The East Carolinian, April 26, 1983






?
(Bht lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.g� r
Tuesday, April 26, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Students Take Part
In Open-Air Forum
On Central America
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Stiff Write
One Last Break Before Exams
fMtoto By SCOTT LARSON
It looks as though Spring is here to stay, and ECL students are
making the most of it. Happy hours at local bars and restaurants
draw students into the downtown area many afternoons, and the
brief break from school is made all the more enjoyable by warm,
sunny weather and discount "beverages Dark days are ahead,
though, as finals begin tomorrow.
Director Of Counseling Center Resigns
On June 22. 1983 an era will
end at the ECU Counseling
Center. Dr. George Weigand, the
founder of the center, will step
down after 20 years as the center's
director.
Weigand came to ECU in 1963
from the University of Maryland
where he was director of the Of-
fice of Intermediate Education.
"The main reason 1 came was
because the only thing they
wanted me to do is counsel
students � nothing else
Weigand saidThat's what I
wanted to do
Weigand, who received his
bachelor's degree in Psychology
from Johns Hopkins University
and his doctorate from Maryland,
is a licensed psychologist.
Weigand specializes in learning
study skills and relaxiation
therapy.
Weigand claims that relax ation
therapy has become respective in
the last ten years. He has also
authored two books:How to Suc-
ceed in High School andCollege
Orientation.
When Weigand began the
Counseling Center, he had one
other counselor. The staff has
grown to five over the years. "The
most neglected area around is
knowing how to work smarter
rather than harder Weigand
said, adding that working longer
and harder is not always the
answer.
said this person should never
answer a question unless they
have an answer; never reer
anybody just to get rid of them
and make direct referrals when
possible.
Before the establishment of the
Counseling Center, Weigand said
there was no central office where
counseling for students was con-
ducted from. The infirmary was
chiefly responsible for consulting
services.
Weigand said the Student
Health Center and Counseling
career. "The rewards you get for
this is when a student comes in
and says 'you helped me ac-
complish what I wanted you
changed my life " Weigand said.
"The kind of feedback you get
from the people you work with
are the kinds of rewards you get in
this business
"George is a unique person
said ECU chemistry professor
David Lunny. "It will be very dif-
ficult to find an individual to do
the job as well as he does it
Lunny has been Weigand's per-
Eight ECU students and alumni
participated in the first campus
"soap box forum" in front of the
Student Supply Store Thursday.
The soap box forum was begun by
a group of students who modeled
their idea after the pit at UNC-
Chapel Hill, where students
gather to express their opinions.
According to Jeff Roberson,
one of the coordinators of the
event, the forum was a success
and will probably continue as a
regular activity on campus.
The group set up a public ad-
dress system with a sign welcom-
ing students and faculty to express
their opinion on the situation in
Nicaragua. Roberson claims the
group will be looking for topic
suggestions for future forums.
Student response to the forum
was generally warm and positive,
although there were some hecklers
at various points during the
forum.
Six of the eight speakers were
basically opposed to the United
States' role in Central America
and Nicaragua, while two other
speakers supported American in-
tervention in the region.
Jay Stone was the first speaker.
Stone recounted several recent in-
cidents where he claimed the
United States had been involved
in overthrowing and undermining
foreign governments. "The
United States' government is
totally involved in repression in
Central and South America
Stone said, "and it seems to me
that what we have to do as citizens
is educate ourselves and others on
this subject
The second speaker was student
Gordon Ipock who agreed with
United States' policy in Central
America. Ipock, a military
veteran, said he had traveled ex-
tensively. Ipock claimed that
Stone was idealistic and his prin-
ciples would never work in reality.
"It's a dirty world, if some people
get killed and bloodied, I mean,
that's just the way it is Ipock
said. "I'd rather see it happening
down there (in Nicaragua) then in
Texas or Louisiana
ECU anthropology graduate
Kerri Nolan, who recently return-
ed from Central America, claimed
that media accounts of the situa-
tion in Nicaragua were exag-
gerated and untrue.
Nolan, who spent a month
travelmg in Nicaragua, said she
initially feared for her life, but,
after contact with the Nicaraguan
people, her fears were alleviated.
Nolan praised the government
for gains made in social areas. She
noted that illiteracy had dropped
from 60 percent to 12 percent in
the three years the Sandinistas
have been in power.
Nolan claimed the majority of
Nicaraguans support the new
government and the United States
should begin negotiation to for-
ward peace in the region. She said
continued support for Reagan ad-
ministration policies toward Cen-
tral America could result in a war
involving U. S. troops.
Another speaker, student Joe
Admire, supported Ipock's posi-
tion and said communist expan-
sionism needed to be stopped in
Central America. Admire noted
that under Communism freedom
of the press, freedom of speech,
freedom of religion and assembly
would not be permitted. "We (the
United States) do have a respon-
sibility to protect this hemisphere
from foreign military in-
terference Admire said.
There was also a letter from
Congressman Walter B. Jones
(D-N.C.) read during the forum.
Jones had sent the letter to
Catholic Campus Minister Helen
Shondell. "As of this time, 1 do
not feel that any further military
aid to these countries (Guatemala.
El Salvador, Honduras and
Nicaragua) would be wise he
said.
"I think the forum was a great
idea said one student who
listened to the speakers. "I hope it
becomes a regular event
The Soap Box Forum was
organized by several students with
support from the ECU Newman
Center. People wishing to suggest
topic ideas for future forums are
asked to contact Mickey Skid-
more at the Newman Center. Any
ECU student, faculty or staff
member is eligible to speak during
the forums.
Over the years, Weigand said Center work closely together and sonal friend for almost 15 years.
the center has worked with
thousands of ECU students on a
number of problems. Most of
them are academic, informational
or social, he said.
Weigand said a properly run
counseling center begins with a
Weigand is nationally respected well-trained person to make first
for his work in both areas, contact with the client. Weigand
Sign Language Sought As Alternative
do direct referrals on a regular
basis.
Counseling is an information
getting and giving service,
Weigand said. It is designed to
help clients to make adjustments
they need to make.
Weigand said counseling
students is the highlight of his
Weigand said he would con-
tinue conseling work while in
retirement � "primarily
volunteer work where it doesn't
matter to me where I counsel
students, or where I work with
students, as long as I am working
with them
Rare Bacteria Causes
ECU Student's Death
Deaf Student Opposes Language Rule
By MIKE HAMER
Staff W ntrr
ECU student Ed Walkinstik has
filed a complaint against ECU in
students are urged to take four
semesters of Latin.
According to Walkinstik,
"asking a deaf person to take a
"The administration realizes
that a lot of students have pro-
blems with foreign languages and
that foreign languages are dif-
By DARRYL BROWN
Vubiui Ncs Editor
An unusual bacteria affecting
the liver and colon has been ten-
tatively named the cause of death
for ECU student Robbie Sue
Gregory, who died early Thursday
morning. The 22-year-old junior
communications major from
Raleigh became ill Wednesday
night in her room in Garrett dor-
are currently being offered to
hearing impaired students. "Latin mitory, was taken to the Student
an attempt to exempt himself and foreign language is equivalent to ficult Ernest said, but there is
other hearing impaired students asking a blind person to do a
from current foreign language re- review on a movie. I asked for
quirements for a bachelor of arts American Sign Language. The ad
degree.
Walkinstik, who is progressive-
ly losing his hearing, is trying to
substitute American sign language
in place of the requirement.
A hearing impaired student is
now required to complete 12
hours of foreign language, just
like everyone else.
According to an official
memorandum of the College of
Arts and Science, hearing im-
paired students should be
evaluated individually in regard to
completing the degree re-
quirements
ministration said 1 could have it as
an elective, but I had to have
Latin
Marc Charmatz, attorney for
the National Association of the
Deaf Legal Defense Fund in
Washington, D.C said he
thought Walkinstik's complaint
was valid. He said he hoped the
matter could be resolved out of
court.
ECU's hearing impaired pro-
gram, begun in 1977, is headed by
Ernest strongly ad-
a point where students who are
competent in other courses are
simply not able to deal with the
problems of an oral foreign
language. It's not as simple for
students as just taking the book
and reading on their own. That
doesn't work for a person with a
hearing loss.
"Take Latin, for example. The
Latin book is written for persons
with normal hearing, and it has
oral drills which help the student
learn the rules of Latin by oral
repetition Ernest explained.
Ernest said a second problem is
that many hearing
University regulations state that
hearing impaired students should
not be exempted, but "emphasis
should be placed on cultural
knowledge and reading and com- v
oosition skills with appropriate said, "and another student has to
modifications of instruction and take Spanish 1004, an oral course
testing techniques. These em- We don't have an interpreter, and
phases should replace the stressing there is no language culture class
of oral skill At present, some for her to take
Mike Ernest.
vocates that hearing impaired students do not have a good grasp
students be allowed to take of English grammar because of
American sign language. problems in their earlier educa-
tive hearing impaired tion. They therefore have trouble
students are having problems comparing Latin grammar with
graduating because of the foreign English. Although oral skills are
language requirements Ernest not emphasized at ECU, they are
used in the class to help students
with syntax and semantics.
Susan McDaniel, associate vice
chancellor for academic affairs,
said she felt sufficient alternatives
is recommended for the hearing
impaired. It is not taught with the
major goal of proficiency in
speaking, but the structure of
Latin is good for getting into the
structures of languages.
"American Sign language
doesn't fulfill the same curricular
need that a foreign language does;
it is not a cultural addition to the
program McDaniel said.
Because of the involvement of a
lawyer in this case, several ad-
ministration officials have refused
to make any statements to the
press.
Wayne Barrow is a hearing im-
paired senior psychology major
who is having trouble graduating
impaired because of the foreign language
requirement. "I'm only lacking
nine hours he said. "I'm going
down for the third time in Spanish
II. It's becoming extremely
frustrating. My hearing loss will
probably get to be worse, and so
I'll have to learn American sign
language as a third language.
Harvard, Boston University,
New York University, Catholic
Health Center and died a few
hours later at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
The type of bacteria has not
been determined, but it is not
thought to be communicable.
Pitt County Medical Examiner
L. Stan Harris said a final autopsy
report would probably be
available by Wednesday. He said
preliminary tests indicated
Gregory had suffered from the
liver infection for about two
weeks and had uncommon com-
plications.
Harris said the infection would
have been easier to treat if
Gregory had sought medical at-
tention sooner. "It might not
have been fatal had she not had
the final seizure Harris said.
Gregory was treated for a high
fever at the ECU Student Health
Center before she was taken to the
hospital. A doctor speaking for
the health center declined to give
details on Gregory's treatment
there pending completion of the
autopsy report and further in-
vestigation.
See U.S. COLLEGES, Page 3
.fighting for the hearing Impaired
�? M
"
T






