The East Carolinian, May 18, 1983






She lEaat (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Uie,i�tJ
Vol.57 Nof (p )h
Tlumday, May 18, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Jenkins Planning To Enter Governor's Race
L
?
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Former ECU Chancellor Dr.
I eo W. Jenkins has unofficially
announced his plans to run for
governor in 1984. "I'm very
serious Jenkins said. "I'm go-
ing to take a crack at it
Jenkins, 69, served as
chancellor at ECU for 18 years
before retiring in 1978. Since
then. Jenkins has remained active
sithin the Democratic Party while
handling special assignments for
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr.
Jenkins said he would not of-
ficially announce his candidacy
until next January because doing
so would require him to give up
his position with "Tarheel Por-
traits a weekly television show.
The network would have to give
equal air time to other announced
candidates if he remained with the
show.
Consistent with his
background, Jenkins noted
education would be his primary
concern if elected governor.
Jenkins commented he was in
favor of introducing North
Carolina students to the computer
age which he termed "the thing of
vhe future
Jenkins said he would like to
see computers introduced at the
high school and community col-
lege level.
"The second thing we've got to
give serious thought to is day care
centers for working mothers
Jenkins said. "Today, people
can't live off one salary; most of
our young folks are two-income
families
Jenkins said he would like to
see more affordable and
reasonable daycare. "I think in-
dustry itself has got to get into the
act (daycare for its employees)
more than it has in the past
Jenkins will be joining an
already packed field of
Democratic hopefuls in the gover-
nor's race. The field is expected to
include Charlotte Mayor H. Ed-
ward Knox, Attorney General
Rufus L. Edminsten, Insurance
Commissioner John R. Ingram,
Lt. Gov. James C. Green, Com-
merce Secretary S.M. "Lauch"
Faircloth, former Deputy Human
Resources Secretary Thomas O.
Gilmore, Rep. Charles G. Rose
111, D-N.C, and former Superior
Court Judge L. H. Thornburg.
Thornburg and Knox have of-
ficially announced their can-
didacies.
Jenkins said he considered the
big field an advantage to his can-
didacy, adding his feelings that
"the more the merrier
A large field could force the
race to enter a second primary
stage which Jenkins thinks would
help his candidacy.
Jenkins has decided to wait
before getting up a fund-raising
organization to support his can-
didacy. "I feel that there ought to
be a place in North Carolina for a
person to run on issues and not
make it a contest to see who can
raise the most money
Another issue Jenkins said he
would work for would permit
dependents of military personnel
to attend state colleges at reduced
in-state rates. Currently, North
Carolina is one of only seven
states which do not allow military
dependents to attend school at in-
state price levels.
"It just seems ridiculous that
we don't let military dependents
come to our state-supported
schools the same way that we let
citizens come Jenkins said.
Jenkins said he would be op-
posed to efforts to raise North
Carolina's drinking age above
current levels. He said the pro-
blem of drunken driving was one
of education, not age. "If a boy is
able to go to war and defend his
See, Dr Page 3
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Dr. Leo Jenkins, who along with former N.C. Senator Robert Morgan
received ECU's first honorary doctorate degrees, is planning to enter the
'84 governor's race.
Transit Authority Ordering New Buses
Bv GREG RIDEOUT
News Kditor
is
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Transit Manager Bill Hilliard announced Monday that he plans to pur-
chase three new busses this fall.
The SGA Transit Authority
in the process of purchasing three
new buses that would save the
school more than $200,000 over
the next five years. Transit
Manager Bill Hilliard said Mon-
day the move would avoid a possi-
ble student fee increase.
Hilliard said the three buses
would cost approxiamately
$60,000 each. The money to pay
for the buses will come from a
$120,000 loan taken out by the
ECU Board of Trustees and from
a S60J000 surplus the transit
authority currently has in its
budget. The transit authority
would pay back the loan over the
next four years.
The new buses were badly need-
ed, Hilliard said, because the six
buses he has are constantly
needing to be repaired, over-
crowded and get poor gas mileage
(3.3 mpg). The three new buses
would hold 95 people, almost
twice as many people as the cur-
rent vehicles. They would also be
better quality buses with a life
span of more than 12 years and
get seven miles per gallon.
According to Hilliard, three of
the old buses would be sold when
the new ones arrive. He said two
1973 models and a 1976 model
would go to make room for the
1983s coming in October. The old
The Tran-ot
purchase the
lowest bidder
have 30 davs
buses are Thomas Built buses,
which Hilliard expects to purchase
again. He said they are now in the
process of receiving bids on the
purchase.
Authority would
buses from the
and would then
to pay for them.
Hilliard said the Trustees would
then borrow the money needed
from the bank that gives them the
lowest interest rate.
The older buses cost approx-
imately $2.000 and ran on
gasoline; the new buses will be
equipped with diesel engines.
Hilnard also said the transit
authority had applied for a grant
from the N.C. Department of
Members Move In
Transportation which would
enable him to run buses
downtown at night. The grants
are being given out for new and
innovative ideas in transporta-
tion. Hilliard believes that with
Gov. James B. Hunt's emphasis
on drunken driving, his proposal
has a good chance of being
selected to recieve the funds.
Hilliard said the plan calls for
running buses downtown to the
bar areas on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday. He said there
would be two routes, one running
towards Riverbiuff and
Eastbrook apartments and one
through campus and towards
Oakmont apartments.
TKE Frat House Reopens
Complete with an $1800 rewir-
ing job and lots of smoke detec-
tors the Tau Kappa Epsilon
fraternity house is once again a
home the fraternity's brothers.
An early morning fire Jan. 8
caused more than $15,000 in
damages to the three-story struc-
ture. Most of the damage was
confined to the attic area which
served as bedrooms for four
students. The cause of the fire was
never determined although some
members have speculated faulty
wiring or a lit cigarette might have
ignited the blaze. There were no
injuries.
Assistant to the Chancellor
Charles R. Blake, faculty advisor
to the TKE's, praised contractors
and TKE members for their hard
work which resulted in the
reopening of the house before
summer classes. "We are very
pleased with the progress Blake
said. "Now we can start off as a
cohesive group in the fall
Blake helped orchestrate a
$15,500 loan from a Greenville
bank which was used to make
repairs including a new roof, new
shingles for the side of the house,
new walls and ceilings.
Because of poor financial
management the fraternity's fire
insurance was allowed to expire,
leaving the group without
coverage. Blake has worked with
TKE members to make the frater-
nity financially stable. The
group's monthly mortgage pay-
ment will be $600 for the next five
years and be reduced to $200 after
seven years. Blake said the rent
from the 14 members scheduled to
live in the house next fall would
cover the expenses.
TKE members and their little
sisters took an active role in the
renovation effort. According to
Blake, their efforts represented
about $7000 in work. Members
led the clean-up effort con-
tributing painting, carpentry and
other interior work. They also laid
carpet, donated by a local
business, in several rooms.
Blake said the house required
less repair than initially expected.
The saved funds were used to
make other improvements on the
structure. Blake credited the con-
tractor for the1000 to $1500 sav-
ing.
Blake said the house is in the
best shape it's been in the last
seven years. He said TKE alumni
would be proud of the renovated
building.
Blake said the new wiring in the
house updated the electrical
system to meet the standards used
for today's newly-constructed
homes. The TKE house was con-
structed in the early 1950s.
"We're very safe Blake add-
ed. Blake said the group would be
able to look back on the tragic
event in a positive light and learn
from the experience.
"We're very safe Blake add-
ed. Blake said the group would be
able to look back on the tragic
event in a positive light and learn
from the experience.
James Lanier Selected
New Vice Chancellor;
Assumes Post July 1
James Lanier
By GREG RIDEOUT
New MMor
Dr. James L. Lanier has been
selected to fill the post of vice
chancellor for institutional
development. Lanier, whose ap-
pointment takes place July 1, is
currently the director of develop-
ment and alumni affairs at
Louisburg College in Louisburg,
N.C.
Acting Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs Angelo Volpe
was also named to continue his
current post permanently. Both
Volpe and Lanier were recom-
mended by search committees
before being approved by the
UNC Board of Governors.
Lanier attended Louisburg Col-
lege and received his bachelor
degree in health, physical educa-
tion and recreation and his
masters in education from ECU.
The job of the vice chancellor
for institutional advancement and
planning includes coordinating
fundraising and promoting good-
will in the local community.
Chancellor John M. Howell,
speaking on the appointment, said
Lanier "has a background that
already prepares him to succeed in
this university effort. He knows
the communities outside the cam-
pus as well as the various aspects
of the campus
Lanier, 36, will succeed Dr.
Donald Lemish, who resigned in
January 1982. Lanier planned and
coordinated Louisburg's develop-
ment and alumni programs since
1976 and directed the three-year
$4.2 million "Third Century"
campaign, Louisburg College's
most successfull fundraising ven-
ture in 30 years.
Volpe, 44, is a native of
Brooklyn, N.Y. He succeeds Dr.
Robert H. Maier, who resigned in
Janurary to become profesror of
experimental surgery in the
School of Medicine. Before his
present appointment, Volpe had
been dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences for more than two
years.
Grads Celebrate
POtt Bv GARY PATTERSON
These two lucky grads hug each other in relief after commencement ceremonies May 6. More than 2600 lucky
ECU students received degrees at the early morning excercises.
World News At A Glance
From Staff and Wire Reports
While we reporters joined you, readers, in sun-
bathing down at the beach, this paper stopped but
the news went on. Here is the rundown of top
stories.
INTERNATIONAL Prosecutor-General Tabrizi
dissolved Iran's Communist Party. U.S. Secretary
of State Shultz is credited with the peace plan now
approved by Israel and Lebanon but not Syria.
PLO leader Yassir Arafat calls for war. Socialists
won national elections in Spain by a landslide.
England's Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher call-
ed a general election for June 9. Iran and Iraq ex-
changed their first POWs. Chilean soldiers sur-
rounded Santiago shantytowns and seized 1,000
residents.
NATIONAL U.S. Roman Catholic bishops ap-
proved and issued their teaching letter opposing
current nuclear strategy; the vote was 238-9. Exit
exams for functional literacy may be required for
high school graduation in Florida and possibly all
states. The stock market recorded record highs, but
the job market for college grads got tighter than
ever. Chicago's machine is outvoting its new mayor
in the city council. Thirteen-month-old Brandon
Hall, who received two liver transplants, died.
Looks like Lakers vs. 76ers in the NBA finals.
STATE Chlordane and other chemicals in a
Durham well suggests widespread well contamina-
tion in North Carolina. Nine of 11 N.C. represen-
tatives joined in passing the nuclear freeze resolu-
tion in the U.S. House.
LOCAL The Greenville City Council adopted an
anti-noise ordinance. Campus groups may apply
for one exception per semester. ECU commence-
ment in Ficklen featured 2650 graduates, ECU's
first doctorate of philosophy, and ECU's first
honorary degrees to Leo Jenkins and Robert
Morgan. Three ECU hazing cases were dismissed.
Professor Stan Riggs won an O. Max Gardner
Award.
OFF THE WALL Mikhail Tsypkin, graduate of
Moscow State and formerly a Soviet army reserve,
reports on Soviet conscripts, their training and
morale. Airport noise is linked with heart disease.
T
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r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MAY 18, 1983
IHEJLASTCAROLINIAS
Announcements
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may um ttio form at right or
woo o separate shoaf of paper If
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units par lino. Each lottor, punc-
tuation mark and word spaco
counts as one unit. Capitaiixo and
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cepted over tho phono. Wo
reserve tno right to rolect ony ad.
Alt ads must be propaM. Enclose
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Please print icjiM! Use capital and
lower case biters.
�Here w THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office by 3:Pf Tuesday before
Wednesday
Name.
Address.
CityState.
No tines.
,�P.
at Tsa pst asst S.
it"
Mfelcome
Students
SOULS
ELECTION
Anyooe interested in running
souls office next semester con
tact Barbara at 75a 9550
BINGO�ICECREAM
PARTY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a
BingoIce Cream Party this
Tuesday, May 24. 193 at 700
pm in the MendenhaM Student
Center Multi Purpose Room All
ECU students, faculty, staff,
their dependents and guests are
welcome Admission is still only
15 cents. Eight types of Bmgo
games will be played Try your
luck at Bingo, eat delicious ice
cream, and have some fun!
Following is a schedule for the
summer Bingoice Cream Par
ties. AH parties are held at 7 00
pm In the Multipurpose Room
Tuesday, May 24, 19�3, Tues
day. May 30, l�s3 Tuesday,
June 7, 1983 Tueday. June 14,
1983
COUNSELORS
WANTED
Male counselors needed tow
ortt In the Lutheran Camp in
Virginia. Two resident pro-
grams as well as canoeing,
backpacking, biking and beach
camp. Contact Rev. F Wayne
Williams, Ft Valley Rt Box 355,
St. David's Church, VA 22652.
GREENVILLE
PEACE COMMITTEE
Love-brutally humiliated and
destroyed a world of stagnant
possibilities created by the false
fathers who built and tolerated
the Auschweitz s and Viefnams
of history, those who have par
ticipated in the torture
chambers of the ecclesiastical
inquisitions and then forgotten
without remorse. This is the
state of affairs that cries out to
us, that plagues our consciences
and demands to be challenged
if you mr ready to make a com
mitment to justice if you are
ready to begin building a new
kind of society tree of violence.
poverty, and alienation we need
you. Come to the meeting of the
Greenville Peace Committee at
M S Elm St. at 7 00 Friday
night, or phone 748 490 for more
information
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven-
ture's Dive Cozumel, Mexico on
the beautiful Yucatan peninsula.
Aug. 3. 1903 to Aug. 10. 1983
Group trip for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving meals,
lodging and air fare from
Raleigh Non-dive" welcome.
Call Ray Scharf at 757 6441.
INTER VAeWlTY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Monday Nights Bible Study
8:30 pm 108 Jarvis Dorm.
Prayer Group for spiritual sup-
port and fellowship 10 15 pm
every night 111 Fletcher. For
more information contact: Todd
108 Jarvis, Shelia 157 Jarvis and
Scott ill Fletcher.
PRE MED STUDENTS
The Kaplan Course, a
preparatory corse for the
MCAT, will be taught at ECU
this summer beginning the last
week m June This course has
been proven to raise MCAT
scores by as much as 2 to 3
points We need 20 interested
persons to sign up in order for
the service to be at ECU this
summer The course is once a
week tor 8 weeks Anyone in
terested must sign up in the
Biology office or call the Biology
club at 757 6286 or 758 6775 for
more information A deposite
should be sent m within 2 weeks
Due to limited space, we can
nont reserve your seat without a
deposit information packets ex
plaining the course curriculum
are available in the mam
Biology office
TEMPORARY
The staff of the East Caroh
nian would like to welcome those
summer students who will "se in
Greenville temporarily Please
try to maintain that certain
equilibrium between study
� ngdying out in the sun with a
six pack of Michelob with your
textbook closed) and party
mgisuckmg down long island ice
teas at Darryls waiting to go
downtown! Please drive
carefully after you have had a
few drinks, because they give
out DUIs down here like the
ELBO gives out draft on ladies
night Have a good one
u
Pitta inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
�-aYA Mn �.
A HARD DAY
LIKE OUR
HARD DAYS NIGHT
Every
THURSDAY
at the
CAROLINA
OPRY HOUSE:
FREE BEER
(8:30-10:00)
FREE ADMISSION ALL NIGHT


4i
Summer
Schedule
Tue. Draft Night 1.50 adm. -
-10t Draft all Night
Wed. Hump Nite 50t cans�free adm.
with ECU ID all night
Thur College Nite 50cans til 11:00pm
�754 cans til 2:00am
Fri. End of the Week Party
704 cans til 11:00pm
Sat. Best in Dance Music
Sun. Ladies Nite-5f Draft while it lasts
�Free adm. for all ladies
Mon. Orientation Party
Check for specials during orientation
The very best in solid gold Rock and Roll
with WITN's Greg Allison

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Super Summertime happy hour specials.
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Late Night Happy Hour 10:00-1:00
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Seab
Bv PATRICK
O'NEILL
Ricky Seabolt, the
ECU student from
Durham who was
critically injured
March 2 in the Village
Green apartment ex
plosion, is making
cellent progress
toward a full recovers
and hopes to be t
at ECU to finish up
requirements for a
marketing degree
"I'm ready to get
out of here and go
home Seabolt said
Monday m an inter-
view from his room in
the Charlotte
Rehabilitation
Hospital where he has
been since last month
"I could come back
(to school) in the fall.
ut it's doubt:
Seabolt -
right now lm loot
to come back spring
session
Both Seabolt
his mother. D
Seabolt. than-
members of the Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity
for the continuous
support they have
given to the family
during their 10-week
ordeal since the ev
sion. "I can't tell you
how great they've
been Seabolt'
mother said, adding
that fraternity
members have
regularly visited,
telephoned and writ-
ten to check on their
brothers recovery.
Seabolt is president of
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN MAY 18, 1983
j
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iiiUHuiiitiimmiimiNiiimimuuiHiiHiiuiHuii
Seabolt Improving Fast
Bv PATRICK
O'NEILL
vwM.ni Ne. Kdilof
Ricky Seabolt, the
ECU student from
Durham who was
critically injured
March 2 in the Village
Green apartment ex-
plosion, is making ex-
cellent progress
toward a full recovery
and hopes to be back
at ECU to finish up
requirements for a
marketing degree.
"I'm ready to get
out of here and go
home Seabolt said
Monday in an inter-
view from his room in
the Charlotte
Rehabilitation
Hospital where he has
been since last month.
"1 could come back
(to school) in the fall,
but it's doubtful
Seabolt said. "So
right now I'm looking
to come back spring
session
Both Seabolt and
his mother, Doris
Seabolt, thanked
members of the Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity
for the continuous
support they have
given to the family
during their 10-week
ordeal since the explo-
sion. "I can't tell you
how great they've
been Seabolt's
mother said, adding
that fraternity
members have
regularly visited,
telephoned and writ-
ten to check on their
brothers recovery.
Seabolt is president of
Pi Kappa Phi. Seabolt was side throughout the
Seabolt is the only transfered to N.C. ordeal. She won t
person still hospitaliz- Memorial Hospital in leave, said Seabolt,
ed as a result of the Chapel Hill. A short who has been trying
time later he was ad-
pre-dawn explosion
that took the life of
ECU student David
Martin and injured 12
others.
Seabolt was sleep-
ing on the couch in
Martin's third-floor
apartment when li-
quid propane gas
tanks ignited in a
laundry room below
Martin's apartment.
The force of the ex-
plosion blew Martin
and Seabolt into a
backyard swimming
pool. Martin was kill-
ed instantly. Seabolt
was admitted to Pitt
County Memorial
Hospital in critical
condition suffering
from severe head and
liver injuries.
Seabolt did not
learn of Martin's
death until two weeks
ago when doctors and
his parents decided he
was ready to be filled
in on the details of the
explosion. "It just
tore him up terribly
Mrs. Seabolt said.
Seabolt's mother
also showed her son
newspaper accounts
of the explosion. "He
didn't realize the
severity of the explo-
sion Martin's father
has also been in touch
with Seabolt by
telephone several
times since Seabolt
was told of his
friend's death.
On March 17,
mitted to the
Charlotte facility so
he could begin the
long rehabilitation
process.
"We're real happy
with his progress
said Seabolt's mother.
"But he's got a ways
to go yet
"I can walk, but it
tires me out Seabolt
said. "I'm still in the
beginning stages of
walking
Seabolt uses a cane
to help him keep his
balance. He is still
suffering from some
to encourage his
mother to take some
time for herself.
Doctors have set
June 10 as Seabolt's
prospective release
date. ECU has
granted Seabolt as
much time as he needs
to make up his course
work from last
semester. Seabolt was
slated to graduate this,
summer. Seabolt's
mother said she plans
to bring her son back
to Greenville to meet
the doctors, nurses
and other people who
have helped the
Seabolts' throughout
their son's recovery.
NOBS
I Jewlery Repair
custom crafting
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: guarantied work
Bring This Ad for
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Dr. Leo Jenkins
In Gov. Race
Continued
from Page 1
country at 18,
he
paralysis on his right ought to be able to
side. Doctors allow know how to drink m-
Seabolt to leave the
hospital one night a
month. Last month he
went to visit his
brother in Georgia.
This month he went
home for the first
time.
While at home,
Seabolt saw many
friends including
fraternity brothers
and relatives. "We're
just thankful now that
Ricky's going to be
alright said Pi Kap-
pa Phi member Scott
Smith. "It's fantastic,
we thank God every-
day that he is on his
way to a full
recovery Smith was
among those who
visited Seabolt in
Durham.
Seabolt's mother
has been at her son's
telligently at 18
Jenkins said. "I don't
think wisdom's going
to come because you
add a year on. More
and more people have
to be taught that
drinking and driving
is something we can-
not tolerate in this
society. It's just too
dangerous
Jenkins stressed
that the United States
should "remain
tough" on national
defense matters.
"We've got to be
competitive with the
Russians; there's no
use kidding ourselves
on that Jenkins
said. "They're (the
Russians) not letting
us alone because they
love us. They're let-
ting us alone because
they're afraid of at-
tacking us
Jenkins did not say
specifically whether
he would support a
nuclear freeze resolu-
tion, but he did say he
would support bi-
lateral reductions in
nuclear arms if the
Russians also took
part in such efforts.
Jenkins said he
could not predict a
sure victory in his race
for governor. "No
one knows what a
man or a women will
do when they get
behind the closed cur-
tain
Jenkins plans to
travel around the state
during the coming
months on speaking
engagements before
he officially an-
nounces his can-
didacy.
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I
2Ufe lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, a
Mike Hughes. �� t�,or
WAVERLY MERRITT. Orector of Athmtam,
Scott Lindley. �,
ALI AFRASHTEH. Crtdu Mmnmter
Stephanie Groon. cv�rm� M���r
Clay Thornton. ,���, s�-
Cindy Pleasants, s� eouot
Greg Rideout. nm &w
CARLYN EBERT, Entertainment Editor
Lizanne Jennings, tmoam
David Gordon. Produce Manner
May 18. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Dr. Leo Jenkins
Joining The Race In '84
Although it's not official yet,
ECU Chancellor Emeritus Dr. Leo
Jenkins has announced his plans to
seek the North Carolina gover-
nor's seat in 1984.
Granted, that race won't even
fully commence for another year.
Nevertheless, we would like to take
this opportunity to lend our sup-
port to this renowned state patriot
and pioneer.
For most of us, the name Leo
Jenkins is synonymous with
change. As well it should be. While
serving as chancellor for 18 years,
Jenkins transformed the then East
Carolina College into what's now a
major Southern university, work-
ing tirelessly with diverse
legislative bodies toward such ad-
ditions as the ECU School of Art
and, most notably, the School of
Medicine.
Again and again, before, during
and since his days at ECU, he has
proven himself a capable leader, a
man unafraid of initiating wor-
thwhile change, a man dedicated to
the social, economic and political
well-being of his fellow North
Carolinians.
Naturally, at this point in time,
speculation on any one part of
Jenkins' gubernatorial
"platform" would be impossible,
since no such formal outline has
yet been put together. Never-
theless, since Dr. Jenkins'
theoretical "stands" are no secret
to anyone familiar with the man,
some comment is necessary.
It seems only natural that im-
provement in education would be
high atop the list of Jenkins'
priorities in a gubernatorial capaci-
ty. Understanding "where the
world is going he is an advocate
of introducing the state's schools
to the computer age. Although
many of North Carolina's institu-
tions of higher learning boast ex-
cellent computer schools, Jenkins
would like to see access to com-
puters and computer education
broadened, and not only on the
college level but in high schools
and junior colleges as well.
Jenkins is also very conscious of
the economic tensions facing most
North Carolinians today and in
recognizing such, would be in
favor of seeking new, less expen-
sive modes of daycare.
Furthermore, one issue of keen
interest to many college students in
the state, Jenkins has said he
would work with those means at
his disposal toward passing legisla-
tion enabling military dependents
to attend North Carolina's public
colleges and universities without
paying out-of-state tuition. Cur-
rently, North Carolina, which has
one of the highest military popula-
tions in the country, is one of seven
states lacking such a law.
But despite all this talk on
"issues Dr. Jenkins fortunately
doesn't fit the bill as a typical
aspiring politician. Unlike those
who would seek the office for per-
sonal glory � not necessarily that
we're pointing any accusing
fingers yet � Jenkins is sincerely
dedicated to the people of North
Carolina.
At 69, most men and women
would be content to retire from the
trials and tribulations of public
life. But not Jenkins. In fact, at
age 69, Jenkins now seems more fit
than ever.
As always, our hats are off to
Dr. Jenkins. And we wish him the
best of fortune and offer him our
continued support in the months to
come.
Working Actively Through Passive Ideals:
A 'Timeless' Idea Whose Time Has Come
By PAT O'NEILL
"An eye for an eye only ends up mak-
ing the whole world blind. "
� Mohandas Gandhi
Although the film about this great
pacifist leader took home the Academy
Award earlier this year, until recently, I
couldn't understand all the excitement
Gandhi seemed to be causing.
A short time ago, 1 read somewhere
that people are fearing the film will "set
off a stampede to pacifism" and that
people will begin to catch "Gandhi
Virus I'm tickled at the thought of it!
But today's leaders have reason to be
worried. Men like Gandhi and Martin
Luther King Jr. were able to exemplify
the power of non-violent resistance in
their efforts to put an end to injustice.
However, the principles of non-violence
are not deemed viable by today's
leaders, who tout the "peace by nuclear
strength" message. The Gandhi film has
re-awakened the sleeping spirit of
pacifism � and yes, it's also beginning
to make sense to a lot of people.
Just as Gandhi pointed out the folly in
"eye-for-eye" reasoning, millions of
people throughout the world are also
beginning to see through the
"nuke-for-a-nuke" mentality of their
leaders.
Instead, people are beginning to see
deterrence and other nuclear strategies
for what they really are: suicide.
The world is faced with several
choices. At this point, none of these can
guarantee us a peaceful existence. I see
our basic choice as being one of risk v.
certainty. Any unilateral disarmament
effort undertaken by the U.S. or
U.S.S.R. will be "risky" for either side.
On the other hand, a continuance of
the arms race at the current levels will in-
sure us "certainty" of nuclear death.
The reason I speak in terms of
unilateral efforts is because time is too
limited for long, drawn-out talks, talks
which have been basically fruitless for
more than two decades. Building trust
and reducing tension are additional ad-
vantages of unilateral initiatives.
Gandhi and King were both aware of
the risks that result from being non-
violent. "They may torture my body
Gandhi said, "break my bones, even kill
me; then they will have my dead body
not my obedience Ironically, both
Gandhi and King met death by way of
an assassin's bullet.
Neither King nor Gandhi would have
killed to save his own life. "There is no
cause Gandhi said, "for which I am
prepared to kill.
Both men are also recognized for their
brilliant insight on numerous issues.
Gandhi lived and identified with the
poor; when he traveled, he went third-
class. King represented the black
American, who was once enslaved by
plantation owners and who is now
enslaved most often by poverty or
racism. "Poverty Gandhi said, "is the
worst form of violence
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to
justice everywhere King wrote in his
famous 1963 "Letter from a Birm-
ingham County Jail Both he and Gan-
dhi spent a good deal of time behind
bars.
Both were pacifists, but neither v.
passive. "I have never advocated passive
anything Gandhi said. "Our
resistance must be active and pro-
vocative King was always at the front
of the march, "actively" working to end
injustice.
Gandhi and King both possessed in-
credible faith, faith unlike that of most
mortals. King dreamed for a day when
"all God's children, black men and
white men. Jews and gentiles. Pro-
testants and Catholics" would be able to
live harmoniously. Gandhi felt the onlv
devils in the world were those in our
hearts. "And that's where the battle-
should be fought he said.
Today, in the age of nuclear weapon
we are the devils to the Russians and
they to us. My hope is that the world will
quickly embrace the spirit of hope seen
in great persons like Gandhi and King.
Perhaps when we Ttd the-wortd of
nuclear weapons and begin to feed the
millions dying from hunger, we will tru-
ly be "free at last
Intelligence Links U.S.
Deaths To Moslem Sect
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
SHIITE TERRORISTS: The Central
Intelligence Agency is convinced that
murder and possession of weapons.
Meanwhile, U.S. intelligence expert-
believe that the Syrian intelligence ser-
vices, headed by the brother of Syrian
President Hafez Assad, provided secret
Shiite Moslems are responsible for the aid to the Shiite Moslems who reported-
Don't Cry Guys; It Was Just A Game
On Winners & Losers
recent bombing of the U.S. Embassy in
Beirut, which killed 17 Americans. The
incident was just one in a string of
similar attacks perpetrated by radical
Shiites.
U.S. intelligence sources believe the
terrorists have connections with Iran's
ly carried out the Beirut attack.
Syrian leaders want the United States
out of Lebanon and apparently believe
that the best way to achieve this goal is
to kill the Americans who are stationed
there.
THE PRESSER FILE: Colorful
The editorial page is probably the last
place you expect, or for that matter
want, to read about sports. After all,
editorial pages are for disseminating opi-
nions, right? Right. Well, that's why I'm
going to write about a sports story about
which I have very strong feelings.
About three weeks or so ago, the
staffs of The East Carolinian and
WZMB squared off in our second an-
nual inter-media softball championship
held at the illustrious Allied Health Field
No. 7.
MIKE
HUGHES
Sportsbeat
Pre-game festivities, which, ironical-
ly, came before the game, included a
comedy show by several members of the
WZMB staff (a routine they called
"infield practice"), much beer drinking
and scouting out good places in the
woods to relieve oneself.
The radio team arrived on the field
early, under the humorous assumption
that practice would help them avenge
their 28-3 loss in 1982. And in the
background, the air waves on 91.3 FM
rang out with taunts, jeers and predic-
tions of an easy WZMB rout. It had all
the makings of an upset. The air was
thick with anticipation.
With the score tied at 0-0 in the top of
the first inning, the WZMB team (which
appeared exhausted from all their
"practice") failed to put anyone on
bate. However, they did manage one
almost-close call at first base when their
third batter (I can't remember his name)
took a home-run swing and grounded
out to our catcher.
In the bottom of the first, ZMB's
tough pitching staff kept the game close,
yielding only seven runs on nine hits.
However, to the credit of the tight
WZMB defense, one East Carolinian
base runner was almost thrown out at
first base.
He was severely reprimanded.
East Carolinian star pitcher Gary Pat-
terson, in his first appearance on the
mound this season, hurled four more in-
nings of no-hit ball before staggering out
to the mound in the top of the sixth inn-
ing and giving up � of all things � a
double. But despite the embarrassment,
Patterson pulled his faculties (or what
was left of his faculties) together and
struck out the side.
Not much worth writing about hap-
pened in the next few innings, except
when a WZMB baserunner tripped over
a discarded beer bottle on his way to
first base, skidded along the dirt for a
while and yelled out a burrage of dirty
words.
He was immediately made WZMB's
team captain.
But then, WZMB staged one of the
great comebacks of all time. In the top
of the 13th inning (we agreed to keep on
playing until either WZMB scored or we
all passed out), The East Carolinian was
shelled for two hits. Our hopes for a
shutout were shattered. And when the
dust cleared (a car went by on the dirt
road alongside the field), the score was
38-1.
This proved the decisive factor in the
game, as The East Carolinian team
started to fall apart. It wasn't so much
that we started playing any worse as it
was everyone had to leave. Pat O'Neill,
an all-star from the League of Women
Voters who, of course, played "left"
field, was already late for a rally. And
yours truly had to get home in time for
Leave It To Beaver. Nevertheless, with a
skeleton team of about five, the domi-
nant newspaper squad managed six
more runs while yielding three in the
14th inning-
After the game, the modest victors
(us) congratulated our opponents (them)
on their fine performance. We, like all
modest athletes, knew there was a time
and place for good sportsmanship.
But that was then, and this is now.
Thus, 1 close with a note to all those DJs
who were so full of taunts before the
game:
You know, you guys really sucked.
Ayatollah Khomeini, who is believed to Cleveland strongman Jackie Presser has
be using them to foment worldwide been elected president of the powerful
revolution. A few examples: Teamsters union, but his rise to power is
� The CIA has learned that Khomeini no surprise to the Justice Department,
planned to use the Shiites to stir up riots Officials there have been keeping a close
last summer throughout Saudi Arabia, eye on him for years.
which is controlled by rival Sunni Douglas Roller, the U.S. attorney
Moslems. who prosecuted Presser's predecessor.
� Some of the same dissident students Roy Williams, co-authored a report on
who took over the American Embassy in organized crime and labor unions in
Tehran in 1979 were later dispatched to 1977. The report stated that Presser's
Egypt shortly before President Anwar "goal is reportedly the presidency of the
Sadat was killed. Intelligence analysts international Teamsters union Added
suspect they may have played a role in the report: "The organized crime affiha-
plotting Sadat's assassination. tion and involvement of Presser
� The government of Turkey recently through, and independent of, the
uncovered an attempt by 33 Shiites to Teamsters Union are well documented
create an Islamic state within that coun- mj
try. They were charged with attempted iMMNMfcMB.kc
EAST CAROLINIAN
ah f a M
26 8 19 5
Rideoui, 3b
Hughes, lb
O'Neill. If
Sacco,f
Williams, u
Patterson, p
Thornton. 2b
Pleasants, cf
24 S 16 3
26 6 20 6
25 6 20 6
24 6 21 7
23 3 10 4
24 5 16 6
23 3 10 3
Tatato
Twtstt
WZMB
OB 44 132 42
WZMB
Player No. I, p
Player No. 2. c
Player No. 3. lb
Player No. 4. 2b
Player No. 5. 3b
Player No. 6. ss
Player No. 7. If
Player No. t, cf
Player No. 9. rf
Player No. 10. dog
Player No. 11, doo
Player No. 12, dip
Player No. 13, fds
Tolas.
SIM
5 0 0 0
5 111
4 110
5 111
3 0 I 0
4 0 0 0
4 0 10
4 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
2 0 00
2 0 00
0 0 0 0
41 4 6 3
aaa asa asa saa u-4
732 323 233 332 6a - 42
Game W.nning RBI - O'Neill (2)
E � Player Not. 1.2,3.4,3.7,9.11,12.13 (four each). DP - East
Carolinian 3. LOB � EC 90. WZMB 2. 2B � Entire East Caroli-
nian learn (4 each). Player No. 4. 3B � Entire East Carolinian team
(3 each). HR � Entire East Carolinian team (2 tack) except Dave
Williams, who got 6.
IP H B Ot BB SO
WZMB
PtayerNo. I(LO-I) 13 132 42 42 0 0
lfWl-0) 14 5 4 406
T �4:31. A �tor 9.
DEAR DIARY �.
Job Out I oo
(CPS) � The job
outlook for college
grads appears bleak
for the rest of this
decade, according to a
new Stanford Univer-
sity study of the long-
range college job
market.
Moreover, "an in-
creasing number (of
college grads) will be
forced to accept jobs
incommensurate with
their level of train-
ing says Russell
Rumberger, author of
the report.
"Based on projec-
tions of low employ-
ment growth for the
'80s he explains,
"and the increasing
number of people
who will hold college
degrees, 1 see a large
number of college
graduates who will be
over-trained and not
able to get upper-level
jobs
Already,
Rumberger says, one
out of every four
young workers in the
labor force has a col-
lege degree. And by
1990, he estimates,
one out of three will
be college grads.
At the same time,
the number of jobs
which require a col-
lege education is
holding steady, while
the number of service
and clerical jobs
panding.
There's alreal
glut of college
in many fij
Rumberger p
out, and soon
high-demand
like engineers
computer sci
grads will be
peting for few
fewer job openu
"We're simplj
ducmg more
grads than the
market can at
and it's going
worse
Many grads
ticularly those
aren't choosey
their majors �
pushed into
and clerical joi
which they arei
qualified, he prj
"It isn't nec
true that those
will earn less
but they win
lower-level jobsl
College grac
rently earn an
of 65 percent
than high
graduates, Rui
says, and for
lucky enough
jobs in their 11
college degree
be worth more.
"I'm
discouraging
from getting a
degree he
Comol
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IT





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 18, 1983
SSfT
pi
fek.
54




�P


ive Ideals:
Has Come
- rote in his
Mil a Birm-
e vtnd Gan-
time behind
but neither was
ated passive
��Our
t and pre-
pays al the tront
working to end
sed in-
a1 of most
a da when
- men and
Pro-
ild be able to
fell the only
se in our
the battles
capons,
P ussians and
� rld will
� oi hope seen
idhi and King.
world ot
feed the
we will tru-
nks U.S.
)slem Sect
IP Mis.
i genet experts
gence scr-
� Nnan
secret
reported-
u k
cd States
ntl) believe
this goal is
art stationed
ill! Colorful
� ie Presser has
the powerful
to power is
Department.
. Keeping a close
I S attorney
's predecessor,
I report on
labor unions in
hat Presser's
'he presidency of the
- union Added
zed crime affilia-
lvemeni of Presser
endent of, the
� ell documented
XXEl

N�,
Job Outlook Bleak
(CPS) � The job and clerical jobs is ex-
outlook for college panding.
grads appears bleak
for the rest of this
decade, according to a
new Stanford Univer-
sity study of the long-
range college job
market.
Moreover, ,4an in-
creasing number (of
college grads) will be
There's already a
glut of college grads
in many fields,
Rumberger points
out, and soon even
high-demand majors
like engineers and
computer science
grads will be com-
peting for fewer and
forced to accept jobs fewer job openings.
incommensurate with
their level of train-
ing says Russell
Rumberger, author of
the report.
"Based on projec-
tions of low employ-
ment growth for the
'80s he explains,
"and the increasing
number of people
who will hold college
degrees, 1 see a large
number of college
graduates who will be
over-trained and not
able to get upper-level
jobs
Already,
Rumberger says, one
out of every four
young workers in the
labor force has a col-
lege degree. And by
1990, he estimates,
one out of three will
be college grads.
At the same time,
the number of jobs
which require a col-
lege education is
"We're simply pro-
ducing more college
grads than the labor
market can absorb,
and it's going to get
worse
Many grads � par-
ticularly those who
aren't choosey about
their majors � will be
pushed into service
and clerical jobs for
which they are over-
qualified, he predicts.
"It isn't necessarily
true that those people
will earn less money,
but they will have
lower-level jobs
College grads cur-
rently earn an average
of 65 percent more
than high school
graduates, Rumberger
says, and for those
lucky enough to find
jobs in their fields a
college degree will still
be worth more.
I'm not
discouraging people
"For students who do
go on to college, they
still have a better
chance of getting a
better, higher-level
job. It's just that
there's also a good
chance they won't
Consequently,
"it'll be more impor-
tant than ever to pick
a major which is in
high demand. A col-
lege degree by itself
just won't mean
much
Still, predicting the
job market years in
advance is a risky
business, warns Linda
Pengilly, with the
College Placement
Council.
"I haven't seen the
study, but we don't
do any long-range
forecasts because
we've seen how many
variables there can be
in the market
The number of peo-
ple with degrees may
well create a glut of
college grads, she
says, but unpredic-
table turns in the
economy could also
create very strong
demands for certain
majors.
9:00 til 200
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I
THE EAST C AK � �
1 HI I AS1 �. AROI INIAN
Features
Allen Film Kicks Off
Summer Movie Lii
ood Mien and Richard Harris in a scene from tonight's MSC film.
By CARLYN EBERT
trslurn tdilor
Woody Allen's 1972 film Everything You Always
Wanted To Know About Sex But Were Afraid To
Ask, which followed on the heels of the best-selling
self-help sex book of the same title, plays at Hendnx
Theater tonight at 8:00 p.m.
Dr. David Reuben, question-and-answer sex guru
and the book's author, glad handed talk show hosts
and hustled his book to a nationwide television au-
dience. Allen's response? A neurotic comedy lifting
the title and format of the bestseller, but posing such
absurd questions as "Why do women have only two
breasts?"
Audiences are also treated to Allen's answers to
"What is sodomy?" and "Are transvestites
homosexual?" An excellent supporting cast includes
Gene Wilder as a shrink in love with an Armenian
sheep named Daisy and Lou Jacobi as a nice Jewish
transvestite who makes the mistake of getting caught
wearing his prettiest lace underthings at a dinner
with future in-laws.
The final and most successful segment, "What
Happens During Ejaculation?" satirizes Dr.
Reuben's overused missile-launching metaphor with
a "2001" stvied inside view of the big act, complete
with an omnipotent computer launching Allen
jessed as a reluctant sperm) and W���
Reynolds out of the mother ship with missile preci
as an Italian housewife with a problem, a telev s on
game show on which panelists try to guess guests
feTual perversions, and a single mammoth femak
breast terrorizing a suburban countryside Allen ap-
pears in another segment as a frustrated medieval
jester lusting after his queen (Lynn Redgrave) �th
disastrous results.
Greeted with mixed reviews, this giddy film often
substitutes sheer silliness for good taste. John Simon
of the ew York Times objected to its lack of sexual
subtlety, but Allen fans ignored Simon and made
Everything You Always Wanted To Know About
Sex But Were Afraid To Ask a moderate summer of
'72 box office success and "What's My Perver-
sion?" a popular party game in at least one
Marvland suburb. .
Allen directed the film as well as writing the
screenplav and starring in four of the seven
segments Filmgoers put off by uncharacteristic
Allen efforts like Stardust Memories or Interiors will
enjoy this piece of vintage Allen neurotica.
Summer
HvMlM BAt MM l
�o-
vi( - um-
t v o the antics
i e even
n be
xhaps a
less entertaining than is expected
during the summer. But just
about everybody, especially the
�industry" folk, agree that the
box office potential of this-
summer-in-movies is unlimited.
I his conclusion is based on the
same avarice that has major
studios investing in 40 major mo-
this summer.
Two of the biggies that opened
last week in theatres across the
country are Blue Thunder, starr-
ing Rov Scheider (now playing at
Greenville's Pl;tt Entertainment
Center), and Breathless, with hot
box office attraction Richard
Gere and beautiful newcomer
weaponry (like a tank that Hies) is mere excuse to introduce the
equipped, we are told at the begin- kooks and misfits of the original
nine of the film, with state-of-the- film in a far less original way
art surveillance appliances that Before even discussing and
are "presently being used by the dismissing the updated Breathless,
U S Government This infor- it is important to recall Jean-Luc
mation is supposed to lend some Godard's 1961 classic of the same
kind of warped validity to a film title that has been remade so poor-
that winds up being a noisy, silly, ly in this country
: PISSr-a ESS! Va,ene Kasky (now p.ay.ne a,
the Plaza Cinema). the only
Protesters Prepare
To 'Fast For Life'
Kv V mil K O'NEIl I

I
it �� ei s ot
d inning
� sts is
I ama that
re attention

film the In-
mbarks on
iel1 violence
: Both times Gan-
Ben Kingslev sUc-
( arolinian in a Tuesday telephone
interview.
Blockev-O'Brien admits that
full support tor the tasters may
falter if they near death. "I've
had difficulties with this from the
beginning she said, referring to
the ethical question of this life and
death situation. "In other words
there is the possibility of
similarity between the two films is
that they both use Los Angeles as
their location.
In actioner Blue Thunder,
Scheider plays a tough LAPD cop
who works nights with a partner
Hying a helicopter and doing air
surveillance of the city; he spots
holdups, drug deals and the like,
assists in apprehension of the bad
guys, does some occasional peep-
ing tomfoolery and then gets
chewed out by his boss, the chief
of police, played by the late War-
ren Oates (to whom this picture is
dedicated). These opening scenes
are terrific, giving us the best of
both an objective and a subjective
viewpoint while taking us along
totally implausible romp that tries
to comment on everything from
the Vietnam War to the dangerous
somebody not being able to last as for a joyride similar to the first
u nt T t it i �o mroo.mnntaop in the
I
e ('Bi ic
01 �� I I i 1 d
fei ation,
�Aili par-
ganizer Pamela
termed "an
in the Ghandian
long as they would like. To put it
bluntly, there's a possibility that
somebody may die
"1 think they have a good
chance of success said ECU
graduate Andy Rector, who is
publicizing the fast in Mobile,
Alabama. "They're going to do it
big crime-spree-montage in the
original Superman movie when
Chris Reeve goes on a tear and
saves everybody in sight, in-
cluding Lois from a nasty fall of
some 30 or 40 stories.
The real "fun" begins when
Blue Thunder, the helicopter of
whether we support them or not the title, is introduced as a possi
.
event '
jo Americans.
inese Bud-
eople from
the fast August
fi ma �


Ids
w e
38th anniversary, of
ie first atomic
: uj against great
te three of the tasters
position letter. "To
must use the most
nonviolent methods
lvaj i: Gandhi is cor-
the most powerful such
method is tasting
"Fasting foi religious people is
i path to God; tor those guided by
ral and ethical principles,
fasting is a profound way to ex-
press their beliefs they wrote.
Gandhi and many others
throughout history have con-
tronted evil institutions by offer-
ing their lives through fasting. We
mtend to do the same
The position letter, written
eleven months ago, was
distributed a week after a massive
June 12 disarmament rally held at
the United Nations in New York
Citv. As a result of the letter and
and this (publicizing the fast) is
the best way to keep them alive
"Open-ended fasts, because
o the life risks involved, have a
wav of speeding up decision-
making, breaking stalemates and
producing change the original
three wrote in their position letter.
"If we ever needed such speed, it
is certainly now. The children are
dving and the thread that holds
the bomb is fraying
The eight met late last month in
I ranee to discuss their planned ac-
tion and to decide under what
conditions they would agree to
call the fast off.
Charles Gray has been planning
the fast for three and one half
years. Gray said his American
citizenship played a strong role in
his decision because he believes
the United States is attempting to
achieve a "first strike capability
"This absolutely should not be
allowed to happen Gray said.
The four French participants
will fast in Paris while the others
will fast in the San Francisco Bay
area. Both groups will remain in
contact in case te need to
negotiate the end of the fast
arises.
Gray mentioned several
"goals" the fasters had for the ac-
tion, including passage of U.S.
ble crowd control device to be us-
ed at the summer Olympics in Los
possibility that our government
might someday try to keep us in
line with something like Blue
Thunder
Good peformances by Scheider,
Malcolm McDowell as an
unscrupulous pilot and nemesis of
Scheider, and Warren Oates, who
died only months after making
this film, lend credibility to an
otherwise incredible story. Also,
the action sequences and special
effects are, save for only a couple,
some of the best around.
All of this brings us to
Breathless, which uses its Los
ed at tne summer uiymivo � .� -�
Angeles. This futuristic piece of Angeles location less well, as a
Godard's film was an amazing
bit of improvision that should
never have been remade in the
first place, a cubistic thriller that
had and audience because half a
century of modern art and movies
had rigorously educated the
public eye. The film had no plot
in the usual sense of the word.
The script of the picture was a
three-page memo. Situation,
dialogue, locations were improvis-
ed every morning and shot off the
cuff. By these casual means
Godard achieved a sort of ad-lib
epic, a Joycean harangue of im-
ages in which the only real con-
tinuity was the irrational
coherence of nightmare. Yet, like
many nightmares, Breathless had
its crazy humor,its anarchic beau-
ty, its night-mind meaning.
The adventurous, almost in-
consequential story of Breathless
dealt with a Parisian cool cat,
played in the original by Jean-
Paul Belmondo, who steals cars
for a living. In the short time span
of the movie, he murders a
policeman and begins a casual,
painfully erratic night from the
authorities, in the course of which
he attempts to collect a shady
debt, singlehandedly commits a
mugging and two or three car
thefts, and recommences a love
affair with a pretty but equally
unadmirable American girl, who
betrays him to the police. Lacking
even the tiny moral energy to
escape, he is shot down, and the
film ends.
The story of Breathless in its
updated form, even the sequence
of events, has changed very little
from the film of 1961 In this one.
Richard Gere plays the anti-hero
as an American who travels from
Vegas to L.A. in a stolen car. is
chased by a policeman who he ac-
cidentally (we are led to believe)
shoots and kills. Of course, in this
one, the girlfriend is French. She
quotes Faulkner instead of Dylan
Thomas and bares her breasts
faster than you can reach for pop-
corn.
The much-touted sex scenes
are, at best, tepid. The use of back
projection and tinting doesn't jibe
with the otherwise slick approach
taken to the project. Sexy
newcomer Valerie Kapnsky is
fine, and Gere gives one of his
best : rformances as a hero who
winds up funnier than he does
tragic. (The new script has him
singing and dressing like Jerry
Lewis and reading Silver Surfer
comic books.)
In short, director Jim McBnde
has taken on the impossible task
of turning one of the most in-
spired films of the French New
Wave into a hip parable for to-
day. Unfortunately, he has, in-
deed, found the task impossible.
5K�S; "pSSto? r- r SfSr ��
I
attracted five more participants,
olange Fernex, president of
France's Green Party,and
Dorothv Granada and Charles
Gray, both ol Eugene, Oregon,
initiated the fast. Also fasting are
French participants Didier Ma-
inguv. Michael Nodet and Jacky
Guy on, Andre Lariviere of
Canada and Kojima, a Japanese
Buddhist monk.
"The main point of the fast is
to show that a million dollars a
minute is being spent globally on
the arms racemeanwhile enor-
mous amounts of suffering is hap-
pening around the world,
especially from hunger,
Blockev-O'Brien told The East
dismantling of their SS-20
missiles, a nuclear moratorium
among the five nuclear powers
and adoption of a Comprenhen-
sive Test Ban Treaty by all nuclear
nations.
According to Gray, the condi-
tions under which the fast would
be called off have not been finaliz-
ed and are subject to negotiation.
He said the fast has already had
"a remarkable effect" on many
people. He is uncertain, however,
whether he will survive to see his
goals achieved. "If we can stop
the arms race it would be
something of a miracle Gray
said. "I guess that makes me
somewhat of a pessimist
.007 Strikes Again
Sean Conner, - I weapoo .t � JJ-J �� SKX KTKl 2S? cA'y
R.E.M
By PAKKh
pl'TKRBAl GH
NEW YORK
�We wanted to make
fa noncool, nontrend
record, and we par
ticularly didn't �
to go to Los Ang-
)r New York or L on-
ion says Pete-
luck, the iankv.
utspoken guitarist
for RE M "We real
v wanted to do it in
the South with pe
,ho were
making rocl
records
So Mw"
v M
length alb
recorded in Chai
,orth Car.
jmall stu
:hief cus
raise the 1
The I P i- j-
r ecc of m
been heard ir
t �elve tunes
B'i the bes-
classic p
artful ar-
iubtle hook
perfec'iv
small .
w hile
p o r a t i n g
measure o!
the-hnes ,
harticulai
M ic h
�ords and
R. F. M
taken from
of deep
known a
moveme
s t a n 11 v
favored �.
critics with the
debut - "Rad
Free Europe
last v ear's Chronic
Town EP -
banj is a
grow ngleg
� bui
terms, since the-
ject mam oi the

Su
Fried Shrimp
Trout
Flounder
Clam Strips

S�WOv
11
Frtdavll
r-
i
i
i
i
10





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 18. 1983
Page 6
sOff
Lineup
Lent computer launching Allen
kanl sperm) and fellow sperm Bun
he mother ship with missile preci-
objections.
k sketches feature Louise Lasser
ieuife with a problem, a television
Ihich panelists trv to guess guests'
Is, and a single mammoth female
1, suburban countryside. Allen ap-
I s .gment a a frustrated medieval
r his queen (Lynn Redgrave) with
lived reviews, this giddy film often
I .ess for good taste. John Simon
l imes objected to its lack of sexual
ans ignored Simon and made
Iways Hunted To Know About
rud To Ask a moderate summer of
It .cess and "What's My Perver-
irt) came in at least one
�he film s well as writing the
tarring in four of the seven
s put off b uncharacteristic
Stardust Memories or Interiors will
vintage Allen neurotica.
Fun?
mugging and two or three car
thefts, and recommences a love
affair with a pretty but equally
madmirable American girl, who
betrays him to the police. Lacking
even the tiny moral energy to
.scape, he is shot down, and the
film ends
The story of Breathless in its
updated form, even the sequence
of events, has changed very little
m the film of 1961. In this one,
Richard Gere plays the anti-hero
as an American who travels from
Vegas to L.A. in a stolen car, is
chased bv a policeman who he ac-
cidentally (we are led to believe)
shoots and kills. Of course, in this
one, the girlfriend is French. She
quotes Faulkner instead of Dylan
Thomas and bares her breasts
raster than you can reach for pop-
The much-touted sex scenes
are, at best, tepid. The use of back
projection and tinting doesn't jibe
with the otherwise slick approach
taken to the project. Sexy
newcomer Valerie Kaprisky is
fine, and Gere gives one of his
best performances as a hero who
winds up funnier than he does
tragic. (The new script has him
singing and dressing like Jerry
Lewis and reading Silver Surfer
comic books.)
In short, director Jim McBride
has taken on the impossible task
of turning one of the most in-
spired films of the French New
Wave into a hip parable for to-
day. Unfortunately, he has, in-
deed, found the task impossible.
fawv. x
mution at Hendrix Theatre. Ad-
ID and activity card and by
ibers.
R.E.M. Is Wide Awake
By PARKE
PUTERBAUGH
NEW YORK �
�We wanted to make
a noncool, nontrendy
record, and we par-
ticularly didn't want
to go to Los Angeles
or New York or Lon-
don says Peter
Buck, the lanky,
outspoken guitarist
for R.E.M. "We real-
ly wanted to do it in
the South with people
who were fresh at
making rock and roll
records
So Murmur,
R.E.Ms first full-
length album, was
recorded in Charlotte,
North Carolina, at a
small studio whose
chief customer is the
Praise the Lord Club.
The LP is as original a
piece of music as has
been heard in 1983: its
twelve tunes embody
all the best virtues of
classic pop � concise,
artful arrangements,
subtle hooks and a
perfectly modulated
small-combo sound
� while incor-
porating a good
measure of between-
the-lines eccentricity,
particularly in
Michael Stripe's
words and singing.
R.E.M. � a name
taken from the state
jof deep dreaming
known as "rapid eye
movement" � in-
stantly achieved
favored status among
critics with their 1981
debut single "Radio
Free Europe and
llast year's Chronic
Town EP. And the
I band is attracting a
growing legion of fans
j� but on their own
(terms, since they re-
Iject many of the stan-
dard pathways to pop
success. They've
declined offers to tour
with such big-time
acts as the Clash, the
Go-Go's, U2 and the
B-52's, for example.
"Opening for other
bands is just the
rankest sort of
masochism Buck
says, scowling. And
they passed over name
producers to work
with a relatively
unknown North
Carolinian named
Mitch Easter,
Easter, who runs a
recording studio out
of his home in
Winston-Salem,
North Carolina, came
to the attention of
R.E.M. through a
mutual friend, Peter
Holsapple of the
dB's. "There was
something about them
that I immediately lik-
ed says Easter.
"They have this kind
of old-fashioned thing
about them that made
me feel real good �
like the way four guys
get together and
decide to form a
group
At the heart of the
R.E.M. aesthetic is
that rapport. Though
Buck stands out as the
most garrulous of the
bunch and Stipe is the
most introverted, they
share a kind of
bemused casualness
about the world that
reflects their upbring-
ing in the Deep South
and their coming of
age in Athens,
Georgia, where they
were students at the
University of
Georgia, a party
school of great
renown. "At Georgia,
all you wanna do is
avoid having a job for
four years, so you
drink and raise hell
Buck explains. "I
didn't study, I didn't
even go to classes. I
waslazy
Nongraduates all,
the four members of
R.E.M. � Buck,
Stipe, bassist Mike
Mills and drummer
Bill Berry � met one
another in the ex-
tracurricular melting
pot of Athens night
life. Berry and Mills,
both twenty-three (as
is Stipe), were
childhood friends
who'd come to
Athens from their
hometown of Macon.
Buck � at twenty-six,
the eldest band
member � hailed
from Atlanta, and
Stipe was an army
brat who'd grown up
in Texas and Georgia.
The latter two were
living in an abandon-
ed church outside of
Athens, and Berry
moved in after getting
thrown out of school.
"It was a real zoo
Buck remembers.
"We lived with some
girl who dealt drugs
� all of these sickos
coming over at four in
the morning with the
urge.
"One of the guys
who lived there before
us was named Purple
Hayes says Stipe,
chuckling. "That
church has been
through generations
of real bad hippies
The main part of
the church made a
good rehearsal hall
for a rock band,
though, and R.E.M.
could stay up all night
cutting their craft on
such venerable stan-
dards as "Gloria"
without having to
worry about the
neighbors. "We
played on the altar
says bassist Mills,
"since it made a kind
of natural stage
Summer Films at Mendenhall
Everything You've Always
Wanted To Know About Sex
From Russia With Love
Pink Floyd, The Wall
The Godfather
Dressed To Kill
Blow Out
Motel Hell
Kentucky Fried Movie
Alien
Blues Brothers
Blues Brothers
Body Heat
Cannery Row
The Long Riders
I, The Jury
The Eyes of Laura Mars
Fort Apache, The Bronx
National Lampoon's Class Reunion
A Clockwork Orange
Attack of the Killer Tomatoes
Invasion of the Body Snatchers
The Stunt Man
Wed May 18
Mon
Wed
Mon
Wed
Wed
Mon
Wed
Mon
Wed
Thu
Mon
Wed
Mon
Wed
Wed
Mon
Wed
Mon
Wed
Mon
Wed
May 23
May 25
May 30
June 1
June 1
June 6
June 8
June 13
June 15
June 16
June 20
June 22
June 27
June 29
July 6
July 11
July 13
July 18
July 20
July 25
July 27
� Mondays (and one Thursday) at 9:00 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
� Wednesdays at 8:00 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre
Super Lunch and Supper
Specials
Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday
.11:00 A.M9:00 P.M
Fried Shrimp
Trout
Flounder
Clam Strips
Crab Cakes
Deviled Crabs
Oysters
and
Choice
of
2
Vegetabl
Includes Beverage and Tax
All You Can Eat
Seafood Bonanza
Every Doy
Yo�r Choice Of Amr Or All
Additional Speciols Thurs-Sundoy
Abram-s t$ftfai
Seafood
11A.M. 9PM
Friday 11 A.M10 P.M. tun.Gw.iSi.
4PM 10 PM (kmmnmm.MCT7tU
Barbecue
Oyster Sap
752-0090
I
I
L
COUPON I
10 OFF ANY REGULAR PRICED MEAL l

'I M PCK 'C �
Each of that advartisad rtams is raquwad lo ba raadily avaaabta lor sata
I balow tha sdvatttsad prica m aach A4P Stora axcapt as spacihcally nolad
in this ad
at or
o
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT MAY 21 AT AtP M GREENVILLE
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS.
TOUR A&P COUNTRY STORE
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FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND. WE WILL DOUBLE
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ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
Between no May 2i we will redeem national
manufacturer s cents-off coupons up to SO for
double their value Offer good on national manu-
facturer' cents-off coupons only (Food retailer
coupons not accepted i Customer must purchase
coupon product m specified size Expired coupons
wilt not be Honored One coupon per customer per
item. No coupons accepted for free merchandise
Offer does not apply to A&P or other store coupons
whether manufacturer is mentioned or not When
the value of the coupon exceeds 50 or the retail
of the item, this offer is limited to the retail price
Savings are Great with A&P's
DOUBLE SAVINGS COUPONS!
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25;
-�W
I iwJHpip
f����
�)� ei�,�i,lwVi





,4-
?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MAY 18. 1983
Page 8
Manahan Looks Ahead
By CINDY PLEASANTS
SparttMMar
After a fourth-place finish in
last year's AIAW National Cham-
pionship, the Lady Pirates had
high hopes of improving their
overall ranking in this season's
National Invitational Softball
Tournament.
The third-seeded Bucs,
however, were eliminated in the
losers' bracket by fourth-seeded
South Florida, but Head Coach
Sue Manahan was quick to point
out that the Lady Pirates have
nothing to be ashamed of. " You
always want to be number one, '
she said, " but how many people
have gotten to be number four?"
Manahan, who has just com-
pleted her second year at ECU,
k has already compiled an im-
pressive 74-25 record. Why has
she been so successful? Manahan
has always stressed the impor-
tance of being an unselfish ball
player. She wants all her players
to be team-oriented, making
sacrifices for their team rather
than seeking personal gain.
Manahan can also identify with
with her players because she is a
player herself. Last year, she was
named to the women's American
Softball Association all-America
team. Manahan's team, the
Virginia Stompers, captured the
ASA National title in 1982, and
this summer Manahan will once
again join the Virginia squad in
hopes of capturing yet another na-
tional title.
Overall, Manahan, who led the
Pirates to a 32-12 record this
season, was not disappointed by
the Lady Pirates' play in Graham.
"I think we played very well she
said. "I think we should have
been able to win the FSU game
(3-2), but they have a definite ad-
vantage over us.
"They played so many more
games and have so much more
money that they can travel with.
Besides that, the weather is always
nice down there (Florida). They
played than 40 games this
season
The lack of monetary funds is a
constant battle ("It's much more
difficult to get what you would
call blue chip prospects here
because we can't offer scholar-
ships"), but Manahan said ECU
has managed to land several ex-
tremely talented players, in-
cluding two all-America players,
Mitzi Davis and Cynthia Shepard,
who just finished their final year.
Pitcher Fran Hooks, second
baseman Ginger Rothermel and
outfielder Yvonne Williams, who
according to Manahan, "have
been ail-every thing" have exited
due to graduation.
The loss of five valuable
starters will take a toll on the Bucs
lineup next year, but the transi-
tion from slow pitch to fast pitch
will be what Manahan is mostly
concerned with. "I like the game
(fast pitch) Manahan said, "but
it will be harder to recruit,
especially pitchers and catchers.
Because the game is not played in
North Carolina, we'll have to
travel more too
Although there seems to be
more disadvantages than advan-
tages to the transition, Manahan
is looking forward to the
challenge. "The NCAA sanctions
championships, and we're trying
to go along with that.
"It'll be nice to have a goal that
goes beyond the state, especially
since only two states � North
Carolina and Florida � are the
two most competitive. There were
teams in other states, but these
two are basically the slow-pitch
states
Because fast-pitch softball is
played in the northern states,
Manahan has been recruiting out
of Virginia, Maryland and other
surrounding areas. Last year, she
brought in five players with fast-
pitch experience: pitchers Stacy
Boyette and Robin Graves, cat-
cher Suzanne Tater, second
baseman Carla Alphin and short-
stop Sandy Kee. All five players
are from Virginia.
"1 think next year will be a
rebuilding year for us Manahan
said. "Some of the players we
brought in have fast-pitch ex-
perience but not at a college level.
That's what we need � ex-
perience
Kobe Announces New Recruits
Lady Pirate Softball Coach Sue Manahan has racked up a 74-25 record
in just two years at ECU.
Lady Pirates Finish
Fourth In Tourney
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Wrilf
The ECU Women's softball
team finished fourth in the Na-
tional Invitational Softball Tour-
nament, held May 6-8, in
Graham.
The Lady Bucs were seeded
third going into the three-day
event which was sponsored by the
American Softball Association.
The University of Florida was
top-seeded in the event, followed
by defending national champion
Florida State. ECU, who won the
state title the week before, was
trailed bv number four South
Florida UNC-Charlotte,
Cleveland State, Northern Ken-
tucky and Western Carolina.
Going into the final day of
play, only four teams were left in
action: ECU and South Florida in
the lower's bracket and top-
seeded Florida in the winner's
bracket.
South Florida thrashed the
Lady Pirates, 8-1, giving the Bucs
a fourth-place finish in their final
appearance in slow pitch softball.
ECU will switch to fast pitch soft-
ball next spring, the only version
of the sport in which the NCAA
offers championship competition.
In the first day of action, senior
outfielders Yvonne Williams and
Cynthia Shepard each slapped
three hits to lead the Pirates to a
6-5 victory over unseeded West
Florida. "Everyone hit the ball
well said Head Coach Sue
Manahan following the game. "It
was a very difficult game for us,
as will everyone we play. No one
is to be taken lightly
On the second day, ECU split a
pair of games to drop into the
loser's bracket of the double
elimination tournament.
The Lady Pirates bowed to
Florida State, 3-2, but downed
Western Carolina in the night
game, 4-3, to remain alive.
ECU jumped out to a 1-0 lead
in the first inning of their opening
game Friday, but FSU tied it up
with one out in the fourth. ECU
scored again in the sixth, but the
Lady Noles took the lead for good
with two runs in the bottom of the
same inning to complete the scor-
ing.
In the second game, the Pirates
put it away with three runs in the
third. Jeanette Roth singled to
open up the inning, and then
yvonne Williams reached on an
error. Cynthia Shepard singled in
Roth, and Williams scored on a
sacrifice fly by Mitzi Davis. Jo
Landa Clayton then reached on
an error, scoring Shepard.
Western Carolina rallied for
two in the bottom of the frame to
close within one, but neither team
scored again.
Pirate head coach Rick Kobe
has announced the signing of 17
recruits for the 1983-84 season.
"We're very, very pleased with
recruiting this year he said.
"We filled a lot of spots where we
had some problems last year
Stratton Smith from Charlotte
and Mike Lotz from Sarasota,
Fla will add strength in the
distance freestyle events. Kobe
described Smith as the "most ver-
satile swimmer of all those com-
ing while Lotz "should break
most of our distance records
before he leaves ECU
Backstroker Kevin Hidalgo
from Chester, Va has a 200-yard
time better than the current ECU
varsity record.
Freestyle sprint recruits include
David Breece of Greensboro and
Tim Baker of Tarboro, both of
whom were finalists in the North
Carolina high school champion-
ship. Ray Fredler of Glenolden,
Pa and Jeff Brown from Ft.
Bragg will also swim freestyle
sprints.
Backstroker Scott Robinson of
Falls Church, Va and freestylers
John Torrence of Davidsonville,
Md and Richard Wells of
Greensboro have also signed.
Leading the list of female
recruits is Caycee Paust from
Richmond, Va a backstroker
who had times under the current
ECU varsity marks. Cindy
Newman, who is the sister of
former swimmer Perry Newman,
will be attending ECU. Kobe has
also added Beth Stackhouse from
High Point and Jean Keating
from Huntington, N.Y in the
freestyle events, and Scotia Miler
from Silver Springs, Md in the
backstroke.
The swim coach also landed
Diver Lori Miller of Columbus,
Pa who Kobe describes as
"having national potential
Kobe is extremely pleased about
the incoming recruits and is hop-
ing to sign even a few more.
"We're still working on some
quality swimmers, but were very
satisfied with those who have
committed he said. "Anyone
else we get is gravy
Bucs Split In Season Finale
Eagles Draft Schulz
By KEN BOLTON
Aafetaal Sports E�or
A split of a doubleheadcr with
Atlantic Christian College over
the spring � summer school
break ended the 1983 season for
the ECU baseball team and left
them with a 21-17-1 mark.
The Pirates, who are the defen-
ding ECAC-South conference
champs, were not invited to par-
ticipate in this year's four-team
tourney.
James Madison, Richmond,
Georgetown and William and
Mary were the four teams invited
on the basis of their record. The
Pirates finished with a 2-3-1 con-
ference mark.
Junior pitcher Robbie Mc-
Clanahan topped off the season in
impressive fashion as he tossed a
two-hitter in the second game of
the season-ending doubleheader
with ACC.
The Pirates scored two runs in
the third inning to pull out the 3-1
victory. A single by Kelly
Robinette, a double by John
Hallow, and a two-run single by
Robert Wells provided all the runs
that the Pirates needed.
In the first game, Atlantic
Christian scored a run in the bot-
tom of the seventh inning to break
a 2-2 tie.
David Lawhon opened the inn-
ing with a single and was sacrific-
ed to second. Since third base was
left uncovered on the play,
Lawhon advanced all the way to
third.
After intentional walks to Jeff
Pierce and Mack Smith loadedt
the bases, Greg Baker delivered a
game-winning hit to right field.
The doubleheader marked the
end of the careers of seven ECU
seniors: John Hallow, Kelly
Robinette, Kirk Parsons, Charlie
Smith, Jack Curlings, Robert
Wells and Mike Williams.
Hallow was a four-year starter
for the Pirates, switching between
third base and right field. In his
four years, Hallow piled up some
impressive statistics.
He is the career ECU leader in
RBI (104), hits (181), total bases
(268), and doubles (34). Hallow is
also third in runs scored and
fourth in number of at-bats.
Another four-year starter for
the Pirates has been shortstop
Kelly Robinette. The Prince
George, Va. native is fourth on
the all-time list with 151 hits and is
third with 587 at-bats.
The loss of center fielder
Robert Wells will leave a big hole
in the Pirate outfield. Wells made
only three errors in his four years
at ECU.
Wells is also the all-time ECU
leader in walks with 82.
Other crucial losses for the
Pirates will be catcher Jack Curl-
ings and outfielder Mike
Williams, along with two pitchers.
Starter Charlie Smith and
reliever Kirk Parsons will leave
the ECU coaching staff with a
vacancy to fill.
With the abolishment of the
summer league, head coach Hal
Baird and assistant coach Gary
Overton will be able to concen-
trate this summer on filling the
spots left by the departing seniors.
The Pirates hope to be able to
get the talent they will need to
return to the championship-
winning form of 1982.
ECU Ail-American defensive
end Jody Schulz was picked by the
Philadelphia Eagles in the recent
NFL draft. Schulz was taken by
the Eagles in the second round,
making him the highest draft pick
in ECU history.
Schulz, who was the 18th player
chosen in the second round, will
most likely play linebacker for the
Eagles.
Schulz played at ECU for two
years after playing for Chowan
Junior College, where he was an
All-American.
After his senior year at ECU,
Schulz received many individual
honors, including Associated
Press third-team All-American
and first-team All-Southern In-
dependent.
Baird Announces Pirates
First Signee Of The Year
Denkler A warded
The Christenbury Award, given
annually to an outstanding senior
as a member of a varsity squad
who had excelled in scholarship,
character and service to ECU, has
been awarded to basketball star
Mary Denkler.
The most decorated Lady
Pirate in ECU history, Denkler's
latest award was preceded by an
NCAA post-graduate scholarship.
The Christenbury Award is
voted upon by members of the
Dept. of Health, Physical Educa-
tion, Recreation and Safety and
the Dept. of Athletics. The award
is in memory of the late John
Christenbury, who was killed in
World War II after coaching foot-
oall at ECU in 1940 and 1941. His
1941 team is the only unbeaten
and untied team in the school's
history.
Buc Chosen
ECU freshman basketball
player Sylvia Bragg has been
selected to compete on the Nor-
theast Region team at the Na-
tional Sports Festival at Colorado
Springs in June.
The tryouts were held May 1 at
Rutgers University.
Head Baseball Coach Hal Baird
has announced the Pirates' first
recruit to sign with ECU this year.
Steve Sides, a 5-9, 160-pound
second baseman from Eastern
Wayne High School, will be atten-
ding ECU, according to Baird.
"Steve was a very highly
recruited player by all of the area
major college teams Baird said.
"We're delighted that he signed
with ECU
Sides won the Golden Glove
Award at Eastern Wayne for
defensive excellence all three years
with the Warriors. He had a
cumulative .378 fielding percen-
tage while earning all-conference
honors for three consecutive
years.
The 1982 Eastern Wayne squad
placed second in the state with a
24-4 recrod, and the 1983 unit
leads the Mideastern Conference
going into the final week.
"He's (Steve) the type of player
that can provide help right
away Baird said. "I fully expect
Steve to contend for starting posi-
tion next year. He runs and hits
well.
"Steve is not only an outstan-
ding baseball player, but an
outstanding student. He's a solid
'A' student and scored 1,100 on
the college boards
Sides is a member of the Beta
Club and the National Honor
Society.
ECU Baseball Coach Hal Baird will spead the mi
key positions because of so many departing seniors
trying to fill
Summer Recreation
1st Summer Session
(MayrUaae21)
Activity
Video Games Rec Nite
Racquetball Tourn.
Co-Rec Softball
Tennis (S) Tourn.
Co-Rec Volleyball
Putt-Putt Tourney
3-on-3 Basketball
Canoe Race
Golf Classic
Prediction Run
Red Pin Bowling
Entry Dates
516-519
516-519
516-519
516-519
523-526
523-526
523-61
530-67
66-69
66-614
Begins
518
523
523
523
524
526
531
62
67
69
615
Days Tin location
W 7-9 p.m. Mem. GymPool
MR TBA Minges Cts.
M&W 5:30-7:30 p.m. IM Fids.
M-R TBA Coll. Hill Cts.
TAR 5:30-7:30 p.m. Mail
RNoon-11 p.m. Hwy 33
TAR 6:30-8:30 p.m. Mem. Gym
R 4 p.m. Tar River
T 9 a.m4 p.m. Ayden CC
R 6 p.m. Bunting Track
W 7-9 p.m. MSC Alley
Camps
During
Several ECU head fa
coaches have
nounced when !he
vmII hold their 1983 Jul
summer
:ssion
camps.
Head Coath i
Emory's Pira
ball camp wili he
on campu.
17-20. lor you
of various age
First-e
Basketball C
Charlie Har:
announced tv
mer camp sess
youngsters : . .
A
1
4
;AGi ' - ;
WZMB pitcher Jim Fnsor
during the annual clash
East Carolinian.
COMPLETE
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Introductory W.
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I �
ll' -
ead
king forward to the
�nee "The NCAA sanctions
Jmpionships, and we're trying
along with that
f It'l bt - e to ha e a goal that
b beyond the state, especially
wo Ntatos North
t lorida � are the
co npetitive. There were
other states, but these
basically the slow-pitch
as! pitch sottball is
in the northern states.
as been recruiting out
a Maryland and other
ai eas I asl ear, she
e plaers with tast-
ence: pitchers Stac
� Robin Graes, cat-
ne Tater. second
lphin and short-
Kee All five players
s .ma.
k next year will be a
for us Manahan
e of the players we
c fast-pitch ex-
al a college level.
ac need � ex-
ecruits
Beth v.uk house from
Point and Jean Keating
Huntington, N.Y in the
and Scotia Miler
S ,er Springs. Md in the
swim
oach also landed
ei I on Miller of Columbus.
o Kobe describes as
ving national potential
� be is extremely pleased about
:oming recruits and is hop-
gn even a few more.
11 working on some
Aimmers, but were very
rj with those who have
;nmed he said. "Anyone
Ae get is gravy
inale
walks with 82.
ucial losses for the
will be catcher Jack Curl-
and outfielder Mike
. long with two pitchers.
starter Charlie Smith and
K ' I Parsons will leave
.caching staff with a
to fill
With the abolishment of the
summer league, head coach Hal
Bail I and assistant coach Gary
Overtoil will be able to concen-
trate this summer on filling the
the departing seniors.
The Pirates hope to be able to
get the talent they will need to
irn to the championship-
winntng form of 1982.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MAY 18. 1983
will spend the summer trying to fill
my departing seniors.
Days TimeLocation
W 7-9 p.m. Mem. GymPool
MR TBA Minges Cts.
M&W 5:30-7:30 p.m. 1M Fids.
MR TBA Coll. Hill Cts.
T&R 5:30-7:30 p.m. Mall
R Noon-11 p.m. Hwy 33
T&R 6:30-8:30 p.m. Mem. Gym
R 4 p.m. Tar River
T 9 a.m4 p.m. Ayden CC
R 6 p.m. Bunting Track
W 7-9 p.m. MSC Aaiey
Camps To Be Held
During June and July
Several ECU head
poaches have an-
nounced when they
�,U hold their 1983
summer session
camps.
Head Coach Ed
Emory's Pirate foot-
ball camp will be held
on campus, July
17-20, for youngsters
of arious ages.
First-year Head
Basketball Coach
Charlie Harrison has
announced two sum-
ma camp sessions for
soungsters ranging
from ages 8-18. The
first session will be
held June 26 through
July 1 and will be for
overnight campers.
The second camp, Ju-
ly 25 through July 29,
will be held for day
campers.
Head Baseball
Coach Hal Baird has
also announced two
camp sessions. The
first session will begin
on June 12 and will
continue through
June 17. This camp
will be specifically for
pitchers and catchers.
The second session,
which will be held Ju-
ly 17-22, will deal with
all aspects of baseball.
Special instructors
attending the camp
will be Ray Pennes,
an assistant at N.C.
State; Tony Guzzo, a
former ECU player
and coach who is now
head coach at Virginia
Commonwealth; and
Chip Baker, the assis-
tant coach at Va.
Tech.
Evans Places
High Twice
In Va. Meet

ECU Trackster Er-
skine Evans placed se-
cond in the 100 meter
and third in the 200
meter events to lead
ECU in the Virginia
Invitational Track
Meet Sunday.
Evans finished the
100-meter race in 10.3
seconds, while his
200-meter time was
20.8.
Nathan McCorkle.
placed fifth in the
100-meter race with a
time of 10.4. The
400-relay team placed
second at 39.9.
The Pirates will run
in the 1C4A outdoor
championships at
Villanova, May 21-22
EVERY WEDNESDAY
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ia
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with Garlic Bread
A


" W ith all you can eat soup and salad
it? .v-ar
3.99
Clay 'The Beav' Thornton
The East Carolinian's Clay Thornton takes his stance in a vain attempt to copy the style of that
famous afternoon personality, Beaver Cleaver.
EVEKY HUDAY
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Breakfast Bar open 6:00am
SHONEYS
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I' V :
W7MB pitcher Jim Ensor serves up one of the many "gopherballs
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Fast Carolinian.
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i
l�KP9
W
i
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MAY 18, 1983
CFA Leader
Sees Battle
KANSAS CITY
(AP) � The U.S.
Supreme Court pro-
bably will have the
final word in the bat-
tle over football
television controls,
the president of the
College Football
Association predicted
Monday.
Dr. Joab Thomas,
president of the
University of
Alabama and a
former chancellor at
N.C. State, also said
that college presidents
were going to become
more active as
athletics struggles
through a decade of
upheavel and change.
"I think there will
be more meaningful
presidential involve-
ment in the next three
or four years than at
any other time in the
history of inter-
collegiat athletics
Thomas said in a
telephone inteiview
from his office in
Tuscaloosa,
Alabama. "For one
thing, we've allowed
the academic pro-
grams to deteriorate
and create embarrass-
ing situations across
the country
The most pressing
order of business for
college athletics is the
resolution of battle
over football televison
rights. An appeal to
the Supreme Court is
one of several options
the NCAA is con-
sidering in the wake
of a ruling last week
by the 10th U.S. Cir-
cuit Court of Ap-
peals.
By a 2-1 vote, the
appelate court upheld
a lower court ruling
that declared the
NCAA in violation of
antitrust laws in forc-
ing member schools to
participate in the
NCAA TV football
plan. The lower
court's order had
voided the NCAA's
current network net-
work contracts for
football television and
enjoined it from mak-
ing future contracts.
However, the ap-
pelate court asked the
lower court to recon-
sider those parts of its
order, and the picture
remains muddled.
The 60-member
CFA includes the
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference and other ma-
jor football con-
ferences and in-
dependents except the
Pac-10 and Big Ten.
The CFA is expected
to offer a TV plan to
its members at its con-
vention next month in
Dallas.
NCAA spokesmen
said Monday they still
were undecided on
their next legal move.
But one possibility is
to attempt to get a
stay of the ruling pen-
ding an appeal to the
Supreme Court.
Eventually, Thomas
believes, the high
court will agree to
hear the case.
A CC gains
GREENSBORO
(AP) � The eight
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference schools gross-
ed more than $13
million from football
and basketball in
1982-83, not counting
money from ticket
sales, league figures
indicate.
The money came
from televison fees,
bowl appearances and
post season basketball
tournament participa-
tion. The money from
basketball exceeded
$8.5 million, com-
pared to about $5.3
million from football.
Among the ACC
members, North
Carolina got the most
money � about
$2,216,500. Virginia
was next at
$2,126,200, followed
by Maryland with
$1,851,250, Clemson
$1,691,850, North
Carolina State
$1,635,850, Georgia
Tech $1,507,900,
Duke $1,453,350 and
Wake Forest
$1,421,550.
booster organiza-
tions.
The ACC and its
members realized the
largest single chunk of
revenue from their
regional basketball
televison network.
According to the
terms of a three-year
contract signed last
year with Raycom-
Jefferson Production-
sa, the ACC members
divided $5 million in-
to shares of $625,000
each. The contract
will be $6 million next
year and $7 million in
1984-85.
The ACC earned
more than $1.5
million for the par-
ticipation of four of
its teams in the
NCAA basketball
tournament. NCAA
champion N.C. StaU
received $550,000 for
reaching the Final
Four, Carolina and
Virginia $412,500
each for reaching the
regional level
Maryland $137,500
for its first- and
second-round ap-
pearances.
Those figures equal
20 percent of 40 per-
cent of the ACC
members' annual
athletic budgets, each
of which falls into the
$5 million to $10
million range.
Televison revenue is
added to gate receipts
and student fees to
meet the budgetary re-
quirements of up to
26 varsity sports pro-
grams. Athletic
scholarships generally
are financed with
funds raised through
ACC bylaws allow
each of its NCAA
participants $50,00
off the top of its earn-
ings plus 50 percent of
the remaining figure.
The other 50 percent
is divided among the
rest of the ACC I
members.
That means State
received $300,000 of
its own earnings plus
portions of the other
teams' earnings for a
total of $358,030.
Burns Resign:
ECU Assistant
Basketball Coach
Beth Burns announc-
ed her resignation in
order to accept the
assistant coaching
position at the
University of Col-
orado in Boulder.
The 26-year-old
native of Chantham,
N.J joined the Lady
Pirate staff two years
ago. Prior to coming
to ECU, Burns coach-
ed at her alma mater,
Ohio Wesley an.
Burns' resignation
is effective im-
mediately.
FOOD LION
These trices good thru
Saturday, May 21,1983
V fuSDA?
(choice)
USDA Choice - Bttf Rtit4 Whtlt
10-12 Lbt. Atftrtft
Lb.
Sliced FREE
USDA Cbaiet Bom-I
Chuck
Roast
Lb.
4-S Ibt. Atftrtgt
Fresh
Picnics
Rtt
Strawberries
3 Liter - Baruady Rbiae. Rose. Cbablis,
Freeeb Colowbara Ziafanael Cbaaia Bleat
Ruby Ceberaet
Inolenook
Pk�. of 12 � 12 0z. Caai
Navalle I Milwaukee
2 Littr
V
22 Ounce
Qtarl
I
Why Pay M.39
6.S0zIt. CkatkTtM.lt OH
Way Pay M.29
Wky Pay M.09
Alpo Dog Food 13 Page Toilet Tissue
7.2S 0z. � Fad Taw
Macaroni & Cheese
14 0z. � AtserUa
Pet Rite Cream Pies
489
4.10s. - U��fJCMatffttrtv Ste� Cat Feee
Purina 100
32 Otaaa
1 Lb. � Qttrttra
Pel Monte CatsupIBflParkay Margarine
2 Caa � Tbtak Vtt
Cherry Pie Filling
COtoLD
DUCK
Half G?l
�I5JC
Half Gallon 50f Off
Liquid
fth F v 3 H
Qti")( ju,(t
Donald Duck
Orange Juice
fJTVy
t�
49 0: ft S
Detergent
, f13 2
?
wm0mt0m&
����"





CRAB A BIGGER SLICE OF SUMMER
r
w
Stop cooking your dinner up or chasing your dinner down.
Crab an extra hour of summer timejll
and have your dinner delivered.
S
Menu
PTA pizzas (Small 12 . Large 16Our zesty sauce is made
with romano cheese and topped with 100 mozzareila
Double sauce is free
Toppings
Pepperoni Green Pepper Rings Green Olives
Ground Beef Fresh Mushrooms Onion Circles
Sausage Black Olives Double Cheese
Canadian Bacon
Double Crust
Italian sauce
Jatepeno Peppers
GREENVILLE
757-1955
JACKSONVILLE
FREE DELIVERY
anywhere in our
service zone!
Deluxe
pepperoni sausage green peppers onions
and mushrooms (5 items for the price of 4)
Pizza Lite � mushrooms, onions ground beef green
peppers ripe olives
353-4700
Look for Other Stores Opening in Eastern North Carolina
buy one get one free
Oi der any large two or more item
and get a small two or more free.
Offer good
thru August 25, 1983
One discount per pizza
(

Qi
grab a dollar or two
special coupon
Save on any 2-topping pizza
S1.00 off small $2.00 off Large
Offer good
thru August 25, 1983
Cl

One discount per pizza
8
buy one get one free
Order any large two or more item
and get a small two or more free.


� Offer good
thru August 25, 1983 oS
One discount per pizza 8 $
buy two and try two
Order any 4 or more toppings and
get 2 toppings free.
Offer good
thru August 25,1983
C

One discount per pizza
ID
buy one get one free Cl
Order any large two or more item m
and get a small two or more free.
Offer good
thru August 25, 1983
3P
One discount per pizza
?
i�t wildeard-pick-a-coupon f
� Order 2 or more toppings, doubte one of mem ���. �
1 a n Order 4 toppings, get 2 of mem torn. 3P
$1.00 off small or 9 00 off large 2-topptng pttza
D Order 2 or more toppings and add one more topping
D Double cneese please on any pizza.

Offer good
thru August 25,1983 a
One discount per pizza
ID
k





Title
The East Carolinian, May 18, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 18, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.268
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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