and optical services
every Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m. Affordable fees, quick, accurate
service. ConYonieat Hoars. Seeing is
Believing DR pETER w H0LUS
fififfniiiiffiiifiifftiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiifiiiitMiiiiiiiiimfifiiitiiiiffiiiititiitfitiniiitir
BUCK'S GULF
2704 E. 10th St. 752-3228
BIG TIME STREET SALE
albums, books, chairs, clothes
you name it and we've got it
Sat. June 18th 409 Biltmore St.
����������������������������������������a
�f� CAM CEH1C
O.O. f.A.
TirTOMANN�x 2M G�ENVillE BIV0
756-9404
Across from Villa Roma,
We do minor repairs, tune ups, brake
I alignments, and air conditioner maintainance.
We have a rood wrecker service and do
service calls. 24 hr. number is 758-1033.
Keep your car looking good
Free car wash with each fill up!
We rent Jartran trucks and trailers for your
moving needs.
Come by today for your complete car needs.
20
OFF
Or Coat� lews
At
ThMOtOftas
9mm OejcoMwli Or Coupon
OeMofAoeJy
Chuck Johnston.
Accounting � 'It has
side and a bad side. Ma
school student, don'l
responsibl and are
mature as college fri
Katz
Beginning toda.
Dr. Ruth Katz
assumes her post as
the nev director of
Joyner Libran. suc-
ceeding Dr. Eugene
A Brunelle �
resigned from the p
last fall to resume
teaching and resea
Katz has sere
associate director
Joyner - nee
September 1980
was recommended b
a university sea
committee. She was
he only applicant
rom ECU to ap
or the position.