5toe Saat (Earoltman
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.�� f
Tuesday, April 26, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
8 P�g�
Circulation 10.000
Students Take Part
In Open-Air Forum
On Central America
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Stiff Writer
One Last Break Before Exams
Photo By SCOTT LARSON
It looks as though Spring is here to sta. and ECU students are
making the most of it. Happ hours at local bars and restaurants
draw students into the downtown area many afternoons, and the
brief break from school is made ail the more enjoyable by warm,
sunny weather and discount "beverages Dark days are ahead,
though, as finals begin tomorrow.
Director Of Counseling Center Resigns
On June 22. 1983 an era will
end at the ECU Counseling
Center. Dr. George Weigand. the
founder of the center, will step
down after 20 years as the center's
director.
Weigand came to ECU in 1963
from the University of Maryland
where he was director of the Of-
fice o Intermediate Education.
"The main reason 1 came was
because the only thing they
wanted me to do is counsel
students � nothing else
Weigand saidThat's what 1
wanted to do
Weigand, who received his
bachelor's degree in Psychology
from Johns Hopkins University
and his doctorate from Maryland,
is a licensed psychologist.
Weigand specializes in learning
study skills and relaxation
therapy.
Weigand is nationally respected
for his work in both areas.
Weigand claims that relax ation
therapy has become respective in
the last ten years. He has also
authored two books:How to Suc-
ceed in High School andCollege
Orientation.
When Weigand began the
Counseling Center, he had one
other counselor. The staff has
grown to five over the years. "The
most neglected area around is
knowing how to work smarter
rather than harder Weigand
said, adding that working longer
and harder is not always the
answer.
Over the years, Weigand said
the center has worked with
thousands of ECU students on a
number of problems. Most of
them are academic, informational
or social, he said.
Weigand said a properly run
counseling center begins with a
well-trained person to make first
contact with the client. Weigand
said this person should never
answer a question unless they
have an answer; never refer
anybody just to get rid of them
and make direct referrals when
possible.
Before the establishment of the
Counseling Center, Weigand said
there was no central office where
counseling for students was con-
ducted from. The infirmary was
chiefly responsible for consulting
services.
Weigand said the Student
Health Center and Counseling
Center work closely together and
do direct referrals on a regular
basis.
Counseling is an information
getting and giving service,
Weigand said. It is designed to
help clients to make adjustments
they need to make.
Weigand said counseling
students is the highlight of his
career. "The rewards you get for
this is when a student comes in
and says 'you helped me ac-
complish what I wanted you
changed my life ' Weigand said.
"The kind of feedback you get
from the people you work with
are the kinds of rewards you get in
this business
"George is a unique person
said ECU chemistry professor
David Lunny. "It will be very dif-
ficult to find an individual to do
the job as well as he does it
Lunny has been Weigand's per-
sonal friend for almost 15 years.
Eight ECU studen's and alumni
participated in the first campus
"soap box forum" in front of the
Student Supply Store Thursday.
The soap box forum was begun by
a group of students who modeled
their idea after the pit at UNC-
Chapel Hill, where students
gather to express their opinions.
According to Jeff Roberson,
one of the coordinators of the
event, the forum was a success
and will probably continue as a
regular activity on campus.
The group set up a public ad-
dress system with a sign welcom-
ing students and faculty to express
their opinion on the situation in
Nicaragua. Roberson claims the
group will be looking for topic
suggestions for future forums.
Student response to the forum
was generally warm and positive,
although there were some hecklers
at various points during the
forum.
Six of the eight speakers were
basically opposed to the United
States' role in Central America
and Nicaragua, while two other
speakers supported American in-
tervention in the region.
Jay Stone was the first speaker.
Stone recounted several recent in-
cidents where he claimed the
United States had been involved
in overthrowing and undermining
foreign governments. 'The
United States' government is
totally involved in repression in
Central and South America
Stone said, "and it seems to me
that what we have to do as citizens
is educate ourselves and others on
this subject
The second speaker was student
Gordon Ipock who agreed with
United States' policy in Central
America. Ipock, a military
veteran, said he had traveled ex-
tensively. Ipock claimed that
Stone was idealistic and his prin-
ciples would never work in reality.
"It's a dirty world, if some people
get killed and bloodied. I mean,
that's just the way it is Ipock
said. "I'd rather see it happening
down there (in Nicaragua) then in
Texas or Louisiana
ECU anthropology graduate
Kern Nolan, who recently return-
ed from Central America, claimed
that media accounts of the situa-
tion in Nicaragua were exag-
gerated and untrue.
Nolan, who spent a month
traveling in Nicaragua, said she
initially feared for her life. but.
after contact with the Nicaraguan
people, her fears were alleviated
Nolan praised the government
for gains made in social areas. She
noted that illiteracy had dropped
from 60 percent to 12 percent in
the three years the Sandinistas
have been in power.
Nolan claimed 'he majority of
Nicaraguans support the new
government and the United States
should begin negotiation to for-
ward peace in the region. She said
continued Niipport for Reagan ad-
ministration policies toward Cen-
tral America could result in a war
involving I . S. troops.
Another speaker, student Joe
Admire, supported lpock's posi-
tion and said communist expan-
sionism needed to be stopped in
Central America. Admire noted
that under Communism freedom
of the press, freedom of speech.
freedom of religion and assembly
would not be permitted. "We (the
United States) do have a respon-
sibility to protect this hemisphere
from foreign military in-
terference Admire said.
There was also a letter from
Congressman Walter B. JoneN
(D-N.C.) read during the forum.
Jones had sent the letter to
Catholic Campus Minister Helen
Shondell. "As of this time. 1 do
not feel that any further militarv
aid to these countries (Guatemala.
El Salvador, Honduras and
Nicaragua) would be wise he
said.
"I think the forum was a great
idea said one student who
listened to the speakers. "I hope it
becomes a regular event
The Soap Box Forum wa-
organized by several students with
support from the ECU Newman
Center. People wishing to sugges
topic ideas for future forums are
asked to contact Mickey Skid-
more at the Newman Center. Anv
ECU student, faculty or staff
member is eligible to speak during
the forums.
Weigand said he would con-
tinue conseling work while in
retirement � "primarily
volunteer work where it doesn't
matter to me where I counsel
students, or where 1 work with
students, as long as I am working
with them
Rare Bacteria Causes
ECU Student's Death
Sign Language Sought As Alternative
Deaf Student Opposes Language Rule
i
B MlkEHAMER
ECU student Ed Walkinstik has
filed a complaint against ECU in
an attempt to exempt himself and
other hearing impaired students
from current foreign language re-
quirements for a bachelor of arts
degree.
Walkinstik, who is progressive-
ly losing his hearing, is trying to
substitute American sign language
in place of the requirement.
A hearing impaired student is
now required to complete 12
hours of foreign language, just
like everyone else.
According to an official
memorandum of the College of
Arts and Science, hearing im-
paired students should be
evaluated individually in regard to
completing the degree re-
quirements.
University regulations state that
hearing impaired students should
not be exempted, but "emphasis
should be placed on cultural
knowledge and reading and com-
position skills with appropriate
modifications of instruction and
testing techniques. These em-
phases should replace the stressing
of oral skill At present, some
students are urged to take four
semesters of Latin.
According to Walkinstik,
"asking a deaf person to take a
foreign language is equivalent to
asking a blind person to do a
review on a movie. I asked for
American Sign Language. The ad-
ministration said I could have it as
an elective, but I had to have
Latin
Marc Charmatz, attorney for
the National Association of the
Deaf Legal Defense Fund in
Washington, D.C said he
thought Walkinstik's complaint
was valid. He said he hoped the
matter could be resolved out of
court.
ECU'S hearing impaired pro-
gram, begun in 1977, is headed by
Mike Ernest. Ernest strongly ad-
vocates that hearing impaired
students be allowed to take
American sign language.
"Five hearing impaired
students are having problems
graduating because of the foreign
language requirements Ernest
said, "and another student has to
take Spanish 1004, an oral course.
We don't have an interpreter, and
there is no language culture class
for her to take
"The administration realizes
that a lot of students have pro-
blems with foreign languages and
that foreign languages are dif-
ficult Ernest said, "but there is
a point where students who are
competent in other courses are
simply not able to deal with the
problems of an oral foreign
language. It's not as simple for
students as just taking the book
and reading on their own. That
doesn't work for a person with a
hearing loss.
"Take Latin, for example. The
Latin book is written for persons
with normal hearing, and it has
oral drills which help the student
learn the rules of Latin by oral
repetition Ernest explained.
Ernest said a second problem is
that many hearing impaired
students do not have a good grasp
of English grammar because of
problems in their earlier educa-
tion. They therefore have trouble
comparing Latin grammar with
English. Although oral skills are
not emphasized at ECU, they are
used in the class to help students
with syntax and semantics.
Susan McDaniel, associate vice
chancellor for academic affairs,
said she felt sufficient alternatives
are currently being offered to
hearing impaired students. "Latin
is recommended for the hearing
impaired. It is not taught with the
major goal of proficiency in
speaking, but the structure of
Latin is good for getting into the
structures of languages.
"American Sign language
doesn't fulfill the same curricular
need that a foreign language does;
it is not a cultural addition to the
program McDaniel said.
Because of the involvement of a
lawyer in this case, several ad-
ministration officials have refused
to make any statements to the
press.
Wayne Barrow is a hearing im-
paired senior psychology major
who is having trouble graduating
because of the foreign language
requirement. "I'm only lacking
nine hours he said. "I'm going
down for the third time in Spanish
II. It's becoming extremely
frustrating. My hearing loss will
probably get to be worse, and so
I'll have to learn American sign
language as a third language.
Harvard, Boston University,
New York University, Catholic
See U.S. COLLEGES, Page 3
By DARRYL BROWN
An unusual bacteria affecting
the liver and colon has been ten-
tatively named the cause of death
for ECU student Robbie Sue
Gregory, who died early Thursday
morning. The 22-year-old junior
communications major from
Raleigh became ill Wednesday
night in her room in Garrett dor-
mitory, was taken to the Student
Health Center and died a few
hours later at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
The type of bacteria has not
been determined, but it is not
thought to be communicable.
Pitt County Medical Examiner
L. Stan Harris said a final autopsy
report would probably be
available bv Wednesdav. He said
preliminarv tests indicated
Gregory had suffered from the
liver infection for about two
weeks and had uncommon com-
plications.
Harris said the infection would
have been easier to treat if
Gregory had sought medical at-
tention sooner. "It might not
have been fatal had she not had
the final seizure Harris said.
Gregory was treated for a high
fever at the ECU Student Health
Center before she was taken to the
hospital. A doctor speaking for
the health center declined to give
details on Gregory's treatment
there pending completion of the
autopsy report and further in-
vestigation.
E4 Waikhntik
.fighting for the hearing impaired
I
t
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 26. 1983
N.C. Has 'Terrible Reputation' In Farm Worker Treatment
North Carolina
farm workers are
denied collective
bargaining rights,
worker compensation
coverage, protection
from hazardous
pestiticides and ade-
quate field sanitation
facilities claims Joan
Preiss, a farm worker
rights advocate, who
spoke at ECU on Fri-
day.
Priess, chairperson
of Triangle Friends of
the United Farm-
workers, also claims
farm workers are
sometimes enslaved
by crew leaders who
threaten their lives.
Priess claimed the
1982 slavery convic-
ions in Nash County
jvere indicative of the
problems the state
faces in this area.
Priess quoted the
findings from a 1980
N.C. Department of
Agriculture study
which indicated that
the state ranks last
among the 20 leading
agricultural states in
terms of wages and
laws intended to pro-
tect farm workers.
She claims North
Carolina does not en-
force child labor laws
in farm-related work.
Priess said farm
workers have been
denied rights that
other workers have
had for decades.
"North Carolina has
a terrible reputation
Priess said. "One of
the worst things that
can happen to a farm
worker is to come to
North Carolina
Priess has worked
with Triangle Friends
for ten years. The
group operates as an
a.m of the United
Farm Workers started
in 1962 by Ceasar
Chavez in California.
She also works with
National Farm
Worker Ministry
which is sponsoring
Farm Worker Week
from now until May
1.
Preiss said the goal
of the two organiza-
tions was to inform
the public on the farm
worker issue and
motivate people to
work for a change.
Preiss said lobbying
and product boycotts
were the two most ef-
fective ways of help-
ing the plight of the
farm worker.
Preiss said legisla-
tion currently being
considered by the
General Assembly on
the slavery issue
would, "if adopted,
be saying North
Carolina won't sanc-
tion it in our midst
Preiss said growers
are calling the statute
an insult to their
reputations and are
lobbying against the
bill. "They (growers)
don't want to be held
responsible for
anything Preiss
said. "The crew
leader system in-
sulates them from
responsibility
The proposed law
would hold growers
responsible if they
hire people who hold
others in slavery.
Preiss asked her au-
dience to boycott the
products of Red
Coach, distributors of
iceberg lettuce and
CampbelFs-Libby,
distributors of several
types of food pro-
ducts. She claimed
that both companies
deny basic rights to
workers who pick
their crops.
Preiss said farm
workers were
"exploited and ex-
cluded" and that
organizing was the
only way they would
achieve justice. "We
support these organiz-
ing efforts because
we've seen that that's
the only way real
substantive, mean-
ingful change is going
to come about for
farm workers Preiss
said.
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
H you or your organization
would like to nave an item
prmted m the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nc. ncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian m care ot
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office n the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd szed paper can
no' oe accepted
' nere is no charge tor an
nouncements but space is often
i.rn.ted Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column tor
publicity
The deadline for an
K vements is 3 p m Monday
tor the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesoayy tor the Thurs
da cap��r No announcements
��pceived after these deadlines
will be pnnteo
T,s space is available to aM
a "cus organizations and
dec irtments
CONGRATULATIONS
Tne Brothers Pledges and
Little Sisters of Kappa Sigma
would like to extend a very
Special congratulations to both
the A ano B league sot tba 11
teams for their first place
tin shes n the intramural Soft
ban race We would also like to
congratulate Frankenst I van
anc Rocky for their superb iobs
m heading up our intramural
pr -gram
EDUCATION
Ail stdudents who plan to
declare physical education as a
major during the spring
sen-iester should report to
Mnges coliseum at 10 00 am on
Thursday. April 26. 1983
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven
fure's Dive Cozumel, Mexico on
the beautiful Yucatan peninsula.
Aug 3. 1983 to Aug 10, 1983
Group trip for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving, meals,
lodging and air fare from
Raleigh Non -livers welcome.
Call Ray Schart at 757 6441.
COLORGL�n
TRYOUTs
Flag and rifle tryouts tor the
ECU. Marching Pirates will be
held on Mav 7 and 14 from 10 00
to 5 00 in the Music building lob-
STUDENTS
MAKE
ADIFFERENCE
If you are a motivated in
dividual who wishes to help seek
solutions to consumer and en
vironmental problems through
research and advocacy, then
North Carolina Public Interest
Research Group (NC PlRG) is
for you It is a student group
researching issues such as Con
sumer Protection
Environmental Quality
Students' Rights Government
Accountability Renewable
Energy Civil Rights NC PlRG
has, m the past, fought for North
Carolina student's rights,
documented the danger of
nuclear cargo transportation
through the state, and most
recently, making the student
drafted Generic Drug Generic
Substitution Bill a law An ECU
PlRG is now being formed
PlRG needs your support Get
together with other students
concerned with these issues For
more details call: Eliza Godwin
at 752 1748
PRE MED STUDENTS
The Kaplan Course, a
preparatory corse for the
MCAT. will be taught at ECU
this summer beginning the last
week in June This course has
been proven to raise MCAT
scores by as much as 2 to 3
points We need 20 interested
persons to sign up m order for
the service to be at ECU this
summer The course is once a
week for 8 weeks Anyone in
terested must sign up in the
Biology office or call the Biology
club at 757 6286 or 758 6775 tor
more information A deposite
should be sent m within 2 weeks
Due to limited space, we can
nont reserve your seat without a
deposit information packets ex
plaining the course curriculum
are available in the main
Biology office
RCSIDENCI HALLS
The residence hells will be
closed at the end of Spring
Semester es of May 6, 193, at
4:00 p.m. Students must vacate
their rooms and remove all their
belongings prior to this time.
Students returning to the same
rooms for first term of summer
school, provided they have
reserved such rooms, may
receive permission from the Of-
fice of Housing Operations to
leave their belongings. The
University will not assume the
responsibility for any student-
owned items left behind. Fur-
ther, the occupants of each room
will be held accountable for any
missing or damaged University-
owned furniture or other
damage within the room.
Due to the leek of adequate
storage facilities and sufficient
personnel to maintain proper
security, storage WILL NOT be
available over the summer.
Students with extreme hard
ships regarding storage should
contact their mrt coordinator
on his or her campus, informa-
tion is available in the
Residence hall Office.
REMINDER: Students with
overdue telephone bills will not
be allowed to register tor sum-
mer school andor fall senester
until these bills have been settt
ed with Carolina Telephone
Telegraph Company.
If there are any questions con-
cerning this information, con-
tact the Office or Housing
Operations
GREENVILLE
PEACE COMMITTEE
Love brutally humiliated and
destroyed: a world of stagnant
possibilities created by the false
fathers who built and tolerated
the Auschweitz's and Vietnams
of history, those who have per
ticipated in the torture
chambers of the ecclesiastical
inquisitions and then forgotten
without remorse. This is the
state of affairs that cries out to
us; that plagues our consciences
and demands to be challenged
if you ere reedy to make a com-
mitment to justice, if you ere
reedy to begin building a new
kind of society free of violence,
poverty, and alienation we need
you.
The East Carolinian
Serving ine campus community
since 1925
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday dur.ng the sum
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated and published for
and by the students of East
Carolina University
Subscription Rate: S20yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU. Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The East
Carolinian, Old South
Building, ECU Greenville,
NC 27834
CAN DO
25 Offset Resumes for
$12.50
Photocopies 5t
? Jtrt
Telephone 757 6366.6367,

CURRY
COPY
CENntzH of Greenville 752-i233Expires43083
Includes typing,
second sheets & envelopes
8V2XII 1 side
Classic Laid Paper
412 EVANS MALL-DOWNTOWN
i





t





























HOUSE
Special
��
8"x10
Natural
Color
Portrait
Fri. & Sat April 29-30 (9 A.M9 P.M.)
Sunday, May 1 (1 P.M5 P.M.)
Students and graduates,
Come on down.
Absolutely Free.
In Appreciation Of Your Business. Furniture World Has
Arranged For You To Have An 8" x 10" Color Portrait
Taken In Their Store Friday And Saturday. April 29 And
30 From 9 A.M. Until 9 P.M. And Sunday. May 1 From 1
P.M. Until 5 P.M.
No Appointment Necessary! Minors Must Be Ac-
companied By Parents. Limit One Per Family.
Furniture World
2808 E. 10th St Greenville. N.C.
ft









Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimmmiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiis
I MOSICir" I
STUDENT
SPECIAL 20 OFF �
STRINGS &
ACCESORIES
752-1159
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIII:
�GUITARS
� AMP'S
�DRUMS
� P.AS
�STRINGS
�ACCESSORIES
News Writers Needed
during the summer at
The East Carolinian
Apply at beginning of summer session at
The East Carolinian offices on the second
floor of Old South Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
Barrel of Fan Inc.
Good for one free gs' video iSRl game Qatfkry)t void sample gL coupon
rA - 1
c5J
H
'
Ha
m.
v
pizza KftJ 100 zesty pizza
with 21 fewer calories.
Ear igw ronqfn orrim pta -p�� ute Ot�itrta
pizza fljte,Jks 100 zesty pizza
with 21 fewer calories.
EX ignc tomgnt order pta "pao ute dekvered
0
to
ot�
t f'nA
6
&
Pizza
Transit
Authority.
2 FOR
THE PRICE OF
ONE
WITH THIS COUPON
FREE COKES TOO
Now Available - Dial Coke
Call Us Now! 757-1955
We Deliver!
BUY ANY LARGE 2-OR-MORE
INGREDIENT PIZZA ANO GET
ANOTHER SMALL 2-OR-MORE
INGREDIENT PIZZA
ABSOLUTELY FREE
NOT VAUO WIANV OTHER COUPON
GOOD THROUGH 8-25-�3
GflEENVILLE 7S7 1�S5
HOURS
4 00 p m -1 00 a m � Sun -Thurs
4 00 pm-2 00 am � Fn & Sat
Now thru
Wednesday
May 4th
ON-PACl
Pizza Transit Authority
REAL DEAL!
FREE COKES TOOMI
Now Available � (Met Coki
HOURS
Sun Thurs � 4 00 p M -1 00 a m I
Fn Sat � 400pm-2 00am .
757-1955 !
: $1.00 OFF SMALL 2-OR-MORE INGREDIENT PIZZA or �
; $2.00 OFF LARGE 2-OR-MORE INGREDIENT PIZZA or :
$2.00 OFF ANY PIZZA LITE�n,�.eo�o�
EXPIRES 5-15-13 5
ON-PAC
V.T. A. "Had a piece lately" f-Shirts
now on sale
Get yours today!
Call P.T.A. for your order.
2tf
U.B.E.
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Book
Buy Back Bonanza
Libra
By STEVE DEAR
Want to receive ex-
pert advise on how to
improve your campus
food servi
your daily
or, better
a more ml
sumer an
U.S. Coll
Coat. From Page 1
University, the Universnv of
Texas, the University of
Washington and the University of
California system have ail decided
that ASL deserves recognition
because it possesses a unique
structure, its own culture and its
own literature.
ASL is considered to be just as
difficult as other foreign
languages. "I would like the ad
ministration to accept ASL as m
oral language Barrow said.
"ECU seems to have such a
high percentage of handicapped
Gi C;binii�m fi's-r. and
T Shirts. S B �q Ba�s
Backpacks Camptnf Eq. 9
mctiT S'e�' Toco Shoe D�i�il
aiM 0�r 'X D "trf' New an� I
Used tt�ns Cowoe ftoe's
S3 f J
ARMY-NAVY
STORE �zsr
ABO!
:� .
App'ts
CALLTi
80CH
LALTARES JEVEI
. - .4 . :
VJW� femee 4mmet
i
;E : � . . -

f
Remount
iff Custom Desigi
Repair
L All Work Done On Pi
mm
Bausch & Loi
Soft Lensesl
COMPLE
includes .ntTtai eye exa" a M
kit. instructions ana follow up
n onth ECU student i.D reauirea
99
00
OPTOMCTRIC
�Y�CAR�
OiQt�nrMt) �
228 GREENVILLE BU
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
NOW LOOKING
COSTS LESSI
OUTFITS F
DAI
DANSKIN
IN ST
CO.

�?'
t �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 26, IN3
reatment
he ingful change is going
would 10 come about for
W'e farm workers Preiss
said
leca
OUSE
8'xlO
Natural
Color
Portrait
9-30 (9 A.M9 P.M.)
P.M5P.M.)
ci graduates,
down.
luteiy Free.
5 Furniture World Has
s 10 Color Portrait
d Saturday April 29 And
Sunday May! From 1
Minors Must Be Ac-
I per Family
re World
e .ille. N.C.





































&V


s �
i.

'
O
St
Bonanza
Library Holds Useful Books Given By Nader
By STEVE DEAR
SurflWrtlw
Want to receive ex-
pert advise on how to
improve your campus
food service, appraise
your daily newspaper,
or, better yet, become
a more informed con-
sumer and citizen? If
so, here's some news:
Joyner Library has
received more than a
dozen publications
which consumer ad-
vocate Ralph Nader
donated to ECU when
he visited the campus
last month.
Containing books,
brochures,
newspapers, and pam-
phlets such as A Stu-
dent's Guide to Im-
proving Campus
Food Service, How to
Appraise and Im-
prove Your Daily
Newspaper, and For
The People: A Con-
U.S. Colleges Substitute ASL
Cont. From Page 1
University, the University of
Texas, the University of
Washington and the University of
California system have all decided
that ASL deserves recognition
because it possesses a unique
structure, its own culture and its
own literature.
ASL is considered to be just as
difficult as other foreign
languages. 41 would like the ad-
ministration to accept ASL as my
oral language Barrow said.
"ECU seems to have such a
high percentage of handicapped
people Barrow said, "and I
think it needs to be shown that a
hearing impairment makes it very
difficult for a person to learn a
foreign language
Walkinstik is a Phi Kappa Phi
honor student who in the early
'70s designed and built an
internationally-known energy ef-
ficient "Solar Chariot" which has
been featured with Walkinstik in
The Mother Earth News and
Mechanix Illustrated. In 1978,
California presented Walkinstik
with its first environmentalist
award. He plans to work for his
masters in Rehabilitation counsel-
I
sumer Action Hand-
book, the special
reserve set up at the
reference desk is
ready for student use
1,1 " " � ij
News Writers Meeting
� 9
ingvocational evaluation for the 1 k
hearing impaired. S Students who have applied for positions as
"All in all Walkinstik said, 1 news writers for The East Carolinian during I
"this university goes out of its i either summer session should attend the S
way to help handicapped S � . � �u- -tu j SI
students. To a certain extent, their S ?g m " news oflce � Thursday, 2
hands may be tied. But when J APnl 28 a 4:30 p.m. and on Monday, May fc
tradition gets in the way of a 16 at 1 p.m. Both meetings will be short; I
the editors if you cannot attend. 5
meaningful education, then a lot
of people are wasting a lot of
time. I'm looking at this for the
entire N.C. system. There are a lot
of hearing impaired students in
North Carolina, and American
sign language is a necessity for
myself and for many other
students
When Nader visited
ECU in March,
students showed a
great enough interest
that he donated the
materials (some of
which cost more than
$25 each) to the
library for student
use, according to Dr.
Eugene Ebbs, chair-
man of this year's
Spring Lecture-
Seminar Series Com-
mittee.
"The student
response to Nader was
tremendous that is
why he was so eager
to get a reserve set up
They are gifts from
Mr. Nader for the
students to use
Ebbs said.
According to Ruth
Katz, associate direc-
tor of Joyner Library,
the materials, which
are now available, will
be processed after the
semester is over. If a
Student Public In
terest Research Group
is formed at ECU. the
library will also cir-
culate any additional
material "worth in-
terest katz aid

HARD DAYS NIGHT
Gt Comouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts, Steeping Bags.
Backpacks. Camping Equip
mem Steel Toed Shoes, Dishes!
and Over 700 Different New and I
Used Items. Cowboy Boots,
ARMY-NAVY
ISO! S. Evans
Street
STORE
ABORTIONS
I 74 week terminations
App'ts Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-321-0575
LAUTARES JLWELFRS
ESTABLISHED 1912
GREFNVILLE, N C
i
4 E.J
St
O.o PL 2 38.ii
Remounts
Custom Design
Repair
All Work Done On Premises
i
p
Bausch & Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPLETE
Includes initial eye examination, lenses, care
kit, instructions and follow up visits �or one
n onth. ECU student ID. required.
Pizza ixui
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas Sack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
u

Every
THURSDAY
I
at the
CAROLINA
OPRY HOUSE
FREE BEER
(8:30-10:00)
FREE ADMISSION
ri
The very best in solid gold Rock and Roll
with WITN's Greg Allison
99
00
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
f0f&4h'4
OPTOMCTRIC
�YECAR�C�Kl�r
Of QrMnvW pa
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Hollis
NOW LOOKING GOOD
COSTS LESS
"make graduation
1 SPECIAL!
With Personalized Gifts
Wont � be tun to wow-off
your Class ot 83 Personalized
Souvenir-Tees in the years to
come? Get a set of special
graduation shirts now with
school logo, colors and what
ever ebe you like They are
perfect for glib and al your
graduation ceiebrabons.
We're Taking You Back in TimeFor the Time of Your Life!
�5-
SHIRTS1
r in Custom Shirts "
Carolina East Mall
756-9709
The ALAMO
U M, ��� r,j l-
IT'S TIME
SUMMER FUN
at
H.L HODGES Sporting Goods
OUTFITS FOR DANCE, FITNESS, FUN & SUN BY
DANSKIN & UGHTNING BOLT
DANSKIN-GO TO YOUR DANCE OR AEROBICS CLASS
IN STYLE! LOOK GOOD & FEEL GOOD IN A
COMPLETE OUTFIT BY DANSKIN.
-LEOTARDS
-TIGHTS
-LEG WARMERS
Restaurant & Nightclub
hr O0O5 ti.r jdJiU ml.rir.
iriiN Imm i.rtrOMllr irpnri
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
Weds. Ladies Sight with The Castaways
All Ladies Free till 9:00
Happy Hour 5:30-9:00
8:30-12:30
Thurs. The Alamo's 1st Ladies Lockout
� with DJ Don Yickers
All Ladies Free all night
WRQR will be doing live Remote
from 8:30-11:30
For the Ladies free draft, wine and
Champagne from 8:30-10:00
Men in at 10:00pm
Coming
May 11th
The Four Tops
'A
So Admission till 8:00-All Greek Members 501
25 draft All Sight.
Late Sight Happy Hour 11:00pm-1:00am
Music by request with HRQR's Kirk Williams
Sat. Johnny H hite & The Elite Band.
Doors open at 7:00 Happy Hour 1-9:00pm.
We have an all new menu featuring
steaks, sandwiches, stuffed potatoes and much more.
LIGHTNING BOLT-HEAD TO THE BEACH
IN A BATHING SUIT BY LIGHTNING
BOLT! ALL NEW STYLES & COLORS
TO CHOOSE FROM.
-ONE-PIECE
-TWO-PIECE
-COVERUPS
Support The Businesses
That Support ECU
WEEK OF APRIL 25th-30th
STUDENTS WILL RECEIVE
AN EXTRA 10 DISCOUNT ON
THE ABOVE ITEMS.
THANKS FOR YOUR BUSINESS!
H.LHODGESCO.
2KE.FfflhStrcct Orcowac. MX.
University Book Exchange
Domino's Pizza
Overton's Supermarket
Todd's Stereo
H.L. Hodges Sporting Goods
The Elbo Room
P.T.A.
Western Sizzlin' Steak House
Goodyear
At Barre
Campus Alcohol and Drag Program
Coin and Ring Man
Sweetings Shoes
TncoCid
420 Club
Zales Jewelers
Western Steer
Lanteres Jewelers
Nntri-System
Curry Copy Center
Pet Village
Malpass Mufflers
Tar Landing Seafood
Boyd's Barber Shop
Sammy's Country Cooking
Aerobic Workshop
Dtener's Bakery
Marathon
Robinson's Jewelers
The Flower Basket
The Wash House
A&P
Plain Jane's
Georges Coiffeurs
Golden Dragon
Arby's
Morgan Printers
Shoaey's
J.D. Dawson
Tekreat T.V.
Buck's Gulf
Mitchell's Hair Strung Salon
Les Jewelers
Balloons Over Green vifle
Optical Palace
Baskin Bobbins
Jeffery's Beer and Wine
United Figure Salon
Bills Fast Food
Mitchell's Hair Styling A
TafTs Office Supply
The Atk
Body Reflections
Coggins Car Care
The Ammo
Pizza Inn
The Subway
Backstage Hair Stadia
Acca Canty
�mi�ppajwiiia��iiununnaamm





