The East Carolinian, April 21, 1983






�hc lEant (Eamliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.y Lp
Thursday, April 21,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12P�g�
Circulation 10,000
Media Board Appoints Managers For '83-84
By GREG HIDEOUT
Newt Editor
The Media Board announced
Monday the new media heads for
the 1983-84 academic year. The
board reappointed Fielding Miller
as general manager of The East
Carolinian, Donna Can ana as
editor of The Ebony Herald and
Gary Patterson as head
photographer.
The board's also selected Jim
Ensor to be general manager of
WZMB and Bryan Hester as
editor of the Buccaneer. Ellen
Moore was tentatively approved
as editor of the Rebel. She was not
present for an interview, but
Chairman of the Media Board
Eric Henderson said the interview
is only a formality since she is run-
ning unopposed for the position.
Miller, who has been general
manager since May of 1982, is the
first person to be reappointed to
his post since the creation of the
media board in 1976. Under
Miller's leadership, The East
Carolinian has experienced a
record year in sales growth. The
increased revenue has enabled the
paper to begin remodeling its of-
fice, which is located in the Old
South Building, purchase a van to
save money on delivery costs and
add another typesetting terminal
to decrease the work load.
Next year, Miller would like to
computerize the billing procedure
and hire a full-time secretary.
Editorially, he would like to in-
crease coverage of groups on cam-
pus, but he is pleased with the
progress the different sections of
the paper have made thus far.
Carvana, who begins her se-
cond term as editor of The Ebony
Herald, has put the minority
paper on campus on a regular
schedule. She plans to increase
coverage of the various minority
groups on campus.
Under Gary Patterson's leader-
ship, the campus photo lab has
converted to a superior Nikon
system. Patterson stressed team
work to his photographers and
has seen the effort pay off in
higher quality print work.
Patterson's major plan for next
year is the relocation of the lab.
At present, the lab is located in
the basement of Fleming dorm
and is subject to flooding during
rainstorms.
Jim Ensor, next year's general
manager at WZMB, said it felt
"fantastic" to be picked to run
the campus radio station. Ensor,
the programming director last
year, said his major goal is to in-
crease the professionalism of the
staff. He hopes to get approval to
pay the disc jockeys, which would
help the overall quality of the sta-
tion, he says.
"I hope to improve on other
books says next year's Bucan-
neer editor, Bryan Hester. Hester,
who worked on this year's staff,
also hopes to get more color pic-
tures in the school's annual year-
book.
The Rebel, the school's literary
magazine, will find Moore, after
she is approved, as its editor.
Moore, a freshman commercial
art student, said her number one
plan is "to get it out on time
The media board appoints new
media heads at the end of every
spring semester.
Fielding Miller
The East Carolinian
Donna Carvana
The Ebony Herald
Gary Patterson
Photography Lab
Debate In Front Of Student Store
Student Public Forum Set Up
Got something to say? Want
people to listen? Well now you
can get on a soapbox and be
heard. That's right, Today
anyone at the Student Supply
Store between 11:45 a.m. and 1
p.m. will be given the opportunity
to say a few words to their fellow
students about the political situa-
tion in the Central American na-
tion of Nicaragua.
A group of ECU students have
come up with the idea of selecting
different topics and asking dif-
ferent campus groups to par-
ticipate in an "open mike" for-
mat to voice opinions on the issue.
The group, which has par-
ticipants from several organiza-
tions, will allow each speaker a
maximum of five minutes at a
time to speak. The ECU Catholic
Newman Center is sponsoring the
event. The ECU Committee on
Central America is one of the
groups which will provide
speakers for the program.
Jeff Roberson, a member of the
committee and one of the
founders of the soap box idea,
told The East Carolinian that the
open-microphone session will br-
ing the issues directly to the
public. "It gives everybody and
anybody a chance to speak out on
issues they feel are important he
said. The group borrowed the
idea from "The Pit a brick area
on the campus of UNC-Chapel
Hill where students can speak on
any topic they choose.
Roberson said this week's topic
was chosen because it is important
to all Americans. "The U.S.
government is involved in the fun-
ding of covert military activities to
destabilize the Nicaraguan
government Roberson said.
"Our tax dollars are being used
for this activity. We're responsi-
ble for what our tax dollars are us-
ed for
If the idea of the soapbox ses-
sion is popular, the group plans to
continue the program next fall,
choosing different topics for
discussion each time
"It sounds like a great idea
said ECU College Republican
President Dennis Kilcoyne. "I'll
probably come by and say a few
words
"It's pretty obvious to me that
Nicaragua is a Marxist govern-
ment Kilcoyne said. "It
adopted all the Marxist revolu-
tionary overtones such as the
glorification of other communist
leaders. It's just crazy to say that
Nicaragua is non-aligned. It's just
so obviously hooked up with the
Soviet Union
Any ECU student, faculty or
staff member is invited to speak.
Anyone with suggestions for
future topics is welcome to give
them to Mickey Skidmore at the
Catholic Newman Center �
Ellen Moore
The Rebel
Bryan Hester
Jim Ensor
The Buccaneer
WZMB
Federal Figures On Loan Defaults
By Students Deceptive, Study Says
(CPS) � The number of
students who fail to repay federal
loans may not be as high as U.S.
Department of Education of-
ficials have been reporting, accor-
ding to a new study by the
American Council on Education.
Since 1975, the government has
been releasing inflated default
rates which reflect the number of
students who initially default on
their loans, but who may resume
payments in response to collection
efforts, the study says.
Most recently, the education
department has asserted default
Slay Chosen As Best Dorm Of Year
Slay Residence Hall in the Central Campus area was named the outstanding dormitory for 1982-83.
Reasons for the decision include Slay's first place award in the SRA Energy Contest, its participation in the
blood drive and other campus and community activities.
Slay Residence Hall, the winner
of the 1983 SRA energy conserva-
tion contest, has been named the
outstanding dormitory of the year
by the Student Residence Associa-
tion. The dorm was cited for its
participation in the blood drive,
contributions to community and
campus activities as well as the
energy contest.
Associate Dean for Residence
Life Carolyn Fulghum said the
dorm was selected for the award
by an SRA committee. Each dorm
had to submit a list of its
qualifications and ac-
complishments to the committee.
This is the first year for the
award, according to Fulghum,
and the trophy given to the winn-
ing hall will rotate among the
dorms, moving to the winner's
lobby each year.
Slay Residence Hall Director
Donna DeLuise said the dor-
mitory's service projects to raise
money for charities and programs
on dorm's halls were just as im-
portant as the major campus ac-
tivities. Involving all the residents
was a vital part of the dorm's suc-
cess, she said.
rates of 15.4 percent on National
Direct Student Loans and 12.3
percent on Guaranteed Student
Loans.
But, the study shows the default
rates drop significantly once col-
lection efforts are made.
The after-collection default rate
for the NDSL is eight percent,
while the percentage of GSL
defaulters is actually 3.8 percent.
"I think it points out that the
quoted default rates are, to say
the least, an overstatement says
ACE spokesman Elaine El-
Khawas.
"There are deadbeats in the stu-
dent loan program, no doubt
about it. But it's not as dramatic
as the government figures have in-
dicated she says.
"The 12.3 percent default rate
for GSLs is made up of
cumulative default figures con-
cedes an education department
source. "All it really tells you is
the number of loans that have
ever been defaulted on and
doesn't take into account
repayments later on
But, the after-collections
default rate "is also misleading
because it does not take into ac-
count people who again default
on their repayments. It simply
assumes that once repayment
begins, it will continue the
education official said.
The real default rate is
somewhere between, the source
says, "probably somewhere
around eight or nine percent. But
which figures you use depend on
what the party involved wants to
show
"We don't like the idea of
overstating the default rates, but
we're stuck with two different
systems, neither of which gives the
real default rate adds Robert
Coats, head of the department's
college-based loan programs.
But, El-Khawas and other of-
ficials suggest the government
uses the pre-collection default
rates to make the problem
"appear worse than it really is
perhaps to make it easier to justify
cutting the programs' budgets.
"I'd don't know their motives,
and I don't think there's been any
real conspiracy to deceive the
public El-Khawas says, "but, if
you state a 12 percent default rate
for GSLs, as the government
does, it certainly makes it sound
like there's a real default problem.
The after-collections rate of 3.8
percent, while still representing
some default problems, seems
much more realistic and accep-
table'
Spurred by perceived default
problems, federal attorneys in a
number of cities have launched
spectacularly publicized efforts to
track down deadbeats.
Last fall, for instance, federal
officials in Philadelphia began
towing away cars belonging to
student loan defaulters, and im-
pounding them until the loans
were repaid.
Volunteer Lectures About
Farm Worker Conditions,
N.C. Anti-Slavery Law
Black Priest Calls Chicago Mayoral Vote Racist
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
A black Catholic priest who
spoke at ECU on Wednesday
claims that racism was behind the
close vote in the recent Chicago
mayoral election in which Harold
Washington, a black, was elected
to head the nation's second largest
city.
Father Martin Carter, director
of the commission on black
ministry in the Raleigh diocese,
claimed that white Democratic
voters abandoned their party after
Washington won the primary
from incumbant mayor Jane
Byrne.
Carter called Chicago "a very
definitely segregated city He
said the city is rigidly ethnic and
that a stranger who worshipped at
the wrong church in Chicago
would find out quickly that he or
she did so. "You'll be told you
can stay because you're here, but
don't come back Carter said.
Carter noted that he found it
surprising that Chicago has such a
racist reaction to Washington
considering that the city was
originally founded by Jon Baptist,
a black from Haiti.
Carter, a native of High Point,
N.C, came to Greenville as part
of his outreach work to Catholic
parishes and student groups
throughout the diocese.
The black ministry office was
begun to help heal the "wounds
of de-segregation that came to
North Carolina in 1953 Carter
said, explaining that at that time a
move was made by the bishop to
integrate (Catholic) schools and
churches in the Raleigh diocese.
As a result, Carter said, all
black parishes and schools were
closed in 1953, and white parishes
were not prepared to receive many
of the disenfranchised blacks.
Black Catholics left their faith
because of this, feeling alienated
and rejected. "We are now in the
process of reclaiming souls, heal-
ing wounds Carter said.
Carter pointed out the distinc-
tion between the words de-
segregated and intergrated. He
said that de-segregated meant that
facilities were open to blacks, but
that the term didn't imply that
blacks had been fully accepted in
an integrated church.
A woman volunteer who has
worked with North Carolina
farmworkers will speak to ECU
classes and at Mendenhall's Cof-
feehouse.
Joan Preiss, the chairwomen of
Triangle Friends of the United
Farm Workers, a support group
for the United Farm Workers
movement, will be here to pro-
mote farmworker's week, which
begins April 25. Preiss said her
group's main work is to help the
plight of the farmworker through
educating the public about the,
what she termed, "horrible" con-
ditions of farmwork.
Preiss is also trying to enlist
support for an anti-slavery bill
that is currently being considered
by the N.C. General Assembly.
Farm Worker Week is being
sponsored by the National Farm
Worker Ministry, an organization
of N.C. churches whose purpose,
Preiss claims, is to support farm
workers as they organize to
"overcome their poweriessness
and achieve equality, freedom and
justice
Preiss said NFWM supports
"self-determination" for farm-
workers. NFWM has been spon-
soring Farm Worker Week for 10
years.
Preiss said the anti-slavery bill
has already been recommended by
a legislative study commission and
could be adopted during this
legislative session. "Farm workers
are still enslaved in involuntary
servitude Preiss said, "and one
See FARM WORKERS, Page S
4-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 21, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd sued paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
noyncements but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee fha' vour announce
ment will run as long as you
want ana suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesdayy tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
CERAMICS
ECU Ceramics Guild Spring
sate Thursday April 21, 1983 on
iv 9 00 am 6 00 pm on the ter
race beside the gallery at
Jenkins Fine Arts Building
KDYARDSALE
Come chec k out the
bargains this Saturday April
23 1983 from Bam until 4 p m
items will include a 8 x 25 ft
flatbed trailer, household items,
clothing of all types toys and
games books ana other misc
items Also being sold,
overstockea styles of piercea
earrings from a local merchant,
at very low prices BaKed goods
will be sola, ana free coffee will
be provided tor the early
morning shoppers' The Yard
Sale is being sponsorea by Kap
pa Delta Sorority at 2101 East
5th St Ram or shine1
WANT TO BE
RICH AND FAMOUS?
Enter the BAHAMA MAMA
BIKINI CONTEST A selected
representative will receive an
all expense paid trip to par
ticipate in the Miss Hawaiian
Tropic US Finals, Aug 26th, 27,
28, 1963, to be held at the
beautiful Plaza Hotel, in
Daytona Beach, Florida. The
finalist will receive an all ex
pence paid trip for one to com
pete for Grand prizes in the 1984
Miss Hawaiian Tropic Interna
tional Competition in Honolulu
Hawan Lots of great prizes for
entering
You could win a dream vaca
tion for 2 anywhere in the world,
a new Porsche sports car, a
Monark Ski Boat and a National
Modeling assignment with
Hawaiian Tropic Must enter by
April 22 1983 at S 00 p m Contact
RANDY EVANS or KEN
ADAMS at 7528125 This is
YOUR BIG CHANCE to show
WORLD what you've got
STAN LANDERS
ECU'S own Stan Landers will be
signmg autographs Wednesday
in � the second floor oathroom
GREENVILLE
PEACE COMMITTEE
Love brutally humiliated and
destroyed a world of stagnant
possibilities created by the false
fathers who built and tolerated
the Auschweitz's and Vietnams
of history, those who have par
ticipated m the torture
chambers of the ecclesiastical
inquisitions and then forgotten