We pull for ECU not from"
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 15, 1983
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GULF
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ilia Roma, 1
rs, tune ups, brake
iditioner maintainance.
�cker service and do
jmber is 758-1033. 1
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rth each fill up!
s and trailers for your
needs.
r complete car needs.
CU not from"
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Students Speak Out
Reactions To New N.C. Drinking Age Law Are Mixed
Chuck Johnston, Junior,
Accounting � "It has a good
side and a bad side. Many high
school students don't drink
responsibly and are not as
mature as college freshmen
Amy Cox, Sophomore, bur-
ly Chilhood Education � "I
think the new law is unfair. It
will cause lots of problems and
difficulties for incoming
freshmen
Tony Robinson, Junior,
Physical Education � "I
think it's a good idea. I don't
think freshmen should be
drinking right off hand. Dur-
ing their first year they should
concentrate on the books
Robin Howard, Junior,
Nursing � "Yes,(I support
the law) for safety reasons.
Drinking and driving is a pro-
blem. People who don't drink
can be hurt by people who are
drunk
Daniel Pennington,
Sophomore, General College
� "I think it's terrible. I feel
that if you're old enough to
die for your country in a war
then you're old enough to
drink
Rita Theodorakis,
Sophomore, Education �
"It's not right, I think the
should keep it at 18. 1 he re
violating the rights of a select
minority of people
Katz Assumes Library Post
Beginning today,
Dr. Ruth Katz
assumes her post as
the new director of
Joyner Library suc-
ceeding Dr. Eugene
A. Brunelle who
resigned from the post
last fall to resume
teaching and research.
Katz has served as
associate director of
Joyner since
September 1980 and
was recommended by
a university search
committee. She was
the only applicant
rom ECU to apply
or the position.
Katz appointment
was announced Satur-
day by Vice
Chancellor for
Academic Affairs
Angelo Volpe. Volpe
also announced the
appointments of Dr.
Ernest B. Uhr as the
new dean of the ECU
School of Business
and Dr. Calfrey C.
Calhoun who will
assume deanship of
the School of
Technology. Both
men will assume their
posts on Aug.l.
All three appoint-
ments were anDroved
Friday by the North
Carolina Board of
Governors.
"I am very pleased
to be accepted by Dr.
Howell and Dr.
Volpe Katz said.
"I'm looking forward
to the challenge and
hope to provide the
best possible service
to the students, facul-
ty and the East
Carolina Communi-
ty Katz added.
Katz is a native of
New England. She
holds a Ph.D in
Library Science from
Rutgers University
where she also served
as assistant university
librarian for academic
personell, systems and
special projects. She
also received her
masters in library
science from Rutgers
and AB degree in
chemistry from Clark
University.
Katz came to ECU
after spending six
years at the University
of Denver where she
served as a senior
research scientist with
the Denver Research
Institute.
In her new role as
director of library ser-
vices, Katz will ad-
minister the universi-
ty's library which in-
cludes 675,000 bound
volumes, 8000 serial
subscriptions, 993,000
units of microfilm,
400,000 U.S. govern-
ment documents and
maps, more than 400
manuscript collec-
tions and the ECU
Music Library with its
holdings of musical
scores and recordings.
Uhr, 41, of Old
Dominion University,
Norfolk, Va has
served there as in-
terum dean and
associate dean of the
School of Business
Administration for
the past three years.
He spent 10 years at
Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and State
University,
Blacksburg, Va, on
the marketing faculty,
See, KATZ, Page 5
PHOTOGRAPHERS
WANTED
m
-The E.C.U. Photo Lab is seeking quality
minded people for our photojournalism staff.
-Experience helpful in Studio, News or Sports
Photography, Push Processing, Color Processing,
Use of Nikon System.
-Must be able to Develop � Print B�W photos.
-Must have phone � access to a car.
-Must be enrolled E.C.U. student.
-Must have examples of work to show.
-Apply with the Media Board Secretary on
the 2nd floor of Publications Buildings
before September 1st.
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(Hift Saat (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, gm,
Mike Hughes. �.��, Eduor
WAVERLY MERRITT. IXrrrior of MMM� ClNDY PLEASANTS. Sports Editor
Hunter Fisher. ��� ���� Greg Rideout. mm Ed,tor
ALI AFRASHTEH. cm fm�r CARLYN EBERT. - - - - Eduor
Stephanie Groon. oif�,� wa-w Lizanne Jennings, m,k rm
Clay Thornton, www sup,� David Gordon, pnon Manage
June 15. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
The Mudslingers
Helms, Hunt Get An Early Start
Ah, how the mud flies.
It's almost as if a taste of
Chicago politics has spilled over
into the state's 1984 U.S.
Senatorial race. Unfortunately, it's
a nauseating taste.
Recently, Sen. Jesse Helms got
the ball rolling in what will certain-
ly prove to be a long mud-slinging
affair by issuing a barrage of
media attacks on the political
record of Helms' probable oppo-
nent, Gov. Jim Hunt. Ironically,
despite Helms' costly !iminary
campaigning � the attack was
structured around paid media
advertisements � Hunt has yet to
even formally declare his can-
didacy.
Helms' accusations range from
alleged illegalities Hunt used to
build his political machine, to
misuse of funds, to illegal out-of-
state contributions, etc etc. One
even accuses Hunt of having mob
affiliations. Imagine that, Jim
Hunt a good ol' boy with an accent
to boot, a member of the mob.
Naturally, Hunt's press team
has retaliated with a satirical
bogus ad of its own, listing as
Hunt's illegal "out-of-state" con-
tributors:
� Hazel Earthshoe, Sierra Club
agitator and chief of the
ultraliberal BACK-PAC.
"Campus Forum
� David Copper field, magician
and member of the devil-
worshiping TRICK-PAC, who
claims to be an expert at "making
elephants disappear
� Daffy Duck, ultra-liberal
leader of QUACK-PAC, who call-
ed Helms "a dissthpicable
dissthgrace
� Boss Hogg, head of HICK-
PAC, fund-raising arm of the Haz-
zard County Political Machine.
� And Pop N Fresh, head of
Pillsbury's DOUGH-PAC, who
promised Hunt "a lot of bread
Real funny stuff.
But even worse than the alleged
parody itself was the fact that Gov.
Hunt didn't understand the gag
until someone explained it to him a
while later.
So, North Carolinians, that's
what we've got going in '84: We've
got our illustrious incumbent
Senator Helms, whose lack of con-
fidence in his own political slate in-
spires him to attack the record of
someone who hasn't even entered
the race yet. And, of course, we've
(probably) got our aspiring U.S.
legislator, Gov. Jim Hunt, who
doesn't understand that his entire
gubernatorial administration is
just one joke after another.
The choice is ours.
N.C. Roads Safe Before?
The editorial "Safe Roads Act �
Legislature Takes A First Step which
appeared in The East Carolinian June
8, made a grievous mistake. The
following statements were made:
In fact the greatest problem
characteristically for North Carolina
hasn't been the laws themselves but
rather the enforcement of those laws.
The Safe Roads Act establishes the
basis for outstanding improvement in
one of the state's weakest areas
It is my opinion that the state
Highway Patrol's enforcement of laws
is not one of the weakest areas in our
state.
According to statistics compiled by
the N.C. Department of Crime Control
and Public Safety, our state led the na-
tion in the average number of DUI ar-
rests per uniformed officer in 1982
(44.54). The total number of DUI ar-
rests in North Carolina during last year
was 50,640. California DUI arrests
topped 131,000, and Texas arrests only
43,246.
In light of this data, I think the N.C.
Highway Patrol deserves a lot of praise
for its efforts to ensure safety on our
roads.
Susan Cross
Editor's Note: Said reference to
"enforcement" implied (or was meant
to imply) not only arrests but convic-
tions. The Highway Petrol, indeed,
deserves commendation. Other phases
of DUI enforcement, however, have a
lot of work to do.
Killing Killers
The recent article titled "Capital
Punishment: 'Most Racist Laws On
The Books In The U.S " by Pat
O'Neill makes a statement that cannot
go unchallenged.
First, the title of the article and its
content are on two different planes.
Mr. O'Neill travels from why we kill
killers, through how we kill killers to
the social status of killers. This would
be perfectly acceptable if there was a
correlation, and if there is, the article
never mentioned it.
Second, Mr. O'Neill makes the
following statement: "Only in nations
such as El Salvador and Iran do
state-sanctioned killings still flourish
Does this mean that the only countries
in the world that have the death penal-
ty are El Salvador and Iran? Where
does he get his information?
Third, Mr. O'Neill insinuates that if
you are black andor poor, you will
end up on death row. Somehow, the
statistics just don't add up.
Speaking of statistics. If "study
after study" has proven so much, why
not cite a few examples?
Overall, instead of blaming N.C.
legislators for failing to "deal with the
realities of the death penalty law"
(when they give killers more choice
than they give their victims) or, instead
of attacking the system, why doesn't
Mr. O'Neill write an article attacking
the rich who use their money andor
influence to escape punishment from
crimes they have committed?
Ronald Weaver
Leonard G. Adams Jr.
Symposium
Last February, then Chancellor-
Elect John Howell decided to hold his
installation in conjunction with the Phi
Kappa Phi symposium titled "Toward
the New Millenium: Challenges and
Dreams As it turned out, the com-
bined event was a terrific success, af-
fording participants the opportunity to
learn much about the world of the
future.
This Saturday, the Greenville and
ECU communities will again have that
opportunity. A summer symposium,
titled "Can We Compose a New World
Symphony? Ancient Rhythms and
New Instruments will be held in con-
junction with the celebration of the
summer solstice, a traditional time of
hope. The list of participants and their
topics promises to be thought-
provoking and informative.
"June 20 is a day to affirm life. It is
free of ethnic and cultural bias and em-
phasizes the integrity of the earth and
the universality of the human condi-
tion
ed
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed.
Worke
BEFORE WE START THE MISSION WE60T 10 PROP &0BBV
OFF AT UTH� tfA6UE, MOUV AT HER VIOtIN LES50N ANP,
Congress' Big $15 Billion Project Keeping
Executives In The Money, Taxpayers Out
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � The Synfuels
Corp. has a name that sounds like a
private enterprise, but it is paid for �
lock, stock and barrel � by the
American taxpayers. We are keeping our
eye on it because it is spending billions
of dollars on energy projects of little
promise.
The corporation was set up by Con-
gress in 1980 to help develop new
resources of energy, and it was given $15
billion to spend. The people who run
Synfuels seem determined to spend every
penny of it, but the American people
will be fortunate if they get a dime's
worth of return on their investment. The
Synfuels executives have given first
priority to their own salaries and com-
forts. Four of the corporation's top ex-
ecutives draw salaries bigger than a
Cabinet secretary's. One out of every
Synfuels employees makes more than
$50,000 a year. The highly paid ex-
ecutives squander additional thousands
of dollars apiece on travel every year.
The corporation has luxurious offices in
downtown Washington, complete with
sauna baths and squash and racquetball
courts.
Yet Synfuels has little to show for all
its excessive spending. Our associates
John Dillon and Corky Johnson have
examined hundreds of internal
documents which show that the corpora-
tion is pouring money into dubious pro-
jects.
The White House is aware that
something is amiss. An internal memo
states that "the goals established by
Congress will not be met Scaling
Synfuels back, the document continues,
"would minimize or eliminate the risk of
large government losses through white
elephant projects
The White House memo recommends
that a commission be appointed to
decide whether Synfuels should live or
die. But Rep. Jim Wright, D-Texas, got
wind of the staff report. He's from a
state where the oil and gas interests have
a large stake in synthetic fuels. He also
happens to be the House Majority
Leader.
So when Wright telephoned the White
House, he got immediate results: The
idea of killing the Synfuels Corp. was
stricken from the White House agenda.
MOST WANTED DICTATOR?:
Muammar Qaddafi, Libya's mercurial
strongman, is the CIA's public enemy
number one. He has supplied mone and!
munitions to a world-wide menagerie of
revolutionary extremists. He ha; provid-
ed terrorists with shoulder-fired missiles j
capable of shooting down airliners He
is constantly stirring up the international
waters.
But there is one intelligence repor.
that really causes the skin of CIA
strategists to creep. In 1970, Qaddaf:
tried unsuccessfully to purchase an
atomic bomb from China. And now, he
reportedly has acquired the ingredients
to build his own crude nuclear dev.ee
This frightening weapon may soon be in
the possession the man whom the in-
telligence community regards as the
world's most reckless ruler.
There have been reports that Qadda
suffers from schizophrenia, paranoia
and serious psychoneurotic distur-
bances. Here is what one secret
psychological profile has to say about
Qaddafi's mental stability:
"Available evidence is insufficient to
confirm or deny definitely whether he
has a mental illness (but) there is much
information about his strangeness, lack
of stability and emotional distur-
bances Cop,nM�.l
United Fraturt Stndicaie Inc
Rules To Live (Together) By
Cohabitational Concerns
STAN LANDERS
Love And Weaponry
Dear Stan Landers: 1 need some ad-
vice. My girlfriend, Beulah, and I are
planning to move in together in the fall
when she comes back to school. Our
parents don't know about it yet, because
frankly, if they did know about it, her
father would probably shoot me. You
see, her father and I don't get along too
well, and he's got lots of guns and
assorted weapons. Actually, he's not
such a bad guy; he probably wouldn't
shoot to kill, just to maim. But, aside
from him, I don't think my parents
would be too keen on the idea either.
Beulah and I are in love, though, and we
still plan to go through with the living
together deal, but I guess what I want to
know is how can I avoid such an unhap-
py confrontation with our parents,
especially Mr. Filbert and his gun?
Enjoying life at present
Dear Enjoying: Like in all dilemmas,
you're going to have to weigh the sup-
posed good against the supposed evil. So
tell me honestly, what does your
girlfriend, Beulah, look like? Because
quite frankly, love is nice, but common
sense is better for your health. If she's
reasonably pretty, with a good figure,
big bongorongos, a nice car, lots of
money then okay. But if she's a dog
� you know, brown teeth, wiry hair,
outie belly button, blood-shot eyes,
bottom-heavy design � don't take the
risk. I mean, why get shot over a
bowser?
But it sounds to me like you're going
through with it no matter what. So,
anyway, here are a few rules of thumb
just to help you live a happy cohabita-
tion and, of course, to avoid getting
caught:
� First of all, a little more common
sense. When cohabitating incognito,
never move all of your furniture out of
your old place and into your girlfriend's
place. You never know when mom and
dad are going to "pop in for a weekend"
to check up c. you. Also leave a few
pair of dirty socks and underwear on
your old stuff, just to give your suppos-
ed place of residence that lived-in look
and smell.
� Second, and this is important for
both of you to remember, when you go
home for a weekend, sort out your laun-
dry beforehand. Strangely enough,
parents often react unfavorably when
little Johnny comes home with leopard-
skin bras, lace panties and a skimpy red
negligee in his dirty-clothes bag.
� Third, teach your old roommate (the
one your parents think you're still living
with) to lie with authority and credibili-
ty. Teach him to say, "No, Mrs. Freud,
Sigmund's not here. I think he's at the
library again so that even the most
distrusting of mothers would believe
him. Keeping on good terms with your
old (supposed) roommate is a must.
Bribe or blackmail him if necessary.
Remember, an honest, clean-cut,
church-going roommate is your parents'
best friend.
� Also, if you are planning to move in
with your girlfriend, be sure to practice
up on your female voice impersonations.
It may be embarrassing at first but will
avoid trouble should her father
telephone after midnight to check up on
her.
� It's also a good idea to leave plenty
of room in your girlfriend's closets for
quick and easy storage of your belong-
ings (and yourself, if necessary) should
her parents decide to pop in for a
weekend unexpectedly.
� And finally, a simple reminder
Now, I'm not trying to preach, but you
should remember that wherever your
parents are concerned, honesty is the
best policy And once you can fake
that, you've got it made.
Dear Stan Landers I was reading that
guy's letter there, and I just thought 1
should write in and say that I've seen his
girlfriend, Beulah, and personally. I
wouldn't take the risk. She is ugh ith a
capital U.
A Concerned Reader
Dew Concerned: Funny you should
mention that, because I've seen your
girlfriend too, and believe vou me, she's
not much to look at cither.
Editor's Note: Stan Landers, an enter-
prising young author from Wrong Side
of the Track, N.C has just completed
his most recent book, titled For Pleasure
or Profit: Do-It- Yourself Brain Surgery
CHARLESTON
S.C.(UPI)- A street
maintenance crew
working in the tourist-
clogged City Market
unearthed a Civil War
artillery shell Tuesdav
Katz
Coat. From Page 3
as director of
graduate programs
and of the doctora!
program in busmen
administration
L'hr will succeto
Dr. James H
Bearden, who served
as dean for the 16
years Bearden resign-
ed his position last
December to become
full-time director of
the Branch Ban .
and Trust Co Center
for Management
Development in the
ECU School of
Business last Jan. 1.
"Dr. L'hr has a ri
background
business as well a�
solid experience in
academic admimstra
tion olpe said
"There is no doubt in
my mind that he will
continue the tradition
of excellence in
leadership that our
School of Business
has established
and boi
pavcmi
before
could ej
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Complete Bicycle
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CRUISERS SM
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Peugot Pipeline Cr
GRE

&
8 oz. Sirloin
6 oz. Beef Ti
8 oz. Chopped Sii
4 oz. Sirloin
Served with KA
or French F
Lunchl
4 oz. Sirloin $j
6 oz. Cubed Steal
lb. Ham bin
WEEKE1
June
Buy one lloz,
Get Second 11
II Steak Dinners
Potato or Fren
NowSei
Abo Prime Rib evej
2 Locatioi
5001
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 13, 19�3

'OfliWA
' ��' �0W

prop mw
INLBSONAUR
ect Keeping
xpayers Out
le has upplied money anc
world-wide menagerie o(
nists. He has provide
th shoulder-fired missilejl
oting down airliners. Hfl
irring up the mternatioru
one intelligence repor
ises the skin of CI
rcep In 1970, Qadda
� ' illy to purchase a
iomb from Ch:na. And now, h
tcquired the ingredient
own crude nuclear device
- weapon may soon be ir
on the man whom the in
mmunity regards as th
ret kless ruler.
been reports that Qaddafif
rhrenia, paranoia
psychoneurotic distur-
Here is what one secret
k has to say about
'ability:
c evidence is insufficient to
lefinitel) whether he
(but) there is much
Hit his strangeness, lack
and emotional distur-
Inc
oncerns
- should her father
ne after midnight to check up on
; idea to leave plenty
i your girlfriend's closets for
storage of your belong-
if necessary) should
decide to pop in for a
:tedly.
inaliy, a simple reminder.
m not trying to preach, but you
Id remember that wherever your
concerned, honesty is the
And once you can fake
I've got it made.
Dear Man I anders I was reading that
et there, and I just thought 1
uld write in and say that I've seen his
Ifriend, Beulah. and personally, I
mid n't take the risk. She is ugly with a
. A Concerned Reader
Dearoncerned: Funny you should
that, because I've seen your
nend too, and believe vou me, she's
" '��' took at either.
Vote: Stan Landers, an enter-
voung author from Wrong Side
fra k, VC. has just completed
recent book, titled For Pleasure
Profit; Do-It- Yourself Brain Surgery.
WIT .I
p 300 CUBITS
we
Workers Unearth Civil War Artillery Shell
srlJnpnLESATON' and bounced it on the
b.c.(UPI) �A street pavement
maintenance crew
working in the tourist-
clogged City Market
unearthed a Civil War
artillery shell Tuesday
twice
before realizing it
could explode.
Police barred traf-
fic in a one-block
radius, but tourists
strolled by and took good show for the
pictures as military tourists, but we kept
bomb experts gingerly pedestrians back
removed the eight- said police Sgt. Albert
inch-wide dud from DiFederico. "We had
the historic site. more curiosity seekers
"It really made a than anything else
Master Chief Petty
Officer Eddie A.
Knaup, a Navy ord-
nance expert who
helped remove the
shell, said it was an
18-inch-long Parrott
Katz Assumes New Post
Cont. From Page 3
as director of
graduate programs
and of the doctoral
program in business
administration.
Uhr will succeed
Dr. James H.
Bearden, who served
as dean for the 16
years. Bearden resign-
ed his position last
December to become
full-time director of
the Branch Banking
and Trust Co. Center
for Management
Development in the
ECU School of
Business last Jan. 1.
"Dr. Uhr has a rich
background in
business as well as
solid experience in
academic administra-
tion Volpe said.
"There is no doubt in
my mind that he will
continue the tradition
of excellence in
leadership that our
School of Business
has established
Calhoun comes to
ECU from the depart-
ment of Business
Education at the
University of
Georgia, having serv-
ed as professor since
1967 and as chairman
of the department
from 1967-1978. The
55-year-old Calhoun,
with a doctorate from
Ohio State University,
has been a member of
the University of
Georgia business
education faculty
since 1962. He
previously held a
faculty position in
business administra-
tion at Georgia State
University.
"Dr. Calhoun br-
ings a unique set of
skills and talents to
the position of dean
which will be very
beneficial for the pro-
gress of the School of
Technology.
"As our society
becomes increasingly
dependent upon
technological ad-
vances, the leadership
which Dr. Calhoun
will provide to the
School of Technology
and the preparation
of students in these
areas will be extreme-
ly important Volpe
said.
Dr. Jo Ann Bell,
director of ECU's
Health Affairs
Library, served as ac-
ting director of library
services while a na-
tionwide search was
conducted.
Katz said she ap-
preciated the diligance
of the search commit-
tee and the support of
all her peers in the
library.
At present, Katz
said she will be
reviewing the entire
workings of the
library. In an attempt
to provide good ser-
vices, Katz is welcom-
ing direct input from
faculty and students
regarding the library.
"I'm anxious to
have a close relation-
ship with the
students Katz said.
"It's important to us
to work closely with
them She pointed
out that the library is
the second largest
employer of student
workers. A total of
between 100 and 150
students are
employeed by Joyner.
round whose fuse had
malfunctioned.
"It's highly unlike-
ly that it would have
exploded but there
have been several
Civil War rounds
found over the years
and nobody can say
they are not
dangerous he said.
The shell was un-
covered at the in-
tersection of East Bay
and Market streets
about 10:30 a.m.
while several hundred
vacationers and
residents roamed
through the open-air
stalls in the market
area.
Leland Oliver, one
of the workers, said
the crew was digging
out a cable, and pull-
ed the shell out with a
rope.
"The guys thought
it was a hunk of ce-
ment or asphalt or
something and thev
were bouncing it on
the ground trying to
break it up Oliver
said. "It took two
men to pick it up and
bounce it on the
ground.
"When so much
rust came off of it, we
found it was a shell.
So we moved out of
the way
The dud, which
contained black
powder and would
have had a shrapnel-
style effect if it had
exploded upon im-
pact, was placed in an
ammunition magazine
until it can be remote-
ly detonated, Knaup
said.
"It probably would
not have knocked
over any buildings if it
had exploded, but it
probably would have
put a hole three feet
wide and two feet
deep in the pave
ment he said.
m
Bicvae
90S
OUALITY BIKE
SALES & SERVICE
"Greenville's Most
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�Fuji -TREK
�Puegeot � Raleigh
Fathers Day Special
rjj?i-v�
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atti's.
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Any Large Pizza.
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1 mm tMpr fvn AR mvi �iA hr
I IMnMmh
Here) a p��) d�ii fur ).
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Ami cvcrvhrxls gctv a en.il poia
Because trial's the onl kind i
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freshest ingredients, cm-iked In
perfection Come im And papa
puza at (iatti's
200 WIST
vresents
Sunday-June
items and Prices
Effective thru Sat June 18,1983.
10 speed129 ond up
CRUISERS $149.95 and up
We have
Peugot Pipeline Cruisers $149.95
530 CONTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
757-3616
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these adver-
tised items is re
quired to be readily
available for sale in
each Kroger Sav on
except as specificai
iv noted in this ad if
we do run out of an
item we will offer
you your choice of a
comparable item
when available
reflecting the same
savings or a rain
check which will en
title you to purchase
the advertised item
at the advertised
price within 30 days
Limit one manufac
turers coupon oer
item
t
MonThurs.
8 oz. Sirloin and Salad Bar $4.99
6 oz. Beef Tips and Salad Bar $3.99
8 oz. Chopped Sirloin and Salad Bar $3.99
4 oz. Sirloin and Salad Bar $3.99
Served with King Idaho Baked Potato
or French Fries and Texas Toast
Lunch Specials 11-2
4 oz. Sirloin $2.19 wSalad Bar $3.19
6 oz. Cubed Steak $2.49 wSalad Bar $3.49
1M lb. Hamburger and Salad Bar $2.79
WEEKEND SPECIALS
June 17th, 18th, 19th
Buy one lloz. Sirloin Reg. Price $5.79
Get Second lloz. Sirloin 12 Price $2.99
II Steak Dinners Served With King Idaho Baked
Potato or French Fries and Texas Toast
Now Serving Surf and Turf
! Also Prime Rib every Friday and Saturday Night
������
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd.
2903 E. 10th St.
X