OUT Eaat (Carolinian
Serving the Ernst Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, (rfW.���r
Mike Hughes, ,�,�, em
WAVERLY MERRITT, Doctor of mmmm ClNDY PLEASANTS, spons Ed,tor
Scott Lindley, ����, Mamr Greg Rideout, ,�, �d�or
Ali Afrashteh. mi He Steve Bachner, in n u h mm
Stephanie Groon. or� w�iprr Juliana Fahrbach, Ed�or
Clay Thornton, Te�Ki � Todd Evans, prod.� m.�
April 26. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
60s Revisited
Injustice Alive And Well In '83
Every so often, in the editorial
writing business, we get word of an
incidence of terrible social in-
justice, an issue of unparalleled
importance and consequence to
society, an issue that literally cries
out for action.
Unfortunately, nothing like that
happenned yesterday. Never-
theless, something like that did
happen last week in St. Petersburg,
Fla.
It was, indeed, reminiscent of
the infamous student protests of
the Sixties: students up in arms
over the middle-class American
establishment, decrying the in-
justice imposed on them by their
ignorant, unyielding elders, rally-
ing to exhibit their collective disap-
proval of the administration. And,
when it was over, it seemed their
efforts were all in vain. It seems
there is no end to injustice.
It all started, after it started the
day before, when 37 high school
students were suspended for par-
ticipating in a rally protesting
school regulations forbidding
wearing shorts to class.
The terrible incident began when
Jeff Strothers, 17, convinced
several of his fellow male
classmates to don miniskirts �
under current sexually-
discriminatory legislation, male
students cannot wear shorts, but
female students are allowed to
wear miniskirts � to protest the
rule. He was suspended Thursday
for plotting and organizing the
protest. Then, on Friday, more
than 300 students � and three con-
cerned mothers � protested in
front of the school. They carried
hard-hitting, anti-establishment,
subversive signs addressed to
school superintendent Leo "Roy"
Sullivan that proclaimed such
athiestic sayings as: "Come on
Lee, let us show our knees
But it was a change that was not
to be. Sullivan, together with half
of the St. Petersburg police force,
repelled the Godless shorts-clad
horde and sent them home.
Speculation has it that the
students were actually communist
infiltrators (working, of course, in
conjunction with the KGB) sent to
America as youngsters to disrupt
democracy and imperialist school
boards around the nation.
However, these allegations �
which came as a surprise to most
of the students' parents � have
not yet been verified.
Sullivan, who also once
suspended a young coed for having
large breasts, had no further com-
ment on the situation.
It was not a pretty sight.
N.Cs Farm Workers:
The Slaves Of The Age
By PAT O'NEILL
"Fighting for social justice, it seems
to me, is one of the profoundest ways in
which man can say yes to man's digni-
ty
Cesar Chavez, Founder
United Farm Workers
The tragic plight of the North
Carolina farm worker is not a new
phenomenon. According to a 1980 study
conducted by the N.C. Department of
Administration, our state ranks last
among the 20 leading agricultural states
in terms of wages and laws intended to
protect farmworkers. And according to
Joan Priess, who visited ECU last week,
"North Carolina has a terrible reputa-
tion
Priess has been active for 10 years as
volunteer chairperson of Triangle
Friends of the United Farm Workers, an
arm of the United Farm Workers, begun
in California by Chavez in 1962. During
her talk at Mendenhall, Priess detailed
the extent of exploitation and degrada-
tion N.C. farm workers have had to en-
dure. In short, North Carolina's farm
workers:
� are denied collective bargaining
rights,
� receive no worker compensation
coverage,
� have no comprehensive health or
safety benefits,
� do not have access to sanitation
facilities while working in the fields
(toilets, drinking water, handwashing
facilities),
� are not protected from exposure to
hazardous pesticides, and
� are paid less than the minimum
wage.
Priess also mentioned that North
Carolina has no child labor protection
and that camp housing is often over-
crowded, filthy, and for all practical
purposes, unhvable. She also claims that
crew leaders partake in "widespread and
flagrant abuse" of the state's ABC laws.
Perhaps the most horrifying point
brought out by Priess was the fact that
farm workers are often enslaved by crew
leaders and are denied all basic rights.
Essentially, Priess described a present-
day situation in North Carolina which is
highly reminiscent of the Crapes of
Wrath era. In other words, injustice,
slavery and other types of human ex-
ploitation are alive and well in the state.
Priess pointed out that farm work is
the third most hazardous industry in
America. The average life-expectancy
for a farm worker is only 49 years.
One would think facts like these
would outrage our political leaders, not
to mention the agriculture industry. But
unfortunately, this is not the case. In
fact, Priess said that the strongest
resistance to legislation protecting the
farm worker is coming from agricultural
growers lobbies and the Farm Bureau.
Despite the findings by several study
commissions detailing decades of abuse
toward farm workers, nothing gets
done.
According to Priess, good recommen-
dations are made, but none is ever acted
on. She said N.C. growers are currently
"up in arms" because the General
Assembly is considering action on an
anti-slavery statute. Growers consider
the statute an "insult to their reputa-
tions
I think the fact that N.C. needs such a
statute is an insult to our state's reputa-
tion. It's also an insult to N.C. citizens
that our state's No. 1 industry is involv-
ed in such gruesome and senseless in-
justice.
"The time has come for
North Carolinians to stop
having 'Pride in Tobacco
and start taking pride in the
workers who pick it
Priess has requested N.C. voters to
lobby support for better laws for our
farm workers. The anti-slavery measure
is a necessary first step. But what's really
necessary to end this injustice will re-
quire much more than legislation.
"Farm workers must organize for their
own self-determination
Priess said the only way that "real,
substantive, meaningful change" is go-
ing to come about for farm workers is
when they organize.
Triangle Friends supports the right of
farm workers to organize. We, the
public, should too. So, the next time you
put some tasty N.C. vegetables on your
dinner table, just take a moment to
think of the suffering and pain that may
have resulted in getting them there. The
time has come for North Carolinians to
stop having "Pride in Tobacco" and
start taking pride in the workers who
pick it.
CONGRATULATIONS
THE TEAMSTERS HAVE
ELECTED YOU TO SERVE
OUT THE REST OF OUR
PRESIDENTS TERM
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
One Last Piece Of bleep bleep For The Road
Some Food For Thought
I wish there were enough weeks in the
year to write about all the things that
have been on my mind lately. But
because this is the last issue for the spr-
ing semester and, of course, because
I've already surpassed my quota of
meaningless offenses for this year, I'll
have to limit myself to this one final col-
umn, this one final compendium, this
one final piece of well
You know, there are still a lot of
things in the world that need to be
thought about. Like, for instance, the
term "higher education in North
Carolina Isn't that a conflict in terms?
Sort of like "military intelligence
"campus security" or "The Best of
Barry Manilow?"
Signing autographs is another thing
that bugs me. I mean, isn't it just a little
strange that people actually ask Arnold
Palmer to sign a can of motor oil? We
seem to be getting carried away. Hell,
before you know it, they'll have Cathy
Rigby doing a Stayfree commercial say-
ing, "You know, hardly a week goes by
that someone doesn't stop and ask me to
sign a mini pad
But there are some good things to
think about, too. For instance, the ECU
football team got off to its best start in
years the other night in the Purple-Gold
game. They're now 1-1!
But behind every rainbow, there's a
gray lining, or perhaps more precisely, a
Ronco commercial. That brings to mind
another thing that bugs me. What kind
of moron tries to cut up a pine tree, or
worse yet, a brick, with a steak knife?
Or how about dropping a raw chicken
on a fake diamond ring to advertise, of
MIKE HUGHES
Stuff I Think About
all things, a non-stick pan. And why the
hell do people in New Jersey have to call
a separate number to order a Pocket
Fisherman or a Slim Whitman album?
These are all things 1 think about at
night.
And I sometimes wonder if people in
ancient Rome or Greece were just like
us. 1 wonder if they ever said anything
like, "Damn, it's the same thing every
year; here it is March, and I'm still
writing 453 B.C. on my checks
Another thing I think about from time
to time is when tuna fish sweat a lot, do
they smell like humans? And what came
first? The chicken? Or Frank Perdue?
And whatever happened to Absorbine
Senior, Playtex Minus or Ben-Hetero?
And if a skunk eats a lot of baked
beans and gets gas, does he have to ex-
cuse himself at the table? Or does
anyone notice at all?
I also sometimes wonder what proc-
tologists and urologists do to unwind
after a tough day at the orifice.
And sometimes I wonder if Ronald
Reagan still gets Jimmy Carter's junk
mail and Playboy subscription.
And what did cavemen do when they
ruined a new pair of shoes by stepping in
dinosaur dung? Did they try to scrape it
off on the neighbor's front rock? Did
they invent swearing? Hip waders?
You know what else has always puzzl-
ed me? (You'll notice I didn't ask if you
care.) What's always puzzled me is
well to be quite honest just about
everything.
Editor's Sote: Mike Hughes, a senior
from Elephant Butte, Montana, feels in-
credibly guilty today, because he has
been lying all year about himself. His
parents are not really Arab oil barons,
or even share croppers; nor is he a
transfer student from the Edna deck
School of Etiquette. No, actually, he is a
just a poor Haitian refugee who swam to
America in 1980 to live the American
Dream, to escape the tyranny of the rul-
ing junta, to seek political and religious
asylum and to meet girls. After spending
nearly three years in Greenville, he plans
to swim back this summer.
Campus Forum
That's Not 'Really' How It Is
A couple of weeks ago, Mr. Stan
Landers published an article titled
"Repelling Doormat Religious
Types
1 feel the readers might appreciate
something about the true background,
preparation and life in general as per-
taining to the Mormon Missionaries.
The missionary program of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday
Saints (Mormon) has been acclaimed
as one of the greatest spiritual
movements and undertakings this
world has ever known.
Let us progressively follow the
events in the lives of young Mormon
boys which lead to the fulfillment of
this spiritual experience:
This preparation includes diligent at-
tendance at the various church
meetings, beginning even with the
nursery, in which doctrines and prac-
tices of the Church are inculcated in
the lives of these tiny ones. Adherence
to moral standards of conduct with
respect to sexual purity, honesty and
other virtuous traits are stressed,
especially in the home.
The youth of the Church are taught
abstinence from the use of coffee, tea,
tobacco and alcoholic beveraes. Other
practices, such as the payment of
tithing, becomes habitual. They are en-
couraged to begin saving part of their
money, for it is understood that they
and their families must bear the entire
expense associated with the mission.
The Church itself does not in any way
share in these expenses.
When young men reach 19, and if
they are living in accordance with
Church standards, they receive a per-
sonal call from the Prophet of the
Church, inviting them to devote the
next 18 months of their lives to pro-
claiming the message of the gospel. It is
to be understood that this call is not
compulsory, and if refused, no
punitive measures are taken against the
young person. The individual's status,
churchwise, is unaffected.
Missionaries do not select the locale
to which they will be sent but go where
they're assigned. It may be one of the
states or a foreign country. There are
currently nearly 40,000 missionaries
(the majority of whom are men,
although some women and older
couples may also serve) throughout the
world.
Acceptance of the call involves in
most cases considerable sacrifice � in-
terruption or postponement of college
matriculation, giving up a job or delay-
ing marriage, leaving home and loved
ones.
This discipline, which comes from
personal conviction, builds and lifts in
a marvelous manner. These young men
are motivated by great and powerful
convictions that what they're doing is
true. They discipline themselves, not
because of demands made upon them
by the Church, but because of the
knowledge within their hearts that
there is joy in service and satisfaction
in laboring in a great cause.
Prior to leaving for their mission, at-
tendance for a period of six weeks at
the Church Training Center is re-
quired. Instruction and counseling are
presented. For those assigned to
foreign countries, an intense instruc-
tional course in the language of that
country is offered.
Upon arrival at the designated field
of labor, the missionaries are assigned
to a "senior" companion � one who
has been in the mission field for some
time. They always work "two by two
Further discipline is exhibited in that
regulations prohibit dating, curtail-
ment in attendance at movies, sporting
events or any activity which might
detract from the purpose for which
they are serving.
The familiar sight of two young men
dressed in white shirts with ties and
dark pants riding down the street on
bicycles depicts the "Elders" on their
way to fulfill an appointment with so-
meone who is being taught, or they
may be on their way trading (knocking
on doors). Some days are better than
others, as far as invitations to come in
and present their message is concerned.
Yet these young men invariably ex-
press their gratitude and thanksgiving
for having the privilege of laboring
with people whom they declare are the
most hospitable and friendly in the
world � this, despite the fact that their
living conditions are usually not the
best, being far from their home en-
vironment. Adjustments must be made
in the diet. Such foods as collards, corn
bread, North Carolina barbecue,
Brunswick stew, grits and others are
unfamiliar items.
Language expressions often make
the missionaries feel that they are, in-
deed, in a foreign land. What, with
such expressions as "Y'all come
"Down yonder "Fixin' to go "I
reckon and "a fur piece
When their labor is completed, and
they return home to their loved ones, it
is the universal testimony of all that the
time spent in the mission field, bearing
witness to the gospel, has been the hap-
piest time of their lives.
Nephi Moroni Jorgensen
Professor Emeritus, ECU
ROTC Column
I'm writing in response to an
editorial by Pat O'Neill in last Tues-
day's East Carolinian concerning
ECU's Air Force ROTC program. Due
to two unrelated incidents involving
ROTC cadets, O'Neill questioned the
cadets' freedom to speak out on certain
issues. O'Neill wrote, "Does his
belonging to ROTC mean that he'd
denied his constitutional right of free
expression?"
Many people were upset with O'Neill
for writing this editorial. He's received
comments from various members of
the AFROTC, expressing their
dissatisfaction. Yet, interestingly
enough, not one letter of rebuttal ap-
peared in Thursday's East Carolinian.
O'Neill wrote, "It would appear that
at least two ROTC cadets are afraid to
express their opinions to their own
campus newspaper Judging from the
lack of written response, I would have
to disagree with O'Neill. It appears to
me that ali ROTC cadets are afraid to
express their opinions to their own
campus newspaper. How else can we
explain their lack of response?
Mary Rider
Senior, CSCI
4
v
U-4
I
Lead singer Mark Kel
Beaver
BvCARLYN F.BERT
suf'Mnicr
In April of 1966, blood red let-
ters burst from the black
background of a Time magazine
cover, announcing that Go6
Dead.
Last year, a cult of rerun wor-
shippers from the University i
Florida told United Press Inter-
national that God was alive and
weU � and He was Beaver
Cleav er.
Uh-oh! Who's going to tell
Beaver's followers that the
Almighty has been resurrected as
a whining, talentless adult for a
wo-hour made-for-TV movie
called Still the Beaverand he
promptlv bit the dust?
There's probably no gentle wav
to break the news, and probably
no need, en.cr. Not even casual
fans of Leave It To Beaver.
which ran from 195" to 1963 and
then became a syndicated rerun
staple, could have missed the big
problems with Still the Beaver
Beaver Cleaver just doesn't cut
as an adult. And no one wanted
Beaver to grow up in the first
place.
Yet that's the unpromising
premise of Still The Beaver The
grown-up Beaver is a irj
modern man - vulnerable.
separated from his wife, a bumbl-
ing single father. and
unemploved. That cute hesitance
of speech that was adorable in the
seven-year-old is painful to watch
in the 32-year-old. Jerrj
Mathers's style of acting hasn
changed a bit in 25 years.
In the opening sequence. Juro
Cleaver brings the believers, the
non-believers, and the mere
nostalgic up to date over a tamily
photograph circa 157. Watty sa
successful attorney married to his
high school sweetheart, but thev
can't seem to make babies. A
flashback of the family huddleo
bravely under big black urn
brellas provides us ample chance
to grieve for Ward Cleaver
(1910-1977). Must we really have
June telling his gravestone.
Those
Writin
BvMIKFHAM
Staff Writer �
Mandolins and pipers, boi
Tommy Makem and the Clan
lasses dancing - these might I
traditional Irish music, but Insni
its own in the rock music worWP
and Them had a hit with "BaPy
in 1966. , . . .
True, the traditional Insn
played today by many fine grj
cellent musicians who synthesis
the root of the blues with the w
lard are currently holding their
Van Morrison is one of these
that Belfast "angst" with t