without remorse This is the
state of affairs that cries out to
us that plagues our consciences
and demands to be challenged
If you are ready to make a com
mitment to iustice if you are
ready to begin building a new
kind of society free of violence,
poverty, and alienation we need
you Come to the meeting of the
Greenville Peace Committee at
�0 S Elm St at 700 Friday
night, or phone 748 490 for more
information
CHORAL SOCIETY
The 75 voice Greenville Choral
Society will present its Spring
Concert at 3 00 p.m Sunday,
April 24 in Wright Auditorium on
the East Carolina University
campus Hyden's "Theresa
Mass" will be sung by the
chorus with soloists and or
chestra The concert will also in
elude a group of selections com
posed by American musicians
Tickets are priced at $2 00 and
may be purchased from any
Choral Society member or at the
door Tickets are also available
at the Pitt Greenville Arts Coun
cil office in the Home Federal
Savings and Loan Building
SILENT DINNER
Thursday at 6:00 p.m. at Dar
ryl's is the last silent dinner for
this semester Come on out and
join the fun See ya there Have
a terrific summer
HEY BUD, LETS
PARTY
The Last Big Bash is
here the second annual
BAHAMA MAMA PARTY spon
sored by Budweiser and
Hawaiian Tropic The Party is
on Monday, April 25 (the day
before reading day) at the Kap
pa Sigma House and begins at
3 00 p m ! Tickets are on sale
right now for $3 00 and entitle
YOU to see the MISS
HAWAIIAN TROPIC BIKINI
CONTEST, a Hawaiian Tropic
viser, a Budweiser mug, and
best of all an afternoon of
listening to the SUPER GRIT
BAND while enjoying 30 KEGS
OF BEER I The winner of the
bikini contest wins an all
exense paid trip to DAYTONA
BEACH to compete in the na
tional competition, a chance to
win a PORSCHE, and be launch
ed on a modeling career! So,
girls it may be worth while to
enterdf interested call RANDY
EVANS at 752 8125) Ticket
sales are limited so purchase
your tickets NOW in front of the
student store! For more infor
mation call 752 5543
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our last biweekly meeting of
mis Spring Semester will be held
on Thursday, April 21 in a new
alace of Jenkins Auditorium at 7
p.m. It was decided unanimous
ly that each member would br
ing a minimum of a quarter to
form a donation to the fund sup
porting the hunger coalition As
a reminder, "Barefoot on the
Mall" starts at 12 noon Thurs
day, also
SLC
Sunday night at 6 30 pm in the
multipurpose at Mendenhall is
the last sign language club
meeting for the semester It is a
regular covered dish meal with
a meeting afterward Please try
to attend We need your support
SCUBA A
DUB-DUB
Are you tired of wasting your
hard earned quarters on self
service car washes that don't
work? Then bring your car to
the Kappa Delta Car Wash this
Saturday, April 23rd, from 9
a.m. until. While your car is be
ing washed, you can spend you
quarters on Pac Man or your
favorite video game The car
wash will be held next to Space
Castle at the Shell Station on the
corner of Hwy 264 and Evans St
ECU LAW SOCIETY
ECU Law Society final
meeting Election of new of
ficers Thursday, April 21st,
Mendenhall. Room 248 at 7 30
p.m.
NCSL
All right, all right, we
apologize! It seer , our goot
"Captain Kirk" ana the crew of
the starship "ECU SGA
terprise" got caught up in over
time on their mission through
the tricky SGA budget, so we un
fortunately cancelled our "last
meeting" of NCSL for this
semester! Never fear, NCSL is
still here for one more wee
anyway' The final and we do
mean FINAL meeting of NCSL
tor the semester will be held
Mondy. April 25th, at 7 p m in
room 212, Mendenhall (we
hope! I Whatever you ao April
25th, NCSL members, make
sure you don't miss this
meeting or else1
CLASSIFIED ADS
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um a separate sfwtt of paper if
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reserve the right to reject eny ad.
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Return lo THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office �i 3:00 Tuesday before
Wedaeaday
Name
Address.
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CityState.
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at 7JC per sac S.
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1 1 I
PI KAPPA PHI
The brothers and little sisters
would like to thank again all the
students of ECU for your con
cern of our brothers who were
injured in the Nillage Green ex
plosion Ricki Seabolt, the most
seriously injured is making ex
cellent progress Hi is now talk
ing and he is starting to move
the right side of his body Our
other brothers who were in
jured, Mike Scott, and Hank are
all moving arouna and moding
excellent progress toword
recovery The Chancellor's Cup
race is coming to a close and
once again it looks as if Pi Kap
pa Phi will be victorious (don't
count them there Chancellors
Cups before they hatch) Thanks
Kappa Sigma for making it a
good race
SUPER BEACH 83 is this
weekend April 24, come on out
ana hear some super beach
music
ECU RUGBY
Rugby game this weekena,
Saturday. April 23, against Fort
Bragg RFC. at 1 00 Last game
of the year, behma the allied
Health building, Don't miss the
action
KYF
The Kings Youth Fellowship
will have ts next meeting on
Monday. April 25 at 8 00 PM in
MSC there will be a time of Bi
ble study and fellowship, follow
ea by refreshments
INDTSTUDENTS
The INDT Club is holding a
Spaghetti and Beer Supper on
Thursday April 21, at 6 00 pm It
will be held at the Tar River Apt
Clubhouse Students interested
m attending should see any IN
DT Club member for tickets
You must purchase your tickets
by 4 00 pm on April 20
ECU POM PON
SQUADTRYOUTS
The ECU Pom Pon squad will
begin tryouts on the 23rd of
April Actual auditions on the
24th Must be present at both
days of practice to audition
Meet Saturday at 10a m. in Flet
cher Music Building lobby ready
to practice
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Congratulations to our new
brothers' We look forward to a
great Fall with you Thanks goes
to Pam Howard for her work on
the Formal Don't forget GolO
Rush and Barefoot on the Matt
Help APO help the Easter Seals
Thursday on the Mall
JUMP ROPE FOR THE
HEART EQUIPMENT
The Equipment nas arrived
Jump ropes. T shirts and Warm
up suits are here Wind breakers
and prizes are on the way The
date is April 23 The place is
Mmges Coliseum
PITT COUNTY
HEALTH FAIR
The East Carolina University
School of Medicine is sponsoring
the Pitt County Health Fair on
April 22 and 23 at the Carolina
East Mall There will be over 20
community organizations n
volved m providing screening
and education during the two
day period Any student
volunteers willing to help with
health screenings and education
will be appreciated For more
information or to volunteer
please call the Health Education
Office at 757 6510 We need your
participation m making this
Health Fair a success'
DUNKING BOOTH
FOR RENT
Dunking booth for rent at
S25 day or S100 week B G
MONEYMAKER Contact War
ren Co Jaycees, P O Box 631.
Warrenfon. N c 27589 or call
(919) 257 1921 or 257 1710
COLORGUARD
TRYOUTS
Flag and rifle tryouts for the
ECU Marching Pirates will oe
neld on Apr.i 23 May 7 ana 14
frorr 10 OO to 5 00 in the MuS.c
building lobby Please bring own
equipment .f possible bring
practice flag if you have one
Dress accordingly
PRE MED STUDENTS
The Kaplan Cose a
preparatory corse for the
MCAT. will be taught at ECU
this summer beginning the las'
week in June This course "as
oeen proven to ra.se MCAT
scores Oi as much as 2 to 3
pj.nts We need 20 Marat d
persons to Sign up la - Jr for
the service to be at ECU m.s
summer The course is once a
week for 8 weeks Anyone
terested must sign up " �'
Biology oft ceor can me B otog
club at 75'6286 or 7586775 fO'
more information A depos la
should be sent n wittim 2 weexs
Due to iim.tee space we ca
nont reserve your seat mou a
deposit information packets ei
plaining the course curr.cuium
are available in �he "a-�
Biology office
PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
AH stouoes rvc c a"
declare physical education as a
maior during the spr ng
semester or o fno M 11
dent teach dur.ng me spr5
semester should 'eoo
Minges coi seum aT '0 30 am on
Thursday Apr 24 1983 tor a
mc�or ard pfys ca I "ess es'
Satisfactory performance or
this test is requrec as a pre�e
quisle for o c a ac "ance o
trie pnysicai educator- i :�
program More ae'a 'ed ntor
mation cover.ng the es s
available by calling 757 64:
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba D . na ���
�ure s De Coz v
me beautiful vca'a- per -
Aug 3 1983 tc - .
Group " p for ce �
two coa s .�s
unlim tea sne- - .
ioqging aia a - 'a
KeHiatl S:r n �e's �-
Can Ra. Sc'a" a- '
The East Carolinian
p . W snec e. - �
a sr
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Monday April 25th "READING
DAY EVE CONCERT"
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EXAM JAM"
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Nicara
The Nicaraguan
government is making
'much needed pro-
gress" in pubhc
education, heahh care
and food distribution,
while L.S pohc
toward the Central
American nation is
causing "much suf-
fering and death
cording to Gail
Phares. who headed a
group of 30 chur-
chleaders on a fad
finding mission to
Nicaragua last wee
The grou of
an "Interfaith Sl
Tour sponsc
the Carolina Inter-
faith Task Force on
C entral An was
heavil) ci of
IS on
N caragua.
P h a r e n claims
"moving toward a
militar solir �:
the region" when
negotiations nould
ight.
Phares. - �
Central America for
more than II
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to. She
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PirateWalk E.
Service For
The director c
that escort sen ice- will be
next Tuesda to c i
operating hours of J
Beginning Tuc
through Thursday
-�atmg from p.r:
Paul Sumret! not! I
va ill also be the final nig
Pirate Walk this
to use Pirate Wall
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The Tickets ei
for o week in
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mug, and a
the SUPER Gl
enjoying
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 21. 1M3 3
I Nicaragua Is Making 'Much Needed Progress'
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SCUBA DIVING
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I ht East C arolinian
v1
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n versity, owned
KJ Dublishea for
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�sity
� pt.on Rate 120 yearly
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oca ted m the Old South
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The Nicaraguan
government is making
"much needed pro-
gress" in public-
education, health care
and food distribution,
while U.S. policy
toward the Central
American nation is
causing "much suf-
fering and death ac-
cording to Gail
Phares, who headed a
group of 30 chur-
chleaders on a fact-
finding mission to
Nicaragua last week.
The group, part of
an "Interfaith Study
Tour" sponsored by
the Carolina Inter-
faith Task Force on
Central America, was
heavily critical of
U.S. policy on
Nicaragua, which
Phares claims is
"moving toward a
military solution in
the region" when
negotiations should
be sought.
Phares, who work-
ed as a missionary in
Central America for
more than 10 years,
said the trip was spon-
sored by the organiza-
tion of N.C. churches
to. She said they were
there to study the role
of the church in the
development of
Nicaragua, investigate
the impact of U.S.
policy in the region,
and investigate
human rights viola-
tions in El Salvador
and Guatemala by in-
terviewing refugees
now living in
Nicaragua.
"The Church is
very, very involved in
the social change pro-
cess Phares said.
"The people have
total freedom of
religion
The conclusions by
those on this
Nicaraguan trip ap-
peared to be ih iirect
disagreement with
Reagan Administra-
tion policy. Reagan
has claimed that there
are wide-scale human
rights violations in
Nicaragua, and the
nation is already
becoming Com-
munist. The ad-
ministration has
warned that
Nicaragua could
become "another
Cuba
"Wherever we went
people were studying,
they're having
massive public health
campaigns; there is
water going to
villages. People have
enough to eat now,
and people are par-
ticipating Phares
said. "There's
marvelous participa-
tion
"The United States
is directly intervening
through the former
Somoeista National
Guard said Phares.
"Already, 500
Nicaraguans have
been killed, many of
them just peasants.
Two thousand
refugees have left the
boarder area
already
"The
tinues
towards
solution
U.S. con-
to move
a military
in the
region Phares said.
"We're suggesting a
negotiated settlement
between Honduras
and Nicaragua and
the United States and
Nicaragua
The Reagan Ad-
ministration claims its
military action in
Honduras, which
boarders Nicaragua,
is to prevent a flow of
arms through
Nicaragua to leftist
guerillas in El
Salvador.
"While we were at
t h e
(Honduran-Nicaragu-
an) boarder, We saw
mmmmm
each house had a
dugout like a bomb
shelter Phares said,
"and we saw a house
where two young girls
and their mother had
been badly injured.
There was blood all
over the place
Phares claims that
the fighting stopped
on the day they were
at the boarder. "The
soldiers mentioned to
us that 'we know they
won't shoot on us to-
day because you are
here " Phares said.
Noting their
presence stoppecj the
fighting, Jeff Bo yer,
a member of the CIT-
CA group, suggested
the idea that other
foreign delegations
come to Nicaragua
regularly to form a
vigil along the
IK OUNCE
�IHEJMD
� FLIER
Mer Stand
Pirate WalkExtends
Service For Exams
The director of Pirate Walk has announced
that escort services will be extended beginning
next Tuesday to coordinate with the
operating hours of Joyner Library.
Beginning Tuesday, the day before exams,
through Thursday night, Pirate Walk will be
operating from 7 p.m. to 1 p.m.
Paul Sumrell noted that Thursday April 28
will also be the final night of operation for
Pirate Walk this semester. Students wishing
to use Pirate Walk mav call 757-6166 for an
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Monday, April 25 3:00 pm At
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Honduran-
Nicaraguan boarder.
Phares said two
members of the CIT-
CA delegation are go-
ing to Washington,
D.C Friday to raise
support for the pro-
posal.
Phares noted that
Sergio Ramirez, a
member of the three-
member Nicaraguan
governing junta lent
his support to the
idea. "They (the
members of the Jun-
ta) thought it was a
good idea Phares
said. "We're really
moving on it; we
think we'll be beginn-
ing it in July
Phares said CITCA
was also asking Euro-
pean governments to
get involved in the
project.
Boyer, a former
peace corps volunteer,
is an anthropologist in
Chapel Hill. "I have
never been so asham-
ed to be an American
in my life Boyer
said in an interview
shortly after returning
from Nicaragua. "We
are at war with
Nicaragua and we
have not been con-
sulted. We saw
women, we saw
children, who arc
receiving a gift of the
American taxpayer in
the bloodiest way
The 30 travelers
ranged in age from 25
to 70 and represented
14 different religious
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t
�Jl Eaat (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
WAVERLY MFRRITT. n-ninn tf l.n.iru
Scott Lindlly. - � -n L.
Al 1 AKRASHTEH,v,� wunr
Stephanie Groon. - mi jiml
Clay Thornton. minnrTipn
Fielding Miller, -h-h x.
Mike Hughes, Managing tduor
Cindy Pleasants, �.��
Greg Rideout, v,�s mw
Steve Bachner, rrniwaiiin iraim
Juliana Fahrbach, ���
TODD EVANS, Prodmhon Manager
April 21, 1W
Opinion
Page 4
Awareness Week
�Vert Opens Eyes And Ears
Unfortunately, it is difficult to
convey the importance of an event
such as Handicap Awareness Week
without at least appearing to
preach. Be that as it may, however,
we would like to take this oppor-
tunity to commend those who
organized and participated in last
week's three-day event.
As much as we hate to admit it,
those of us without physical deter-
rents often take our "normalcy"
(whatever that word means) for
granted, often at the expense of
placing the handicapped on a
pedestal. Most of us don't know �
don't even really want to know �
what it's like to be blind, deaf,
paralyzed, mentally retarded, etc.
And in reality, we cannot know
what it's like.
Realizing "what it's like
however, is not the fundamental
purpose of Handicap Awareness
Week. Neither is it meant to enable
us to feel sorry for our handicap-
ped classmates or to increase our
sympathy for them.
Sympathy is too easy a response.
It only implies that the differences
between us are insurmountable.
And pity only encourages an in-
crease in the already-apparent gap
between those with physical
disabilities and those without. So,
rather than attempting to evoke
sympathy on our parts, Handicap
Awareness Week was intended to,
as the name implies, make us more
aware of the needs of the han-
dicapped, and in increasing our
awareness and understanding, in-
crease our acceptance.
Very few, if any, handicapped
persons feel comfortable in an en-
vironment of patronizing and pity,
whether that sympathy be direct or
indirect. Most would prefer to be
"just one of the boys (or, of
course, girls) And it is through
events like Handicap Awareness
Week that this is accomplished.
And despite the characteristic
low turnout, an ECU tradition,
most organizers agreed that HAW
'83 was a success. Most of the of
lectures, performances and simula-
tion activities were very well receiv-
ed.
A lot of work went into the
preparation and execution of Han-
dicap Awareness Week 1983. Once
again, we commend those whose
efforts made such a worthwhile
event possible for the third year.
Fortunately, however ironically,
through your time and effort, a lot
of eyes and ears were opened.
Campus Forum
Hello (Again), Larry
I was pleased to see my letter to you
all received so much attention and that
you enjoyed it so, apparently. Thank
you for restraining yourself to only
altering one sentence; i.e we can
contribute our appreciation was
originally, we can contribute in-
telligently to this mess As you had
claimed in your note to my letter to
have run it as I wrote it, it occurred to
me to sue your pants off, just to carry
this fun a little further. But, as I have
already caught you with your pants
down, I am satisfied; i.e editorial,
April 19, 1983, paragraph four: you
(assuming the managing editor writes
the editorials) spelled aid as a noun, us-
ing it as an infinitive.
Thanks so much for your construc-
tive criticism; I learn fast, fast enough
so that I have learned many of your
corrections to my letter were incorrect;
i.e "inspirationally barren" is not
hyphenated, due to the "ly" ending in
inspirationally. Surprize and offence
are both accepted alternate spellings.
Perhaps, if you apologize to the fatties
on campus and promise not to use the
students' funds to humiliate elements
of the student body, the Media Board
will buy you folks a better dictionary.
To get back to my original purpose,
which you effectively obscured with
your (if I may venture another opinion)
ill-placed criticism of my grammar,
etc I wish to clarify one point. When I
was praising the "couple dedicated
iconoclasts I assure, I was not talk-
ing about any editors. Therefore, when
I noted one exception to the editorial
dolts, I was noting the one exception.
Specifically, so that clod the news
editor won't start taking bows, that ex-
ception was you, Mike.
Bye the bye (take that to your Har-
brace). I think it is a damn poor mind
who cannot think of more than one
way to spell a word. What's more, 1
believe in creative expression (or
slaughtering the Queen's English, if
you will), and I am not an English ma-
jor, nor a journalist. What is your ex-
cuse? Have you ever heard how
English professors take The East
Carolinian into class and tear it up one
side and down the other?
Best Regards,
Larry Martin
Editor's Note: You're right. This is a
lot of fun. Listen, we'll have to stay in
touch after graduation. Whaddya say?
Another 'Dolt Larry
I would like to inform Larry Martin
that I am the inept, inspirationally
barren dolt" who changed the name of
Fountainhead to The East Carolinian
in 1979.
We did it because our market con-
sultants informed us that a college
newspaper whice does not include the
name of the college can easily go
broke.
We wanted to do well financially for
two reasons: First, we wanted to be self
supporting, so that we would use less
student fees; and second, we wanted
students to continue to get the
newspaper free.
Also, being solvent means being
editorially independent. You, Mr.
Martin, like getting the newspaper
free, and you like editorial in-
dependence. You said so yourself.
Marc Barnes
East Carolinian Editor (1979-80)
The Dos And Don'ts Of Interview Etiquette
Getting That First Job
Dear Stan Landers: I am a 23-year-old
home ec. major from Gump, N.C and
I'll be graduating in May (if I can pull at
least a "C" in my Cleaning and
Laundering for the Masses class).
Anyway, I'll be heading out into the real
world soon, and sooner or later, I'll pro-
bably have to face a job interview or
two. That's my problem. I've never had
a job interview before � except, of
course, when I worked that summer in
the "stun line" at the Gump Hog
Slaughterhouse � so I'd sure appreciate
a couple of helpful hints on the dos and
don'ts of interview etiquette. I will ap-
preciate any and all suggestions you may
offer.
TIMID IN TYLER
Dear Timid: Well, I'm certainly glad
you asked this. Having been through too
many interviews to count on both feet
(more than 12, in other words), I con-
sider myself somewhat of an expert in
the field. So, I'd be more than happy to
oblige.
I guess I should start with the absolute
basics of job interview etiquette. After
all, it seems logical to start at the beginn-
ing, doesn't it? Oh well, the first thing
you want to do is set up your interviews
for the late morning or early afternoon.
That way, even if you discover the pro-
spective job sucks, you can still milk the
employer for a free lunch. And don't
worry about over-ordering; chances are,
you'll never see this guy again anyway.
There are, however, certain dishes
you, the interviewee, should try to avoid
� not because they may be too expen-
sive, but because they may make for an
embarrassing situation later in the inter-
view. Naturally, these include beans,
spicy sausages and, of course, most of
your authentic Mexican foods. But then
again, any employer who'd take you to
Taco Bell for lunch deserves what he
gets, right?
Good Advice
With Stan Landers
Once the actual interview begins,
there are a few things you will want to
keep in mind as well:
� First of all, try not to pick your
nose, ears, teeth or navel while talking.
But if you Find the gold-digging urge
simply too great (as we all do at times),
and you feel you can't resist, then be
sure, at least, to extend your pinky.
� Secondly, try not to burp while ask-
ing or answering a question, especially
where money is concerned, and extra-
especially if you disregarded my advice
above on Mexican food.
� Thirdly, and finally, be couru
and respectful, even if the interviewer
a moron. Answer all questions truth!
iy unless, of course, you think you
improve your chances by lying Bu: be
sure to plan out your untruths and exag-
gerations beforehand, so as to avo;c. em-
barrassing contradictions laie-
Remember, sincerity is an absolute must
in making a favorable impression And
once you can fake that, you've got it
made.
Dear Stan Landers: Do you like pop-
sides? And if so. what's vour favorite
color and flavor? Also, why do birds fly
to South Carolina for the winter1 And
finally, do you know where I car. gel a
new secret decoder ring0 M old one
broke.
CHANCELLOR HOWELL
Dear Chan Boy, you've stumped me
again. Another toughie. Tell you what,
how's about giving me a litile time to
think about my answer, and I'll fill you
in ai our next Dick Tracy Club meeting
at your office. Over and out
Editors Sole: Stan Landers, who
may or may not be writing his last ad ice
column for The East Carolinian
just completed a year-long, comp
highly-technological study on Green.
weather, using state-of-the-ar: in-
struments and data, and has concluded
ihat Greenville weather sucks.
U.S. Intervention In Nicaragua, A
Source Of Shame, Embarrassment
By PAT O'NEILL
Last week, Rep. Robert Britt gained,
perhaps, a uniquely keen insight into the
situation in Nicaragua, when one of his
aides made the following statement on
U.S.Nicaraguan policy:
"The only thing I'm really afraid of
(is) being hit by a CIA bullet
That's an interesting comment for a
congressional aide to make, but, of
course, it comes as no surprise. Presi-
dent Reagan can't seem to make up his
mind. He likes to stick his nose in the af-
fairs of every Central American govern-
ment he can.
The United States policy toward
Nicaragua, however, is somewhat dif-
ferent than our policy toward El
Salvador and Guatemala. Yet in all these
cases, the results are the same: The poor
are being neglected and brutalized.
Nowhere does our policy so blatantly
fly in the face of justice and democracy
as it does in regard to Nicaragua. The
Reagan administration has publicly
acknowledged a $19 million appropria-
tion to destabilize the Nicaraguan
government, a government that has, ac-
cording to the Rev. Charles Mulholland,
"considerably improved the material lot
of the people
Mulholland travelled to Nicaragua in
March. Speaking at ECU about his trip,
Mulholland stated that U.S. policy
toward Nicaragua is wrong and that the
U.S. should, instead, focus its efforts on
helping the young government to suc-
ceed.
Last week, a group of North Carolina
church leaders returned from a week-
long fact-finding mission to Nicaragua.
Britt's aide and some representatives
from the media accompanied them.
Their conclusions were similar to those
Mulholland offered. "The United States
is directly intervening (in
Nicaragua) said Gail Phares, coor-
dinator of the trip. "Already, 500
Nicaraguans have been killed, many of
them peasants The U.S. continues to
move toward a military solution
Americans who travel to Nicaragua all
seem to return with similar stories about
the warmth and gentleness of the
Nicaraguan people. They tell of the pro-
gress being made by the Sandinista
government in the areas of health,
education and the overall economic
plight of the people.
Mulholland called the improvement
of economic conditions "the main target
of (the Nicaraguan) administration
Phares said the Nicaraguan government
is improving the nation's literacy rate,
public health care, food and is "making
a lot of much-needed progress
Phares called her visit to Nicaragua a
"joyous experience
"I don't know how to describe the
creativity and the warmth of the
Nicaraguans she said, a feeling echoed
by most of her fellow travellers, none of
whom saw any evidence of human rights
violations. None of them was barred
from going anywhere he or she pleased.
Why then does our government insist
on reeking havok on what appears to be
a decent Nicaraguan government? The
only excuse they give is the usual Marx-
ism communism line and how the I N
will eventually become communist too if
the dominoes begin to fall.
To this argument, Mulholland hac; a
sensible answer. He suggested that in-
stead of alienating the Nicaraguan
government, we should provide it with
developmental aid.
This policy, Mulholland claims, will
prevent Nicaragua from becon -
"another Cuba" and will help her peo-
ple at the same time. He insists that
Nicaragua is searching for a "third
way" of governing itself, a form of
government not in line with either I S
or Soviet policy.
Perhaps the words of Chapel Hill an-
thropologist Jeff Boyer, who travelled
with the Phares church group, besl
describe my feelings about
U.S.Nicaraguan policy. Upon return-
ing to the United States, a disgusted
Boyer said. "1 have never been so
ashamed to be an American in mv life "
KpiMowqMcvueM�
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I HI FAST CAROL IMAS
APRIL 21. 1�W?
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Si
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. courteous
ntervicwer is
ns truthful-
think you'll
lying. But be
� iths and exag-
.t- to avoid em-
ons later.
tbsotute must
ssion. And
it, you've got it
you like pop-
your favorite
Jo birds fl
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My old one
K HOWELL
. -tumped me
I ell you what.
i little time to
1 11 fill you
meeting
� anders, who
� . his last advice
� arolinian, has
mplicated,
�� Greenville
�:e-art in-
. concluded
iragua, A
rrassment
md hem the U.S.
:ommunisi too if
Fall.
Mulholland had a
iggested that in-
- the Nicaraguan
d provide it with
! ' ilholland claims, will
from becoming
�ill help her peo-
time He insists that
:hing for a "third
tself, a form of
with either U.S.
Ihapel Hill an-
Boer, vkho travelled
:hurch group, best
feelings about
� Upon return-
?tates, a disgusted
T have never been so
Nmencan in my life
�-1 I
QUy WH0 REACHES RFTY
' UP 6IRLS Y
. -4
Summer Tour Of Europe Open To Students
PATRICK O'NEILL
S��fl�ntcf
to
do.
and
are
v ou.
Got $1,666
Tare1 If ou
Michael Voors
Richard I aing
looking for
Voors is director of
the Arts Media Center
and Laing is dean of
the School of Art.
Together the are pro-
moting and planning
a mid-summer trip to
Europe.
The School of Art
and Division of Con-
tinuing Education are
jointly sponsoring the
trip in conjuction with
Eben Tilly Associates,
a Michigan group that
has organized the
European trip the last
four summers.
Your SI 666 will get
you round-trip airfare
to Europe, where you
will spend two weeks
in Holland, Italy,
German) and
Sw it zerland. The
package includes all
hotels, two meals a
dav, all land travel
and Mght seeing
guides.
The cities the group
will visit include:
Rome. Siena,
Florence, Venice,
Basle. Heidelberg,
Freiburg, Cologne,
Ostrich and Amster-
dam. (For $300 more,
travelers may opt to
stay in Amsterdam an
extra week.)
The jet will depart
from New York on
Wednesday, July 27
and land in Rome.
Travelers opting for
the two-week package
Farm Workers' Plight,
Anti-Slavery Discussed
( ont. From Page 1
of the ways that farm
worker advocates feel
they can deal with this
is through the adop-
tion of this statute
Preiss said she
would be discussing
the two boycotts with
ECU students.
�� '�:� v����-� �
�.� � ���.�� �;
Triangle Friends
and the NFWM are at
present supporting
boycotts of Red
Coach iceberg lettuce
and all Campbells �
Libby products.
Preiss accusses both
these companies of
denvine basic nehts to
the workers who pick
their crops.
Preiss will be speak-
ing in the coffeehouse
at 7 p.m. Friday and
in several classes dur-
ing the day. Any ECU
organization wishing
to invite Preiss as a
speaker may do so by
calline 58-4906.
� o '

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11
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rjtr.

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X
-J.
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c
IBREAKFAST BAR OFFERING!
� Frathly Scr�mfcid E$g� � Hom�mid� Buttarmilk feacuiti � MCn
� Country Milk Qrdvy � Horn Fried Potatoes � Southom Styto Ors �
Homamada Mu41tna � Link and Patty Sausaga � A Oholea o�
"Shonaya" Own Spaclal Frutt Taping �Gratad American Chaaaa �
PLUS The Fruit Pat .featuring a variety a fraah fruK and tomatoee
SHONEYo
20S Greenville Blvd.
MOMDAY-FHIOAV
� 40 A.M11 40 A.M.
SATuapAV-SUMOAV
A HOUOAYS
� �o A.Maeo p.m.
Also Open
Friday � Saturday Nights
Midnight-Jam
NO RISK RECORDS
THE
ROCKATS
MINILP
l
TRY
$4.99
$5.49
� rACCCTTC
CASSETTE
NO RISK RECORDS
DON'T LIKE EM? RETURN EM
FOR A FULL REFUND NO
QUESTIONS NO HASSLE
CASStTTE
MAS
AVMtABU
KfA
Featuring ESCALATOR OF HFE
CHANGE REACTION-OUT OF THE BLUE
l TRIGS INCIUUIO
RCilr
Records and Cassettes
will return home from
Amsterdam Aug. 10.
Others will return
Aug. 17.
The program was
designed to offer
students the
take
the
Record Bar
RECORDS, TAPES A A LITTLE BIT MORE.
THROUGH MAY 4, PITT PLAZA &
CAROLINA EAST MALL

tunity to
tage of
resources
Europe,
oppor-
advan-
special
available in
Voors said,
adding that students
are also eligible to
receive course credit
for the trip.
According to
Voors, the ECU trip
to Europe has been
considered for a
number of years.
"Students had been
asking about it for a
long time Voors
said. "So. we decided
to put one together
Students opting for
course credit for the
trip will be eligible to
receive three to six
hours of painting and
drawing credit. They
must participate in
one week of
preliminary work on
campus befor the trip.
Countinuing
Education Units
(three semester hours)
will also be available
for public school
teachers making the
trip. The trip is also
open to the general
public for either the
two week or three
week package.
Elizabeth Ross, an
art instructor at Cen-
tral Piedmont Com-
munity College in
Charlotte, will be
directing the trip.
Ross has regularly
escorted groups of
students on travel ex-
cursions both in the
United States and
Europe. She has
directed the "Art in
Europe" trip during
its three previous
years.
Voors and Laing
are listed as co-
directors of the pro-
gram, but only Voors
will make the trip if
participation by ECU
students is limited. At
present, there are six
students from ECU
registered for the trip.
One faculty person
will travel for every
eight students taking
the trip.
A total of 49 people
from all across the
state will be making
the trip. Voors stress-
ed the fact that
"anyone, anywhere in
the country1 iv
welcome to go. "Our
price is er, er
good compared to
most other packages
to Europe Voors
said, adding that most
trips generally cost
more than $2,000.
"It's one thing tor
a student to see a pic-
ture of
M i c h a 1 a n g e I o ' s
'David Voors
said. "but. 11"
another thing to he
standing below it.
looking up and realiz-
ing that its's 18 tee:
tall. A a y one
wishing to join the
"Art in Europe" trip
is asked to contact
Voors or Laing in the
School of Art A valid
passport is required of
all individual making
the trip. Voors s d
participant sh
apply foi their
pa-poris a soon a-
possiblc
4alttCwtto&r4i
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fomefoify;
I
Items and Prices
Effective Wed April 20 thru
Sat. April 23. 1983.
OvEflTiSfcD 'TfcM POLIO
Eac o �"�ese a2�e" sea 'es s e
qure3 tc t� 'eaan j.a ar a 'c
sa e in ea 'Oe' Sa� c e�;e;
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sawe sa� r�ga D� a ra cec "
� e ' e .r to purcase e
ace" sec 'e a' ina ac�ef' se:
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Open Mon thru Sat 8am to Midnight
Sun 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd.

Greenville
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avtf X-
V
COST CUTTER
70 LEAN
SOLD
IN A
LB- ih
Chub Lb
PAK
Ground Beef
98
Total Price $4.90
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
99 m
ssss
iiSBK?
FRESH CHEESE OR
Pepperoni
Pizza
For J SAVE
FRESH CRUSTY
M B Kaiser
� Hard Roffs
12-Oz
Can
89
AEROSOL
HAIRSPRAY
KBOGEB100
ViVowlat Wilk
H40
Y Miss Breck
Jug
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Sttawl�me$
COST CUTTER IWS
IMITATION
Cheese
Food
12-Oz.
12-Oz
PKg.
'Of'





I Ml I si c ROl INIAN
Style
APRll 21. 1983
Page 6
ECU'S Dr. Daniel
An Interesting 'Blend' Of The Past
By MIKE HAMER
Staff nici
He made the touchdown
spiked the ball
twisted his ankle
got stretchered off the field.
1 laughed
till beer
came out mv nose.
Not many people think about
Rolling Stone as a place to en-
counter poetry. And perhaps
many poetry lovers would have
trouble getting past the pictures
and articles about prince and the
three lingerie-clad members of
the "Vanity 6 But the poetry is
there � little poems tucked bet-
ween the record reviews on the
back pages. This poem appeared
in Rolling Stone's April 14,1983
issue.
Hal Daniel likes the fact that
Rolling Stone appeals to music
lovers and people who love the
pop culture. He is wary of poetry
that can only appeal to those peo-
ple who've taken a poetry course
in college. "The academics don't
know how to relate to the people
in the streets Hal said, "the
academics become myopic. I
listen to my students to see what
they're talking about. I'm into a
synthesis of academic poetry and
street poetry Besides Rolling
Stone, Hal will also have 2 peoms
appearing in Relix, a New York
City Rock 'n Roll magazine.
Hal J. Daniel was born forty
years ago in Memphis, Ten-
nessee. He enjoys talking about
his family and his family
heritage. His great grandfather's
brother on his father's side was
the legendary Jack Daniels of
whiskey fame. His family on his
mother's side is descended from
the Wardlaw family � a strong
Scottish clan which claims Bishop
Henry Wardlaw, the man who
crowned King James I of
England, as one of its ancestors.
The name Wardlaw is derived
from "Warden of the Lough
"I've had to deal with the
weird gene pool that I've in-
herited Hal says. "My mother
is a poet, and my grandmother
was a poet. They both went to the
same finishing school, Stevens, in
Missouri, and they both have a
very strong Victorian way about
them. Meanwhile, my grandaddy
died with his underwear on in a
penthouse in Memphis, and my
father used to walk around Mem-
phis with a quarter in his ear and
a baseball in his hand, and he'd
bet people that he could throw
the baseball through a door
across the street. What I've had
to deal with is the Victorian ele-
ment on my mother's side and the
West Tennessee rascal on my
father's side
Hal grew up in Memphis, and
in 1960 he went to the University
of Tennessee in Knoxville on a
basketball scholarship. He played
basketball for one year. But he's
been in the university community
ever since. As an undergraduate
he majored in psychology,
sociology, and philosophy, he
received his master's in the
speech and hearing sciences, and
he received his PhD in the com-
Producer-Director Joe Layton
Day Of Dance Will Feature Joe
'Annie9 Layton, Noted Producer
Noted choreographer, director and producer Joe
Layton will be featured at ECU's sixth annual "Day
of Dance" workshop Sunday, April 24.
Layton will conduct master level classes in audi-
tion techniques. Other classes will be taught by ECU
dance faculty members Paula Johnson, Patricia Per-
talion and Mavis Ray.
The workshop, for dancers at all levels of train-
ing, has been scheduled to celebrate National Dance
Week and will include classes in auditioning techni-
ques, ballet, modern dance, jazz and tap dance.
Registration is limited to dancers 10 years old or
older, with a $10 per person fee.
Layton, who served as executive producer of the
hit motion picture Annie, has had a remarkable
career on stage and television as well as in
Hollywood. Since working on "Annie he has gone
on to direct the film Richard Pryor, Live on Sunset
Strip.
Beginning his career at the age of 16 in the chorus
of Oklahoma, Layton went on to direct or
choreograph such Broadway and international tour-
ing hits as Barnum, George M, The Sound of Music,
Platinum, Two by Two, Dear World and Bring Back
Birdie.
He has directed Barbara Streisand in four TV
specials, garnering an Emmy and three additional
nominations. He has also done TV specials with
such performers as Diana Ross, Olivia Newton-
John, Raquel Welch, Cher and Mary Martin
Other stars who have worked under his direction
in Las Vegas, on TV or on Broadway include Carol
Burnett, Diahann Carroll, Melissa Manchester, the
Carpenters, Bette Midler, Dolly Parton, Connie
Stevens, Dyan Cannon and Mac Davis.
In conjunction with the "Day of Dance" will be
held an organizational meeting of the North
Carolina Dance Alliance at 9:30 a.m. April 24.
The meeting will draw persons from a 15-county
area who wish to help foster the potential and
growth of dance in the state. Counties to be
represented are Beaufort, Bertie, Camden, chowan,
Currituck, Dare, Gates, Hertford, Hyde, Martin,
Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt, Tyrrell and
Washington.
No advance registration is required to attend the
Dance Alliance meeting.
Additional information and pre-registration
forms for the "Day of Dance" workshops are
available from the Department of Drama.
parative anatomy of the ear from
the University of Southern
Mississippi in 1969. "I did it all
on my own Hal said, "I've
been a bell boy, a pimp, I've been
a river rat, and I've sold dope,
among other things. When you
want to prove yourself, you do
those types of things, and I love
hard work, and I have a brain
He is currently a professor in
speech, language, auditory
pathology and adjunet professor
of anthropology at ECU.
Hal likes to talk. He talks a lot.
Some of his friends would say
that somethimes he talks just to
stir things up. "I'm lucky he
says, "the State pays me to talk
He enjoys talking about the craft
of writing, and when he talks, he
is usually very animated � he has
a twinkle in his eyes.
"One thing you have to realize
as a writer is that your day will
have its zeniths and nadirs.
Bukowski's advice to young
writers is 'Don't But, Hal
says, "if you want to be a writer.
See SEXISM, Page 8
Dr. Hal Daniel
Recidivism Rate In
North Carolina High
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff Writer
While there is a soul in prison I
am not free.
Eugene Debbs
In recent months East Carolina
students and Greenville residents
have been involved in several
educational projects designed to
increase people sensitivity to the
need for prison reform in our
state.
The organization known as
Phoenix has been one of the
Greenville groups that has done
outstanding work in the area of
prison reforms. Jayne Silliman,
an ECU student is the president
of the Greenville chapter of
Phoenix.
According to Silliman Phoenix
was begun three years ago in
North Carolina and now has
chapters in four North Carolina
cities. "Our purpose is to aid
communities in the areas of
criminal justice Silliman said.
Phoenix, a national non-profit
corporation, exists to be respon-
sive in supporting and
strengthening efforts through
trained volunteers to:
� Develop a statewide com-
munication network for sharing
knowledge and information on
volunteer activities and pro-
grams.
� Provide a system of statewide
linkage for people involved in the
(prison) system with appropriate
services and resources.
� Expand and strengthen ex-
isting volunteer activities by pro-
viding training, technical
assistance and materials.
� Create greater public
awareness of the needs of in-
dividuals in the Criminal Justice
System.
� Develop and promote ad-
vocacy on behalf of those involv-
ed in the system.
ECU Corrections professor
Gus Moeller, formally deputy
director of the U. S. Bureau of
Prisons, is now on the NC State
Board of Phoenix. Moeller told
The East Carolinian that Phoenix
is "strongly supportive of all
alternatives to imprisonment
Moeller sees the "enlistment of
volunteers " as the most impor-
tant aspect of the work of
Phoenix. He called Phoenix a
"networking organization" for
all volunteers across the state.
Moeller noted that volunteers
are recruited to serve in
numerous capacities such as
assisting ex offenders as they re-
enter society, providing one-to-
one support for juvenile of-
fenders and supervising com-
munity service and victim restitu-
tion programs.
Last month Phoenix, largely
through the efforts of Silliman
and another ECU corrections stu-
dent Mary Pat Shiels, sponsored
a visit bv NC Judge Willis P.
Whichard1 to ECU.
Whichard was the chairman of
the NC citizens Commission on
Alternatives to Incarceration. He
came to ECU to discuss the con-
clusions of two years of study
that went into the final report of
that commission.
Whichard pointed out that NC"
has consistently ranked first in
the nation in incarceration rates
and that taxpayers were the "real
victims of crime" because the
criminal justice system is not
achieving its goals.
Whichard painted a glum pic-
ture of the North Carolina
criminal justice system. He called
it costly, ineffective and over-
crowded. "Either we have the
worst sort of people in the world
in North Carolina or there's
something wrong with the
system. I think it's the latter
According to Whichard North
Carolina prisons and jails at pre-
sent hold about 18,000 inmates in
facilities equipted for 14,000.
"Incarceration is an extremely
expensive remedy he added.
Whichard said that North
Carolina was at "a cross-roads"
where it must make a choice bet-
ween continuing to build more
prisons or looking toward alter-
natives to incarceration. He add-
. i
Incarceration
is an extremeh
expensive remedy'
ed NC has recenth speni v
million for new prison c
tion.
Two statistics v -
quoted showed the harsr
meffectiveness o the
criminal justice system. He sa
that "6 percent of people
ted to NC prisons were adn
for non-violent crimes ai d
estimates show state rec d
rates (the number of ev
who return to prison) a- h
60 percent.
Phoenix has dose)) stud
alternatives recommended
Whichard commission rep.
supports their enactment.
The local Phoenix group
regular meetings and is open to
the public. Those wishing
receive more information at
Phoenix can contact: J
Silliman 1402 N Overl -
Greenville.
Barefoot On The Mall
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
(Tentative)
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL
April 21, 1983
Emcees: EDMONDS & CURLEY
12:00 Noon
1:00 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:15 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
FANTASY
Knee Walkers
Edmonds & Curley
Simmons and Warren
Knee Walkers
Varsity Cheerleaders
Kappa Alpha Psi Step Show
ECU Jazz Band
T . . , Gary Kern
I nnidad Tripoli Steel Band
XTRAXTRA!
The Fabulous Knobs
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r-v; i
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M Li
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Toxic
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 21. 1983
Page 6

lame!
In
High
r Incarceration
s an extremely
xpensive remedy

N( ha recently spent $111
i � - neu prison construc-
I statistics Whichard
q loted showed the harshness and
.eness of the N.C.
e system. He said
76 percent of people admit-
v M preens were admitted
or non-violent crimes and some
sho� state recidivism
(the number of ex-offenders
.rn to prison) as high as
� ent.
Phoenix has closely studied the
ilternatives recommended in the
nard commission report and
supports their enactment.
The local Phoenix group holds
egular meetings and is open to
ne public Those wishing to
'eceive more information about
Phoenix can contact: Jayne
Silliman 1402 N. Overlook
Greenville.
es
'
The Mall
OF EVENTS
ative)
N THE MALL
1,1983
DS&CURLEY
FANTASY
Knee Walkers
Edmonds & Curley
Simmons and Warren
Knee Walkers
Varsity Cheerleaders
kappa Alpha Psi Step Show
ECU Jazz Band
Gary Kern
I nnidad Tripoli Steel Band
XTRA XTRA!
The Fabulous Knobs
Film
Premier
CHARLOTTE,
N.C. (UP1) � The
world premiere of a
movie about stock car
racing, which stars
Burt Reynolds and
Loni Anderson, will
be held in Charlotte
May 28, Charlotte
Motor Speedway of-
ficials announced
Wednesday.
The Movie, Stroker
Ace previously billed
as Stand On It, will be
shown at Owens
Auditorium on the
eve of the World 600,
the longest race on
NASCAR'S GRAND
NATIONAL CIR
! CUIT.
; The Charlie Daniels
Band will perform
prior to the showing.
In the movie,
Reynolds portrays a
My Favorite Year' will be shown on Friday and Saturday nights at 5, 7, and 9 p.m. in NASCAR Grand Ace
? Hendrix Theatre. Admission is free with ECU ID and activity card or MSC membership. I who loses his financial
�� ���������� backing because of his
off-beat antics. He
'My Favorite Year' Shows This Weekend
signs a contract with a
fried chicken magnate
named Clyde Torkic,
then tries to break it.
Ned Beatty portrays
Torkle while Ms.
Anderson plays the
role of Torkle's public
relations director. Jim
Nabors plays Ace's
chief mechanic.
The movie is based
on the book Stand On
It by William Needly
and Robert Ottum.
The movie was
directed by Hal
Deedham, who also
directed Smokey and
the Bandit, Hooper,
and Smokey and the
Bandit II.
Needham and
Reynolds own the
stock car driven on
the Grand National
Circuit by Harry
Gant. Gant and
fellow drivers Neil
Bonnett, Dale Ear-
nhardt, Terry
Labonte, Benny Par-
sons, Kyle Petty, Tim
Richmond, Ricky
Rudd and Daytona
500 winner Cale Yar-
borough also are in
the movie.
Money raised from
the $50 each tickets
will go to the Save
The Cape Hatteras
Lighthouse Commit-
tee, the Grand Na-
tional Drivers' relief
fund, and Charlotte's
600 Childrens
Charities.
The $15 million
movie was filmed last
year at or near
Charlotte Motor
Speedway Atlanta In-
ternational Raceway,
Alabama Interna-
tional Motor Speed-
way, Daytona Inter-
national Speedway,
and Darlington Inter-
national Raceway.
Humpy Wheeler,
president and general
manager of the
Charlotte track, said
none of the stars of
the movie have said
they will definitely at-
tend the premiere
"It will depend on
their shooting
schedules Wheeler
said.
Walter Wood, the
movie's producer,
said Charlotte was the
logical place to have
the premiere.
"I couldn't imagine
having the world
premiere anywhere
else he said
Wednesday atter iiu�
news conference an-
nouncing the May
date. "This is the city
where it all started.
We couldn't have
made the picture
without the coopora-
tion 1 got here
Charlotte was the
stage of the first
Grand National Race
in 1949.
One scene in the
movie where
Reynolds' car crosses
the finish line upside
down is a reenactment
of an incident that oc-
curred to former
Grand National
Driver Tim Flock in
1952.
Toxic Waste Sites Cited
By EMILY CASEY
SUff Writer
Hazardous Haste in America is a fat, but
very readable book about a major contem-
porary problem at the end of WWII (1945).
Thirty-three years later (1978) an EPA
report indicated that the problem was
magnified eighty times. That's 80 billion
pounds of hazardous waste. What's worse,
EPA estimated that the amount of this
poison "properly disposed of" was only
10�7o
After an introductory chapter, the pro-
blem of hazardous waste is presented in a
series of case histories. Want to refresh your
knowledge of what happened at Love
Canal? The information is here, plus ac-
counts of other Hooker Waste dumps in the
city of Niagara Falls. Read about the rural
community of Harding, Tennessee, where a
chemical company bought a farm and used it
as a dump for pesticide wastes. By the time
people began to get sick, thirteen years later,
the dump had been closed, covered with
fresh dirt and new grass. It was so quickly
forgotten that the county agent tested their
foul-smelling water for bacteria and finding
none, told them to go ahead and drink it.
Well, there's a lot more to the story, but
you'll have to read it yourself. It'll help you
to understand why hundreds of Warren
County people risked imprisonment, time
after time, to keep PCB-contaminated soil
from being disposed of in their area.
After more interesting examples, the book
progressed to sections on the law and on the
problems and technologies of disposal. The
final chapter attempts to answer the question
"Where do we go from here?" The last 216
pages are given over to references, appen-
dixes, and an index.
You may be interested in Appendix IX,
which is the EPA's list of the top superfund
sites. Number 109 is "PCB Spills in North
Carolina On their list of "Potential
Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites"
(Appendix X),the EPA has three Greenville
locations: Burroughs-Wellcome, Coastal
Chemical, and the city landfill.
What can we do about hazardous wastes?
"The greatest disincentive" to improving the
techniques of handling hazardous wastes "is
the ease and economy of disposalin
'secure' landfills Instead of being so
preoccupied with how to throw away this
staff, they argue, we should be thinking
about resource recovery and recycling.
The book is significant, authoritative, and
interestingly written. And it's in Joyner
Library if you don't have $27.50.
C0MC0N0UT
THE PUTTINGS FINE!
lOih Si. Exttnann ivnvBAvi
Grwfwfe.N.C. ��
75B-1I20 AU YOU CAM HAY
TO �MA ONLY flLtt
12
r.o.twnu
fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi.iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiilllllllfllllllliiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiE
�JOCKETT
.ou,tars STUDENT
: SSI SPECIAL 20 OFF 1
S&L STRINGS
1 'Accessories ACCESORIES
HAVING PROBLEMS
with
DRUGS? ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
SCHOOL?
We Can Help!1
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL A DRUG PUOUBAM
501-503 Erwia Bid t
757-6793
t�
E.C.U. Major Attractions
Committee Presents:
CAROLINA
OPRY HOUSE
Presents In Concert
NITTY GRITTY
DIRT BAND
who; Evelyn King wSpecial guest
Dazz Band
FRIDAY
APRIL 22
Kxlrd Added Attraction
SUPER GRIT COWBOY BAND
ADVANCE TICKETS
$9.00 PER PERSON
ADVANCE TICKET LOCATIONS
when: Saturday,April 23,8:00pm
l .MK not M
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
CALL 758-3943
where: Minges Coliseum
yyzfflv.v.
TONIGHT
APRIL 21st
THE MEN OF
Aycock
Dorm
CORDIALLY INVITE
THE WOMEN OF ECU
TOTHEELBO
FREE BEVERAGES
Tickets are now on sale at:
Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center
Record Bar at Carolina East Mall in Greenville
Apple Records in Greenville
Record Bar in New Bern
ADM. 25C 7:00-9:00pm
ECU ID REQUIRED
sss��s���$�s$��
Price:
Student
$7.50
Public
$9.50
At The Door
$9.50
�.�
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 21. 1983
Professor Deplores Sexism
Cont. From Page 6
the most improtant
thing you can do is go
to the West Coast and
see what's happening,
and see what people
are writing about it.
Here on the East
Coast we're more
traditional. In Seattle,
Washington, there
will be fifty to sixty
poetry readings going
on every day. Some of
the bookstores have
poetry sections as big
as the ECU
bookstore. Even New
York can't hold a can-
dle to Los Angeles.
LA. is insane � it's
the end of the world
Hal has been a fre-
quent critic oi The
East Carolinian,
especially of their
advertizing policies.
He pointed to an
advertisement for a
handgun in one recent
issue. "1 think it's
deplorable that adver-
tizing should take
such a tack, that it
would cater to these
ads he said, "A
theme of my poetry is
to write about the
stupidity of men and
women. 1 hate sexism.
1 hate the fact that
they'll have
something like a 'Best
Legs Contest' as
though women's legs
are just something for
men to stick their
cocks in
"I write a lot of
oems about the stuff
I see in the paper �
stuff like men's
egocentricity and ag-
cressiv eness and
women's vanity and
inanity. I write about
men cuckolding other
men's women. Men
need to support each
other, and women do
too. In a way, it's a
sin city here. The ma-
jority of the students
are so hormonal; they
need to view others as
human beings and not
as objects
Hal Daniel started
writing at the age of
37, the same age at
which his mother
began writing.
Though he has only
been writing poetry
for the past three
years, he had been
writing for ten years
before that as a scien-
tist. And even though
such mavericks as
Richard Brautigan,
Louden Wainwright
111, and Charles
Bukowski are his
heroes, the scientific
poet, Loren Eiesley, is
also a hero. "It's
good to be a scientist
and a poet because
you can take what
science does and put it
into literature. I write
a lot of poems bridg-
ing the arts and
sciences. 1 want to
write about all aspects
of life. You have to
know women, and
you have to know
men. Women don't
cut down these
beautiful oak trees,
only men do that
"I've writt 91 hun-
dreds of scientific
papers. 1 know how to
get a cross an idea
crisply. William Staf-
ford is an expert at
that. But you've got
to have passion, too.
Like Blake said,
'Exuberance is beau-
ty You've got to go
150 percent all the
time
Grads � Seniors � Grads � Seniors � Grads � Seniors
.IfraiNfft rpi
�"U
GETTIIG IT TUOK A LIFETIME
SO LET S GIVE IT A PROPER HANGING
We send a frtinu with h.jiui cut double
ur triple mjt o1 vto' hotcfl ready tor
hunying You ,itun h the diploma to the
mounting board Isee b�iowl This gives
custom frammg it about half the price
thanks to direct setting
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DOUBLE MAT FRAMED DIPLOMA TRIPLE MAT FRAMED DIPLOMA
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finger, replace and hang Misalignments easily corrected Instructions included
And please give us some working time because all frames and mats are hand cut
on bevel arid we want you to have yours by graduation time
CANNON S of Chapel Hill
314 W University Dr
1919) 967 2366
Chapel Hill N C 27514
mat choices
.4ME OF SCHOOL
sr Jv It rrnw in0"a s 14
Please include check or money order to avoid COD charges
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Weekend Special
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Soft Lenses
COMPLETE
:ttides mitiai eye examination, lenses, tare
instructions and follow up visits for one
n onth. ECU student ID required
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228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
UPTON ANNEX
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SUPER BEACH '83
-Sunday,April 24th 1983
Featuring
i
The Catalinas The Showmen
Billy Scott

The Georgia Prophets

The Castaways


New Pitt County Fairgrounds,
Greenville
Gate Opens at 11:00 - Bonds Start at 12:00
BYOB (Bring Your Own Beer) No Glass or Bottles
ID's Checked at Gate
�Tickets: Advance - $5.00 �At Gate - $7.00
Ticket Location GREENVILLE � Record Bar.Pitt Plaza
Sponsored By c.�. Tankard Distributing Co.
Y
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6 inch individual Plain only $2.45
each additional topping 50C
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For take out call � 752-4741
coupon
Purchase Any 16 inch pizza,and gel one (1)
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expires May 15,1983
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Purchase Any 12 or 16 inch Pizza and get
2 med. Soft drinks Free.
expires May 15,1983
with the best beer prices in town
Come enjoy the fun and the sun on Pharo's beautiful oati
!Hr I V
ECU
3 KKN BOLTON
For the past two year. Ed
football fans hae become used to
seeing Jody Schulz in the oppos-
ing team's backfield � er
thundering down on the quarter-
back or nabbing a fleet-fool
tailback from behind
Schulz, who led the Pirate
tackles for the second ear .
row, has been selected a� The I
Carolinian's Male Athlete Ol
Year.
Schulz's purple and gold v 9i
was a comforting sight for El I
faithful bu! a scan apparition
enemy squads.
The 1982-83 season a .
ft hull's last at ECU, a
senior Chester. MD native hopes
his future stam the same as
last years award winner.
Robbins.
Robbins was a star:ing
sive guard for the St Lou
dinals of the NFL last e
Schulz would also like to try his
hand at the professional level.
Certain to be a top-lev ei pick in
the upcoming NFL draft. Schulz
hopes to take advantage of the op-
portunity. "I'm going to get a
chance, and it's up to me u
I'm going to do with :t Schub
slated. "I'd definitely like to give
it a shot
The pro scouts are adt
Schulz's talent. a are the
members of the Associated Press
awards committee. At the end
last season, Schulz wa- nan
third-team AP All -American as
well as First-team All-South In-
dependent. He was also seie.
to play in the Japan Bowl and ihe
Blue-Gray Classic.
This past season was a
cessful one for the Pirates, wti
Finished with a -4 reco
a highly-competitve schedule.
But according to Schulz. the
winning record wasn't sur
to him or any of the other team
members.
"We thought we'd win no
than that Schulz stated, reterr-
jing particularily to a narrow
'to N.C. State. "We should have
been 8-3
Schulz compiled some
pressive statistics in last ye
campaign, as he led the tear
tackles (105), tackles for loss
quarterback sacks (10 an
ble recoveries (2)
But the most memorable
aspects of Schulz's final year at
ECU were the people he met
the places he got to travel
Shepard Co
B RAND MEWS
All-American Cynthia She
is certainly making a food case
for herself as the greatest s
player in ECL history.
The 5-4 power-hitting right
Fielder already holds individual
career records for most run. hits.
RBI, doubles and total numbe-
bases.
Three
With six recruits coming in and
the loss of three players, the ECL
men's basketball team has yet
another unpredictable season
ahead of them.
Following a 16-13 season. First
year Head Coach Charlie Har-
rison sat down and met with each
of his players to talk about the up-
coming year. "I sat them down
and asked them what they wanted
to do he said. "They tell me
how they fed and then 1 interject
my feelings to what they have
said. We try to make decisions on
what is best for them
What was the outcome?
Freshman guard Keith McLeod is
Panning to transfer, junior for-
ward Jeff Best is going to concen-
trate on his studies, and freshman
Y-
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83
983
owmen
jhets
or Bottles
00
t Plaio
�y -
f f f
eese
talue
get
own
s beautiful patio
HI I S i K()I INIAN
Sports
M'kii 2i, is:
ECU Athletes Of The Year Selected
Bv KT KOI 1)
V-M.imn Sport t .1
the past uso years, I c I
hall tans have become used to
ng lod Schul in the oppos
eam's backfield eithei
i ing dow n on the quartet
abbing a fleet footed
tck fi om behind
Schulz, who led the Pirates in
lot the second yeai in a
is been selected as l he last
i's Male Mhlete Ol 1 he
's purple and gold No. 95
a comforting sight for E I
a scai apparition foi
1982 S3 season was
last Ul and the
MD native hopes
� the same as did
iwa y nnei. 1 ootie
a starting often
si Louis Cat
NF 1 last yeai. and
� would also like to try his
' pritfessional level.
b a ip level pick in
pcoming l I draft, Schulz
ike advantage of the op
"I'm going to get a
i it's up to me what
w ith it Schul
d "I'd definitely lit give
� . iware o!
are
i the end of
caso was
. am � v. mencan as
Mi-South In-
� deni i I tlso selected
tpan B �- irid the
I
pa i - v m i w. i
i

va
-

I have
im-
(7 i.
fum
or able
ilz's final yeai ai
I he people he n
travel.
"We always had a lot of fun on
toad tups Schul said on reflec-
ting back to the '82-83 season. "1
really liked travelling to places I
had never been before, like Texas
and Missouri "
One instance that stands out in
Schulz's mind was on the way
back from the game with Temple
I niversit) in Philadelphia - the
last game of the year and of
Schulz's career.
While passing through
Maryland on the way home, the
entire ECU contingent stopped to
eat seafood at fisherman's Inn, a
restaurant that overlooks the
Chesapeake Bay
What was different about this
seafood restaurant is the fact that
Schulz's parents are the owners.
It. for some reason, profes-
sional football doesn't work out
foi Schulz, he said he would enjoy
moving back home and working
in the restaurant.
But the prospects of the 6-4,
235-pound defensive end not
making a living on the football
field aren't verv good.
Smee he no longer has spring
dulls tii occupy his time, Schulz
has spent the List couple of mon-
ths lifting weights, running and
hanging around the practice field
watching the 1983-84 edition of
ECU football
Schulz praises head coach Ed
I morv foi furthering his career
and advancing the success of ECU
otball.
" oach 1 morv is really com-
mitted to getting the program the
best it can be Schul stated. "If
he can gel all the support that he
needs, he's going to have a lot of
cess
V last December's annual ECU
award banquet, Schul added to
honors when he received the
lanet Overtoil Outstanding Senior
ward. He was also named the
Mosi Valuable Defensive Player,
permanent defensive captain, and
winner of the Purple Pirate
Kward for defensive plav.
With all of the laurels that he's
received and the good times that
lie's had, Schul will be sorrv
when the time comes to leave
c ireenville
"I wish I had another year here;
I think this year's team is really
going to be good Schul com-
mented.
But no matter how good the up-
coming team is. there will be a
hole left where Jody Schulz's
large frame used to search and
destroy ECU opponents.
Jody Schul (topi
Lastarolinian's
and Mary Denkler (bottom) were
thktes Of lhe ear for the 1982-
chosen as The
83 season.
Shepard Combines Power With Lightning Speed
B K-Nm MEWS
pard
linly making a good case
: self a
in E( I hist
5-4 power-hitting right
ilready hi lds indiv idual
� most runs, hits,
and total numbei of
A four-year starter, Shepard is
currently batting .465 and has
scored 28 runs m just 73 at-bats.
she lias hit five triples and four
home runs, and has an
unbelievable career batting
average of over .500.
I ast year. Shepard helped the
Pirates to a 42-13 record and a
fourth place finish in the nation.
She was named an All-American,
k mm-
Cynthia Shepard
and was also a nominee tor the
Broderick Award signifying the
best collegiate softball player in
the country
Shepard hails from Sneads
Ferry, N.C and grew up with
teammate Yvonne Williams. Both
attended high school together and
then came to ECU on scholarship.
Shepard and Williams are the best
of friends and both are known as
LCI's softball speedsters.
"Cynthia and Yvonne are two
of the most dangerous base run
ners in the nation said head
coach Sue Manahan.
"Cymp (as she is called bv hei
teammates and friends) has a very
explosive first step added
Manahan. "She can advance
from first to third on any base hit
and can take away anv ball hit in
her direction when playing the
outfield
Although she is one of the
fastest players in the game today,
Shepard isn't too bad at the plate
eithei
"She is more powerful with the
bat than any other plaver I've ever
coached Manahan stated. "She
is highly respected by opposing
teams
Shepard also leads the team in
reaching base on errors, which is
due to her hard-hitting abilitv.
C orisidered one of the top slug-
gers in the college ranks, the soft-
spoken senior can't explain whv
she's so strong with the bat. As
Manahan explained, "Cymp lead
with performance rather than
words
Shepard, who is majoring in
correctional science, will graduate
at the end of summer school. She
doesn't have any immediate plans
for the future, and right now,
Shepard is mostly concerned
about winning.
And if Cynthia Shepard keeps
on playing the way she has the last
four years, that's what the Pirates
will keep on doing.
ByClNDl PLEASANTS
Only one name comes to mind
when selecting I he Last Caroli
man's Female Athlete Of I fa-
Year
During her tour vear career
ECU, the all-America forward
rewrote the record books. She
became ECU'S second all-time
leading scorer with 1,789 points
She shot 0.9 percent from the
floor to place first in field goal a
curacv and grabbed 800 rebounds
to finish fourth in reboundii .
Along with these a.
complishments, she averaged 15
points overall, placing her sixtl
all-time scoring averages
W ithout a doubt, senior basket
ball sensation Marv Denkler made
this year's selection an easy one.
Who else could be more
propnate and so deserving than
an athlete who has excelled
her freshman vear
Denkler reflected back on
four seasons at ECU as being one-
great learning experience. "More
than anything. I've learned that
developing yourself, and being the
best you can be at whatever you
do is what's so important she
said. "1 know now that nothing
comes easy, and the only way
achieve is to work hard.
"Coach (C athv Andruzzi) I
us that sacrifices now bring
greater end. and now 1 .
that's verv true
Denkler made the 10-membei
Women's Basketball N'e - x
all-America team this vear af
being named honorable mention
last season.
Denkler received hei
honor last week, however, wl
she was awarded a $2in) NCAA
post-graduate scholarship at the
school of her choice The Ale
dria. Va native said si
wasn't expecting iward a
hasn't decided what she will
next year. "I'm reallv not - .
which school I'd like to atten
Denkler said. "I've been
tact with an agent, and 1 might try
to play semi-professional ball in
Europe
Denkler, an I'rban Planning
major, ha- maintained a )
gradepoint average during
past three vears and currently has
a 3.2 average this semester W-
18 road games this season, how
has Denkler kept her studies up?
"It's just self discipline she
said. "1 had a good educational
background. 1 went to Catholic
schools all my life
Denkler discovered that she a
not only competitive on the
basketball court but in
classroom as well. "Each year
I've just wanted to do better she
said. "I don't want to settle with a
'B" if 1 can get an A
Denkler. who served as the
team's co-captain during her final
season, led the Pirates to a 14-12
finish in spite of a few problems
along the way. "Our team was
very unique she said. "1 don't
think we had the talent we have
had in the past, but the players
worked hard. When we got down
to eight (players) because of in-
juries, the plavers reallv came
through f
" 1 here
I ha ' �
-f
I
for tv

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I
:


-

I
(Ho I
-
V
kler
" c .
tout �
laid ba �

S :
do.

i
'�
taiv towai
(Denkler)
I'm glad 1
enough to
We' e asi really
her. 1 � a f�
a s
that comes a
. i
� "
Pirates Drop Seahawks
WILM1NG rON ECl
freshman sensation Winfred
Johnson pitched a four-hitter and
went four-for-five with three RBI
Tuesday night as the Pirates
defeated the UNC-Wilmington
Seahawks 6-0.
While raising his record to 6-1.
Johnson gave up six walks and
SI IKP
He als
i

I he P
i after R
doubled and s
Shank's bio. p
Three Players Exit, Harrison Looks Ahead
With six recruits coming in and
K.ss ol three players, the E I
m's basketball team has yet
ither unpredictable season
ahead ol them.
following a 16-13 season, first
ar Headoach harlie Hai
nson sat down and met with each
of his plavers to talk about the up
ming vear "I sat them down
md asked them what thev wanted
to do he said "They tell me
how thev feel and then I interject
mv feelings to what they have
said We try to make decisions on
what is best for them "
What was the outcome9
freshman guard Keith Mel eod is
planning to transfer, junior tor-
ward Jeff Best is going to concen-
trate on his studies, and freshman
forward Johnny Edwards pro-
bably won't be returning for
various reasons.
"We want all of them to be
happy with their decisions said
a concerned Harrison, "but at the
CINDY PLKASANTS
A Look Inside
same time we have to be honest
with each of them. The players
should be aware of what they can
expect in the future
The loss of Edwards, the 6-6
C harlotte native who averaged
18.8 points and 8.6 rebounds this
season, will definitely be a major
setback. But at this point. Har-
rison wants what is best for both
player and team. "I don't think
Johnny's happy here he said. "I
have a lot of respect for Johnny as
a person and a basketball plaver,
as well as his individual nature,
but he has decide if he'd rather be
part of a group or an individual
Harrison is obviously disap
pointed about the lack of E.d-
wards in next season's lineup, but
remains positive that the Bucs can
be high achievers. "It's a shame if
we lose Johnny he said. "We
could have a helluva ballclub. I
just want him to be happy
wherever he goes. As for us, we
won't look back
The remaining players on last
year's squad should be returning,
and Harrison has already named
Herb Gilchrist and Tony Robin-
son as co-captains. "Tony showed
definite leadership on the court
this year, Harrison said, "and
Herbie is one of the kids who has
stayed around for four years.
Both are very deserving of beine
captains
Lhe addition of six players will
definitely make a difference in the
team's overall depth, and Har-
rison said some of the players will
be expected to make immediate
contributions. "We have to rely
on some of these younger kids
Harrison said. "What we do of-
fensively and defensively is very
simple.
"If they play and respond well,
there's no reason why they can't
play
Two guards, forwards and
centers will be joining the ECU
squad this fall, including the 6-10
"still-growing" I eon Bass
"We feel we've got a great
group of kids that are loyal to
ECU Harrison said "Thev
want to do well here, and thev
didn't come here as a second alter-
native. They made a decision to
come here, and the other kids
made a decision to return
Harrison feels this year's up-
coming squad will have at least
one distinct characteristic from
last season's team
w
n : .i vcr�
closer knit group with the
coming in Harrison sa "W e
want them to have a feel
security and that brings about
cohesiveness
I here's one other characteristic
the squad will also be sure to
have, as well as am other team
coached under Harrison � com-
petitiv eness
'The thing that helped us most
this vear was the tact that we were
competitive he said. "We were
competitive against every team we
played We may not have plaved
good at times, but we alwavs
played hard





9
L�Aas�
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 21. 1983
Sneaker Sam Sez
Awards Picnic
The second annual
Intramural Awards
Picnic will be held
Monday, April 25
from 4:00-6:00 p.m.
at the bottom of the
College Hill. Tickets
can be purchased at
the Intramural
Department, 204
Memorial Gym, for
$1.25. The ticket en-
titles you to a hot dog,
beans, slaw, chili,
chips and a drink.
Come on out and en-
joy the fun. Tickets
must be purchased in
advance.
Golf Classic Results
Action at Ayden
Golf and Country
Club last week
resulted in the follow-
ing winners: Stephen
Laroque had the low
score for the men with
a 69, and Ann Byrnes
was low for the
women with a 102. In
team competition,
Jones "A" came out
on top in the residence
hall division and Kap-
pa Sigma "A" finish-
ed on top among the
fraternities.
Co-Rec Putt-Putters
Crowned
It was a cold day as
six Co-Rec Putt-Putt
teams putted their
way through the
36-hole course for
their shot at the title.
The team of Billy Dix-
on and Ellen
Slaughter were vic-
torious as they
defeated Zelton Steed
and Julie Bassett with
a six-stroke advan-
tage. Dixon putted a
66 as Slaughter sup-
plemented with an 81
for a winning team
score of 147. Con-
gratulations to the
champs, and a special
thanks to the Green-
ville Putt-Putt Golf
and Games staff for
their assistance.
Softball Playoffs
Softball playoffs
are underway and the
picks are in. In the
men's independent
division, the Bombers
are highly favored.
Aycock Swats look
like they might cap-
ture the residence hall
division for the men
and Fleming's QDPI
for the women. As
usual, the Heart-
breakers are the
favorite in the
women's indepen-
dent. It looks like a
battle between Pi
Kappa Phi and Kappa
Sigma in the fraterni-
ty "A" division. The
Tri Sigs appear to be
strong contenders to
capture the sorority
division. All-Campus
playoffs are Monday
night so come out and
watch.
Volleyball Playoffs
Set For Tonight
The volleyball
playoffs wind up
tonight as the men's
and women's All-
Campus matches are
scheduled for 7:00
and 8:00 p.m.
Favorites to take this
year's titles are, for
the men, On Your
Knees, the defending
champs under a new
name this year. And
for the women, the
favorites are the Ban-
Body's. Come on out
and see the action as it
wraps up this evening
in Minges.
Summer Aerobics
Aerobic classes for
first session summer
school will be
Monday-Wednesday,
5:15-6:15; Tuesday-
Thursday, 12:00-1:00
and 5:15-6:15. All
classes will be held in
Memorial Gym Dance
Room. First session
classes run from May
16-June 16 with
registration held on
May 16 and 17. Cost
is $8.00 for students
and $10.00 for
facultystaffspouse.
Second session
aerobics classes run
from June 27-July 28
with registration on
June 21 and 22.
Classes will be held
Monday-Wednesday
5:15-6:15 and
Tuesday-Thursday
5:15-6:15 in Memorial
Gym Dance Room.
Cost is the same as
first session.
Equipment Room
Notice
The intramural
equipment room
check-out service in
Memorial Gym will
close on May 1 until
the first summer ses-
sion. All equipment
must be returned and
all late, lost, or
damaged fees must be
paid by May in 204
Memorial Gym,
Monday-Friday from
8:00 to 5:00.
Facility Hours For
Gym, Weight Room
and Pool
All informal recrea-
tion areas will open
and close following
normal schedules
through Sunday, May
1. The Gymnastics
Room will be closed
after April 28; the
Memorial Pool will be
closed after May 1;
the Minges Weight
Room will be closed
after April 29; and the
Memorial Weight
Room and Gym-
nasium will be open
May 2-15 from 8:00 to
5:00 and closed
weekends.
. SS&x
W4
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COUPON
COUPON
r
i
Deli Kitchen
Home-Style Cooking and
Homemade desserts.
Open Daily 6:30- 7:30
Choice of meat, 2 vegetables, J
Homemade bread and beverage $2.95i
With Coupon from 2:30 - 7:30
Corner of Dickinson - Raleigh Ave.
752-5339
it
EAT in or Carry out Special Good thru May 7th
NOBS
Jewlery Repair
custom crafting
fair prices
guaranteed work
Bring This Ad for
ZOoOFF
14K Chain Repairs
I by Les Jewlery
j 1201.5th Street. 758-212 7
10-5 TuesSat.
Herbalife Distributorship
is looking for men and women 18 yrs. or
older for jobs as distributors in sales
and consultation in retail and wholesale of
Herbalife products.
for further information call
752-0211
522-0486 (call collect)
ask for Dottie Sugg
MCA TWIN PAX
THE
TWO-ON-ONE
FOR
$7.99
MCA TWIN PAX iMCATWWIWVXlMCATVWNWVX
TWO FULL ALBUMS
ON ONE CASSETTE.
THE BEST
BY
THE TOP REC0BDING ARTISTS
ON SALE THRU APRIL 27
Record Bar
RECORDS. TAPES S" A LITTLE BIT MORE
Pin PLAZACAROLINA EAST
Classifi
FOR SALE
ECO STUDENTS tcuit sta�
Wtom� 'o our � �� nartHl �
ttw Pitt Co�nf ft '9'Ovnc,
located Ofl Nortti G'��. �
BivO Open ����� Sa'urfla. rc
jvftdav I tii s Crattj "oo-i km
niter boot �' Dip-art o
old postcards button r.
pistols anO collector 5 Jtf.
Baal bargains
JOfM KAWASAKI �� i �oc
priced to sail Grea' M'oa I
Good condition Ttiij j , rt4
motorcycK Mafca an o"�' C
tiO SPECIAL i varrana J nc
Good condition tr t . .
D,K� N9d to si SU� r ��
tar Can 7J2 '3-
10W CHEVT Custorr CW r
4i4 4 speed ii.dins �� -
dows AM MM CMMtll P S
p B LOCK n Duos � ��
Priced to sen IM soc C
?S2 4�3S
CAR STEREO COVP'f
�ifti am �m r�e .� � ;r
and speaners K Mtli � -
new CXI STEVE at 7SB ol5
FOR SALE F -� S
SPEAKER �
j'SO Can 'S wtn
FOR SALE MreaanaJi
'0 speed Skcs i�-
tovo,rit ,n Fee
cellent pre I: : :�
Call 1 S3 0 ane �-t -
"i8
s;
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ae.mts j
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B -en ane ji
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KAPPA SIGM
PRESEN
ALL
.
PRIt 5
1st 6 M
the attu ana t ph
2nd 3 W
the a ana
3rd I Monti
the ait and
ATTENTION
ALL SENIORS
Heirloom Photographers will be
available to take Cap & Gown portraits
Monday April 25 thru Sat. April 30
10:00am-12:00 noon 2:00-9:00pm
at PLAIN JANE'S Restaurant
Between Panama Jack's & The Book Barn-5th St.
This is a graduation special and all portraits are
50 off regular photography shop prices
All students and faculty are welcome to take
advantage of this offer.
wm
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WOULD ti& TO DffiESS OUR.
rAP�?EClATlOJ R? V00J? WII?0MASC
IKJ lUE 00 QioOLVEAic?. Wt W6R�
PLEASED TO SCPvT VOUt? BJTtRTAlKJMtMT
KJBE0Sy FROM cXAJ.9 MOBLC D J. S TO
uappv MooicS 4 our eesuuf? wc&iy scmgdulf
Wt DGEPLV APPIt�MATg YOOe CLCCTiOfsJ OF
TCiF "EL80" TO FUL TU9SE tJEEDS.
WE WOULD LIKE TO 00NG�XTUUT�" TUG
CLASS & '8b " AND W�SH ALL ECO STUD6MTS
A PL&&V.T 4 PCrCSRA. SUMMER 0OaJC .
Please omc Fueruec comows or rue
CAST CAROUKMKJ FOR OUR S�AMeR 4 OWWWklW
DJiEerApNMEKJT Schedules t specials.
Package A
1-8x10'
2-5x7'
16 mini Wallet
Regular Graduation Special Save
$29.00 $14.95 $14.95
(great for exchanging with friends)
WOMEN S HEMIH
CARE VOl CAS
depen: OS
SEff CcS
-
L�A
Package B
2-8x10
4-5x7
32 mini Wallet
Regular
$79.90
Special
$39.95
Save
$39.95
I
I
Regular
$139.90
Package C
4-8x10
4-5x7
16 Wallet
32 mini Wallet
50
Special
$69.95
Save
$69.95
?-
on day of portrait 50 required on delivery of portrait
Finished portraits will be delivered
GRADUATION DAY MAY 6 at Plain Jane's Rest. 5th St.
Photographers will be available on Graduation Day for
additional portraits with graduates family.
Campus Co-ordinotor Eric Henderson SGA Pr�s 758-7910
Gordon Broxton FaiilMand 7524028
When runs out
you won i have to.
nS rot mrrtfci-S f o��I �� rt
Canftrr writiaf Sftcii i
fnffrr roi�f coeti-Ml w
cwhfl S�s steclj?oi-t
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fhK fi�s in- !?� oi ill.
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THE AC
THE WHO
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6
ITS.
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1
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SRS
swill be
n portraits
April 30
-9:00pm
laurant
Barn-5th St.
traits are
irices
to take
Special Save
$14.95
with friends)
Save
$39.95
Save
$69.95
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 21. 1983
11
Classifieds
FOR SALE
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff
Welcome to our tloa market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Groonvillt
Bivd Open every Saturday and
Sunday I tilCrafts, tools, fur-
niture books, etc Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' tfimi
Real OaraainsiJ
KJ 7W KAWASAKI, INI. 11,400
Priced to sell Great bargain.
Good condition This is a real
motorcycle Make an offer Call
752 �MS
tso SPECIAL II Yamaha S1.M0.
Good condition An excellent
bike Need to sell Make an of
ler Call rn-otM.
��e: CHEVY Custom Deluxe 10,
4i� 4 speed, sliding rear win
dows AM FM, cassette PS
p B Lock in hubs. Rally wheels
Pr.ced to sell, StO.SOO Call
's: 4935
CAR STEREO COMPLETE
ith am tm receiver equaluer
and speakers 30 watts and like
new Call STEVE at 7S0 4045
FOR SALE FISHER 530
SPEAKERS Will sell cheap,
i'SO Call 7S40477
FOR SALE Burgundy 27 inch
10 speed Snogun bike Just
Bough' m Feb Toe clips Ex
ceilent price JUS or best offer
Call 7S1 04�9 and leave message
177 MOB Asking $100
75244$
Call
J PANASONIC TMNUSTERS. J
advents. J Sony speakers, now.
must soil. Call 752 2340. ask for
Rick and Judy
KENMORE REFRIGERATOR
� "J voar old. is cubic toot.
Available May 1, SUS. Groat
oorgaiw. call 7H-0001.
FO�SALE: 13 cubic foot
Wbirlpool refrigerator Avacado
oxeon, s toot tall. Best offer. Call
COMPACT
7S0 JMJ.
OEO, best offer,
REFRIGERATOR: 1 year old,
SJ cubic foot. Soautiful condi-
�. �lSo. Call 7��4et,
70 HONDA XLJSO w helmet.
Exc cond moo 3 cycle trailer
with jtraps tUS 757 1233.
FOR SALE: S cubic ft. rofrtg!
Great for dorm, sm Call
7H-377, after p.m.
REFRIGERATOR FOR SALE:
One year old 5 cubic foot
retngeratorfreeier. Exc. cond.
SISOcall 7S04174
DRESSER, COMPACT
STEREO, and queen site sofa
bed for sale Good condition.
Call Kirk at 7S0-4704.
1�7 FENDER MOD F-10.
i 2 string acoustic with case, ex-
cellent condition. 5300 neg.
355 4354 after 4:30 p.m
FOR SALE: Sleeper sofa. Good
condition. $75 or best offer,
752 5530.
SURFBOARD - Outer Banks 5
foot. It inch twin fin. Groat con
ditlon. Now, $100. 753 m�.
PERSONAL
DELTA ZETA: Congrats for
your success during Greek
Week- We'll miss you this sum
men Nig Bro's.
HAPPY 31 birthday. LiMl A
special day to a special friend.
Lovo, your Roomie.
VIVA EL PUERTO RICOI Si.
como no? Bien gracias. Pedro y
Maria siempre; Miguel y
Juanita de vei en cuandol Hasta
la vista I Hasta mananai Hasta
luegol Hasta Fernando Valor
luelaj
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 3 bedroom
house New home fully furnished
�n Stokes area. To share with
female roommate and owner �
reasonable rent. Call after 5 30
p.m. Mon-Fn. anytime
weekends ph. 753-114.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share excellent two-bedroom
townhouse at Wedgewood Arms
for the Summer. Call 754-4307.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Call 752-2342.
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED to share two-bedroom
apt. Call after 5:00 750-4340.
NEEDED: FEMALE ROOM-
MATE to share 2-bedroom
trailer one mile from ECU cam-
pus. For more mformatin, call
Helen at 752-1171 after 4:30.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share two-bedroom
townhouse at Tar River Estate.
Rent plus deposit 5130 and half
expenses. Nonsmoker, please
Phone 752-030.
WANTED: WE NEEO ONE
female to share our townhouse
one block from campus, W0 per
month plus one-third utilities.
Available May-summer or fall if
needed. PleaM call 7SO-Se7.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
SUMMER: 3BDR Apartment in
Wilson Acres. 13 rent and
utilties. Call 752-3101.
ROOMMATE NEEDED
RIVERBLUFF Apartments.
Total, rent and utilities,
$l30person. Call Jeff Mitchell
at 757-0443 Call in mornings or
4-7.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
SHARE furn. IBRD, townhouse
May Aug M4month plus 13
Utilities. Call 7M-7130.
NEEDED: WOMAN TO SHARE
2-bedroom duplex. May-July 31.
Furnished, grand piano,
sundeck. Less than one mile
from campus. $12Smonth.
750-2030.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED FOR THE SUMMER.
on delivery of portrait
(ree-
f's Rest. 5th St.
lation Day for
family.
758-7910
MON APRIL 25
KAPPA SIGMA AND THE ATTIC
PRESENT 1st ANNUAL
ALL CAMPUS
CHUG OFF
StOmenth plus 13 utilities Poof
available. Call 754 17n for more
information.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
SUMMER: beginning of May
Aug. 14. Eastbrook 405 C (ISO
month plus 11 utilities Como by
and chock It out.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to snare 1 bedroom
townhouse with patio and pool.
Call 7S1-3SS3 after 11 a.m.
ROOMMATES WANTED for
summer-fall. Carriage House
Apartments. Call 754-4407.
FEMALE WANTED TO SHARE
2 bedroom traitor close to cam-
pus. J72.50 plus one-half utilities.
Available now. 754-7114.
ROOMMATE NEEDED,
SINmonth plus utilities. Avail.
MayS Sepl 1. 754-0543. call Kim
Gray.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, experience, quality
work, IBM Soloctric typewriter
Call Lanie Shive 7SO 5301 or
GAIL JOYNER 754-1041.
TYPING: Term papers, thesis,
etc. Call Kempie Dunn, 751-4733.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER-
VICE: Complete audio repair
call after 4 p.m. Mark 752-114.
MOV I NOT No iob too large or
small I Reasonable rates, call
7S0-�S33.
10 YEARS TYPING:
Reasonable rates; spelling,
punctuation and grammar cor
rections; proofreading. Call
CINDY a.m p.m. at 355 1444
TYPING ANO GRAPHICS-
RUSH JOBS. Portfolio and
references. Call S. Hamilton
7S0-�17 or L. Piantadosia.
7M-0411.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: KNEX GOLDEN ACE
tennis raquot in area of Jarvis
and 5th streets. SM reward, if
found, contact me at 757-4441.
WANTED
WANTING TO BUY:
BED. Call 7S0-S4O4.
DOUBLE
WANTED: MUSICIAN for Bap
tist Church. Call 522-3070 after
4:00.
WANTED to sublease one
bedroom apartment at Tar
River Estates this summer Apt.
is beside largo swimming poet.
has patio and is located S
minutes from campus. Call
7 54 4424 for more information.
APARTMENT to sublease for
summer at Cannon Court. Bus
route to ECU. If interested call
757 1420,
TAKE OVER LEASE BEGINN-
ING MAY. 1 bedroom. 1 13
blocks from campus. Energy ef-
ficient. Handicapped features
For more info, call 7S0-O3S3.
APT FOR RENT both summer
sessions. 104-B Eastbrook
J' 25 month Fully furnished
MALE 754-5100.
FURNISHED 2 BEDROOM
APT. TO SUBLET: May
August. For more info, call
355-4701.
FOR RENT: EFFICIENCY
garage Apt. 1 Mocks from ECU.
Occupancy Aug. I. Deposit and
�ease SUS plus utitit.es Call
mi sm.
EMPLOYMENT
NATIONAL FIRM interviews
for summer iobt $310 whly.
Hard workers only Tue. Wed.
Thurs Apr. 1 11. 4-7 Brewster
D-10S.
GEMINI SHIRTS. INC Rocky
Mount. N.C has summer Obs
available for interested
students Jobs consist of travel
�ng to national motorcycle races
and working in souvenier con
cession stand Good pay Con
tact Erie Kavit at l -444-007
Thinking of going to summer
school at UNC Chapel Hill this
summer Lat Grenville Towers
solve your housing problems!
For only S3S0 per session, you
get all ot the lotiowmg and
more Space in a double room
with an utilities (even air cond
tionmgi) included in price. IS
an you car. eat meals per week
in our cafeteria with Sunday dn
ner through Friday lunch beng
served, fully air conditioned
lounges with cable TV on each
floor, and full use of our
sundeck. weghtroom and pool
areas Granville Towers is
directly ediecent to both cam
pus and downtown Chapel Hill1
A full social program s planned
including pool parties and
cookouts' For a summe- to
remember call or write I for
an application Granville
Towers University Square
Chapel Hill NC (41110 7,43
MARRIED COUPLE NEEDS 1
or 1 BR apartment from May 20
to Aug. 20. Have own furniture.
Desire apartment with pool
privileges. Ask for Dalton, from
5-0 p.m. at 757 104.
PERSONS WANTED to rent
apartment at Eastbrook.
2-Bdrm. 1 12 bath, bus route to
ECU. Pool beginning May 1.
Lease is optional. For more in-
formation, call 7S7-3040.
MISC.
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALL
Reasonable t ites. Call 7S0-S33.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
"Wop�W
$1.00 off Racket stringing with this coupon
(ONE COUPON
PER RAQUET)
with
PRIZES
1st 6 Month pass to
the attic and trophy
2nd 3 Month pass to
the attic and Gifts
3rd I Month pass to
the attic and Gifts
REGIS TRA TIO. LIMITED
TO 1st 15, 4 MEMBER TEAMS
REG IS TRA TIO ENDS A T
10.00PMAPR. 25AT
A TTICS GIFT GALLER Y
REDUCED ADMISSION TICKETS
A VA It A BLE FROM A N Y
KAPPA SIGS
MR.C. TENNIS CENTER
"I Pitty the Fool That Doesn't Shop at Mr. C
218-C E. Fifth St. (BESIDE HEART'S DELIGHT)
758-7008
OPEN APRIL 25-
HOURS 10:00am-6:00pm MONSAT.
-CLOTHING AND SHOES BY
Adidas, Le Coq, Diadora, Converse
-RAQUETS By
Kennex, Wilson, Prince, Heod, Kneissi, Rossignoi
-Kennex Bronze Ace $65.00
Powerace $50.00, Silver Ace $85.00
Golden Ace $75.00, Power Dominator $60.00
Composite Dominator $95.00
ishesl
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
4185.00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information call
832 0535 (Toll Free Number
too 221 2548) between � AM
and 5 P.M. Weekdays.
RALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
417 West V rg?n St.
Rafael
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts, Sleeping Bags
Backpacks Comptng
mem Steel Toed Shoes, Ois
and Over 700 Different New and
Used Items. Cowboy Boots,
Hi IS
ARMY-NAVY
STORE "VteVr
���
.ABORTIONS. I
1 -24 week terminations 1
App'ts. Made 7 Days I
CALLTOLL FREE f
1-800-321-0575 1
ENGINEERINGSCIENCES
YOUR DEGREE
MAY BE WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
The Army is looking for 1983 graduates ir.
Engineering and Science disciplines to serve as
commissioned officers. For those who qualify, this
program could be an important step toward a
rewarding career �in or out of the Army.
You've worked long and hard to earn your
Bachelor of Science degree. A commission in the
Army is a good way to use your technical exper
tise while gaining valuable supervisory ex
perience. And the opportunity is availabie now!
An Army placement officer is available to
discuss opportunities and qualifications with
those about to receive degrees in Engineering or
Science. Contact him direct to arrange an ap-
pointment convenient for you. Call:
CAPTAIN
LOUIS MOiRALES
752-2908 IN GREENVILLE
ARMYOFFKER.
BEALLVOUCANSE.
L
HELP WANTED
E.C.U. dinitKj hall Sowvomotion
Coup, it now accepting ap-
plkations for part-tima studottt
employe to bogin in fall
semestor Positions or
available at Collogo Hill Din-
ing Hall and Mojndonholl Snack
Bar. Stuoanto may apply at
eitnar location bejtwoon
2:00-5:00�m only. (Ho phono
colls plaota). Wo offor convov
nianca to camps,Haxibt�
scheduling, $3.35 par hour and
.1 nh shrrt vou work.
ENTERTAINMENT
Fantasy
ECU Jazz Band
Kneewalkers
Gary Kern
Trinidad Tripoli Steel Band
Xtra Xtra!
Final Act To Be Announced
ATTRAC
g
Marcella RiM�prtuj
Teller andnRM
Antique Images- 'cUime
Costumamwjaphs
CaricatuMWmed-A
New LoomYourself
ThtBoseTaos-Funky,
ffi tz1in Tattoo:
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion a dw- . � v
DEPEND ON. s ' morsrnaaee �(� .
. , no'fieerr�ingCnter Counse�orscx6
i �� ana .i' To support ana "����
�ana - -oursafe'v c-xniort ard ofivac, are
assured &V the car-rig star? of the Fleming Cente'
SERVICES � Tuesday - Sat jraav Aorfion Ap
� rrretsB ist&2naTf.me5te'ADortionsupto
' - (Veefcs � Free Pregnancy Tests � very Early
Ptear ancy Tests � An mc e Fees � insurance
Acceptea � CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
Health care, counseling Tir; FLEMING
CENTER
ana education for o
of aaaes
15
ECU DISCOUNT
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Park View Commons
Across from Doctors Park
Open? 5:30
Mont Fri.
752-1444
PLUS LOTS OF GRE
AND
EDMONDS AND C
The better
ball point
mamL
When it runs out
you wont have to.
H got werytiiH P� :
sJotter wtTtJ-f. SpecifJIy ��-
fiBfer ritt i.g for co-thi-tl wrttl-f
coafort. SUitless steel poiot
TppgstM carbide tell. Perfectly
baUaced. A choke of -sedio-i or
fitje points. Atf best of �llyo� II
�ever tbrow it oat.
Jast slip ia a 3fc refill aad
yoa're ready to write agaia. So
jcians
r-
i
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i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
T-Shirts on
Stud
7EMCEES
yl8
bring this ad for a
FREE WASH
OFFER GOOD WHEN USINGi
SECOND WASHING
MACHINEALSO
"fluff n'fold
Service available- attendants
on duty 7 days a week
Mt,raaaataadget
attc'ntalBIVaataaa
alas a few refills.
S.
coupon expires
April 2 7
1
IWASrf
HOUSE
10tt� St. Across from
Krispy Kreme (752-4117)
I
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IIM IS�T rk � C1IIW � r jm. w. �. i
uth S i Block from a
the "Hill" (752-W34) til
Attraction "The Fabulous Knobs"
THURSDAY, APRIL 21
12:00 NOON-?
.
- .�� j ����� i





F
12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN APR1L21.1983
ECU
DINING
SERVICE
WANTS YOU
to attend the intra Squad
PURPLE AND GOLD
FOOTBALL GAME
on
Saturday�April 23rd
BUTFIRST:
Have your pregame meal
on Purple and Gold Night
in College Hill Dining Hall
Ribeye Steak
Baked Potato and Sour Cream
Broccoli Spears with
Cheese Sauce
Dinner: 4:30-6:30pm
Whole Baby Carrots
Salad Bar
Desserts
Beverages
Game Time: 7:00pm
We are within walking distance ofFicklin Stadium
price only $3.75 person
(lower with discount coupon)
"sa'veJSc College Hill Dining Hall valid 4-225-4
Discount Coupon
off any Meal c
I G�od4-225-4Sm75.
Ribeye Steak 1-8 oz. Serving per person "All you can
eat" available on second entree plus vegetables,
salad bar, beverages and deserts.
Meal Plans Welcomed
-
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 21, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 21, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.266
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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