f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
Hollerin' F
JUNE 15. 19t3 P�t6
'Psycho IF Succeeds
In Risky Comedy Bid
k
By STEVE BACHNER
Staff Writer
It's difficult to understand why
one specific audience will laugh at
something, while another au-
dience will find that same thing
completely unfunny. Often, those
audiences are alike in dignity, or
lack dignity altogether, and still
opinions about what was or
wasn't funny differ greatly. Peo-
ple who aspire to write good com-
edy, to innovate, take on the dif-
ficult task of predicting public
taste � even when writers stick to
formula, they have no way of
knowing whether or not their gags
are going to have any mass accep-
tance, if this is what they seek.
Joan Rivers occasionally does a
one-liner about Karen
Carpenter's death: "I have no
sympathy for someone who loses
so much weight that she can be
buried in pleats The reaction is
always shock. Audiences simply
aren't ready for this kind of
material. Who knows when they
will be?
In my mind right now I'm sure
oi two things, both are simple:
comedy is a risky business; and,
with the exception of Psycho II,
there haven't been any good com-
edies at the movies this summer
� at least no consistently funny
ones.
One of the most promising of
these films opened last week at
the Plitt Entertainment Center in
Greenville, Trading Places, starr-
ing old SNL regular Dan Aykroyd
and new SNL regular Eddie Mur-
phy. The teaming of the two isn't
really any big deal since all of
Aykroyd's films, except one, have
been embarrassing stinkers. But
Eddie Murphy has already shown
us � in Walter Hill's excellent 48
Hours � that he not only has
screen presence, but is as funny as
a young Pry or, and has already
had better luck with his films.
Nevertheless, this
"sophisticated comedy" � an
update on The Prince and the
Pauper tale, satirizing the art of
American avarice � loses steam
after some genuinely funny
scenes. Like he did in The Blues
Brothers, director John Landis
throws everything at us with only
about one-third the success.
Another disappointment that
had great power going in is the
latest Steve Martin, Carl Reiner
collaboration, The Man with Two
Brains (now playing at the Plaza
Cinema). The film is different
from the former in that it is a
broad farce and purports to be
nothing more. But, similarly, it
loses steam after a funny first half
hour. When this kind of film
doesn't fall off, it usually
becomes a hit.
Reiner and Martin know what
works, and they know to keep this
type of film short. They also
know that this type of film made
them lots of money the first time
out; but if your gags aren't funny,
then the effort is going to seem
strained. The Man with Two
Brains is decidedly more Brook-
sian than other Martin vehicles,
and still has more going for it
than Trading Places, though pit
against the hot Eddie Murphy, it
may not stand a chance.
Local Voters' League
Studies Current Issues
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Jake and Elwood Blues � the 'Blues Brothers' � pay tribute to the
musical tradition set in motion by great soulsters like Sam and Dave,
Wilson Pickett and James Brown.
'Blues Bros
Revives Soul
Singer In Concert
By GORDON IPOCK
SUfT Writer
1 was recently digging through a
box of old 45s at a local used-
record store and found a couple
of gems: "Sweet Soul Music" by
Arthur Conely, and "Soul Man"
by Sam and Dave.
Both bring to mind tonight's
showing of The Blues Brothers at
Hendrix Theatre � Sam and
Dave because they were the
original Blues Brothers, and soul
music because that's what the
movie is ultimately about.
Though the outrageous chase
movements. James Brown's "Say
It Loud, I'm Black and I'm Pro-
ud" exemplifies the themes of
"The only way to make pro-
gress is to take action
One motto of the
League of Women Voters.
In 1919, 15 states had already
passed laws giving women the
right to vote. In March of that
year, the 19th Amendment to the
Constitution was nearing final ap-
proval when Carrie Chapman
Catt sent out the call to the 50th
Aniversary Convention of the Na-
tional American Women Suffrage
Association.
"As a fitting memorial to a half
century of progress, the Associa-
tion invites the women voters of
the 15 full suffrage states to at-
tend this anniversary and there
join their forces in a League of
Women Voters, one of whose ob-
jects shall be to speed the suffrage
campaign in our own and other
countries Catt wrote.
Out of this invitation grew the
League of Women Voters, which
has since expanded to include
some 130,000 members in more
than 700 local chapters nation-
wide.
The League, as it is intimatcy
referred to by members, was for-
black pride and black unity in soul mally organized in Chicago on
music. Many
doubt, heard
more clearly
young blacks, no
Brown's message
than Dr. Martin
Luther King's.
Soul music was by blacks,
about blacks and for blacks dur-
ing a period two decades ago
Feb. 14, 1920. Then its official
name was The National League of
Women Voters.
Describing the function of the
organization, Catt said: "We
have an anomaly; we are going to
be a semi-political body. We want
when America was struggling to political things; we want legisla
end racial injustice. But soul
music was also popular among
whites, not only in America, but
in Europe as well. Sam and Dave,
Pickett and other soul artists
tion; we are going to educate for
citizenship
Today, more than 60 years
later. League members are still
stressing the same points. "We
are nonpartisan; we do not sup-
port candidates said Rhea
Markello, President of the
Greenville-Pitt County League of
Women Voters.
Markello was elected to head
the local chapter for the 1982-83
term. The League boasts about
100 members in the Pitt County
Chapter. Considering its size, it
may surprise quite a few people
that they get so much work done.
The League conducts an
observers corp, members of which
faithfully attend the various
meetings of Greenville City and
Pitt County governments. By
their visibility, the League lets of-
ficials know there is citizen con-
cern and input in what they do.
Perhaps the League's most im-
portant work is the study of cur-
rent issues on national, state and
local levels.
At the national level, the
League adopts the theme for
study and asks all local chapters
to participate in the project. The
current study is on national
security. According to Markello,
the League will be evaluating U.S.
national security policies and their
impact on our domestic programs
and relationships with other na-
tions.
On the local level, the League
adopted to study the present
Greenville City form of govern-
Se LEAGUE, Page 7
Singer-songwriter Ray Fogg
will be appearing in concert on the
ECU campus on Tuesday, June
28. The concert will begin at 8:00
p.m. on the University Mall,
weather permitting, or in Hendrix
Theatre. The concert is under the
sponsorship of the Student Union
Special Concerts Committee.
, Ray Fogg is from Cleveland,
Oh. His unique style of story
songs has made him popular in his
home town and is now bringing
him recognition on the college cir-
cuit nationwide.
Fogg's songs take you inside
people's minds. Sometimes his
songs are sensitive, such as "A
Penny For Your Thoughts in
which the bum in the park wishes
he had someone to talk to, or in
'The Best Years Of Our Lives in
which a generation struggles with
the trouble of growing up only to
find they must fight a war. Other
times Fogg's songs are rowdy.
And you know you're in for
something when vou hear the title
"If It Has An' Ashtray, We'll
Take It With this song, Fogg
charges up his audience with a
scenes � excellent at first in the
shopping mall but absurd by the routinely toured packed houses in
movie's end � provide action, Europe's major cities.
Bclushi and Akroyd's real pur- During the late '60s, soul music
pose with The Blues Brothers was filled radio programming, not on-
story of three boys just out of a tribute to singers like Sara and ly on black stations but Top 40
school who go out to buy a cheap Dave, and Conely. No doubt a stations aimed at whites as well.A
car. film clip, if one exists, of Sam and three-week survey of the national
Not only are the songs enter- Dave at Harlem's Apollo Theatre charts of best selling records in
taining, but his between song would be a better tribute and a
chatter is funny and many times sight more entertaining. Or a live
touching. He'll have you laughing clip of James Brown or Wilson
Pickett.
During the '60s, Brown and the
rest were the standouts in a
musical style known as soul
Music Camps Begin
By ROBIN AYERS
Staff Wrirar
that will be broadening and in-
teresting.
One does not ordinarily think Two hundred campers are ex-
of Greenville as a place for camp- pected for the choral camp's third
as he picks judges for an audience
participation number, and then
he'll grab your heart as he tells
about a child he encountered
working in refugee camps in
Somalia on the coast of Africa.
Besides writing songs and
traveling the country to give con-
certs, Fogg is active in
humanitarian issues such as world
hunger and peace. He has made
many appearances to help raise
money for such causes. Fogg was
honored to receive the Cleveland
Rotary Club's International Ser-
vice Award in 1982.
Fogg always wants to make sure
of at least one thing: when his au-
diences leave, they leave entertain-
ed. So if you want entertainment,
be sure to be on the University
Mall for Tuesday's concert.
music. It grew out of a fusion of music became the rage during the
blues, black rock and roll (a la '70s, most soul singers couldn't or
Chuck Berry aknd Little Richard) wouldn't make the change to that
and black gospel music. Many of banal style. Some, like Al Green,
the well-known soul singers like
Brown, Sam and Dave, Pickett, that Sam and Dave split up in a
Aretha Franklin and Al Green backstage knife fight. Others, like
had originally started as young Pickett, are playing the circuit of
gospel singers. They applied the small blues nightclubs to, ironical-
feel of gospel to secular topics to ly, predominantly white au-
mg, but ECU will be the site in
June and July for three summer
music camps. The School of
Music is sponsoring a choral
camp, a keyboard camp and a
band camp. Each camp lasts one
week.
The music camps are open to
students from eighth through
twelfth grades. An application
and a letter of recommendation
are required to attend. During
returned to gospel. Legend has it their stay, campers wilJ concen-
that
Record World shows 15, 13 and
16 soul records respectively for
weeks beginning 10, 17 and 24
August 1968 in the Top 40.
But despite its one time
popularity, soul music is a
anachronism today. When disco
trate in areas of music that in-
terest them most, such as theory,
composition or electronic music.
They may also take classes on
create soul.
Where blues had traditionally
expressed a sense of helpless suf-
fering in the Jim Crow world of
blacks before the '60s, soul was a
positive, unifying music. It sprang
from the same source as the civil
rights and black power
their chosen instrument,
diences. The keyboard camp is now in
session, running from June 12-18.
Today black radio plays a com- Directed by Dr. Charles Bath, this
posite style of music that a pro- camp is in its second year,
gram director at WQDW in The choral camp is scheduled
Kinston calls "urban contem- for June 19-26. Dr. Rhonda Flem-
porary And very little of it has ing, camp director, promises
soul. an intensive musical experience"
year. Dr. Fleming says enrollment
has doubled in the last two years.
Free public concerts are
scheduled during each camp
week.
A concert is scheduled for Sun-
day, June 26, at 2:00 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
This year marks the 30th an-
niversary of ECU's band camp. It
is co-directed by Harold Jones
and Herbert Carter.
Says Mr. CarterThis camp
will be the largest we've ever had.
We'll have four bands as well as a
fall symphony
Two concerts � one outside �
will go on this week. The cour-
tyard between Fletcher and
Brewster Buildings is the place for
the first concert, on Sunday, July
3, at 6:30 p.m. On Friday. July 8,
a concert is scheduled for 1:00
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Reporter Psyches Up For Hollerin' Contest
By CARLYN EBERT
tatrriaiaa
al lr ditot
Before I moved to North
Carolina, I thought the Spivey's
Corner Hollerin' Contest was just
another stunt dreamed up by
Johnny Carson's staff writers.
Like those singing chihuahuas.
Come to think of it, a yodeling
mutt might stand a good chance at
Spivey's Corner this Saturday.
The problem would be fitting him
into one of the the competitive
categories. Would he qualify as a
Junior Hollerer? Or as an entrant
in the Possum Trot? Or would he
have to slug it out with the rest of
the gang: doggers, bikers,
whistlers, conch shell blowers, hot
dog vendors, freelance rednecks
and, of course, those dedicated
pros � the entrants in the key
competition, the 'official' 15th
Annual National Hollerin' Con-
test (6 p.m.)?
And these folks are serious
about hollerin "Anyone can just
git up 'n yell one old codger
with part of his cheek missing told
the crowd last year. He tucked his
Red Man into the damaged cheek.
"Hollerin on t'other hand, is a
tradition and an art The
crowd cheered, stamped, sucked
Bud in cans and spat it out.
I wasn't there early enough to
enjoy the greased pole climb or
the watermelon rod. Or to take
part in the Annual Hollerin' Run.
Last year, with one Collard
Festival and one Shad Festival
behind me, 1 arrived only in time
for a fast tour of the artisans'
booths selling carved knotty pine
toilet paper holders and National
Hollerin' Contest t-shirts (with
the irresistable logo of a gaping
mouth in mid-holler). Then I settl-
ed back for the show.
I think it was sometime between
the whistlin' contest and the fox
horn blowin' contest when the
commotion behind me started up.
The field was packed with bodies
blanket-to-cooler like a New York
beach on Memorial Day.
"Git of fa man cooler growl-
ed one low voice. "Wake UP,
sumbitch
Sure enough, it was addressing
the reeling drunk in the yellow
cowboy hat and the Chevy Eats It
t-shirt who had, only moments
before, collapsed onto the oc-
cupied lawn chair just in front of
me.
The low growl belonged to a
burly biker in tattoos and a cutoff
black leather vest anchored across
a big beer gut.
His black helmet, a spare for the
lass in studded jeans who sprawl-
ed across his lap, was strapped to
a beach chair. Four biker clones in
studded wristbands and
sunglasses clenched their beers in
their teeth and proceded to hurl
the redneck intruder a few
blankets away. We saw him sober-
ing up into someone 'se's cooler.
"Ugh said the girl in the stud-
ded jeans.
"Just look straight ahead
said JoAnn, a friend I'd run into
and who had a towel to sit on.
"And now said the emcee,
"Entrant Number Five, from
Dunn, North Carolina
Bwaaaaah-eeeeeee, wailed
Number Five on his fox horn.
"Pretty good applauded
JoAnn.
"This sumbitch with you?" a
new voice demanded of the
biker's picnic group behind me.
"He's botherin this lady
"Keep watching JoAnn
breathed through her teeth. The
emcee began introducing the
Ladies' Callin' Contest, and Con-
testant Number One stepped up to
the microphone. She tucked her
hands demurely into her red
checked apron pockets and
swayed as she leaned into the
mike.
"Ah grew up she began,
"ratcheer in Sampson County, on
the very very very same land mah
daddy grew up on, and the same
as mah granddaddy grew up
on
"TAKE IT OFF screamed
Fat Leather Stud.
and the same land as mah
great-granddaddy farmed too,
'cause they was all farmers
" WHOOOO-EEEEE
all farmers she continued
nervously, "workin' out in the
'backer fields. And when mah
great-grandmamma was ready
with his dinner, why, she'd lean
out that ol screen door and shoo
away the chickens and call him in
from the farrrrrr field, and it
sounded somethin' like this She
took a breath and tugged her mat-
ching kerchief.
"Seeee-SULLLL It's Dinnnnn-
UHHHHHHH The
microphone added its own reverb
and rattle to her shriek. We clap-
ped politely.
"What'd you say to this lady?"
demanded the new voice from
over yonder.
"Called me a slut said the
lady next to the new voice. I had
to look over. She was about 5'5"
and as hefty as one of the bikers.
She had on old faded hip-huggers
and a baby blue gauze halter, and
under it her chest flared up and
down indignantly.
"Contestant Number Two is
from Burgaw, North Carolina
"Don't turn around said
JoAnn, but I already had.
To my amazement, the hunky
lady in blue gauze was squaring
off with the lap lady in studded
jeans while Biker Number One
slugged the owner of the new
redneck voice with a crumpled
beer can.
"You sleazy BITCH scream-
ed the ladies behind me.
"Daaar-lin! Supper's
REDDDD-EEEEEE scream-
ed the lady from Burgaw. "Come
n GIITT-it, you hongrymanV
she sang. "1 got chicken 'n biscuit
for ya
The crowd whistled and clap-
ped wildly. Lady Caller Number
Two had an edge, it appeared. She
weighed about 225.
Someone managed to tear the
ladies apart before the contest
security boys shoved through the
crowd. "That's enough said the
law men, separating the big biker
from his new opponent, who pro-
mptly turned around and popped
another leather-clad biker.
'Break it UP screamed the fran-
tic guards.
"Let's move up JoAnn sug-
gested. But it wasn't possible to
move up much more than a towel-
width, because the Ladies' Callin'
Contest was over, and a string trio
was pumping out fiddle music as
the Buck Swamp Kkkin' Cloggers
swirled onto the stage in a melee
of orange petticoats. Half the
crowd ahead of us stood up and
began whirling one another
around in foot stompin' glee.
"Who won?" JoAnn asked.
I stood on my tiptoes and
peered at the corner of the stage,
where the skinny girl from Florida
See HOLLERIN Page 7
Continued From P.6
who'd done her
water-skiing call was
shaking hands with
the judges. "The one
you didn't like, who
got up and vowed
she'd be back to win
this contest ever
single year I told
her.
"No, I meant�'
She hiked her thumb
over her shoulder
When 1 looked back,
the bikers and ladies
were calmly swiggmg
beer and
another
around ar
"Our n
guev-
1 � YOl
BITCH'
! m
to edge .i