9tfB3
r
j
bought
does he have to ex-
it table1 Or does
A it. a
I
times wonder what proc-
tists do to unwind
1 I I �. t .
metimes I wonder it Ronald
� Carter's junk
bsci iption.
avcmen do when they
oes by stepping in
' to scrape it
from rock? Did
W'P waders'1
always pu.zl-
ticc 1 didn't ask if you
vays puzzled me is
uite honest just about
1);
' � Hunhes, a senior
t Montana, feels in-
today, because he has
tut himself. His
. ab oil barons,
pers; nor is he a
from i he Edna deck
No, actually. he is a
r Haitian refugee who swam to
the American
escape the tyranny of the rul-
seek political and religious
meet girls After spending
in in Greenville, he plans
� his summer.
w It Is
mis arc usually not the
their home en-
Vd istments must be made
h foods as collards, corn
th Carolina barbecue,
ew, grits and others are
�ai
expressions often make
arics feel that they are, in-
a foreign land. What, with
ns as "Vail come
yonder "FixhV to go "I
and "a fur piece
en iheir labor is completed, and
turn home to their loved ones, it
' e universal testimony of ail that the
speni in the mission field, bearing
the gospel, has been the hap-
I 'heir lues.
Nephi Moroni Jorgensen
Professor Emeritus, ECU
KOTC Column
writing in response to an
b Pat O'Neill in last Tues-
C arolinian concerning
rce ROTC program. Due
unrelated incidents involving
adets. O'Neill questioned the
reedom to speak out on certain
O'Neill wrote. "Does his
ngmg to ROTC mean that he'd
led his constitutional right of free
ression?"
any people were upset with O'Neill
writing this editorial. He's received
"TJd fr�m vanous members of
M-KOTC, expressing their
atisfaction. Vet, interestingly
ugh, not one letter of rebuttal ap-
red ,n Thursday's East Carolinian.
Neill wrote. "It would appear that
ast two ROTC cadets are afraid to
s their opinions to their own
ufs ncPaper Judging from the
of written response, I would have
Magrec with O'NeflL It appears to
that ail ROTC cadets are afraid to
iress their opinions to their own
Jpus newspaper. How else can we
(lain their lack of response?
Mary Rider
Senior, CSCI
1 (
lets
lie
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
APRIL 26, 1983 Page 5
Trendy' New
Band Makes
Big Impression
Photo By CINDY WALL
Lead singer Mark Kemp fronts local progressive band The Trend in a recent performance on the University Mall.
By STEVE DEAR
Staff Wrtttf
A starving child cries motherless
in agony You change the station
and your Jesus fades to grey Our
hearts lie frozen in a wasteland
numbed of excess We close our
eyes and we sleep the nights away
Are these lyrics from Barry
Manilow's latest hit single? Or
maybe, more realistically, the
latest from The Clash? Neither
one. These lyrics are from
"Bleeding Pain" written by
Greenville's own The Trend. Last
Friday night this talented pro-
gressivenew wave band gave the
usual crowd at the New Deli a
taste of their unusual original
sounds mixed in among cover
versions of popular new wave
oriented tunes.
The young four member group
played about a dozen songs
The ironic aspect of The
Trend's performance is that their
original songs sound significantly
Comeback An Awful
By CARLYN EBERT
Suff Writer
In April of 1966, blood red let-
ters burst from the black
background of a Time magazine
cover, announcing that God is
Dead.
Last year, a cult of rerun wor-
shippers from the University of
Florida told United Press Inter-
national that God was alive and
well � and He was Beaver
Cleaver.
Lh-oh! Who's going to teU
Beaver's followers that the
Almighty has been resurrected as
a whining, talentless adult for a
two-hour made-for-TV movie
called Still the Beaverand he
promptly bit the dust?
There's probably no gentle way
to break the news, and probably
no need, either. Not even casual
fans of Leave It To Beaver,
which ran from 1957 to 1963 and
then became a syndicated rerun
staple, could have missed the big
problems with Still the Beaver:
Beaver Cleaver just doesn't cut is
as an adult. And no one wanted
Beaver to grow up in the first
place.
Yet that's the unpromising
premise of Still The Beaver. The
grown-up Beaver is a truly
modern man � vulnerable,
separated from his wife, a bumbl-
mg single father, and
unemployed. That cute hesitance
of speech that was adorable in the
seven-year-old is painful to watch
in the 32-year-old. Jerry
Mathers's style of acting hasn't
changed a bit in 25 years.
In the opening sequence, June
Cleaver brings the believers, the
non-believers, and the merely
nostalgic up to date over a family
Photograph circa 1957. Wally's a
successful attorney married to his
high school sweetheart, but they
can't seem to make babies. A
flashback of the family huddled
bravely under big black um-
brellas provides us ample chance
to grieve for Ward Cleaver
(1910-1977). Must we really have
June telling his gravestone.
"Ward � I'm worried about the
Beaver?"
And the Beaver, married and
living far away, is "still over-
whelmed by the smallest pro-
blem Little problems like
divorce
When his wife kicked him out,
Beaver does what any modern
California man facing losing his
kids and paying alimony would
do: he puts on his green baseball
cap and his windbreaker, picks
up his lunchbox � uh, his brief-
case, and goes home to Mom and
Mayfield, that bland epitome of
suburban '50s Waspland.
I guess that's what I expected,
to be taken back. Either that or
some high-camp hilarity; there
was little of either. From
Beaver's return to the end of the
movie, only clips from the
original series brought back
Beaver and Wally when they were
still cute, June when she was still
unenlightened, and Ward when
he was still alive and dispensing
advice.
So why didn't it work? Bar-
bara Billingsley rinses coffee cups
as convincingly as she did in
1959, only now she has her
eyebrows waxed and talks about
buying a condominium. Ken Os-
mond remains the slippery, oily
bully, only now he's Haskell
Construction, a company that
gets by on slipshod work and
bribes. Richard Deacon returns
as Fred Rutherford to offer our
poor hero a job, so the Beaver
can bring his two sons back to
Mayfield "where there's good
stuff in the ice box
Even nostalgia, the show's ma-
jor selling point, seemed strained.
After all, you can catch the Beav
on cable reruns anytime. The
show failed by trying to recapture
its original charm and warmth in
a Meaningful and Relevant way.
It tried to introduce the Cleavers
to the 80s.
Leave It To Beaver may have
spouted its share of messages and
morals, but it did it when situa-
tion comedy � like its audience
� was younger and less
sophisticated. When discipline
meant losing your allowance in-
stead of a trip to the child
psychologist.
Okay, so the Cleavers were
super-normal, even for the 50s.
Plunging these cherished
stereotypes head-first into the
scenarios of today's sitcoms �
career anxieties, single paren-
thood, identity crises � doomed
the return of the Cleavers and
any chance of audience accepting
them as much more than an
epilogue to an era of remembered
normalcy. Still the Beaver, aim-
ing at the leftover pocket desire
for the good ol' days when no
one was impotent or divorced,
played instead to audiences un-
willing to swallow the pairing of
modern problems with 50s
psyches.
But every few seasons, a pro-
ducer envisions grand ratings for
the revival of an old situation
comedy. Old shows and their
stars have an emotional
stronghold on TV-generaltion
memories. And there's a televi-
sion penchant for tidy endings
and for shows by formula.
They're cheaper.
But the success rate of sitcom
revivals is only slightly higher
than that of McLean Stevenson's
post-MASH series. The Many
Loves of Dobie Gillis, a hit from
1959 to 1963, survived only its
pilot eplisode in 1977, called
Whatever Happened to Dobie
Gillis? (He grew up, got married,
got boring.) Danny Thomas tried
to resuscitate his long-running
series in 1979 as Make Room for
Granddaddy, which died in one
season. And the casualties go on:
Ozzies Girls, The Brady Brides
and Rescue from Gilligan's
Island all failed.
Sometime satire turns in finer
' return of vehicles than the
real thing. In SCTV s Leave It To
Beaver 25th Anniversary Reu-
nion, Ward is a hopeless
alcoholic, June is having an af-
fair with Eddie Haskell, and
when an oveweight Beaver cat-
ches the pair and empties a pistol
at them, brother Wally laments,
"Boy, Beaver � just wait till
Dad gets home
The dialogue from Still the
Beaver wasn't much ludicrous. I
didn't know whether to wince or
laugh at such lines as, "He wants
to petition for custody! Can you
believe that little goof?" Gee,
Dad.
Not many sitcoms get on the
air these days featuring the
warm-hearted families of the
Leave It To Beaver years without
a foot in the door of social com-
mentary despite identical
characterizations or story lines.
Different Strokes, for example,
teams adopted black siblings with
a wifeless white benefactor. A
totally different guy, the father
still delivers vintage Ward cleaver
homilies like, "a man never gets
so old he forgets how it was being
a little boy
In fact, that's all Jerry' Mathers
remembers: the squints, the
grimaces, the walking home de-
jectedly with one foot on the curb
and one foot down in the street.
Jerry the Adult trying to play
Beaver the Adult shoots holes in
our memories of the kid and his
era. It seems we just don't want
our nostalgia jostled by grown-up
child stars.
Besides, you don't want to
shoot down someone's God, do
you? And for heaven's sake,
don't mess with 50s nostalgia
unless you're going to do it the
way Happv Days does � by leav-
ing it in the 50s.
Say Amen, somebody. And
pass the Saltines and the root
beer.
better than their cover versions of
songs by groups such as The
Police, The Jam, The Producers
and The Romantics. Perhaps that
is because the band is trying hard,
and successfully at that, to con-
vey their own message, albeit
political, as can be seen in their
lyrics to their song "Totalitarian
Madness
So what if they're taking our
kidsSo what if they're telling
'em lies 'So what if they 're taking
our last breath So what if they
support mass death So what if
the third world is starving Sine-
teen eighty-four is no longer fic-
tionAh, totalitarian madness
All their songs, original or
otherwise, were performed very
well with the exception of their
cover version of Tom Petty and
the Heartbreaker's current hit
"Change of Heart They played
that song so fast that Tom Petty
would probably not even have
recognized it.
Despite that one disappointing
moment, this band really knows
how to put out some fresh pro-
gressive sounds. To put it simply,
these guys are good: they don't
use sophisticated lighting
systems, strobe lights, or ex-
ploding smoke bombs, they only
rely on their musical ability and
give a very entertaining perfor-
mance.
What The Trend can boast of
about their music is its
cohesiveness. Bassist Danny
Dinerdo, guitarist Brett Richards
(who both write the music to the
group's original songs) and
drummer David Kebler give
strong support to the campable
voice of lead singer Mark Kemp
(who writes the lyrics for the
groups originals).
The Trend will be back at the
New Deli this Friday afternoon
(during "happy hour") at 3 p.m.
After struggling through exams,
those students who enjoy
original, progressive sounds in
the new wave (with some
sociopolitical insight mixed in)
would miss a great opportunity to
enjoy The Trend's performance.
Don't miss them.
Those Wild Irishmen
Writing Great Music
ByMIKEHAMER
StaffWritor
Mandolins and pipers, bourans and fiddlers
Tommy Makem and the Clancy Brothers Irish
lasses dancing - these might be associated1 wUh
traditional Irish music, but Irish music: has aho held
its own in the rock music world since VtnMomson
and Them had a hit with "Baby, Please Don t Go
in 1966
True the traditional Irish music is stillJbeing
Played today by many fine groups, but some ex-
cellent musicians who syntheske the soul that s at
the root of the blues with the loneliness of the Irish
lard are currently holding their own.
Van Morrison is one of these.Irishmen who ten
that Belfast "angst" with the blues-soul-gospei
music of America which he so obviously loves. He
has been playing professionally since 1960, when he
was 15, and he has been selling records since 1966
when "Gloria" hit the air waves. He is one of the
most consistent of the singersongwriters on the
music scene.
Inarticulate Speech of the Heart (Warner
Brothers) is Van's latest. There are no rockers here
like "Brown Eyed Girl" and "Domino but there
is an abundance of excellent music that will delight
Van Morrison fans. This is a record for one's
meditative moods; it resembles Astral Weeks and
Common One, if it must be compared to earlier
releases.
See THOSE, Page 7
Indiana Jones On Campus This Weekend In Exam Flick
Harrison Ford stars as the already-legendary Indiana J
Raiders of the Lost Ark, showing this weekend as the free
Hendrix Theatre. Times for the film are 7 p.m. on Thursday
Saturday. Admission is by ID and activity card for students
staff on campus. The flint is sponsored by the ECU Student
in Steven
m film at
5,7:15
Union Films
�s
s
and 3t p.m. on Friday and
I





