The East Carolinian, May 25, 1983






Qtoe iEast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No. aj
Wednesday May 25,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5,000
Naso Unveils SGA Communications Network
By GREG RIDEOUT
cwi Editor
SGA President Paul Naso has a
plan. It's the same plan he had
during his campaign, and the
same one he wants to implement
now. "A communications net-
work Naso says, "that would
combat student apathy
From his office on the second
floor of Mendenhall Student
Center, Naso explained his
"three-pronged attack for getting
information about student
government to the student
Naso's attack begins with the
media on campus. He said he's
working now to get radio time on
WZMB and a column in The East
Carolinian.
"The exposure of the
legislators Naso says, "would
give them a reason to care Naso
feels that getting the legislature to
care about what it is doing and
giving the members publicity are
the first steps to increasing com-
munication between the students
and the SGA.
Prong number two involves
what Naso calls formal connec-
tions. To get two-way com-
munication started, Naso believes
he and the legislators should get
out and talk to the students more.
This would involve, Naso said.
going to house council meetings.
He would like to see a profile of
all legislators printed and handed
out to their respective consti-
tuents.
The third and final prong is in-
formal contacts. Naso called this
"the person in the dorm who
knows everyone This person
could get information to the
whole dorm quickly. Naso feels if
he gets to know these people, he
could get news about the campus
out quicker.
What would Naso do with the
communications network once it
is set up? "A lot of things Naso
says with a smile. "There's so
Organizers Meet
much going on that the average
Joe doesn't know � we want to
get it to him.
"I want the legislature to do
more than just give money
away Naso said, explaining that
he sees the SGA as an all-
encompassing body responsive to
all the students needs.
Naso realizes the plan he envi-
sions is bold, and his ideas are
tempered by a dose of optimism.
He said there are three types of
students on campus � those who
already care, those who might
care and those who will never
care. He believes that the SGA,
through public forums within his
communications network, could
reach those people in the middle.
"I know I can't get them all, but I
can get some Naso said.
When Naso talks about
himself, he is actually talking
about his administration. He said
he plans to work closely with Tory
Russo and Mike Dixon, his prin-
cipal advisors.
Naso foresees leaving most of
the administrative work to Russo
and Dixon. This, Naso said,
would leave him the chance to do
what he thinks he does best � get-
ting the information out.
"The ultimate goal (of the net-
work) is unity Naso said.
Paul Naso
Striving for change
Approval Process Begun For PIRG
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Auisunt N�M Fdltor
Several students have formed
an executive organizing commit-
tee to actively work on
establishing a Public Interest
Research Group chapter at ECU.
PIRG is a national network of
student chapters founded by con-
sumer advocate Ralph Nader. The
group has chapters on college
campuses in 25 states and
Canada. Chapters work on
specific problems of consumer in-
terest in their area.
During his visit, Nader was en-
couraged by the interest that ECU
students, faculty members and ad-
ministration officials showed in
the PIRG concept. Nader sent a
field coordinator here in April
and as a result an executive
organizing committee formed and
has begun holding weekly
meetings.
"Personally, I think it's a great
organization said SGA Presi-
dent Paul Naso who attended the
PIRG's Monday committee
meeting. Naso said he supported
the idea of PIRG on ECU's cam-
pus as long as the group was able
to function independent of the na-
tional organization.
Members of the executive com-
mittee have assured Naso that if
established, the ECU-PIRG
chapter will respond to student
wishes and suggestions. Naso said
he would like to see a PIRG
chapter work "hand in hand"
with the SGA to reach a common
end that would benefit ECU
students.
"PIRG will be what the
students make it said Dan
Lucas, a political science student
who is acting president of the
PIRG executive organizing com-
mittee. "Everyone will get a
chance to get actively involved; as
actively involved as they choose
In the past, PIRG chapters have
done research in areas as diverse
as women's health care and bicy-
cle paths to larger environmental
issues such as pollution control
and nuclear power. According to
Lucas, one of the priorities of an
ECU-PIRG chapter would be to
prepare a student guide to Green-
ville to help students become more
familiar with the city. Lucas said
the guide could cover issues of
concern to students, such as a sec-
tion on price indexing.
"PIRG takes a problem or
something perceived as a problem
and studies it Lucas said.
"(PIRG) tries to reach some con-
clusions to solve the problem
Rick Brown, a history student
working with the organizing com-
mittee, pointed out that in many
cases students involved in PIRG
research projects are eligible for
course credit. Brown sees PIRG
offering students the opportunity
See, PIRG, Page 5
Board Denies 'Rebel' Editor Tuition
By GREG RIDEOUT
Nrw i- diior
GARY PATTERSON � ECU Photo Lab
The Media Board unanimously
approved a new chairman Mon-
day for the 1983-1984 academic
year. The board also voted not to
extend its policy of paying sum-
mer school tuition for media
heads to the editor of the Rebel.
Chairman Mark Niewald, a
senior political science major, said
he was pieased that he was elected
to the post. Niewald said he would
strive to make the Media Board
into what the guidelines of the
organization say it should be.
People Barricades
A supervisor oversees the installation of barricades next to the
bushes on Fifth Street. The iron fences are being constructed to
prevent students from shortcutting between the bushes.
Educators Hesitant
Education Savings Account Meets Death In Congress
(CPS) � President Ronald
Reagan's proposed Education
Savings Account � introduced to
encourage parents to save for
their children's college education
and initially hailed as a good idea
by college lobbyists � apparently
is a dead issue now.
The proposal is "going
nowhere, and has no chance of
ever going anywhere" in Congress
now, higher education lobbyists in
Washington say.
The plan would have allowed
people to put money away in a
special college account, and then
spare them taxes on the earnings
from the money set aside for col-
lege.
"There's simply no real en-
thusiastic support for it among
higher education groups reports
Eric Wentworth, vice president of
the Council for the Advancement
and Support of Education.
"Most people feel it offers little
incentive, and that if it passed it
could be used later by the Reagan
administration to justify further
reductions in financial aid he
adds.
President Reagan proposed the
Education Savings Account in
early February as part of his
1983-84 higher education budget.
At that time, rumors around
Washington had it that the ESA
would essentially be a carbon
copy of the popular Individual
Retirement Account, which
allows people to write off con-
tributions to the account and earn
tax-free interest on the money.
As it stands now, however, the
administration's ESA would pro-
vide tax-free earnings, but no tax
deductions for the amount con-
tributed.
"The plan just isn't acceptable
to most of the higher education
community because, although the
interest earned on the savings
would not be taxed, the contribu-
tions would be fully taxed. That's
just not enough incentive for most
people says Dennis Martin with
the National Association of Stu-
dent Financial Aid Advisors.
Reagan's ESA would allow an-
nual contributions of up to $1000
per child, and the money could be
used only towards tuition, room
and board.
But, accounts could only be
opened for children for use bet-
ween the ages of 18 and 26 ex-
plains Charlie Saunders,
legislative director for the
American Council on Education.
"And the program cuts off at
families whose income is over
$50,000 to $60,000 a year he
said.
"That not only cuts off the peo-
ple who would most likely be able
to save, but it eliminates many
See, EDUCATION, Page 5
The board's decision to not pay
the Rebel editor's summer school
tuition and to only pay for one
session for the Ebony Herald
editor came in a closed session.
Niewald said the board based its
decision on whether or not the
particular media was required to
operate for 12 months to complete
its job. The board felt the Rebel,
since it comes out only once a
year, is a nine-month job.
Rebel Editor Ellen Moore, who
attended the meeting to argue her
case, said she felt the board's deci-
sion was inconsistent. Moore felt
in order to put out the Rebel on
time (which it hasn't been the last
two years) she must work all year.
Moore, a sophomore from
Virginia, is paying her tuition for
the first session but will be unable
to be here second session because
of the board's decision.
Niewald said the editor of the
Ebony Herald, Donna Carvana,
would have her first session paid
for on the basis that she and her
staff planned to print a summer
edition in June. He said the
board's decision only applied for
this summer. The Ebony Herald is
normally considered a nine-month
media by the board.
This is the first year the Media
Board has granted to pay the sum-
mer school tuition of 12-month
media heads. Rudy Alexander,
director of Mendenhall Student
Center and a member of the
board, said the decision was made
because the board requires the
various heads to be full-time
students and be here during the
summer.
Alexander explained that while
most students are home during the
summer replenishing their funds,
the general managers of WZMB
and The East Carolinian, the head
photographer at the photo lab and
the Buccaneer editor are required
to be in school. At present, ex-
ecutive officers of the SGA and
the president of the Student
Union have their summer school
paid for also.
Other business conducted by
the Media Board included ad-
justing budgets for the various
media so they will be able to
operate until June.
Abortion, Capital Punishment Next
Topic For Student Soap Box Forum
Student organizers of the ECU
Soap Box Forum decided to con-
tinue the unusual event that began
in April because of the positive
response it received from students
and participants involved in the
initial forum.
A committee of students have
chosen the topic "What is pro-
life? (i.e. abortion, war,
euthanasia, capital punishment)"
for the next forum being held Fri-
day at 11:30 a.m. in front of the
Student Supply Store. Any person
having an opinion on the topic is
invited to speak from the podium
for up to five minutes. Anyone
wishing to rebutt may do so by re-
questing rebuttal time.
The Soap Box Forum was
originally modeled after "The
Pit a bricked-in area on UNC-
Chapel Hill's campus where
students can go to express their
opinions on any topic.
The Catholic Newman Center
agreed to act as sponsor for the
Soap Box Forum. Peer Minister
Mickey Skidmore has been coor-
dinating the selection of topics to
possibly be addressed during
future forum events.
"I don't think we can begin to
solve the problems of the world
unless we discuss them first
Skidmore said. "This (the Soap
Box Forum) is the perfect oppor-
tunity to do exactly that
The first Soap Box Forum was
held on April 21. Students and
faculty members were invited to
express their opinion on the role
of the United States government
in Nicaragua. Eight people opted
to speak on the subject. The pro-
gram, which lasted more than an
hour, attracted dozens of students
who gathered to listen to the
speakers. Some speakers were
booed and heckled during their
presentations, but all were ap-
plauded as they concluded.
Organizers of the Soap Box
Forum are considering making the
open-air discussions a regular
event on campus. They plan to use
the summer semesters as a trial
period to gauge student support
of the plan. If participation is
broad, the group will probably
continue the Soap Box Forum on
a monthly or semi-monthly basis
in the fall.
Skidmore said the topic "What
is pro-life?" was chosen because
of the broad and volatile nature of
the question which includes the
controversial issues of abortion,
capital punishment, war and
euthanasia.
The forum uses a microphone
to amplify the speaker's voices.
�AftY PATTCBSOM CCU
Volleyball On The Mall
These students are getting in shape for the upcoming intramaral volleyball tournament to be heM daring
first summer session. Spikes Hkc the one the young lady Is attempting can be seen on campus on any sunny
afternoon.
��TF"
t





5he lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 Nof aj
Wednesday May 25,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 5.000
Naso Unveils SGA Communications Network
?

By GREG RIDEOUT
Nr�t diior
SGA President Paul Naso has a
plan. It's the same plan he had
during his campaign, and the
same one he wants to implement
now. "A communications net-
work Naso says, "that would
combat student apathy
From his office on the second
floor of Mendenhall Student
Center, Naso explained his
"three-pronged attack for getting
information about student
government to the student
Naso's attack begins with the
media on campus. He said he's
working now to get radio time on
WZMB and a column in The East
Carolinian.
"The exposure of the
legislators Naso says, "would
give them a reason to care Naso
feels that getting the legislature to
care about what it is doing and
giving the members publicity are
the first steps to increasing com-
munication between the students
and the SGA.
Prong number two involves
what Naso calls formal connec-
tions. To get two-way com-
munication started, Naso believes
he and the legislators should get
out and talk to the students more.
This would involve, Naso said,
going to house council meetings.
He would like to see a profile of
all legislators printed and handed
out to their respective consti-
tuents.
The third and final prong is in-
formal contacts. Naso called this
"the person in the dorm who
knows everyone This person
could get information to the
whole dorm quickly. Naso feels if
he gets to know these people, he
could get news about the campus
out quicker.
What would Naso do with the
communications network once it
is set up? "A lot of things Naso
says with a smile. "There's so
Organizers Meet
much going on that the average
Joe doesn't know � we want to
get it to him.
"I want the legislature to do
more than just give money
away Naso said, explaining that
he sees the SGA as an all-
encompassing body responsive to
all :he students needs.
Naso realizes the plan he envi-
sions is bold, and his ideas are
tempered by a dose of optimism.
He said there are three types of
students on campus � those who
already care, those who might
care and those who will never
care. He believes that the SGA,
through public forums within his
communications network, could
reach those people in the middle.
"I know I can't get them all, but I
can get some Naso said.
When Naso talks about
himself, he is actually talking
about his administration. He said
he plans to work closely with Tory
Russo and Mike Dixon, his prin-
cipal advisors.
Naso foresees leaving most of
the administrative work to Russo
and Dixon. This, Naso said,
would leave him the chance to do
what he thinks he does best � get-
ting the information out.
"The ultimate goal (of the net-
work) is unity Naso said.
Paul Naso
Striving for change
Approval Process Begun For PIRG
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Assistant New, i diior
Several students have formed
an executive organizing commit-
tee to actively work on
establishing a Public Interest
Research Group chapter at ECU.
PIRG is a national network of
student chapters founded by con-
sumer advocate Ralph Nader. The
group has chapters on college
campuses in 25 states and
Canada. Chapters work on
specific problems of consumer in-
terest in their area.
During his visit, Nader was en-
couraged by the interest that ECU
students, faculty members and ad-
ministration officials showed in
the PIRG concept. Nader sent a
field coordinator here in April
and as a result an executive
organizing committee formed and
has begun holding weekly
meetings.
"Personally, 1 think it's a great
organization said SGA Presi-
dent Paul Naso who attended the
PIRG's Monday committee
meeting. Naso said he supported
the idea of PIRG on ECU's cam-
pus as long as the group was able
to function independent of the na-
tional organization.
Members of the executive com-
mittee have assured Naso that if
established, the ECU-PIRG
chapter will respond to student
wishes and suggestions. Naso said
he would like to see a PIRG
chapter work "hand in hand"
with the SGA to reach a common
end that would benefit ECU
students.
"PIRG will be what the
students make it said Dan
Lucas, a political science student
who is acting president of the
PIRG executive organizing com-
mittee. "Everyone will get a
chance to get actively involved; as
actively involved as they choose
In the past, PIRG chapters have
done research in areas as diverse
as women's health care and bicy-
cle paths to larger environmental
issues such as pollution control
and nuclear power. According to
Lucas, one of the priorities of an
ECU-PIRG chapter would be to
prepare a student guide to Green-
ville to help students become more
familiar with the city. Lucas said
the guide could cover issues of
concern to students, such as a sec-
tion on price indexing.
"PIRG takes a problem or
something perceived as a problem
and studies it Lucas said.
"(PIRG) tries to reach some con-
clusions to solve the problem
Rick Brown, a history student
working with the organizing com-
mittee, pointed out that in many
cases students involved in PIRG
research projects are eligible for
course credit. Brown sees PIRG
offering students the opportunity
See, PIRG, Page 5
Board Denies 'Rebel' Editor Tuition
GAR Y PATTERSON � ECU Photo Lab
By GREG RIDEOUT
News t diior
The Media Board unanimously
approved a new chairman Mon-
day for the 1983-1984 academic
year. The board also voted not to
extend its policy of paying sum-
mer school tuition for media
heads to the editor of the Rebel.
Chairman Mark Niewald, a
senior political science major, said
he was pleased that he was elected
to the post. Niewald said he would
strive to make the Media Board
into what the guidelines of the
organization say it should be.
People Barricades
A supervisor oversees the installation of barricades next to the
bushes on Fifth Street. The iron fences are being constructed to
prevent students from shortcutting between the bushes.
Educators Hesitant
Education Savings Account Meets Death In Congress
(CPS) � President Ronald
Reagan's proposed Education
Savings Account � introduced to
encourage parents to save for
their children's college education
and initially hailed as a good idea
by college lobbyists � apparently
is a dead issue now.
The proposal is "going
nowhere, and has no chance of
ever going anywhere" in Congress
now, higher education lobbyists in
Washington say.
The plan would have allowed
people to put money away in a
special college account, and then
spare them taxes on the earnings
from the money set aside for col-
lege.
"There's simply no real en-
thusiastic support for it among
higher education groups reports
Eric Wentworth, vice president of
the Council for the Advancement
and Support of Education.
"Most people feel it offers little
incentive, and that if it passed it
could be used later by the Reagan
administration to justify further
reductions in financial aid he
adds.
President Reagan proposed the
Education Savings Account in
early February as part of his
1983-84 higher education budget.
At that time, rumors around
Washington had it that the ESA
would essentially be a carbon
copy of the popular Individual
Retirement Account, which
allows people to write off con-
tributions to the account and earn
tax-free interest on the money.
As it stands now, however, the
administration's ESA would pro-
vide tax-free earnings, but no tax
deductions for the amount con-
tributed.
"The plan just isn't acceptable
to most of the higher education
community because, although the
interest earned on the savings
would not be taxed, the contribu-
tions would be fully taxed. That's
just not enough incentive for most
people says Dennis Martin with
the National Association of Stu-
dent Financial Aid Advisors.
Reagan's ESA would allow an-
nual contributions of up to $1000
per child, and the money could be
used only towards tuition, room
and board.
But, accounts could only be
opened for children for use bet-
ween the ages of 18 and 26 ex-
plains Charlie Saunders,
legislative director for the
American Council on Education.
"And the program cuts off at
families whose income is over
$50,000 to $60,000 a year he
said.
"That not only cuts off the peo-
ple who would most likely be able
to save, but it eliminates many
See, EDUCATION, Page 5
The board's decision to not pay
the Rebel editor's summer school
tuition and to only pay for one
session for the Ebony Herald
editor came in a closed session.
Niewald said the board based its
decision on whether or not the
particular media was required to
operate for 12 months to complete
its job. The board felt the Rebel,
since it comes out only once a
year, is a nine-month job.
Rebel Editor Ellen Moore, who
attended the meeting to argue her
case, said she felt the board's deci-
sion was inconsistent. Moore felt
in order to put out the Rebel on
time (which it hasn't been the last
two years) she must work all year.
Moore, a sophomore from
Virginia, is paying her tuition for
the first session but will be unable
to be here second session because
of the board's decision.
Niewald said the editor of the
Ebony Herald, Donna Carvana,
would have her first session paid
for on the basis that she and her
staff planned to print a summer
edition in June. He said the
board's decision only applied for
this summer. The Ebony Herald is
normally considered a nine-month
media by the board.
This is the first year the Media
Board has granted to pay the sum-
mer school tuition of 12-month
media heads. Rudy Alexander,
director of Mendenhall Student
Center and a member of the
board, said the decision was made
because the board requires the
various heads to be full-time
students and be here during the
summer.
Alexander explained that while
most students are home during the
summer replenishing their funds,
the general managers of WZMB
and The East Carolinian, the head
photographer at the photo lab and
the Buccaneer editor are required
to be in school. At present, ex-
ecutive officers of the SGA and
the president of the Student
Union have their summer school
paid for also.
Other business conducted by
the Media Board included ad-
justing budgets for the various
media so they will be able to
operate until June.
Abortion, Capital Punishment Next
Topic For Student Soap Box Forum
Student organizers of the ECU
Soap Box Forum decided to con-
tinue the unusual event that began
in April because of the positive
response it received from students
and participants involved in the
initial forum.
A committee of students have
chosen the topic "What is pro-
life? (i.e. abortion, war,
euthanasia, capital punishment)"
for the next forum being held Fri-
day at 11:30 a.m. in front of the
Student Supply Store. Any person
having an opinion on the topic is
invited to speak from the podium
for up to five minutes. Anyone
wishing to rebutt may do so by re-
questing rebuttal time.
The Soap Box Forum was
originally modeled after "The
Pit a bricked-in area on UNC-
Chapel Hill's campus where
students can go to express their
opinions on any topic.
The Catholic Newman Center
agreed to act as sponsor for the
Soap Box Forum. Peer Minister
Mickey Skidmore has been coor-
dinating the selection of topics to
possibly be addressed during
future forum events.
"I don't think we can begin to
solve the problems of the world
unless we discuss them first
Skidmore said. "This (the Soap
Box Forum) is the perfect oppor-
tunity to do exactly that
The first Soap Box Forum was
held on April 21. Students and
faculty members were invited to
express their opinion on the role
of the United States government
in Nicaragua. Eight people opted
to speak on the subject. The pro-
gram, which lasted more than an
hour, attracted dozens of students
who gathered to listen to the
speakers. Some speakers were
booed and heckled during their
presentations, but all were ap-
plauded as they concluded.
Organizers of the Soap Box
Forum are considering making the
open-air discussions a regular
event on campus. They plan to use
the summer semesters as a trial
period to gauge student support
of the plan. If participation is
broad, the group will probably
continue the Soap Box Forum on
a monthly or semi-monthly basis
in the fall.
Skidmore said the topic "What
is pro-life?" was chosen because
of the broad and volatile nature of
the question which includes the
controversial issues of abortion,
capital punishment, war and
euthanasia.
The forum uses a microphone
to amplify the speaker's voices.
�AKY PATTCRSOM � KCV
Volleyball On The Mall
These students are getting in shape for the upcoming intramural volleyball tournament to be held daring
first summer session. Spikes like the one the young lady Is attempting can he seen on campus on aay sanay
afternoon.
mj� �i�
-
?. � 4&fc�.�







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25, 1983
-Jp�

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ork. m the Lutheran Camp in
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qiams as well as canoeing,
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SI David's Church, v A 22652
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? 30 pm 108 Jarvis Dorm
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every night l Fletcher For
Tiore information contact Todd
108 Jarvis, Sheiia 157 Jarvis ano
icott 111 Fletcher
STUDENTS MAKE
A DIFFERENCE
If you are a motivated in
dividual who wishes to help seek
solutions to consumer and en
vironmental problems through
research and advocacy, then
North Carolina Public interest
Research Group iNC PIRG) is
tor you. It is a student group
researching issues such as Con
sumer Protection
Environmental Quality
Students' Rights Government
Accountability Renewable
Energy Civil Rights NC PIRG
has in the past fought foi North
Carolina student's rights,
documented the danger of
nuclear cargo transportation
through the state, and most
recently making the student
dratted Generic Drug Generic
Substitution Bill a law An ECU
PIRG is now being formed
PIRG needs your support Get
together with other students
concerned with these issues For
more details call Eliza Godwin
at 752 1748
SOULS
ELECTION
Anyone interested in running
souls office next semester con
'act Barbara at 758 9550
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven
ture s Dive Cozumel. Mexico on
'he beautiful Yucatan peninsula
Aug 3 1983 to Aug 10, 1983
Group tnp for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving, meals
lodging and air fare from
Raleigh Non divers welcome
Call Ray Scharf at 757 6441
BINGO�ICECREAM
PARTY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a
BingoIce Cream Party this
Tuesday. May 24. 1983 at 7 00
pm in the Mendenhaii Student
Center Multi Purpose Room. All
ECU students, faculty, staff,
their dependents and guests are
welcome Admission is still only
25 cents Eight types of Bingo
games will be played. Try your
luck at Bingo, eat delicious ice
cream, and have some fun!
Following is a schedule for the
summer BingoIce Cream Par
lies All parties are held at 7:00
pm m the Multi Purpose Room
Tuesday, May 24, 1983, Tues
day, May 30, 1983 Tuesday,
June 7 1983. Tueday, June 14,
1983
BINGO ICECREAM
The Department of Univeesity
unions is supporting their se
cond Summer Bingo Ice Cream
Party on Tuesday, May 31 1983
at 7 00 p.m m the Mendenhaii
Student Center Multi Purpose
Room All ECU students, facul
ty, staff, their dependents and
guests are welcome Admission
is 25 cents Eat delicious ice
cream, enjoy the air condition
mg. play bingo, and hopefully
wm prues Eight different bingo
games will be played Bring a
friend!
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Take a study break Come to a
Bible Study: discussion, intor
mative. and devotional A time
for Christian fellowship and
spiritual atmosphere 8 30pm
on Monday nights at 108 Jarvis
Anyone is welcome to come
NOBS
Jewlery Repair
custom crafting a
fair prices
guaranteed work
Bring This Ad for j
20OFF
14K Chain Repairs j
by Les Jewlery j
12(1 E. 5th Street. 758-22 7 '
10-5 Tues Sat. f
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
11018 Pregnancy Test, Oirttt
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information call
832 05)5 (Toll Free Number
800-221 251) between � A.M
and 5 P.M Weekdays
RALEIOHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
? 17 West V '���� St.
BateiS
Thursday is
College Nite
THIS WEEK
ONLY
AH Premium Cans
35 c

75
9:00-11:00 11:00-2:00
Limit 2 per purchase
I

ADM. $1.00
Come Early

$1.00 off Racket stringing with this coupon
(ONE COUPON
PRE MED STUDENTS
The Kaplan Course, a
preparatory corse for the
MCAT, will be taught at ECU
this summer beginning the last
week in June This course has
been proven to raise MCAT
scores by as much as 2 to 3
points We need 20 interested
persons to sign up in order for
the service to be at ECU this
summer The course is once a
week for 8 weeks Anyone in
terested must signup in the
� ology office or call the Biology
club at 757 6286 or 758 6775 for
more information A deposite
should be sent in within 2 weeks
Due to limited space, we can
nont reserve your seat without a
deposit information packets ex
plaining the course curriculum
are available in the main
Biology office
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
Love brutally humiliated and
destroyed a world of stagnant
possibilities created by the false
fathers who built and tolerated
the Auschweitrs and Vietnams
of history, those who have par
ticipated in the torture
chambers of the ecclesiastical
inquisitions and then forgotten
without remorse This is the
state of affairs that cries out to
us, that plagues our consciences
and demands to be challenged
If you are ready to make a com
mittment to justice if you are
ready to begin building a new
kind of society without violence,
poverty, and alienation we need
you Come to the meeting of the
Greenville Peace Committee at
610 S Elm st at 7 00 p.m. every
Friday night, or phone 748 4906
for more information
J
PAPER SIGNS ARTIST
Mark Barker, a multi talented
jock, scholar, and artist has
signed a three month contract
with the East Carolinian.
Barker's agent informed The
production manager at the
newspaper that his client would
only be available to work on
Tuesday nights which happens
to be when the weekly edition of
the East Carolinian is published.
The terms of the contract were
undisclosed to the press, but in
side information has revealed
that Barker's salary could be in
the six digit range Barker was
seen today at the local Mercedes
dealer putting a down payment
on a 1983 midnight black
Mercedes 300SD Turbo
diesel It's great being in the
newspaper business
Writers Needed
Apply In Person
At The East Carolinian
Tuesday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
At The Old South Building
Across From Joyner Library

�:��:�����
i ' I
HiIIIin
DID
YOU
.GET,
Vours
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abobtion a v � �&�
DEPEND ON. hoc mat s Kae e .� -1 ,
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SERVICES � Tuesaav - Saturaav Acvortion
DomtmentsB 1st & 2na Tr-meef Apoftionsup to
1S yVeeks � Free Pregnancv Tests � very Early
Pregr-ancv Tests � Atlnc s j& Fees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 781 55SC DAY OB NIGHT �
Health care counseling TUC C CM I tAf"
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HAPPY HOUR 8:30-10:00
FREE DRAFT
PRIVATE CLUB-MEMBERS & GUEST
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membership special for the summer. �
months for $135 or 4 months for $1651
The ALAMO
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HOURS 11:00om-6:00pm MONSAT.
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Converse leather shoes $36
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� beside Foodtown. �
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Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery
Weds. The Fabulous Kays from 8:00-12:00
AU Lady Members Free AU Sight Doors open at 5:30
Ladies you know happy hour 2 for 1
H
IllHiS: Ladies Lockout
Happy hour 8:30- 10:00pm
ifiini
�i Closed
Beach review with WRQR'SKirk Williams
Ladies free from 8:00-10:00pm
Happy hour 8:00- 10:00pm
We have an all new menu featuring
steaks, sandwiches, stuffed potatoes and much more.
BUCK'S GULF
2704 E. 10th St. 752-3228
Across from Villa Roma,
We do minor repairs, tune ups, brake
alignments, and air conditioner maintainance.
We have a road wrecker service and do
service calls. 24 hr. number is 758-1033.
Keep your car looking good
Free car wash with each fill up!
We rent Jartran trucks and trailers for your
moving needs.
Come by today for your complete car needs.
u
a
We pull for ECU not from
I
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Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
.CALL 7S8-2�6 Greenville Blvd.
Legis
RALEIGH, N C
(UPI) A bl�
limiting the length of
legislative sessions to
75 days over a two-
year penod passed its
final Senate test Tues-
day and was sent to
the House.
The measure, which
was introduced at the
request of Lt. Gov
James C. Green,
cleared on a 35-12
vote.
But it could face a
difficult time in the
House, where Speaker
Liston Ramsev.
D-Madison, has in-
dicated he opposes the
bill because it ould
hurt the orderly
operation of the
General Assembly.
Ramsey has endors-
ed a proposal that
woul
legisj
held
year!
abouj
than!
Janui
Tl
now
Jan
numl
regull
abouj
returi
folloj
short!
limit!
ters
TH
pos
Sen
"Gei
D-DJ
limn
sionsl
days
pern
Raleig
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
Some have referred
to it as a "moral
thunderclap" while
others have accused
the U.S. Conference
of Catholic Bishops
of supporting the
Soviet Union.
Never before has a
group of Catholic
bishops caused so
much clamor like the
did earlier this month
when they voted over-
whelmingly to sup-
port a document call-
ing on the world's
nuclear powers to hah
the expansion of their
nuclear arsenals.
The bishops voted
to approve the third
draft of their
44,000-word pastoral
letter, "The
Challenge of Peace
The work on the
document required
two years of study.
Catholics number
about 50.000
Americans and repre-
sent the nation's mos:
populous denomina-
tion. Bishop F
Joseph Gossman was
the representative
from the Diocese of
Raleigh at the
Chicago meeting that
approved the final
draft.
Gossman called the
letter a teaching docu-
ment meant to
stimulate thought and
discussion of the
pea
nucli
issu
G(
W'OUII
the
some
the
the
taket
ear
n uc
issue
I
been
once I
wha:
feel
�� ergj
bre,
I
Gos
"Cas
said
mon
can
I
'hat
inc bl
tar:
thes
Deer.
our
per:
thml
any:
G
that
thro
growl
causi
his
recat
He d
arouj
QUALITY
SALES & S
"Greenville's
Complete Bicycle
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IMEEAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25, 1983
eded
erson
rolinian
to 5 p. m.
i Building
er Library
�:�: x�k.k
OSSSfB

$
�&
$
0
r-
1
�C?L?
s
1
I
10-10:00
T
IERS & GUEST
I
s
I
A MO
& Nightclub
t mzhtspot & eatery.
i"4 lr(iifijl Mr
! 90-12:00
I U izhr Doors open at 5:30
four 2 for J
lout
VS: 30- 10:00pm
S Kirk Hilliams
:OOpm
menu featuring
potatoes and much more.
est Pizzas Are
Delivered!
Legislative Blotter Shows Busy Day For Reps
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI) - A bill
limiting the length of
legislative sessions to
75 days over a two-
year period passed its
final Senate test Tues-
day and was sent to
the House.
The measure, which
was introduced at the
request of Lt. Gov.
James C. Green,
cleared on a 35-12
vote.
But it could face a
difficult time in the
House, where Speaker
Liston Ramsey,
D-Madison, has in-
dicated he opposes the
bill because it would
hurt the orderly
operation of the
General Assembly.
Ramsey has endors-
ed a proposal that
would require long
legislative sessions
held in odd-numbered
years to convene
about a month later
than the current
January starting date.
The Legislature
now convenes in
January of odd-
numbered years for a
regular session lasting
about six months and
returns in June of the
following year for a
short session generally
limited to budget mat-
ters.
The Senate pro-
posal, introduced by
Sen. William G.
"Gerry" Hancock,
D-Durham, would
limit legislative ses-
sions to 75 working
days over a two-year
period, but would
permit a 25-day exten-
sion.
Under Hancock's
bill, the Legislature
would convene for an
organizational session
limited to six working
days and then recess
until March while bills
are introduced and
committees begin stu-
dying them. It also
creates a permanent
study committee to
examine legislative
operations.
The measure
cleared a preliminary
Senate test last week,
but final action was
delayed.
Sen. Julian
Allsbrook,
D-Halifax, question-
ed the need for the bill
during Tuesday's
debate.
"We have talked
about shortening ses-
sions, but the fact is
we just don't do it
Allsbrook said. "I
don't want to appear
to be an obstruc-
tionist, but I'm con-
vinced with these
paper efforts to
reduce sessions,
nothing is going to be
accomplished
Allsbrook, who is
serving his 13th term
in the Legislature,
said when he first
came to the General
Assembly in 1935,
there was a limit of 60
days for sessions but
lawmakers stayed in
Raleigh for five mon-
ths.
Because Hancock's
bill sets statutory
limits, it would be less
effective than a con-
stitutional limit in
reducing the length of
sessions. Allsbrook
said.
In other legislative
action:
A controversial
House-passed
measure revising
reconciliation stan-
dards for separated
couples was killed by
the Senate after being
returned to the floor
for the fourth time.
The bill and a pen-
ding amendment were
tabled on a 32-15 vote
after Sen. R.C. Soles,
D-C,Columbus, said
the measure had
"floated around" the
Senate too long and
had been re-referred
to committee four
times.
"This amendment,
as well as the entire
bill, are un-
necessary he said.
The bill would have
revised standards
determining when a
husband and wife
who are legally
separated have recon-
ciled and resumed
their marriage.
Courts have ruled a
single night spent
together is sufficient
for a reconciliation
that reverses a separa-
tion agreement and
reopens the entire
matter.
The measure, which
cleared the House
earlier this year,
would have required
courts to determine
whether there was an
intent to reconcile.
It ran into heavy
opposition in the
Senate during three
previous debates and
was sent back to com-
mittee each time.
When it came up
Tuesday, Sen. Robert
Davis, D-Rowan, pro-
posed an amendment
requiring cohabita-
tion lasting more than
three days was a
reconciliation and
Soles moved to kill
the bill and the
amendment.
The Senate
Judiciary III Commit-
tee approved legisla-
tion doubling prison
terms for people con-
victed of child abuse.
Current state law
now sets a five-year
maximum term for an
adult who inflicts
serious physical in-
juries on a child under
16. The presumptive
sentence is two years
unless a judge deter-
mines the cir-
cumstances require a
longer or shorter
term.
The bill approved
by the committee
would raise the max-
imum sentence to 10
years, with a presum-
ed sentence of three
years.
Supporters initially
wanted to set a max-
imum term of 30
years.
"It seems to me
that for a person who
burns a child's toes
off, the penaltiesi
ought to be worse
than for possession of j
marijuana said Sen.
Tony Rand.
D-Cumberland.
But several commit-
tee members
disagreed.
'This is way too
high said Sen
Robert Davis.
D-Rowan "This is
worse than (the
sentence for)
manslaughter
Sen. Wilma
Woodard, D-Wake.
said child abuse
should be dealt with
in other ways beside
imprisoning a parent
CAMPING SPORTING
MILITARY GOODS
Of WC 0ltf�ni 'i�i
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S Evans
Raleigh Bishop Speaks Peace
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Assistant News Editor
Some have referred
to it as a "moral
thunderclap" while
others have accused
the U.S. Conference
of Catholic Bishops
of supporting the
Soviet Union.
Never before has a
group of Catholic
bishops caused so
much clamor like they
did earlier this month
when they voted over-
whelmingly to sup-
port a document call-
ing on the world's
nuclear powers to halt
the expansion of their
nuclear arsenals.
The bishops voted
to approve the third
draft of their
44,000-word pastoral
letter, "The
Challenge of Peace
The work on the
document required
two years of study.
Catholics number
about 50,000
Americans and repre-
sent the nation's most
populous denomina-
tion. Bishop F.
Joseph Gossman was
the representative
from the Diocese of
Raleigh at the
Chicago meeting that
approved the final
draft.
Gossman called the
letter a teaching docu-
ment meant to
stimulate thought and
discussion of the
peace, war and
nuclear armaments
issues.
Gossman said he
would like to think
the Holy Spirit had
something to do with
the dramatic change
the bishops have
taken in the last 10
years regarding the
nuclear-weapons
issue.
"More and more
people are suddenly
discovering what's
been going on and
once you find out
what's going on you
feel like you're on the
verge of a nervous
breakdown or a
nightmare
Gossman said.
"Casper Weinberger
said we have to have
more weapons so we
can have less � what
kind of thinking is
that? That's not logic
� maybe they're hav-
ing brain meltdown �
something's screwy
"And when you
start finding out that
these people have
been doing this with
our tacit approval or
permission, I don't
think I like that
anymore Gossman
said.
Gossman admits
that he has also gone
through a period of
growth and change
causing him to change
his personal views
regarding these issues.
He credits the people
around him for mak-
ing him confront
issues he'd rather not
have.
"There were some
people who shoved it
(the nuclear � eapons
issue) in my face and
said, 'Look at this
and I said, 'I don't
want to But I finally
started looking at it
and it looks terrible
Gossman referred
to the present nuclear
arms race as "a for-
mula for disaster not
a formula for salva-
tion
"I think the
message to the
Catholic community
is 'Hey, wake-up and
look at this, "
Gossman said.
Gossman said there
has been a ground-
swell of support for
nuclear disarmament
from many arenas
and that the nation's
bishops were only
joining an already
strong movement.
"Catholics arc usually
considered very
patriotic people
Gossman said. "In
the past, we've been
super-patroits and
that's one of the
reasons people are
reacting so strongly
now that we have
taken a posture
somewhat at variance
with the patriotic
stance
Gossman has
received numerous
letters both critical
and supportive of the
bishop's letter. "I
cannot support a
leadership that
advertently or in-
advertently offers
comfort and support
to the Soviet Union
stated one letter
Gossman received this
week.
"The Soviet Union
is obviously an impor-
tant part of any
peace-keeping or
peace-making effort
in this country and we
have to deal with
whatever that reality
turns out to be
Gossman said.
"We're supposed to
be a Gospel people.
At some point the
Gospel ought to have
something to say
about how we res-
pond to people like
(the) Russians
"Don't just talk to
the people who agree
with you Gossman
said. "Try to listen to
the other side. If
either side thinks they
have the whole solu-
tion, I think they're
being very naive
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
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for just sl.39
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. 8:00pm til doting
15 draft with purchase of 4 tocos -fC
A
AT BARRE,ltd
Dancewear Specialty Shop
For all your dancing needs.
422 ARLINGTON BLVD.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
C919) 756-6470
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Purchase a 12 or 16 inch Pizza with 2 or more
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wos
Where the Happy Crowd Meets
WED. MAY 25 1983
Bicvcte
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757-3lo
ATTIC
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AU SUMMU MMM STUMNTS 'til
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The Best
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Ask Anyone!
All Burgers Arc '4b
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Doily From Overtons.
Bring this ad-10 OFF
Any Ice Cream Selection
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Wed, is 99 Sue Day
4 Breakfast Served
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LL ABC Permits
DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS
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FIESTA TIME
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M En at tt Wm. Party TOC
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Greenville's only
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open 7 days a week
A PRIVATE CLUS MOT OPEN
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Pisso (After 4:00)
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Burgers "Fresh Beef Dotty"
Hot Dogs "AH Beef"
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FEATURES DAILY SPECIALS
HAS TAKEOUTS
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TUE: Lodres Night
Free with Met I
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WED: Uems Wine!
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Qttfe ?Ea0t Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, c��M�i�r
Mike Hughes. ua�s�t ��,
Waverly Merritt. o�� 0 .v�, Cindy Pleasants. �, e,o.
Hunter Fisher. �, Managtr Greg Rideout. e�
ALl AFRASHTEH. C� Man CARLYN EBERT. �nr��m�,� Eduor
Stephanie Groon. cm, m. Lizanne Jennings. �
Clay Thornton, ris David Gordon, Pro,� �
May 25. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
El Salvador
Falling Into The Pattern
On Monday, the Pentagon
released yet another piece of
"secret" information concerning
U.S. involvement in the ongoing
civil strife in El Salvador. Ironical-
ly, this "revelation" comes as no
real surprise to anyone even vague-
ly familiar with U.S. policy in Cen-
tral America.
The choice bit of information
the Pentagon revealed to the public
Monday was that U.S. AC-130
planes have been flying classified
reconnnaissance missions over El
Salvador to try to detect in-
filtration of arms to Marxist guer-
rillas
The statement of these secret
flights came after the Army an-
nounced that it would start train-
ing an additional 525 junior of-
ficers for the El Salvadoran army
at Fort Benning, Ga later this
week.
Obviously anticipating questions
about the Unites States' increasing
military involvement in Central
America, those Pentagon officials
(who, naturally, remained
nameless) were quick to remind the
press that those reconnaissance
planes are flying unarmed. "The
mission of these aircraft is
passive a spokesman said, "and
all flights comply with interna-
tional law
So just why doesn't this latest
admission from the Pentagon
come as a shocker? Quite frankly,
because a good portion of the
American public has recognized a
distinct pattern for some time now.
The stage is beginning to take an
all too familiar shape, and many of
us arc realizing that we've seen this
all somewhere before.
It somehow seems ironic that a
government so overly concerned
with downplaying comparisons of
U.S. involvement in Central
America to the evolution Vietnam
War would continue to call such
comparisons themselves.
The AC-130 gunship was not on-
ly used but was born in the Viet-
nam War, when the U.S. was try-
ing to choke off infiltration of men
and arms from North Vietnam into
South Vietnam.
The fact is, the situation in El
Salvador is fast becoming (pardon
the cliche) another Vietnam. What
started out as a "purely advisory"
exercise is quickly following the
same turbulent path.
Perhaps the Reagan administra-
tion has an extremely short
memory span � less than 15 years.
Perhaps Mr. Reagan has forgotten
that in the early 1960s, U.S. in-
volvement in Vietnam was "purely
advisory Perhaps he's also
forgotten that that same "purely
advisory" capacity quickly evolved
� through such "small" increases
as reconnaissance missions � into
a full-scale war. But then Mr.
Reagan is an ol man.
Naturally, Pentagon sources
consistently deny allegations that
"actual U.S. military involve-
ment" is being stepped up. Ah,
once again we see how contradic-
tions run rampant in Washington.
After all, those same Pentagon
sources claimed the purpose of fly-
ing reconnaissance missions over
El Salvador is to "detect infiltra-
tion of arms to Marxist guer-
rillas This in itself implies that
U.S. involvement is on the in-
crease. Why would the U.S. be
putting forth so much effort if not
in an effort to deter the transporta-
tion of those arms? It's hardly like-
ly that they're flying at night for
the fun of it.
The fact is, the United States is
already deeply involved in the
spreading Central American War.
As for now � from what we, the
naive, are told � our involvement
is still largely "advisory But
those acquainted with recent U.S.
history aren't at all consoled by the
knowledge that at present, we're
"only advising That just means
we're following the pattern right
on schedule.
ECU St
International Fast For Life
The Ultimate Arms Protest
By PAT O'NEILL
On Aug. 6, eight people, including
two Americans, will begin what they've
termed "an open-ended fast" as an at-
tempt to reverse the international
nuclear arms race. If the goals they have
set for the fast are not achieved, all
eight, and possibly others, may starve to
death.
On two occasions during his quest for
peace in his native India, Mohandas
Gandhi embarked on similar fasts. An
international figure loved by millions,
Gandhi succeeded in his attempts. No
one wanted to see Gandhi die.
Fasting as a political tactic was used
more recently � though far less suc-
cessfully � by IRA members in Nor-
thern Ireland prisons. Ten men suffered
gruesome deaths when Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher turned a deaf ear to
the inmates demands for political
prisoner status.
I am a person dedicated to the quest to
rid our world of nuclear weapons. I am
also a true believer in the non-violence
professed by Gandhi. Therefore, this is
the first time I have ever been so
challenged by the proposed actions of
my fellow peace activists. Is fasting
suicidal? Is it violent? Can I really sup-
port an action which could result in the
deaths of several people?
Being of Irish ancestry, I became very
emotionally involved in the plights of
the IRA hunger strikers. Each day, I
would read newspaper accounts of the
suffering these men were going through:
teeth falling out, blindness, the use of
water beds to prevent bones from break-
ing through skin, comas and death.
The incredible determination of these
men thoroughly amazed me. The ap-
Understanding & Coping With Sex:
Ups And Downs, Quirks And Jerks
Dear Stan Landers: Is there anything
wrong with a man who insists his wife
dress up like Smurfette before going to
bed? How about a man who likes to let
our German Sherherd sleep between us
at night wearing my brassiere? How
about a guy who constructed a vine in
our bedroom so he could swing from the
bathroom to the bed wearing nothing
but a leopard-skin loin cloth and yell like
STAN LANDERS
Expert Retractions
Tarzan? How about a man whose
favorite pastime is greeting the paperboy
every morning in his "Kiss Me, I'm
Irish" underwear? Well, my husband
Myron, who I'm married to, doesn't
seem to think so. But I'm starting to
wonder. So tell me, Mr. Landers, is
there anything wrong with Myron?
Myrna from Smyrna
Dear Myrna: Wrong? With Myron?
You've got to be kidding! Hey, I want to
party with this guy. He sounds like a lot
of fun. And what an inventive mind! 1
mean, sure, a lot of people know how
much fun a dog can be, but that thing
about the vine, that's something even I
hadn't thought of. Yes, ma'am, you've
got yourself a winner in Myron, Myrna.
Be nice to him, and maybe sometime,
he'll let you wear the dog's brassiere!
Dear Stan Landers: Why did the black
woman who had triplets name them
Eenie, Meenie and Meinie?
The Phantom
Dear Phantom: Because she didn't
want no "Mo But please realize I
don't appreciate that kind of sick joke.
Dear Stan Landers: I write to you as a
last resort, as a person who has virtually
given up hope in the American people.
Being an American myself, I have
become deeply saddened of late by our
society's ills, most notably, our unrepen-
tent, unrestrained exploitation of sex.
It pains me to see what we've become:
children who thrive on entertainment ex-
hibiting latent sexual content, teenagers
who have only to turn on the TV for an
hour a day to learn what my generation
had to learn on the streets over the
course of thirteen years, and adults who
treat sex and sexuality as nothing more
than a source of disgusting jest.
hi my opinion, this reflects a sick
society. I just can't help but think
something's terribly wrong when a
10-year-old boy (my son, Felipe) can
recite at least 20 different nicknames for
just about every part of the female body.
Don't you think so?
Abhorred in Ayden
Dear Abhorred: You're right, there's
definitely something wrong there.
Something's just not getting through to
this kid. I mean, hell, when I was 10, I
knew at least 30 anatomical aliases � 40
for some things!
Dear Stan Landers: Do you have any
advice on how 1 should tell my son about
the birds and the bees? He came home
from school the other day while 1 was
baking bread and asked me where babies
come from, and quite frankly, his ques-
tion caught me so off guard that 1 didn't
know what to tell him. I tried to stuff his
mouth and mind with milk and cookies,
but he just kept asking. I don't know
what to do. He's only six. Help!
Confused in the Kitchen
Dear Confused: Sounds to me like
your confusion extends much further
(upstairs) than the kitchen.
But before I go on, I just want you to
know that having been through much oi
the same, 1 can sympathize with both
you and your son. I guess I was about six
when my mother asked me the very same
thing.
The main point to remember is that
kids nowadays are a lot smarter than
when you were a kid. You can make up
stories about storks, UPS delivery men
and cabbage patches, bit chances are.
unless your kid's a moron, he just isn't
going to buy them. So, I suggest you
don't try to fill his tiny head with a lot of
crapola. Tell him the truth. Sit him
down at the kitchen table, take his little
hand in yours and say gently, "I just
don't know
Editor's Sote: Stan Landers, a senior
from Gazongas, N.C sometimes
wonders who cleans up all the ' 'bullish
after a Merill-Lynch commercial.
The Nauseating Business Of Sanctioning
'Officiality' In Television
parent lack of concern for their lives ex-
hibited by Thatcher was incomprehensi-
ble. They died; the fast was abandoned;
their demands unmet. Bobby Sands
became a hero to millions.
My fears of seeing a repeat perfor-
mance of this gory event this summer are
probably well-founded. The nuclear
arms race has been going on uncon-
trollably for almost 40 years. The five
major nuclear powers show absolutely
no indication of a willingness to stop it. I
support the fast because I personally
believe the world is quickly approaching
nuclear doom.
It may be true that many of the IRA
hunger strikers were convicted killers.
The "Fast for Lifers on the other
hand, include a 58-year-old grandfather,
a Japanese Buddhist monk and a young
woman who is president of France's
Green Party. All are dedicated par-
ticipants. They have united urder this
banner: "To affirm that all humanity
has a right to live freed from the pain of
hunger and the dread of holocaust
Initially, the fast included only three.
In less than a year, five others have join-
ed. 1 suspect that before it's all over � if
it ends at all � many others will join.
The threat of holocaust is real. Nuclear
weapons, because of their exhorbitant
cost, are already killing, because they
represent a misappropriation of funds
� a theft from the poor.
"Open-ended fasts, because of the life
risks involved, have a way of speeding
up decision-making, breaking stalemates
and producing change three of the
fasters wrote in a 1982 letter. "If we ever
needed such speed, it is certainly now.
The children are dying, and the thread
that holds the bomb is fraying
I must admit, I watch a lot of televi-
sion.
But you know, everytimc I turn on the
TV, I want to vomit. Ironically, it's not
so much the endless stomach-turning
repertoire of carbon-copy sit-coms and
soap operas (shows which are admittedly
nauseating in their own right) as much as
it is commercials
I guess what bugs me more than
anything else about TV ads is "official"
things. Let's face it, we Americans are
hung up on officiality. And if you don't
believe me, then just turn on the oV tube
for an hour or so. I mean, for the 1984
U.S. Olympic Team alone, we've got of-
ficial cameras, official cars, official ten-
nis shoes and, of course, official potato
chips. Lord knows, we wouldn't want
our prize athletes to snack on unofficial
potato chips
But as unpatriotic as this may sound,
sometimes 1 can't help but think we're
getting just a bit carried away. Sure, it's
only hi-tops and potato chips now, but
who's to say this ridiculous officiality
craze won't eventually spill over into
other facets of life?
A lot of people may disagree with me,
but I feel confident that we have yet to
see the full extent of this "sanctioned"
sickness. Yes, I can see the new slogans
now: "Trojan the official prophylac-
tic of the United States Olympic Ski
Team "Stayfree the official mini
pad of the League of Women
Voters "Preparation H the of-
ficial headache medicine of the U.S.
House of Representatives And, of
course, "Extra-Strength Penicillin the
official cure-all of careless U.S. GI's and
college students who consistently forget
their official prophylactics Mark
my word. It's only a matter of time.
But what I want to know is how in the
hell does some particular product
become "official?" Is officiality sup-
posed to be some sort of award? Is it
supposed to somehow benefit a
manufacturer by increasing sales on his
product? I find that hard to believe. I
mean, think about it. If the purpose of
sanctioning products is to increase sales,
then why do the NFL and NBA have of-
ficial home computers? Hell, most of
those guys can't even read, much less
operate a computer. I just don't know.
And that's not all, either. Another
thing we seem to be getting carried away
with are those asinine TV surveys. You
know the ones like, four out of five
MIKE HUGHES
4&
proctologists surveyed recommend Tri-
dent for their patients who chew gum in
funny places That sort of thing.
Everything you see on TV nowadays is
what "doctors recommend most
Needless to say, these "scientific TV
surveys" bug the hell out of me. I mean,
what kind of moron wouldn't recomend
something if an interviewer gave him 50
bucks to do so? This is one moron who
would.
Another thing about TV commercials
that really burns my BVDs is how they
build up their products as some sort of
amazing elixir, some juice of life long
awaited by the masses. Take Sanka cof-
fee, for instance. I don't know about
you, but I just love how Robert Young
always seems to be on hand whenever
one of his friends is on the brink of
disaster. But fear not, he's got an answer
for everything:
Oh, damnit says a nervous
wreck poised over a cluttered, blood-
drenched work table. "I can't take it
anymore
"Heavens, Bill, why so upset?" a sur-
prised Young asks.
"Oh, I don't know, Dr. Welby.
Nothing seems to be going right. I lost
my job the other day; my wife left me
last night for the milkman. Then I
wrecked my brand new Porsche. And
now � can you believe it � I've just cut
off the better part of my left hand with
this damned hacksaw I'm so jittery
"Hey, sounds to me like you've been
getting too much caffeine, Bill
But what's even worse are those in-
famous Michelob Light commercials.
You know the ones with all the guys
playing tennis, football or whatever
They're always just about ready to
throw in the towel, when some little
smartass in the back suggests they pla
for the championship of the world.
Naturally, he gets no takers. "Naw.
you're just too good today his humble
opponent concedes.
"Aw, c'mon, don't be a wimp
"Nope, you're just too good
"Communist
"Naw
"Adulterer
"That's beside the point. 1 don't want
to play anymore
"Okay, then, let's play for $20 then
"No, I'm too tired
"All right, damnit, we'll play for my
brand new Mazeratti 450 turbo
"I'll pass
"My luxurious eight-bedroom house
on the beach?"
"Naw
"My beautiful buxom blonde wife.
Candy?"
"Nope, maybe some other time
"A Michelob Light?"
"Ah, you've done it now, pal And
suddenly, the same moron who only
minutes before couldn't hit the ball over
the net from three feet away becomes a
white Arthur Ashc.
Whew! That's some beer, huh?
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a credit
to his race, once won a Michelob Light
from his Mom, who challenged him to
the welterweight boxing championship
of their house. She shouldn 't have men-
tioned the beer.
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Amount Smj tdiior
North Carolina has
more than 2000
Africans attending its
colleges and univer-
sities claims Apollo C.
Okoth, an ECU
business administra-
tion student from
Kenya. Man of these
students have come to
the United States
through exchange
programs. They are
thousands of miles
from home and kr. w
little of the culture or
language of this coun-
try.
Because of these
specific proi
African stuc
Okoth fou
I'nited Afi
dent AssocJ
off-shoot
O r g a n i z a t
African L'i
Organizatj
African I
in Ethiopia
ternationai
organizatioi
Okoth wj
chosen to hi
for the duj
1983-84
ear The
recently h
and lamr
Green
attended
PIRG Wan
From ECU
Continued from page 1
to become involved m pi
that will benefit their carec
the community as weii.
(PIRG) can be very helpful in b
ter preparing students a-
enter both careers or
graduate studies Bro
PIRG student leade-
plan to actively involve f
members in their org
work. The group has prepare
memo about PIRG to be �
all ECU instructors.
At present, PIRG leaders have
met with Chancellor J
Howell, administration
and several dozen fa
members. Brown met pa
with Naso to discuss efforts bv i
group to become an official -
pus organization.
Naso stressed the importar
PIRG getting both student
SGA support for their orgai
effort. Naso also advised
Education
Receiving
Continued from page 1
older students who are g
to school. The range of pe
would benefit is very narrow
Thus, most higher ed.
officials are waiting foi a
ESA that would offer more mcenl
fives for parents � and stud I
themselves � especially s
once the program is in place,
could be used as a bargaining j
to reduce traditional financial aij
programs.
"We and the rest of the g
education community supr
general concept of the Ev -
long as it in noway is KH
replacing other forms of financM
aid savs Kathy Ozer. leg
director for the II.S v
Association, a Washingtoi
DC. based student lobbyii
group.
Sen. Robert Dole. D-kan.
Smokers
WINSTON
SALEM. N.C. (VPI)
� The R.J. Reynolds
Tobacco Co. Tuesday
announced introduc-
tion of a new cigarette
brand aimed at cost-
conscious smokers.
Called "Century
the regular length
non-menthol cigaret-
tes will be sold in a 25
cigarette pack, rather
than the standard 20
cigarette pack, said
Harold J. Lees.
Revnolds vice presi-
dent for new brands
and specialty tobacco.
Century will be
available in full flavor
and low tar versions.
Cartons of Century
will contain 225
cigarettes but can be
sold at the same price
as standard cartons,
said Lees. Individual
packs can be sold at
the same, or slightly
higher, price than
standard cartons, he
said.
"We've found a
way of giving tnm
more for their
money he said.
Lees called Century

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i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25. 19t3
FREEZE r
"?
With Sex:
A nd Jerks
Dear Man I anders: Do you have any
1 should tell my son about
he bees1 He came home
K other Ja while I was
ed me where babies
. qu frankly, his ques-
iff guard that 1 didn't
�n. 1 tried to stuff his
i th milk and cookies,
kepi asking. I don't know
He's only six. Help!
Contused in the Kitchen
Demionfused: Sounds to me like
ision extend much further
� an the kitchen.
go on, 1 just want you to
rig been through much of
car sympathize with both
I guess I was about six
isked me the very same
to remember is that
a lot smarter than
i kid You can make up
ks, I 'PS delivery men
i chances are,
kid's a moron, he just isn't
So, I suggest you
us tin head with a lot of
turn the truth. Sit him
I nen table, take his little
. - and say gently. "I just
� anders. a senior
fas, N.C sometimes
i . v up all the ' 'bullish
� - mmenial.
ning
levision
wrecke
rie;
;ntz
the other day; my ife left me
the milkman. Then I
brand new Porsche. And
u believe it � I've just cut
r part of my left hand with
acksaw I'm so jittery
. sounds to me like you've been
o much caffeine. Bill
even worse are those in-
Michelob Light commercials.
m the ones with all the guys
ennis, football or whatever
re always, just about ready to
throw m the towel, when some little
smartass in the back suggests they play
the championship of the world.
iturally, he gets no takers. "Naw,
you're just too good today his humble
opponent concedes.
'Aw, c'mon, don't be a wimp
'Nope, you're just too good
( mmunist
" N a a
Adulterer1"
That's beside the point. I don't want
to play anymore
kay, then, let's play for $20 then
N . I'm too tired
"All right, damnit, we'll piay for my
brand new Mazeratti 450 turbo
"I'll pass
M luxurious eight-bedroom house
on the beach?"
"Naw
'Mj beautiful buxom blonde wife,
C and) r"
'Nope, maybe some other time
A Michelob Light?"
Ah, you've done it now, pal And
suddenly, the same moron who only
minutes before couldn't hit the ball over
the net from three feet away becomes a
white Arthur Ashe.
Whew! That's some beer, huh?
Editor's Sole: Mike Hughes, a credit
to his race, once won a Michelob Light
from his Mom. who challenged him to
the welterweight boxing championship
of their house. She shouldn 7 have men-
tioned the beer.
ECU Student Named African Group President
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Auutani Nc�� Editor
North Carolina has
more than 2000
Africans attending its
colleges and univer-
sities claims Apollo C.
Okoth, an ECU
business administra-
tion student from
Kenya. Many of these
students have come to
the United States
through exchange
programs. They are
thousands of miles
from home and know
little of the culture or
language of this coun-
try.
Because of these
specific problems that
African students face,
Okoth founded the
United African Stu-
dent Association, an
off-shoot of the
Organization of
African Unity. The
Organization of
African Unity, based
in Ethiopia, is an in-
ternational student
organization.
Okoth was recently
chosen to head UASA
for the duration the
1983-84 academic
year. The Association
recently held a goat
and lamb picking in
Greenville which was
attended by more
than 250 people from
throughout the state
including Sen. Vernon
White (D-Pitt).
Okoth, who has
been in the U.S. four
years, speaks English
fluently and is only
one semester short of
graduation. Okoth
said UASA was form-
ed "in order that we
(African students)
may foster unity
among ourselves and
reinforce the move to
Pan-Africanism
Okoth explained
the group's hope that
Africa, as a continent,
could be unified as the
United States of
Africa similar to the
United States of
America.
"We are convinced
that it is (the) in-
alienable right of all
people to control their
own destiny Okoth
said. "We are con-
scious of the fact that
freedom, equality,
justice and dignity are
essential objectives
for achievement of
the legitimate aspira-
tions of African peo-
ple
Okoth believes that
creating a sense of
unity carl best be
achieved by first br-
inging the students
together to meet and
learn about each
other.
Objectives of the
new organization in-
clude the promotion
of social, political,
cultural and economic
awareness -among
Africans, the pro-
viding of forums for
the discussion of
issues pertaining to
Africa's development
and preservation of its
culture and art, the
promotion of solidari-
ty among African
people in order that a
better educational
plan for Africa's
future development
can be achieved, the
instilling of a better
understanding bet-
ween Africans and the
outside world and the
seeking of viable ways
of reducing
underdevelopment in
Africa by eliminating
illiteracy, disease,
hunger and economic
deprivation.
Okoth claims
members of UASA
are inspired by a
"common determina-
tion" to achieve the
goals and objectives
of the group. He
hopes that student
members will unite
and form study
groups to work in the
effort to solve
Africa's problems.
Okoth said the pro-
blems of hunger and
illiteracy are major
areas of concern to
UASA. He said
UASA condemned
apartheid, the official
policy of racial
segregation in the
Republic of South
Africa. Okoth called
apartheid inhuman.
"There is no way they
can say it is rightful to
do he added.
At present, Okoth
hopes UASA will en-
courage friendship
among African
students as well as
provide them with
support during the
difficult early stages
of their ajustment in a
new land.
PIRG Wants Approval
From ECU Students
Continued from page 1
to become involved in projects
that will benefit their careers and
the community as well. "It
(PIRG) can be very helpful in bet-
ter preparing students as they
enter both careers or post-
graduate studies Brown said.
PIRG student leaders said they
plan to actively involve faculty
members in their organizational
work. The group has prepared a
memo about PIRG to be sent to
all ECU instructors.
At present, PIRG leaders have
met with Chancellor John
Howell, administration officials
and several dozen faculty
members. Brown met personally
with Naso to discuss efforts by the
group to become an official cam-
pus organization.
Naso stressed the importance of
PIRG getting both student and
SGA support for their organizing
effort. Naso also advised the
group to invite more student
leaders to its meetings so these
leaders could become more
familiar with the PIRG concept.
Naso's suggestions were welcom-
ed by the group.
"We plan to work very closely
with student leaders to make them
aware of the goals of the PIRG
organization Brown said.
The PIRG committee is con-
sidering several ways to get sup-
port from the student community.
They are considering circulating a
student questionnaire to deter-
mine student concerns and in-
terests. They also plan to look in-
to the problems arising from
students living off campus.
Anothc goal of the PIRG leaders
would be to improve the relation-
ship between ECU students and
Greenville residents.
The group meets on Mondays
in Room 221 of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center at 6:30 p.m. Anyone
is welcome to attend.
EducationalAccounts
Receiving No Interest
Continued from page 1
older students who are going back
to school. The range of people it
would benefit is very narrow
Thus, most higher education
officials are waiting for a hybrid
ESA that would offer more incen-
tives for parents � and students
themselves � especially since,
once the program is in place, it
could be used as a bargaining chip
to reduce traditional financial aid
programs.
"We and the rest of the higher
education community support the
general concept of the ESA, as
long as it in no way is construed as
replacing other forms of financial
aid says Kathy Ozer, legislative
director for the U.S. Student
Association, a Washington,
D.C -based student lobbying
group.
Sen. Robert Dole, D-Kan, for
one, has proposed an ESA tor the
last several years. It would allow
parents to write off contributions
as well as dividends on the ac-
count.
And at least five other versions
of the ESA � one would allow
people to withdraw money for
new home purchases as well as for
education expenses � have come
before Congress in the last several
years, says a spokeswoman with
the House Ways and Means Com-
mittee.
"There certainly have been
more generous educational tax-
incentive plans proposed notes
ACE's Saunders. "And if nothing
else, perhaps Reagan's proposal
will generate some discussion on
the subject
"We might even see a viable
proposal get somewhere in the
next few years he speculates.
"But not this fiscal year
Smokers Get Discount
WINSTON-
SALEM, N.C. (UPI)
� The R.J. Reynolds
Tobacco Co. Tuesday
announced introduc-
tion of a new cigarette
brand aimed at cost-
conscious smokers.
Called "Century
the regular length
non-menthol cigaret-
tes will be sold in a 25
cigarette pack, rather
than the standard 20
cigarette pack, said
Harold J. Lees,
Reynolds vice presi-
dent for new brands
and specialty tobacco.
Century will be
available in full flavor
and low tar versions.
Cartons of Century
will contain 225
cigarettes but can be
sold at the same price
as standard cartons,
said Lees. Individual
packs can be sold at
the same, or slightly
higher, price than
standard cartons, he
said.
"We've found a
way of giving them
more for their
money he said.
Lees called Century
a "totally new
category" of cigaret-
tes, aimed at value
conscious smokers,
but said the brand is
not intended as com-
petition for generic
cigarettes.
Century will be in-
troduced July 5 in 33
states. Those states
tax cigarettes on a
per-unit basis, and
also have low local
cigarette taxes, said
Lees.
N.C. Independent
Hits Greenville Area
Under the banner
"We serve no power
but the truth and pur-
sue no cause but
justice" the North
Carolina Indepen-
dent, a new bi-weekly
newspaper, hit the
streets of Greenville
this month.
The Independent,
trying for statewide
exposure, began
limited circulation in
Greenville on May 13
with retail sales at
several locations
around the city.
The Friday issue
was the third copy of
the tabloid to come
off the presses since
its premier issue was
released April 15.
Independent editors
claim they are hoping
to provide readers
with "the kind of
news, feature and opi-
nion pieces that the
state's press can't or
won't publish
The new paper is
currently being
distributed free on a
trial basis in Durham.
Raleigh, Chapel Hill
and Asheville also
have limited retail
distribution of the In-
dependent.
Greenville is cur-
rently the only eastern
North Carolina city
where the Indepen-
dent is available.
N.C. State NCAA
Championship
Baseball Caps
HARD DAYS NIGHT
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items and Prices
Effective wed. May 25
Thru Sat May 28, 1983
AOVERTISEO ITEM
POLICY
Each o� these edver
t'sefl item i� '�
quired to be readily
available (or safe in
each Kroger Savon,
�icapt as specifically
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we will otter you your
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Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
REGULAR OR LIGHT
Budweiser
Beer
12-Oz.
Cans
DIET COKE,
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MELLO YELLO OR
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$409
2-Ltr.
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VEGETABLES
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W W � � Hi �1l�
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��� m -�����,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
MAY 25, 1983
Page 6
N V
W
9k
worn
Summer Flicks
Hit Greenville
Recollection Into The Past: 'Pink Floyd The WalV
Bob Geldof (right) stars as burned-out rock performer Pink, Kevin
McKeon as Pink the youth, in the MGM presentation of 'Pink
Floyd The Wall appearing tonight at 8:00 in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre. Director Alan Parker shuffles time and
place, reality and nightmare, as we venture into Pink's painful
memories, each one a 'brick' in the wall he has built around his
feelings. Admission is by ID and activity card for students and
MSC membership for faculty and staff.
Women s Group WAPs Porn
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Asaotaai Nc� Ediior
In the South, it isn't unusual to
encounter a preacher or television
evangelist speaking out against
the immorality of sexual pro-
miscuity or pornography.
Well, way up north in New
York City, there's a nonsectarian
group of women doing the same
thing. Activist members of
Women Against Pornography
(WAP) have been working since
1979 to rid New York's Times
Square district of "dirty"
bookstores, peep shows and sex
emporiums.
The group leads frequent walk-
ing tours of the Big Apple's por-
no district, which is located near
WAP's West 47th Street offices.
Members participate in public
demonstrations outside
publishers' offices of magazines
such as Playboy and Hustler.
They call for boycotts of certain
movies they deem exploitative or
degrading to women, and they
exert pressure on advertisers to
discontinue ads that reinforce
such exploitation and degrada-
tion.
"The word pornography is
rooted in the Greek word porne,
which refers to the writing or
graphic depiction of female
slaves or whores said Alexan-
dra Matusinka, coordinator of
WAP. "So in a sense por-
nography is saying that women
are whores; women are sexually
available to men all the time
whether or not they want it
Matusinka said WAP was
founded because of the prolifera-
tion of these negative images of
women as well as the recent trend
in the "sexualization of
children" � especially of little
girls � in the media.
Matusinka believes that por-
nography helps perpetuate
anything from street harassment
to more serious crimes against
women such as rape. She also
believes pornography reinforces
traditional sex roles at a time
when both men and women are
attempting to break away from
the traditional ideals. "Women
are seeking for more equality in
economics and politics she ad-
ded.
WAP members turned out in
full force last October to
demonstrate against Sexpo '82,
the first Northeast conven-
tiontrade show for por-
Super Grit Rocks Attic
Hot Pickin' From Hood swamp
Bv ROBIN AYERS
Staff Writer
The atmosphere is intox-
icating. Rounding the corner of
the entrance leading into the bar-
room, one becomes a part of a
colorful menagerie: the Attic's
clientele.
In a small southern town a few
years ago, these folks may have
appeared a little radical to the
belles and beaus of the Bible belt.
And may still. On any other day,
look for these good people in the
businesses, farms and schools of
Pitt County. Ties are straight,
hair and manner in place. A tem-
porary slowdown in the rat race
comes to town on the weekend,
and these folks want to raise
some hell and bend some elbow.
Come evening, they need look
only as far as downtown Green-
ville for lively entertainment.
Last weekend rocked to a
country beat whsn Super Grit
Cowboy Band played the Attic
Friday and Saturday nights. On
Friday night the band got off to a
good start with a big, ap-
preciative crowd that asked for,
and received, two encores. Super
Grit had the dance floor booked
with couples shuffling, swaying
and swinging. Those not on the
dance floor were not exactly still;
a few just managed to sway.
Super Grit Cowboy Band hails
from Goldsboro, Greenville and
places in between. Together for
six years, this five member group
has been gaining widespread at-
tention throughout the country.
The band's experience is evident
in the quality of its music. Most
of the program consisted of past
hits written by SGCB members
and songs by other artists from
Hank Williams to Joe Walsh.
The group performed a lively
medley of songs "about and
by Hank Williams Super Grit
did its own summation of this
county legend's life with selec-
tions like "Your Cold Cold
Heart" and lyrics such as "My
bucket's got a hole in it; I can't
buy no beer and "Why must
you live out the songs you
write?"
Creating an atmosphere and
establishng rapport with an au-
dience can play a crucial part in
the success or failure cf any
band's performance. Super Grit
has no problem. Armed with
cowboy hats, a David Allen Coe
t-shirt and a pedal steel guitar
that sings, these urban cowboys
make up in musical energy what
they lack in experience home on
the range or on the back of a
Brahmin bull.
"Half the time I'm ending up
some place I don't belong sing
Super Grit, echoing the sen-
timents of a few audience
members who, in the course of
the evening, will travel an altered
course of consciousness of which
they aren't fully aware until they
try to remember in the early mor-
ning where they parked the car
last night. Along these lines is the
Rolling Stones' "Honky Tonk
Woman well-played by SGCB.
But I remember this song and
"Johnny B. Goode" for more
than content they were loud.
Some people obviously feel
that music cannot be good (or
heard) unless the volume is at an
ear- ringing level. Now I'm sure
the sound was not turned up foi
these two numbers, but the rock
and roll songs performed Friday
night came across louder than the
songs with a bluegrass or country
theme.
Other well-known songs Super
Grit delivered included Lynard
Skynard's "Alabama" and the
traditional "Orange Blossom
Special The latter was especial-
ly impressive, with fiddler Mike
Kinzie giving an energetic rendi-
tion of a song attempted or per-
formed many times over by many
other bands.
A saxophone and banjo add
dimension to a band, and Super
Grit's musicians incorporate
these instruments well. "If You
Don't Know Me By Now a
song written by Super Grit's Bill
Ellis, featured Clyde Mattocks �
this band's answer to Willie
Nelson � with some crystal clean'
banjo picking.
After listening to Super Grit
for six years, I find their sound
and enthusiasm remain fresh. If
you missed SGCB this time, look
out for them; they're sure to
return.
nographers held in New York Ci-
ty. WAP organizers billed the
convention "a sexist fraud
Demonstrators arrived bran-
dishing signs reading "Porn
Enslaves Women "Sexpo Ex-
ploits Women" and "Porn Isn't
Sexual Liberation as well as
large reproductions of
photographs and cartoons from
Hustler, Screw and Velvet
(magazines participating in Sex-
po) that depicted women in
chains, women enjoying violence
and women in dog collars and
harnesses.
Late last year, WAP joined
other women's organizations in
protesting the release of racist
and sexually violent video games.
One game called "Custer's
Revenge" shows a naked blond
male figure with an erection chas-
ing a red-skinned naked female
figure, dark-haired with a
feather. If he avoids the flying ar-
rows, he rapes the Indian woman
as a reward. " 'Custer's Revenge'
not only says that rape is a
legitimate form of revenge, but
also a legitimate form of enter-
tainment said WAP coor-
dinator Robin Quinn. Men often
join WAP organizers in these
protest efforts.
Recently WAP has spoken out
against a pornographic hot line
which uses tape recordings of
women speaking in sexually pro-
vocative tones.
WAP claims that pornography
is a $7 billion a year industry
See ACTIVISTS, Page 7
By STEVE BACHNER
Staff Writer
It's a good newsbad news
week for movies in Greenville.
The good news is that a surpris-
ingly intelligent black comedy
called Eating Raoul opened last
Friday at the Plaza Cinema. The
bad news is that its abbreviated
run ended just yesterday, making
way for the most anticipated film
of the summer, Return of the
Jedi. (This is both good and bad
news, depending on whether or
not you've been anticipating late-
ly.)
Eating Raoul is a film that you
might have at least read
something about since almost
every national publication that
gives lip service to the current
cinema has run articles on it.
Raoul is a truly offbeat tale of
middle-class American couple
Paul and Mary Bland and their
scheme to knock off rich Los
Angeles swingers in order to raise
money for a restaurant and a
house. The tailored B-movie plot
by writerdirector Paul Bartel �
who plays Mr. Bland � is enrich-
ed with campy interior design,
plenty of sight gags and sharp
satire aimed at the partying West
Coast upper-class.
Mrs. Bland is played with
stone-faced aplomb by Mary
Woronov, the darling of the New
York underground and Barter s
acting partner in such quick-
witted "guilty pleasures" as
Rock 'n' Roll High School and
Hollywood Boulevard. (Bartel's
best known film before Raoul
was the hilarious drive-in epic
Death Race 2000 which did not
include Woronov.)
The backers of Eating Raoul
were at one time sweating the
film's future when it seemed that
its unmarketable features might
thwart any and all distribution
deals. Company after company,
including some independents,
passed on Barters film until after
much discussicn Twentieth
Century-Fox International
Classics picked it up with the
hopes that it would find at least a
cul following � instead, it went
on to become the most unlikely
sleeper-hit of 1982.
If you missed Raoul on this
trip � short one that it was �
you can still catch it on campus in
the fall.
Some of the heavyweight
movies of the summer will be
opening in the next few weeks; all
of them should make it to Green-
ville. Following is a look at May
highlights and also a preview of
what the trades tell us are the
"money" films for the month of
June. In the coming weeks, The
East Carolinian will review cur-
rent films and preview more ma-
jor studio releases for the months
of July and August.
NOW PLAYING:
Blue Thunder (Columbia Pic-
tures): Actioner about a futuristic
surveillance helicopter in L.A.
With Roy Scheider and Malcolm
McDowell. (Reviewed in last
week's East Carolinian; now
playing at the Plitt Theatre.)
Breathless (Orion Pictures):
Richard Gere stars as a streetwise
hustler in this remake of the
classic Jean-Luc Godard love
story. With Valerie Kapnsky.
(Reviewed last week; now playing
at the Plaza Cinema.)
Blue Skies Again (Warner
Bros.): Harry Hamlin and Mimi
Rogers in a story about a woman
baseball player trying to make it
in the majors. (Not playing in
Greenville.)
Spacehunter: Adventures in
the Forbidden Zone (Columbia):
Peter Strauss and Molly
Ringwald. 3-D movie about a
galactic mercenary who journeys
to a plague-ravaged planet to
rescue three female space
voyagers. (Now playing at the
Plitt Theatre.)
Return of the Jedi (20th
Century-Fox): George Lucas con-
cluding chapter of the middle
"Star Wars" trilogy resolves the
fates of Mark Hamill, Harrison
Ford, Carrie Fisher and Billy Dee
Williams. (Now playing at the
Plaza Cinema.)
COMING IN JUNE:
War Games (MGMUA Enter-
tainment): Matthew Brodenck,
Ally Sheedy and Dabney Col-
eman. Adventure story about a
Seattle high school student who
inadvertently hooks his home
computer into the North
American Defense Command's
computers.
Octopussy (MGM): Roger
Moore is back as 007 in the 13th
installment of the James Bond
film series. Maud Adams co-stars
in the title role, with Louis Jour-
dan as the evil prince Khan.
Yellowbeard (Orion): Graham
Chapman stars as the raunchiest
pirate on the 16th-century high
seas. With Eric Idle, John Cleese,
Cheech and Chong, the late Mar-
ty Feldman, Peter Cook, Peter
Boyle, James Mason, Madeline
Kahn.
The Survivors (Columbia):
Walter Matthau and Robin
Williams. Comedy about two vic-
tims of unemployment who
become unwittingly invloved with
a down-on-his-luck hit man
played by Jerry Reed.
Trading Places (Paramount
Pictures): Dan Aykroyd and Ed-
die Murphy. Director John Lan-
dis' update on The Prince and the
Pauper tale satirizing the art of
American avarice.
Psycho II (Universal Pictures):
Twenty-three years after Hit-
chcock's classic Gothic thriller,
Anthony Perkins is on the loose
once more. Vera Miles again co-
stars.
Twilight Zone (Warner Bros.):
Four separate stories directed by
Steven Spielberg, John Landis.
George Miller and Joe Dante.
One episode was marred by the
deaths of Vic Morrow and two
child actors during filming.
The Man With Two Brains
(Warner Bros.): Steve Martin is a
brain surgeon in love with a
woman as horrible of spirit as she
is beautiful of body.
Superman III (Warner Bros.):
Christopher Reeve returns as the
flying wonder to do battle with
Richard Pryor. With Annette
O'Toole as the new love interest.
Fanny and Alexander
(Embassy Pictures): Ingmar
Bergman's final film (he says), a
three-hour lyrical fantasy based
on the lives of a large Swedish
family in the early 1900s.
7 IHEEASTCAl
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WAP cites re
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Matusinxa av
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show to college-
Matusinka
help men and
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WAP note-
"erotica" and po
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Flicks
nville
a With Valerie Kapnsky.
leviewed last eek; now playing
Plaza Cinema.)
I; . Skies Again (Warner
k s Harr Hamhn and Mimi
vina story about a woman
eball plaer trying to make it
ne majors. (Not playing in
.enulle.)
j icehunttr: Adventures in
e horhidden lone (Columbia):
rauss and Molly
gwald 3-D movie about a
tactic mercenary who journeys
a plague-ravaged planet to
three female space
ow playing at the
eat re.)
trn of the Jedi (20th
George Lucas con-
chapter of the middle
A . trilogy resolves the
Mark Hamill, Harrison
arrie Fisher and Billy Dee
ou playing at the
za k. inema.)
VUNG IN JUNE:
? 'arCiamwiMGM UA Enter-
kinment): Matthew Brodenck,
Sheedy and Dabney Col-
Adventure story about a
Battle high school student who
advertently hooks his home
uter into the North
can Defense Command's
) nputers.
)ctopussy (MGM): Roger
Kloore is back as 007 in the 13th
jstallment of the James Bond
I'm series Maud Adams co-stars
�he title role, with Louis Jour-
ar. as the evil prince Khan.
ellobeard (Orion): Graham
man stars as the raunchiest
irate on the 16th-century high
v With Eric Idle, John Cleese,
h and Chong, the late Mar-
ldman. Peter Cook, Peter
James Mason, Madeline
yle,
,ahn.
The
Survivors (Columbia):
Matthau and Robin
ims Comech about two vic-
unemployment who
rcome unwittingly invloved with
I An-on-his-luck hit man
i b Jerry Reed.
trading Places (Paramount
ctures): Dan Aykroyd and Ed-
e Murphy. Director John Lan-
update on The Prince and the
auper tale satirizing the art of
ncan avarice.
Psycho II (Universal Pictures):
cnty-three years after Hit-
k ock's classic Gothic thriller,
�Anthony Perkins is on the loose
I. e more. Vera Miles again co-
1Hilight Zone (Warner Bros.):
our separate stories directed by
teven Spielberg. John Landis,
ieorge Miller and Joe Dante.
One episode was marred by the
deaths of Vic Morrow and two
child actors during filming.
The Man With Two Brains
(Warner Bros.): Steve Martin is a
orain surgeon in love with a
woman as horrible of spirit as she
is beautiful of body.
Superman III (Warner Bros.):
Christopher Reeve returns as the
flying wonder to do battle with
Richard Pryor. With Annette
O'Toole as the new love interest.
Fanny and Alexander
(Embassy Pictures): Ingmar
Bergman's final film (he says), a
three-hour lyrical fantasy based
on the lives of a large Swedish
family in the early 1900s.
' A
lal steel-powered rock'n'roll this
1 THE ESTCAJOUnuh
MAY23. 1983
Activists Battle Big Apple Porn
Continued From Page 6
plZ!l0lCnC,e V lcast 1(M5 of its m�-
w ?J ,C?m Studlcs which they c�aini "repeatedly"
show the link between media violence and real life
violence.
Matusinka says public education is WAP's primary
goal. WAP organizers often lecture and present a slide
show to colleges, universities and other groups
Matusinka claims educational outreach is designed to
help men and women understand the content of pro-
nography and how it effects their lives. "Pornography is
really a sexuality of alienation Matuskinka said.
�Inherent in pornography is role playing where one per-
son is dominant and another submissive
WAP notes a distinction between what they term
�erotica" and pornography. " Pornography is writing
or imagery that objectifies, degrades and brutalizes a
person in the name of sexual stimulation or entertain-
ment they claim. Erotica, of which WAP approves,
depicts mutuality, respect, affection, humor and power
balance. It can include explicit sex, nudity or sexual play
but does not involve pain or punishment. "You don't see
that in pornography adds Matusinka.
Some magazine publishers, film producers and others
have accused WAP of censorship. WAP denies this
claim. "We do not advocate censorship We are pro-
testing the physical and psychological violence in por-
nography and the degradation of women We are seek-
ing to make pornography unprofitable. We urge women
not to condone or participate in it and men not to buy
it
"Some people still feel that pornography is something
that has nothing to do with them if they don't see it
id Matusinka. "There is a pervasive attitude that
devalues women in this culture It really is important,
especially for women, to understand this attitude and the
way in which they're treated in pornography, in
legitimate films, and advertising
Matusinka advises college-aged women to study the
history of women. "It's important to know who they are
and really get involved in women's study courses and to
take notice and be critical she said. Those wishing to
write to Women Against Pornography are invited to do
so at 358 W. 47th St New York, N.Y. 10036.
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Monday night's offering from the Student Union Films
Committee is the 1972 Oscar-winner The Godfather.
The film rolls at 9:00 in Hendrix Theatre.
� 752-1411 �
ATTENTION
E.C.U. STUDENTS & FACULTY
ANNOUNCING
HUCKLEBERRY'S
Open
TAR-
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prices effective thru wed Sat. May 28 in Greenville
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MAY 25. 1983
Page 8
Five Pirates Selected For Festival
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Y diior
Three ECU students and two
university graduates have been
selected to participate in the Na-
tional Sports Festival, which will
be held from June 19 to July 3, in
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Judy Ausherman and former
ECU athletes Sam Jones and
Maureen Buck have been selected
to play on the South Team Hand-
ball squad for the second year.
ECU graduate Stan Joyner, who
now resides in Greenville, was
chosen to compete on the men's
South Team Handball squad, and
sophomore Sylvia Bragg will join
12 players and three alternates
making up the Southeast Basket-
bull team.
Jones, who broke several
records during her two-year
careeer at ECU, is now a member
of the U. S. National Handball
team. She currently resides in
Lake Placid, N. Y where she
practices handball twice daily.
According to ECU Intramural
Director and National Sports
Festival coordinator Dr. Wayne
Edwards, Jones is a top candidate
for the '84 Olympics. Edwards
watched Jones play two weeks ago
at the National Team Handball
Tournament in Washington,
D.C and said he saw a big dif-
ference in her v verall performance
since she left for Lake Placid 12
months ago. "Sam is definitely a
top choice for the Olympics Ed-
wards said. "Her coach (Klement
Capliar) is so pleased with her im-
provement
Joining Jones will be Ausher-
man, an '82 graduate of ECU.
Ausherman, who is from Chapel
Hill, is now teaching in St. Croix,
Virgin Islands.
Buck, a former ECU softball
standout, will make her second
trip to the festival, and is looking
just as forward to this year's com-
petition. "I was kind of hesitant
my first year, but it was a fan-
tastic experience Buck said.
"This year should be even more
exciting because it's right before
the Olympic games
Buck describes team handball
as an "endurance sport and
said she is thrilled to get another
chance to compete. "I think I'm
very lucky to be a part of it
stated a modest Buck. "The south
team has already so many na-
tional team players, and I'm glad
I get to go along
Bragg is also glad to be going
along, especially after competing
against 200 players for one of 12
positions on the team. Three alter-
nates are also selected. "I was
pretty confident Bragg said,
"but the competition was very
tough Bragg began practicing
for the Festival on Tuesday with
her coach, Cathy Andruzzi.
Joyner, who received a degree
in urban and regional planning,
will be the only male athlete atten-
ding the festival from ECU.
Joyner has been playing handball
for four years in the intramurals
program, and was persuaded to
attend the Olympic development
training camp in Colorado Spr-
ings, under Edwards' persistance.
"He just saw me playing in-
tramurals, and thought I had
talent in the sport Joyner said.
Joyner came to ECU as a swim-
mer, and added that having an
athletic background is very impor-
tant. "Team handball is physical-
ly tough, but it's also a lot of
fun
The athletes will arrive in Col-
orado Springs on June 19, and
will practice for one week. Com-
petition will begin on June 27.
Despite Missing Post-Season Playoffs,
Pirate Baseball Carries On Tradition
By KEN BOLTON
ntaliat Sports Editor
For the 12th consecutive year,
i he ECU baseball team finished
the regular season with a winning
ecord.
Although this year's 21-17-1
mark was somewhat disappoin-
ting for the Pirates, who were the
defending ECAC-South cham-
pions, the team personified the
tradition of ECU baseball (only
one losing season in 32 years).
The 1983 campaign was filled
with both acclaim and anxiety for
ihe Pirates and head coach Hal
Baird, who ended his fourth
season at ECU with a career
record of 111-53-1.
Before the season, Baird knew
' the pitching staff was going
to be a key area. In the past, pit-
ching at ECU has been com-
parable with some of the most
successful staffs in the country.
In the past six seasons, Baird
! is produced five pitching staffs
i.iiiked in the top twenty in the na-
including a sixth-place rank-
in 1982. The highlight came in
1981 when the Pirates led the na-
tion with a 2.78 ERA.
The loss of Bill Wilder and Bob
Patterson from last year's staff
contributed to this year's
blossoming 4.01 ERA, the highest
earned-run average in ECU
history.
The season started off well for
the defending conference champs
as an early-season, seven-game
winning streak brought the
Pirates to 10-2 after the first two
weeks of the season.
But the Pirates became unable
to consistently win away from
home, as their on-the-road record
of 5-9-1 indicates.
Another element that plagued
this year's team was the weather.
n four different occasions, key
conference games were cancelled
due to heavy rain. As a result, the
Pirates finished with a depleted
conference mark of 2-3-1.
Individually, the top performer
for the 1983 season was a
freshman. Winfred Johnson, who
attended East Bladen High School
in Elizabethtown, N.C was a
two-way starter at designated hit-
ter and pitcher.
Not only did Johnson lead the
team in batting (.321), home runs
(11) and total bases (84), he also
finished the season with a 7-1
mark on the mound.
The Pirate bats were not as ac-
tive as during the year before, as
the team batting average fell from
.295 in 1982 to .271 this season.
Following Johnson in the bat-
���,
� � .
-iVA.��&a&& � �- -�r1r;W�Jl

ECU's John Hallow, who is the all-time RBI leader with 104, had
another good year in 1983 with a .300 batting average and 30 RBI.
ting race (minimum of 50 at-bats)
were: Todd Evans, .310; John
Hallow, .300; Kelly Robinette,
.288; David Wells, .274; Robert
Wells, .264; Jack Curlings, .254;
Mark Shank, .237; David Home,
.227; Tony Salmond, .207.
Johnson was easily the leading
home-run hitter with 11. Next in
order were Hallow with five and
Evans with three.
Evans and Hallow shared the
team lead in number of hits with
45 each. Johnson was not far
behind with 44, followed by
Robinette with 42 and Robert
Wells, who finished with 32 base
hits.
For runs-batted-in, Hallow was
again the leader with 30. This
should come as no surprise con-
sidering Hallow is the all-time
ECU RBI leader with 104.
Other players successful in br-
inging home the runners were
Johnson (28 RBI), Evans (20),
Robinette (18) and David Wells
(15).
As far as number of runs scored
in the season, Salmond led the
team with 28. Robinette and
Evans followed closely behind
with 26 and 25, respectively.
Other offensive-category
leaders were: Hallow (doubles and
at-bats), Salmond (stolen bases
and walks), Evans, Hallow and
David Wells (two triples each).
Sophomore Bob Davidson led
the team in ERA with a 3.10
mark, followed by Johnson's 3.26
and Robby McClanahan, who
finished with a 3.93 average.
Davidson also led the staff with
69 strikeouts and 78.1 innings pit-
ched.
Johnson's seven victories were
by far the most on the club, with
Davidson, McClanahan, Charlie
Smith and Chubby Butler fini-
shing with three victories apiece.
Ficklen's Gridiron Gets Fresh
Look After Severe Problems
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
In order to maintain a Division-
I status, the ECU football team
must constantly upgrade its pro-
gram, and one of the most recent
improvements has been the
renovation of the Ficklen Stadium
football field.
Ficklen's gridiron is being com-
pletely resurfaced for drainage
purposes, and according to Assis-
tant Athletic Director Bob
Helmick, it is a move that has
been long overdue. "The last
drainage system was installed in
1967 he said, "and it's definite-
ly time for a new one
Renovation of the field was an
administrative decision and will
cost an estimated $160,000.
University maintenance, which is
responsible for the upkeep of all
University facilities, will fund the
project.
Over the years, the soil on the
field has become so compacted
that water has been impossible to
drain properly. The field would
often be covered with large pud-
dle, nnd after just an inch of rain,
the plang surface would take a
week to completely dry.
The problem reached its peak
earlier this year when head coach
Ed Emory had to move spring
practice to another location.
Because the field was not draining
water properly, the team was
unable to practice.
The new system drains an inch
of rain in less than six hours. It
consists of twelve 16-inch- deep
trenches, which run the length of
the field. A pipe will be placed in
the bottom of each trench and will
carry water off the field into two
large storage pipes. Each trench
will be filled with gravel and sand
with eight inches of soil on top.
Construction of the project,
which began in the last week of
April, will be completed as early
as July 15 in order to allow time
for the grass to mature.
The new field is expected to last
at least 10 years and once com-
pleted, Helmick believes the
Pirates will have something to be
proud of. "It will be as good as
any grass field in the country he
said.
Runners Take Third
In Villanova Meet
PHILADELPHIA � ECU
finished third in the 400- and
1600-meter relay events, as the
Pirates took I lth place with 20
points Sunday in the IC4A Track
and Field Championships at
Villanova University.
Freshman Chris Brooks took
second place in the long jump
with a leap of 24'8
�itfJAv
r
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irtu T �

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The 400-meter relay unit of
Terry Brown, Nathan McCorkle,
Joseph Dingle and Erskine Evans
finished with a time of 40.93.
Eddie Bradley, Reuben Pierce,
Ray Dickerson and Brooks came
in at 3:10.18 in the 1600-meter
relay. McCorkle placed seventh in
100-meter dash with a time of
11.08.
GARY PATTERSON
ECU's Sylvia Bragg competed against 200 girts in order to become one
of 12 basketball plaers making up the National Sports Festival's
Southeast team.
NBA Final Series To
Run At Blazing Tempo
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) � A
message for fans interested in wat-
ching the remainder of the NBA
championship series: Fasten your
seatbelts and enjoy the show.
The Philadelphia 76ers and the
Los Angeles Lakers again will go
at it Thursday night at the Spec-
trum in Game 2 of the best-of-
seven series. That contest could be
played at even a faster tempo than
Sunday's, which the 76ers won
113-107.
With outstanding open-court
players such as Maurice Cheeks,
Andrew Toney and Julius Erving
for the "6ers and Magic Johnson,
Norm Nixon and Jarnaal Wilkes
for the I akers, the rubber will be
burning.
"This is really going to be
something Johnson said. "The
way both teams play � their
styles, their big men � leads to
great open ci irt basketball. 1 can
see it going all the way (seven
games) this time
The two teams combined for 61
fastbreak opportunities Sunday
but Philadelphia, although it had
five fewer chances, outscored the
Lakers, 36-23, and used their run-
ning game to take control in the
third quarter.
"For both teams, this is closer
to the style we both like 76ers
coach Billy Cunningham said.
"These two are the best running
teams in the game
This is the third championship
meeting between the two teams in
the last four years. Even though
it's only a game old, history, of
sorts, was made Sunday.
The loss marked the first time
in the last 10 best-of-seven playoff
series that the Lakers dropped
their opening road game. It also
marked the first time the 76ers led
a playoff series against Los
Angeles.
"I don't know what difference
that's going to make Erving
said. "We fought all year to get
the home-court advantage. 1 don't
think we play drastically different
on the road than an home. If there
is a difference this year, it's that
more plavers hae been able to
contribute for us
Both teams took Monday off
and will resume practice today.
The Lakers are welcoming the
three days oi rest between the first
two games.
Reserve forward Bob McAdoo
is on a day-to-day basis with a
bruised thigh suffered in Friday
night's game against San Antonio
and did not play Sunday. Michael
Cooper was hampered Sunday by-
bruised ribs and Nixon, the
Lakers' high scorer in Game 1
with 26 points, has a sore left
shoulder from a first-quarter col-
lision with Toney.
The Lakers also used Monday
to catch their breath from a whirl-
wind weekend in which they won
the Western Division title Friday
night in San Antonia, flew to
Philadelphia Saturday and played
Sunday.
�� ����� ������ r
�P
? v'
The football field was aot a very pretty sight for thousands of ECU graduating seniors d ri
commencement service. �t
h
s?
A
1

Former ECl basketball stir sam Jone
expected to participate in tht IM4 otyaapai
of the U.S. National Team Handball traml
Weary Drivers
This Week's
CHARLOTTE,
N.C. (UPI) � A :oui
of $30,100 will be up
for grabs when quali-
fying begins Wednes-
day for this weekends
World 600 NASCAR
race but drivers vying
for the lucrative pole
purse will have to bat-
tle pressure and
fatigue as well as each
other.
The Grand Na
tional teams have not
had a break in seven
weeks and will go
after what Charlotte
Motor Speedwav
of.
ficials call the riches:
pole in motor sports
only four days after
competing at Bristol.
Tenn.
"The worst pan is
there are weeks to go
before we can relax a
little bit driver Bill
Elliott said.
"This stretch
running some 13 or 14
weeks in a row is star-
ting to tell on some of
the teams he said
"You can see it in the
garage area from race
to race and you can
almost pick out the
teams that are still go-
ing to be in the cham-
pionship hunt when
this string is over, and
those that aren't. It's
tough working da
De
ifta �
monet �
S4s
130,1 K
winner
in Is
� nave
citent -
teams and p
trentei d I
of pressu
members

capafa i
' ��
N a
champ
X i
lot of press
peop I
Neil B
race's l
champion sa '
amount
pos ted I
the loru
Granc Na
cuit ' .
and
car
The
reached S3
Charlotte an I
Ficials
stakes d . a
track � l
riches; j
top qualifier lot
ficials art i
v
-�.� 4R- � �
.���
Tue. Draft
-10tDn
Wed. Hump NiU
with ECU ID all
Thur College Site 51
�754 cans til 2:00am
Frt End of the Week
704 cans til 11:00pm
Sal. Best in Dance Mi
Sun. Ladies Nite-54
�Free adm. for all
Man. Orientation Pi
Check for specials





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25, 1983
9
Page s
estival

GARY PATTERSON
ECU Photo Lab
.ainsi 204) girls in order to become one
g up the National Sports Festival's
nal Series To
Blazing Tempo
only a game old, history, of
sorts, uds made Sunday.
The loss marked the first time
i the last 10 best-of-seven playoff
that the Lakers dropped
pening road game. It also
- i the first time the 76ers led
a playoff series against Los
Angeles,
1 don't know what difference
ng to make Erving
"We fought all year to get
me-court advantage. I don't
link we p!a drastically different
a J than an home. If there
fferertce this year, it's that
rs hae been able to
e tor us
varm took Monday off
11 resume practice today.
The akers are welcoming the
three days of rest between the first
two games.
Reserve foruard Bob McAdoo
on a day-to-day basis with a
J thigh suffered in Friday
ght's game against San Antonio
d not play Sunday. Michael
was hampered Sunday by
ribs and Nixon, the
I -�� high scorer in Game 1
26 points, has a sore left
Mulder from a First-quarter col-
n Mth Toney.
lakers also used Monday
itch their breath from a whirl-
wind weekend in which they won
the Western Division title Friday
in San Antonia, flew to
Philadelphia Saturday and played
Sundav.
-?��
3PK3i'
kts of ECl gradu.ti.ig senior, dBri�g
Former Coach Seeks Damages
Former ECU basketball star Sam Jones (seen here with teammate Fran Hooks on her back) is
expected to participate in the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, Calif. Jones is presently a member
of the U.S. National Team Handball learn.
COLUMBIA, S.C.
(UPI) � A suit seek-
ing at least $150,000
from the University of
South Carolina and
Athletic Director Bob
Marcum has been fil-
ed by former head
football coach
Richard Bell, who
claims the school
cheated him out of
three years of wages
and benefits.
Bell, who filed the
suit in U.S. District
Court May 13, was
fired by Marcum on
Dec. 1, 1982, for in-
subordination after
refusing to discharge
four assistant coaches
at the athletic direc-
tor's request.
He is the third
former head coach at
USC to sue the
university this year.
Jim Carlen, former
head football coach
and athletic director
before Marcum, has a
federal suit pending
on breach of contract
charges. Pam Par-
sons, former women's
basketball coach, is
suing the university
and Sports Illustrated
for $75 million for
statements about her
written in the
magazine.
Bell contended in
his suit the university
has humiliated and
embarrassed him,
subjected him to
public ridicule and
emotional stress and
refused honor the re-
mainder of his four-
year contract. He has
asked for actual and
punitive damages.
Under his contract, he
was to receive an an-
nual salary of $50,000
and fringe benefits.
Bell, who has taken
a job as an assistant at
Duke, alleged Mar-
cum decided to fire
him and then devised
a plan to have him to
fire four assistant
coaches to induce him
to breach the contract
so the university
would not have to pay
the remainder.
"USC has willfully
and fraudulently fail-
ed and refused to pay
such wages and has
falsely and with intent
to cheat the plaintiff
out of his wages the
suit said.
Bell said he has suf-
fered "enormous and
permanent diminu-
tion of his earning
capacity" because his
ability to obtain a
similar head coaching
job or a promotion
has been impaired. He
also said his personal
and professional
reputations have been
irreparably damaged
CouHTRY Cooking
512 E. 14th Street
Greenville, North Carolina
imAMiWUmMiMtP&iZi
Weary Drivers Set For J
This Week's World 600
New Daily Special Prime Rib $3.99
Why pay $12.00 for a delicious
prime rib dinner.
Get your friends
and try this new special today!
LAUTARES JEWELFRS
ESTASLISHCO 1912
GREENVILLE. N C
Our new summer hours are:
U:00am-9:00pm Daily
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CHARLOTTE,
N.C. (UPI) �A total
of $30,100 will be up
tor grabs when quali-
fying begins Wednes-
day for this weekend's
World 600 NASCAR
race but drivers vying
for the lucrative pole
purse will have to bat-
tle pressure and
fatigue as well as each
other.
The Grand Na-
onal teams have not
had a break in seven
ueeks and will go
after what Charlotte
Motor Speedway of-
ficials call the richest
pole in motor sports
only four days after
competing at Bristol,
Tenn.
"The worst part is
there are weeks to go
before we can relax a
little bit driver Bill
Elliott said.
"This stretch of
running some 13 or 14
weeks in a row is star-
ting to tell on some of
the teams he said.
"You can see it in the
garage area from race
to race and you can
almost pick out the
teams that are still go-
ing to be in the cham-
pionship hunt when
this string is over, and
those that aren't. It's
tough working day
and night, day after
day with no break
Despite the week-
after-week grind, the
monetary figures � a
$478,010 race purse,
$30,100 to the pole
winner, and $50,000
in lap leader awards
� have kindled ex-
citement among the
teams and placed a
tremendous amount
of pressure on their
members.
"I think there will
be 15 or 20 cars
capable of taking the
pole said two-time
Grand National
champion Darrell
Waltrip. "That puts a
lot of pressure on a lot
of people
Neil Bonnett, the
race's defending
champion, said the
amount of money
posted this year for
the longest race on the
Grand National cir-
cuit means "abuse
and misuse" of one's
car.
The pole purse
reached $30,100 when
Charlotte and In-
dianapolis 500 of-
ficials got into a high-
stakes duel over which
track would have the
richest purse for the
top qualifier. Indy of-
ficials announced a
$17,000 pole prize
after noting Charlotte
paid $16,200 last year
Charlotte countered
with $20,000. Indy
upped its pole winn-
ings to $24,000. The
North Carolina track
retaliated by adding a
new Ford Tempo
valued at $9,563, plus
$557 in cash to reach
the $30,100 figure.
Unlike most tracks
where a driver's
fastest lap determines
his starting position,
qualifying at the
l4-mile speedway in-
volves a four-lap
average.
David Pearson,
who has won 14 pole
positions at the track,
said the key to winn-
ing the top starting
position is setting up
the car to run four
consistant laps rather
than one fast lap.
"You have to have
the car exactly right
and running good and
cool for four laps to
win the pole Pear-
son said.
Ron Bouchard said
the four-lap qualify-
ing system "gives us a
better chance at the
money. The chassis
will come into play
more, instead of a
super motor that will
get you around for
one lap
Summer
Schedule
Tue. Draft Night 1. SO adm. -
-10t Draft all Night
Wed. Hump Nite 504 cans�free adm.
with ECU ID all night
Thur College Nite 50cans til 11:00pm
�754cans til 2:00am
Frt End of the Week Party
70 cans til 11:00pm
Sat. Best in Dance Music
Sun. Ladies Nite-54 Draft while it lasts
�Free adm. for all ladies
Mon. Orientation Party
Check for specials during orientation
Remnants
Custom Design
Repair
All Work Done On Premises
p
CRAB A BIGGER SLICE OF SUMMER
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Phone
752-1440
pucians
315 Parkview Commons
Across From Doctors Psrk
Open 9 A.M -5:30 P.M. Mon -Fit
Beecher Kirkiey Dispensing Optician
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Stojocooking your dinner up or cnasing your dinner down
" Grab an extra nour of summertime
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anywrere m our
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GREENVILLE
757-1955
JACKSONVILLE
353-4700
Loon for Otner Stores Opening in Eastern Ncrtr Carolina
buy one get one free
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buy two and try two
Oraer any 4 or more tODomgs ana
get 2 toppings free.
Offer good
thru August 25 1983
U wildcard-pick-a-coupon
Offer good
thru August 25 1983
One o�v c,t oey c : ��
Offer good
thru August 25 1983
?
Dn MCCV-V pe &IZi
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MMMI ��
�. - - �





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 25, 1983
Sailboat Race
Gets Underway
VIRGINIA
BEACH, Va. (UPI)
� Struggling against
sluggish breezes, the
11 teams in the Wor-
rell 1000 sailboat race
took off Tuesday
from the first check-
point at Fort Pierce,
Fla headed for
Cocoa Beach.
Race spokesman
Ned Deaver in
Virginia Beach said
the teams left Fort
Pierce at about 10:20
a.m exactly a day
after the race's quick
start in Fort Lauder-
dale.
But the second day
began more slowly, as
winds dropped down
to between three
knots to four knots
and the teams fought
to capture a stronger
breeze to keep going.
"The winds aren't
blowing very well for
the right use of a
Hobie Cat Deaver
said. "It might be 7 or I
8 o'clock tonight
before they get into!
Cocoa Beach
The teams � seven
from the United
States and one each
from Australia,
France, Canada and
Holland � are sailing
16-foot Hobie Cat
catamarans from Fort
Lauderdale to
Virginia Beach.
Unlike the previous
seven races, the teams
this year are stopping
at each of the 10
checkpoints to rest
and to plot sailing
strategy.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
TO ELMA Your breath it like
that o a thousand buffalo decen-
d.ng upon a dead yah. Your
eye, like pools ot sweat. Your
teeth, like the tusks of
prehistoric mammoths. Your
hair, like a Brillo Pad that's just
been used to scour the pans in an
Italian restaurant. Marry me?
HERB
TUTOR
NEEDED
NEED TUTOR immediately for
management accounting. Call
7S3-4M4 anytime. Ask for AB
DULLAH
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
5 P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
�LASAGNA
�SPAGHETTI
$3.99
(Choice of 3 Sauces)
with Garlic Bread
With ail you can eat soup and salad $4.99
3
"
,1
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT ��
FLOUNDER DINNER
I also Open Fri. and Sal.
nights midnight-3 a.m.
Breakfast Bar open 6:00am
SHONEYS
MS GmmtWi SK4.
Shrimp lovers
Why travel 100 miles
to the beach and pay
high prices for
fresh shrimp?
Popcorn
Shrimp
Dinner
$3.39
2
:amily Restaurants
AWHALEOFAMEAL
"S
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
popcorn shrimp dinner
at only $3.39
Banquet Facilities Available!
758-0327 4
Holly Farms - �fade A
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Saturday, May 28,1983
Lb.
Fresh Cat Whole Or Rib Half
14-17 lb. Aoriji (SliMf FREE)
m
�B
m
3 Lbs.
Loins
Sliced FREE - Armour
Canned
Hams
Each
Sweet
Western
Cantaloupes
2 Lifer
7SO Ml. - Leaeereiee, Bieeee. Resale
Ri unite
Wine
Pk�. el 11 - It Ox. Cett
Miller
rk�. if 12 -11 0i. Cenetee t Lt.
Budweiser
MT 9
11 Ounce
Half Oallea - Denald Dsek

Why Pay M 19
399
289
17 Ox. - Whale Craaae Style
Del Monte Solder. Corn EH Hot Dog SaUCO
� Ceeet - Feed Teare
Ho�kara,er Hot Pee.
Buns 8,
Rolls
119 Sheet. 1 Ply SQ DR'
So-Ori SQ-DRl
fnsfpini9
Why Pay 59'
V
10 0x. � Castleherry Teies Pete leaker Mill
3109
14 Ox. � Freeeb Ctt
Del Monte 6rtM Betas
Qiert
Duke's Mayonnaise
4 Peek 1 Ply
489
4,5 Or liver Xidoey Hearty $tot - Oat Fee4
Purina 100E
7.15 0x. � Feed Team
Edon Toilet Tissue Maearoni ft Cheese
�Mm
Food Town Sleaeh
3?S�
Trend
Detergent
Why Pay 4 49
4��'VW
10 Ounce
31E
Pizza
Whr Ps '1 29
IvVvv
1 lb Food Town
Margarine
Quarters
Why Pa 47 E�:H
?
3l� �
" wii. Wi' .famt
lago .��n ��
? a. � ii mtr
� m �nmmmitfmmm





Title
The East Carolinian, May 25, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 25, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.269
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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