Or
the held.

were
with u

"j .
BODY-
HEAT
As the tempervture ran.
the suspense hrpns
R
jOHNBELlHl
DAN AYKROYD
THE
BLUES
BROTHERS
- H �
c m
LjI
'The Blues Brothers" appear
and Thursday night at I Mom
is 'Body Heat showing at 9
MSC's Hendm Theatre.
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miHfifi mummmmm'





2
IE IS. 1983
Page 6
ters' League
urrent Issues
(ion; we are going to educate for
citizenship
Today, more than 60 years
later, I eague members are still
stressing the same points. "We
are nonpartisan; we do not sup-
port candidates said Rhea
Markeilo, President of the
Greenville-Pitt County League of
Women Voters.
Markeilo was elected to head
the local chapter for the 1982-83
term. The League boasts about
100 members in the Pitt County
Chapter. Considering its size, it
may surprise quite a few people
that they get so much work done.
The League conducts an
observers corp, members of which
faithfully attend the various
meetings of Greenville City and
Pitt County governments. By
their visibility, the League lets of-
ficials know there is citizen con-
cern and input in what they do.
Perhaps the League's most im-
portant work is the study of cur-
rent issues on national, state and
local levels.
At the national level, the
League adopts the theme for
study and asks all local chapters
to participate in the project. The
current study is on national
security. According to Markeilo,
the League will be evaluating U.S.
national security policies and their
impact on our domestic programs
and relationships with other na-
tions.
On the local level, the League
adopted to study the present
Greenville City form of govern-
t pro
' the
h reach
the
I that
It to the
final dp
lapmai
Ihe 50th
�he Na-
uffrage
a half
kssocta-
iiers ol
to at
there
iue ol
lose oh
uffrage
other
rew the
which
i elude
more
i ation-
natev
fas for-
igo on
i 'Ticial
izue of
the
We
oing to
le want
ll
�gisla-
See LEAGUE, Page 7
amps Begin
think
camp-
site in
jummer
ol of
choral
and a
its one
Jpen to
hrough
ication
idation
Dunng
:oncen-
Ihat m-
theory,
music.
tses on
fnow in
12-18.
Ith, this
leduled
Flcm-
ses
nence"
that will be broadening and in-
teresting.
Two hundred campers are ex-
pected for the choral camp's third
year. Dr. Fleming says enrollment
has doubled in the last two years.
Free public concerts are
scheduled during each camp
week.
A concert is scheduled for Sun-
day, June 26, at 2:00 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
This year marks the 30th an-
niversary of ECU's band camp. It
is co-directed by Harold Jones
and Herbert Carter.
Says Mr. CarterThis camp
will be the largest we've ever had.
We'll have four bands as well as a
fall symphony
Two concerts � one outside �
will go on this week. The cour-
tyard between Fletcher and
Brewster Buildings is the place for
the first concert, on Sunday, July
3, at 6:30 p.m. On Friday, July 8,
a concert is scheduled for 1:00
p.m. in Wright Audito.ium.
Contest
las mah
Id too,
s
fntinued
in the
;n mah
ready
d lean
id shoo
him in
and it
is She
ler mat-
chief.
innnnn-
The
reverb
re clap-
lady?"
from
tid the
I had
Fut 5'5"
bikers.
luggers
ler, and
up and
"wo is
lina
said
hunky
juanng
ktudded
One
ie new
impled
beer can.
"You sleazy BITCH scream-
ed the ladies behind me.
Daaar-lin! Supper's
REDDDD-EEEEEE scream-
ed the lady from Burgaw. "Come
'n GIITT-it, you hongrymanV
she sang. "I got chicken 'n biscuit
for ya
The crowd whistled and clap-
ped wildly. Lady Caller Number
Two had an edge, it appeared. She
weighed about 225.
Someone managed to tear the
ladies apart before the contest
security boys shoved through the
crowd. "That's enough said the
law men, separating the big biker
from his new opponent, who pro-
mptly turned around and popped
another leather-clad biker.
Break it UP screamed the fran-
tic guards.
"Let's move up Jo Ann sug-
gested. But it wasn't possible to
move up much more than a towel-
width, because the Ladies' Callin'
Contest was over, and a string trio
was pumping out fiddle music as
the Buck Swamp Kickin' Cloggers
swirled onto the stage in a melee
of orange petticoats. Half the
crowd ahead of us stood up and
began whirling one another
around in toot stompin' glee.
"Who won?" JoAnn asked.
I stood on my tiptoes and
peered at the corner ot the stage,
where the skinny girl from Florida
See HOLLERIN
Hollerin' Fest Draws Feisty Crowd
Continued From p.6
who'd done her
water-skiing call was
shaking hands with
the judges. "The one
you didn't like, who
got up and vowed
she'd be back to win
this contest every
single year I told
her.
"No, I meant�"
She hiked her thumb
over her shoulder.
When 1 looked back,
the bikers and ladies
were calmly swigging
beer and fondling one
another and looking
around arrogantly.
"Our neighbors, I
guess
'YOU SUM-
BITCH someone
far behind me yelled.
I saw Security begin
to edge in from the
cotton candy truck.
On the far fringe of
the field, a pair of
rednecks in CAT caps
were getting huffy
with a pair of bikers
in studded denim.
"Just part of the
show shrugged
JoAnn. "Sometimes
it's hard to tell the
bikers from the
rednecks, 'cause the
bikers are just
rednecks themselves
until they get
Harleys I stored
this shred of informa-
tion with my other
bits of Southern com-
mon knowledge.
"Maybe I'll enter
next year I mused.
"I can holler just as
loud as any of those
ladies, I bet
"Oh, no said
JoAnn. "It's not just
holler in' loud. You've
got to do something,
like a hymn or an old-
fashioned hog call
Unfortunately, I
don't know too many
hymns. Or too many
hog calls. I could do
my New Jersey traffic
yell, complete with
arm gestures, or
maybe my hailing-a-
cab-in-the-city holler.
What I think I'll
do, though, is stand
out in my back yard
for the rest of this
week drinking beer
and
practice
"Amazing Grace" in
my best fake soprano
vibrato holler. And
not mention that mah
granddaddy didn't
never crop tobacco.
(How could he in
Chicago?)
On Saturday, if my
courage holds up, I'll
just be an ol' girl from
Wayne County. And
if I don't make it all
the way to Johnny
Carson, well, it'll still
make a great story. It
seems safer than sit-
ting in the crowd,
anyway.
I
Eech of these advertised items is required to be readily eveiiebte for sate .
below the advertised prica m aach A4P Store aicept as specifically noted
m this ad
at or
O
BODY
HEAT
the temperature rests,
the suspense begins
JOHN BELUSHI
DAN AYKROYD
THE
BLUES
BROTHERS
A JWVf RSAl PCTURE
League Of Women Voters
Working Hard In Greenville
Ri-s&
The Blues Brothers' appears tonight at 8
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Continued From Page 6
ment (mayor and city council),
especially the length of terms and
types of representation. "We are
concerned about the lack of
representation of minorities on
our city council Markeilo said.
The study is being chaired by
ECU Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Safety professor
Dr. Patricia Dunn and will con-
centrate on the city council and
procedures in the city charter.
After completing a study,
which can take up to several
years, the League releases their
findings in a position statememt
which has been reached by con-
sensus. "We believe that you
study at the grass roots before you
come to a decision as an organiza-
tion Markeilo said.
She said the League, because of
its reputation as a staunch sup-
porter of civil rights, was able to
bypass lengthy procedural work
and come out in support of the
Equal Rights Amendment. "I'm
ashamed to say this Markeilo
said, referring to the League as an
organization not supporting the
ERA until 1972.
Other areas addressed by the
local chapter include enviornmen-
tal concerns, fair housing, and the
review of city, county and Green-
ville Utilities Commission
budgets. Further information is
obtainable through the League via
P.O. Box 1551, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT JUNE 18 AT AA P IN
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V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
��
Sports
JUNE 15. 1983
Page 8
Robinette, Hallow Continue Careers
By KEN BOLTON
ssislaal Sports t diior
When the ECU baseball team
takes to the field next season, the
Pirates will be without two of the
team's cornerstones from the
previous four years.
Kelly Robinette, a four-year
starter at shortstop, and John
Hallow, also a four-year starting
third basemanoutfielder, will be
attempting to continue their
ba.ebal! careers in the profes-
sional leagues.
Robinette was recently drafted
by the Cleveland Indians in the
13th round of the annual amateur
baseball draft. Hallow will be
signing as a free agent with the
San Diego Padres.
Robinette, the slick-fielding
23-year old from Prince George,
Ya was the highest draft pick in
head coach Hal Baird's four vears
at ECU.
"Kelly is a defensive-oriented
player and that's the strongest
part of his game Baird said.
"He has outstanding hands, good
quickness and good lateral move-
ment
But even with all of the tools
that Robinette possesses, Baird
realizes the difficulty for any
player in rising through the minor
league ranks.
"The chances of anyone mak-
ing it are less than 50-50 Baird
commented. "It's a hit-or-miss
proposition for anyone, but with
a couple of breaks, it wouldn't
surprise me at all if Kelly made
it
Robinette has been assigned to
the Indians' Class A farm club in
Batavia, N.Y.
After four seasons at ECU,
Robinette is fourth on the all-time
list with 151 base hits and is third
with 587 at bats.
During the 1983 season,
Robinette batted .288 while han-
ding out 113 assists from his
shortstop position.
It will be hard to fill the vacan-
cy left by Robinette's departure,
but the Pirates have a shortstop,
who was red-shirted last season,
that Baird feels will be able to
handle the job.
Hallow, who is the all-time
ECU leader in RBI, hits, total
bases and doubles, reported to
Spokane, Wash, this weekend.
The 22-year old Greenville
native batted .300 in 1983 and led
the team in RBI, hits and doubles.
Hallow finished his career at ECU
with a .317 batting average.
Next year's ECU squad will be
trying to improve on this past
season's 21-17-1 mark, but it will
have to be done without the ef-
forts of Robinette and Hallow,
who have represented their purple
and gold uniforms well on the
baseball diamond.
"It's very hard for someone to
come into college baseball and
start for four years Baird
responded. "We're awfully proud
of both Kelly and John
Both Pirate athletes Kelly Robinette and John Hallow begin their professional careers after four ears as
ECU's top baseball players.
Edwards Transfers To ISU
By CINDY PLEAS ANTS
-uoiw r dilor
ECU's highly-touted freshman
center, 6-5 Charlotte native
Johnny Edwards, will transfer to
Indiana State this coming fall.
Head Basketball Coach Charlie
Harrison said in March that Ed-
wards wanted to transfer to
another school. But last week in
The Yews and Observer, a story,
which was comprised of wire
reports, claimed that Edwards
was academically ineligible to play
at ECU in the fall.
According to Harrison, this
report was incorrect. "Johnny
was academically eligible to at-
tend ECU as a student Harrison
stressed, "but he would have had
to have gone to summer school in
order to play on the team in the
fall NCAA rules call for a cer-
tain grade point average by
athletes.
When Edwards told Harrison
Former ECU center Jon. ny Edwards will make Indiana State his new
home this fall.
that he wanted to transfer after
the completion of the 1982-83
season, both coach and player
mutually agreed to make other ar-
rangements. Edwards was then
given permission to talk to other
schools, and letters were also writ-
ten in Edwards behalf. "I wanted
to do what was best for Johnny
Harrison said.
Why did Edwards want to
transfer away from ECU? Har-
rison said his player's decision to
transfer was motivated by several
factors, including academic trou-
ble. "My major concern was that
he has to be happy here in things
other than basketball status he
said. I told Johnny that unless
he started going to tutors and
abiding by the rules set for the rest
of the team, then changes were
going to have to be made.
"I simply told him the truth.
He was in a hole academically,
and I guess Johnny figured that
the best thing for him to do was to
start somewhere else with a clean
slate
Harrison said he made no state-
ment about Edwards' intentions
to transfer because he was waiting
to receive word that one school
would take him, and added, "It's
Johnny's life
The star center, who averaged
18.8 points and 8.6 rebounds this
past season, will definitely leave a
gap in next year's lineup �
something Harrison is obviously
very much aware of.
"I hate to lose Johnny he
said, "and I appreciate what he
did for the team last season, but
there are things other than basket-
ball to consider.
"As for Johnny, there was no
way he could continue on the path
he was going. If so, there would
have been altercations between he
and I. Johnny is an exceptional
ball player, but an athlete also has
to come to terms with his social
being as well
Because of NCAA rules, Ed-
wards will sit next season out at
Indiana State, but will be eligible
to play during the 1984-85 season.
The break, however, may just be
what Edwards needs. "It gives
him a year to get things
straightened out Harrison said.
In a statement released by the
school, Indiana State Head Coach
Dave Schellhase praised his
newly-acquired player. "We are
extremely happy to have Johnny
in our program he said. "He is
a proven (NCAA) Division I
player who will help us in reboun-
ding and scoring
Indiana State is a member of
the Missouri Valley Conference.
The team had a 9-19 overall
record and a 5-13 conference
finish.
Edwards, who could not be
reached by telephone, will play
forward at ISU rather than filling
a center position.
Fast Named
Coach At
Presbyterian
East Carolina's Garry Fast, an
administrative assistant in the
athletic department, has accepted
a football coaching position at
Presbyterian College, it was an-
nounced Friday.
Fast, in his third year at ECU,
served on the Pirates' football
staff before moving to his ad-
ministrative position over a year
ago.
Fast, 28, will coach quarter-
backs, running backs and
receivers at Presbyterian.
Pirates Ink
First Golfer
John Faidley of Myrtle Beach,
S.C. has signed a grant-in-aid to
play golf with ECU � the first
signee this spring for coach Jerry
Lee.
He played at Socastee High
School under coach Rich Agle. A
one-handicapper, Faidley was the
team's most valuable player.
Faidley finished in the top ten
in the nine major junior cham-
pionships he entered in 1983, in-
cluding a sixth-place finsish in the
Carolinas Juniors Championships
in Monroe.
"John is an outstanding young
man said Lee. "We are pleased
to be getting a very fine student as
well as a very fine golfer. John has
the potential to be an excellent
college golfer
Connors, Martina Top Seeds
LONDON (UPI) � Defending
champion Jimmy Connors and
John McEnroe were named the
No. 1 and No. 2 seeds Monday for
next week's Wimbledon tennis
championship. Martina
Navratilova and Chris Evert
Lloyd were the top two women's
seeds.
If the draw goes according to
form, Connors will meet
McEnroe for the title in a rematch
of last year's Wimbledon final.
Navratilova, eliminated in the
recent French Open, is favored to
take a fourth Wimbledon singles
title and stop Even's march. The
No. 2 seed has captured the last
three Grand Slam events, the
U.S Australian and French
Opens.
Ivan Lendl, the
Czechoslovakian looking for his
first Grand Slam title, is seeded
No. 3 on the strength of his ex-
ploits on the Grand Prix tour,
even though he dislikes grass-
court play so much that he didn't
bother to play Wimbledon last
year.
Roller Chosen
the 1982 event are Argentines
Guillermo Vilas (4) and Jose-Luis
Clerc (7). Neither attended last
year because of the Falklands
War.
Wimbledon
'83
Sweden's Mats Wilander is
seeded No. 5, ahead Gene Mayer.
Vitas Gerulaitis, Steve Demon
and Jimmy Arias are Nos. 8, 9
and 10, ahead of South Africans
Johan Kriek and Kevin Curren.
The other seeds are Brian Gott-
fried, Bill Scanlon, Hank Pfister
and Tim Mayotte.
These seedings follow the world
rankings except in the case of
Mayotte, 22nd on the computer.
But Monday he was named ahead
of hard-court specialists Tomas
Smid of Czecxhoslovakia and
Henrik Sandstrom of Sweden.
Americans also dominate the
women's seedings with Andrea
Jaeger and Tracey Austin due to
meet in the semis and Pam Shriver
seeded No. 5.
Bettina Bunge (West Germany),
Wendy Turnbill (Australia), Hana
Mandlikova (Czechoslavakia) and
Sylvia Hanika (West Germany)
are ranked ahead of No. 10 Billie
Jean King, who at 39 is one of the
Wimbledon legends, having won
21 of the event's singles and
doubles titles.
The other seeds are Barbara
Potter, Virginia Ruzici
(Romania), Jo Durie (Britain),
Andrea Temesvari (Hungary),
Kathy Rinaldi and Claudia Kohde
(West Germany).
Durie is the exception as far as
world ranking is concerned. She is
No. 17 on the computer, but
Temesvari, Rinaldi and Kohde
have been moved down to ac-
comodate her. Zina Garrison,
although 16th in the world, has
been left out.
McEnroe and Peter Fleming
and King and Shriver are seeded
to retain the men and women's
doubles titles.
Assistant SID
Bob Roller has been named to
fill the position of assistant sports
information director at ECU, it
was announced Friday.
Roller, 22, is a 1983 graduate of
Virginia Tech and worked for
three and one-half years in the
SID office at VPI. He replaces
Mark Brand, who accepted a
similar position at Arizona State.
Orioles Nest In First
BASEBALL: The Baltimore
Orioles moved into the
American League East lead last
week as the Orioles had won 10
out of their last 12 games as of
Tuesday afternoon. With their
record of 36-24, the Orioles now
have the highest winning percen-
tage in the American League.
Baltimore owns a three-game
lead over the Detroit Tigers; the
Toronto Blue Jays, who were
leading the division at this same
time last week, are three and
one-half games back.
In the National League, the
Chicago Cubs continue to be the
hottest club in the month of
June as the Cubs have won 10
out of 12. The Cubs are only
three games behind the defen-
ding world champion St. Louis
Cardinals.
Atlanta's Dale Murphy has
continued this year where he left
off the 1982 season. Last year's
National League MVP leads the
majors in home runs (17), RBI
(51) and runs (54), and is spor-
ting a .326 batting average.
Sports Update
GOLF: Spaniard See
Ballesteros shot an eagle on the
final hole to break a three-way
deadlock in this weekend's
Westchester Classic in Harrison,
N.Y. Prior to the 18th hole,
Ballesteros had been in a tie with
Andy Bean and Craig Stadler.
Ballesteros, who collected
$81,000 for victory, sank a six-
foot putt after a 225-foot three-
iron shot gave him the eagle op-
portunity.
Next stop for the PGA Tour is
in Oakmont, Pa. for the U.S.
Open. Ballesteros will be trying
to add the U.S. Open title to his
Westchester crown as well as the
Masters that he won in April.
� ��
TENNIS: In the final tune-up
before next week's Wimbledon
tournament, Jimmy Conners
defeated John McEnroe 6-3, 6-3
Sunday to capture the title in the
Stella Artois Grand Prix. Con-
ners never trailed McEnroe in
the match and would appear to
be the favorite to repeat as the
Wimbledon men's singles
champ.
The Stella Artois Grand Prix
is played on the same surface �
grass � as the prestigious
Wimbledon tourney. This year's
final was almost identical to last
year's, when Conners defeated
McEnroe 7-5, 6-3 en route to the
Wimbledon championship.
COLLEGE BASEBALL: In
the College World Series held in
Omaha, Neb Texas defeated
Alabama 4-3 for the top spot in
college baseball. Texas, 66-14.
was ranked number one going
into the tournament and came
out on top.
This was the third College
World Series title for Texas.
which was playing in its third
consecutive CWS. The
Longhorns previously won the
title in 1949. 1950 and 1975.
FOOTBALL: The
Philadelphia Stars became the
first team to qualify for the
United States Football League
playoffs Sunday with a 23-9 vic-
tory over the New Jersey
Generals.
The Stars, led by former I INC
star Kelvin Bryant, clinched the
Atlantic Division in the USFL's
inaugural season. The playoffs
are scheduled to begin July 9.
HORSE RACING: Caveat,
ridden by Laffit Pincay Jr cap-
tured the 115th running of the
Belmont Stakes Saturday after-
noon with a three and one-half
length victorv over Slew O'
Gold.
Caveat's trainer. Woody
Stephens, also was the trainer
for Conquistador Cielo. last
year's Belmont winner.
ECU Defensive Coordinator
Promises Tough Buc Squad
2ND SUMMER SESSION
(June 22-July 29)
ActivityEntry DatesBegins DaysTimeLocation
Video Games Rec Nite� �623 R 7-9pm Mem GymPool
Tennis (s) Tour.62024627 MR TBA Coll. Hill Cts.
Co-Rec Volleyball620-624628 T&R 5:30-7:30 pm Mall
Tube Water Volleyball622-627629 MAW 6:30-8:30 Mem
Putt-Putt Tourney627-630630 R Noon-11 pm H wy 33
1-on-l Basketball627-63075 T&R 6:30-8:30 Mem Gym
Prediction Run75-7777 R 6pm Bunting Track
Softball Tourney75-78711 M-R TBA IM Fids.
Golf Classic711-714714 R 9am-4pm Ayden CC
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
When ECU defensive coor-
dinator Tom Throckmorton was
offered a position by head foot-
ball coach Ed Emory, it didn't
take the Richmond, Va. native
long to reply.
"After coach Emory offered
me the job and I took a look at the
program, I was very, very im-
pressed Throckmorton stated.
"There have been so many im-
provements made since they were
in the Southern Conference, and I
also saw some excellent athletes
who all seemed like they wanted
to play
Throckmorton, a graduate of
Randolph Macon, explained how
he has always been interested in
coaching. "My first job was as a
high school coach and from there
I kept progressing until I made it
to college football on the Division
I level he commented.
Throckmorton arrived in
Greenville just in time for spring
practice, and was pleased with
what he got accomplished. "We
did a lot of teaching and added
several new concepts to last year's
5-2 defense he said. "We also
worked on drills and tried to in-
stall confidence in the kids
Although Throckmorton ex-
pects everybody to contribute �
and says no positions have been
set � several players seem to have
established themselves as prime
candidates for a starting role.
Clint Harris and Chuck Bishop
are strong in the secondary, as are
linebackers Mike Grant and PJ.
Jordan. Steve Hamilton, Hal
Stephens, Gerry Rogers, Jeff
Pegues and Curtis Wyatt should
all see considerable playing time
on the defensive line.
Throckmorton said he has en-
joyed ECU thus far, and is op-
timistic about the season ahead.
"I'm not going to make any pro-
mises, but I can tell you we will be
in shape and we're going to come
out hitting hard
Seve
Shot
HARRISON.
(UPD - The
Open never ha- r
happy battlegn
for Seve Bailesterj
Since piawng
first Open in 1971 j
best he ha-
16th placer j
eluding
failed ton
and on oi �
at Baltusrol I
he was qua
when he an
course too La
tee time
.

Thi
manu'
critics point out
just a-
Bailestero-
reckle- .
doesn!
fenced
fines ol
and (r
notoriou
narrow fa rwa
rough
g r e �:
N c -
Bailec-
ing.
fider.
bUOVr
by vkl
two
peara:
the Mastei
cond time
and on S
unlea-r
tacula"
final �
three-wa
lead and
S450.000 West
Classu
Now.
FSU
New
TALLAH
Fla. (UPI) -
McKet
at Pre-b
lege the pas! -
has beer.
men tennis
Florida v
sitv. FSI
Director v
gram
Tuesdav
McKee, 3
ceeds Rai
who re
become a
and insl
private
Geore
McKex
in 1974
Cla
COME ONE ;C�i
BIG TIME &�D S I
� no, June 'ft ' i
Street E�er�" -
eluding Muon. FaoiH
dirty 6oo�s -c -
qua Wr jo- � �
TYPING TEBV
ESSAYS �rx! REv
SELECTS IC ' I
�na CAMERA
RESUME SEC. I
MIKE �' r� ��
HAVE A FUM JOS
SUMMER B
counselor ' bea h
Hie1 Must be o
tfiusiAStic anc gooe
Serto resume 'c �cl
o Amer.c Booul
Hi Emer��) 'vie
SPECIAL
AVAILABLE
L
?





Careers
�wr
JWBPtP - ���jLt
'trs after four tar a
est In First
e in the
: K i. On-
Mel nroe in
ai as the
s i n g 1 e s
-Vri
sui face
'�'�i' prestigious
ournej "his year's
identical to last
� ��
( O!I �,rBW.HM.L: In
. ge wor!Set es held in
-Tcxav defeated
- 3top spot in
asebTexas, 66-14. ' e going
ind cameollege
SI exas, �bird The
� ��
FOOTBALL: The
ame the
for the
all I eague
�� ha 2; -9 ic-
n �- w It rse
i ei I N
in the USFI 's
I " 6 playoffs
begin JuK 9.
� ��
HORSI K(IV caveat,
:ay Jr cap-
unning ol the
tturday after-
and one-halt
� Slew ()"
trainer, Wood)
the trainer
lor ielo, last
' dinner.
isive Coordinator
nigh Rue Squad
- �� �� pleased with
� omplished. "We
hing and added
uicepts to last year's
he said "Wc also
Irills and tried to in
fidence in the kids
Throckmorton ex
body to contribute �
no positions have been
several players seem to have
d themselves as prime
lates tor a starting role.
lint Harris and Chuck Bishop
strong in the secondary, as are
lebackers Mike Grant and P.J
"dan Steve Hamilton. Hal
Stephens, Gerry Rogers, Jeff
Pcgucs and Curtis Wyatl should
Jll see considerable playing time
he defensive line.
I hrockmorton said he has en-
CJ EC! thus far. and is op-
l!plsti ahut the season ahead.
� not going to make anv pro-
Nses, but lean tell vou we will be
m shape and vse're going to come
out hitting hard
in
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNfc 15. 1983
Seve Takes Another
Shot At U.S. Open
HARRISON,
a PI) The
NY.
U.S.
Open never has been a
happy battleground
f0i Seve Ballesteros.
smce playing in his
first Open in 191, the
best he has done is
16th place. Twice, in-
cluding last year, he
failed to make the cut,
and on one occasion,
ai Baltusrol in 1980,
he was disqualified
when he arrived at the
c too late for his
tee tune.
I his past perfor-
m a nee chart, his
critics point out, reads
as it should be.
Ballesteros can be a
reckless gambler who
doesn't like to be
fenced in by the con-
ns of a golf course.
and Open 1 ayouts are
notorious for their
narrow fairways, high
rough and slick
g r e e n s .
Nevertheless,
Ballesteros keeps try-
ing, and his con-
dence has been
buoyed tremendously
b v ictories in his last
U.S. ap-
ances. He won
. Masters for the se-
cond time in April,
on Sunday, he
cashed a spec-
tacular eagle on the
hole to snap a
ree-way tie for the
ad and win the
5450,000 Wesichester
( Lassie.
Now, it's on to
Oakmont, site of this
year's Open beginning
Thursday.
"This gives me a lot
of confidence for next
week the dashing
26-year old Spaniard
said following the
Westchester victory,
which was worth
581.000. "I'm very
realistic and 1 know a
USGA course is not
the type that suits my
game. But I believed
in myself and I have a
chance. If I have a
chance. I'm going for
it
Only three men
have won the U.S.
Open after winning a
PGA event the
previous week.
Ballesteros will be
seeing Oakmont for
the first time and was
planning to get in
three practice rounds.
He didn't even bother
to get a scouting
report on the course,
but said that wasn't
important.
"1 really don't need
it he explained. "I
know every U.S.
Open course will have
narrow fairways, high
rough and fast greens.
1 feel like I'm a better
player now. with
more experience, so
that may help
In only six tour-
naments in the U.S.
this year, Ballesteros
has won twice for ear-
nings of S189.764. He
would like to play
more in this country,
but his request to the
PGA to allow him
certain concessions
was turned down
recently by Deane
Beman, the Tour
commissioner.
To become a
regular member of the
Tour, Ballesteros
would be required to
play a minimum of 15
events, and his
freedom to compete
in Europe would be
severely limited.
Ballesteros requested
a waiver that would
allow him to play in
nine European tour-
naments, and this was
refused.
"I have a lot of
friends in Europe
Ballesteros said.
"That is where 1 first
made my reputation,
that is where I won
my first tournaments
and that is where I
earned a lot of
money. I have my
commitments to
fulfill there.
"Maybe one day I
will plav more in the
U.S. 1 would like the
challenge to see what I
can do
In the meantime, it
would please him con-
siderably to take the
U.S. Open crown
back to Europe with
him.
Olympic Tickets On Sale
LOS ANGELES �
More than 5.5 million
tickets to the 1984
Olympics go on sale
to the American
public today utilizing
a computerized mail
Sears,Roebuck and
Co. stores around the
nation and at banks in
California and New
York.
A spokesman for
the Sears store at
Raleigh's Crabtree
order system expected Valley Mall said ticket
to sell out many applications are
year before
summer's
events
next
Games.
The tickets � rang-
ing in price from $3
for the cheapest seats
at several events to
$200 for the best seats
for the opening and
closing ceremonies �
must be ordered from
brochures being
distributed at
available at the
customer convenience
department.
No tickets will be
sold at any Sears
stores. All sales will
be by mail order with
applications to be
handled by check,
money order or credit
card numbers. The
applications will be
processed in order of
arrival.
The forms describe
the 23 Olympic sports
and venues and in-
clude a schedule
listing starting times
and prices for approx-
imately 370 individual
events. They do not
indicate seat loca
tions.
Olympics officials
said Mondav the
system was designed
to ensure the widest
possible distributer,
limit the potential ot
brokers to buy up and
resell tickets at higher
prices and eliminate
favoritism for special
interest groups
The co-rec volleyball championship game will be held Thursday at
6:30 p.m. Co-rec volleyball will also be offered during the second
summer session.
G0&
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
FOUR (4) Tacos
for just $1.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
8:00pm til doting
C 1 S draft witti purchase of 4 tocos yL
AITARH
GRFFNVILLE
JEWELFKS
ID 1912
f. r
-� f
1 1 J8J.
(
Remnants
Custom Design
Repair
All Work Done On Premises
FSU
New
Names
Coach
1 1 1 AHASSEE,
I la. tl Ph Richard
McKee, tennis coach
at Presbyterian Col-
lege the past siv years,
as been named head
men's tennis coach at
Florida State Univer-
FSU Athletic
Director C.W. ln-
L:a m announced
Iuesday.
McKee, 31, suc-
ceeds Randy Jobson,
who resigned to
become a professional
and instuctor at a
private club in
Georgia.
McKee graduated
in 1974 from the
University oi North
Carolina, where he
was a three-time
NCAA all-American.
In 1975 and 1976, he
was a touring profes-
sional and teaching
pro at Sea Pines Rac-
quet Club in Hilton
Head. S.C. In 1976,
he was head pro at
Rock Hill Country
Club and also head
tennis coach at Win-
throp College.
His team at
Presbyterian was
ranked in the NAIA
top 20 for three of his
six seasons.
HARD DAYS NIGHT
'free Beer at the CPftY house
,v� PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CH'NA&CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
Every
THURSDAY
at the
CAROLINA
OPRY HOUSE
FREE BEER
(8:30-10:00)
�FREE ADMISSION
ALL NIGHT











i
'v


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with WITN's Greg Allison
We're taking you Back in Time For the Time of Your Life!
TIME IS RUNNING OUT;
The Opry House is going private soon!
Special 12 price membership! $5.00
Mail for applications: COH
P.O. Box 3016
Greenville, NC 27834
cz
0
Classifieds
cotgJgy��M�
COME ONE COME ALL to the
BIG TIME YARD SALE Com
� no, June 18th at 409 Biltmore
Street Everything goes, in
dueling Hugh Fridges albums
dirty books and collectible iun
que We've got it all!
TYPING TERM PAPERS.
ESSAYS and RESUMES IBM
SELECTRIC TYPEWRITER
and CAME RA READY
RESUME SERVICE Call
MIKE at 752 6984
HAVE A FUN JOB FOR THE
SUMMER' Ba a vacation
counselor at beautiful Emerald
Isle' Must be energetic, en
thusiastic and good humored!
Send resume to Vacation Club
of America 142 Bogue Inlet Dr.
107 Emerald Isle. NC 28S57
SPECIAL POSITICNS
AVAILABLE
ROOMMATE WANTED:
2 bedroom apartment on Tenth
Street Rent JU7 SO'month plus
i 2 utilities call 7S� 8790.
401 S. EVANS ST. OPENf:30-5:MMONSAT.
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"YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
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-tmm
I





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 15, 1983
t
Sneaker
Sam Sez
Volleyball Set For
Finish
As first session
summer school comes
to an end, so does co-
Rec volleyball. Seven
teams began tourna-
ment play last week.
Only two will remain
to compete in the
championship game,
which will be played
Thursday, June 16 at
6:30.
Even though com-
petition has been
fierce, one team re-
mains the favorite for
capturing the title.
ONE LAST
SNATCH is compos-
ed of the Intramural
volleyball women's
champs as well as the
men's divisional
champions. Members
combine to provide
exciting and well-
coordinated efforts.
Thanks to all the
people who have par-
ticipated and be wat-
ching for co-rec
volleyball in second
summer session.
Dribblers Roll On
The fast-paced
sport of three-on-
three basketball nears
a finish as one team
will survive and reign
as the champions.
Seven teams com-
pleted round-robin
play and qualified for
tournament play
which began on Tues-
day, June 14. Two
teams appear to be
top contenders for the
title. B-LOOSE,
which is composed of
the men's divisional
champs and the EN-
FORCERS will pro-
vide stiff action. A
Third team, THE
RATS, expect to pro-
vide some hidden
strategies, giving the
race for the title a very
strong competition.
Catch this final
game to be held
Thursday, June 16, at
7:30 p.m.
Co-Rec Softball and
Golf Classic Cham-
pions Crowned
Banks Drewry took
the first summer golf
title as he shot an 82
to capture the in-
dividual crown.
In co-rec softball, it
was NANCY'S
FAVORITES
outlasting the attemp-
ted comeback by the
PHIL LATIO GANG
in the seventh inning.
NANCY'S
FAVORITES took
the lead in the second
inning, 3-0, and held
onto the lead to the
end, winning the
championship title,
6-4.
Red-Pin Bowling
Tonight
The MSC bowling
alley will be in action
tonight for the Red
Pin Bowling tourna-
ment. This individual
event will be from 7 to
9 p.m. Participants
will be bowling for
various awards.
Upcoming Ac-
tivities
As first summer
session activities are
winding down, second
session activities are
being put on the front
burners. Activities for
next session begins
with another Video
Games Rec Nite at
Memorial Gym on
June 23 from 7 to 9
p.m. Activities
schedules for second
session include tennis,
co-rec volleyball,
water volleyball, putt-
putt tourney, softball
tourney and one-on-
one basketball. For
further information,
contact the
Intramural-
Recreational Services
Office in room 204,
Memorial Gym.
i ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
�1�S 00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information call
832 04JS (Toll Free Number
800 J31 1S40) betweenAM
and 5 P.M Weekdays.
RALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
9w West V rq1 St.
riuieiq
L
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABOBTrON: a difficult deo-v
DEPEND ON. ston that s made easier by
the women of the Heming Center Counselors are
available day and night to support and under-
stand you Your safety comfort and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICfS: � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st & 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
16 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very tarty
Pregnancy Tests � All inclusive Fees � Insurance
Accepted � CALL 7� 1-5550 DAY O NJGHT �
Health care, counseling �UC a Ciiiur
and education for wo- 'Mt tMINto
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
4iC Greenville �tv�
753023 -24 MRS
PLAZA SH
24 hour Towing Service
U-Haul Rentals
Available
A11 New Salad Bar Over 20
Ingredients Enjoy with Lunch
or
Dinner Buffets
or
"ALL YOU CAN EAT"
Our New Salad Bar-$2.09 I
Best Pizza In Town.
10 Si Charles Streets
The best piixa in town.jj
USPA Choice Beef Round - Whole
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Saturday, June 18,1983
Se
m (jCHOTCEj
r
10-12 Lb. Average
(Sliced FREE)
?
��y
Lb.
US0A Clioiet B�tf Chuek - Benilits
Chuck
Roast
Lb.
USDA Chtict B�f Round
Sirloin Tip
Each
Western
USDA
CHOICE
Roast
Cantaloupes
2 Liter
$a99
B Rod BarrjuaaY
firoeeeho Ron
1.S Litar - Mt. Naelar Via Raaa. White Chabiit
m m White Saaterae
Almaden "
Wine
Pk. of 6 - 11 Oi. MR Bottlts
Miller
Pk�. of 12 - 12 Oz. Cut
Stroh's
22 Ounce
2 Lb. - Frtwb Friat
Why Pay M 39
M T
10 Ouaee
Why Pay 57 Eacb
�fey Pty M.29
32 Oaaea
Qaart
Del Monte Catsup STJFO Mayonnaise
389
14 0i. - ChoH Betf livir ft Reef
Kal Kan Dog Food
?.1S0�. FaaiTaw
Macaroni & Cheese
K�&M
S 0i. � Libby t
Vienna Sausage
10 0i. - AteaHaa'
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Puss N' Boots feKLiquid Slender W
4 Pick - Wbita Pife
Toilet Tissue
4. A A
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DUCK
1 Lb Quartos
Half Gallon
Donald Duck
Orange Juice
Qri1e j.ce
Mrs. Filbert's
Margarine
Why Pay 84 Each
1 A & �
W. Pa, I h
mm ��,
&�M





Title
The East Carolinian, June 15, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 15, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.272
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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