J
?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 26. 1983
Page 6
Sizable Recruits Sign With Lady Bucs
ECU women's basketball coach
Cathy Andruzzi has announced
the signing of four athletes to
basketball grants-in-aid. The four
include 5-10 forward Annette
Phillips of Louisburg Junior col-
lege, 6-0 forward Lynn Nance of
Asheboro, 5-11 center Julie Davis
of Alexandria, Va and 5-9 guard
Jody Rodriguez of Fayetteville.
"We are pleased about the four
athletes we have signed Andruz-
zi said. "Not only are they fine
athletes, but they are good
students. They have outstanding
over-all credentials. They are the
four girls we have been interested
in. They bring us some size which
we wanted to add, and they are
really enthusiastic. They wanted
to come to ECU and to be a part
of our program
Phillips, a starting forward on
the Louisburg squad which finish-
ed second in the National Junior
College Tournament last season
and fourth this year, originally at-
tended Princeton High School in
Smithfield. She was all-
tournament in the East Coast
Classic and the St. Augustine's
College Tournament as well as co-
Most Valuable Player at the East
Coast Classic.
Phillips was all-Region 10 both
athletically and academically in
1982 and 1983 and as the outstan-
ding defensive player. At
Princeton, she was the Player-of-
the-Year in the Carolina con-
ference as well as all-East. She is a
member of the Beta club and Phi
Theta Kappa.
"We've wanted Annette for a
long time Andruzzi admitted.
"She is a hard worker on and off
the court. She is not flashy, but
gets the job done, and she's a
smart ballplayer; she hustles
Nance, a forward-center for
Southwestern Randolf High
School, was all-Central Carolina
Conference in 1982 and 1983.
Ranked fourth of 135 in her
senior class, Nance was the
Player-of-the-Year in Randolf
County in 1983 and the
Southwestern Female Athlete-of-
the-Year.
She averaged 19.8 points and
10.2 rebounds per game as a
senior, 14.9 points and 9.4 re-
bounds as a junior and 10.0 points
and 8.0 rebounds as a sophomore.
She holds school records for most
points in a season with 459 and
most points in a game with 45.
"Lynn has a lot of potential
Andruzzi said. "She played on a
young team in high school and has
to carry a lot of responsibility.
She has a great deal of character
and she is hard-working
The 6-1 Davis, from Lake Brad-
dock Secondary School in Alexan-
dria, was an all-Region choice by
the Washington Journal and a
second-team selection on the
Washington Post Northern
District team.
Davis was second team all-
League and third-team all-
Northern Region. In addition to
being the MVP at Lake Braddock,
Davis holds career school records
for most points scored (916), most
rebounds (691) and most blocked
shots (123). She is the first female
athlete to receive a scholarship at
Lake Braddock in the last 10
years.
"Julie is big Andruzzi said.
"She was under four different
head coaches in four years, but
she has the size and potential for
us. She will need some consisten-
cy, but we're excited about getting
her
The only guard signed is
Rodriguez of Terry Sanford in
Fayetteville. All Southeastern 4A
Conference in basketball, softball
and volleyball, Rodriguez was all-
City, all-County and Player-of-
the-Year in Fayetteville. She was
all-East and honorable mention
all-State and a nominee for high
school ail-American status.
She scored more than 1,000
points in her four-year career and
was the MVP of the local
Christmas Tournament.
"She's one hustling ballpllayer
and she's like that 24-hours a
day Andruzzi explained. "She's
vtry enthusiastic. You'll see a lot
of Jody in the future
Head Coach Cathy Andruzzi signed four athletes who will give the
size needed on next year's squad.
Williams Impressive
In Grid Scrimmage
H�ofo By GARY PATTERSON
Pirate shortstop Kelly Robinette slides head-first into home plate with the tying run in the tying run in the ninth inning of
Saturday's ECU-Camel contest. The Pirates won, 8-7, on Winfred Johnson's two home runs.
Bulldogs Turn Back 'Stranded' Pirates
By KEN BOLTON
siulul Sports Editor
Right fielder Greg Baker went
four-for-four and scored four
runs Monday night as the Atlantic
Christian Bulldogs defeated ECU
8-4.
For the Pirates, it was a case of
wasted opportunities as ECU
stranded 12 men on base.
"We had a lot of opportunities,
but couldn't take advantage of
it said ECU head coach Hal
Baird.
The one bright spot for the
Pirates was Winfred Johnson's
fifth-inning homer � his 11th of
the year. Johnson is now one off
the record of 12 homers in one
season set in 1981 by Butch Davis.
The Bulldogs jumped out to a
2-0 lead after the first inning on a
walk by Eric McDaniels and a
two-run blast by shortstop David
Lawhorn.
After ECU scored a run in the
bottom of the first on Todd
Evans' fielders-choice, ACC came
back with two runs in the second.
The Pirates' frustration con-
tinued in the second inning as Kel-
ly Robinette hit into a bases-
loaded double play.
In the fourth inning, ECU had
a golden opportunity but failed to
convert it into any runs.
Tony Salmond opened the inn-
ing with a single to left field. Jack
Curlings followed with a double
down the left-field line, but Sal-
mond was thrown out at the plate
trying to score.
With Curlings on third,
Robinette popped up in foul ter-
ritory and John Hallow grounded
out to first to end the inning.
The Pirates wasted another run-
scoring opportunity in the sixth
when Evans grounded out to the
shortstop with the bases full.
Although the Pirates out-hit the
Bulldogs 11-9, it was a matter of
some defensive mistakes at key
times and a lack of batting at op-
portune times.
"We had breakdowns in every
area Baird said. "But we're
playing as hard as we possibly
can
The Pirates have four games re-
maining on the 1983 schedule, and
it is going to close as to whether
ECU will make any post-season
tournaments.
Only four teams will be invited
to the ECAC tournament in May,
and ECU is currently battling with
Georgetown for the fourth spot.
James Madison, Richmond and
William and Mary have all but
wrapped up the first three spots.
On Friday night, ECU will host
Baptist in a 7:00 p.m. game, and
the two teams will play again
Saturday at 1:00 p.m.
On Sunday, the Pirates will
travel to Wilson to wind up their
season with a doubleheader with
Atlantic Christian.
Seniors Honored
At A wards Banquet
As expected, senior Mary
Denkler was the most honored
guest at the ECU Women's
Basketball Awards Banquet Sun-
day afternoon.
Denkler, who just completed
her fourth year as a Lady Pirate
ball player, was named as the best
offensive player, The Daily
Reflector's most valuable player,
and was co-recipient of the "I
Have Survived" award.
"Mary came to us very bow-
legged three years ago said
Head Coach Cathy Andruzzi with
a laugh, "but 'The Denk' really
came through. She's gonna leave
ECU with a very, very strong
memory
Senior Caren Truske was
selected as the most improved
player. Truske came to ECU three
years ago from N.C. State. "Her
improvement from the first time
she came to us was unbelievable,
Andruzzi said. "She hung in there
and earned herself a starting posi-
tion
"The Rat Of The Year" award
or the best defensive player trophy
went to senior Fran Hooks. "The
individual who isn't afraid � a
gutsy player gets this award An-
druzzi said. "I remember one time
when Fran got her head stuck
under the scoring table diving for
the ball. She's played 6-2's and
5-11's (players) all year
Both Hooks and Denkler
received the "I Have Survived"
award. "We give this to those
who serve four years active duty
Andruzzi said, "and I mean that.
Going through our program is not
easy, and we expect a great deal
out of our athletes
After giving each senior pla-
ques, Andruzzi praised Hooks,
Denkler and Truske for showing
excellence not only on the court
but in the classroom as well. All
three players will graduate with at
least a 3.0 gradepoint average.
Individual awards were given to
Junior Darlene Hedges,
Sophomores Darlene Chaney and
Loraine Foster and freshmen
Sylvia Bragg, Delphine Mabry,
Rita Simmons and Lisa
Squirewell.
By KEN BOLTON
wuki Soct� r diior
Earnest Byner rushed for two
touchdowns and John Williams
completed all six of his passes as
the Gold defeated the Purple
21-12 in ECU's annual spring
scrimmage game Saturday night.
In addition to his 83 yards
through the air, Williams also
rushed for 65 yards on 10 carries
in a game played under wet and
windy conditions.
Head coach Ed Emory, in his
fourth year at the ECU helm,
viewed the game from the press
box and was happy with what he
saw.
"I was pleased all around with
the game Emory stated. "We
saw some very positive things and
it was by far the best spring game
we've had since I've been here
The Gold squad jumped out to
an early 14-0 lead on Byner's two
first-quarter touchdowns.
After Jeff Heath � who was
the place kicker for both teams �
started the game off by booting
the kickoff out of the end zone,
the Gold took over on their own
20-yard line.
With Williams and Byner doing
most of the damage, the Gold
marched all the way down to the
Purple 27-yard line.
Facing a third down and eight.
Gold tailback Bubba Bunn took
an option pitch from Williams
and raced around the left end for
a ten-yard gain.
On the next play, Bunn ran off-
tackle for a 12-yard pick up, put-
ting the Gold on the five-yard line
with a first-and-goal situation.
Byner then took the handoff up
the middle, breaking several
tackles on the way to the end zone
with the game's first score.
Before the Purple had even
touched the ball, the Gold team
had run off the first six and one-
half minutes of the clock and had
kept the ball on the ground for 13
of the 14 plays in the drive.
The Purple, with Kevin Ingram
at quarterback and Tony Baker
and Reggie Branch at running
backs, took their initial kickoff
and advanced to the Gold 33-yard
line.
But a fumble by Baker and
subsequent recovery by Kenny
Phillips gave the Gold the ball on
their own 31.
The Gold needed only six plays
to cover the 69 yards as Williams
completed passes to Stefon
Adams for 17 yards and Norwood
Vann for 20 yards.
Byner took it over the goal line
from the nine with another burst
up the middle behind a line head-
ed by 300-pound senior Terry
Long.
The score at the end of the first
quarter was 14-0, and the half
ended with the same totals as the
increasing rain made play dif-
ficult.
The second half started with the
Purple's Chris McLawhorn retur-
ning the kickoff 57 yards before
being hauled down by the last
defender.
After three straight runs by-
Branch netted 29 yards, the drive
stalled and a fourth-and-four at-
tempt was thwarted by the Gold
defense.
The Gold took over on their
own 17 and Williams directed his
team to the Gold 43, where Byner
again headed up the middle, this
time for a 32-yard gain.
Freshman fullback Pat Bowens
took the handoff on the very next
play and busted through the line
and scored on a 25-yard scamper.
The Purple was again unable to
score in the third period, and the
score was 21-0 going into the final
frame.
A pass interference call netted
the Purple 43 yards on their first
drive of the fourth period, and In-
gram snuck in from the one-yard
line three plays later. The two-
point conversion failed and the
Gold clung to a 21-6 lead with
See GOLD, Page 8
Bucs Topple Camels
�V ��V PATTIKttN
Seniors Fran Hooks, Cares Truske, and Mary Deakler received all the
special awards at the annual banquet this year.
By RANDY MEWS
Staff WriMr
Freshman powerhouse Winfred
Johnson led off the lenth inning
with a home run as ECU out-
slugged Campbell University
Saturday afternoon in an 8-7
baseball victory.
The Pirates hit four home runs
in the contest, which was delayed
for more than an hour due to the
rain. Johnson knocked out two,
while Jabo Fulghum and Todd
Evans each had one.
Johnson, who pitched the first
5 13 innings of the game, also
served as designated hitter. He
had three hits, scored three runs
and batted in two runs in five at-
bats.
"Johnson has been a joy to us
this year, and he showed it to-
day said Head Coach Hal
Baird.
Robby McClanahan was the
winning pitcher, going the final 4
23 innings. He struck out six,
and gave up just two hits as he
posted his second victory against
three losses.
After trading runs in the third
inning, John Hallow singled to
right in the bottom of the fourth.
Evans then followed, knocking
the ball over the right field fence
for a 3-1 edge. Johnson was next,
and he made it 4-1 with one of his
two homers.
Campbell scored five big runs
in the top of the fifth to take a 6-4
lead. After an ECU error, a bunt
and a single that loaded the bases,
Mickey Spicer knocked out a
ground-slam to push the Camels
into the lead.
In the seventh, Campbell added
another run when Rodney Stovall
sacrificed to give the Camels a 7-4
advantage.
ECU pulled back within one
with a pair of runs in the sixth,
and then finally tied it with a run
m the bottom of the ninth. Kelly
Robinette doubled to right center,
moved to third on a fielder's
choice, and then scored on a John
Hallow sacrifice fly.
That set the stage for Johnson's
dramatic tenth-inning homer �
his tenth of the season
Those
Coafjmed From Page 5
There are four m
strumentals on the
album, and the other
songs are almost
mystical hymns that
explore those spaces
in one's psyche hich
are hard to speak
about. For example.
Inarticulate Speech (
the Heart .No. 2, an
says, "I'm a soul in
wonderI'm just wild
about it � 1 cant live
without it
Morrison itarU off
BucSi
Winfred Johnson, a
5-10, 210-pound
freshman from
Elizabethiofcr.
selected as the ECAC
South co-Plae;
the-Week James
Madison Lnie:
Todd Whitaker
also named along uith
Johnson.
Johnson, a pucher-
264 By Pass.
Next Door to
Toyota East
-Jri5di

W�&
rENGINEERI
THE
WOI
The Arm;
Engineering aj
commissioned
program couic
rewarding can
You've w
Bachelor of Sc
Army is a gc
tise while
experience. Ai
An Army
pus soon to aj
tions with th
Engineering oi
placement offi
call:
752






