The East Carolinian, June 1, 1983






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Stye i�mt (EaralMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.$
Li
Wednesday June 1,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Pitt Judge Acquits
Eight Frat Brothers
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Vv�iu�m Son Kdllor
Eight members of the Omega
Psi Phi fraternity have been ac-
quitted of assault charges stemm-
ing from an initiation ceremony
held last February.
Pitt County District Court
Judge H. Horton Roundtree ac-
quitted the students who were
charged with the assault of their
fraternity pledge Tony Michael
Jones. Fifteen Omega Psi Phi
members have been charged with
various violations stemming from
the incidents.
Roundtree ruled that Jones'
testimony did not support charges
in the warrants and that because
of the nature of the initiation inci-
dent Jones actually gave his con-
sent to the assaults.
Jones, 21, testified that he was
beaten, kicked and pushed during
separate initiation incidents on
February 10 and 12. During the
Feb. 12 incident Jones was knock-
ed unconscious and required
treatment at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital and the Stu-
dent Health Center for head and
back injuries.
ECU Vice Chancellor for Stu-
dent Life Elmer Meyer said three
separate sets of guidelines exist
that outlaw hazing, a charge
which all 15 defendants have also
been accused of.
On May 10, District Judge E.
Burt Aycock, dismissed hazing
charges against three of the 15
defendants after ruling the state's
70-year-old hazing law un-
constitutional. Ayccck's ruling
has been appealed to Superior
Court, and a hearing is scheduled
for June 2. �
Besides the state law against
hazing, Meyer said the university
and the national fraternities each
have rules that prohibit such acts
that could endanger the health or
safety of its students.
Meyer said an ECU statute pro-
hibited all students and frater-
nities from "endangering, injur-
ing or threatening to injure the
person or property of another
The rule also explicitly prohibits
ECU students from participating
in hazing or embarrassment of
other students.
Omega Psi Phi has been put on
probation by the university as a
result of the incident. "Regardless
of the status of the court cases at
this time, the fraternity will re-
main on probation Meyer said.
Meyer and Associate Dean of
the Judiciary James Mallory have
been conducting their V)wn in-
vestigations of the incidents, but
have not indicated what action
they might take against the frater-
nity members.
The cases of the other defen-
dants have been continued until
June 16.
Det. Lt. Gene McAbee of cam-
pus security has been observing
the trials of the ECU defendants.
McAbee said he believed Round-
tree veiwed the initiation assaults
as an ongoing activity and not as
an isolated incident.
McAbee said it would be im-
proper for him to comment on the
remaining cases. "It's all in how
the judge views the incident
McAbee said.
McAbee advised students not to
join fraternities if they were con-
cerned about these types of ac-
tivities. Those who want to join
fraternities should not make their
final judgements based on the
fraternity's rush party, McAbee
said. "I'd try and get to know the
people a little bit better
Lethal Choice
New Option Sought
hot� By OAKY FATTCRSON
ecu

m
New Wave Studying
This girl can't seem to decide whether she wants to study or listen
to her favorite radio station. Reports have it that she finally gave
up and went home to watch Ryan's Hope.
By GORDON IPOCK
Suff �nia
A bill sponsored by Sen. Robert
M. Davis, D-Rowan, that would
make death by lethal injection an
option to North Carolina's gas
chamber appears likely to pass the
state Senate.
The bill was tentatively approv-
ed by a vote of 39-6 in a second
reading of the Senate Monday
night. A final vote is scheduled
for today.
Davis originally introduced a
bill to replace the gas chamber
with a lethal injection of sodium
pentothol. However, the bill was
modified in a Senate subcommit-
tee making lethal injection an
alternative to the gas chamber.
The bill, if passed, will not effect
the 34 inmates currently awaiting
execution on North Carolina's
death row.
Dr. Clark Bright,
anesthesiologist at the ECU
School of Medicine, described
sodium pentothol as a barbituate
hypnotic that will render a person
asleep or unconscious within 15 to
30 seconds. If given in a heavy
enough dose, it will render a per-
son permanently unconscious and
cause cardiac arrest, death by
heart failure, he explained.
Other debate on the bill has
centered around the medical pro-
fession, insuring that no doctor or
pharmacist would be compelled to
administer the drug.
"The bill was in subcommittee
twice said Davis. "Most of the
questions about the bill had a
reasonable answer, and 1 think
we've answered them. Last night
there was a lot of discussion, but I
think most everybody felt the
answers were all right, and that's
why the vote went as it did
If the bill is approved by the
Senate today, it must then go to
the state House of Represen-
tatives.
Davis sees death by lethal injec-
tion as a more humane and
dignified means of execution than
death by gas chamber.
"A good many people
throughout not only North
Carolina but the world are not
satisfied with gassing people to
death said Davis. "The
Holocaust is an example of how
people can become upset with this
sort of treatment.
"This is by far the most
humane wav of execution con-
See, NEW, Page 3
Student Newspapers Beating Out Locals
AIDS Disease Found
In North Carolina
The AIDS scare has reached
Greenville and the president of
ECU's gay student organization
predicts the appearance of the
disease in North Carolina will
change the dating habits of many
gay men.
AIDS, Adult Immune Deficien-
cy Syndrome, is a disease which
breaks down the victims immune
system. In 10 reported cases of
AIDS appearing recently in North
Carolina, seven of the victims
have died. There is no known cure
for aids.
According to Dr. Peter B.
Campbell, head of the Infectious
Disease Division of the ECU
School of Medicine, the cause of
the disease is uncertain and it ap-
pears to be spreading. "The
number of cases (of AIDS) is in-
creasing exponentially Camp-
bell said. "It's clearly an epidemic
in its early stages
Until recently the disease had
been appearing primarily in
distinct clusters in U.S. urban
centers and mostly among male
homosexuals. But now the
disease, which can be transmitted
via blood transfusions, is appear-
ing among heterosexuals, their
children and hemophiliacs who
receive regular blood transfu-
sions.
"Before it was just a gay
disease, and it didn't really mat-
ter, it wasn't worth in-
vestigating said Gary Faircloth,
president of the East Carolina
Gay Community, a support group
for gay students attending ECU.
Faircloth claims pressure was not
placed on the medical community
to find a cure for AIDS until it ap-
peared outside the gay communi-
ty. "Now that its striking other
areas and other lifestyles, it's wor-
thwhile to find a cure Faircloth
added.
Faircloth said it was a shame
that the lives of homosexuals are
perceived by some people as less
valuable then the lives of
heterosexuals. "Those are human
lives regardless of the sexuality
Faircloth said in a reference to the
large number of gay men who
have died after contracting AIDS.
The disease has been appearing
in the United States for almost
five years. Campbell said AIDS is
not easily spread and that drastic
changes in people's lifestyles were
not necessary. "It's (AIDS) not
highly contagious by any means
Campbell said.
Campbell did suggest that peo-
ple in the "high risk groups"
begin to be more cautious.
Specifically Campbell suggested
that people in high risk groups be
cautious when donating blood to
avoid unwittingly passing the
disease on.
Faircloth said the appearance
of AIDS in North Carolina would
not cause a change in people's sex-
uality, but it would cause a change
in their lifestyle.
Faircloth said many gay men
will probably begin to be less
casual in choosing their sexual
partners because of the AIDS pro-
blem. He said the ECGC would be
mounting an educational cam-
paign in the fall to warn students
about the disease and provide
them with information.
Faircloth said the ECGC acts
primarily as an educational
organization for young gay people
and straight (heterosexuals) peo-
ple as well. Besides holding bi-
weekly meetings, members of the
ECGC also speak to groups and in
classes on the topic of homosex-
uality.
Of the ten people diagnosed as
having AIDS, two have been in-
mates at Raleigh's Central Prison.
Three of the AIDS victims, one
each from Chatham, Orange and
Lenoir counties, were North
Carolina residents. The others
were from out-of-state. One of
the victims was treated at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital,
Campbell said.
According to Dr. W. Paul
McKinney, an edpidemiologist
with the N.C. Division of Health
Services, all of the reported AIDS
victims were homosexuals.
(CPS)"We've lost it mourns
Glen Ponczak, outgoing editor of
the Western Courier, the student
newspaper at Western Illinois
University.
"We employed over 90 students
this year, and now that the town
daily w�H be printing the paper,
we have no guarantee if more than
a handful of students will be in-
voloved in next year's paper he
says.
Indeed, even the editor of the
Macomb Daily Journal, which
last week successfully won a
university contract to publish the
student paper for the coming
year, "can't say right now just
how much students will be involv-
ed" when it takes over.
The situation at Western Il-
linois dramatically illustrates an
escalating problem that many col-
lege papers are having these days
� fighting off competition, com-
plaints, and in this case,
takeovers, by their commercial
competitors.
At the University of Arizona,
for example, a number of Tucson-
area publishers have claimed that
the student paper. The Daily
Wildcat, has put them out of
business.
Their complaints recently led
the Arizona legislature to pass a
law, which, among other things,
will make it more difficult for stu-
dent papers to compete with local
publishers.
Likewise, the publisher of the
Columbia Tribune in Columbia,
MO has spoken out vehemently
against having to compete with
the University of Missouri's
paper, The Missourian.
And at the University of
Illinois-Urbana, one local paper
folded, and another local has
bought out a fledgling campus
paper in a heated battle to com-
pete with the university's Daily II-
lini.
"Competition between student
and local commercial papers has
always been a problem says
Nance Green, with the National
Council of College Publications
Advisors (NCCPA).
But recently, she notes, the
competition has intensified in
many college towns as the reces-
sion limits the number of advertis-
ing dollars to go around.
"And at the same time as these
advertising dollars are drying
up she says, "more and more
college papers are feeling a great
deal of pressure to be more self-
sufficient, to get out and sell more
ads so their financially-strapped
schools won't have to fund
them
Local commercial publishers,
on the other hand, battling similar
problems, argue it's unfair for
publically-funded campus papers
� which don't have to pay high
salaries or buy their own equip-
ment � to compete for their
business.
See, STUDENT, Page 3
Tuition Hikes; Visitors May Pay More
By GREG RIDEOLT
Pitt County Rep. Ed Warren,
member of the House Higher
Education Committee, said Tues-
day that he believes there will be
increase in tuition for out-of-state
students this fall. He said a bill
that requests a $300 hike for non-
residents has been reported out of
committee and should be voted on
by the General Assembly soon.
A recent News and Observer
story said several key legislators
were working on an in-state tui-
tion increase of up to 20 percent,
hut Warren said he knows of no
efforts to increase in-state tuition,
and, if there were, he would be
opposed to them. Warren said
that although he went along in
committee to raise out-of-state
tuition, he was against any tuition
increase.
Chancellor John M. Howell
said he obviously would prefer to
keep tuition as low as possible,
but economic factors sometimes
makes an increase mandatory.
Howell said the General Assembly
is very concerned with education
and feels any increase they do
recommend would be carefully
considered.
William Friday, president of
the university system, told the
N&O he felt an increase of in-state
tuition of more than 10 percent
would be a hardship for students
of limited means. Friday noted
that the General Assembly in-
creased in-state tuition 20 percent
in 1981.
Both Friday, Howell and War-
ren have long opposed tuition in-
creases, but Friday said he could
support the bill from Warren's
committee that increases out-of-
Proposed tuition increases may force non-residents to fork out more
General Assembly is currently considering a bill to increase taitioa.
�A�Y PATTtaSON - ecu
for their education
state tuition.
All three officials said that the
outcome of the tuition situation
would not be known until the end
of the current legislative session,
which should be around June.
Howell mentioned that a
substantial increase of out-of-
state tuition in 1973 caused ECU's
non-resident enrollment to drop
more than 50 percent. The
chancellor said that there would
be no other fee increases this year.
North Carolina law gives the
General Assembly the power to
raise university system tuition.
Draft Resister
May Face Jail
Connecticut! draft resister
Russell Ford will be facing the
possibility of spending the next
five years in federal prison when
he arrives in court for sentencing
Monday.
Ford, 19,has gone on record
that he is unwilling to pay a fine
or accept alternative sentencing.
Ford says he plans to put federal
Judge M. Joseph Blumenfeld "on
the spot" forcing the judge to let
him free or send him to prison.
"I would not accept a com-
munity work sentence said Ford
who visited ECU last February.
Ford is the first American since
the Vietnam war to spend time in
prison for draft registration
refusal.
Ford said he is opposed to ac -
cepting a community work
sentence because he doesn't
believe the United States govern-
ment can make a responsible
choice of what conotes service to a
community. "My resistance to
war is a service to the human com-
munity Ford said.
mil .�- fri �i� Jin JWuiifo ifc ii� �fcitfi�i' ' ' i&(�"�: �
"��j��i - - r-p�
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE I, 1983
Announcements

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�T� 111
�TFT"
'ho Fast Carolinian
hi' i iTif�u . �'tl'r 'ill v
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� shed every Tuesday
rftursda dyi'ig the
vcar and every
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rta University, owned
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are located in tne OM South
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�rig, ECU Greenville,
� . i.phone 757 .14 6J�7
e3C�
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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�iid like to have an item
rated m the announcement
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nouncement torm and send it to
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rms space is available to an
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a ���"enfs
STUDENTS MAKE
A DIFFERENCE
It you are a motivated m
dividual who wishes to help seek
solutions to consumer and en
vironmental problems through
research and advocacy then
North Carolina Public Interest
Research Group iNC PIRGt is
tor you it is a student group
researching issues such as Con
sumer Protection
Environmental Quality
Students Rights Government
Accountability Renewable
Energy Civil Rights NC PIRG
has. in the past toughf tor North �
Carolina student s rights
documented the danger ot
nuclear carg transportation
through the state, and most
recently making the student
dratted Generic Drug Generic
Substitution Bill a law An ECU
PiRG is now being formed
PIRG needs your support Get
together with other students
concerned with these issues For
more details call Eliza Godwin
at 752 1748
SOULS
ELECTION
Anyone interested in running
souls office next semester con
tact Barbara at 758"550
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
Love brutally humiliated and
destroyed a world ot stagnant
possibilities created by the false
fathers who built and tolerated
the Auschweitz s and Vietnams
of history, those who have par
tcipated in the torture
chambers of the ecclesiastical
inquisitions and then forgotten
without remorse This is the
state of affairs that cries out to
us that plagues our consciences
and demands to be challenged
it you are ready to make a com
mittment to iustice if you are
ready to begin building a new
kind of society without violence,
poverty, and alienation we need
you Come to the meeting of the
Greenville Peace Committee at
610 S Elm st at 7 00 p m every
Friday night, or phone 748 4906
for more information
PRE MED STUDENTS BIBLE STUDY AT ECU
The Kaplan Course, a
preparatory corse for the
MCAT, will be taught at ECU
this summer beginning the last
week in June This course has
been proven to raise MCAT
scores by as much as 7 to 3
points We need 20 interested
persons to sign up in order for
the service to be at ECU this
summer The course is once a
week for 8 weeks Anyone in
terested must sign up m the
Biology office or call the Biology
club at 757 6286 or 758 6775 tor
more information A deposite
should be sent m within 2 weeks
Due to limited space, we can
nont reserve your seat without a
deposit information packets ex
plaining the course curriculum
are available in the mair
Biology office
inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship sponsors a bible
study on Monday nights Come
to 108 JarvisHali at 8 30 pm for
a time ot spiritual fellowship
and fun Prayer is also offered
every night at 111 Fletcher Hall
at 10 15 pm Take a break from
studying
COFFEEHOUSE
NEEDS MEMBERS
If you like variety entertain
ment and want a challenge
become a member on the stu
dent union coffeehouse commit
tee For more information . con
tact the Student union (Room
234) at 7576611. Ext 210
SENIORS
Want a central place for three
letters ot reference from your
professors If you are
graduating this summer, then
you complete a registration
packet available from the
Career Planning and Placement
Service if you will finish m the
fall, spring, or summer of
academic year 1983 84. you may
pick up a packet and prepare it
to return in August or
September
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven
ture's Oive Cozumei. Mexico on
the beautiful Yucatan peninsula
Aug 3. 1983 to Aug 10. 1983
Group trip for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving meals,
lodging and air fare from
Raleigh Non divers welcome
Call Ray Scharf at 757 6441
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
One million dollars per minute
is being spent worldwide on the
military The Greenville Peace
Committee reiects the notions
that more weapons brings us
more security We meet every
Friday night at 6 30 p m for a
pot luck dinner and meeting
During the summer we have
several activities planned and
we need your help Come join us
m our plans for June 20th
WORLD DISARMAMENT
DAY The meetings are held at
610 S Elm St For more infor
mation call 758 4906 or 752 5724
Peace
leBget
better. -
? acquainted
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COUNSELORS
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Male counselors needed tow
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camp Contact Rev F Wavne
Williams, Ft Valley Rf Box 355.
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PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers ano little sisters
of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity would
like to welcome everyone back
tor the summer term We hope
that everyone W'H have a fun
but mamly successful summer
Watch tor Part.es by the Lake
at the Pi Kapp house
264 By Pass,
Next Door to
Toyota East
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Why pay $12.00 for a delicious
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Stu
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE I, 1983
s get
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Student Press On Top
Continued from page
"It's simply not
fair for the private
sector to have to com-
pete with state or local
institutions says Ed
Jewett, head of Ter-
ritorial Publishers in
Tucson.
Jewett and other
Arizona business
leaders successfully
promoted a new state
law to limit competi-
tion between state-
supported institutions
and private
businesses.
"We have
documented evidence
from two other
newspapers � The
Mountain Newsreel
and the Tucson Week-
ly News � who claim
they were put out of
business because of
the Wildcats he says,
although he could not
name any references
to contact from either
of the defunct
publications.
The competition
can get intense for
commercial papers.
The Columbia
Tribune must daily pit
its 25-reporter staff
against the 125 stu-
dent reporters of
MU's Missourian, run
and subsidized by the
university.
Not surprisingly,
the larger campus
papers can win such
competition. Illinois'
Daily im "definitely
had an influence on
one of the papers �
The Gazette � going
out of business
recalls Dick Sublette,
once an Illini editor
and now UCLA's
publications director.
More recently, The
Courier � the re-
maining off-campus
daily � maneuvered
to avoid a similar fate
by buying out a not-
so-well-to-do campus
paper that was trying
to compete with the
Mini,loo.
At Western Illinois,
the Macomb Daily
Journal directly at-
tacked its main cam-
pus competitor,
although Journal
Editor Don Black says
the university's
Western Courier
"really wasn't hurting
us that much
The Daily Journal
nevertheless carefully
underbid Bitter Car-
rot, Inc.� a coalition
of faculty members
and students that had
published the paper
for more than a
decade � by nearly
$36,000 for the
school's annual con-
tract to write and pro-
duce a paper for the
campus.
"It's a one-paper
town now con-
cludes student Editor
Ponszak, who will
leave the paper for
good in August.
The NCCPA's
competition laws
defeat the whole pur-
pose of having a stu-
dent press in the first
place.
"Students working
on school papers are
in the process of train-
ing so they can later
get staff jobs on other
papers she says.
"Competition is a
part of the business
"And if you're go-
ing to train people
right adds UCLA's
Sublette, "you need
to sell ads to finance
your publication.
How can you teach
kids marketing if they
don't go out and hit
the street?
Moreover, com-
mercial publishers
who blamr their ills
on local student
papers "are looking
for scapegoats
Green savs.
In the long run, at-
tacking the student
press "will hurt
everyone, because
that's where the
future staffs of com-
mercial papers come
from
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From Page 1
tinued Davis. "I
could hardly live with
myself if I looked
back and saw people
being gassed to death
and hadn't tried to do
a little something to
make those last few
minutes easier,
because we have the
technology and the
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"When you put a
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within a matter of
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have to struggle and
fight for life and have
those terrible remem-
brances available to
the family of how
they died
According to
Davis, there appears
to be little opposition
in the Senate to the
lethal injection op-
tion.
"Some folks just
like leaving it as it is,
and some folks like
for capital punish-
ment to be
harsh said
"But I
they've
sidered
rather
Davis,
think once
really con-
the matter,
most folks find that it
is better
"I've discussed this
with the Warden of
Central Prison and a
lot of other people
said Davis, "and
from the discussions
I've had it appeared
now was the time to
try and do something
to make life during
those last few minutes
a little easier and
more humane
Arkansas, Texas,
New Mexico and
Oklahoma at present
use lethal injection as
their sole means of ex-
ecution. Montana,
Washington, Idaho,
Utah and
Massachusetts offer
lethal injection as an
alternative to other
forms of capital
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- ir itfu.





Stye �aat (Uaroltnian
Serving the East Caroline campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, o�M��r
Mike Hughes, m ��,
WAVERLY MeRRITT. oaar oauu ClNDY PLEASANTS. s es�
Hunter Fisher, Mmn Greg r,DEOUt, a. Edhor
Ali Afrashteh. cmm m.� Carlyn Ebert. - - . Eo,
Stephanie Groon, o� .�� Lizanne Jennings. ��
Clay Thornton. recnicml s,w David Gordon, �
June 1, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
60s Revisited?
Campuses See Return Of Forum
If there was ever an "age of in-
volvement" so to speak, that era
would surely be the Sixties. An age
of protest, perhaps, of turmoil, ad-
mittedly, but one also of un-
paralleled involvement. The 60s
was an age of active demonstra-
tion, of participation, of fighting
for a common cause.
Unfortunately, the 60s being
also a time of domestic and foreign
turbulence, a "time to be forgot-
ten much of that spirit of par-
ticipation has since dwindled. To-
day's college campuses are no
longer the site of intense student
rallies and political protests. No
longer is the college campus the
forum of ideas it once was.
But just when most of were get-
ting used to tru passive ideals
brought on by the post-Vietnam
era, it seems a resurgence in cam-
pus "activity" is upon us.
After about a 10-year respite,
campus fora are making their reap-
pearance in record numbers across
the nation. And although the
number of participants in these
organized public debates is meagre
by comparison to the renowned
massive demonstrations of the 60s,
the contemporary issues addressed
are just as hard-hitting as were
their predecessors.
Even East Carolina, hardly a
forerunner of American college
campus trends, has recently seen
the establishment of the Soap Box
Forum, an organized public debate
on the central issues of our time.
Student reaction and response,
although not fantastic, has been
quite good, and participation has
been better than many originally
expected.
Thus far, two such public
debates have been held on campus,
each with a central topic or basis of
discussion: i.e U.S. involvement
in Nicaragua and the meaning of
the term "pro-life" in 1983.
Unlike organized partisan debates,
the Soap Box Forum is structured
to enable any person with any idea
to relate his or her thoughts to
fellow students. It's an old idea
whose time has come.
But equally reminiscent of the
1960s is the nationwide resurgence
of student groups seeking active
participation in governing bodies,
a cause which more or less died out
in the early Seventies. Now, several
colleges in Missouri, Texas,
Massachusetts, Indiana, Virginia,
Maryland and other states have
begun to organize efforts to gain
an active voice in their governing
boards, with the purpose of in-
creasing student input in the
legislative process.
In addition, Public Interest
Research Groups (PIRGs), in-
spired by consumer advocate
Ralph Nader, have sprung up on
college campuses over most of the
nation.
� � �
The Sixties was, without a
doubt, the most controversial era
in this nation's history. Perhaps it
is a good time to forget. Perhaps
the violence and turmoil are best
left in the past. But it should also
be remembered that violence and
turmoil were but half of what that
era had to offer. And, in fact, it's a
comfort to know that after a
10-year absence, many of the
ideals and principles of the 60s are
back.
"Campus Forum-
Excuses, Excuses
Dear Mike,
Gee whiz, guy. We at WZMB didn't
realize how seriously you pencil
pushers took the softball game.
Goshdarnit, if we'd known that, we
would have practiced.
Oh, and Mike, I'd like to call to your
attention several errors in your article
(East Carolinian, May 18). No offense,
fellah, but the truth should be known.
1) "The air was thick with anticipa-
tion Thick with anticipation my
shirtsleeve. Can't you tell anticipation
from humidity? You must understand
that the majority of our players had
sinus conditions that very afternoon.
Do you know how difficult it is to play
softball, nay, responsible softball, with
a nose that weighs 10 pounds? Of
course you don't. Look, Mike, most of
our players turned down professional
contracts from several big-league ball
clubs. Hey, we're good. But when any
athlete plays with a sinus condition
under humid conditions, anyone could
imagine how poorly the player's game
would go.
That's why we had the alcohol; we
needed to relieve the pain.
2) "(a ZMB player) took a homerun
swing and grounded out to the cat-
cher
Very simple, you cheated.
3) "Gary Patterson hurled four
more innings of no-hit ball
Before Gare (name used by close
friends) ascended to the mound, he
should have been disqualified from the
game, because he is not a member of
The East Carolinian staff (sorry Gare).
Also, what's this "no-hit" mess? We
were hit several times. I guess from
now on, we'll stand a bit further away
from the plate.
4) WZMB baserunner yelled
out a barrage of dirty words
As any responsible U.S. citizen
knows, the FCC does not permit an-
nouncers to use profanity. Therefore,
no one on our staff uses profanity.
Maybe "doggonnit" every now and
then.
5) "Pat O'Neill, an all-star from the
League of Women Voters was
already late for a rally
Patrick is a den mother for Girl
Scout Troop 93.5, and he was late for
Maypole wrapping practice. What a
lame excuse for leaving early.
6) and your's truly (ta-da) had
to get home in time for Leave It To
Beaver
Leave It To Beaver was not on that
day. Coward.
7) "You know, you guys really (a
very bad word)
"Stank "played poorly
"needed showers any word(s) except
the naughty word you used. Poor
choice. May Professor Warren haunt
you in your dreams.
8) I'd like to point out some
statistical errors, too.
Players 1, 3, 8 and 13 were all the
same player.
LOB � Now, come on, we weren't
playing tennis.
Cindy Pleasants, not Dave Williams,
had 6 homeruns, and you guys know it.
The final score was 44-4, not 42-4
All in all, you guys, it was a nice
game. Next time, though, get the facts
straight. Be warned. We may even
practice next time.
Respectfully,
Player 1,3, 8 and 13
WZMB
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs).
IPRP THE COURT
HAS TAKEN AWAY
OUR ALL-WHITE
CHRISTIAN SCHOOL'S
TAX EXEMPT STATUS
WHAT SHOULD WE PO ?,

So
American 'Mega-Consumption' Lifestyle
At The Heart Of The World's Problems
By PAT O'NEILL
Judging from my encounters with
many U.S. citizens, I am led to believe
that we are living in a microcosm, a
diminutive world that shelters most
Americans from much of what goes on
in the real world.
While the United States represents on-
ly about six percent of the world's
population, we consume a dispropor-
tionately higher percentage of the ear-
th's resources. Some estimates even
claim that the U.S. population consumes
more than half of the world's non-
renewable resources.
Many Americans are unaware of this
fact, and those who are probably believe
this is "the way it should be Personal-
ly, I believe this lifestyle of mega-
consumption is the center of many of the
world's problems.
We Americans are living a Darwinistic
existence. At some point, we must
realize that our unrestrained consump-
tion and waste means that people in
other parts of the world aren't getting
their fair share. Over-consumption even-
tually trickles � or should I say doesn't
trickle � down to the millions of poor
people trying merely to exist.
On this note, I'd like to mention a
conversation I had about six years ago
with a missionary visiting Greenville.
His name was Rev. Jack Ganley. He'd
spent 13 years working with the poor in
Tanzania.
I asked Jack if the people in his village
had any idea how others in developed
nations lived. Quite frankly, his answer
shocked me. He said the people of Tan-
zania couldn't believe that in the United
States, people were so rich that they
could feed grain to their livestock. I'm
sure many of us never even thought of
this as being a sign of wealth. Heck,
everyone eats grain-fed beef, right?
(Incidentally, 76 percent of the grain
grown in the U.S. is used as feed.)
Another tid-bit I picked up some years
later from one of Jack's colleagues is
that Americans living in the top 40th
percentile of the nation's economic scale
are in the top five percent of the
wealthiest people in the world! What
this means is that middle-class
Americans are wealthier than 95 percent
of the world's population.
As an American, I am embarrassed b
these facts and figures. Morally, 1 am
defenseless, because as a mega-
consumer living in the U.S I am direct-
ly impacting on the lives of the millions
of poor throughout the world.
All people are entitled to enjoy and
consume the earth's riches. Just becusc
we are Americans doesn't mean our lives
are more valuable than those of African
peasants. Proportionate sharing of the
world's resources is an idea whose time
should have come long ago. Americans
must learn to live more simply so
that others may simply live
'Driven' To Tears
Spending A Day At The DMV
You know, I've always considered
myself a fairly competent driver. That
is, I did consider myself fairly competent
until I went to get my license renewed
Last week.
License renewal is one of those things
you just don't think too much about. I
mean, I figured I'd be in and out in
about 10 minutes, just long enough for
me to write a bad check. Little did I
know what was in store.
So anyway, I walk in to the DMV, and
this fat lady wearing baggy pants and a
gun yells across the office for me to sit
down, fill out some forms and wait my
turn. Knowing how trigger happy cor-
pulent cops can be, I repressed an insult
and found a seat.
MIKE HUGHES
Stuff I Think About
The place was filled with the usual
riff-raff. In one corner, there were two
women, both with their hair in curlers,
jotting down answers and gabbing about
the latest love affair on General
Hospital. Over in another corner, there
was a redneck who came to pick up his
special-order license tag, which boasted
his favorite saying: "HOT-DAM
And, of course, in the other corner were
two fat people, who only came inside to
get out of the sun and to see if the candy
machine was working.
Anyway, after spending about an
hour writing my autobiography on form
DMV-426-A, the fat woman with the
baggy pants came over and gave me
another paper marked NCDMV-426-B
(Written Test). I chuckled a bit at the
mere thought of taking a driving test in
North Carolina. It seemed a conflict in
terms
Little did I know how little I know
about the rules and regulations of driv-
ing. I mean, they asked questions I
couldn't have answered even if I had
studied.
Take hand signals, for instance. There
were three questions on the test about
proper hand signal technique. How to
make a left turn; how to make a right,
etc. Now, I could be wrong, but I was
somehow under the impression that
hand signals went out in the 60s with the
wonderful invention of the blinker. How
the hell was I supposed to know I was
supposed to know about hand signals? I
mean, up North, the only hand signals
we ever used were obscene.
And only on a North Carolina driving
test would there be six questions about
farm implements. I mean, one read:
"You are following a slow-traveling
hog truck on a two-lane highway. You
want to pass it, but oncoming traffic is
heavy. What should you do?"
Then, they give about four possible
answers, none of which makes any
sense. I mean, it would seem the first
thing to do is roll up the windows and
make an obscene gesture, right? Well,
not according to NCDMV-426-B.
Then, there was one that read: "You
are approaching a busy intersection but
are still about 100 yards away. What
does it mean when the traffic light at
that intersection turns from green to
yellow?"
The thing about that one, once again,
was that none of the answers were right!
I mean, to me, when a light turns from
green to yellow, and I'm still a good
ways away from the intersection, that
means I'd better haul ass and hope there
aren't any law dogs around to see me
run the red light.
"How much alcohol does a
180-pound man have to consume to be
considered legally drunk?" another one
asked. Now, how in the hell am I sup-
posed to know that? I mean, this guy
might be a wimp. He might get tipsy
after three beers. Then again, he might
be a rock gut. And anyway, what in the
hell does "legally drunk" (as opposed to
illegally drunk, I suppose) mean?
Sounds like one of those infamous terms
coined by Ike Andrews.
Needless to say, I grew so frustrated
with the stupid test that I started putting
in my own answers:
20 � "What is the first thing you do
when you've been in a serious acci-
dent?"
Bleed.
21 � "What should you do when you
sec an ambulance with its flashing lights
on coming up fast behind you?"
Thank God it's not me inside.
22 � "What do you do if vou
discover your horn doesn't work?"
Leave the window down, so 1 can
make obscene gestures and yell a lot.
23 � "In North Carolina, what is the
regulation on picking up and discharg-
ing hitchhikers?"
Pick 'em up when they look good;
discharge 'em when you find out thev
looked better from far away.
24 � "What is the leading cause of
automobile accidents in North
Carolina?"
Female pedestrians wearing short
shorts.
25 � "How many were killed on the
state's roads last year?"
I'm not sure, but I personallv ran over
eight possums, three rabbits' and mv
neighbor's Chihuahua
I go back Thursday for a retest.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, an in-
coming freshman from Wav Down
Yonder in the Paw-Paw Patch, S.C
likes to raise hell by putting tin cans in
Aluminum Only" dumpsters.
BEHlMDINtlESSEEM
B PATRll
The second
of the ECL
Forum produ
cassionally
debate on th
" hat is pro-
Eleven peoj
part in the
forum Friday!
noon in front
Student Suppl.
Dozens of int
passers-by stor,
listen as del
argued the pr
cons of an uj
international
fast to prou
nuclear arms rs
Speakers I
dressed the to
abortion,
euthanasia i
use of anim
research Rj
ECU math pr
Dr. Carroll
provided sparkl
debate he
outlined hi-
definitions of pj
Webber sail
aspect of qui
ell a quantity'
to be applied
definition of li
that all sensitii
organisms uere
ed to a high-j
quality of life
:
E
: ovctv
IIM���
)
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� �V ���wo , m�it. MHi-mwt
�mtt)mfm
� � I � - 1���W





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 1983
-1
n' Lifestyle
s Problems
er tidbit I picked up some years
from one of Jack's colleagues is
mencans living in the top 40th
le of the nation's economic scale
the top fie percent of the
ilthiest people in the world! What
s means is that middle-class
ins are wealthier than 95 percent
world's population.
�mencan, 1 am embarrassed by
icts and figures. Morally, I am
ess, because as a mega-
- er living in the U.S 1 am direct-
ling on the lives of the millions
� throughout the world,
dl people are entitled to enjoy and
ume the earth's riches. Just becuse
Americans doesn't mean our lives
e valuable than those of African
Proportionate sharing of the
esources is an idea whose time
iv e come long ago. Americans
iearn to live more simply so
tat others may simply live
Ma:
eDMV
iless to say, 1 grew so frustrated
ie stupid test that I started putting
my own answers:
"What is ihc first thing you do
hen you've been in a serious acci-
Bleed
"What should you do when you
Jee an ambulance with its flashing lights
ming up fast behind you?"
Thank God it's not me inside.
"What do you do if you
� er your horn doesn't work?"
Leave the window down, so 1 can
lake obscene gestures and yell a lot.
"In North Carolina, what is the
regulation on picking up and discharg-
I lihikcrs?1
em up when they look good;
ge 'em when you find out they
Keel better from far away.
- � "What is the leading cause of
� mobile accidents in North
ma9"
Female pedestrians wearing short
"How many were killed on the
Kate's roads last year0"
'm not sure, but I personally ran over
nght possums, three rabbits and my
leighbor's Chihuahua
I go back Thursday for a retest.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, an in-
jming freshman from Way Down
I Yonder in the Paw-Paw Patch, NC,
I ikes to raise hell by putting tin cans in
Mummum Only" dumpsters.
WMSSEEM
KKnCHITW
EDiCATE THEMTO
LVINPUMMAR?

Soap Box Debates Life
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Assistant News Editor
The second edition
of the ECU Soap Box
Forum producd oc-
cassionally heated
debate on the topic
"What is pro-life?"
Eleven people took
part in the 90-minute
forum Friday after-
noon in front of the
Student Supply Store.
Dozens of interested
passers-by stopped to
listen as debators
argued the pros and
cons of an upcoming
international hunger
fast to protest the
nuclear arms race.
Speakers also ad-
dressed the topics of
abortion, war,
euthanasia and the
use of animals for
research. Retired
ECU math professor
Dr. Carroll Webber
provided spark to the
debate when he
outlined his three
definitions of pro-life.
Webber said the
aspects of "quality as
well a quantity" need
to be applied to any
definition of life and
that all sensitive living
organisms were entitl-
ed to a high-average
quality of life.
Under this defini-
tion of pro-life, Web-
ber introduced 10 ex-
amples of instances in
which he believed
people or society were
working in the interest
of life. "Our nation
would thoroughly
study non-violent
civilian defense and
then throw all of its
armaments into the
ocean � alco its elec-
tric chairs Webber
said.
Webber cited the
efforts of eight peace
activists who plan to
begin what they've
termed "a Fast for
Life" as a protest of
the nuclear arms race.
He included them
among his ten ex-
amples of pro-life.
Webber's com-
ments regarding the
fasters spurned
several others to
remark on the merits
of the fast. All eight
fasters could die of
starvation if certain
"goals" for nuclear
disarmament are not
agreed upon by the
world's nuclear
powers.
"I think it's in-
tensely grotesque that
people in a land of
plenty would starve
themselves said one
student who disagreed
with Webber.
"I think it's com-
mendable what
they're doing said
ECU student Gordon
I pock. I pock added
that he was not real
optimistic that the
fast would achieve its
goals, but he wished
the fasters luck in
their efforts. Ipock
felt that repression of
the media in the
Soviet Union was a
major drawback to
nuclear disarmament.
He didn't think the
Soviet people would
be permitted to hear
or read press reports
about the fast.
Another ECU stu-
dent, W.G.
Boudreaux, also
disapproved of the
fast. "Eight people
are going to starve
themselves to death in
a futile cause
Boudreaux said.
"There's no way,not
with eight people;
they're going to get
Russia (and) the
United States to do
anything to lessen
their nuclear
capabilities
"But I guess it will
make a profound
social statement
Boudreaux said. "I'm
not exactly sure how
effective profound
social statements are
though
"I think they (the
fasters) say something
to us all said stu-
dent Henry Wooten.
"I think it says
something to Ronald
Reagan and other
people like him, sure-
ly they must feel some
remorse
"I guess if you look
at it, what Jesus did
really wasn't all that
much different
Wooten said. "He got
disgusted with
everybody (and) he
gave his life
"It's very hard for
me to say 'Oh yea
these people are doing
a great thing " com-
mented ECU graduate
Mary Rider.
Non-violence
doesn't mean people
aren't going to die.
What nonviolence
means is that we're
not going to cause
death. We may die,
but we're not going to
cause death
Student Greg
Howell called the fast
a blatent act of
hypocracy. "How can
people advocate pro-
life then turn around
and kill themselves
for that cause
Two speakers cor-
related their religious
faith with their topics,
while others avoided
the religious issue en-
tirely.
Audience response
to the forum appeared
positive, with
speakers receiving
rounds of applause
after they concluded.
Heckling was less ap-
parent at this forum
then it was during the
first one in April.
Organizers of the
event have said they
plan to use the sum-
mer sessions as a test
period to determine if
the Soap Box Forum
will be popular among
ECU students. If the
forum proves to be
popular, organizers
say they will continue
the event on a regular
basis in the fall.
A BOX VO(j�AN
SINK t�R TETTH
AT BARRE,ltd.
j � .?
Dancewear Specialty Shop
For all your dancing needs.
422 ARLINGTON BLVD.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
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Each of these advertised items it required to be readily available tor tat .
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in this ad
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coupons not ace saladCustoms must purchase
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' - - - "





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNEl, 1983 PMe6
Kick Summer Boredom With Cool Diversions
By ROBIN AYERS
Surf Writer
I'm going to encourage some
decadence on this first day of
June. If you can, think about stu-
dying.
There you are hunched over a
book at one elbow, a notebook at
the other. You've been toying
with a ballpoint pen as you keep it
close to write down notes or any
passing thought of enlightenment.
Something catches your eye,
and you look up. A luminous light
has startled you with its brilliance,
and you realize it's the radiance of
a day in summer. You notice the
rainclouds that loomed so
ominously in the morning have
passed on. Class is over.
So now it's midafternoon, and
you're hanging around. You've
got time on your hands � well,
not exactly. I mean, you could
visit the biology lab; study for an
upcoming test on irregular verbs;
research a paper; or worry over
the speed-flying quality of sum-
mer school. Any number of
reasons for industriousness will
do.
But aren't you bored to death
with the whole scene? Be honest.
However, if you're thinking of
courageously sticking to the
grind, don't look too long out-
side.
Laziness permeates the air. It's
summer, and ever since God
created vacation, man has
possessed that inborn desire to
periodically escape from the real
world and its obligations.
This desire is particularly strong
in students. When summer casts
its spell, try one of the following
little refreshers � or make up
your own list.
1. Tune in a soap opera. Make an
afternoon of them. It is "Ryan's
Hope" this "Guiding Light" will
help you have "Capitol" gains be-
ing "Young and Restless" in the
summer of the "Days of Our
Lives
2. Go swimming in the Pamlico
River at Little Washington or in
the Tar, if you dare.
3. Sunbathe. (An obvious diver-
sion.)
4. Walk to the town commons.
The further away you live, the
greater the chance for adventure.
Be sure to time your trek. And
once there, what do you do? Read
on.
5. Watch the Tar River flow.
6. Cast a line.
7. Do absolutely nothing.
8. Ogle the opposite sex.
9. Ogle the same sex.
10. When the sun disappears � a
common enough occurence in
Greenville � you can watch the
rain fall.
11. Or you can be a little more
precise and measure splash
distance of drops on impact.
12. Or watch the steam rise up off
the asphalt when the rain sub-
sides.
13. Mix some margaritas, or
whatever you ingest best.
14. Listen to Jimmy Buffett
records.
15. Perform numbers 13 and 14
simultaneously.
16. If you have transportation or
you are resourceful, go to the mall
and enjoy its air-conditioned com-
fort. The benches are hard,
though.
17. Leave town.
And if you still feel compelled to
loaf constructively, you might
want to:
18. Clean up your dorm room or
your apartment, or learn how to
remove margarita stains from the
beige shag carpet.
19. Clean out a closet. Match up
your shoes.
20. Harvest the fruits and
vegetables of your passion at a
local pick-your-own farm.
21. Water those plants on your
windowsill that appear to be gasp-
By STEVE BACHNER
SUM Writer
After a punishing two-year
wait, our memories tuned to that
climactic moment when Han Solo
is frozen in carbonite, George
Lucas and the gang from In-
dustrial Light and Magic (his
special effects facility) have final-
ly given us the concluding chapter
of the middle "Star Wars"
trilogy. The Return of the Jedi
(now and forever playing at
Greenville's Plaza Cinema II).
As you should know by now,
the film stars everyone we fell in
love with in the first couple of in-
stallments and a host of cuddly
new creations that you won't be
able to escape all summer long.
(It's not that I can't understand
the reason for all this merchandiz-
ing � I know it's great for
business � but the media satura-
tion gets more tedious each time
around.) And as you also should
know, this segment resolves the
fates of Mark Hamill, Harrison
Ford, Carrie Fisher and Billy Dee
Williams. So much for plot.
Let me say right off that Jedi is
not a turkey, and is in many ways
technically better than its
predecessors. The images are
sharper, the color registration
clearer, and the sound effects
crisper and more pronounced.
This one must really be something
at a full 6-channel Dolby Stereo,
70mm screening. Jedi certainly
flexes its technical muscles and
shows them off like a West Coast
flake pointing the way to the spa.
All of these innovations are fine
� in fact, we've come to expect
them � and the action sequences
are extremely well-staged. The
trouble is that the special effects
are altogether the same ones we've
seen in this series and a dozen or
Viewers, Nielsens Rank
Football And Hillbillies
As Ail-Time Favorites
By GORDON IPOCK
Miff Writer
Pro football and "The Beverly
Hillbillies" account for 21 of the
50 most-watched television broad-
casts of all time according to the
Nielsen ratings.
The program with the all-time-
highest ratings, however, is the
final two-and-a-half hour episode
of"M.A.S.H According to the
A.C. Nielsen Company, the
February 28, 1983 "M.A.S.H
achieved an incredible rating of
60.3: of all the nation's homes
with television sets, 60.3 percent
were tuned to the program. That
translates into 125 million
viewers.
High ratings allow networks to
charge more for commercial time.
CBS, expecting high ratings for
"M.A.S.H charged advertisers
$450,000 per half minute, another
record.
The 60.3 figure is astounding
when compared to the 53.3 rating
of the former number one televi-
sion event � the "Who Shot
JR.?" episode of "Dallas" in
1980. The only other broadcast to
break the 50 percent mark was the
final episode of "Roots" with a
51.1 rating.
The ratings themselves are
fascinating. Of the 50 highest
rated programs of all time, 12 are
football games � 11 Super Bowls
and the 1982 NFC Championship
Game. No World Series baseball,
Olympics telecast, or any other
sporting event has ever made the
top 50 list. When it comes to
television, football is obviously
America's most popular spectator
sport.
Nine episodes of "The Beverly
Hillbillies" are in the top 50.
Younger viewers may scratch their
heads in wonder, but Jed, Gran-
ny, Jethro and Elly May were a
smash hit with prime-time viewers
during the early 60s. Amazingly,
six of the nine episodes came in se-
quence. Beginning on January 1,
1964 and running through
February 5, each Wednesday
evening between 41 and 44 percent
of the nation's televisions were
tuned to the Clampetts.
See VIEWERS, Page 7
more remakes; to say I've seen
this all before would at least be
the understatement of the sum-
mer.
Liking the series only about
two-thirds as much as most
moviegoers, 1 come not to be
moved along by the story but to
marvel at the technical advances
and the imagination that
culminates in some of the most
creative filmmaking that the in-
dustry has to offer. I can still see
where Jedi lacks the conciseness
that the original Star Wars had; it
lacks the surprises that Empire
gave us, and it represses the Ford
and Williams characters to the
point that they almost cease to ex-
ist.
Return of the Jedi is content to
follow its successful formula, and
the series has gotten terribly in-
grown, in much the same way as
the James Bond series. This is not
the kind of risk filmmaking that
Star Wars-creator Lucas has built
his reputation on and is perhaps
the reason why he is loudly pro-
claiming that he may never make
those other two trilogies.
Still in Greenville this week, at
the end of a long and successful
run at the Plitt Entertainment
Center, is a glitzy "feel-good"
drama called Flashdance. The
film is the summer's biggest
sleeper thus far, starring an
ing their last drop of chlorophyll.
I hope this list gives you a start
on how to wastespend (insert
your own definition here) time on
your hands. You aren't bored,
and those old books are collecting
a little dust.
However, if you don't hoof it
eventually (say, around exam
time), you may find you have lots
of spare time.
I
WfJL-M
New Installment In 'Star Wars' Saga:
'Return Of The Jedi9 Tops Films Slated
To Grace Local Screens This Summer
Ptwto fry DAVE WILLIAMS � ECU
unknown 19-year-old Yale
freshman named Jennifer Beals.
As you might or might not know,
Beals does only some of the danc-
ing in the film; the rest is filled in
without screen credit. None of
this of course matters since the
movie is a plotless, hyperactive,
exploitative, narcissistic and im-
mensely entertaining thrillride
that is surprisingly unpretentious
if for no other reason than that it
is simple-minded. Flashdance is
slick, slick, slick: It has great dan-
cing, a great soundtrack, and
great set-pieces. This is a perfect
summer film, and it passes the
time very quickly.
Another type of film we've
come to associate with summer is
currently playing at the Park
Theatre in downtown Greenville.
Screwballs is the umpteenth
remake of American Graffiti
which, once a prototype for the
teenage exploitation film, now
seems far removed from the wan-
ton nature of such drive-in enter-
tainment as Porky's and Spring
Break. Screwballs is about the
crazy, lovable students of T&A
High and has plenty of the
relentlessly crude sight gags that
make this kind of film so much
"fun This one is no better or
worse than any of the rest, so if
this is your scene, jump right in.
And Without His Kedsl
Four ECU students and one canine college drop-in display their
favorite tactics for alleviating boredom.
New Releases Have Low
Points And High Points
By MIKE HAMER
record.
Staff Writer
The band hails from Georgia,
Most cult recording artists sell but they don't sound like it. They
to a select but steady audience. In- sound like a hybrid of early
deed, Kevin Rowland of Dexy's Beatles and early Byrds, and they
Midnight Runners reports that sound great. The excellent rhythm
Van Morrison advised him to go
for the select audience rather than
the full mass audience. None of
the records reviewed here will be
million-sellers or will gain great
fame for the artists. But at least
two of these three albums are
worth a close listening.
Murmur
R.EM.
R.E.M. cut their new LP (on
I.R.S.) in Charlotte for producer
Mitch Easter with assistance from
Don Dixon. Dixon, the bass
player with Arrogance, has done
production work on the debut
albums of several North Carolina
bands. Easter, Dixon and R.E.M.
have done a fine job with this
guitar, bass and drum work keep
these songs moving along. You
could bring Murmur to your
Saturday night dance party.
Every song is solid, bringing the
listener back to the speakers and
ready for more. The lyrics,
however, are barely discernible
through most of the record �
reminding me of early Rolling
Stones tunes. They've been
deliberately mixed this way,
perhaps because the band wants
to call attention to each song as a
whole.
Two of my favorite songs on
Murmur are "Pilgrimage for its
neat bass intro, and "Moral
Kiosk which explores the great
See NEW, Page 7
Local Bands To Do Benefit
lightning WeBf art Rutabaga Brother Mike Hi
By MIKE HAMER
SttflWrikr
Next Wednesday, June 8,
Greenville area musicians will pre-
sent the Fourth Annual Blues and
Jazz Benefit for WVSP, the
public service radio station
located at 90.0 FM. The benefit
concert will be held in the main
room of The Attic. Music will
begin at 9 PM.
Four bands have donated their
services for this year's benefit
conceit, and all four are among
the area's strongest bands. The
roster is comprised of Proteus, a
jazz-oriented group; Jazz Plus,
who play soul and jazz; The
Rutabaga Brothers and Lemon
Sisters, who play swing, soul, and
-rhythm and blues; and the Lightn-
ing Wells Blues Band, who play
Chicago-style blues and rhythm
and blues.
WVSP has been instrumental in
providing jazz, blues, soul, reggae
and classical music to the Nor-
thern rural counties around War-
ren ton, extending as far east as
Greenville and as far north as
Petersburg, Virginia. Besides pro-
viding music, VSP, which stands
for " Voices Serving People
provides a forum for dispensing
vital information to the rural poor
in these Northern counties. Pro-
grams range from information on
food stamp laws to WVSP's
"Prison and Justice Forum
Funding for the station comes
from listener contributions,
grants and benefits such at
Wednesday evening's music fest
at the Attic.
New LPs
Continued From Page 6
aelf-mocking image of eerythmg
looking so much more attractive
inside a 'moral kiosk' � an im-
aginative metaphor. And
"Perfect Circle" is a dreamy song
with some eerie images of gallows
and shadows way out of place
R.E.M. played J.Js in Green
ville about two years ago. but I
missed them I wish 1 hadn't.
Key
Joan Armatrading
Who is this black woman who's
always wearing a ke around her
neck; who has gold records from
Britain. Canada. Australia ana
Sol
gu
OCi
wi
IS
V
anj
O
' I
an
mi
m(
w
fol
R 1
sol
L
Viewers, Nielsen.
All-Time Televisl
Continued From Page 6
However, the ABC minis?
Roots" is the all-time chamr I i
having back-to-back highly rated
episodes. Eight sequences of !
"Roots" appeared nightlv dura
the final days of January ;s�"
All eight made the top 50 pro-
grams list with an average ra:
Of 44.9.
NBC's most successful k
was "Bonanza The Sunciav
night western that ran from 1959
to 1973 has six episodes on the I r
50 list. All were during Febru.
and March of 1964 and 1965
It's also worth noting thai 29
the top 50 shows were broadca:
during the month of January
Most of the other top shows were
also shown during cold-wea
months.
In fact, only one program :rom
June. July or August is among the
top 50 � the concluding episode
of "The Fugitive The August
1967 finale to the popular ser.e-
scored enormous ratings both i
the U.S. and overseas. Millions
watched David Janssen end his
four-year search for the a
armed man and finally exonerate
himself. The Quinn Martin r
duction became the most-watched
show in history with a 45.9 rating
Todav it ranks eleventh.
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WE CATER TOSTUDENTS NEEDS
STUDENTS WITH VALID IDs RECI
AS USUAL ON MERCHANDISE
NOW STUDENTS CAN RECEIVE A1
IN THIS AD.(only for days listed abo
UGHTMING BOLT BATH
ONE-PIECE-TWO-PIECE
SUB 4 RUNNII
RUNNING SM
ALL-Wf
DANSK1KS
leotards!
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JOIN OUR SHOE
CLUB BY OBTAINING
A SHOE CLUB CARD
AT THE STORE AND
SAVE EVEN .�
MORE! JDiP
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mm���i
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JHE EAST CAROLINIAN
JL'NEl. 1983
II NE 1. 1W
Page 6
iversions
M m room oring their last drop of chlorophyll.
earn hou to1 hope this list gives you a start
ins from theon hovs to waste spend (insert
your own definition here) time on
t Match upvour hands. 'fou aren't bored,
and those old rlooks are collecting
t uits anda little dust.
Assion at aHowever, ifyou don't hoof it
armeentually (say, around exam
1T- on ourtime), you mavfind you have lots
1 o be gasp-of spare time.
U ��HP" I hi jt t
�? �r ?
ft L ' wmm ��.��
1�ft aw BJ �
a.
Photos by DAVE WILLIAMS - ECU Photo L.b
7ow His Keds!
id one canine college drop-in display their
lating boredom.
leases Have Low
nd High Points
i
� sell
lence In-
(t Dexy's
- that
im to go
ther than
INone of
e wil, be
Lin great
at least
lurm are
LP (on
�roducer
ice from
ie bass
fras done
debut
Carolina
R.E.M
nth this
record.
The band hails from Georgia,
but they don't sound like it. They
sound like a hybrid of early
Beatles and early Byrds, and they
sound great. The excellent rhythm
guitar, bass and drum work keep
these songs moving along. You
could bring Murmur to your
Saturday night dance party.
Every song is solid, bringing the
listener back to the speakers and
readv for more. The lyrics,
however, are barely discernible
through most of the record �
reminding me of earlv Rolling
Stones tunes. They've been
deliberately mixed this way,
perhaps because the band wants
to call attention to each song as a
whole.
Two of my favorite songs on
Murmur are "Pilgrimage for its
neat bass intro, and "Moral
Kiosk which explores the great
See NEW, Page 7
Benefit
June 8,
(will pre-
lues and
�P. the
station
benefit
ie main
Isic will
d their
benefit
among
The
teus, a
Plus,
The
Lemon
ful, and
.ightn-
io play
Chicago-style blues and rhythm
and blues.
WVSP has been instrumental in
providing jazz, blues, soul, reggae
and classical music to the Nor-
thern rural counties around War-
renton. extending as far east as
Greenville and as far north as
Petersburg, Virginia. Besides pro-
viding music, VSP, which stands
for " Voices Serving People
provides a forum for dispensing
vital information to the rural poor
in these Northern counties. Pro-
grams range from information on
food stamp laws to WVSP's
"Prison and Justice Forum
Funding for the station comes
from listener contributions,
grants and benefits such as
Wednesday evening's music fest
at the Attic.
New LPs From Armatrading, R.E.M. Are Good Listens
Continued From Page 6
self-mocking image of everything
looking so much more attractive
inside a 'moral kiosk' � an im-
aginative metaphor. And
"Perfect Circle" is a dreamy song
with some eerie images of gallows
and shadows way out of place.
R.E.M. played J.Js in Green-
ville about two years ago, but 1
missed them. I wish I hadn't.
The Key
Joan Armatrading
Who is this black woman who's
always wearing a key around her
neck; who has gold records from
Britain, Canada, Australia and
South Africa; who plays electric
guitar on her records and who will
occasionally slip in a hot lead;
whose producer, Steve Lillywhite,
is the red-hot man behind U2 and
XTC; and who has Tony Levin
and Adrien Belew from King
Crimson playing bass and lead
guitar on her newest record?
Her name is Joan Armatrading,
and anyone who hasn't heard her
music has missed some of the
most sensitive and brilliant song
writing in the last eight years.
Armatrading started out in a
folk vein in the early 70s; now I
would classify her with the fresh
sounds of U2 and XTC, thanks to
Lillywhite.
The music on The Key (A&M)
is good � the sound pops off the
record, but I don't think this
record contains Armatrading's
best songs. Walk Under Ladders,
released early last year, had better
tunes, as did Show Some Emotion
('77) and To The Limit ('78). But
there are some very good songs
here.
Armatrading's songs on The
Key are written from the perspec-
tive of a young person in the fast
lane; there isn't as much in-
trospection going on as in her
earlier records. An exception is
"Everybody Gotta Know Here
Armatrading sings,
have been some place
I never would go to
Just not my style
But persuasion made me
Open my mind.
Several songs here are purely
fun. Armatrading places tongue
firmly in cheek when she sings,
"(I Love It When You) Call Me
Names ("She's wearing heavy
leather with laceHe dresses up in
cowboy tasteThey punish then
they think up a crimeIt's their
way of loving not mine) And in
"What Do Boys Dream she lets
her imagination wander over the
many things boys must dream
about � mythical monsters or the
big romance with the ideal girl of
their dreams.
The musicianship is first class.
Adrien Belew's solo guitar and
Larry Fast's synthesizer work
deserve special mention. It's not
Joan Armatrading's best effort,
but it's a good one.
Pride
Robert Palmer
Palmer's new LP on Island
Records sounds like it was con-
ceived, rehearsed and recorded on
a rich man's tropical island
paradise where none of the sound
and feeling of 1982-83 was allow-
ed to enter, where the artist had
whole year before deciding it was
time to get another record out.
This is not to say that good
records can't be conceived in a
studio; it happens all the time.
And, of course, records arc
rehearsed and recorded in studios,
but a good one should still sound
like a solid, real life performance.
A layering of pleasant sounds
isn't enough.
Perhaps Palmer should stick to
the writing and singing and hire
himself an excellent producer and
a good engineer. Then he should
wait until he has ten good songs
Viewers, Nielsens Rank Their
A11-Time Television Favorites
Continued From Page 6
However, the ABC miniseries
"Roots" is the all-time champ for
having back-to-back highly rated
episodes. Eight sequences of
"Roots" appeared nightly during
the final days of January 1977.
All eight made the top 50 pro-
grams list with an average rating
of 44.9.
NBC's most successful series
was "Bonanza The Sunday
night western that ran from 1959
to 1973 has six episodes on the top
50 list. All were during February
and March of 1964 and 1965.
It's also worth noting that 29 of
the top 50 shows were broadcast
during the month of January.
Most of the other top shows were
also shown during cold-weather
months.
In fact, only one program from
June, July or August is among the
top 50 � the concluding episode
of "The Fugitive The August
1967 finale to the popular series
scored enormous ratings both in
the U.S. and overseas. Millions
watched David Janssen end his
four-year search for the one-
armed man and finally exonerate
himself. The Quinn Martin pro-
duction became the most-watched
show in history with a 45.9 rating.
Todav it ranks eleventh.
In January 1970, "The Bob
Hope Christmas Show" finally
topped "The Fugitive" with a
46.6 rating. It now ranks ninth,
and the 1971 "Bob Hope
Christmas Show" ranks 15.
There are several other double
winners in the television ratings.
The November 1976 two-part
showings of "Gone With The
Wind" ranked first and second
(47.7 and 47.4) on the list until the
final episode of "Roots" surpass-
ed them the following year.
The :wo live Beatles pefor-
mances on "The Ed Sullivan
Show" vaulted that long-running
variety program to the top of the
list for over four years. The
February 9, 1964 Beatles debut
was the most-watched television
airing until "The Fugitive" sur-
passed it. The BeatlesSullivan
broadcasts now rank 14 and 22.
There are also two Academy
Awards shows in the top 50
Nielsen ratings, and two
"Gunsmokes 1961, are the
oldest broadcasts among the top
50.
A Miss America Pageant,
"Airport "Love Story and
"Cinderella" and an episode of
"All In The Family" complete the
list of America's most-watched
television programs.
&
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IN THIS AD.(only for days listed above)
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read nothing but Playboy for a before he releases another album
2ndANNUAL
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Call 756-8977 to place order
203 N. EASTERN ST.
BE THERE OR B2
items and Prices
Effective wed. June 1,
Thru sat. June 4, 1983
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these eoe
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each Kroger Sa� on
eicept as jwci .
noted m this ed H we
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�re will Offer you your
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Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
12-02.
Cans
REGULAR OR LICHT
Budweiser
Beer
$459
DIET COKE,
TAB. SPRITE,
MELLO YELLO OR
Coca cola
$109
-Ltr. I
2-Ltr.
Btls.
RUFFLES
Potato Chips
tr dr 8-02.
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Totino's Pizza
fc�a?air 1�-
10-or
Pkg.
OLD FASHION STYLE
Sour Cream
Cake Donuts
$169
DOZ. I
AMERICAN OR
MUSTARD
Potato Salad
ID.
79c

! ��
-�
� � �





THE EAST CAROL INI AN
Sports
JUNE I. 1983
Page 8
Athletes Enjoy Summertime
Kicker Jeff Heath is one of many athletes keeping in shape, but he
still takes time out to attend a rock concert or two during the summer
break.
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
At the end of the spring
semester, most ECU athletes
packed up their belongings and
headed for home. But a few decid-
ed to attend summer school to
make up for a few classes they
missed during their hectic
semesters. Even in the summer,
however, athletes still seem to
have rigorous schedules.
Here's what a few of them are
doing:
Lloyd Bltckjootball tight end:
"I was red-shirted one season, so
I'm taking two classes so I'll be basketball forward: "In several
able to graduate by December, weeks, I'm flying out to Colorado
I've been following a workout Springs to try out for the United
calendar to keep in shape for the States basketball team which will
upcoming season compete in the Pan-American
Dave Reicheneker, basketball
center: "I've been lifting weights
four times a week, and playing
basketball with Thorn Brown
(graduated ECU team member)
everyday. After summer school,
I'll be looking forward to going
home and spending time with my
parents
Rueben Pierce, track hurdler:
"I've been concentrating on
school, and occasionally lifting
weights. When I go home, I'm go-
ing to start training every day and
also work at a lumber yard.
Mary Denkler, former ECU
games. I graduate at the end of
the second session, and after that
I hope to play basketball in
Europe
Barry Wright, forward: "I
work out every day but plan my
time so 1 don't get burned out.
I'm going to work at Old Domi-
nion's basketball camp
Jeff Heath, football
placekicker: "I've been running,
lifting, and playing a lot of
basketball to keep in shape. I like
listening to music, and I just saw a
great concert by The Producers
(rock group) at Roadies
(nightclub). When I go home, I'm
going to work on a construction
crew
Jeanette Roth, softball pitcher:
I'm playing on a team in the
United States Softball Associa-
tion. I practice every day, and e
play games on the weekends. I
also work part-time at Church's
Fried Chicken
Fran Hooks, former basketball
guard: "I've been working out
five days a week, and I'll be an in-
structor for two weeks at Cath
Andruzzi's basketball camp 1
graduate at the end of the sum
mer, and hope to be a student
teacher at ECU in the fall
John Floyd, football center.
"I've been relaxing, listening to
good beach music and cooling
out. At home, I plan on doing a
lot of hunting and fishing, and
mentally preparing myself for the
season ahead
un
VIRG1N1
;EACH. Va. (I
Team Sun Bnt
ttled to take
.rightsville Bej
4.C. -Atlantic
4.C leg of thc
CU 1000 sailboat
,ut Team Austj
cmained the ov
cader toda
The catamaran
rom Florida!
Virginia Beach
scheduled to r
i 10 am toda
Team Sun Bntci
the pole positK
boats were sdM
to depart from
uc Beach. N C
route to Cape
tcras. N.C I
miles aw as
The race begaj
week and is ch
to end Frida)
Team Sun B.
was clocked in ai
p.m. Tue�da'
Sneva Celebrates First Indy Title
AUTO RACING: Tom Sneva
ended his years of frustration at
the Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Sunday when he captured the 67th
Indianapolis 500. Sneva had
finished second at Indy three
times in the last six years.
The 35-year old former junior
high school principal passed Al
Unser Sr. and Al Unser Jr. on the
191st lap and crossed the finish
line with an average speed of
162.117 mph, the second-fastest
Indy 500 ever.
Of the 33 cars that began the
race, only 13 finished. The
44-year old Unser finished se-
cond, followed by Rick Mears,
Geoff Brabham and Kevin
Cogan. For the victory, Sneva
took home $300,000.
Sports Update
BASEBALL: With one-fourth
of the major-league baseball
season completed, the Los
Angeles Dodgers, St. Louis Car-
dinals, Toronto Blue Jays and
California Angels are leading
their respective divisions. The two
teams with the top overall records
� the Dodgers and the Atlanta
Braves � have resumed their bat-
tle of 1982, when the Braves won
the division on the last day of the
season.
The Dodgers, minus Steve
Garvey and Ron Cey, are off to
their best start in six years, with a
record of 31-14 as of Tuesday.
The performance of the pitching
staff, especially Fernando Valen-
zuela and reliever Dave Stewart,
has resulted in a major league-
leading 2.94 earned-run average.
The next closest team, the Mon-
treal Expos, carries a 3.26 ERA.
Valenzuela has given up only
six hits and has not allowed a run
in his last two outings. The
22-year old left-hander has pitch-
ed four shutouts this season to go
along with his 6-2 record.
HOCKEY: The New York
Islanders won their fourth con-
secutive Stanley Cup last week
with a four-game sweep of the Ed-
monton Oilers. The Islanders used
a tight defense to stop the Oilers'
powerful scoring attack led by
Wayne Gretzky, who failed to
score a goal in the series.
The Islanders now join the
Boston Celtics (1959-66), New
York Yankees (1936-39 and
1949-54) and the Montreal Cana-
diens (1956-60 and 1976-79) as the
only major pro franchises to win
four or more consecutive titles.
BOXING: "Marvelous" Mar-
vin Hagler continued his
dominance of the middleweight
division on Friday night as he
knocked out the WBC's leading
contender, Wilford Scypion, at
2:47 of the fourth round.
Hagler, who turned 29 last
week, has now successfully
defended his title seven straight
times � all by knockout. Possible
opponents for Hagler's next fight
include former lightweight and
welterweight champ Roberto
Duran.
Patty Sheehan fired a record-
breaking, nine-under-par 63 Sun-
day to capture the LPGA Corning
Classic in Corning, N.Y.
Sheehan's 72-hole total of 272
shattered the previous record of
280, which had been held by
Sheehan and Sandra Spuzich.
The victory in the Corning
Classic was the fifth in Sheehan's
three-year career on the LPGA
tour.
LACROSSE: Syracuse Univer-
sity scored nine unanswered goals
in an eight-minute span Saturday
afternoon to lead the Orangemen
to a come-from-behind 17-16 vic-
tory over Johns Hopkins in the
NCAA championship game.
It was the first lacrosse title for
Syracuse, who replaced defending
champion North Carolina.
Turner Slides Under Slander Suit
COLLEGE BASEBALL:
ECAC-South member James
Madison defeated Delaware 6-5
on Sunday to propel the Dukes in-
to the College World Series in
Omaha, Neb.
By defeating Delaware, JMU
captured the NCAA Eastern
Regional and a berth in the Scries,
which gets underway Friday.
ATLANTA (UPI) � Ted
Turner figures the $17 million
slander suit brought against him
by sports agent Bucky Woy and
thrown out by a federal jury was a
waste of time.
A four-man, two-woman jury
deliberated for only an hour Tues-
day before ruling in Turner's
favor regarding Woy's claim that
the Atlanta Braves owner defam-
ed his character when he accused
him of being responsible for the
1979 death of Braves general
manager Bill Lucas.
"It was certainly a waste of my
time and a lot of other peoples'
time said Turner who was ab-
sent from the courtroom when the
verdict was announced. "I told
the truth and when you tell the
truth it's not slander. I'm happy.
What I did was tell the truth and
the jury agreed. The person
slandered was Bill Lucas and not
Bucky Woy
Turner made his accusation
against Woy in June 1979, a
month after the death of Lucas
from brain hemorrhage and car-
diac arrest after a ruptured
aneurysm in his neck. He con-
tended charges Woy made against
Lucas, including calling him a
"liar during bitter contract
negotiations on the 1979 contract
for Braves third baseman Bob
Horner, was a contributing factor
in the death.
The suit, which was filed three
years ago, went to the jury Tues-
day afternoon, on the seventh day
of the trial, after attorneys for
both sides made their final
arguments.
U.S. District Court Judge
Horace Ward had instructed the
jurors to first decide if Turner
acted with malice when he accused
Woy of killing Lucas and should
consider a monetary award only if
it felt there was malice.
Woy, claiming Turner damaged
his reputation and hampered his
business as a sports agents, had
asked for S5 million in actual
damages and $12 million in
punitive damages.
"We're extremelv happy said
Turner's attorney Dennis Webb
"I think this was the right verdict.
1 believed it was going our wa the
entire time. I felt the evidence was
very powerful on our side
I
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Church Announces Additions
GOLF: Hale Irwin shot a three-
under-par 69 Sunday to capture
the $460,000 Memorial Tourna-
ment in Dublin, Ohio. Irwin chip-
ped in a 25-footer from the fringe
of the 16th green for a birdie that
gave the former U.S. Open champ
a one-shot victory.
Ben Crenshaw and third-round
leader David Graham finished in a
tie for second at 282. Irwin, who
started the day four strokes
behind Graham, carried home
$72,000 for the victory.
HALL OF FAME: Former
Duke basketball star Jeff Mullins
heads a group of five men who
have been chosen for induction in-
to the North Carolina Sports Hall
Of Fame.
In addition to Mullins, the 1983
inductees include New York
Yankee executive Clyde King,
former major-league baseball
player Whitey Lockman, or-
thopedic surgeon Dr. Lenox
Baker and billiards champ Luther
"Wimpy" Lassiter.
ECU head soccer coach Robbie
Church, who is in the process of
preparing for his second year at
ECU, has announced that 19
recruits have indicated their inten-
tion of playing for the PUates next
season.
Two high school players from
New Jersey head the list of grant-
in-aid players. Goalie Grant Pear-
son was named to the top 33 list of
soccer players in the state, as well
as all-state. His teammate, Doug
Patmore, is considered as one of
the top sweepers in the high
school ranks.
Other recruits expected to be
wearing Pirate uniforms are: Alan
Smith, Atlanta; Brian Colgan,
Bowie, Md David Henenlofter,
Nassau Junior College; George
Podgorney, Winston-Salem;
Michael McKeown, Deer Park,
N.Y Charlie Thompson, Atlan-
ta; Matt Evans, Simsberry, Ct
Charlie Twitty, Raleigh; Palmier
Grossi, Broadview Heights. Ohio;
Marc Kloeckewer, Yallev Springs,
N.Y.
David Koon, Petersburg. Ya
Kevin Bigley, Wall. N.J Creig
Crenshaw, Wilmington; Shahab
Farivar, Stafford, Ya Robert
Anastasio, Lynbrook, NY Burv
Ellis, Falls Church, Ya Gler
Scharder, Petersburg, Ya.
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with
B
Olympian Signs With Pirates
ECU head swim coach Rick
Kobe has announced the committ-
ment of three additional swim-
mers for the 1983-84 season, in-
cluding an Olympic participant.
Chema Larranaga from Lima,
Peru, holds two Peruvian national
records in distance freestyle events
and was a participant in the 1980
Moscow Olympics.
At Daytona Community Col-
lege in Daytona Beach, Fla Lar-
ranaga was a junior college cham-
pion in the 500 and 1650
freestyles. In 1982, he was runner-
up for Junior College Swimmer of
the Year.
Kobe also announced the sign-
ing of Todd Sipowski of Ft.
Pierce, Fla. and Jon Mathieson of
Tuckahoe, N.Y.
These three signees bring the
number of Pirate swimming
recruits to 20.
IIMIIttlllltilll'tH
ECU sophomore Doug Kelly shows how he maneuvers against a 1M2 opponent. Joining Kelly will be 19
top recruits who just announced their intentions to play soccer with the Pirates.
Pitt On '84 Schedule
The ECU football program
continued its rise into the ranks of
the college football powerhouses
with the recent scheduling of the
University of Pittsburgh in 1984
The Pirates will face the
nationally-ranked Panthers on
October 6.
The 1984 schedule now includes
Florida State, Temple, N.C.
State, Southern Mississippi, and
Southwestern Louisiana.
"As we continue to project our
future in football, the addition of
teams like Pittsburgh are very
much our desire said Athletic
Director Ken Karr. "Pittsburgh,
like East Carolina, is a major in-
dependent, which makes for a
good situation.
"Further, Pittsburgh is a na-
tionally noted team that will pro-
vide us with the very best competi-
tion. And if we desire to be among
the nation's better Division I-A
clubs, we must play the best
The Temple and Southern
Mississippi games will be played
in East Carolina's Ficklen
Stadium in 1984.
Informal Recreation
SWIMMING POOLS
MEMORIAL
MonWedFri 7 a.m8 a.m. Mon-Fri
Mon-Fri 11:30 a.m1 p.m. SatSun
WEIGHT ROOMS
MINGES
4p.m 7 p.m.
1 p.m 5 p.m.
MEMORIAL
According to ECU Athletic Director Dr. Ken Karr, ECU mast play
teams like Pittsburgh If it is to be considered among one of the better
Division I-A teams in the country.
McGuigan Resigns Post
ECU Lady Pirate track coach Carolina program two years ago.
Pat McGuigan has announced her She came to ECU from Memphis
resignation, effective immediate- State,
ly. McGuigan has resigned to pur-
McGuigan, a native of Down- sue a doctorate degree from the
ington. Pa and a graduate of University of Maryland in exercise
Pittsburgh, joined the East physiology.
Mon-Thurs
Fri
SatSun
8 a.m9 p.m.
8 a.m5 p.m.
1 p.m 5 p.m.
MEMORIAL
GYM FREE PLAY
MINGES
Mon-Thurs 3 p.m 7 p.m.
FriSatSun Closed
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT (MG 115)
Mosl
true
deli
piz;
all tl
Mon-Thurs11 a.m9 p.m.Mon-Thurs
Fri11 a.m 5 p.m.Fri
SatSun1 p.m5 p.m.SatSun
RACQUETBALL
RESERVATIONS
11 a.m9 p.m.
11 a.m 5 p.m.
1 p.m 5 p.m.
TRAINING ROOM
(MGU1)
Mon-Fri
11:30 a.m3 p.m. Mon-Thurs 10- 12a.m 2- 3:30
I
?
- it � ,J� �'I Hnnnni'lW'W11 "
'�"� � ��� .�-





Page 8
ertime
I i of United States Softball Associa-
ihat tion. 1 practice every day, and we
in play games on the weekends. 1
also uork part-time at Church's
"I Fried Chicken
m Fran Hooks, former basketball
out guard: "I've been working out
tomi five days a week, and I'll be an in-
structor for two weeks at Cathy
batt ndruzzi's basketball camp. I
ling, graduate at the end of the sum-
of rrei. and hope to be a student
ike teacher at ECU in the fall
law a
leers John Flod, football center:
Ices "I've been relaxing, listening to
I'm good beach music and cooling
ion out. At home. I plan on doing a
lot of hunting and fishing, and
:Her mentally preparing myself for the
the season ahead
lander Suit
and
pson
not
i
a
ed
h n-
a
.1 c
act
II oh
fcree
tes-
rtr
I
arguments.
I S. District Court Judge
Horace Ward had instructed the
jurors to first decide if Turner
acted with malice when he accused
s o of killing Lucas and should
consider a monetary award only if
il felt there was malice.
W ov, claiming Turner damaged
his reputation and hampered his
business as a sports agents, had
asked for $5 million in actual
damages and $12 million in
punitive damages.
"We're extremeh happy said
Turner's attorney Dennis Webb.
I think this was the right verdict.
1 believed it was going our way the
entire time. I felt the evidence was
very powerful on our side
A dditions
poug
of
i eh
ta; Matt Evans, Simsberry, Ct
Charlie Twittv, Raleigh; Palmier
Grossi, Broadview Heights, Ohio;
Marc Kloeckewer, Vallev Springs,
NA
Dawd Koon, Petersburg, Va
Kevin Bigley, Wall, N.J Creig
Crenshaw, Wilmington; Shahab
Farivar, Stafford, Va Robert
Anastasio. Lynbrook, N.Y Burv
Ellis, Falls Church, Va Glen
Scharder. Petersburg, Va.

?
'54
jtSf
' :4Fv. Jfli � :
1982 opponent. Joining Kelly will be 19
Ith the Pirates.
al Recreation
NG POOLS
m. Mon-Fri
.m. Sat Sun
HT ROOMS
MINGES
4p.m7p.m.
1 p.m 5 p.m.
m.
m.
m.
MINGES
Mon-Thurs 3 p.m7 p.m.
Fri SatSun Closed
EQUIPMENT
CHECK-OUT (MG 115)
m.
m.
m.
Mon-Thurs
Fn
SatSun
11 a.m. -9p.m.
11 a.m 5 p.m.
1 p.m5 p.m.
TRAINING ROOM
(MG1U)
m. Mon-Thurs 10-12 a.m 2-3:30
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE l i�i f
Sun Britches Sail
VIRGINIA
BEACH, Va. (UPI)
Team Sun Britches
battled to take the
Wrightsville Beach,
N.CAtlantic Beach,
M.C leg of the Wor-
rell 1000 sailboat race
but Team Australia
remained the overall
leader today.
The catamaran race
from Florida to
Virginia Beach was
scheduled to resume
at 10 a.m. today with
Team Sun Britches in
the pole position as
boats were scheduled
to depart from Atlan-
tic Beach, N.C en
route to Cape Hat-
teras, N.C about 83
miles away.
The race began last
week and is scheduled
to end Friday.
Team Sun Britches
was clocked in at 3:26
p.m. Tuesday at
Atlantic Beach after
waving Wrightsville
Beach about 10 a.m
said Worrell 1000
spokesman Richard
Moore at race control
m Virginia Beach.
Defending cham-
pion Team USA was
second at 3:27 p.m
followed by Team
Rudee's at 3:28:14
p.m.
They were followed
by point leader and
1981 champion Team
Australia (3:28:57),
Team Virginia Beach
(3:31), Team Holland
(3:37), Team Canada
(3:38), Team France
(3:39), Team
Tidewater (3:40) and
Team Belk (3:50).
The boats were
scheduled to hit the
cape about 7 p.m
but the race could go
faster if winds im-
prove, Moore said.
"If they have good'
winds, (they) could
get in much earlier
than that Moore
said.
The lowest
cumulative score will
win the catamaran
race. The winners of
each leg pick up only
three-quarters of a
point, while last place
picks up 11 points.
Team Australia
leads the squads in the
point standings with
16 followed by
Team USA with 31.
Team Rudee's was
third with 34, follow-
ed by Team Sun Brit-
ches (36s), Team
Virginia Beach (37),
Team France (61),
Team Canada (62),
Team Holland (63),
Team Tidewater (78)
and Team Belk (82).
Sneaker Sam Sez
ECU baseball coach Hal Baird has anoounced the signing of pitcher
Mike Christopher.
Volleyball Set For Ac-
tion
With seven teams
and almost ideal play-
ing weather, In-
tramural Volleyball is
rolling right along.
This bumping action
is conducted on two
courts within the
"mall" on the ECU
campus.
Even though two
regular-season games
remain, playoff ac-
tion is set to begin on
June 7. Several teams
are showing im-
pressive pre-season
play. Some of the
favorites include. One
Last Snatch, Doc Joes
and GMR All Stars.
When the summer-
time boredom hits
you, come on out to
the mall and catch this
smashing action.
Putt-Putters Roll
OB
Eight people braved
the fierce, stormy
weather to turn in
scores for the In-
tramural Putt-Putt
Tournament. Scores
ranged from the 80s
into the 60s for this
18-holc extravaganza.
When all scores were
calculated, Neil Ed-
wards stroked away
with the crown with a
score of 62. Con-
gratulations to all par-
ticipants. The
Intramural-
Recreational Services
would like to extend
gratitude to Putt-Putt
Golf and Games for
their help with this
tournament.
Canoe Down The
River
The Intramural
Department is spon-
soring its third annual
canoe race on Thurs-
day, June 2 from 4 to
6 p.m. There are both
solo and tandem divi-
sions. Canoes, pad-
dles, life jackets,
transportation and
sodas are all provid-
ed. Registration
deadline is Wednes-
day at 5:00 p.m. A
maximum of 20 peo-
ple will be allowed to
enter.
&
xxzx&
.SUB
$1
I
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I
I
I
I
.00 OFF
ny Foot Long Sub or Salad'
with Purchase of a Medium Drink
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
1C Greenville Blvd.
754-3023 � ?4 MRS.
PLAZA SHELL
24 hour Towing Service
I -Haul Rentals
Available
I
I
I
I
Good thru June lst-June 8th !
758-7979
I
I
I
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l
I
ANNOUNCING � . .
SATURDAY OFFICE
HOURS
For your convenience we will be open
for examination and optical services
every Saturday from 9 00 am to 100
p.m. Affordable fees, quick, accurate
service. Convenient Hours. Seeing is
Believinq.
DR PETER W HOLL1S
P
A
P
A
�� Were

&
r
$

I

&� 1B
'
Offc
208 E. Fifth Street
Greenville, N.C. .
miiiiimiHiimtiiuHHiimiiiiiiimiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM
I BUCK'S GULF 1
CWCAKOEfflER
O.O P.A.
TiPTONANMtx 2J8GREENVH.Lt BlvO
756-9404
$
20
OFF
Any Comptot Pwcriptwn
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Fitting
Must B� rV�nt�d At
TtawOtOrdw
Otnsr Discounts Or Coupons
Oo Not Apply
2704 E. 10th St. 752-3228
It

HAPPY HOUR 8:30-10:00
FREE DRAFT
PRIVATE CLUL MEMBERS & GUEST

8
:
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756-0088
mmmmmm
Across from Villa Roma,
We do minor repairs, tune ups, brake
alignments, and air conditioner maintainance.
We have a road wrecker service and do
service calls. 24 hr. number is 758-1033.
Keep your car looking good
Free car wash with each fill up!
We rent Jartran trucks and trailers for your
moving needs.
Come by today for your complete car needs.
"We pull for ECU not from"
mtiiiiiiiiiiiflitfiiiiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiifiiiiiifiifiiiifliiitiiuiiiiiiiiiittiitttifltiiiittiiiiiiiniiiT
Pizza inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas
Now Being Delivered
Most delivery pizzas tack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
Pi ZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY:
CALL 758-26 Greenville Blvd.
Are
cinema V
XTAR.WARX.
RETURNS
PITT-PLAZA S OPPING CENTER
Starring
Steve Martin
N-O-W SHOWING
DAIL YA T
2:00-4:30-7:00-9:30
STARTS
FRIDA Y
iMMiMtert
R Shows 3:WS:i0- 7:10-9:00
AR.WARX
RETURN VMEDI
e�4rt
'Will be
titled4h
STARTS FRIDAY
STEWART
ft ivmirr
TMf ATMS

ttfftttt
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MARK HAMILL � HARRISON FORD � CARRIE FISHER
BILLY DEE WILLIAMS � ANTHONY DAN�LS.c
c��D�W�HWWSt. KENNY M�IBMMI HUNK0Z
.� RICHARD MARQUAND � HOWARD KAZANJIAN
. LAWRENCE KASDAN - GEORGE LUCAS
,�GEORGE LUCASJOHN WILLIAMS
SORRYNO
Passes of Any Kind Accepted
No Bargain Matinee
-hNo Discount Tickets Accepted
11 YEARS LATER,
NORMAN BATES
IS COMING HOME
, wmmm �





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 1. 1983
Pirate Athletes
To Compete In
June Triathlon
East Carolina
University will be well
represented in the
Youth Unlimited
Triathlon to be held at
High Point, N.C. this
Saturday, June 4. The
group competing
from ECU consists of
Robert Morrison,
professor of
Chemistry; Ross
Reaves, graduate stu-
dent; Maureen Fox,
administrative assis-
tant; Jamie Moul,
assistant director
Intramural-
Recreational Services.
The group has been
training extensively
for the past two mon-
ths and all except for
Moul have par-
ticipated in North
Carolina's premier
triathlon event � the
Wilmington
Triathlon, which has
as its, distance a one-
mile swim, a 42-mile
bike ride and a
10-mile run. The High
Point distances will be
one-half mile swim,
20-mile bike race and
a six-mile run.
Robert Fox, who
has finished four
other triathlons, and
Robert Morrison,
who is a veteran of
two of the grueling
events, both train
throughout the year.
Morrison, with a
record of ten
marathons and many
other races of varying
distances, is one of
the top age-group
runners in eastern
North Carolina.
Fox has run 12
marathons and over
80 other road races.
In training for the
triathlon, both Fox
and Morrison, during
a typical week, log ap-
proximately 20 miles
on the bike prior to
arriving at work at
8:00 a.m run from
5-10 miles each day at
noon, swim one-half
mile or more follow-
ing work in the even-
ing, bike another 5-10
miles and end the day
with a 2-4 mile run.
Saturdays are
reserved for either a
long run of over 10
miles or a race nor-
mally followed by a
15-20 mile bike ride.
On Sundays, the
group goes for a long
bike ride of 50-70
miles in length. Fox
indicates that by the
end of a week all are
dragging a bit but the
overall feeling of be-
ing in good physical
condition keeps
everyone going. They
all enjoy participating
together in the
triathlons.
ECU is truly
represented by an
outstanding group of
dedicated and
disciplined athletes.
Classifieds
FOR SALE: TABLE and chair
�� in good condition. MUST
SELL. Call WMM.
BEACH COTTAGE FOR RENT
ATNorth Myrtle Boach. Two
bedroom, sloops six. Rents by
weekend or week. Call 77f K0�
WANTED: FEMALE TO
SHARE I bedroom apartment
at Eastbrook tor tall and spring
semester next year. Sto rent per
month, 11 utilities; non-
smoker, please. Call 71-702
after 5:30 p.m.
TYPING. TERM, THESIS
Manuscript. Call NINA after 3
p.m , 7S4-M13.
� � � � �
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
UBS 60 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information call
132 0535 (Toft Free Number
(00 221 JSaa) between � AM
and S p.m. Weekdays.
RALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
� H West V rg�n St.
Sdieig
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion a camr- � ten.
DEPEND ON nor the s aot- e e- r ,
"e ���� en o"i"� en-nngCen'ef Course ors are
:o ice jcv ana n.gnt to support ana ur.a4
s'ano vx our safety comfort and prvacy are
assured Dy the caring staft of the Piemmg Center
SERVICES: � Tuesaav - Saturaav ADortton Af
PO'rtmentsB 1Sf & 2ndTr1me5ter Aoortions up to
19 eens � free Pregnancv Tests � very Early
Pregnancy Tests � An mc y jb Fees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-55SC OAY Off NIGHT
Health care, counseling
ana education for wo-
er or a11 ages CENTER
THE FLEMING
Metal Rimless V
Frames
with Single Vision
Lenses
$44�
S7S.K
Complete
GLASS OR
PLASTIC
LENSES IN
ANY USABLE
PRESCRIPTION
(Tints Extra) (No Other Coupons Applicable)
THIS AD MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER
(OFFER 0000THRU JwieJO.IftS
GREENVILLE STORE ONLY
pucians
J18 MRm Commons
Across From Doctors rari
Open! AM-SN P M. MonFrt.
Peothor Klrtley Olipwiitnrj Opttclin
CALL US FOR AN
EVE EXAMINATION
WITH THE OOCTOft
OF YOUR CHOICE
Holly Firms - 6ra.lt A
These prices good thru
Saturday, June 4, 1983
VlViote
Lb.
USDA Ctiaiee B.tf Ca�k - B�ml�
Chuck
Roast
We Reserve The Right
To Limit Quantities
Each
USDA CiRict UmHi Pick
Cube
Steak
JlMtt
Western
Cantaloupes
2 liter
Pks �' 12 -12 Ox. Cast
Milwaukee
3 Liter � Ra.ee, Baraaser Chaklis. Ret
Taylor
Calif Cellars
Pk8 �f 12 - 12 0: Caas
$troh's
�r
22 Ouaes
Why Pay M 39
Qatrt
6.S0zLt.CaaakTaaa laOil
Hay Pay 1.29
Waif Pay M 09
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Wr-M
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14 Ox. Caa � Ckffi fceflfeerNeriemeat
4i 0i. � Feee1 Tasra
Alpo Dog Food S Vegetable Oil 9m Cold Power

10 Oaaca
2
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49 0eaes
Jeno's Pizza B
VIS?
Half Uth� - Waits Usaee
Apple Juice
1$ Ot. Ctt F��4 In Meat Fits ft Caic.aa
v v
i u. r�t Tt�
Margarine Quarters

10 Ol. - ek.ikCll.iSi
PUSS N'Boots HUbbyUte Pineapple
DUCR
32 Ounee
Del Monte rP-e�
4 Pack- Crurin-n
Toilet
Tissue
WK Ps� 1 11
Hi '� Gills
Donald Duck
Orange Juice
Or :e
Why Pay M 19
?
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 1, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 01, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.270
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57558
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