The East Carolinian, June 8, 1983






�to iEaBt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No, fc�
Wednesday June 8,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,
Drinking Age
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Vuutant Ntwi Milor
Beginning Oct. 1, at 12:01 a.m
a law will go into effect to raise
North Carolina's minimum drink-
ing age to 19. Last Thursday,
after months of revision and com-
promise, the General Assembly
passed the Safe Roads Act.
The bill, which received almost
unanymous approval from both
houses, has been termed "the
toughest law in America against
drunk driving by Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. Hunt was the chief sup-
porter of the legislation.
The section of the new measure
requiring the age change is ex-
pected to be difficult to enforce
and has received little support
from officials at North Carolina
colleges and universities.
Several ECU officials have
spoken in the past against the age
change claiming the law will be
difficult to enforce and require
university officials to segregate
students at college functions
where alcohol is served.
Vice-Chancellor for Student
Life Elmer Meyer has been in op-
position to the proposal since it
was initially discussed in the
General Assembly. In an inter-
view Tuesday, Meyer said he
Bus. School
Gets $20,000
Banking Gift
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
StaAWtitci
On Tuesday, May 31, the nor-
theastern group of the North
Carolina Bankers Association an-
nounced a $20,000 gift to the
banking curriculum here at ECU's
business school.
Dr. James H. Bearden, dean of
the School of Business, said the
gift i; "seed money" that will be
used to generate more than
$100,000 in endowment funds for
an NCBA chair in banking.
"This initial gift by NCBA will
provide us with the momentum to
build a support base for the pro-
gram. We expect a significant
amount of interaction with the
banking community in North
Carolina as we develop and
enlarge our banking cirriculum
Bearden said.
The money will be used to pay
plans to hold a meeting Friday at
2 p.m. with all interested parties
to discuss the numerous changes
that will be necessary to enforce
the new law.
"Fait Accompli said Meyer,
indicating that now the university
must begin to work with, not
against, the new law. "It's going
to cause us some difficulty
Meyer said. "It's going to cause
students some difficulty
Meyer is welcoming student
participation Friday at the
meeting being held in the Student
Life Conference Room at the
Whichard Building. "We're going
to look at everything Meyer
said. He added the new law would
impact on many student functions
such as fraternity rushes and other
events.
Meyer said a new type of ID
card would probably be required
to distinguish between 18- and
19-year-olds. Meyer claims that
more than 20 percent of ECU's
students including "most
freshman" are under the age of
19. ECU will be admitting ap-
proximately 2.600 new freshmen
this fall. Many will be 17-year-
olds, Meyer said.
"1 felt it was something needed
to make our roads safer for law
abiding citizens said Sen. Ver-
non White, D-Pitt, who sup-
ported the Safe Roads bill. White
said the measure was designed to
make it more difficult for high
school students to buy alcohol,
and the General Assembly "did
not have college students in
mind" when it voted to pass the
bill.
White said the new age law
would be "very hard to enforce"
and that there were "a lot of loose
ends" to be worked out. He add-
ed that any retailer who sold
alcohol to those under age would
be in serious trouble if they were
caught.
During a Thursday press con-
ference, Hunt said he was
"shocked and appalled" by the
flagrant disregard many retailers
have for the law forbidding them
to sell alcohol to minors. "We're
going to break them. We're going
to stop selling beer to minors
Hunt said.
The new law also contains sec-
tions which would require jail
sentences for some offenders con-
victed of drunk driving. The new
measure will also scrap several
statutes that previously had allow-
ed those convicted of drunk driv-
ing to plea bargain. These provi-
sions will now be replaced by a
driving-while-impaired statute.
LC
i St oa�v pattsmson ecu
After Oct. 1, ECU's 18-year-olds will no longer be seen chugging down the brews on campus. A North
Carolina statute going into effect on that date will prohibit all people under the age of 19 from purchasing
beer or wine in the state.
Immigration Service Restricts Students
Dean Bearden
for costs associated with such
things as faculty research, guest
speakers, travel courses, ad-
ministrative expenses and banking
forum.
David Nisbet, chair of NCBA
Group I said, "Of course this
.pecific effort by the eastern
North Carolina banks is viewed as
a continuation of our interest in
being involved in higher educa-
tion, especially as it impacts on
the banking field. We are pleased
to provide these funds with the
hope that others will be suppor-
tive also
(CPS) � Restrictions on
foreign students attending
American colleges are about to get
tougher in August, and may get
even harder if Congress passes a
new bill.
The Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS) an-
nounced last week that, as of
August, it will give foreign
students four years to complete
their coursework here.
If they don't finish in that time
and they want to continue going
to school, they'll have to return to
their home countries for two years
before re-registrating here, ex-
plains INS spokesman Janet
Graham.
At the same time, congressional
committees approved bills that, if
passed by the full House and
Senate, would force foreign
students to return home for two
years before becoming eligible to
apply for permanent U.S. citizen-
ship.
Graham says the bills are
necessary to "deter" foreign
students whose "whole intent is
never to go back home
But Carole Shaffer, interna-
tional student advisor at the
University of San Francisco,
believes Congress is trying to keep
out foreign students to save jobs
for Americans.
"It is our feeling that this
legislation is being proposed
without proper justification
adds Georgia Stewart of the Na-
tional Association of Foreign
Students Affairs (NAFSA)
She insists congressional spon-
sors of the bill are using "old and
not very reliable" information.
The sponsors believe 40-to-50
percent of the 325,000 foreign
students now here are trying to
gain permanent resident status.
Stewart says only about 15 per-
cent of the 325,000 foreign
students new here are trying to
gain permanent resident status.
Stewart says only about 15 per-
cent has in fact applied for resi-
dent status. "It's not a very
remarkable figure she notes.
But Hie House Subcommittee
on Immigration did pass an
amendment that would exempt
about 4,500 foreigners who apply
for certain college jobs �
engineering teaching positions in
particular � from the return-
home requirement.
No further congressional action
is needed to enforce the INS' new
rule that will put a definite limit
on the foreigners' visas.
Congress passed the law mak-
ing the change possible in 1981,
but the INS delayed putting the
change into effect.
Since then "a few bad people in
the barrel have spoiled the
batch Shaffer says. Some
foreign students have managed to
stay on in this country for up to
nine years.
Until now, foreign student visas
were good for "duration of
status meaning they lasted as
long as the student remained a
student and didn't violate an
laws.
As of August, however, the
government will isssue only visa-
that have a "date certain" expira
tion. Freshmen entering in 198?,
for example, will get visas that ex-
pire in 1987.
Under the new rules, the INS
will also need to know the stu
dent's major, if the student
changes majors, and if the student
transfers schools, adds INS ex
aminer Joe Cuddihy.
Stewart hopes "there will be
some exceptions" granted.
especially for foreign student
afraid to return home for political
reasons.
In any case, students will havt
to be more vigilant in maintaining
their statuses, Shaffer says
They're not off to a good start
Student Forum
PIRG Proposal Receives Strong Support
Women Opposed To Weapons
Embark Oni Walk For Peace'
JTT'
-�-fc�-
i
In March Consumer Activist
Ralph Nader visited ECU. Dur-
ing his visit, Nader said he
found support among both
students and faculty to
establish a Public Interest
Research Group (PIRG) at
ECU. Nader then sent a
representative from his
Washington, D.C office to
help lay the ground for the
research organization's ECU
chapter. Students were asked if
they would be supportive of the
idea of a PIRG chapter at
ECU.
Don Westbrook, Chemistry,
Freshman � "I would be in
favor of the idea of a PIRG. I
think it would be good to get
students involved in research in
their fields of interest
Susan Thomas, General Col-
lege, Freshman � "I'm in
favor of PIRG because I think
it might help the students to in-
crease their areas of
knowledge
Keith Stalltngs, English,
Senior � "Definitely. I would
like to see that (PIRG) happen
here. It would bring prestige to
ECU
Darlene Keene, Biology,
Senior � "I support it. Maybe
if we had a PIRG, the students
would get more involved in the
things that are going on around
us
Thomas
A group of women peace ac-
tivists were cheered on by a crowd
of more than 50 supporters Mon-
day as they began their First leg of
a 600-mile, 30-day walking trip
from Durham, N.C. to Seneca
Army Depot in New York.
The event, known as the
Women's Peace Walk, began at
noon. Ten women started the
walk which will make several
stops in Virginia, Maryland, Pen-
nsylvania and finally New York.
Five women plan to walk the en-
tire distance while other women
are expected to join the walkers
for shorter intervals.
The walk is being sponsored by
the Durham-based War Resisters
League. The league is holding the
event as part of its effort to op-
pose United State's plans to
deploy medium-range nuclear
missiles in Western Europe later
this year. The Seneca Army Depot
is used as a storage facility for the
neutron bomb and Pershing II
missiles. Both weapons are
schedualed for deployment in
Western Europe.
WRL staffperson Mandy
Carter will be walking the entire
distance. Carter called the walk
"one of the many ways to
challenge our government on the
deployment of the cruise and Per-
shing II missiles
The walkers will be joining
dozens of other women in Seneca
where they plan to establish a
peace camp similar to camps
presently set up by women living
in Western Europe who also op-
pose the missile deployment. The
European women also set their
camps up on the peripheries of
U.S. military bases.
Elana Freedom of Durham is
planning to walk the entire
distance. Freedom, 62, has been a
pacifist for more than 40 years.
She said she is a "firm believer in
the power of nonviolence" as a
way to resolve conflicts. Freedom,
who once walked from California
to Washington, D.C on another
peace walk, said she sees her ef-
fort as a way to help
"de-escalate" the nuclear arms
race.
"For centuries, men have made
the decisions about war, about
destruction of men, women,
children and the countryside
Freedom said. "We feel that we
can't leave it to the men anymore
� we must be vocal; we must pro-
test
The Durham group expects to
arrive in New York on July 4.
Carter said the walk is a "gesture
of support" for the women in
Europe who are also opposing the
deployment of the new missiles.
In a statement released last
week, Secretary of Defense
Casper Weinberger announced
that plans to deploy the new
warheads were on schedule.
In a related story another group
of North Carolina peace activists,
including a dozen student and
faculty members from ECU, took
part in a one-hour vigil opposing
nuclear weapons outside the gates
of Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base on Saturday.
The group stood with signs on a
grassy median on the main road
leading into the base. Some
members of the group contend
there are nuclear weapons kept at
Seymour Johnson, but base of-
ficials will neither confirm nor
deny the presence of such
weapons.
The vigil was sponsored by the
North Carolina Peace Network
and was held in conjunction with
an "open house" celebration held
at the Goldsboro facility. The
open house was designed to give
the public and news media the op
portunity to visit the base and
view its equipment and facilities.
Editorial
Stan Landers
Sports
Page 2
Page 4
Page 4
Page 6
Page 8
10
News You Can Almost Use
� The tornado season Is well
under way, b�t this Is not to be
confused with the Attack-of-
the-KHler-Toaato season
which begins July 20 at
MendenhaH Student Center.
era who hold two
jobs nay he able to deduct
r taxable lucoae the
cost of getting groat one Job to
another. College students
i't confute this with the
off
to
-A�






THl FAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 8, 1983
?
Announcements
STUDENTS MAKE
A DIFFERENCE
H yix are a motivated in
dividual Mrtw wisnes to help seek
solutions to consumer and en
vtronmental problems mrough
rr-srarch end advocacy, then
North Carolina Public interest
Research Group (NC PIRG) is
tor you. It is a student group
researching issues such as Con
sumer Protection
Environmental Quality
Students' Rights Government
Accountability Renewable
energy Civil Rights NC PIRG
has. m the past, fought for North
Carolina student's rights,
documented the danger of
nuclear cargo transportation
through the state, and most
recently. m�hing the student
trafted Generic Drug Generic
Substitution Bill a law. An ECU
PIRG is now being formed,
PIRG needs your support Get
together with other students
concerned with these issues For
more details call Eliza Godwin
at s: w�
COUNSELORS
WANTED
Male counselors needed tow
ork in the Lutheran Camp in
V.rqinla Two resident pro
gi ,m as well as canoeing.
INK! par king, biking and beach
ramp Contact Rev F. Wayne
Williams. Ft Valley R? Box 355,
St David's Church. VA W�57.
SOULS
ELECTION
Anyone interested in running
tMiis office next semester con
lad Barbara at 7M 9550
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Monday Nights Bible Study
6 '0 pm tOa Jarvis Dorm
P ' -r Gro�ip for spiritual sup
t irl incl fellowship 10:15 pm
rvrv night 111 Fletcher. For
�t information contact Todd
ii vH. Stwlta 1S7 Jsrvis and
Bit III Fletcher
BINGO-ICECREAM
Attention bingo lovers, the
Department of University
Unions will be holding its final
summer Bingo ice cream party
on Tuesday, June 14. I9t3 in the
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi Purpose Room. All are
welcome Admission is only 25
cents.Eat ice cream and play
bingo for a priie Bring a friend
BIBLE STUDY AT ECU
inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship sponsors a bible
study on Monday nights. Come
to 106 JarvisHall att 30p.m. for
a time of spiritual fellowship
and fun Prayer is also offered
every night at HI Fletcher Hall
at 10 IS p.m. Take a break from
studying.
COFFEEHOUSE
NEEDS MEMBERS
It you like variety entertain
ment and want a challenge,
become a member on the stu
dent union coffeehouse commit
tee For more information , con
tact the Student Union (Room
734) at 7576611. Ext 210.
SENIORS
Want a central place for three
letters of reference from your
professors' If you art
graduating this summer, then
you complete a registration
packet available from the
Career Planning and Placement
Service If you will finish In the
fall, spring, or summer of
academic year 1983-84, you may
pick up a packet and prepare it
to return in Augus or
September.
The East Carolinian
vn mf the campus community
unct 1925
Puuiished every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wedn .day during the sum
m-r
� East Carolinian is the
on vial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned.
operator and published for
and by the students of East
Carolina University
Subscription Rate: M yearly
The East Carolinian office
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU. Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER: Send ed
dress changes to The East
Carolinian. Old South
P 'iidmg, ECU Greenville.
NC 27834
Telephone: 7S7-4J6. 4367,
4309
Name

SUMMER SOLTICE
FOR PEACE
Greenville community leaders
art joining together on June 20th
to celebrate a Day of Peace dur
mg the Summer Soltice. The
celebration wilki be worldwide
as people everywhere work for
peace. 5reenville will be a
teach in on June IS For further
information call 758 4906.
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
One million dollars per minute
is being spent worldwide on the
military. The Greenville Peace
Committee rejects the notions
that more weapons brings us
more security. We meet every
Friday nig at 6:30 p.m. for a.
pot luck d' ner and meeting.
During the summer we have
several activities planned and
we need your help. Come join us
in our plans for June 20th
WORLD DISARMAMENT
DAY. The meetings art held at
610 S. Elm St. For more infor
mation call 758 4906 or 752 5724.
Peace.
SCUBA DIVING
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven
hire's Dive Cozumel. Mexico on
the beautiful " ucatan peninsula
Aug. 3. 1983 to Aug. 10, 1983
Group trip for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving, meals,
lodging and air fare from
Raleigh Non divers welcome
Call Ray Scharf at 757 6441
CLASSIFIED ADS ,
Yom may mm n orm at rlfptit or j AddfOi
w a waara sheaf of paper if r.ermt-
you rs��tf more Itftm. That v � �-�7'w
units par line. Each latter, pone j
tuatlon mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalist end
nyphenate words properly. Leave
space et end of line it word
doesn't tit. No eds win be ec-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reiect any ad.
All ads mast be prepaid- Eodoat
75� per line or fraction of a bat.
Please print lcgMy! Use capital and
lower case letter.
atom toTNE EAST CAMMJNIAN
�ff k� bi 3:ta Tanan bateet J
:��
MB" . -
� " JS1-
Pizza jLqxi
Greenville's Best Pizzas
Now Being Delivered
Most delivery pizzas Sack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
Are
d
BICYCLE
P0S
QUALITY BIKE
SALES & SERVICE
"Greenville's Most
Complete Bicycle Shop"
�Fuji ajREK
�Puogeot � Raleigh
10 speedSi 29 � up
CRUISERS $149.95 and up
We have
feuoot Ptpattne Cruisers $149.95 1
S3t CONTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE, NC 17134
757-31

ARMN SURPLUS
DIPPING iu- sv,
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' jij ' S � vans
INTRODUCING . . .
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Now on most slnglr vision pl.iMu Irnv
vc i .in provide von wuh ihr finished pro-
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ai c urutc srtvirr Seeing is Believing
I)K PfcTEK W. HOLLIS
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756-9404
O.O f.A.
"CssMi ntGREEKvtl.ll � -
CoUHTRV CobKlMG
512 E. 14th Street
Greenville, North Carolina
�nv Complete P'ejpion tvegusses �
O' Contact L�"S Filling
OFF
Mus: B�P'WM
n� 0' O'Oe'
Oin�f �cou�is O' Gouoons Do Not Apcuv
New Daily Special Prime Rib $3.99
Why pay $12.00 for a delicious
prime rib dinner.
Get your friends
and try this new special today!
Our new summer hours are:
11:00am-9:00pm Daily
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat June 11. 1983
ADVERTISED 'EM
POLICY
Each of th�se ade'
tised items s 'e
quired to b� red'iy
available o' sate n
each Kroger Sav o"
except as sc� � a �
noted m this ad M e
dO run Out O' a 'I�m
e iii o'er Ou yOuf
choice o' a com
parable M'eti fien
available -eiseo"
the same savngs or a
ramchech " ctt
entitle you ro pu'
chase the advertised
item at the ad.eseo
price withm 3c aa.s
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
imk
PREMIUM
Miller
Beer
l$-185
N.R �
BtlS. �
DIET PEPSI,
PEPSI LIGHT OR
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$119
2-Ltr.
2-
N.R
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PRINCLES
Potato Chips
FRESH FRIED
Apple
Fritters
3.99
E. Ge
Dr. Helmut Domke pie
of East Germany, a ven:
Christian disarma- addrj
ment leader, spoke in Di
Durham Sundav at 30-n
the Watts Street Bap- befo
tist Church. Six Deo- Doi
'Art In
By MELA ME for
ROGERS
Approximate!) 20 teresl
spaces art still open, tact
but time is running hea
short, to participate in cent
this year's Art m flooi
Europe program The Finel
deadline to register (
Head O
To Add
Dr. Kathryn
Kolasa, chairperson
of the Departmer !
Food, Nutrition
Institution Manage-
ment in the ECl
School of Home
Economics, will be
among the speakers at
the "Mth annual
meeting of the
American Home
Economics Associa-
tion June 18.
Kolasa, who joined
the ECU faculty last
December, will be
speaking during the
international phase of
the Association's na-
tional meeting. She
will specifically ad-
dress ways home thel
economists and mei
students can be in- pe
volved in interna- ma
tional work. Her top c
is "Food and Nutri-
tion in the Interna-
tional Arena
Kolasa has done ex-
tensive work in
several Central and
South American
countries as well a
Europe and West
Africa. She has co-
authored a book and
stuc
thirl

typ
grai
ed
(
nl
I
bed


8 oz. Sirli
6oz. Beef
8 oz. Chopped
4 oz. Sirl
Served with
or Frencl
lui
4 oz. Sirloii
6 oz. Cubed Stt
lb. Hambi
�WEEK
JunJ
Buy one 802
Get seconj
Steak Dinners!
Potato or Fn
Now
Also Prime Rib el
�'





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 8. mi
RMN SURPLUS
MILITARY GOODS
G�� I90(. O.it.r.nl tec .
Sf� nc i
ARMY NAVY STORF
�TlSEO TEM
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19
E. German Disarmament Leader Visits N.C.
Dr. Helmut Domke
of East Germany, a
Christian disarma-
ment leader, spoke in
Durham Sunday at
the Watts Street Bap-
tist Church. Six peo-
ple from Greenville
went to hear Domke's
address.
During his
30-minute lecture
before 150 people,
Domke addressed
several fears he claims
East Germans harbor
concerning the
nuclear arms race.
Damke criticized
United States plans to
install cruise and Per-
shing II medium-
range nuclear missiles
in Western Europe.
Yet, on only one oc-
cassion did Domke
elude to the fact that
he was also opposed
to Soviet-made SS-20
missiles in Eastern
Europe.
Domke claimed
that the people of
Central Europe were
strongly in favor of
disarmament and
peace. "We in Central
Europe have no
chance for survival
Domke said.
"Nuclear war at any
scale is a total
'Art In Europe' Trip Still Has Space
holocaust for us, for
my wife, for my son,
for all Christians, for
all people
Domke said the
race was becoming
more dangerous
because leaders of
nuclear nations were
technologically in-
Domke said the
theory of deterance
was not viable and
that nations would
have to develop a new
theory for security.
Domke called this
theory "common
security He said this
would be directed at
By MELANIE
ROGERS
SuffWniet
Approximately 20
spaces are still open,
biu time is running
short, to participate in
this year's Art in
Europe program. The
deadline to register
for the two-week trip
is June 13.
Anyone who is in-
terested should con-
tact Michael Voors,
head of the media
center, on the third
floor of the Jenkins
Fine Arts.
Costing $1,666, the group throughout the
Art in Europe pro-
gram includes round
trip air fare, land
transportation in
Europe, accommoda-
tions at first class
hotels, two meals a
day and a tour guide
who accompanies the phasis is on art,
tour is open
anyone, student
nonstudent
entire two weeks.
Leaving July 27 and
returning August 10,
the tour features
Holland, Germany,
Switzerland and Italy.
Although the em-
Head Of Nutrition
To Address Meeting
the
to
and
alike.
Students may receive
college credit for
�ourses offered dur-
,ng the trip. Thirty
people from across
the state, including six
from ECU have
registered for this
year's trie
This year's Art in
Europe is a continua-
tion of the Art in
Europe program
started in 1980. Ac-
cording to the spon-
sor, Eben Tilly
Associates, Inc "we
started Art in Europe
four years ago
because we felt that
there was a need for
an art-oriented pro-
gram which also in-
cluded normal
sightseeing
This is the first year
ECU has participated
in the Art in Europe
program. According
to Michael Voors,
ECU is participating
this year because of
student interest.
Voors hopes that in
the future, ECU will
establish a more Der-
manent program of its
own. This year, Voors
will be researching the
possibility of using a
dormitory in Europe
as permanent housing
for future summer
tours. ECU chose the
Art in Europe pro-
gram for its low cost
and choice of coun-
tries to be visited.
creasing their nuclear all nations as opposed
arsenals and prepar- to one. "One element
ing strategies to use
them. "There's a
strategic conception
of limited nuclear war
released by the U.S.
government Domke
said. "There are also
statements of such
kind that it might be
necessary to make �
to contemplate at
least � a first strike
against the Soviet
Union
Domke said the
people of Central
Europe were unable
to understand why the
American people were
willing to endorse
these positions of
nuclear strategy.
of common security is
that we must
recognize the right for
existence of the
political and social
system of the other
side he said.
Domke, 39, is a
physicist. He
graduated from the
University of
Rostock. In 1972, he
received his doctorate
at the University of
Leningrad. He is at
present working as a
volunteer with the
Federation of Protes-
tant churches in the
GDR.
During a question
and answer period
Domke said the term
"Better dead than
red which is often
used by Americans,
was very dangerous
and not conducive to
peace-making. "I'm
living in a country
which is in this sense
red and I am not
dead Domke aid
"I can live as a C hris-
tian in my country �
indeed I have some
problems
Domke said he saw
signs of hope for
disarmament in the
American people, but
not from its leaders.
Domke said Chris-
tians represented the
basis of his hope.
Christianity is a diiv-
ing force that lets us
hope but not dispair.
Domke said.
During his visit to
North Carolina.
Domke made steps in
several cities. He is
one of twelve East
Germans touring the
United States.
Dr. Kathryn
Kolasa, chairperson
of the Department of
Food, Nutrition and
Institution Manage-
ment in the ECU
School of Home
Economics, will be
among the speakers at
the 74th annual
meeting of the
American Home
Economics Associa-
tion June 18.
Kolasa, who joined
the ECU faculty last
December, will be
speaking during the
international phase of
the Association's na-
tional meeting. She
will specifically ad-
dress ways home
economists and
students can be in-
volved in interna-
tional work. Her topic
is "Food and Nutri-
tion in the Interna-
tional Arena
Kolasa has done ex-
tensive work in
several Central and
South American
countries as well as
Europe and West
Africa. She has co-
authored a book and
published more than
50 research articles
and reports.
Kolasa noted that
she will primarily be
speaking about op-
portunities for
students to work in
third world develop-
ing countries. She will
highlight the different
types of self-help pro-
grams that she has us-
ed in her work.
One area known as
"the barefoot doc-
tor" program has
been used by Kolasa
to train village poeple
to identify certain
problem health areas
and take care of
themselves. Kolasa
mentioned teaching
people to recognize
malnutrition in their
children and better
feeding practices as
two of the critical
areas recognized by
public health
volunteers working in
developing countries.
4 4 H o m e
Economics: Momen-
tum for Change" is
the theme of this years
AHEA event to be
held at the Milwaukee
Exposition and Con-
vention Center and
Arena in Milwaukee,
Wis.
The AHEA meeting
will feature political
journalist David
Broder, professional
trend-watcher John
Naisbitt, economist
Jane Bryant Quinn
and CBS news cor-
respondenthumorist
Charles Osgood as
keynote speakers.
"I'm pleased to
have this opportunity
to share this informa-
tion Kolasa said,
"people are not
generally very aware
of the international
arena of food and
nutrition
The AHEA, one of
the largest profes-
sional associations in
the United States, has
approximately 35,000
members specializing
in consumer services,
family economics,
resource manage-
ment, nutrition, in-
stitutional administra-
tion housing and
other fields.
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QUf �aat (Eorolinian
Serving the Ernst Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller.
Mike Hughes.
Waverly Merritt.
Hunter Fisher.
ALI AFRASHTEH, omkt
Stephanie Groon, o�. ��
Clay Thornton. t��k
mem
Cindy Pleasants. e&o,
Greg Rideout. a, &���
CARLYN EBERT, Emltrtainmtnl Editor
Lizanne Jennings. & ��
David Gordon, w�ro�. w��
Juik 8. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Safe Roads Act
Legislature Takes A First Step
On Oct. 1, 1983, the Safe Roads
Act, a series of drunken-driving
laws inspired by Gov. Jim Hunt,
will go into effect. The Governor
claims that with the adoption of
this package, North Carolina will
now have the 'toughest law in
America against drunk driving
Some of the major provisions of
the new law include the following:
� The abolition of the DUl
statute and all related lesser of-
fenses, adopting rather a driving-
while-impaired statute for all of-
fenses, thus eliminating plea
bargaining.
� An increase in the minimum
legal age for buying and consum-
ing beer and fortified wines from
18 to 19.
� The imposition of civil liability
on establishments that sell alcohol
to underage customers who later
become involved in motor vehicle
accidents.
� The authorization for police to
set up road blocks to screen for
drunk drivers at their own discre-
tion.
� Under the new law, it will now
be a criminal offense for a driver
to consume beer andor wine and
possess open beer or wine con-
tainers while in a vehicle.
Passengers, however, are not in-
cluded under this provision.
� The creation of a second, or
penalty, phase of a trial for defen-
dants convicted of driving while
impaired. If no "grossly ag-
gravating factors" are found
(additional offenses committed
while driving impaired), the
minimum penalty for DWI is a
sentence of 24 hours of community
service. However, depending on
the weight of any and all of said
factors, persons convicted of DWI
will now face a maximum sentence
of 24 months in prison.
� Also under the new law,
anyone refusing to take a
Breathalyzer test or recording a
blood alcohol level of .10 percent
or more will be subject to an im-
mediate 10-day license suspension.
In addition, a $25 restoration fee
will be invoked.
� The law also stipulates that
judges may confiscate and dispose
of the motor vehicle of a driver
convicted of DWI while driving
under a license suspension for a
previous drunken driving convic-
tion.
� As of Oct. 1, any 16- or
17-year-old driver found to have
consumed any amount of alcohol
will have his or her license revoked
for 45 days or until he or she
becomes 18, whichever is longer.
� And finally, the new law
makes it a criminal offense for
anyone under 19 to use fraudulent
identification (fake ID) to buy or
attempt to buy beer or wine and
for anyone under 21 to buy or at-
tempt to buy liquor or mixed
drinks. Persons found guilty of
this offense will have their driver's
license revoked for one year.
So, after literally months of
deliberation, haggling and rewor-
ding, the N.C. Legislature has
finally adopted its most, if not on-
ly, worthwhile piece of legislation
to date. Indeed, Gov. Hunt and
those individual senators and con-
gressmen who worked tooth-and-
nail to get the new law on the
books deserve commendation.
Perhaps North Carolina's drunken
driving laws are now the
"toughest
Unfortunately, however, in the
past, the relative strictness or laxity
of our state's DWI laws hasn't had
a tremendous bearing on the actual,
problem at hand. In fact, the
greatest problem characteristically
for North Carolina uasn't been the
laws themselves but rather the en-
forcement of those laws.
Sure, the Safe Roads Act
establishes the basis for outstan-
ding improvement in one of the
state's weakest areas. And to quote
another safe-driving cliche, it's
certainly a law we can live with.
But putting it all down on paper is
only half the job. After all, any
law is only as good as its execution.
�Qflpfc Believe ItcrMl
f
1
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AREPWOOP
TREE5HAPEP
LIKE AN OIL
DERRICK
WWINCAL
MRRRFROMWSHPC
CLAIMS-
THISC0K1A1MS
ALL OF THE
NUTRITION
ASCHOOLCHILD
NEEDS IN A DAY
tlWS IS A PEACEKEEPER
THIS IS
rrjoj
60001& WB8U6
FOUMPBV EWIH TIMES BEACH MDj
THISTREEQIVB OFF MORE POLLUTION
THAN A STEEL MILL IN YOUNGSTOWN
Capital Punishment: 'Most Racist
Laws On The Books In The U.S
By PAT O'NEILL
"Why do we kill people who kill peo-
ple to show that killing people is
wrong?"
Better, perhaps, than most words, this
famous quote illustrates the total lack of
logic inherent in U.S. death penalty
laws. Throughout the world, most
civilized nations have outlawed this
beastly business. Only in nations such as
El Salvador and Iran, where brutal
leaders have total control, do state-
sanctioned killings still flourish.
Last week, the North Carolina Senate
passed a law that will allow future death-
row inmates to choose their own poison.
Now, the condemned have a choice.
They can opt for the "inhumane" gas
chamber or choose a more "humane"
death, like lethal injection.
"Why do we kill people
who kill people to show that
killing people is wrong?
The senators have been walking
around, patting themselves on the back
for their merciful decision. "A good
many people throughout not only North
Carolina but the world are not satisfied
with gassing people to death said Sen.
Robert M. Davis, the bill's sponsor.
Lethal injection, he added, is "the most
humane way of execution
Personally, I don't see much dif-
ference between death by inhaled gas
and death by injected poison. Dead is
dead! And I tend to doubt that North
Carolina's 34 death-row inmates will be
rejoicing very much at the passage of
this "humane" law.
Once again, the N.C. Legislature has
failed to deal with the realities of the
death penalty law. It simply doesn't
work. Study after study has proven that
capital punishment does not effectively
deter murderers. Its only purpose, then,
is to satisfy society's craving for revenge
against those who take a human life.
But even if one argues that capital
punishment does work as a deterrent, an
even bigger question exists about the
discriminatory use of the penalty.
Throughout U.S. history, more than
half of those sentenced to death have
been black. An even larger percentage
have been poor. In short, capital punish-
ment laws are, by far, the most racist on
the books in the United States.
At present, there are about 1,168 peo-
ple on death row in the U.S. Of that
number, 42 percent are black, five per-
cent Hispanic and one percent native
Americans and other minorities.
In North Carolina, where 34 inmates
sit on death row, 15 are black, one is
native American.
These statistics tell the story of capital
punishment. "Those without the capital
get the punishment If you're poor,
you can't afford legal assistance.
Of course, arguing for mandatory im-
" These statistics tell the
story of capital punishment.
1Those without the capital
get the punishment. M
position of death sentences to all killers
would be equally wrong. First of all, it
would never be approved. And second.
it would be unjust to sentence Charles
Manson types to the same fate as those
who perpetrate less-hideous killings
There is no way to impose capital
punishment sentencing fairly. For this
reason, all such laws should be stricken
from the books.
Americans are always looking for cut-
and-dry solutions to their problems. It's
simpler to kill killers than to search for
reasons why crime is increasing. And un-
fortunately, history has shown us that
it's also easier to switch methods of do-
ing dirty work than to admit that the
system as a whole is a failure.
The Art Of Nose-Picking
Universal Quirks
quirk (kwurk) n. A peculiarity of
behavior that eludes prediction or sup-
pression. An unpredictable or unac-
countable act or event; vagary. An
equivocation; quibble; subterfuge.
Advice (For Lack Of A Better Title)
AAIKE HUGHES
Picking A Winner
Dear Stan Landers: My roommate.
Alma, and 1 were wondering something.
Since you are a worldly traveler, we
thought you could help us. You see,
Alma and I are planning to go to China
in the fall to look for work. We hear
there's excellent opportunity there (what
with the population on the decline), but
we're really unfamiliar with the tcr-
STAN LANDERS
Straight Talk
ritory, so we thought you could give us
some advice; you know, like who to see
about what. What we want are a couple
of good-paying jobs that don't require
much skill, because frankly, we eat a lot,
but we're not too bright. We're not par-
ticularly interested in rice or snake farm-
ing, if that's any help. But we would ap-
preciate any help you could give us.
Gladys in Greene
Dear Greene Gladys: Well, right now,
as far as I know off-hand, there are only
two real opportunities available in most
of China. Of course, I could research it
for you, but I haven't yet received this
week's copy of the Peking classifieds.
And anyway, I'm playing golf later this
afternoon, so I really don't have time to
look into it.
First of all, there's a tremendous need
for barbers in the Orient. Now, I know
what you're already saying. You have no
training in Oriental barbering. But don't
fret. I mean, think about it. How tough
can it be to put a bowl over their heads
and shave everything that hangs out?
The only other high-paying, low-skill
job I can think of is in the field of police
artistry. You know, like the guy on
Hawaii Five-0 who draws the criminals'
faces from witness descriptions. Here
again, very little artistic talent or skill is
involved. All you would need to do is get
one fairly competent sketch of a
Chinaman, make about a hundred
copies and use one every time a crime is
committed. It's a snap!
Glad I could help. Good luck and
good hunting.
Dear Staa Landers: There's
something that's been on my mind for
months now. And normally, I wouldn't
be so straightforward in asking, but I'm
losing sleep and need to know. Anyway,
here goes: What was your favorite
episode of Gilligans Island!
Curious in Clement
Dear Cartons: You scum! How dare
you assume that I've ever even seen
Gilligans Island! It embarrasses me to
even be associated with such a moronic,
childish television show. Talk about
your "lowest-common-denominator"
theory of TV. Why, no self-respecting
fourth-grader would ever watch, much
less admit to watching, Gilligan's Island.
You question my very intelligence. I am
abhorred!
But in answer to your question, I'd
have to say that my favorite episode was
when the Professor (played, of course,
by Russell Johnson) first discovers that
he can make batteries and a transmitter
out of coconuts.
Now that was fascinating!
Editor's Note: Stan Landers, who
claims to have been Boxcar Willie's
brother, Sidecar, in an earlier incarna-
tion, is glad that society in the 80s has
replaced such asinine television shows as
Gilligans Island with more intelligent
programming, like The Secret Powers of
Matthew Star and Joanie Loves Chachi.
You know, quirks are kind of well,
funny, I guess. They're easy as hell to
notice in those around us, but God for-
bid any of us should have quirks of our
own. That's the funny thing. We all love
to complain about Cousin Zeb's
disgusting habit of belching in the
shower or how Aunt Myrna scratches
her fat rear end in public, but the fact is,
we all do it from time to time.
Deny it as we may, quirks are univer-
sal. And as much as we hate to admit it,
we're all pretty much the same when it
comes to peculiarities.
Take nosepicking, for example.
Granted, there are probably 1,001 dif-
ferent methods for extracting stubborn
nasal blockage via fingers and tissues.
There's the frontal attack, the plunging
pinkie, the Kleenex cleanout, the honk-
n-grunt, the cross-hand slide, the gold-
digger, the drill-n-pull, the "proper
pluck" (with pinkie extended), the
snort-n-snack just to name a few
But however individual we all claim to
be, however "unique" our nosepicking
styles, somewhere down the line, we all
share the same disgusting quirk. We all
open up the tissue for inspection before
throwing it away.
I wonder why.
I mean, it's like we expect to find a
pearl or a chunk of gold buried inside.
We've all looked a million times before
� it's always the same snotty letdown �
but we all still do it.
And the same holds true for other ex-
cavations as well. Think about it.
Whenever you cram a Q-tip in your ear,
don't you yank it out and analyze it? Is
there really anything on the end of that
swab worth looking at? Not usually,
unless maybe if you're an organic
chandler!
And how about when you wake up in
the morning and rub the sleep from your
eyes. Don't you roll it around between
your fingers and wipe it off on the wall?
Of course you do. We all do.
What I like best about quirks, though,
is when people try to hide them. Like
when you're sitting in class or in church,
and you notice the guy in front of you
fiddling with his right nostril. He thinks
he's fooling everybody by discreetly
picking a winner and trying to hide it
between two fingers. Then, just when he
thinks no one's looking, he drop his
notebook or hymnal to the floor and
wipes off his finger under the scat while
he's picking up the book.
Now that's funny!
And how about when you're standing
in a large crowd of people, and you
break wind or let flee an aromatic belch.
Don't you go along with the rest of the
crowd and blame it on the guy standing
next to you?
Of course you do. Everybody does.
That is, everybody but me, of course.
Unlike everyone else, I don't have any
disgusting quirks.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, �
transfer student from the "Great
Writers' School" in Topeka, Kansas,
has only one real shortcoming and
you just read it.
Resister
Draft resister
Russell Ford will not
have to spend time in
prison as a result of
his refusal to register
for a military draft.
During sentencing
Monday, a Connec-
ticutt Federal Judge
sentenced Ford to 35
days in prison.
Fecause Ford had
already served 35 days
in federal prison
before his trial last
summer, ne m
free with "nm
ed
Ford, 19.
visited ECL
February. aj
first American
imprisoned for
resistance smd
Vietnam war. Fl
Judge M Ji
Blumenfeld tolc
that neither
ment or pro!
was hkeK to
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�Hot
VRRRFROMVNHPC I
TO CONTAINS
ALL OF THE
p) NUTRITION
J A SCHOOL CHILD
i NEEDS WAW.Y
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNEj. 19�3
PEACEKEEPER
THIS IS
t Racist
he U.S.9
hese statistics tell the
capital punishment.
without the capital
he punishment.
?
ventences to ail killers
. rong. First of all, it
approved. And second,
ust to sentence Charles
the same fate as those
es-hideous killings.
way to impose capital
encing fairly. For this
aws should be stricken
s
always looking for cut-
to their problems. It's
it ierv than to search for
nme is increasing. And un-
:Mor has shown us that
to switch methods of do-
ork than to admit that the
a whole is a failure.
King
Quirks
- ige ia fingers and tissues.
the frontal attack, the plunging
Kleenex cleanout, the honk-
the cross-hand slide, the gold-
e dnll-n-pull, the "proper
pinkie extended), the
i � just to name a few
oeer individual we all claim to
unique" our nosepicking
omew-here down the line, we all
he same disgusting quirk. We all
e tissue for inspection before
aav.
hy.
it's like we expect to find a
;hunk of gold buried inside.
i ked a million times before
always the same snotty letdown �
e all still do it.
the same holds true for other ex-
well. Think about it.
Inc. er you cram a Q-tip in your ear,
. ank it out and analyze it? Is
really anything on the end of that
worth looking at? Not usually,
s maybe if you're an organic
Idler'
iid how about when you wake up in
orning and rub the sleep from your
Don't you roll it around between
tingers and wipe it off on the wall?
lourse ou do. We all do.
hat 1 like best about quirks, though,
hen people try to hide them. Like
you're sitting in class or in church,
you notice the guy in front of you
ling with his right nostril. He thinks
tooling everybody by discreetly
ing a winner and trying to hide it
een two fingers. Then, just when he
is no one's looking, he drops his
fbook or hymnal to the floor and
rs off his finger under the seat while
picking up the book.
)w that's funny!
nd how about when you're standing
large crowd of people, and you
tk wind or let flee an aromatic belch.
t you go along with the rest of the
-d and blame it on the guy standing
to you?
If course you do. Everybody does.
hat is, everybody but me, of course.
like everyone else, I don't have any
justing quirks.
ditor's Note: Mike Hughes, a
sfer student from the "Great
ters' School" in Topeka, Kansas,
only one real shortcoming and
just read it.
Resister Ford Set Free
Draft resister
Russell Ford will not
have to spend time in
prison as a result of
his refusal to register
for a military draft.
During sentencing
Monday, a Connec-
ticut! Federal Judge
sentenced Ford to 35
days in prison.
Because Ford had
already served 35 days
in federal prison
before his trial last
summer, he was let
free with "time serv-
ed. "
Ford, 19, who
visited ECU last
February, was the
first American to be
imprisoned for draft
resistance since the
Vietnam war. Federal
Judge M. Joseph
Blumenfeld told Ford
that neither punish-
ment or probation
was likely to change
Ford's attitudes. A
jury took 10 minutes
to convict Ford of
registration refusal
last April 14.
"We made it said
a jubilant Ford after
Blumenfeld announc-
ed his decision.
"You'd be a nuisance
to have on probation
and you wouldn't
change if we put you
in jail Blumenfek
allegedly told Ford.
More than 50 sup-
porters and friends of
Ford were in the cour-
troom during the
sentencing. Ford
�could have received a
maximum sentence of
five years in federal
prison and a $10,000
fine. Ford was not
assessed a fine.
"This reluctance to
put us (draft resisters)
in jail is a step
towards a reluctance
Writers Needed
Apply in person
at East Carolinian
for all sections
Located Old South Building
across from Joyner Library
to prosecute us
Ford said.
He is one of 13
Americans to be in-
dicted for registration
refusal since the
federal law was
enacted in 1980. The
government has
chosen only to indict
men who have
publically or through
affadavits called at-
tention to their
refusals. Justice
Department estimates
claim that close to
one-million men have
not registered.
"I will continue
resisting said Ford
who has been arrested
on at least four other
occassions for non-
violent civil disobe-
dience.
During his Green-
ville visit, Ford spoke
to several hundred
ECU students. He
visited ECU
classrooms and
several local schools.
Ford told ECU
students that he
believed registration
for the draft was only
the first step in the
government's plan to
impose full scale con-
scription .
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNES. 1983
Page 6
Whiz Kid Plays 'War Games'
By STEVE BACHNER
Matthew Brodtrick. Ally Sheedy in John Btdhim's
Quite a few "major motion pic-
tures" opened around the country
last Friday, and I managed to
satisfy my curiosity about a few of
them right away. I was probably
most curious about James
Toback's romantic thriller Expos-
ed, starring Nastassia Kinski,
because I had heard so many con-
flicting views on the film. But
before I discuss Kinski's latest, let
me recommend director John
Bad ham's latest, War Games, for
it is the summer's best film so far.
(The film is now playing at Green-
ville's Buccaneer Theatre.)
A month or so ago, War Games
had one of the most successful na-
tional sneak previews in years.
Afterwards, the execs at
MGMUA kept advertising costs
low in hopes that the most power-
ful selling point in the business,
word-of-mouth, might snowball
with only marginal help from pro-
motional spots. If Greenville can
be looked upon as any kind of in-
dicator, then the brisk business
that the Buc is doing in only its
first week with the film is a sign
that, indeed, favorable word-of-
mouth is at play here.
I'm still not convinced that
whiz-kid Badham is a great direc-
tor, as some are calling him,
though he is on an unmitigated
tear right now. His treatment of
Saturday Night Fever, one of the
most successful films of all time,
was awkward and droopy. His
last three films as a director,
Whose Life is It Anyway, Blue
Thunder and War Games, show
no special flair with material of
this nature. But his penchant for
stories about the effects of
technology gone berserk has net-
ted him the most original
screenplay of the year.
War Games is the story of two
high schoolers � played with
verve by relative unknowns Mat-
thew Broderick, as a computer
whiz, and his unbelievably cute
partner, Ally Sheedy (Bad Boys)
� who inadvertently plug a home
computer into the North
American Defense Command's
system. The two challenge their
new electronic friend to an inno-
cent game of Global Ther-
monuclear War with unexpectedly
serious results; of course, WWIII
is just around the corner.
War Games is only a little
pretentious in making its big
moral statement at the end and
has a bit of a split personality: the
first half has romance, suspense,
action; the second half is all
cloak-and-dagger stuff with a
MacGuffin and a double chase to
boot. But the movie is so original,
so good-natured, so frantically
well-played, that it wills you to
like it � I wouldn't want to know
anyone who didn't.
Moving from one kind of split
personality to another, Norman
Bates returned to screens last
week after 22 years of
psychotherapy. Universal's
Psycho II (now playing at Green-
ville's Plaza Cinema) takes a
Saturday Night Live approach to
the business of remaking Hit-
chcock and winds up with a
hilarious satire of the original.
The laughs, methinks, are all in-
tentional.
Anthony Perkins has the pro-
verbial field day recreating his
original role as the put-upon
Bates, returning to his motel for
peace and quiet only to find that it
is now an adult facility. Perkins
takes none of this seriously and
gives an inspired comic perfor-
mance that affords Norman, a
folk hero that should be treated
with respect, the luxury of martyr-
dom.
Hitchcock's favorite actress.
Vera Miles, also recreates her role
as Marion Crane's (Janet Leigh)
sister Lila. She is the subject of a
terrific black sight gag when, dur-
ing an authentic identical close up
of that famous scream that
followed the discovery of Nor-
man's mother's corpse, a butcher
knife is shoved through her
mouth.
James Toback's Exposed (now
playing at the Buccaneer Theatre)
is partly the director's horny, self-
indulgent fantasy about German
actressmodel Nastassia Kinski,
partly a thriller about a terrorist
group in Paris, and partly a love
story about the affair between
Kinski and ballet legend"actor"
Rudolf Nureyev, who stinks up a
good portion of the film with his
lisping and wooden brand of ac-
ting. The rest is not bad. Harvey
Keitel plays a terrorist to make
your skin really crawl and Kinski
is, as ever, lovely and very, very
good � Exposed is worth seeing
for her frenetic, overtly sexual
dance scene alone.
The best thing about Alone in
the Dark (now playing at Green-
ville's Plitt Entertainment
Center), a horror-movie spoof
that is sometimes droll, sometimes
See SUMMER, Page 7
Hot Wheels For Big Kids: Beach Cruisers Tear Into Town
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
Style MUor
What are those things with the
big tires and huge handlebars tear-
ing through Greenville? They're
beach cruisers, and they're a
popular means of transportation
this summer.
Beach cruisers are bicycles with
oversized tires, seats and
handlebars on the traditional
frame structure. Foam grips on
the handlebars prevent the hands
from slipping while barreling
through that rough terrain. These
cruisers can be equipped with or
without hand brakes and speed
selection. Wheels are made extra-
wide to avoid sinking into sandy
beaches.
Cruisers are meant to be ridden
on the beach, but ECU students
find them perfect for downtown,
across campus and dirt riding.
Surfers and beach bums in Florida
and Baha, Calif, were the mentors
for this popular craze. Now the
fad has progressed all across the
United States, including Green-
ville.
The Bicycle Post, 530 Cotanche
St stocks all types of cruisers in a
variety of styles and colors. Such
models as the Earth Cruiser, Pipe
Line Cruiser, Typhoon and Boss
Cruiser are available. Eye-
catching red, blue, black and
green are among the many colors
these cruisers show off.
Beach cruiser enthusiast John
Nix explained cruisers have less
chance of repair than your or-
dinary 10-speed. The durable
cruiser is dependable to last for
many years. "It's your simple,
basic bike said Nix. "There's
not as many parts as in a
10-speed, so less chance of
rusting
Girls, don't think that guys are
the only people able to enjoy this
free-wheeling experience. Accor-
ding to the Bicycle Post, the
number of guy,s who are buying
the cruisers is equal to the number
of girls.
These cruisers range from
$100-5200, but to keep in style
and enjoy rambling through
Greenville, it's worth it. �
Nostalgia Reigns
Antique Show A Success
By ROBIN AYERS
surr wriur
Old collectibles and afternoons
in the country: Last Sunday was a
perfect day for both.
Woodside Antiques' 18th An-
nual Lawn Show and Sale took
place beneath clouds that
threatened rain but didn't spoil
the event.
At a house about a quarter mile
out on 264-Bypass, past the in-
tersection with Dickinson Ave
dealers set up shop for the day on
Mrs. Leota Jenkins Tyson's lawn.
Mrs. Tyson is the owner of Wood-
side Antiques, which she started
28 years ago with her sister, the
late Lucy Jenkins Allen.
Dealers displayed objects of
beauty and nostalgia under tall
and aged trees. An antique sleigh
and a hand-cranked phonograph
recalled sounds of another era.
Lithographs, photograhs and
lace tempted browsers. Furniture,
ornately carved, stood out ma-
jestically. Rarely can the younger
generation find such quality and
workmanship in something new.
Silver, china and crystal sparkl-
ed and shone beneath the after-
noon sun. Boxes � cloth, wood,
tin � once held jewelery, momen-
tos, tobacco. They now hold
memories and a collector's
fascination.
As many beautiful things as
there are from any age, so there
must be ugliness. Swords stretch-
ed out in a neat row, still gleam-
ing. A WWI rifle rested across a
baby's cradle. On this peaceful
day, the firearm was years and
worlds away from the battles for
which it was made.
A set of dinnerware in the
Depression glass pattern
"Sharon" glistened in the sun like
translucent pools of pink. A
breeze ruffled the folds of in-
tricately embroidered Chinese
robes.
Part of the fun of an antique
show is talking with the dealers
about their treasures and
themselves.
Doloris Chandler of
Vanceboro.N.C. began collecting
when her son Kenny, then nine
years old, developed an interest in
antiques and started hoarding
anything old. After a few visits to
flea markets, Doloris bought a
couple of unmarked boxes of
odds and ends at an estate sale for
Kenny to sell at a flea market. The
Chandlers now have their own
shop south of Chocowinity.
Among the items on the
Chandlers' table was a mandolin
guitar harp, or autoharp. A book
� the Constitution of the
Presbyterian Church in the United
States � has an interesting story
behind it, which Mrs. Chandler is
happy to tell. This copy of a 19th
century edition, she says, was
given by a slave to his master. It's
worth $250.
A lot of dealers do not have a
shop in their hometown. Instead,
they do business solely through
travelling.
Depresaoa glass draws the eye at WoostaMe AatJaaea.
fey aO�IM ATMS
George Cullon of Roanoke
Rapids, Va. retired after working
for a supermarket chain for 36
years. Now he travels to shows to
display and sell his goods. This is
George's fourth year as a dealer; a
more enjoyable hving, he will tell
you. Items featured by George
were old kitchen utensils and a
variety of tobacco tins.
The Coburns of Portsmouth,
Va. are also gypsy dealers. This
year was their second visit to
Woodside. A wicker baby scale
was prominent among the goods
they had for sale.
Craftspeople were alongside the
antique dealers, displaying their
wares. Jane Harris of Grifton has
been making dolls for three years.
Sunday, Jane and her friends set
up house in a gazebo in the
backyard. The dolls smiled in
their calico print dresses, beckon-
ing to girls of all ages to take them
home.
When they started Woodside
Antiques, the Jenkins sisters
began with $350 worth of stock in
a one-room barn originally used
for grading tobacco. Woodside
Antiques expanded into the
stable, garage and a tenant house.
The sisters later added more one-
room shops as they were needed.
For their first show, Mrs.
Tyson said she and her sister "just
decided to do it and spread the
word. Thirty-five dealers got the
tradition rolling.
Since the beginning in 1965,
dealers from four states have
come to Red Oak, as many as 82
in attendance.
Sunday was also the celebration
of Mrs. Tyson's 86th birthday.
Mrs. Tyson's hair is silver but her
eyes are bright when she talks
about the antique business. "The
most rewarding experience has
been the friends I have made
she says. She has led a full and in-
teresting life, from playing piano
in a silent movie house to making
three European trips. On a trip to
Mexico, Mrs. Tyson found herself
in an impromptu jam session in a
local cantina.
Mrs. Tyson is pianist at Red
Oak Christian Church, where she
has played since she was a
See ANTIQUE, Page 7
�ABV FATTHSOM - SOU PtMM La
Urban beachboy John Nix craises to happy hoar.
Women Peace Marchers
En Route To New York
By PATRICK O'NEILL
On Monday morning a group
of women left Durham, N.C,
beginning the first leg of a
600-mile walk to Seneca, New
York. The women's destination is
the Seneca Army Depot, which
houses both the neutron bomb
and Pershing II nuclear weapons.
The women hope to arrive by July
4 to join other women who will be
establishing a Peace Camp at the
Depot in opposition to the
scheduled deployment of the Per-
shing in Western Europe later this
year.
The Walk For Peace, as it is
known, is sponsored by the
Southeast regional office of the
War Resisters League. Mandy
Carter, one of two women staff
members of the WRL's Durham
office, is participating in the walk.
Events such as the Walk For
Peace have been sponsored by the
League for more than 60 years.
Nationwide there are more than
10,000 members of WRL, which
has its national headquarters in
the Bowery section of New York
City. Membership requires no an-
nual dues and asks only that
members agree with the organiza-
tion's statement of purpose: "The
War Resisters League affirms that
war is a crime again humanity.
We therefore are determined not
to support any kind of war, inter-
national or civil, and to strive
non-violently for the removal of
all the causes of war
Dannia Souther land, another
WRL-SE staffer, will be supervis-
ing the Durham office while
Carter is walking. Southerland
told The East Carolinian that
WRL is a "real diversified
organization" working for
"social change through non-
violent action
Since its establishment by a
group of conscientious objectors
after WWI, WRL has expanded
its range of concerns and has suc-
cessfully attempted to keep in step
with the numerous peace and
justice issues that have surfaced.
During the civil rights move-
ment of the late '50s and '60s,
WRL was among the leaders of
groups organizing for an end to
discrimination against blacks. In
1959, Martin Luther King Jr. ad-
dressed WRL's Annual Dinner.
WRL staff members often recall
times they were victims of
violence while joining the famous
"freedom rides" in the South.
During the Vietnam War, WRL
initiated dozens of anti-war ac-
tions. League staffers have all
spent time in prison for their non-
violent resistance. The New York
office even held a party to
celebrate the fiftieth arrest of one
staff member.
Su
Cob tint
silly, is thatl
Dr Dan Pol
This afford)
directed the
Robert Shaj
ster. plenty
make fun o
Dr Pott
Dr Leo Bal
a peace pip
Ma
He
Coniini
WRI ha,
to stop the
as a solution
claims that
the cause
of crime
worked for
people and
interventio
has opr
has been i
moen
Both C
focus a lot
fermn:
build a ;
and the
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A . -
:f ' -�





I
Page f
ames'
era Miles, also recreates her role
a- Marion crane's (Janet I eigh)
Mster I lla she is the subject of a
' c b!av k sight gag when, dur-
g an authentic identical close up
�: that famous scream that
lowed the discover) o Nor-
m's mother's corpse, a butcher
fe is shoved through her
mouth
James Foback's Exposed (now
aying al the Buccaneer Theatre)
artl) the director's horny, self-
ulgent fantas) about German
5 model Nastassia Kinski,
a thriller about a terrorist
up in Pans, and parti) a love
about the affair between
i and ballet legend "actor"
doll Nureyev, who stinks up a
ortion of the film with his
and wooden brand of ac-
- The rcsl is not bad. Hare
xeitel plas a terrorist to make
ou ill reall) crawl and kinski
as ever. loel and very, er
d � Exposed is worth seeing
her frenetic, overtly sexual
r scene alone.
The best thing about Alone in
t Dark (now playing at Green-
ill e' Pint Entenainmen'
enter), a horror-movie spoof
a is sometimes droll, sometimes
See SUMMER, Page 7
o Town
9A�Y PATTf RSON - ECU PHo lab
uses to happy hour.
e Marchers
New York
lational or civil, and to strive
pn-violently for the removal of
11 the causes of war
Dannia Southerland, another
RL-Sfc staffer, will be supervis-
ig the Durham office while
:arter is walking. Southerland
Id The East Carolinian that
RL is a "real diversified
� rganization" working for
social change through non-
iolen' action
Since its establishment by a
Iroup of conscientious objectors
Ifter WWI, WRL has expanded
p range of concerns and has suc-
ssfully attempted to keep in step
nth the numerous peace and
istice issues that have surfaced.
During the civil rights move-
lent of the late '50s and '60s,
RL was among the leaders of
roups organizing for an end to
jiscnmination against blacks. In
'59. Martin Luther King Jr. ad-
ressed WRL's Annual Dinner.
RL staff members often recall
imes they were victims of
lolence while joining the famous
freedom rides" in the South.
During the Vietnam War, WRL
itiated dozens of anti-war ac-
ns. League staffers have all
snt time in prison for their non-
lolent resistance. The New York
Tfice even held a party to
elebrate the fiftieth arrest of one
iff member.
See MARCHERS, Page 7
Summer Sizzlers, Bombs Share Marquees
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 8, MM
Continued From Page 6
silly, is that its central character
Dr. Dan Potter, is a psychiatrist!
This affords Jack Sholder, who
directed the film and wrote it with
Robert Shaye and Michael Harp-
ster, plenty of opportunity to
make fun of the profession.
Dr. Potter has gone to work for
Dr. Leo Bain, who smokes pot in
a peace pipe with a feather on the
end and insists on referring to his
patients as "voyagers even
though they're known as maniacs
elsewhere. When the maniacs
escape, surround Dr. Potter's
home and terrorize his family, Dr.
Potter tells his wife and daughter:
played by Jack Palance, Martin
Landau, the enormous Erland
Van Lidth and a fourth actor
whose identity is supposed to be a
mystery (all we know about him is
that he has frequent nosebleeds).
As villains, these actors have a
Breathe deeply! Hopefully, we'll good chance to ham it up royally,
never have to go through this kind and they take good advantage of
of stress again
Stress it is, as the family is
menaced by four lively thugs
Marchers For Peace
Head For New York
Continued From Page 6
WRL has also actively worked
to stop the use of prisons and jails
as a solution to crime. The League
claims that incarceration is one of
the causes rather than preventers
of crime. The League has also
worked for the civil . i -his of gay
people and for a cessation of U.S.
intervention in Latin America,
has opposed draft registration and
has been active in the women's
movement.
Both Carter and Southerland
focus a lot of their work on the
feminist issue. "We're trying to
build a bridge between feminists
and the peace movement
Southerland said, adding that
feminist theory must be brought
to its rightful place in the peace
movement.
esi's
i
Leagu
Southerland believes there is a
direct connection between the
violence inherent in U.S. foreign
policy and the violence against
women and children in the home.
WRL-SE Ujses a combination of
education and action to convey its
messages to the public. The walk
is one example of education and
action being utilized together for
change.
In 1975 the League initiated
another walk. This walk, known
as the Continental Walk, stretch-
ed from San Francisco to
Washington, D.C and WRL us-
ed it to call attention to the
dangers of the nuclear arms race.
In both 1978 and 1982 the
League has been one of the key
organizers of huge rallies held in
conjunction with United Nations
Conferences on Disarmament.
Perhaps WRL's most well-
known event was 1978's
simultaneous Moscow-
Washington anti-nuclear
demonstration.
While 11 WRL members un-
furled a banner on the White
House lawn, seven other members
did the same in Moscow's Red
Square.
The banners, written in native
languages of both countries,
stated "No Nuclear Weapons! No,
Nuclear Power U.S.A. or
U.S.S.R Leaflets in both
languages were also distributed
for a few seconds before both
groups were arrested.
Ironically, the Moscow group
was let free after only a few hours
of questioning, but the 11 in
Washington were detained in jail
overnight and later tried, found
guilty and fined.
Besides working to increase in-
volvement of women in the peace
movement, Southerland also
wants to see greater participation
among non-whites. "We need to
debunk the idea of the white peace
movement she said.
Southerland said she hopes the
1980s will be a time when the
movement toward peace becomes
"multi-cultural" as well as
"multi-racial She also claims
that WRL attempts to integrate an
"anti-racist" analysis and action
in all its projects.
The League has an interna-
tional affiliate known as War
Resisters International which is
active in several countries
throughout the world.
WRL plans to hold its 60th An-
niversary National Conference
from July 14-17 at Lafayette Col-
lege in Easton, Pa.
the opportunity. The story's
straight-arrow characters are also
a lot better than a movie like this
might warrant, and most of them
are relatively new. They include
Dwight Schultz, Lee Taylor-
Allan, Deborah Hedwall,
Elizabeth Ward as an unusually
brazen child and Carol Levy as
the obligatory sexy, frightened
baby-sitter.
Two films playing in Greenville
that you want to avoid are science
fiction "epic" Spacehunter:
Adventures in the Forbidden
Zone, starring Peter Strauss and
Molly Ringwald, and Doctor
Detroit, starring Dan Aykroyd,
Howard Hessman and Donna
Dixon.
Spacehunter (now at the Plitt) is
a 3-D feature that, even with those
damn glasses on, is flat. The story
concerns a galactic mercenary
who journeys to a plague-ravaged
planet to rescue three female
space voyagers in a bad "road"
movie type of way. The film is one
of those Canadian tax shelter
packages that is distinguished
from other quickies like it only by
the fact that it got a major
distribution deal with Columbia
Pictures. The location work was
done on one of Utah's many salt
flats. Seriously.
Doctor Detroit (in its last week
at the Buccaneer) is an embarrass-
ingly unfunny vehicle for old SNL
regular Dan Aykroyd. It comes
off worse than most television sit-
coms. Everything is so
outrageously overdone that a new
definition for the word
"excessive" comes to mind. The
soundtrack is great though, main-
ly soul and funk, and James
Brown does a cameo; but the few
laughs that the movie happens
upon are, like pain, quickly
forgotten.
jB
THIS MOVIE
IS TOTALLY
OUT OF
CONTROL
This week at Hendrix Theatre: Tonight at 8, the zany
'Kentucky Fried Movie Monday at 9, it's 'Alien
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-�f?-
Antiques Draw
Nostalgia Buffs
Continued From p.6
teenager. She gets re-
quests to entertain at
community functions
to share her music and
her joy of living.
Retired from the
antique business as of
Jan. 1, Mrs. Tyson is
looking forward to a
cruise to Alaska in
August, a visit to one
of three states she
hasn't yet seen.
Antiques are her
life, she says. They
have taken her about
the world and into the
hearts of many peo-
ple.
Antique treasures
are often faded or
discolored. The
materials are fragile
from age, but they are
no less beautiful.
They invite us to visit
places and times of no
return.

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1

t
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 8, 1983
Page 8
Pirate Freshman Ready For Festival
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports ��ior
When fc�U sophomore Sylvia
Bragg participates in the National
Sports Festival later this month,
she will become the second lady
Pirate coached by Cathy Andruzzi
to attend the games.
Former basketball center
Darlene Chaney played on the
southeast squad last year.
According to Andruzzi, the
festival gives athletes a chance to
see how high the caliber of com-
petition is across the country. "I
think that any time an athlete gets
an opportunity to go up against
the finest ball players in the na-
tion, they're very lucky An-
druzzi said. "They can see how
far they can go
After competing against 200
girls for a position on the
southeast team, Bragg has already
seen a portion of what she can do.
But that's not quite enough. "I've
become more confident jn myself
and what I'm capable of doing
Bragg said. "It's just a matter of
going out and doing it
Andruzzi will be practicing with
Bragg until she leaves for Col-
orado Springs in hopes of prepar-
ing her for what lies ahead. "The
festival is a great, prestigious
event Andruzzi said. "It gives
you goosebumps because that's
what athletics is all about. Sylvia
didn't make it last year, but now
it's time for her to go out there
and do her thing
Andruzzi is mostly drilling
Bragg on individual offensive
moves, basic man-to-man defen-
se and outside shooting.
"There's such a high altitude
there, and that may have an effect
on Syl Andruzzi said, "but I've
been real pleased with her perfor-
mance and her personal growth
This past season, the freshman
earned a starting position on an
injury-riddled team. By the year's
end, Bragg was averaging 9.8
points per game and 3.8 rebounds
per contest. Against Boston Col-
lege, the former Converse ail-
American popped in a career-high
23 points.
During her high school days in
Richmond, Va Bragg led her
team to a 54-4 record in three var-
sity seasons, including a 21-1
finish and regional and district
titles her senior year.
But a great deal has changed
since Bragg first arrived at ECU.
She got a quick lesson in the fund-
mentals of college basketball.
"It's (college basketball) a lot dif-
ferent from high school Bragg
said. "There's a lot of hustle. You
always have to be aware on the
court. You cant let up at all.
Coach helped me a lot. She told
me you can't act as a freshman.
This past year taught me so
much
Andruzzi describes Bragg as a
hard worker and a player whose
main goal is to keep improving.
"I hope Sylvia enjoys the ex-
perience and appreciates the op-
portunity, Andruzzi said. "We
just want her to do the best job
she can.
"We'd like all our girls to be
the best they can be � not
mediocre
Noah Captures French Title
TENNIS: Yannick Noah
became the first Frenchman in
37 years to win the French Open
tennis championship Sunday
with a 6-2, 7-5, 7 6 victory over
defending champion Mats
Wilander.
Noah, displaying a serve-and-
volley attack, collected $90,000
in the world's premier clay court
championship.
The title match was played in
front of 16,000 partisan fans at
Paris' Roland Garros Stadium
and marked the first time in five
years that the men's title went to
someone other than a Swede.
In the women's final, Chris
Evert Lloyd needed only 66
minutes to defeat Mima
Jausovec of Yugoslavia 6-1, 6-2
?a capture her record-tying fifth
French Open crown.
Evert shares the mark with
Australian Margaret Court, who
last won in Paris in 1973. The
victory earned Evert $70,000 and
added to her previous titles in
1974, 1975, 1979 and 1980.
BASEBALL: Rod Carew of
the California Angels was nam-
ed American League Player of
the Month for May, and the San
Fransisco Giants' Darrell Evans
was given the award in the Na-
tional League.
Sports Update
Carew batted .438 during
May, including six doubles, one
triple and nine RBI. Evans hit
.423 with 41 hits, nine home runs
and 23 RBI.
Dave Stieb of the Toronto
Blue Jays and Bill i as key of the
San Fransisco Giants were nam-
ed Pitchers of the Month in the
American and National League,
respectively.
Stieb won five games in May,
making him the majors' winn-
ingest pitcher with eight vic-
tories. Laskey won six games
while allowing only 13 earned
runs and 32 hits in 41 innings.
BOXING: Marvis Frazier,
22-year old son of former
heavyweight boxing champ Joe
Frazier, followed in his father's
footsteps Saturday by scoring a
unanimous decision over Joe
Bugner in a 10-round
heavyweight bout.
Bugner, a 33-year old
Englishman, lost a 12-round
non-title fight to the elder
Frazier in London in 1973.
GOLF: Fred Couples won his
first PGA Tour event Sunday as
he defeated four other golfers in
a five-way playoff in the
$400,000 Kemper Open in
Bethesda, Md.
Couples, Scott Simpson, Gil
Morgan, Barry Jaeckel and T.C.
Chen of Taiwan all finished tied
at one-under-par 287 after 72
holes of regulation.
On the second playoff hole,
Couples fired a five-iron to
within two feet of the cup and
tapped-in for the decisive birdie.
For the victory, Couple took
home $72,000.
BASKETBALL: Each
member of the Philadelphia
76crs will receive at least $26,000
from a record $422,500 pot for
winning the NBA championship
last week.
The pot includes $100,000 for
the best regular-season record,
$42,500 for beating the New
York Knicks, $50,000. for
beating the Milwaukee Bucks,
and $230,000 for defeating the
Los Angeles Lakers in the cham-
pionship series.
Sophomore Sylvia Bragg will take her first-year college experience to
Colorado Springs this month to compete in the National Sports
Festival.
Bishops Eliminated
eruvian Olympic Performer Heads
List Of Finest Incoming Swimmers Ever
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
ECU head swim coach Rick
Kobe closed out his recruiting ef-
forts this week, and called his in-
coming class, "the finest crop of
swimmers to ever come to ECU
"We're very, very pleased with
our recruiting he said, "and we
filled all the spots where we had
some problems last year. I don't
see any weaknesses on the men's
or women's team for the upcom-
ing season
Foremost among the recruits is
Chema Larranaga from Lima,
Peru. Larranaga holds two Peru-
vian national records and was a
participant in the 1980 Olympics at
Moscow.
In 1982, he was junior college
champion in the 500 and 1650
freestyles, and was runner-up for
swimmer of the year.
Also joining the Pirates will be
backstrokers Kevin Hidalgo from
Chester, Va and Caycee Paust
from Richmond. Both hold times
in their events that are better than
the current ECU varsity records.
Diver Lori Miller of Columbus,
Pa will be a fine addition com-
plimenting current men's diver
Scott Eagle. Kobe describes each
as having national potential.
Among the 26 new recruits, 16
men and 10 women, Kobe also
managed to sign two YMCA Na-
tional champions and a junior col-
lege all-America.
"I expect everybody to con-
tribute immediately Kobe said.
"Swimming is the type of sport
where freshmen can step right in,
and I feel about 75 percent of our
new kids will score points for us in
their first season
Although the Pirates are going
to be strong in every event, Kobe
will look for the most out of his
freestylers. "We're solid all the
way from the 50 to the 1650 meter
events he said.
Stan Williams, who returns
from a year's stay in Texas, and
Steve Hallet, a transfer student
from Tennessee that becomes
eligible in December are two addi-
tional swimmers that will join the
freestyle corps in the fall.
Kobe has high expectations for
the 1983-84 season and has
scheduled the toughest teams in
the country to face his Pirates.
The men will compete in 12 dual
meets, and the women in 13. ECU
will confront the likes of North
Carolina, South Florida, John
Hopkins and South Carolina.
The Pirates begin practice 10
days aftef class begins this fall in
preparation for their November
18 meeting with N.C. State.
MARIETTA, Ohio (AP) �
North Carolina Wesleyan, top-
ranked in NCAA Division III
baseball going into the World
Series, lost two games Monday
and was eliminated from the tour-
nament.
The Bishops fell to Otterbein
10-9 in the first game, then lost
6-4 to host Marietta in the doubie-
elimination tournament.
Wesleyan finishes the season with
a 38-7 record.
John Mastel, hitless in four
previous trips to the plate, won
the opening game for Otterbein
with a two-out two-run single
through the middle in the bottom
of the ninth.
Wesleyan had taken a 7-2 lead,
scoring five runs in the fourth on
four hits, including doubles by
Ronnie Shorter, Willie Arrington
and Mike DeLeone, and an error.
Otterbein pulled to within one
in the fifth when Mike Blythe and
Dave Whitehead hit back-to-back
homers, and tied the score at 7-7
in the seventh when Blythe doubl-
ed off the wall and came home on
Whitehead's single.
Wesleyan went ahead 9-7 in the
eighth when Charlie Simpson hit
an 0-2 pitch from Kirk McDonald
for a two-run homer.
In the bottom of the ninth,
Brett Brownfield blooped a single
off Mike Siciliano and Blythe
chased Siciliano with another
single. Whitehead's fifth hit of the
game, a grounder between the legs
of pitcher Carl Payne, brought
Brownfield home.
Jim Hoyle reached first on a
NL West Heats Up
ATLANTA (UPI) � You'd
think it was playoff time the way
folks are carrying on about this
week's three-game series between
the Atlanta Braves and the Los
Angeles Dodgers.
The series began Tuesday and is
the first of the year between the
two clubs. The reason for all the
excitement is that one-third
through the season, the first-place
Dodgers led the second-place
Braves by only one and a half
games with the rest of tne Na-
tional League West far behind.
The pressure for this one is on
the Braves since they have to
sweep the series to grab the lead.
Two ouf of three would still leave
them a half-game back. Lose all
three and they would be hard
pressed to get this close again
before the All-Star break.
The Braves are off to their best
start in their 18 seasons in Atlanta
� 34-18. That's three more vic-
tories than they had through their
first 52 games last year and at that
time they were one and a half
games ahead instead of one and a
haii" behind.
"We feel like we've been on a
treadmill, said Braves manager
Joe Torre. "Everytime we win,
the Dodgers win. When they final-
ly lose one every now and then, we
fail to take advantage of it.
"But now that we're finally go-
ing head-to-head for the first time
this season; maybe we can do
something about it ourselves. We
know the Dodgers are the team we
have to beat to repeat as division
champions. We've known that
since before the season even
began
The Dodgers got off to a slow
start last season but, at 35-16, are
the hottest team in the major
leagues this year. In addition to
their usual fine pitching and ex-
ceptional speed, they also have
been getting the long ball from
rookie Greg Brock and Pedro
Guerrero, who have 11 home runs
each. Although the Braves finish-
ed a game ahead of the Dodgers in
the National League West last
year, the Dodgers, who trailed by
10 in last July, won 11 of 18
meetings with Atlanta.
See DODGERS, Page 9
TbJs Pirate swtaner Is only
Kobe. Kobe described this year's recruiting
Altogether, Kobe brought in 2
1
"the finest
10 w
of
to Head coach Rick
to ever cone to ECU
fielder's choice and then a walk
loaded the bases. After a fly to
short left field for the second out.
Mastel rapped his game-winrung
hit.
It was the seventh one-run game
of the series, and the fifth decided
in the ninth inning.
Payne, losing pitcher in relief of
tiie fusi game, started the second
and again was tagged with the
loss, only his third in 14 decisions
this year.
Marietta capitalized on a pair
of errors and a passed ball to
eliminate the Bishops.
Wesleyan took a 1-0 lead in the
first on Richard Mattocks' double
and a single by .Arrington. But
Marietta tied the score in the se-
cond when Arrington dropped a
fly ball with the bases loaded.
The Pioneers never trailed after
taking a 3-1 lead in the third on
Mark Talarico's RBI double and a
passed ball by DeLeone.
Wesleyan threatened in the bot-
tom of the ninth, scoring once on
back-to-back doubles by Moochie
Medley and Jim Provenzano. A
single by Mattocks, who had
homered earlier, left runners at
first and third, but then Jim Ken-
nedy got Arrington to pop a bunt
to third, ending the game.
Kennedy went the distance for
Marietta, scattering eight hits and
striking out nine.
Wesleyan lost its second catcher
of the series of the series in the
first game when Toby Holliday
suffered a fractured ankle while
sliding into second base in the se-
cond inning.
Baird Names
Third Signee
Jimmy Riley of Chesapeake.
Va. signed a basketball grant-in-
aid to attend ECU, Pirate head
coach Hal Baird announced last
week.
Riley is the third player to sign
with ECU this year. The Pirates
have already signed pitcher Mike
Christopher of Dinwiddie, Va.
High School and second baseman
Steve Sides of Goldsboro High.
Recruit Update
Three high school players who
have committed to ECU will be in
the lineup July 26 when the an-
nual East-West North Carolina
all-star game is played in the
Greensboro Coliseum.
6-5 Derrick Battle of Northern
Nash and 6-9 Jack Turnbill of
Wilmington New Hanover will be
members of the East squad.
6-7 Roy Smith of Gastonia
Huss will be playing on the West
team.
These three players mark the
largest contingent of future ECU
players ever to play in the East-
West contest.
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estival

it
ill take her first-year college experience to
mpete in the National Sports
Eliminated
Jer - choice and then a walk
ided the bases. After a fly to
hort left field for the second out.
M istel rapped his game-winning
hit.
It was the seventh one-run game
' the Nenes. and the fifth decided
in the ninth inning.
Payne, losing pitcher in relief of
the tirsi game. .lated the second
tgain was tagged with the
5S, onl) his third in 14 decisions
Marietta capitalized on a pair
� errors and a passed ball to
eliminate the Bishops.
esleyan took a 1-0 lead in the
� on Richard Mattocks' double
: a single b Arnngton. But
Marietta tied the score in the se-
J when Arnngton dropped a
fly ball with the bases loaded.
The Pioneers never trailed after
taking a 3-1 lead in the third on
Mark Talarico's RBI double and a
parsed ball by DeLeone.
esleyan threatened in the bot-
tom of the ninth, scoring once on
k-to-back doubles by Moochie
Medley and Mm Provenzano. A
gle by Mattocks, who had
mered earlier, left runners at
first and third, but then Jim Ken-
ned got Arrington to pop a bunt
to third, ending the game.
Kennedy went the distance for
Marietta, scattering eight hits and
striking out nine.
V esleyan lost its second catcher
of the series of the series in the
game when Toby Holliday
red a fractured ankle while
ding into second base in the se-
'd inning.
ingle
f the
� Baird Names
Third Signee
Jimmy Riley of Chesapeake,
Va. signed a basketball grant-in-
aid to attend ECU, Pirate head
coach Hal Baird announced last
week.
Riley is the third player to sign
with ECU this year. The Pirates
have already signed pitcher Mike
Christopher of Dinwiddie, Va.
High School and second baseman
0 Steve Sides of Goldsboro High.
Recruit Update
Three high school players who
have committed to ECU will be in
the lineup July 26 when the an-
nual East-West North Carolina
all-star game is played in the
Greensboro Coliseum.
6-5 Derrick Battle of Northern
Nash and 6-9 Jack Turnbill of
Wilmington New Hanover will be
members of the East squad.
6-7 Roy Smith of Gastonia
Huss will be playing on the West
team.
These three players mark the
largest contingent of future ECU
players ever to play in the East-
West contest.
rh Rick
ECU
I
Brewers Trade Thomas
MILWAUKEE
(UP1) � The
Milwaukee Brewers,
exchanging the long
ball for defense, Mon-
day traded slumping
home run king Gor-
man Thomas to the
Cleveland Indians for
center fielder Rick
Manning and left-
hander Rick Waits.
The defending
American League
champions also gave
up reliever Jamie
Easterly and minor
league pitcher Ernie
Camacho.
Thomas, a 32-year
center fielder
hampered by injuries,
has averaged 35 home
runs and 98 RBI the
past five seasons and
Played a key role in
the Brewers' pennant
drive last year.
"We're delighted to
have Gorman
Thomas said In-
dians president Gabe
Paul. "We hate to
lose Rick Manning
but our need for home
run power dictated
the move.
"We've been sear-
ching far and long for
a power hitter and we
think Gorman
Thomas is one of the
better ones in baseball
today said Phil
Seghi, Indians' vice
president-general
manager.
The Brewers
regular center fielder
since 1978, Thomas
has 202 career
homers. He led the
American League in
homers in 1979 and
shared the crown with
Reggie Jackson last
year with 39.
The departure of
Thomas may set off
protest from
Milwaukee fans, who
have made the out-
fielder a great favorite
in recent years.
But the injury-
plagued Thomas is
hitting .183 this
season with only five
home runs in 26
games. He was tied
for fourth place on
the club in home runs
and sixth in RBI with
18.
The Brewers an-
nounced Sunday the
recall of outfielder
Mark Brouhard from
Vancouver of the
Pacific Coast League.
Outfielder Bob Skube
was sent down.
Easterly, 30, is 0-1
with one save and had
a 3.86 ERA in 12
games this year. He
has a lifetime record
of 11-26.
Camacho, 27, was
with the Brewers Tri-
ple A team at Van-
couver this year.
The Brewers have
been interested in
Manning for some
time. The fine-
fielding 28-year old
joined the Indians in
1975 and has a major
league average of
.263, with 35 career
home runs, 142 stolen
bases and 326 RBI.
Dodgers, Braves To Square Off
Cont'd From Page 8
Both teams had
Monday off and
Torre feels that was to
the Braves' advan-
tage.
"We needed the
rest, especially for our
pitchers said Torre.
"This way, we'll be
able to start right
handers all three
nights. If we had a
game Monday, it
would have moved
our rotation up a day,
and we might have
had to use a left-
hander, which I'd
prefer not to do
agiainst Los
Angeles
Torre also feels the
rest will be good for
his relief staff, which
has worked overtime
of late since the
Braves have gotten
only one route-going
performance from a
starter in their last 34
games.
"That doesn't
bother me as much as
it seems to bother
some people said
Toire. "I'm a lot
more concerned about
how a game ends than
how it starts. If our
short relievers (who
have a 6-2 won-lost
record and 19 of
Atlanta's 20 saves)
keep getting the job
done, that's all that
counts
Torre plans to start
Rick Camp (5-4)
against Fernando
Venezuela (6-2)
tonight and his rookie
Craig McMurtry (7-2)
against Burt Hooton
(4-2) Thursday.
Torre feels Atlan-
ta's bats are ready to
test that Dodger pit-
ching. With four
regulars at .300 or
better, the Braves
have a team batting
average of .278, with
Dale Murphy leading
the league in home
runs (13), runs baited
in (43) and runs
scored (50).
"This is a series
that everybody has
been waiting for
players and fans
alike said Torre. "I
don't know how the
Dodgers feel about it,
but we're really look-
ing forward to it.
"They tell us we're
going to have more
than 40,000 on hand
each the three nights
and that's great by
us Torre said. "Our
players play with a lot
of animation. They
like to play in front of
big crowds
Some would have
you think there was
bad blood between
the Braves and
Dodgers because of
some of the comments
that have been made
in the past, especially
by Dodger manager
Tom Lasorda.
"I don't think that
is true at all said
Murphy, who is runn-
ing slightly behind last
year's pace when he
was named Most
Valuable Player in the
National League.
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if 24 HOURS Epir� July 31, 1983 DRIVE THRU �








coupon HUCKLEBERRY'S coupon
HAM & CHEESE BISCUIT
(with purchase of any beverage)
.jl. per order JL
t 0v79P SAVE 40P

if 24 HOURS Ex,� July 3i. 1983 DRIVE THRU if

� coupon HUCKLEBERRY'S coupon






SAUSAGE & CHEESE BISCUIT
(with purchase of any beverage)
per order
Only79P SAVe30P
if 24 HOURS
Expires July 31. 1983

DRIVE THRU
� coupon HUCKLEBERRY'S coupon
� BEEF RIB SPECIAL SAVE 75$
2 Two Jumbo Beef Ribs, Fries, Biscuit �
� (with purchase of any med. or lg. beverage) �
� per order
� Only $1.99
� 24 HOURS Expires July 31, 1983 DRIVE THRU

� coupon HUCKLEBERRY'S coupon
t HAM & EGG BISCUIT $
J (with purchase of any beverage)
per order
t On 79 SAVE 40$ $

if 24 HOURS Expires Jury 31, 1983 DRIVE THRU �

� coupon HUCKLEBERRY'S coupon
SAUSAGE & EGG BISCUIT
jl. (with purchase of any beverage) jf
, per order jl.
Only 79$ SAVE 30$ �
� �
� 24 HOURS Expires July 31. 1983 DRIVE THRU �
� coupon HUCKLEBERRY'S coupon coupon HUCKLEBERRY'S coupon
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE. Mg
Only 20 Miles To Go
Oa Saturday, June 4, six ECL -Greenville participants will compete in a triathlon in Hti
Point. The triathlon consists of a one-half mile swim, a 20-mile bike ride and a 6 2-mik
run.
Pizza
Transit
Authority,
2 FOR
THE PRICE OF
ONE
WITH THIS COUPON
Call Us Now! 757-1955
WiMlMf
FREE COKES TOO
Now AvaHabt � Diot Com
�UY ANY LARGE 2-OR-MORE
MOflEOCNT PIZZA AND GET
ANOTHER SMALL 2-Oft-MORE
�NOREOCNT PIZZA
ABSOLUTELY FREE
�' �AUD �'� OTt�� COU�OM
3CCC ��� j3
HOURS
t JB z � -1 DO a m � So �m
X pff 2X a- � c- iSa:
ON�PAT
Pizza Transit Authority FREE C0KES cc
REAL DEAL! wo-Aw-tab�
Sm ttun � 00 � � I X I �
f-s�i �400c oc��
757-1955
$100 OFF SMALL 2-OR-MORE INGREDIENT PIZZA or
$2.00 OFF LARGE 2-OR-MORE INGREDIENT PIZZA or
$2 00 OFF AMY PIZZA UTEn��.
EX�tBES 8-2-83
OWPAC
��8&&�V
BEEF RIB SPECIAL SAVe75P
if Two Jumbo Beef Ribs, Fries, Biscuit W
if (with purchase of any med. or lg. beverage)
pcrorder
t Onhy$1.99 if
J 24 HOURS Ep��.My3i.m3 DRIVE THRU 24 HOURS
EGG & CHEESE BISCUIT
(with purchase of any beverage)
per order
079$ save3(HP
Expires July 31, 1983







DRIVE THRU
4
HAPPY HOUR 8:30-10:00
FREE DRAFT
PMVATE CLUB MEMBERS & GUEST
gftKRSSWKSffi
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f


10
THE EAST CARPI 1N1AN
JUNE 8. 1983
?
T
Sneaker
Sam Sez
Doublcheader Action
Wednesday
Co-Rec softball
winds up Wednesday
with a doubleheader.
Nancy's Favorites
have been a strong
contender thus far,
beating their op-
ponents by an average
of 10 points per game.
The second game
Wednesday will be for
the championship.
Action begins at 5:00
p.m.
Tennis Tourney
Tennis singles tour-
nament is underway
as five participants
are vying for the title.
Mike Wynn and
William Shipley are
favored in this single
elimination action as
both sport undefeated
records.
Seeing Red
Red Pin Bowling
registration is now
through June 14. This
is an individual event
scheduled to take
place at MSC Bowling
Alley Wednesday,
June 15 from 7-9 p.m.
For more information
stop by Memorial
Gym Room 204.
Athletes Join
Conference
Two members of
the ECU football
team will work as
huddle leaders during
next week's national
Fellowship of Chris-
tian Athletes Con-
ference in Black
Mountain.
Kevin Samuel, a
snapper from Fayet-
teville, and Jeff Pat-
ton, a defensive end
from Selma, will each
head up a group of
approximately 14 high
school boys for a
week-long con-
ference.
"Kevin and Jeff
have been very active
in our local FCA
chapter explained
assistant coach Bob
Sanders, local advisor
for the FCA "And
this is a fine honor to
be selected to be a
huddle leader.
"The conference is
to work with the high
school boys in a
recreational setting,
but with spiritual em-
phasis being placed on
the week's activities
Sanders, and
associate head coach
Art Baker, are both
expected to attend
some sessions of next
week's conference, as
well as a conference
the following week.
Classifieds
BEACH COTTAGE FOR RENT
ATNorth Myrtle Beach Two
bedroom, sloops six. Ronts by
weekend or woofc. Coll m-i�W.
WANTED: FEMALE TO
SHARE 2-bedroom (pertinent
at Eastbrook for fall and spring
semester next year. S0 rent per
month, 1J utilities; non-
smoker, please. Call 75 702
after 5 JO p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED: Gerogetowne Apts. S71.7S a
month. Call 7M-4otS.
MATURE GAY WHITE MAN.
age 11, seeks meaningful rela-
tionship with man. Don't like
bars or groups. Too shy, I guess.
Chat, P.O. Box 4273 Greenville,
n.c. mm.
COME ONE COME ALL to the
BIG-TIME YARD SALE. Com
ing June tlth at 40 Biltmore
Street. Everything goes, in-
cluding Hugh. Fridges, albums,
dirty books and collectible tun-
qua. We've got it all!
TYPING: TERM PAPERS,
ESSAYS and RESUMES. IBM
SELECTRIC TYPEWRITER
and CAMERA-READY
RESUME SERVICE. Call
MIKE at 7S3-efM.
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVF
SERVICE
eK Gri-nviMe Blvd.
756-3023 "�HHS.
PLAZA SHE
M hour Towing Service
' -Haui Rentals
Available
an
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion a dWr � c
DEPEND ON. sicr tner s raaee e'r ,
�-e en o'he emmy Cervef Counse o's are
:vi oce jcy ana night to support ana uno
s'ana you ou' safety comfort ard privacy are
assured oy tne canng staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturaav Aportion Af
pomf-nents � 1st & 2na TrmneJfet Aportions up to
' - ,Veeks � Free Pregnancv Tests � very Early
Preg ancv Tests � All inc u' � jQ Fees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-555C OAY OR NIGHT �
Health care, counseling THE FLEMING
CENTER
and education for wo-
ner of all ages
OPEN 8:30-5:30
Monday Saturday
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
�m 00 Pregnancy Test, ftii
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further Information call
132 �5JS (Toll Free Number
M0-12I-1SM) between � A.M.
and S P.M. Weekdays
RALEIOHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West V rf�n St.
Rdleifl
MS PATRICIA BULLOCK
Manager
Call lor appointment � 758-6498
BULLOCK'S
BARBER SHOP & HAIRSTYLING
1210 West 5th Street
Greenville. N.C. 27834
-SEE-
:
Alvin & Anthony
For Curls. Perms and Styles �
Daniel & J�rome S
For all Modern Cuts and Styles :
3
ooooetoo�e�ooeoee�e��eooeeeeoefioteoe���oeeee��eoo.
USDA Choice B�tf Ron.
Fall Cat
Roan
These prices good thru
Saturday, June It 1983
Lb.
USDA CHoiet Family Pack
Cube
Steaks
Lb
USDA Choice Beef Round - Bottom
USOA
CHOICE
Round
Roast
Quart
Rid
Strawberries
1 littr
S liter - BarjaaaV Ckaklii, Rkiaa, Rttt
Masson
fk. tf it � it oi. eotttf. a it.
Schlitz Beer
�� � it - ti or n a�tu
Miller Beer
fk. �111 -11 Oi. Cta� R�s l�
Budweiser
k MX A
�r v
22 Ounce
Half a�liaa
Why Pay 1 19
Donald Duck
Orange
Juice
S U. - Crl.tla Cat
X?
St Oaact
Magome
P299
399
�ftf Pay M.St
119 Shaett 2 Ply
So-Dri
Towels
Wfcy Pay S9
SODRI
SODRI
30DRJ
s
10 0t. - CattlaharrtTTasM Pata Oaaaar Mil
Del Monte Catsup figjfl Hot Dog Sauce
Qaart
Duke's Mayonnaise
1 Lb. - NtrieriM
Blue Bonnet
99
IS Off - 4 Pa�k Tallat Tiiiaa
Cottonelle
I Mb. ��
Embers Charcoal
4.5 Oi. � Amrttal Ctt Fed
Bright Eyes
J39
8 Oi. - Ataart�� Vatart
Light IT Lively
iKT.Iju
V
lLa
v
9 5 0; Combs PepB-erom Sa

Pizzas
Why Fay 89
8 Count Food To�n
Hamburqer Met Ocq
Buns&
Rolls
42 Dane
Trend
Detergent
WS P?, -1 19





Title
The East Carolinian, June 8, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 08, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.271
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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