1 Ml t AM C XKOl IMN
Sports
APRIl 26, IW
I'diif ft
Sizable Recruits Sign With Lady Bucs
I �. i women's basketball coach
Cath ndruzzi has announced
signing of tour athletes to
, ants m aid I he tour
. iide s 10 forward Annette
Phillips ot Louisburg junior col
ege, t 0 forward 1 ynn Nance of
s 5-11 centei Julie Dais
t andi ia, a , and 5-9 guard
R Kiriguez ot Fayetteville.
"We are pleased about the foui
' � . signed Andruz-
'Nol only are the fine
es, hut they are good
dents rhey have outstanding
i 6 lentials 1 hey are the
� At h i e been interested
in. fhev bring us some size which
wanted to add, and they are
ist , rhey wanted
! v I and to be a part
, a sianing forward on
- -quad which finish
the National Junior
nameni last season
- eai. originally at
n High School in
She was ali-
amenl in the hast Coast
Classic and the St. Augustine's
College Tournament as well as co-
Most Valuable Playei at the Easl
Coast Classic
Phillips was all Region 10 both
athletically and academically in
ls82 and lsK3 and as the outstan-
ding defensive player. A t
Princeton, she was the Player-of-
the-Yeai in the Carolina con
ference as well as all last. She is a
member of the Beta club and Phi
I beta kappa
"We've wanted Annette tot a
long time ndiui admitted.
"She I a hard workei on and o
the court She is not flashy, but
gets the job done, and she's a
smart ballplayer; she hustles
Nance, a forward-center tor
Southwestern Randolf High
School, was all-Central Carolina
Conference in 19S2 and ls83.
Ranked fourth o 135 in her
senior class. Nance was the
Player-of-the Yeai in Randolf
County in 19S3 and the
Southwestern female Athlete-of-
the Year.
She averaged 19.8 points and
10 2 rebounds per game as a
senior, 14.9 points and 9.4 re-
bounds as a junior and 10.0 points
and 8.0 rebounds as a sophomore.
She holds school records for most
points in a season with 459 and
most points in a game with 45.
"1 ynn has a lot of potential
Andruzzi said. "She played on a
young team in high school and has
to carry a lot of responsibility.
She has a great deal o character
and she is hard-working
The 6 1 Davis, from I ake Brad-
dock Secondary School in Alexan-
dria, uas an all-Region choice by
the Washington Journal and a
second team selection on the
W ashington Post Northern
Districl team.
Davis was second team all-
League and third-team all
Northern Region. In addition to
being the MVP at lake Braddock,
Davis holds career school records
tor most points scored (916), most
rebounds (691) and most blocked
shots (123). She is the tirst female
athlete to receive a scholarship at
1 ake Braddock in the last 10
ears.
"Julie is big Andruz.i said.
"She was under four different
head coaches in four years, but
she has the size and potential for
us. She will need some consisten-
cy, but we're excited about getting
her
I he only guard signed is
Rodriguez of Terry Sanford in
Fayetteville. All Southeastern 4A
Conference in basketball, softball
and volleyball, Rodriguez was all-
City, all-County and Player-of-
the-Year in Fayetteville. She was
all-Past and honorable mention
all-State and a nominee for high
school ail-American status.
She scored more than 1.000
points in her four-year career and
was the MVP of the local
Christmas Tournament.
"She's one hustling ballpllayer
and she's like that 24-hours a
day Andruzzi explained. "She's
v try enthusiastic. You'll see a lot
of Jody in the future
Head Coach Cathy Andrui signed four athletes who will give the
sie needed on next year's squad.
Williams Impressive
In Grid Scrimmage
� . V ,
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Pirate shortstop Kelly Robinette slides head-first into home plate with the tving run in the tying run in the ninth inning of
saturdax's ECU-Camel contest. The Pirates won. 8-7. on Winfred Johnson's two home runs.
Bulldogs Turn Back 'Stranded' Pirates
BvKf N BOl Assistant sport rION lit Of
Ri. 1Bakerwent
andscoredfour
Mi �ght ai the Atantic
.eteatedECl
for thi es, it was a case of
rtunities as ECU
: : I men on base.
'We had a lot ot opportunities.
' couldn't take advantage of
: ECU head coach Hal
ne bright spot for the
;s was Winfred Johnson's
nning homer � his 1 lth of
hnson is now one off
cord ot 12 homers in one
season set in ls�M bv Butch Davis.
1 tie Bulldogs jumped out to a
2-0 lead after the first inning on a
walk bv Eric McDaniels and a
o-run blast bv shortstop David
1 aw horn.
After ECl scored a run in the
bottom ot the first on I odd
Evans' fielders-choice, ACC came
back with two runs in the second.
The Pirates' frustration con-
tinued in the second inning as Kel-
ly Robinette hit into a bases-
loaded double plav.
In the fourth inning. ECU had
a golden opportunity but failed to
convert it into any runs.
Tony Salmond opened the inn-
ing with a single to left Field. Jack
Curlings followed with a double
down the left-field line, but Sal-
mond was thrown out at the plate
trving to score.
With Curlings on third,
Robinette popped up in foul ter-
ritorv and John Hallow grounded
out to tirst to end the inning.
1 he Pirates wasted another run-
scormg opportunity in the sixth
when Evans grounded out to the
shortstop with the bases full.
Although the Pirates out-hit the
Bulldogs 11-9, it was a matter oi
some defensive mistakes at key
times and a lack o batting at op-
portune times.
"We had breakdowns in every
area Baird said. "But we're
playing as hard as we possibly
can
1 he Pirates have four games re-
maining on the 1983 schedule, and
it is going to close as to whether
ECU will make any post-season
tournaments.
Only four teams will be invited
to the ECAC tournament in May,
and ECU is currently battling with
Georgetown for the fourth spot.
James Madison, Richmond and
William and Mary have all but
wrapped up the first three spots.
On Friday night, ECU will host
Baptist in a 7:00 p.m. game, and
the two teams will play again
Saturday at 1:00 p.m.
On Sunday, the Pirates will
travel to Wilson to wind up their
season with a doubleheader with
Atlantic Christian.
B KKN BOl ION
1 Mjiiiai spt.ft, rd�t�r
I arnest Byner rushed foi I -
touchdowns and John Williams
completed all six ot his passes as
the Cold defeated the Purple
21-12 in ECl 's annual sprit -
scrimmage game Saturdav night.
In addition to his 83 � ds
through the air. Williams also
rushed tor 65 vards on 10 can
in a game plaved under wet and
windv conditions.
Head-coach Ed Emory, in his
fourth vear at the ECU helm,
viewed the game from the press
box and was happv with what he
saw.
"1 was pleased all around with
the game Emory stated "We
saw some verv positive things and
it was by far the best spring game
we've had since I've been here
1 he Cold squad jumped out to
an earlv 14-( lead on Byner's two
first-quarter touchdowns.
After Jeff Heath io was
�place kicker for both teams -
started the game ott bv hos-
tile kickoff out ot the end one.
the Cold took over on their own
20-vard line.
With Williams and Byner doing
most o the damage, the Cold
marched all the wav down to the
Purph
-vard line.
Seniors Honored
At Awards Banquet
�s expected, senior Mary
Denkler was the most honored
nuest at the ECU Women's
Basketball Awards Banquet Sun-
day afternoon.
Denkler, who just completed
her fourth year as a Lady Pirate
ball player, was named as the best
offensive player. The Daily
Reflector's most valuable player,
and was co-recipient of the "I
Have Survived" award.
"Mary came to us very bow-
legged three years ago said
Head Coach Cathy Andruzzi with
a laugh, "but 'The Denk' really
came through. She's gonna leave
ECU with a very, very strong
memory "
Senior Caren Truske was
selected as the most improved
player Truske came to ECU three
vears ago from N.C. State. "Her
improvement from the first time
she came to us was unbelievable
Andruzzi said. "She hung in there
and earned herself a starting posi-
tion
"The Rat Of The Year" award
or the best defensive player trophy
went to senioi Fran Hooks. "The
individual who isn't afraid � a
gutsy plaver gets this award An-
druzzi said. "I remember one time
when Fran got her head stuck
under the scoring table diving for
the ball. She's played 6-2's and
5-1 l's (players) all year
Both Hooks and Denkler
received the "I Have Survived"
award. "We give this to those
who serve four years active duty
Andruzzi said, "and I mean that.
Going through our program is not
easy, and we expect a great deal
out of our athletes
After giving each senior pla-
ques, Andruzzi praised Hooks,
Denkler and Truske for showing
excellence not only on the court
but in the classroom as well. All
three players will graduate with at
least a 3.0 gradepoint average.
Individual awards were given to
Junior Darlene Hedges,
Sophomores Darlene Chaney and
Loraine Foster and freshmen
Sylvia Bragg, Delphine Mabry,
Rita Simmons and Lisa
Squirewell.
lacing a third down and eight.
Cold tailback Bubba Bunn took
an option pitch from Williams
and raced around the left end for
a ten-yard gain.
On the next plav, Bunn ran off-
tackle for a 12-vard pick up. put-
ting the Gold on the five-yard line
with a first-and-goal situation.
Byner then took the handoff up
the middle, breaking several
tackles on the way to the end zone
with the game's first score.
Before the Purple had even
touched the ball, the Gold team
had run off the first six and one-
half minutes o the clock and had
kept the ball on the ground for 13
of the 14 plays in the drive.
The Purple, with Kevin Ingram
gie Bram u
. ks. toi � kickofl
i to tl
But a
� v �
: . �� I the ball oi
�s n -
1 he Gold nee d only si
� ;over tl � � '��
completed passes
Adams for l Sorw
ann tor 20 � I
Byner toi k it ovei
� :n the nine w
up the middle behind a line
ed bv 300-p
I ong.
rhe score at tl
. arter was -
ended with the sari
mcreu .
� .alt.
rhe
Purple's Chris Mel a �
rung the kickofl 57 yai
by ' � i
der.
Vfter thr� txaij
Branch netted 29 vards. the
stalled and a fourth-and
tempt was thwai
defense.
The Gold took over on tl
own 17 and Willian
team to the Gold 43, �'ere B- .
again headed up the m
time for a 32-vard gain.
freshman fullback Pa' Be-
took the handoff on the vet
play and busted through the line
and scored on a 25-yard sea
The Purple was again unable to
score in the third period, and
score was 21-0 going into "
frame.
A pass interference call nc
the Purple 4. vards on their I
drive of the fourth period.
gram snuck in from the one-)
line three plays later The tw
point conversion taiieo and
Gold clung to a 21-6 lead with
See GOLD, Page 8
Bucs Topple Camels
PHote �y OAKY PATTERSON
Seniors Fran Hooks, Caren Truske, and Mary Denkler received all the
special awards at the annual banquet this year.
By RANDY MFVS
Freshman powerhouse Winfred
Johnson led off the tenth inning
with a home run as ECU out-
slugged Campbell University
Saturday afternoon in an 8-
baseball victory.
The Pirates hit four home runs
in the contest, which was delayed
for more than an hour due to the
rain. Johnson knocked out two.
while Jabo Fulghum and Todd
Evans each had one.
Johnson, who pitched the first
5 13 innings of the game, also
served as designated hitter. He
had three hits, scored three runs
and batted in two runs in five at-
bats.
"Johnson has been a joy to us
this year, and he showed it to-
day said Head Coach Hal
Baird.
Robby McClanahan was the
winning pitcher, going the final 4
23 innings. He struck out six,
and gave up just two hits as he
posted his second victory against
three losses.
Atter trading runs in the thi
inning. John Hallow singled to
right in the bottom of the fourth
Evans then followed, knocking
the ball over the right field fence
for a 3-1 edge. Johnson was next,
and he made it 4-1 with one of his
two homers
Campbell scored five big runs
in the top of the fifth to take a 6-4
lead. After an ECl error, a bunt
and a single that loaded the bases.
Mickey Spicer knocked out a
ground-slam to push the Camels
into the lead.
In the seventh, Campbell added
another run when Rodnev Stovall
sacrificed to give the Camels a "4
advantage.
ECC pulled back within one
with a pair of runs in the sixth,
and then finally tied it with a run
in the bottom of the ninth. Kellv
Robinette doubled to right center
moved to third on a fielder's
choice, and then scored on a lohn
Hallow sacrifice flv
That set the stage for Johnson's
dramatic tenth-inning homer -
his tenth of the season
Those
( ontinurtl rn�m r'a
There an
;rientais
urn, and
s o n g a
mvsticai hyi
explore th
in Oi
Inarticulate
the Heart
won :�
with .
M
BucSI
vs �
5 - 1
Mad
lol
VSk
CIO r
264
i
9 fl5Cdr
S
t
f
ENGINEERU
THE A!
WOW
Er.i;
commis
progr
rewdTv.
Hdche.or t I 5
Arm �� is a i I

tise w
experU i A.B
An Arn
pus soon
tu�ns wtih
EnkTiru-er -
pUcemei
call:
I
752-2'
BE





THE EAST CAROL 1NIAN
APRIL 26. 1983
Bucs
tour athletes who will gie the
mpressive
crimmage
rback and Tony Baker
Branch at running
eir initial kickoff
; he Gold 33-yard
imble b Baker and
recovery by Kenn
he Gold the ball on
eeded only six plays
the 6 ards as Williams
passes to Stefon
1 ards and Norwood
: l yards.
it over the goal line
nine with another burst
� behind a line head-
; � pound senior Terry
re a- the end of the first
vas 14-0. and the half
d rith the ame totals as the
i n made play dif-
: half started with the
e's Chris McLawhorn retur-
ff 57 ardv before
hauled down by the last
three straight runs by
netted 29 yards, the dne
. a iourth-and-four at-
as thwarted b the Gold
took over on their
d VS illiams directed his
he Gold 43, where Byner
tded up the middle, this
i 32-yard gain.
ashman fullback Pat Bowens
handoff on the very next
ind busted through the line
: on a 25-vard scamper.
Purple was again unable to
re in the third period, and the
re wa 21 -0 going into the final
ne.
pass interference call netted
?3 ards on their first
� the fourth period, and In-
am snuck in from the one-yard
three plays later. The two-
mversion failed and the
I clung to a 21-6 lead with
see GOLD, Page 8
pie Camels
After trading runs in the third
inning, John Hallow singled to
right in the bottom of the fourth.
ans then followed, knocking
the ball over the right field fence
for a 3-1 edge. Johnson was next,
and he made it 4-1 with one of his
two homers.
C ampbell scored five big runs
in the top of the fifth to take a 6-4
lead. After an ECU error, a bunt
and a single that loaded the bases,
Mickey Spicer knocked out a
ground-slam to push the Camels
into the lead.
In the seventh, Campbell added
another run when Rodney Stovall
sacrificed to give the Camels a 7-4
advantage.
ECU pulled back within one
with a pair of runs in the sixth,
and then finally tied it with a run
in the bottom of the ninth. Kelly
Robinette doubled to right center,
moved to third on a fielder's
choice, and then scored on a John
Hallow sacrifice fly.
That set the stage for Johnson's
dramatic tenth-inning homer �
his tenth of the season.
ung
out-
itv
p
ied
the
wo,
dd
�irst
also
He
n-uns
� at-
R us
It to-
Hal
the
(rial 4
six.
he
lainst
Music
Continued From Page 5
There are four in-
strumental on the
album, and the other
soags are almost
mystical hymns that
explore those spaces
,n one's psyche which
are hard to speak
about. For example,
Inarticulate Speech of
the Heart o. 2, Van
savs. "I'm a soul m
wonder I'm just wild
about it � 1 can't live
without it
Morrison starts off
the album with an op-
timistic cut, "Higher
Than the World
Here Van says
"Higher in my mind,
I'm gonna leave these
blues behind; and I'll
find what I'll find,
Today
Morrison explores
that unique brand of
Irish soul in the song
"Irish Heartbeat
Stay � cause the
world is so cold, I'm
going back to my own
one,I'm going to
talk to my own one.
My favorite cut on
the record is "Rave
On John Donne
Here Van calls on
some of the great
poets of the English
language to sing
through the industrial
revolution � through
the technological
revolution:
Rave on, words on
printed pageRave
on, Walt Whitman �
nose down on wet
grassRave on, Mr.
Yeates � rave on
through the writing of
a vision.
Rave on, Van, rave
on.
I first heard about
U2 from a couple of
Irish girls who were
working for a
mayoral campaign in
New Orleans to make
enough money to get
down to Mexico.
They liked Van Mor-
rison and they liked
traditional music, but
they were in love with
U2. After hearing
U2's third release
War (Island Records),
I can see why.
From the LP's title
to the lyrics to the
music, the theme of
the importance of be-
ing close to someone
in two comes through
again and again. This
theme rings
throughout "New
Year's Day perhaps
the best and most im-
portant song or this
record. Here U2 say,
"Though torn in two
we can be one. I will
begin again
Another great song
on this album is
"Sunday, Bloody
Sunday which may
have been written
about Bloody Sun-
day, a 1972 incident
when British
paratroopers killed 13
civil rights
demonstrators in
Londonderry. Steve
Wickham adds a
violin solo that lends
an eerie touch which
causes the song to
stay with the listener.
The pain of living
in a country which is
torn by conflict comes
through again in
"Like A Song and
in "Drowning Men
In "Like A Song
U2 says, Angry words
won't stop the
fight Two wrongs
won't make it right.
One of the best
lyrics on the record is
on side 2 in a song
called "Surrender
It's in the street get-
ting under my
feetIt's in the air; it's
everywhere I look for
youIt's in the things
I do and say If I want
to live, I've got to die
to myself someday.
There isn't a bad
cut on this record. I
feel that special credit
for success goes to
Steve Lillywhite who
has done a superb job
of production on
these songs.
Kevin Rowland and
Dexy's Midnight
Runners make a
valiant attempt on
T o o - R y e - A y
(Polygram), but they
can't quite seem to
pull it all together.
Rowland attempts to
fuse a Motown soul
sound with traditional
Irish music. This
blend words on a cou-
ple of songs, notably
"Come On Eileen"
and "The Celtic Soul
Brothers but it just
doesn't carry most of
the songs.
Kevin Rowland has
potential, but it might
take a good producer
and several tighter
songs before they will
be able to met the
caliber of U2 and Van
Morrison.
Albums courtesy
Record Bar, Carolina
East Mall.
Buc Slugger Chosen
Winfred Johnson, a
5-10, 210-pound
freshman from
Elizabethtown, was
selected as the ECAC-
South co-Player-of-
the-VVeek. James
Madison University's
Todd Whitaker was
also named along with
Johnson.
Johnson, a pitcher-
designated hitter,
banged out three hits
and a home run in
East Carolina's 6-0
shutout of UNC-
Wilmington. In that
game, Johnson also
four-hit the Seahawks
while striking out
nine. Against Camp-
bell University,
Johnson smashed two
home runs and a dou-
ble, including the
game-winning round-
tripper in the bottom
of the tenth inning to
defeat the Camels,
8-7. For the week,
Johnson went eight-
for-thirteen, and five
runs batted in and
scored five runs.
Western
Sizzlin
Weekend
Greenville,N.C.
Special
264 By Pass,
Next Door to
Toyota East
WEDNESDAY 5
SPECIAL
FOUR (4) Tacos
for just $1.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
8:00pm til closing .
draft with purchase of 4 tocos t
April 29th, 30th & May 1st
Buy one 11 oz. Sirloin Reg. Price $5.7
Py only Vi price $2.90 Second Sirloii
All steaks served with King
Idaho Potatoes or Fries -Texas Toast
Salad Bar only $1.00 with this special
Featuring Prime Rib
Every Frl. � Sot. Nigh
New Serving 14oiT-Bone
April Lunch Specials Mon-Sat 11-2
Jr. Sirloin $2.19 wsalad bar $3.19
Chopped Sirloin $2.49
wsalad bar $3.49
lb. Hamburger wBaked Pot. $1.89
wsalad bar $2.89
Baked Potato wsalad bar $2.50
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
500 w. Greenville Blvd. 7564040
IReflrrrc's finnurl
SPKTNCr TSHXffT 5RLB
CJXll 7f?K�t Plflce Ffr
SHtftT PRZCES 5TPlT
nrHvUU
o
.Tar Landing Seafood ffib
' RoUnru V W
W
- mm
A WHALE OF A MEAL
t$m
pecse
Cs

1
WfTM QPECUL MAW W0UG Fc� lAOlES
fanefafy
r ENGINEERINGSCIENCES"
CONSIDER
THE ADVANTAGES OF
WORKING FOR YOUR
UNCLE.
The Army is looking for 1983 graduates in
Engineering and Science disciplines to serve as
commissioned officers. For those who qualify, this
program could be an important step toward a
rewarding career - in or out of the Army.
You've worked long and hard to earn your
Bachelor of Science degree. A commission in the
Army is a good way to use your technical exper-
tise while gaining valuable supervisory
experience. And the opportunity is available now!
An Army placement officer will be on cam-
dus soon to discuss opportunities and qualifica-
tions with those about to receive degrees in
Engineering or Science. Contact your department
placement office to arrange an appointment. Or
Call: CAPTAIN
LOUIS MORALES
752-2908 IN GREENVILLE
ARMYOFFICER.
pc ah YOU CAN BE.
Family Restaurants
All You Con Eot
Specials
Shrimp til you emu cat
Special for only $5.99
Tues-W ed-Thurs nights
rj l OS Airport Heat Greenville, N. C
KsasaMBaaiagssMBMsasaaapaaMi
Copvi lCJnt 19S5
Krogei Sav on
Qummv Riqnts Reserved
None Sold To De.uers
items
Effective
Thru Sat
and Prices
Thurs April 27
April 30 19S3
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each o� these adver
tised items t re
quired to be readily
available tor sale r
each Kroger Saw on
e�cept as specifically
noted ih this ad M e
do run out ot an item
we will oMer you your
choice o a com
parabie item he"
ava'abie rejecting
the same savings or a
rainchech which 'H
entitle you to pur
chase the advertised
item at the advertised
pnee withm 30 days
Open Mon. thru Sat. Sam to Midnight � Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
-vu
KROGER GRADE A
Large Eggs
doz i wkW
KROGER
2 Lowf at Milk
2-Cal
Jug
s!
KROGER
OLD FASHIONED
COST CUTTER WhltC BaCl
peanut Butter 00h
24-OZ
Leaf
BATHROOM
TISSUE
7-OZ
Can
If. "I �
LUNCHEON MEAT .JJ 01131111111
Spam Effiufi
4 QQv
ROM
Pkg
FROM THE BAKERY
FRESH BAKED
CHOCOLATE CHIP. RANGER
PEANUT BUTTER OR
Sugar cookies
ml
For
SAVE
79
CALIFORNIA
RED RIPE
Strawberries
$138





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 26, 1983
?
T
Gold Prevails
Cont'd From Page 6
9:55 remaining in the
game.
Another pass in-
terference penalty,
this one for 21 yards,
was called against the
Gold. That enabled
Ingram and tight end
Howard Berger to
team up on a 32-yard
TD bomb.
The conversion try
failed again and the
game ended with the
Gold winning by the
final nine-point
margin.
The final statistics
pointed to the Gold's
dominance on the
ground, as the win-
ners out-rushed the
Purple 292 to 189
yards. Branch was the
game's leading rusher
with 83 yards; Byner
led the Gold with 78
yards on nine carries.
The play of
Williams, a junior
college transfer who
also played on the
Pirate basketball
team, was a gratifying
sight to Emory.
"I was very pleased
with John Williams'
play Emory said in
the dry confines of the
press box. "It makes
me feel good about
the way the quarter-
backs are playing go-
ing into the fall
Emory said that
this year's ECU team
will throw the ball
more than in the past,
with two-thirds of
spring practice having
been spent on the
passing game.
Saturday night's
game marked the end
of practice until mid-
August, when the
Pirates will begin
preparing for the
September 3 season
opener against
Florida State.
"We had the best
talent that we've ever
had for this game
Emory commented.
"The spring has been
very positive; it's the
best we've had since
I've been here
In addition to the
new faces in uniform
� there are 32
freshmen and five
junior college
transfers � there will
be a lot of new faces
on the sideline this
year.
Nine coaching
changes have been
made to Emory's
staff, including the
additon of new offen-
sive and defensive
coordinators.
Art Baker, former-
ly head coach at Fur-
man and The Citadel,
will be the offensive
coordinator as well as
Associate Head
Coach. Tom
Throckmorton comes
to ECU from VMI
and will serve as
defensive coor-
dinator.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff:
Welcome to our flea market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd. Open every Saturday and
Sunday I til S. Crafts, tools, fur
niture, books, etc. Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' items.
Real bargeinsM
K2-7S0 KAWASAKI, 1W1. S1.M0.
Priced to sell. Graat bargain.
Good condition. This is a real
motorcycle. Make an offer Call
752 4�3S.
�SO SPECIAL II Yamaha Si,KM.
Good condition. An excellent
b.ke Need to sell Make an of
fer. Call 752-433.
1M2 CHEVY Custom Deluxe 10,
4x4. 4-speed, sliding rear win-
dows, AMFM, cassette. PS
P.B. Lock-in hubs, Rally wheels.
Priced to sell, SIO.SOO. Call
7S2-4t3S.
FOR SALE: FISHER S30
SPEAKERS. Will sell cheap,
SISC. Call 7i4-77.
KENMORE REFRIGERATOR:
1 12 years old. 2.S cubic feet.
Available May I. $12S. Great
bargain, call 757 eO05.
FOR SALE: ! cubic loot
Whirlpool refrigerator. Avacado
green, 5 feet tall. Best offer Call
75-1303.
COMPACT OED, best offer
755202.
REFRIGERATOR: 1 year old,
5 5 cubic feet. Beautiful condi-
tion, SIM. Call 72-�44.
'71 HONDA XL2S0 w helmet
Exc. com) SWO. 757 '233
Helen at 752 2171 after 4:30.
ROOMMATES WANTED for
summer-fall. Carriage House
Apartments. Call 754-007
ROOMMATE NEEDED for
summer IM plus 13 utilities.
Call 75 343.
ROOMMATE WANTED IM-
MEDIATELY for summer to
share 4 bedroom house on Sum-
mit St. MSmonth plus 14
utilities, washer, dryer, air
conditioned 757 3411.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 2 bedroom
apartment. $13Smonth in-
cluding utilities, can ama.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 2 bedroom
apt. at King's Row $20 mo.
Available May I. Can 7Sa-442.
SERVICES
MORLEY WAH-FUZZ PEDAL
cheap Call 7S2-�I
FOR SALE: SCUBA TANK 71
cult steal lust viped and
hydroed. S4S. Also, wet suit 42
regular, S2S. Both S0. Call
75-05a. John Warren.
FOR SALE: S cubic ft. rafrig.
Great tor dorm, SI 25. Call
75372 after 4 p.m.
REFRIGERATOR FOR SALE:
On year old 5 cubic foot
refrigeratorfreeier. Exc. cond.
sis call 7sa-t27t.
PERSONAL
HOW 'BOUT thm weenies with
che, right weenie? SPIKE
and PJ.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: KNEX GOLDEN ACE
tennis raquet in area of Jarvis
and 5th streets. $20 reward. If
found, contact ma at 757-4041.
LOST: DOG. Answers to
ROSIE. Medium-long black
hair. Part lab, part retriever.
Lost in vicinity of 5th Street
across from Jarvis Dorm.
Reward offered. Call Kim,
757-1131.
SEKA
FIND
AND YE SHALL
HAPPY 22 BIRTHDAY Michael
Sampson, from your babe,
LISAll
PAT K: Do you have a Krtmm
colorcd VolvoT How many
Volvos dees it take to get from
Betes Creek to ECU? Attention:
Army has sale on used tents you
could make some khaki clothes.
Why don't you run fer Miss
America � yew have a little Mt
from alt titty statesl SPIDER.
CINDY H What s round, white.
and gets t�upgd at a Limit
TYRONE JONES Man, yew is
dun greatess. I ain't never seed
nobuddy what could woof down
rib an' ripple like yew, my man.
But tell me, Ty, what happened
to yo rhythmT
ROOMMATE
WANTED
Frith Whole Or Rib Half
Thete frleet good thru
Saturday, April 30,1983
WANTED
WANTING TO BUY: DOUBLE
� ED. C�H 7B-S44.
WANTED: MUSICIAN for Bap-
tist Church. Call 522 3071 after
4:f.
PERSONS WANTED to rent
apartment at Eastbrook.
2-Bdrm. I 12 bath, bus route to
ECU. Peel beginning May I.
Lease is optional For more in
formation, call 757 34.
HAVE TWO OPENINGS tor
juniors majoring in journalism
who have already taken basic
courses in news writing fer sum-
mer intern jobs on North
Carolina's largest weekly
newspaper. We particularly
desire the Barbara Walters,
Howard Cossell, Bryant Gumbel
type of inquiring reporter who
does net mind asking ALL the
questions the public wants to
knew. We particularly want in-
quiring reporters who can see
additional news and feature
stories, do general assignment
reporting, cover courts, Man en
the Street Interviews, etc. No
Sports The by lined clippings
you will get will instantly grab
any editor's attention after
graduation We can also use two
others who are maioong in the
advertising sequence Call Tent
or Jean Boney at (fit) 220 70Sl
Tuesday, Wednesday or Thurs-
day. Ala mane News, Graham,
N.C.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 1 hdr�m
house New hem fully furnished
in Stakes area. Te share with
female roommate and owner �
reasonable rent. Call after 5 34
p.m. Mon-Frt. anytime
H. 712-124.
MISC.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
te share excellent two beJreem
townhous at W�dgwd Arms
fer the Summer. Call 7S-4�7.
NEEDED: FEMALE ROOM
MATE te sbar 2 bedroom
trailer one mile frem ECU cam-
�deTetMrWlqpTfW C4PI1
MOVING? NO JOB TOC
LARGE OR SMALL!)
Reesenehte rates. Call 7M-SM.
SUMMER JOBS AT OCEAN-
FRONT HOTEL with lodging.
rail
or a combination of various
duties. Semi resume te Colony
Beach inn. F.O. Best 17 Nags
Head, N.C. �7W er call 441244.
Lb.
USD chalet Bnf Chilli - Bo ii
Chuck
Roast
14-17 Lb. Averaa.e
(Sliced Free)
6ra4i A - 4-4 Ik. Avi.
Fresh
Qt
R�i - Riri
California
Strawberries
$0$
2 Liter
Pepsi
Cola
Pk� af 12 � 12 0i. Cut
Miller
Beer
$$99
5 Liter � Bare.ue Reu Cb.biit
Paul
Masson
Phi. a? 6 - ft 0i. Cam
Sehlitz
Malt Liquor
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE, experience quality work, IBM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanie Shive 7SO 5301 or GAIL JOYNER 754-1042.5
TYPING: Term papers, thesis, etc. Call Kempi Dunn, 752-4733.b
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SERVICE: Complete audio repair call after 4 p.m. Mark 752 m. MOVING? No job too large or small! Reasonable rates, call.
750-4533.
99
Y
32 Oiaei
22 Ounce
Why Pay H.39
Del Monte
Catsup e
Wb- Pay '1.19
171
14 Oz. da � Atiartae
89
Qaart
Alpo Dog Food m� JFC Mayonnaise H Hot Dog Sauce
79
4 Pack - 2 Ply
Edon Toilet Tissue
41
399
10 0z. - CatTidberff leek. Hill Tea at Pete
15 Ot. - Cat Fee - I Wee Heat flab t CbUbe
589
1 Lb. � Narf ariM tartan
31oTJ
It Oz. - Fraatb Cat j
Del Monte Green Beans
4� - .
t:�
99
Half Call � Deeei. Deck
Puss M' Boots $hed(Ts Spread Orange Juice )
� Te
16 Or Phillip j
N�3 Pork a
Beans
porfeVi
beans
Why Pay 2 81'
BaV W.aaaam. JaaalT aV"m
r?16V
49 Ounce
4 h! 1! i 1 k�Kjinl
Uji.lDffiH
tjafaf
Xt ajbtw � ma if alii UlAMS i�C0L6 WMTIMWhy Pa, 2 39 ,
10 Ojbc
s?fU
Jeno's
Pizza
firry
�V��� Pa, 29
- -� "
�� �'� mt"
��
�m. �� .ma
� m mmmmt





Title
The East Carolinian, April 26, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 26, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.267
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy