The East Carolinian, April 19, 1983






ufte fEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.$T �n
Tuesday, April 19,1983
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 10.000
SGA Appropriations
Funds For Campus Groups Total $80,986
COURTSHIP IN 'OUR TOWN' - A nostalgic look at a soda fountain courtship in small-town America is provided by this scene
from the ECU Playhouse production of Thornton Wilder's "Our Town The pair of lovers are Emily Webb and George Gibbs,
played by Donna Lynn Cooper of Yanceyville and Jeffrey Bennighofen of Charlotte. Both are students at ECU. The production
is scheduled for April 14-19.
SEE OUR TOWN Pg. 8
Ptiolo By CARLTON BENZ
Gardner Leaves Student Life
By GREG HIDEOUT
NmFJlM
After a short debate, the SGA
Legislature approved their
1983-84 budget Monday night
with a minimum of hassle. Only
two bills were contested out of 30.
The annual appropriations pro-
cess earmarked $80,986 for
various campus organizations.
According to Speaker of the
House Gary Williams, each group
that requested funds had their
budgets cut several times before
the process was complete. The
total amount asked for by the 31
groups totaled more than
$220,000.
A $1,000 appropriation to the
Inter-Fraternity Council was the
first contested bill of the evening.
A motion was made by the bill's
sponsor, John Greer, to shift the
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Assistant to the Vice Chancellor
for Student Life John Gardner
resigned last week. He intends to
further his education and work
harder for world peace.
Gardner, who has been with the
university two years, has been in-
volved primarily in budget work
for the division of housing and
other areas. "We're extremely
sorry to see John leave said Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer. "He has done very much
for the university and the Division
of Student Life
Gardner has decided to pursue
a doctoral degree in marketing,
which he hopes to use in further-
ing the cause of world peace.
"Marketing is an area that is
neglected Gardner said, adding
that peace organizations need to
research public opinions of securi-
ty. "The need is here for any
organized activity to look at
marketing he said, "not just
business
Gardner has been involved in
peace issues for several years,
dating back to his days as an ECU
graduate student. Last year, he
took a six-month leave of absence
to devote his energies to reversing
the nuclear arms race, an issue
which he said, "overrides every
other issue it makes all other
issues moot Gardner said.
Gardner said his resignation,
which takes effect May 31, will
allow him to work more directly
with students and spend more
time on issues that don't "pay off
in dollars
Meyer praised Gardner for his
knowledge of finances and com-
puters. "His knowledge has
been invaluable in making deci-
sions of benefit to the students
Meyer said.
Meyer said Gardner was in-
strumental in helping the universi-
ty obtain a $242,000 loan at three
percent interest from the College
Housing Program. The loan was
used to make residence halls
energy efficient.
"In the past two years, he has
helped the students save over
$15,000 through energy conserva-
tion in the residence halls Meyer
said, referring to Gardner's work
with the Student Resident
Association's energy contests.
According to Meyer, Gardner
has also done an excellent job as
financial advisor to the Student
Union, the media board and the
Student Government Association.
"His financial analysis informa-
tion has helped make better
decisions to all of our benefit
Meyer said. "He will be difficult,
if not impossible, to replace
Gardner said that the "hardest
thing" about leaving his job was
leaving all the "great people" he
has worked with. "1 think it's
been great to work with all these
people Gardner said.
money from an honorarium to be
used for a leadership conference
to the printing of a pro-Greek
handbook which would describe
fraternity life to incoming
freshmen.
Jim Ensor, a member of the ap-
propriations committee, called the
book "propaganda" for the
Greek system. He said student
money would be spent more fairlv
on a conference which would pro-
mote the whole school instead of
just one part of it. After a friendly
amendment first switched the
money to printing costs, the
legislature voted 14-10 to put in
back as an honorarium.
The second contention was
shortlived as one legislator tried to
pull the executive council budget
from the total budget package.
The motion as soundly defeated.
Most grdups received far less
than they asked for. including the
normally big-getters, the Visual
Arts Forum, the Student Forum
for Musical Organizations, the
Marching Pirates and the ECU
Playhouse. The Visual Arts
Forum received $7,800 out of a
total request for $43,000. The
musical forum got $9,000 of the
$50,472 it wanted, with all monev
for travel being cut. The Mar-
ching Pirates raked in $5,050 of
the $16.95 it asked for and the
Playhouse got $4,000 of the
$20,000 requested
Speaker of the House Williams
said no money was appropriated
for travel because of a bylaw pro-
hibiting the use of SGA funds for
travel.
Williams said this year's ap-
propriations committee did an ex-
cellent job on the 83-84 budget.
David Whitley. chairman of the
appropriations committee, said
the consideration and subsequent
cuts of the bills before them were
based on need, service to the
school, size of the group and who
uses .the service offered.
Williams said the total ap-
propriations left the mandated
17.5 percent reserve, which totals
about $15,000. He said after
money that went unspent during
this year's legislature revert back
and interest income is added,
S30.000 will be left.
Students Not Sure Of
Accreditation Problems
John Gardner
Group Walks For Hunger Relief Fund
Bv STEVE DEAR
Staff Writer
While most of Greeville slept
away the chilly morning hours
Saturday, an estimated 175 ECU
students and Greeville residents
participated in Greenville's
12th annual CROP Walk for
Humanity.
The 20 kilometer (12.4 mile)
trek for world and local hunger
began at 9 a.m. at Green Springs
Park on East Fifth Street. The
walkers wound their way through
the streets of Greenville, stopping
at varioius checkpoints manr;d
by volunteers to verify their pro-
gress.
The first of the few diehards
who ran the entire route arrived at
the last stop, the Baptist Student
Center on East 10th Street, at
about 10:20 a.m. The last walkers
finished around 2 p.m. One per-
son walked the route on four-foot
stilts.
It is estimated that over 150 of
the appioximately 175 par-
ticipants completed the entire
walk.
CROP, the Community Hunger
Appeal of Church World Service,
the promotional organization
behind the walk, promotes many
similar walks throughout the U.S.
for hunger relief.
Walkers were asked to obtain
sponsorships (which were tax
deductible) per kilometer walked.
Seventy-five percent of the money
raised will be donated to CWS. It
will help fund national and inter-
national relief and development
projects for the needy.
The remaining 25 percent of the
funds will be donated to Church
Ministries United, a fund created
by 14 local churches that donate
money to poor residents of Pitt
County, according to Catholic
Campus Minister Sister Helen
Shondell, who helped organize the
event.
Sponsors had the option of
designating their donations to any
of 13 international hunger relief
agencies other than CWS, such as
CARE, the Southern Baptist
Foreign Mission Board, Catholic
Relief Services, and Project
HOPE.
According to Sister Shondell,
the final figures on the money
raised through the walk will not
be available until July or August.
However, she estimated that this
year's CROP Walk had "a few
less" participants than last year's.
"Some people who had planned
to walk didn't Shondell told
The East Carolinian.
"The spirit was great (during
the walking) Shondell said. We
wish we could get a bigger
crowd
Last year, about $5,000 was
raised through the CROP walk.
Shondell said that growing
numbers of people are requesting
financial and social relief from the
government but are not able to get
help. "Because of the economy
more poeple are asking for
emergency funds. They don't
qualify for social services, yet they
have real needs She added that
the United Nations estimates ap-
proximately 50,000 people starve
to death each day.
The concept of having a "Walk
for Humanity" is a sign of
solidarity with the thousands of
people who have to walk over 20
miles a day to obtain water. Many
of the relief and development pro-
jects CWS helps are designed to
make better irrigation and water
resourse systems.
Greenville police were on hand
to help with any problems along
the route.
Also, food and refreshments
were provided for the walkers by
Jarvis Memorial Church and St.
Gabriel's Catholic church.
The walk was organized by the
ECU-Greenville Hunger coalition
and was also promoted by local
churches, schools and organiza-
tions.
Shondell encourages all those
who walked to collect the dona-
tions as soon as possible. AH
donations may be deposited in the
Greenville CROP Walk for
Humanity account at local
Wachovia bank branches or at the
ECU Newman Center at 953 East
Tenth Street.
A random interview of several
ECU education students has rais-
ed questions regarding efforts by
university officials to provide ac-
curate information to students
concerned about last month's ac-
creditation denial by the National
Council for Accreditation of
Teacher Educuon.
"I feel like I should have been
informed about what was going
on instead of just reading it in the
paper said ECU art education
student Shari Phelps. "I feel like
it's an important part of mv
future
Patti Collins, a senior in
elementary education, said that
she felt the situation had been
adequately explained to her by
Dr. Beverly Swenson, one oi her
instructors. "She cleared my mind
pretty well Collins said.
Several students refused to
allow their names to be printed
with their comments and others
refused to comment at all. Most
claimed that they didn't want to
risk being criticized for speaking
out.
The NCATE denial centered on
the administrative organization of
the ECU . education program
which is splintered among several
ECU departments. Eleven
disciplines at ECU fall under the
jurisdiction of the School of
Education. NCATE denied ac-
creditation because of the lack of
a central coordinating agency to
oversee the 11 departments.
ECU officials have been very
optimistic that accreditation will
be restored during the next
academic year. They have told
students not to worry, assuring
them that the denial by NCATE
will not have a negative impact on
their careers. The N.C Board of
Education has also put ECU's
teacher education program on
two-year probation.
"Why didn't they do something
about it fne years ago. that's
what we want to know,1 said
ECU special education student
Debbie Feldhaus.
"When we go out to get a job
they're going to remember all
this said another special educa-
tion student who asked not to be
identified in this story. "They
knew about this five years ago �
they knew about it 10 years ago
Another student in elementary
education who also asked that her
name not be used said she felt
faculty members had done an
honest job of explaining the situa-
tion. "They've tried to tell us as
See STUDENTS, Page 3
U.S. Embassy In Lebanon Blown Up; 28 Die
BEIRUT, Lebanon (UPI) � A
bomb blew apart the U.S. Em-
bassy Monday and collapsed the
reinforced concrete floors on
employees, killing at least 28 peo-
ple, including six U.S. Marines,
hospital officials said.
A doctoi at the American
University Hospital said another
100 people were injured by the
blast. The 28 dead included six
Marines and two Lebanese
policemen, the doctor said.
The entire front of the building
was ripped off and the floor col-
lapsed like cards on those working
in front of the building.
A group calling itself the
Islamic Struggle Organization
called a local news organization
immediately after the blast to
claim responsibility. The com-
mander of the Marines had warn-
ed earlier in the day that he ex-
pected more Moslem Shiite at-
tacks on his force.
"It ripped out eight front of-
fices and the snack bar, which
must have had 15 or 20 people in
it said Kurt Shafer, a foreign
aid officer who was knocked from
his chair on the back of the
seventh floor. "It was bad that it
happened at lunchtime
The bomb went off shortly
after 1 p.m. either just in front of
the mission or just inside the front
door. Some reports said the explo-
sion was caused by a car bomb.
The highway outside the
building was jammed with midday
traffic.
Ambassador Robert Dillon was
in the bulding at the time, but was
reported to be "all right" by
political officer Ryan Crocker,
who stood on the wreckage-
strewn sidewalk directing
Marines.
U.S. envoys Philip Habib and
Morris Draper, in Beirut for troop
withdrawal talks between Israel
and Lebanon, were not at the em-
bassy and were safe, a White
House spokesman said.
"The hospital is a disaster area.
Casualties are being brought in
every minute UPI free-lance
photographer Pierre Sabbagh said
from American University
Hospital.
"The whole facade of the
seven-story building is ripped
apart. It's a mess of concrete and
metal rubble UPI correspon-
dent Peyman Pezman reported
from the scene of the burning em-
bassy.
The body of one man, cut in
half, lay in the middle of the street
� so blackened most people ran
by without noticing. A Lebanese
Red Cross worker placed a
blanket over the remains.
A Lebanese military officer,
stumbling out of the wreckage,
screamed uncontrollably at what
he had seen inside. Ten am-
bulances sped off with casualties.
Survivors on the top floor of
the burning building were calling
for help and lowering attache
cases of vital papers to Marines
who rushed to the scene.
Relatives of U.S. Embassy
employees � most of them
Lebanese � collapsed on the
glass-covered sidewalks when they
saw the wreckage. Black smoke
billowed from the fires on the
ground floor and the charred cars
around the building.
Almost 100 Marines, rushed in-
to the area from their base in the
south of Beirut, formed a ring
around the smoking ruins.
Handicap A wareness
r CIMOV WALL.
A student simulates the handicap of blindness as part of Handicap
Awareness Week held test week at ECU.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 19 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed m the announcement
column please type it on an an
nouncement form and s�nd it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwnt
-opy on odd sued paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee tnat your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline tor an
nouncements 3 p m Monday
?or me Tuesday paper and 3
p m Weonesdayy tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received atter these deadlines
wiH be printed
This space is available to an
ijmpus organi rations and
departments
HEY BUD, LETS
PARTY
The Last B-g Bash s
ere 'he second annual
BAHAMA MAMA PARTY soon
sored by Budweiser and
nawa'ian Tropic The Party is
on Monday April 25 (the day
rtore reading day a' 'he Kap
pa Sigma House and begins at
3 00 pm1 Tickets are on sale
ngh now tor S3 00 and entitle
YOU to see trte MISS
HAWAIIAN TROPIC BIKINI
CONTEST a Hawaiian Tropic
viser a Budweiser mug. and
best of an an afternoon of
s'en.ng to the SUPER GRIT
BAND while en,oying 30 KEGS
OF BEER The winner of the
bikir contest wins an all
exense paid trip to DAYTONA
PEACH to compete in the na
onat competition a chance to
.v n a PORSCHE and be launch
eo on a modeling career! So,
SjirH il may be worth while to
enterilf interested call RANDY
EVANS at 752 8125) Ticket
sales are limited so purchase
, our tickets NOW in front of the
uden' store1 For more intor
"a'ion call 752 553
BUCCANEER BABES
There will be mtervies to
select the 1983 8 Buccaneer
� wsonWefl April 20 at 7 00 in
-A'es Pieiohouse
AKA BAKE SALE
The Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority will hav� a bake Ml
April 20, 193 in the lobby of the
Student Supply Store from
� 002 00
WEST AREACAMPUS
Wes' Area Gets High" on
Aecnesoay April 20th from 1 5
pm in the park.ng lot adiacent to
Clement and White dorms
Come iOin us and find our what
The Alternat ve really s
MUSICALE
Sigma Alpha lota presents its
annual Composers Musical on
Tuesday, April 19 at 7:30 p.m. in
the A J Fletcher Recital Hall.
The program will consist of
works composed by ECU
students and alumni Selections
to be presented include elec
tronic. vocal, and instrumental
compositions
YHDL
The Young Home Designers
League meets Tuesday the 19th
at 5 00 at Plain Jane's
Restaurant
DARRYL'S SOCIAL
The ASPA members will have
an end of the year get together
on Wednesday the 20th at 4 00
p m See va' there1
COLORGUARD
TRYOUTS
Flag and rifle tryouts for the
ECU Marching Pirates will be
held on April 23, May 7 and 14
from 10 00 to 5 00 m the Music
building lobby Please bring own
equipment if possible (bring
practice flag it you have one)
Dress accordingly
CHEMISTRY
SEMINAR
Dr Werner Heri, Department
of Chemistry Florida State
University will present a
seminar entitled "Recent
Aspects of Sesquiterpene Lac
tone Chemistry on Friday.
April 15 1983 at 2 00 pm in
Flanagan Buiioing room 201
Refreshments will be served in
room 204 following the seminar
CERAMICS
ECU Ceramics Guild Spring
sale Thursday, April 21, 1983 on
ly 9 00 am 6 00 pm on the ter
race beside the gallery at
Jenkins Fine Arts Building
AMBASSADOR PARTY
The Ambassador's end of the
year part is scheduled for Sun
day, April 24. 1983 at 6:00. the
Vice Chancellor and hiswifewill
be hosting the party and maps to
their home can be picked up at
he Alumni Center If you plan to
attend you must sign up by
Wed . April 20th in the
Taylor Slaughter Alumni
Center The scholarship. Am
bassador of the Year, and other
awards will be announced at this
time We will look forward to
seeing everyone there.
FOREIGN
LANGUAGES
LECTURE
The East Carolina university
Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures joins
with the Sigma Upsiion Chapter
of Phi Sigma lota in announcing
the, second lecture in their series
of lectures for 1982 �3
Professor Nancy Mayberry
will rod a paper, "The Doctrine
of the immaculate Conception in
European Art and Literature
from the Middle Ages to the
Baroque on 19 April 1983, to
begin at 7 30 pm in the coffee
House of Mendenhaii Student
Center A reception will follow
INDT STUDENTS
The INDT Club is holding a
Spaghetti and Beer Supper on
Thursday April 21, at 6:00 pm It
will be held at the Tar River Apt.
Clubhouse Students interested
in attending should see any IN
DT. Club member for tickets
You must purchase your tickets
by 4:00 pm on April 20
ALPHAOMICRONPI
BIG BROTHERS
The Big Brothers of Alpha
Omicron Pi will have a meeting
on Tuesday, April 19 at 4 30 pm
All Big Brothers are encouraged
to attend this meeting The Big
Brother Banquet will be held on
Monday, April 25.
NO JOB, NOW WHAT?
On April 19 at 3:00 p.m. In
Mendenhaii 221, the Career
Planning and Placement Ser
vice has invited the Personnel
Manager of a major bank to talk
on his perceptions of the job
market tor college graduates.
Other job search considerations
will also be discussed.
PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
All stdudents who plan to
declare physical education as a
major during the spring
semester or who intend to stu
dent teach during the spring
semester should report to
Minges coliseum at 1000 am on
Thursday, April 26, 1983 for a
motor and physical fitness test.
Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a prere
quisite for official admittance to
the physical education major
program More detailed infor
mation covering the test is
available by calling 757 6442.
MUSICALE
Sigma Alpha iota presents its
annual composers Musicale on
Tuesday. April 19 at 730 p.m. in
the A J Fletcher Recital Hall
The program will consist of
works compossed by ECU
students and alumni. Selections
to be plerformed include eloc
tronic. vocal, and instrumental
compostions
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may um ttit form at rtfltf or
u�o � separata snoot of popor If
you nootf moro lino. Thoro art 33
units por lino. Each lottor, punc-
tuation mark and word spaco
counts as ono unit. Capitalize and
nyphonato words proporly. Loavo
space at ond of lino if word
dotsn't fit. No ads wilt bo ac-
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reiect any ad.
AN ads must bo prepaid. Endow
75� per line or fraction of a hoc.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case tellers.
ftetara to THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office by 3:�t Toesdoy before
Woi(M��a,
ECU POM-PON
SQUADTRYOUTS
The ECU Pom Pon squad will
begin tryouts on the 23rd of
April Actual auditions on the
24th Must be present at both
days of practice to audition
Meet Saturday at 10 a m in Flet
Cher Music Building lobby ready
to practice
PRE MED STUDENTS
The Kaplan Course, a
preparatory corse for the
MCAT, will be taught at ECU
this summer beginning the last
week in June. This course has
been proven to raise MCAT
scores by as much as 2 to 3
points. We need 20 interested
persons to sign up in order for
the service to be at ECU this
summer The course is once a
week for 8 weeks. Anyone in
terested must signup in the
Biology office or call the Biology
club at 757 6286 or 758 6775 for
more information A deposite
should be sent in within 2 weeks.
Due to limited space, we can-
nont reserve your seat without a
deposit information packets ex
plaining the course curriculum
are available in the main
Biology office
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
LECTURE SERIES
The East Carolina University
Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures joins
with the Sigma Upsiion Chapter
of Phi Sigma lota in announcing
the second lecture in their series
of lectures for 1982 83
Professor Nancy Mayberry
will read a paper, "The Doctrine
of the Immaculate Conception in
European Art and Literature
from the Middle Ages to the
Baroque on 19 April 1983, to
begin at 7 X pm in the Coffee
House of Mendenhaii student
Center A reception will follow.
ECU BAHAI CLUS
The Bahai Club of ECU will
have its final meeting of this
semester Tuesday April 19 in 241
Mendenhaii from 11 until noon
Bahai s believe that human be
ings nave been created to know
and to worship God, the
Almighty and the Loving and the
Provider of all mankind.
Baha'u'llah (the prophet
founder of the Bahai faith)
teaches that God is the ever
forgiving and the Most Compas
sionate
SOCIAL WORK
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications are now being ac
cepted for the David B. and
Willa H Stevens Scholarship for
undergraduates enrolled in the
Division of Social Work The
$500 00 Scholarship will be
awarded for the fall semester of
1983. The recipient will be
selected on the basis of
academic excellence, financial
need, good citizenship, and
dedication to the Social Work
andor Criminal Justice profes
sions Applications are available
(and should be returned to) in
the Division of Social Work,
room 314, Allied Health building.
Deadline: April 20, 1983. For
more information call 757 6961
Ext 219.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Congratulations to our new
brothers! We look forward to a
great Fall with you Thanks goes
to Pam Howard for her work on
the Formal. Don't forget Gold
Rush and Barefoot on the Mall
Help APO help the Easter Seals
Thursday on the Mall
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven
ture's Dive Coiumei. Mexico on
the beautiful Yucatan peninsula
Aug 3, 1983 to Aug 10, 1983
Group trip for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving, meals,
lodging and air tare from
Raleigh. Non divers welcome
Call Ray Scharf at 757 6441
ECU LAW SOCIETY
ECU Law Society final
meeting Election of new of
ficers Thursday. April 21st,
Mendenhaii, Room 248 at 7.30
p m
ECU RUGBY
Rugby game this weekend.
Saturday, April 23, agamst Fort
Bragg RFC, at 1 00 Last game
of the year, behind the allied
Health building. Don't miss the
action.
NOT TIME TO REST?
With finals approching. you
are probably on the go constant
ly Take a little time out to slow
your pace down Come sing.
share, and study the word of
God inter varsity meets on
Wednesday nights at 6 30 ir
Biology N102
STAN LANDERS
ECUS own Stan Landers w.n be
signing autographs Wednesday
,n a the second floor bathroom
DUNKING BOOTH
FOR RENT
Ounking booth tor re a-
S25 day or $100 ween B G
vONEY MAKER Con'ac'Ad-
ien Co Jaycees, P O Bo� 63
Warrenton, N c 27589 8f e
(919) 257 1921 or 257 1710
RAGG TYME MARKETING, INC
1001 S.PITT STREET
752-4450
INVITES YOU TO ENJOY
The East Carolinian
Strung ihe campus community
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STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
OWNED & OPERATED BY
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Student:
B PATRICK O'NEILL,
Staff �nm
lsiting ECL
lasi six days si
Jason Adkins, a to hundre
representative from students aba
the Washington office possibility of
of the national Public ing a PJRG
Interest Research on campus.
Group, has been Adkins waj
Students
Coot. From Page 1
honestly as they can where we
stand. They've told us what they
know she said.
"I think East Carolina is a very
qualified school for education
said Collins. "It's always been top
quality Collins said she felt con-
fident that the quality of ECl 's
teacher education program a
never questioned and that she w a
not worried about the situation.
Collins admitted that if she
were not a senior she would pro-
bably be more concerned about
the denial NCATE's denial doe
not impart on students who are
graduating next month. "I trunk
the administration is doing all
Final Tax Z
Demonstrate
"For one shining momer the
IRS tax machine stalled satJ
anchorwoman on the ever. -
news Friday. While many Gu.
ville residents were laboring
diligently to file their last-minute
tax returns, a group of ECU
students and Greenville residents
decided to block the entrance of
the Internal Revenue Service of-
fice, protesting the amount of taut
dollars being used for military
purposes.
Group leaders called the action
"an interruption of busmes- as
usual at the Internal Revenue Sei
vice Shortly before 12:15 p m
eight of the demonstrat
separated from the group and
joined together to block the t
trance of the IRS building located
at the corner of First and Evans
streets. The blockade lasted three
minutes and prevented any
from coming in or out of the
building.
One ECL student. English ma-
jor Keith Hoggard. said he par
ticipated in the blockade to "raise
people's awareness that nuc
weapons can be limited
"I went to express my d;
proval of the large percentage
mv tax money going for mih
spending said Dr. Amy H.
non, a Greenville mother ol three
children who took part in the
blockade. "Because I ha
children, it makes me more c
cerned for the future of the wot
I have more of a stake in it
said.
Like Hoggard. Hannon aid the
proliferation of the nuclear arms
race was her main reason for pa-
ticipating.
The demonstration wa not
sponsored by a particular group.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL if 13
Students Respond With Support For PIRG
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUfl Writer
Jason Adkins, a
representative from
the Washington office
of the national Public
Interest Research
Group, has been
visiting ECU for the
last six days speaking
to hundreds of
students about the
possibility of beginn-
ing a PIRG chapter
on campus.
Adkins was sent to
ECU by Ralph Nader,
the founder of PIRG.
Nader, who visited
ECU last month,
found enough interest
and support amoung
the administration
and students to send
Adkins to help lay the
groundwork for an
ECU PIRG Chapter.
"The ECU student
body and faculty has
enthusiastically
responded to the
PIRG concept
Adkins said. "An ac-
tive group of 30
students has been pro-
moting the idea of
establishing the non-
partisan, student-run
public research and
advocacy organiza-
tion on ECU's cam-
pus
PIRG's are involv-
ed in consumer pro-
tection, environmen-
tal preservation,
political reform,
energy policy and
Students Lack Information
Cont. From Page 1
honestly as they can where we
stand. They've told us what they
know she said.
"1 think East Carolina is a very
qualified school for education
said Collins. "It's always been top
quality Collins said she felt con-
fident that the quality of ECU's
teacher education program was
never questioned and that she was
not worried about the situation.
Collins admitted that if she
were not a senior she would pro-
bably be more concerned about
the denial. NCATE's denial does
not impart on students who are
graduating next month. "I think
the administration is doing all
they can to improve their pro-
grams Collins said.
"I don't think they're telling us
enough about it said Feldhaus.
"They're just telling us not to
worry Feldhaus said that Dr.
David Powers, one of her instruc-
tors had done a "good job" of ex-
plaining the situation.
"I graduate in December
Feldhaus said. "What if we're not
re-accredited by then?"
"I feel like this is an important
part of my life said Phelps. "I
was told in one of my art classes
that it would not have an effect on
my teacher certification, that
relieved some of the tension, but I
still want to know more
Phelps suggested that the
Final Tax Day Brings
Demonstration At IRS
"For one shining moment the
IRS tax machine stalled said the
anchorwoman on the evening
news Friday. While many Green-
ville residents were laboring
diligently to file their last-minute
tax returns, a group of ECU
students and Greenville residents
decided to block the entrance of
the Internal Revenue Service of-
fice, protesting the amount of tax
dollars being used for military
purposes.
Group leaders called the action
"an interruption of business as
usual at the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice Shortly before 12:15 p.m
eight of the demonstrators
separated from the group and
joined together to block the en-
trance of the IRS building located
at the corner of First and Evans
streets. The blockade lasted three
minutes and prevented anyone
from coming in or out of the
building.
One ECU student, English ma-
jor Keith Hoggard, said he par-
ticipated in the blockade to "raise
people's awareness that nuclear
weapons can be limited
"I went to express my disap-
proval of the large percentage of
my tax money going for military
spending said Dr. Amy Han-
non, a Greenville mother of three
children who took part in the
blockade. "Because I have
children, it makes me more con-
cerned for the future of the world.
I have more of a stake in it she
said.
Like Hoggard, Hannon said the
proliferation of the nuclear arms
race was her main reason for par-
ticipating.
The demonstration was not
sponsored by a particular group,
but several ECU students were in-
volved in promoting the event.
No police were present during
the sit-in and the three-minute in-
terruption was not broken up.
One woman, who was
prevented from entering the IRS
during the sit-in, smiled and in-
formed the group that she "didn't
mind at all having to wait a few
minutes.
Others who visited the building
during the demonstration shook
their heads in approval of the
signs being held by the
demonstrators. Only a few people
opted to ignore the group.
When police arrived on the
scene, they ordered the
demonstrators to disperse because
they didn't have a permit. The
demonstrators said they didn't
think a permit was needed to
assemble on federal property, but
the police disagreed.
"I believe the ideas we were
representing are ideas that need to
be presented to the public on a
regular basis said ECU en-
vironmental health graduate stu-
dent Larry Martin, one of the
demonstrators. "They (the
public) shouldn't lose sight of it
Martin said the primary issue of
the IRS demonstration was to
protest the amount of money be-
ing spent on "destructive causes"
when there's so much need for
other 'non-destructive" uses of
the money. "Nothing constructive
comes from military expen-
ditures" Martin said.
The group claimed that their
demonstration was only one of
many held throughout the nation
on Friday.
COUSIN'S PIZZERIA
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COUSIN'S PIZZERIA
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School of Education hold a public
meeting and invite speakers to
discuss the NCATE denial in
depth. "I'm kind of at a stand-
still Phelps said. "I don't know
enough about it to have an opi-
nion one way or the other
Fledhaus also said she wants to
know "the play-by-play" of the
situation and what's being done to
correct it. "I'm sure they know
what they're talking about
Feldhaus said. "(But) we should
be more informed. We shouldn't
have to just put our faith in
them
"I feel left out in the dark
said Phelps, "There's really
nothing I can do about it.
Everything I've learned, I've
learned in The East Carolinian
Coffee Break
social justice.
During his visit,
Adkins has maintain-
ed a steady presence
at a table set up out-
side the Student Supp-
ly Store. He has given
numerous ECU
classes a short presen-
tation on PIRG,
distributed literature
to students and held
several meetings to ex-
plain the PIRG con-
cept.
PIRGs are funded
by student activity
fees, which amount
usually to $2 or $3 a
student per semester.
A referendum must
first be passed by the
students authorizing
the expenditure. The
fee is refundable to
any student not desir-
ing to support PIRG's
work.
Adkins and a
number of ECU
students have been
showing a 15-minute
PIRG film at various
places on campus.
The film gives an
overview of PIRG's
work in several cities
around the country.
PIRG chapters arc
currently active in 25
states, Canada and
Australia.
Adkins, who has
also visited with
several ECU ad-
ministrators and
faculty members, said
that he has three main
objectives for his
visit: To educate the
student body about
the work of PIRG, to
set up a core of in-
terested students to
begin an ECU-PIRG
chapter and to involve
ECU faculty and the
entire Greenville com-
munity in PIRG's
work.
Adkins hopes that
this late-semester
drive will culminate
with a referendum
and petition drive
next fall.
Adkins hopes a
core group of students
will work on campus
this summer to plan
outreach strategies in
preparation for a ma-
jor push in the fall.
'PIRG's offer
students the oppor-
tunity to work on
issues of real
significance to the
local and universitv
communities
Adkins said.
ECU geology stu-
dent Eliza Godwin
has been an active stu-
dent for the PIRG
project. "Being
science-minded. lm
interested in en-
vironmental pro-
blems Godwin said
She added that
Nader's lectures gave
her the drive to work
on the project.
Godwin said she
felt confident that a
PIRG chapter would
be started next fall at
ECU.
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Tuesday, Wednesday
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- - � -iiU'





QUje lEttBt (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, Gwai��
Mike Hughes. ��
WAVERLY MERRITT. n.�o, of M ClNDY PLEASANTS. spons �d�o,
Scott Lindley. m. m Greg R�deout. - �"
ALI AFRASHTEH. M ���� SlEVE BaCHNER� ��-�
STEPHANIE GROON. mh. JULIANA FAHRBACH. M-r
Clay Thornton, mm sw ToDD EVANS- �����
April 19. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
bility
A 'Golden Opportunity'For ECU
As reported last week, ECU may Needless to say this is an ex-
become the first public university cellent opportunity for ECU
in North Carolina to host a Public students to increase their input in
interest Research Group (P1RG) local legislative tconstldKera0QnnsH
- a student-run, student-funded Many of us like to sit back and
organization that works on public complain about how rules and
nolicv issues of interest to students regulations are made every year
and the surrounding community. with little or no consideration for
Started bv consumer advocate student welfare. Not that we don t
Ralph Nader in 1970, PIRGs are have good reason to gripe at times,
concerned with a wide range of especially those times when we see
issues, including consumer protec- the apparent nonchalance ex-
tion political reform, social hibited by our legislators. But sad
justice energy policy and en- to say, issuing random complaints
vironmental preservation. In accomplishes nothing at all, except
several states � PIRGs are active to reinforce those ignorant tenden-
in 25 states as well as Canada and cies we've grown used to
Australia - they have been It may well not be chic for
responsible for the passage and students to get involved in a discus-
defeat of laws involving these and sionaction group like a PIRG We
other issues, and PIRG surveys much prefer to sit back and let life
and studies are often published in pass us by, with as little effort ex-
regional, state or national publica- pended as possible. Indeed, that s
tions. much easier' much more col
legiate.
PIRGs are funded through stu- But as previously mentioned,
dent activity fees and are controll- this is certainly a "golden" oppor-
ed by a student board of directors tunity, one that in this paper s opi-
who oversee all of the organiza- nion, students should not pass up.
tion's activities.
When Nader lectured at ECU
last month, he found on campus
what he considered adequate in-
terest and support among ad-
ministration and students to justify
sending a representative from
Washington to aide in the forma- Duke University, will be available
tion of a local ECU-Greenville to discuss PIRG activities in the
PIRG. state.
I

I'm Talking About FAT People!
Dealing With Porkers
Remember the good ol' days, when
people were fat, and no one had
cellulite? Well, need 1 say it, those days
are gone. Nowadays, people are still just
as fat, but we have a 1,001 different
names to call them. It isn't so much that
society's any nicer � not by any
"stretch" of the imagination. But never-
theless, it does reflect a changing at-
titude on society's part toward fat and
fatness.
AAIKE HUGHES
� �
Jason Adkins, who works for
Nader in Washington, will be on
campus today showing films and
discussing the purpose and need
for PIRGs. In addition, Ruffin
Slater, representing the PIRG at
Campus Forum
We're All Dolts, Larry
When I returned to East Carolina to
find that the �'FOUNTA1NHEAE �A,srW-
had regressed to the uninspiredjtatus oc " � j
of the EAST CAROUNIANfTs "A
disappointed, although not fclFpn4'e3l 1
Plfr
puAcT
had been of the opinion that the tenets
and inpiratinn which had spawned the
hannerTFOUNTAlNHEAIfor ECU's
newspaper had been on the decline.
The simple premise of questioning
authority (or status quo, or powers
thatbe, or what "isrytc.) and con-
7Cfar social issues-and individual
freedoms that were major themes of
NtAttd &r
Alt cjs.
'HSifHtd
Pork -A Beans
No pun intended, but fat is big
business. And although no one really
wants to be fat, everybody and his
brother wants a slice of the fatness pie.
Think about it. We've got clothing
stores dedicated solely to "the portly
customer sugar-free anything and
everything and enough "amazing new
diet plans" to make anyone vomit. But
try as we may to make the world a more
sightly place in which to live, every sum-
mer, the oceanside is filled (overfilled)
with scores of bright pink beached
whales and grounded blimps.
Now, I'm not talking about your
"slightly overweight" people, you
know, those saddle-baggers who just
seem to enjoy food. No, I'm talking
about the real porkers, the kind of peo-
ple who just like being fat, people who
have to rent a U-Haul once a week just
to go to the A&P. I'm talking about peo-
ple who sweat profusely watching slow-
motion football replays on Sunday
afternoon TV. I'm talking about people
who just don't care, people who serve
Dexatrim hors d'oeuvres smothered in
Swiss cheese and bacon at dinner par-
ties. I'm talking about people who spend
a fortune every year on new upholstery,
sofa springs and bed slats. People who
go to costume parties dressed as
buildings, islands or the entire Walton
family. People who've forgotten what
their feet look like. People who make
"reservations for two" when dining
alone. People who could smuggle
anything they want into the country
because they know no one would ever
frisk them. People who know pizza
delivery boys by name and give them
special Christmas tips every year. People
who commission a team of muralists to
do their family portraits. People who
never drive with seat belts because
they're held plenty secure by the
dashboard. People who carry com-
prehensive lunchbox insurance.
I'm talking about people who punish
their children by sending them to bed
without seconds on dessert. People who
think aerobics is a new kind of Chinese
food served over rice. People who buy a
side of beef when relatives come for the
weekend. People whose entire wardrobe
(polyester, incidentally) is spotted with
barbecue sauce and spicy mustard. Peo-
ple who phone-in their orders before go-
ing to McDonald's. People who smell
worse after a shower than they did
before. People whose belly buttons ac-
tually show emotion. People whose
butts and thighs look like they were
chiselled out of marble by a near-sighted
stone mason with a jack-hammer.
I'm talking about people who request
special group rates when flying alone.
People who name their children after
mountain ranges or continents. People
who "run over to Fast Fare for a gallon
of milk and come back an hour later
with four bags of groceries and potato
chip crumbs on their (double, sometimes
triple) chins. People who always look
like they're aching to take a bite out of
your furniture. People who give kids a
thrill simply by diving into a swimming
pool. People whose pants and shirts
come with stakes, poles and lie-downs
People who freshen their breath after a
big meal with a half gallon of mint chip
ice cream and a box of York peppermint
patties. People who carry a picture of
Orson Welles in their wallets and think
Liz Taylor looks sexier now than eer
People who you'd like to hide under
during an air raid. People who make
playhouses for their kids out of old
clothing boxes. People whose furniture
and cars you actually feel sorry for. Peo-
ple doomed to resemble the infamous
"Before" pictures their entire lives.
I'm talking about people who sit on
tacks and find out about it three days
later in the shower. People who never
have to worry about closing an overstuf-
fed suitcase. People who are constant!)
mistaken for the Michelin tire man Peo-
pie who take seven hours to play a round
of golf because every time thes gel out
of the cart, they have to replace at least
two big divots. People who frighten pool
lifeguards by swimming in the deep end
and small children and their mothers bv
swimming in the shallow end. People
who fast for three hours and lose five
pounds. People who play the Roman ar
my in Julius Caesar.
1 guess what I'm trying to say is these
people arc, well FAT
Oh, damn now I forgot what 1 was
going to say about them.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, who
likes belching under water to analyze the
different bubble formations, once
weighed a hefty 166 pounds but is no a
fit 158. He hopes there aren 7 as man
fat people on campus as there are Mor-
mons.
. p jnoreidea7StimulatedctionToriented
i � student bodies of the past has been

pit
ro rttd
Larry
r
D

wanting, in my opinion.
This is my final semester at ECU,
and I'm going to miss the school paper
'cause I ain't payffn) for it). I have not
een disappointed, though somewhat
-urprizjeJ to find the spirit of the
jFCnJNTAINHEAD persevenn
ft ' through the efforts ofa�coji�i5
hi T� u dedicated iconoclaststhaFcontribute to
the paper regularly. The exposure to
significant issuesjsuch as the peace ef-
li tir fort' imbalancc of resourcesclass ex-
1 � " ploitation, nuclear insanity, civil
righjs'and war that these writers have
provided are a major service to the in-
habitants of ECU. As world citizenship M fc
is our duty to develop perspectives on jiJJJJ - f
these issues that will shape our future, pV �jt
so that we can contribute appreciation. so jpr
I hope the spirit of theCFOUN- j
f AINHEAD endures, despite a succcs- �7 fV
sionoT inept, inspirationallyrbarren yTJ'
AFROTC: Enhancing Education?
Or Just Intimidating Free Speech?

��
-TV"
'6
or-
sion oi inept, inspir�uunuiy� uoj.vm.
doltswfiicK have passed for feditorial
staffTwith the noted(exceptiohU
Larry Martin
GRADEHLT
readers should be informed that
thYeditors will mix up thepunctuation
in letters they don't like scuo discredit
lit ivuvia w��j .w. - �- �-m�
.r the writer. Don't be looted by their
X . i vVbphmorisR (no ffenceV prank
l-iji another'oneistoomitawordjiojeith-
0L
rdJiojSt
change the meaning of a lineTorhave it
appear the writer can't complete a
though) like he is some kind of drug
abuser.
Editor's Note: Being an inept dolt,
and being that you "found out" about
how we "mix up the punctuation in let-
ters (we) don't like" (please don't tell
anyone about it), I thought it best to
run yours just as you wrote it, with a
few minor "marginal" suggestions.
Cjm�& $(AJe
By PAT O'NEILL
Last Tuesday, 1 was granted permis-
sion to observe a debate on the nuclear
freeze-arms race in the Policy and Issues
class of Associate Professor Homer
Yearick.
Jeffrey Wickersham, an ECU ROTC
student, was a participant in the debate.
When Wickersham saw me, he im-
mediately asked Yearick to have me
removed from the classroom. After
some discussion among Yearick,
Wickersham and myself, I was denied
access to the debate.
During the course of this discussion,
Wickeisham informed us that he was
"going out on a limb and "it could
mean his career" if it was reported that
he was involved in the debate. Incident-
ly, Wickersham was debating "against"
the nuclear arms freeze, a position clear-
ly in line with that of most United States
military officials.
From the hallway outside the
classroom, I was still able to hear some
of the debate. Before Wickersham spoke
to the class, he clearly qualified that his
statements were "strictly" his personal
opinion and that he was not speaking as
a representative of the U.S. Air Force or
the ROTC. Again, Wickersham, said he
was risking his career by debating this
issue. "We're not supposed to speak
out he told the class.
Yearick interjected a question to
Wickersham asking him why he was so
concerned about losing his career in light
of the fact that he was debating from a
position most military personnel would
agree with. Wickersham gave a vague
response.
This situation raises a number of
questions regarding the role of ROTC
on this campus. Certainly, I respect the
position of Yearick. He did the right
thing in honoring his student's request.
But what if I had been a student in that
class? Would Wickersham have refused
to participate in the debate and taken an
"F?" Why did Wickersham feel his
career was in jeopardy for participating
in assigned class work? Does his belong-
ing in ROTC mean that he's denied his
constitutional rights of free expression?
Of course, ROTC officials have
denied that Wickersham's career was
ever in jeopardy. What else could they
say?
It seems to me that participation in
ROTC should enhance (if that's possi-
ble) a student's education, not stifle it.
But if so, then why did Wickersham feel
his career was in jeopardy? Is there an
unwritten ROTC policy that keeps its
cadets from fully participating in their
school work?
1 don't believe that Wickersham just
misunderstood ROTC policy, because
this is not the first time a situation like
this has occurred.
Earlier this semester, another ROTC
student Dorothy Baker wanted to write a
paper for one of her ROTC classes on
the Greenville Peace Committee. After
attending one GPC meeting, Baker was
told her topic was unacceptable for the
paper.
When 1 contacted Baker about
possibly writing a news story on the
situation, she refused to elaborate. She
denied being advised not to attend GPC
meetings. But she, like Wickersham,
believed her career would be in jeopardy
if the situation were reported in the cam-
pus newspaper.
Following our conversation, Baker
telephoned The East Carolinian and ask-
ed News Editor Greg Rideout not to
print a story about the incident. She also
contacted the Media Board to stop the
presses.
The story was never written, because
the facts were speculative, but both ot
these incidents bring certain ROTC
policies (written or unwritten) into ques-
tion. It would appear that at least two
ROTC cadets are afraid to express their
opinions to their own campus
newspaper. This fact alone makes me
wonder about the censorship policies of
the U.S. military.
It's no secret that former Vietnam
Commanding General William
Westmoreland, now touring the college
lecture circuit, blames the media for the
United States' loss in that conflict.
Westmoreland has even gone so far as to
call for a "blackout" of the press in the
event that the U.S. should involve itself
in a similar conflict. I'm sure many U.S.
military leaders are of the same opinion.
Westmoreland's suggestion raises an
almost unlimited number of questions.
It's frightening, to say the least. Would
he go so far as to jail reporters? Close
down newspapers?
Could it be that our own campus
ROTC is echoing a position similar to
Westmoreland's?
It's a shame that Wickersham and
Baker feel they've signed away their
right to free expression, but it's more a
shame that the ECU ROTC has instilled
fear in its students and has created a
schism between them and their campus
-� .J. B .� -
Alcohol
The V esi Area
Residence Council
and the Campu
Alcohol and Drug
Program will be co-
sponsoring an
Alcohol Aarene
Fair edneda to
gue studentv sugges-
tions on responsible
alcohol consumption.
The tair. hich
arts at 1 p m. in the
parK.ng lot a I
to Clement and White
Residence Halls, is
tilled �'We Vea
Gets H j The
pnmar goal
fair is '��
responsib
ing sd.d Rol
Sm. v
Residence H
tor. ho is h
.ame th
Smith is worl
est area CO
Janet Johns
the other
.e b.
prej
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f air wi
a serit
including e.
booths Bn
Hollings Th
For '84 De
COLUMBIA. -
(LPb � Sen En
Hoihrtt. pledg -
put merica �cl
to work and b
the nation's
world trade
n o u n c e d
didaq �
Dem cratic pr lei
tial
Under the glare
TV lights &i ping
flashb . b
accused
Reaga
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Pre
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-
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D:
Discrimin
tCPSi - V
. an ha ruled thai a
predom
Georgia college
fairly disci m
aga;n: a white facu
member
Saannah Sta
College now a
federal appeals ce irt
to reconsider
February decis
favor rf Dr r
Lincoln, a former
home econ re -
teacher at the
Lincoln contends
that Saanr� State
didn't renew hei -
tract in 1978-79
because she is white
r wo-thirds
school's stafl -
dent bod are b w �
Last year aGf
district court -greed

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL �. 193
P&
il
e!
Porkers
hered in
� end
ter).
ple who
-ed as
v a
i j
10 make
dining
smuggle
country
aid ever
pizza
e them
pie
because
h
v Cl
to bed
ople who
t Chinese
o buy a
I
did
ons ac-
i whose
) �ere
-lhted
lo request
ng alone.
jren after
Is People
r i -allon
)ur later
id potato
ometimes
triple) chins. People who always look
like they're aching to take a bite out of
our furniture. People who give kids a
thrill simply by diving into a swimming
pool People whose pants and shirts
come with stakes, poles and tie-downs.
People who freshen their breath after a
big meal with a half gallon of mint chip
ice cream and a box of York peppermint
patties. People who carry a picture of
Orson Welles in their wallets and think
11 Taylor looks sexier now than ever.
People who you'd like to hide under
during an air raid. People who make
playhouses for their kids out of old
clothing boxes. People whose furniture
and cars you actually feel sorry for. Peo-
ple doomed to resemble the infamous
"Before" pictures their entire lives.
I'm talking about people who sit on
:ks and find out about it three days
later in the shower. People who never
have to worry about closing an overstuf-
fed suitcase. People who are constantly
mistaken for the Michelin tire man. Peo-
ple who take seven hours to play a round
of golf because even time they get out
of the cart, they have to replace at least
two big divots. People who frighten pool
lifeguards bv swimming in the deep end
and small children and their mothers by
swimming in the shallow end. People
who fast for three hours and lose five
pounds. People who play the Roman ar-
my in Julius Caesar.
1 guess what I'm trying to say is these
people are, well FAT
Oh, damn now I forgot what I was
going to say about them.
Editor's Sole: Mike Hughes, who
likes belching under water to analyze the
different bubble formations, once
weighed a hefty 166 pounds but is now a
Jit 158. He hopes there aren't as many
fat people on campus as there are Mor-
mons.
g Education?
Free Speech?
imber of
lot" ROTC
espect the
the right
is request
ml in that
e refused
taken an
feel his
rticipating
lis belong-
demed his
cpression?
hals have
ireer was
:ould they
hpation in
it's possi-
t stifle it.
Irsham feel
s there an
keeps its
�g in their
fsham just
because
lation like
ler ROTC
to write a
classes on
ftee. After
Jaker was
jle for the
ler about
ry on the
rate. She
Uend GPC
ckersham,
jeopardy
if the situation were reported in the cam-
pus newspaper.
Following our conversation, Baker
telephoned The East Carolinian and ask-
ed News Editor Greg Rideout not to
print a story about the incident. She also
contacted the Media Board to stop the
presses.
Tht story was never written, because
the facts were speculative, but both of
these incidents bring certain ROTC
policies (written or unwritten) into ques-
tion, it would appear that at least two
ROTC cadets are afraid to express their
opinions to their own campus
newspaper. This fact alone makes me
wonde- about the censorship policies of
the U.S. military.
It's no secret that former Vietnam
Commanding General William
Westmoreland, now touring the college
ecture circuit, blames the media for the
United States loss in that conflict.
Westmoreland has even gone so far as to
call for a "blackout" of the press in the
event that the U.S. should involve itself
in a similar conflict. I'm sure many U.S.
military leaders are of the same opinion.
Westmoreland's suggestion raises an
almost unlimited number of questions.
" s tn8htenmg, to say the least. Would
ne go so far as to jail reporters? Close
down newspapers?
Could it be that our own campus
wll 1S f a Position similar to
Westmoreland's?
It's a shame that Wickersham and
ri!hfr,thcy'vc "Sned away their
IhVm l�Kfr �Pre�ionf but it's more a
shame that the ECU ROTC has instilled
Su� S studenls �� h� ere0 a
�m ta" them and tfieir campus
newspaper.
U-
Alcohol Fair Offers Information, Samples
The West Area
Residence Council
and the Campus
Alcohol and Drug
Program will be co-
sponsoring an
Alcohol Awareness
Fair Wednesday to
give students sugges-
tions on responsible
alcohol consumption.
The fair, which
starts at 1 p.m. in the
parking lot adjacent
to Clement and White
Residence Halls, is
titled "West Area
Gets High The
primary goal of the
fair is "to promote
responsible drink-
ing said Rose Mary
Smith, Clement
Residence Hall direc-
tor, who is helping to
organize the event.
Smith is working with
west area coordinator
Janet Johnson, and
the other west-area
residence hall direc-
tors to present the
four-hour fair.
The fair will feature
a series of activities
including educational
booths, Breathalyzer
tests, coordination
drills and films. The
Breathalyzer tests will
be administered by
the N.C. Highway
Patrol and the ECU
Campus Police. Some
of the students who
participate in the tests
will be drinking beer
in controlled amounts
and competing in
events with those who
have not had any
alcohol.
The coordination
drills will include
several games to test
participants
manipulative skills
such as a ring toss and
peg game. An
obstacle course which
will include running,
jump roping and a
tricycle race around
cones will be ad-
ministered to both
alcohol and non-
alcohol drinking par-
ticipants.
For non-alcohol
drinkers the fair will
offer a bar serving
alternative non-
alcoholic beverages.
The recipes for the
drinks will come from
a booklet titled "It's
Party Time which
was prepared by the
Virginia Polytechnic
Institute and State
Hollings Throws Hat Into Ring
For '84 Democratic Nomination
COLUMBIA, S.C.
(UPI) - Sen. Ernest
Hollings, pledging to
put Americans back
to work and bolster
the nation's role in
world trade, today an-
nounced his can-
didacy for the 1984
Democratic presiden-
tial nomination.
Under the glare of
TV lights and popping
flashbulbs, Hollings
accused President
Reagan of catering to
University. Copies of
the booklet will be
distributed at the fair.
The booklet also
gives students several
suggestions on
hosting and planning
parties that will in-
clude reponsible
drinking. The booklet
points out that a ma-
jor part of being a
responsible host is to
provide for the safety
of your party.goers. It
suggests that special
attention be given to
the travel ar-
rangements of party
goers who consume
alcohol. It also sug-
gests that the host
provide an assortment
of "attractive" non-
alcoholic beverages
and not pressure non-
drinkers to imbibe.
"selfish, individual
interests at the ex-
pense of the common
good" and criticized
the Democratic Party
for "losing the faith
of the American peo-
ple
"Every time a pro-
blem arose, we of-
fered a single solution
� spend more
money he said.
"For generations,
Democrats appealed
to the American peo-
ple as a majority
Hollings said. "For
generations,
Democrats managed
the economy respon-
sibly. We will not be
returned to the White
House until we prove
we can do this again
Hollings told a
crowd of about 300
chanting supporters
that one of the coun-
try's biggest
challenges is "our
need to prepare
America for survival
and success in the
global economic con-
test
"We have the
resources to win he
said at a technical col-
lege he helped
establish as governor
of South Carolina.
"We have the human
ingenuity, the in-
dustrial muscle, the
iscientific imagination
and the financial
strength
Discrimination Suit Upheld
(CPS) � Another
court has ruled that a
predominatly-black
Georgia college un-
fairly discriminated
against a white faculty
member.
Savannah State
College now wants a
federal appeals court
to reconsider its
February decision in
favor of Dr. Anita
Lincoln, a former
home economics
teacher at the school.
Lincoln contends
that Savannah State
didn't renew her con-
tract in 1978-79
because she is white.
Two-thirds of the
school's staff and stu-
dent body are black
Last year a Georgia
district court agreed
that Lincoln's con-
tract would have been
renewed "but for
discrimination and
ordered the college to
pay her back salary
and court costs.
The University
System of Georgia,
which runs the col-
lege, then appealed to
the U.S. Eleventh Cir-
cuit Court of Ap-
peals, which ruled in
Lincoln's favor in
February.
"We're asking for a
re-hearing now in
order to get due pro-
cess says University
System of Georgia at-
torney Al Evans. "If
we don't get recon-
sideration, I suspect
we'll ask for a (U.S.)
Supreme Court
review.
Evans says Savan-
nah State ad-
ministrators were not
guilty of race
discrimination in
refusing to renew Lin-
coln's contract.
Among other things,
he charges, Lincoln's
defense was unfairly
weighted by testimony
from former Savan-
nah State President
Prince Jackson.
Jackson "has made
it a point to testify
against the college in a
number of other court
cases" since resigning
his post, Evans says.
"We always see an
increase in sex and
race discrimination
suits during reces-
sionary time Evans
adds. "But we win 90
percent of the time
because the courts
realize instructors are
reaching for anything
to defend their jobs
Gil Stacy, Lincoln's
attorney, expects the
appeals court to deny
the request for a re-
hearing, and says his
client is satisfied with
the outcome of the
three-year-old case.
"I think we proved
our main point: that
race was the critical
issue in not renewing
her contract Stacy
adds. "It just goes to
show that racism
doesn't have any col-
or boundries

THE STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
For 2 Day Representatives for 1983-84
You can pick up applications at
MendenhalVs information desk
until April 19,1983 at 5:00p.m.
��
CAROLINA
OPRY HOUSE
Presents In Concert
NITTY GRITTYI
DIRT BAND
afcasv
FRIDAY
APRIL 22
Extra Added Attraction
SUPER GRIT COWBOY BAND
ADVANCE TICKETS
$9.00 PER PERSON
ADVANCE TICKET LOCATIONS
MMMMM vitm mik , uuiMim not �
KKO�l' � K r " I U
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
CALL 750-3943
,M A
4444444
According to Smith
several educational
booths will be set-up
and "lots of free
literature" will be
available. The ECU
School of Medicine
will have two booths
set-up dealing with
the health related
aspects of alcohol
consumption. The
medical schools'
booths will deal with
fetal alcohol syn-
drome, a disease that
effects unborn infants
of pregnant mothers
who drink, and the ef-
fects of alcohol on the
brain.
The Student Health
Center will also set-up
a booth that will help
students to identify
"the invisable
alcoholic" among
their friends and
classmates. This per-
son may have a drink-
ing problem that no
one else is aware of.
Smith claims that
Alcohol Awareness
Fairs are nothing new
to N.C. college cam-
puses. She claims that
N.C. State and UNC-
Greensboro have
recently held similar
events. "Any college
campus is going to
have drinking and we
just want to present
the facts to the
students Smith
said. "We're not be-
ing prohibitionists;
we're just trying to
promote responsible
drinking Smith
said.
The fair is open to
the entire campus
community. Johnson
said all students are
encouraged to come
out and try one of the
alternative beverages
or visit the booths.
"I'd love to see a
large turnout she
added.
"If drinking is go-
ing to occur on college
campuses then we
want our students
-western
Sizzlm
TV
Weekend
Greenville.N.C.
Special
April 22,23 & 24
Bay 8oz. N.Y. Strip Reg. Price $5.89
Pay only price S2.9S Second N.Y.
Strip All steaks served with King
Idaho Potatoes or Fries -Texas Toast
Salad Bar only $1.00 with this special
Featuring Prime Rib
Every FriSot. Night
Now Serving 14ozT-Bone
April Lunch Specials Mon-Sat 11-2
Jr. Sirloin $2.19 wsalad oar $3.19
Chopped Sirloin $2.49
wsalad bar $3.49
jflb. Hamburger wBaked Pot. $1.89
wsalad bar $2.89
Baked Potato wsalad bar $2.50
2903 EL 10th St. 759-2712
500 w. GrenvMt Blvd. 736-0040
SOPHIES CHOICE
Plaza
cinema
here at East Carolina
to be among the
responsible
drinkers said
Smith.
Helping Smith and
Johnson are Kathleen
Braswell, Dawn
Carpenter, Susan
Kennedy and Vanessa
Higdon, the other
West Area residence
hall coordinators.
The fair is slated to
end at 5 p.m. and in
the event of ram
snow) the fair will be
moved into the lob-
bies of Clement and
White Hails.
- CciWlUE
A cod my
A word Winner
Best Actress
Mofyl Snttp
MonFri.
7:30 only
SAT. & SUN
(R) 2:45-5:30-8:15
756-0088
PITT-PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
Register For
Three days & two
nights at Myrtle
Beach, Plus
$104.00
In
Cash
f
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Seats
$2.00
First
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Held Over
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Like its really,
totally, the most fun
a couple of bodies
can have. You know?
MonFri. 3:00-7:05-9:00
Sot.A Sun 3:15-5:10-7.05-9:00
E.C.IL Major Attractions
Committee Presents:
Wh0: Evelyn King wSpecial guest
DazzBand
when- Saturday,April 23,8:00pm
Where: Minges Coliseum
Tickets are now on sale at:
Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center
Record Bar at Carolina East Mall in Greenville
Apple Records in Greenville
Record Bar in New Bern
Price:
Student
$7.50
Public
$9.50
A t The Door
$9.50
i4�i
�tejjfj





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 19, 1983
1
Handicap A wareness Week Proves Successful
Despite low atten-
dance, the activities of
Handicap
Awareness Week were
a success, claims ECU
graduate student
Kathy Wilson, a
member of the com-
mittee that organized
the three-day event
last week.
"Wising up on the
Handicapped was
the theme of the event
with activities co- the problems and
sponsored by the Stu- capabilities of the
dent Government handicapped as well
Association and the as resources available
Pitt County Commit- to them. Wilson add-
throughout the week
and Thursday. She Choir, a choir con- tions working with the Matching Game: XVhree students arc
also said the evening prised of severely- to handicapped in the Handicapped People nm graduate
events drew greater
participation.
Wilson said the
profoundly-retarded
members, many of
whom also have
tee for Employment ed that the purpose of Tuesday evening pro- multiple physical han-
.�. i � � II J: llli 1
Pitt County area, and Jobs" was
Students were also presented by Dr.
able to participate in Stephen Thomas, an
simulation activities ECU assistant pro
of the Handicapped
Wilson said the
purpose of Handicap
Awareness Week was
to stimulate, within
the ECU Campus and
Greenville communi-
tv, an awareness of
the event was achiev-
ed for those who par-
ticipated.
The first day of the
program was the
slowest, Wilson said,
but things "picked
up" on Wednesday
gram was especially dicapps. "It was just
good. She praised remarkable to be able
ECU attorney David to see a group so han-
Stevens and keynote dicapped preforming
speaker Chet Motter- the way they did
Lanier Advises 'People
For The American Way'
shead for their
remarks. Mottershead
is N.C. Liaison for
the International Year
of Disabled Persons.
Wilson said the
highlight of the even
Wilson said. "1 think
the people who saw
their performance
really had their eyes
opened
The activities of the
week also featured
was a perfor- booth exhibits set up
mance by the Caswell by various organiza-
doing their graduate
work in the Depart-
ment of Rehabilita-
tion Counseling
Wilson said the
Thursday evening per-
evaiuanon. inu�r nf canias
five PCOP.C induding �!?���&
Greenville Mayor Per- tcu st " �
cy Cox attended known ' song to sign
Thomas' workshop. acting troupe -as a
Wilson said the "great success and
other members of the drew a laycdio
panel, ECU graduate Wright Auditor unv
students Sandy Fantasy haome
Jackson and Betty �JZ
i mpioyer-inausma. Waters, were also musical interprc
Workshop entitled disappointed with the of songs through sign
"The Computerized lack of participation language.
that allowed them to
experience handicaps
such as blindness,
deafness and confine-
ment to a wheelchair.
Numerous lectures
and films were held as
part of the educa-
tional activities of the
week. On Wednesday
morning an
Employer-Industrial
fessor in vocational
evaluation. Thirty-
C. C. Rowe. dire.
lor of handicapp su
dent services, agre
with the commute?
that participation jv
low, but he praised
this year's event as the
best Handicapp
Awareness Week
gram of the three thai
have been held
was a very complete
program, perhaps
best we've ever had.
Rowe said
never have the k
participation . . j
like to have U
bit low but overall
it went ver e
Laing Selected
Evaluate Progrj
Of Ca. Art Scl
Dr. Gene Lanier of
the East Carolina
I niversity library
science faculty,
recognized as a
spokesman for first
amendment
freedoms, has been
appointed to the ad-
visory group of the
new North Carolina
office of People for
the American Way.
The national, non-
profit organization
was founded three
years ago by telev ision
writer-producer Nor-
man Lear and others
to promote and pro-
tect individual rights
and freedoms.
The
10 0,000-member
orgainzation has
become known na-
tionally for work on
behalf of religious
tolerance and free
speech and against
censorship in schools
and libraries.
According to Barry
Hager of Winston-
Salem, director of the
N.C. office. North
Carolina was the fifth
state selected to have
its own office because
it was regarded as
"one of the states
where we see threats
to constitutional
freedoms as being
particularly visible
The state office was
established with the
aid of a $90,000 grant
fromt he Z. Smith
Reynolds Founda-
tion. It will work
closely with the N.C.
Association of
Educators and the
N.C. Library Associa-
tion.
Other advisory
group appointees in-
clude Rev. Claude
Broach, former direc-
tor of the Ecumenical
Institute of Wake
Forest University;
Greensboro teacher
Cecil Banks; Dr. K.
Z. Chavis, associate
executive secretary of
the N.C. Association
of Educators; Rev.
Collins Kilburn, ex-
ecutive director of the
N.C. Council of
Churches; Elizabeth
Duncan Koontz,
former Assistant State
Superintendent of
Public Instruction;
Martha McKay,
former chairperson
for the N.C.
Women's Political
Caucus; Grace
Rohrer, former N.C.
Secretary of Human
Resources and
Greensboro attorney
McNeill Smith.
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�1983 Domino's Ptaza, tat
��Mi
Dr Richard H I a
ing, dean off the ECl
School of V will
travel to southern
California next month
to evaluate three �
universitv art de;
ments and to advise
California's Depart-
ment of Education
concerning which two
of the three scl
should offer the
Master r Fine '�
degree
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 19, 1983
ccessful
out the �eek
ee students trt
hcii graduate
the Dtp
Rehabilita
tinseling
n said the
U evening per
k- o I antasy,
�alls
sign"
a as a
and
vd 10
�.um.
ome
: heir
P B '
1
C C. Rowe, direc-
tor of handicapp stu-
dent services, agreed
vuth the committee
that participation was
tow. but he praised
this ear's event as the
host H a n d i c a p p
wareness Week pro
k:iam of the three that
have been held. "It
�av a ver complete
program, perhaps the
best we've ever had
Rowe said. "You
never have the level of
participation you'd
like to have. It was a
bit low but overall
it went verv wel' "
TM
9 Center
Laing Selected To
Evaluate Programs
Of Ca. Art Schools
Dr. Richard H. La-
ing, dean of the ECU
School of Art, will
travel to southern
California next month
to evaluate three state
university art depart-
ments and to advise
California's Depart-
ment of Education
concerning which two
of the three schools
should offer the
Master of Fine Arts
degree.
The three campuses
he will visit are the
Universities of
California at Los
Angeles, Fullerton
and San Diego. Laing
was selected by all
three from a national
list of possible
evaluators recom-
mended by the Na-
tional Association of
Schools of Art and
Design.
Laing will spend
four days as the sole
visitor for the project,
analyzing the current
support systems for
offering the MFA, the
highest studio degree
in the art field.
In addition to his
career as an art
educator and active
exhibitor of his own
work, Laing has been
an art curriculum ad-
ministrator at North
Ford Guilty Of Non-Registration
Dean Richard Laing
Texas State Universi-
ty, Ball State Univer-
sity and Edinboro
(Pa.) State College, as
well as at ECU.
He has also served
as a consultant for
numerous art educa-
tion programs
in the nation.
Walesa Taken In Custody
WARSAW, Poland
(UPI) Lech
Walesa, forniwr leader
of the banned
Solidarity trade
union, was arrested
by Polish police today
while driving to War-
saw to take part in
memorial ceremonies
for victims of a
Jewish ghetto upris-
ing, witnesses said.
Walesa was taken
into custody near
Olsztyn, 130 miles
north of Warsaw. He
had left his home in
Gdansk by car earlier
in the dav to pay
tribute to the 60.000
Jews who died in the
1943 rebellion against
Nazi occupation
forces.
A CBS-TV news
crew behind Walesa in
a separate car also
was taken into
custody. Witnesses
said they were taken
to militia head-
quarters in Olsztyn.
but released more
than two hours later.
Police in Olsztyn
said Walesa also had
been released, but the
American television
crew said they saw no
sign of him. There
was no other word on
Walesa's
whereabouts.
Witnesses said a
Catholic priest who
was riding with
Walesa, the Rev.
Henryk Jankowski of
Gdansk, also was ar-
rested. Witnesses said
they were riding in
Jankowski's car when
it was stopped.
It was the second
time in a week Polish
police detained
Walesa. On Wednes-
day, Walesa was
taken from his Gdan-
sk home and ques-
tioned for five hours
about his secret
meetings with leaders
of the Solidarity
underground.
Danuta Walesa was
detained the following
day for 2 hours, but
said she refused to
answer questions
about her husband's
contacts with the
fugitive Solidarity
leaders.
Walesa was travel-
ing to Warsaw to
place flowers at two
of the memorial sites
honoring the Jewish
martyrs.
"I respect those
people who fell for
ideals similar to those
many of us hold
dear Walesa said
Saturday. "I am not
giving up. I'll lay
flowers and a wreath
with a ribbon
Poland's com-
munist ruler, Gen.
Wojciech Jaruzelski,
met visiting Jewish
leaders and pledged to
curb anti-Semitism in
Poland, a participant
in the meeting said.
Rabbi Moshe
Rosen, the chief
Jewish clergyman of
Romania, disclosed
the meeting in a
speech during
ceremonies re-
dedicating the War-
saw synagogue,
restored by the regime
as part of observances
of the anniversary of
the Jewish ghetto
uprising.
"The Polish
government is
fighting anti-
Semitism, the premier
assured us1 Rosen
said.
Israeli sources said
Jaruzelski met with
Stefan Grayek, a
leading member of the
Israeli delegation of
350 visiting Warsaw
for the ghetto obser-
vances, and Rabbi
Yitzhak Frenkel of
Tel Aviv.
More than 1,000
Solidarity supporters
gathered at the monu-
ment Sunday for a
peaceful demonstra-
tion despite police op-
position.
"If the heroes of
the ghetto were alive
today, I am sure they
would join us in our
fight for freedom,
truth and human
dignity said Janusz
Onyszkiewicy, a
former Solidarity of-
ficial interned for a
year during martial
law.
Onyszkiewicy was
arrested after Sun-
day's demonstration,
but no other arrests
were known to have
been made on Sun-
day.
Scores of uniform-
ed police and several
busloads of
plainclothes officers
watched the
demonstration, adver-
tised in advance by
underground hand-
bills simply as a
imemorial service.
It was not clear why
authorities felt it
necessary to try to
disperse the crowd.
Jewish delegations
have arrived in
Poland from the
United States, Israel
and other countries
for official
ceremonies and ex-
hibits organized by
the Polish govern-
ment for this week's
40th anniversary of
the uprising.
Draft registration
resister Russell Ford
was convicted Thurs-
day in a Federal Court
on charges of failing
to register for the
military draft. The
jury deliberated 10
minutes before
deciding. Ford is the
first American since
the Vietnam war to
spend time in prison
for draft registration
refusal.
Ford visited ECU in
February at the invita-
tion of the Greenville
Peace Committee.
After the convic-
tion was announced, a
number of Ford's
supporters were
cleared from tho cour-
troom by Judge M.
Joseph Blumenfeld
for disruption.
No date has been
set for sentencing.
Ford's supporters
held rallies outside the
courtroom
throughout the trial.
Some protestors had
to be carried from the
premises after refus-
ing to leave.
During a short pre-
trial conference with
the judge, Ford was
denied a motion to
dismiss the charges
against him on the
grounds that
resistance to war is
not a crime. "He
denied that without
even reading the mo-
tion Ford said.
Ford acted as his
own attorney,
although he received
legal advice during the
trial. He was given the
opportunity to cross-
examine witnesses at
length including the
U.S. attorney for the
prosecution, an FBI
agent and a represen-
tative of the Selective
Service System.
"Almost all of the
questions 1 raised
were ruled irrelevant
through the courts'
refusal to deal with
these questions
Ford said, adding that
he had prepared five
pages of questions.
"We were still able
to bring a lot out
through the ques-
tions Ford said,
"even though they
weren't answered
On his own behalf
Ford invited two
other "public non-
registrants" who are
also openly opposing
the federal draft
registration law. One
of the resisters, John
Bach, had been con-
victed for draft
refusal in
Blumerfeld's cour-
troom in 1969. Ford
said Bach was "an in-
spiration" to him dur-
ing his ordeal.
Ford, 19, faces a
maximum of five
years in prison and a
$10,000 fine.
Since Ford's indict-
ment, several other
draft registration
resisters have been
convicted and some
have served prison
time. Most are cur-
rently free on appeal
00
bonds.
During his
February visit to
ECU, Ford spoke to
several hundred ECU
students. He vistied
ECU classrooms and
several local schools.
Ford told ECU
students that he
believed draft
registration was only
the first step in the
government's plan to
impose full scale con-
scription and possibly
get involved in a war.
� �i ��: �
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wnen it comes to pizza, pta comes to you.
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Call P.T.A. for your order.
QDffBaU)
Coll 752-5543
c-jfiaSas





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
APRIL 19. 1983
Page 8
Production Of
'Our Town'
Huge Success
Critically Acclaimed Comedy, 'My Favorite Year Showing Soon
It's Comedy Cavalcade time when Peter O'Toole, as matinee Bruns looks on in 1982's critically acclaimed comedy My
idol Alan Swann is a television guest on the top-rated live show, Favorite Year. The film will be shown at Hendrix Theatre this
with host comedy star "King" Kaiser (Joseph Bologna, right) Thursday at 7 p.m. and this Friday and Saturday at 5, 7 and 9
and "second banana" John Welsh (left), while "bit player" Phil p.m.
Townshend Gives Us 'Scoop'
By STEVE DEAR
Staff Writer
Pete Townshend
Scoop
Very few composers would be
able to do what PeteTownshend
has done on his new release,
Scoop, a double-album con-
sisting entirely of home and
studio recordings. The album
presents a fascinating collage of
the origins of many of his own
original, innovative musical crea-
tions written between 1965 and
1982.
These twenty-six selections give
an intimate look at Townshend's
musical genius and the process
that his songs went through
before being either adapted and
polished by the Who or simply
abandoned. Originally, these
recordings were "never intended
to be heard by a wide audience
as Townshend states in the liner
notes. But the album does emerge
as being a fine example "of how
home recordings produce moods
and music, innocence and naivete
that could be arrived at in no
other way
His experiments with different
sounds and a wide variety of in-
struments (with a few exceptions,
he plays all the instruments)
heard in these recordings provide
the basis for the powerful Who
renditions. Upon listening to
Townshend's original versions of
"Behind Blue Eyes Magic
Bus and "Love Reign O'er
Me" it's easy to see how the
music of the Who almost com-
pletely depends on Townshend's
own creativity and experimenta-
tion.
This album dqes more than
just give samples of original
demos intended for the Who, it
gives a "scoop" of what the real
Pete Townshend, creative com-
poser, is like � not just "the"
PeteTownshend, acrobatic lead
guitarist for the Who.
With examples of Townshend's
instrumental such as his jazz
guitar playing on "To Barney
Kessel" (a guitarist extraor-
dinaire) to the synthesizers on
"Initial Machine Experiments
Townshendprovides a wide varie-
ty of enjoyable musical ex-
periments.
This is a unique and enjoyable
album, but recommended for on-
ly those who enjoy creative
musical experimentation, not
finely polished rock and roll.
Madness
Madness
With the first U.S. release of
their self-titled LP on Geffen
Records, the young British group
Madness is among the new
groups fusing "new wave" and
reggae styles with very upbeat
pop arrangements. (That's right,
"ska) And they're succeeding.
While these days, so much of
the rockpop establishment is
trying to synthesize everything
from the percussion to vocals,
(for example, the new Neil Young
and Styx albums). Madness pro-
vides a neat arrangement of
horns, guitars, percussion,
keyboard (mostly piano) and
straightforward vocals.
This is the type of album that
sounds better and better with suc-
cessive listenings. No one could
listen to this collection of twelve
very catchy tunes and not find his
or her toes tapping.
The album's highlights are the
moderately successful single
"Our House, House of Fun" and
the jazz tinged "Madnesr (Is All
in the Mind)
Essentially a collection of
previously released songs in Bri-
tain, Madness is full of fresh
sounds. This seven member
group is obviously taking a dif-
ferent approach to ska music
than many of their colleagues
who may be struggling to stay
successful. Madness might be an
indication of the new direction
ska is taking � one for the bet-
ter.
Pink Floyd
The Final Cut
It is hard to imagine a more
lyrically insightful or more
REVIEWS
dramatically performed art rock
album being released anytime in
the near future than Pink Floyd's
career finale, The Final Cut. The
brainchild of lead singerbassist
Roger Waters, this artistic
achievement elaborates on many
of the themes that Pink Floyd's
previous album The Wall in-
itiated. Moreover, it takes them
one step further.
See FLOYD'S, Page 9
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Have you seen the ECU
Playhouse production of Our
Town yet? Well, hurry up and get
a ticket � tonight's the closing!
The Pulitzer Prize winner by
Thornton Wilder just gets better
every time � this production is
no exception.
The messages offered by the
play are unlimited; the acting is
grand � there's not one weak
performance in the crowd of
leads.
Our Town offers the viewer an
opportunity to appreciate, to live
each day as if it were your last.
This appreciation of life is
displayed from the most simple
of human levels. The typical Our
Towner reaps joy from the light
of the moon and the fragrance of
heliotropes in the air.
The Cartwrights are the rich
family in the fictitious New
Hampshire town of Grovers Cor-
ners (Population 3,149, including
the rural folks), but they live up
on the hill in a big white house.
The audience is never introduced
to the Cartwright clan, they're
not supposed to be. Our Town is
about real people � people who
live in the valley.
Our Town is not a fantasy
town. It's people that don't live
happily ever after, they just go
on. The play begins with the stage
manager (a role, in this case, and
a well done one by Bob Myers)
telling the audience a little bit of
information about Our Town.
Throughout the play he interjects
at intervals to give us additional
tid-bits of information. Dr.
Gibbs (Paul Jarrett) has just
delivered twins in Polish Town
(that's where the immigrants live
� a sort of "other side of the
tracks") and he's been up all
night on a house call. Incidental-
ly, the doctors family isn't rich
which might give some indication
of the rates he charges for house
calls.
Gibbs gets his morning paper
from Joe Crowell (Christy Gar-
Cooper and Bennighofen.
rison). Crowell later graduates
from MIT at the "head of his
class but then is killed in World
War I, "all that education for
nothing the stage manager tells
us adding that he can't unders-
tand why Crowell wanted to go
and pick a fight with the Ger-
mans anyway.
George Gibbs (Jeffrey Benn-
inghofen) falls in love with the
girls next door Emily Webb
(Donna Lynn Cooper). Webb ex-
pects a man to be perfect but for
the most part her needs are sim-
ple. She considers both her father
and George's to be perfect. Mrs.
Gibbs (Allison Thompson) longs
to see Paris. She's the most ex-
travagent character we meet. A
person should get a chance once
in their life to go some place
where the people don't speak
English. Gibbs tells her neighbor
She dies too soon to make the trip
of her dreams.
At one point, the audience gets
a big surprise. First the stage
manager invites questions from
the audience to be directed to
editor Webb (Gregory Alan
Watkins) of the Grovers Corners
Chronical. Several actors and ac-
tresses situated around the
theatre make some inquiries. "Is
there much interest in culture and
the arts in Grovers Corners
asks one women in the audience.
Webb responds that Grovers
Corners people enjoy the sun
coming over their mountain and
the songs sung by the town's
birds.
Act II takes place 1,000 days
Se� OLR TOWN. Page 9
Culture Keeper
He's Ageless And Elegant
By ALICE STEIN BACH
Tae BaMaarc Saa
NEW YORK � "Me? Oh, you know, I'm just a
saloon singer Bobby Short says with a husky
laugh, his foot tapping out a staccato message
against the glowing parquet floor of his apartment
overlooking 57th Street.
Uh huh. And Fleet wood Mac is just another
Cadillac dealer.
You see, what we have here � in Bobby Short �
is a man who, if there were a Society for the Preser-
vation of Class, Elegance and Nostalgic Art of Sup-
per Club Singing, would be registered as a national
landmark; someone to be preserved and protected
by law for the benefit and enjoyment of future
generations.
A keeper of the culture, he has been called. A
custodian of class. The premier cabaret performer in
America. Maybe the world. No doubt about it, Bob-
by Short belongs to that small list of people who are,
quite simply, the best at what they do: Fred Astaire,
Katharine Hepburn, Ella Fitzgerald, Cary Grant,
Miles Davis. You know. The Class Acts of the
World.
And what Bobby Short has been doing better than
anyone else for the last 30 years is this: He sits at a
piano and � in a voice both husky and clear and
mellow � invests old songs with new meanings,
reunites for his audience a slower, sweeter past with
the present.
More than anyone else performing today, Short
evokes a period of lost elegance and unearthly
glamour through the incomparably witty and in-
nocently sophisticated songs of such masters as Cole
Porter and the Gershwin brothers, Rodgers and
Hart, Noel Coward and the like.
In a world hopelessly infatuated with fast food
and built-in obsolescence, Short provides his au-
dience with a sense of elegant continuity. When he
steps onto the floor of the posh Cafe Carlyle � his
headquarters in Manhattan for the last IS years �
and sings his favorite Cole Porter lyric ("Why
shouldn't ITake a chance when romance passes
byWhy shouldn't I know of love?") he is the very
symbol of sophistication, of penthouses and cham-
pagne and buckets of dry wit.
"A lot of grace has vanished from our lives, don't
you think?" Short says. "Now everything is so
speeded up. It gets harder and harder to hold onto
an image
Of course, a lot of people would say that Short
has had trouble holding onto his image; that he's
hardly changed at all over the years; that he's as
timeless as the songs he sings.
Sec SHORT, Page 11
'Barefoot On The Mall9 Ushers In Spring Thursday
One of last year's jugglers at Student Union Special Events Couuaittee
on the Mall This year promises to he just as much faa ia a
is this Thursday at 12 nooa on the University Mail; the rate site ts
�Pring festival
c�M weather. The
V
Xtra Xtra! C
Lead ocaitt Eatk Jritre
of "progressive" rock
here in a performance e
Hall in downtown dreem
students will open for
Floyd's
Continued From Page 8
Obsessed with the
death of his father.
Eric Fletcher Waters
(killed while fighting
for Britian in World
War II). Waters con-
tinues his assaults on
world wide
establishments �
political, educatiena.
and otherwise � that
he rather emphatical-
ly states "make k'
generation)
mad sad laugh. c-
ryand lav down and
die (in war) Waters
sings his message �
more conviction
this album than eer
before.
A main mspira:
for this work is ob-
viously British Prime
Minister Margaret
Thatcher's sending
British troops to win
back the Falkland
Islands. Rogers take
that event, couples it
with the plights of
other belligerent
countries and fighting
soldiers such as his
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acter we meet. A
d get a chance once
go some place
people don't speak
tells her neighbor.
nto make the trip
ml the audience gets
e First the stage
- questions from
be directed to
(Gregory Alan
c Grovers Corners
5 era! actors and ac-
s d around the
� some inquiries. "Is
� in culture and
�vers Corners
in the audience.
that Grovers
enjoy the sun
their mountain and
I by the town's
place 1,000 days
01 R H)WN, Page 9
V
Spring Thursday
imittee spring festival "Barefoot
konably cold weather. The festival
r h Mendenhall Student Center.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 19, 1983
'Our Town' Huge Success
Continued From Page 8
Xtra Xtral Opening For Fabulous Knobs At Thursday Fest
after Act 1, but not
much has changed in
Grovers Corners.
Emily and George are
a little older, they fall
in love and George
cans college and
baseball to take over
his uncle's farm. The
marriage day scene is
beautiful as George's
baseball friends prac-
tically scare him out
of marriage with their
outside-the-church
ribbing and teasing.
Mrs. Gibbs and
Mrs. Webb (L. Thon-
da Kirby) do not want
to see their babies
leave their nest. The
fathers take it all in
stride.
Act HI reveals the
true beauty of Our
Town and Emily gets
to steal the show. She
dies during childbirth
and joins the other
"dead" residents in
the hilltop cemetery.
Now it's nine years
later. The stage
manager tells us that
the dead people are all
waiting, searching for
something eternal.
"We all hope that
something is eternal
he adds.
Death is not only a
part of Our Town, it
even gets a few roles.
The audience gets to
meet the dead, some
of them are new
characters, others are
left over from
previous acts. The
focal point of Our
Town's message
comes from the dead.
"Five people don't
understand, " they
tell us.
Emily immediately
becomes aware of the
fact that live people
let life go by without
really living it. Now
that she's dead she
realizes what she has
left behind. She
recognizes that life
should be lived �
moment by moment
� every moment to
its fullest.
Five people live in
"a cloud of ig-
norance" says Simon
Stimson (Greg
Phillips) who had
earlier joined the
ranks of the dead via
suicide.
Emily decides she
must return to life to
relive her early
childhood. Her
mother-in-law warns
her against the plan
telling her that she
will not only relive
life, but she will also
be observing it at the
same time. She will
always know the
future.
Emily decides to see
for herself. Take the
least important day to
relive, she is told, it
will be important.
In Our Town we
embark on a trip
through life, the life
that we all live � and
sometimes don't lie.
Director Cednc Win-
chell guides us,
through his actors, on
this trip to Our Town
It's a wonderful trip
� take it.
Lead vocalist Edie Jeffreys and bass player Jac Cain
of "progressive" rock band Xtra Xtra! are shown
here in a performance early last year at JJ's Music
Hall in downtown Greenville. The local band of ECU
students will open for Raleigh R&B favorites The
Fabulous Knobs this Thursday on the Univesity Mall
at spring festival "Barefoot on the Mall The con-
cert is sponsored by the Student Union Special Events
Committee.
Lil Sisters
PRESENT
'All Campus
Chugging Contest
Four person teams
Wed. Apr. 20,1983
9:00-1:00Adm $1.00
Prizes
s�sjsswy
I
1st $60.00 CASH
2nd $30.00 CASH
3rd $15.00 CASH I
I
�ntries con sign up at the club-
Iby:
For NmA Only
GffOflVHM CHlfOpfOCtO
Domino's
Villa Roma BarroU o4 Fun
S�� Station � took tarn
Plain Jane's
Trot House
Crow's Nest
Mike � Forty Center
tfkTuCer
caroling east mall greenvtle
EAST CAROLINA'S MOST
COMPLETE COSMETIC AND
FRAGRANCE STORE. . .
Floyd's Latest Cuts
Continued From Page 8
Obsessed with the
death of his father,
Eric Fletcher Waters
(killed while fighting
for Britian in World
War II), Waters con-
tinues his assaults on
world wide
establishments �
political, educational
and otherwise � that
he rather emphatical-
ly states "make (each
generation)
madsadlaughc-
ryand lay down and
die (in war) Waters
sings his message with
more conviction on
this album than ever
before.
A main inspiration
for this work is ob-
viously British Prime
Minister Margaret
Thatcher's sending
British troops to win
back the Falkland
Islands. Rogers takes
that event, couples it
with the plights of
other belligerent
countries and fighting
soldiers such as his
father, and creates an
artistic masterpiece
with a unified and
very convincing
message. The album
stands as a "Requiem
for the post war
dream and Waters
final statement about
the fate of planet
earth (a nuclear
holocaust) in the last
song "Two Sons in
the Sunset" is, one
might say, less than
optomistic: "the sun
is in the easteven
thought the day is
donecould be the
human race is run
For better or worse,
what distinguishes
this album from all
previous Pink Floyd
albums is the absence
of the synthesizers of
former Floyd
keyboardist Richard
Wright, who quit the
band. Containing the
ever creative guitar
work of David
Gilmour, the strings
of the National
Philharmonic Or-
chestra, the percus-
sion work of Nick
Mason, and other ac-
companiments by
various session men,
this album has more
natural and realistic
sounds than their
previous works.
Wright's departure
from the band, which
may have forced
Waters to rely more
on his own vocals
than the synthesized
sounds of Wright,
might also have been
the reason for
Waters' outstanding
dramatic singing on
this album.
Pink Floyd's classic
Dark Side of the
Moon still surpasses
the Final Cut in
overall musicality,
but the latter is also
an instant classic �
one that the listener
will want to ex-
perience all over again
after playing it.
WANTED
Mature, responsible male or female to
share three-bedroom duplex with two
working ECU students. Near campus,
rent cheap; clean enviroment; plenty
albums. Call Charles at 756-8865 or
752-4935.
CAMP COUNSELORS
Challenging career opportunities in child care
in North Carolina. Live-in positions at year-
round boy's wilderness camp working with
problemed youth, taking extended canoe,
backpack, and raft trips. Camping ex-
perience and two years college preferred for
entry into rewarding profession that offers
continual inservice training, direct staff sup-
port, and supervisory feedback. Competitive
salarybenefit package. Call 704-371-8355 or
send resume to Eckerd Foundation, P.O.Box
31122, Charlotte, NC 28231. Equal Opportuni-
ty Employer.
Bausch & Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPLETE
includes initial eye examination, lenses, care
kit, instructions and follow up visits tor one
n.onth. ECU student I.D. required.
'Simply the Besf
Yours FREE with a 7.50
Purchase or More!
CLINIQUE
Five famous Ciinique
beauty workers for you
to try in travel sizes.
Dramatically Different
Moisturizing Lotion,
Soft Beige Extra-
Help Makeup, Blue
Lilac Eye-Shading
Pencil, Non-
Aerosol Hair
Spray and
Dubonnet�
lipstick.
Shop Monday Through Saturday 10 a.m. Until 9 p.m.
Phone 756-B-E-L-K (756-2355)
99
00
�w
A (bums courtesy
The Record Bar.
of
JUHIW EXECS
ARE YOU NEW IN THE JOB MAKKET-
SALARY
Star-tV 517,200 - ?Z4.1in increasing
annually to 28.6nn - S4d,RO0 in four
years .
QUALIFICATIONS
r0lWgraHsT al1 de9rees and deree
levels considered. Hecent grads lookiny
for first job as well as those
ontenplating a job change (under age
34) tre encouraged to apply. Required
to pass .lental and physical e�a:is.
BENEFITS
TuiTl .wdml. lentil, unlimited sick
leave, 3 d�ys annual paM vacation,
post grad education programs and
retirement in ?( years!
Tuitions are still avai'able m the
follo-ihg aroas: Management (technical
and non-technican. Engineering.
Nuclear, Teaching, Intelligence
Aviation Management. Hiving, Pilots.
Fin!nee. Personnel Manage-wnt. Worldwide
locations - we pay relocation expenses.
if you are interested in .we
information send your school transcripts
or resume to:
FRMK WIGGINS
U.S. HAW 0FFIC�� PROGRAMS
1(101 Navaho Or.
Raleigh, NC 27609
Or call 1-800-662-7231
gji.4pn, MonFri.
�� the IL'v's Flit Demonstration Team
ll Angled Satoroay, April 23rd at
tnear?�e Corps Air Station. Cherry
Point. NC.
�XH
onoMerwc
�Y�CAR�C�HTCR
Of i
PA
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Holds
NOW LOOKING GOOD
COSTS LESS
TtheTfdwl
MULT IS
EMPTY1
for men
has on opening for o port-time
sales-person. Men's retail experience
preferred. Must be able to work
weekends and during the summer.
Apply at Brady's Pitt Plata
Monday thru Friday (2:00 until 5:00)
HARD DAYS
NIGHT
TWIST CONTEST
Thurs. April 21st
at the
CAROUNA
OPRY HOUSE
$200.00 First Prize
FREE BEER
(8:30-10:00)
ADMISSION
The very best in solid gold Rock and Roll
with WTTN's Greg Allison
We're Taking You Back in TimeFor the Time of Your Life!
'
-�,�





THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 19. 1983
ENTERTAINMENT
ATTRACTIONS
Fantasy
ECU Jazz Band
Kneewalkers
Gary Kern
Trinidad Tripoli Steel Band
X-tra, X-tra
Final Act To Be Announced
Marcella Ruble-Fortune
Teller and Palmist
Antique Images- Old Time
Costumes Photographs
Caricatures Unlimited-A
New Look At Yourself
The Rose Tattoos-Funky,
Daring, and Fun Tattoos
Main Attraction "The Fabulous Knobs"
PLUS LOTS OF GREAT FOOD
AND
EDMONDS AND CURLEY, EMCEES
TShirts on Sale; Monday 18
Student Center
a i

0ON&
hort
Continued From Pa
"People expect me to remain aj
lamn hard he says. "Because.
ly being ageless, then they're agl
s I am young and ebullient anJ
ludience, then it's as though th
hat young.
"It's very hard and as one gr
lore and more difficult to make
teep it up
But aside from a few gra
mstache and a fighting weight
f his high school 155, Short at
ic same as he did 20 years ago
as performing in clubs in New
msiastic � but small � group o)
ins; his reputation was high ami
lanhattan, but his security, bot
id financial, was somewhat pr
It was the early "60s and alth
)peared on the best-dressed hi
id Harper's Bazaar. Short soq
imself walking around Manhati
ime in the pocket of h immaci
lit.
'That was the Bad Period
Ig to his career in 1964 and
?med to be going nowhere. "1
le impact that the arm a! of rocl
le music world in the "60s it
lat has not happened sine
jned before � in my on I
id a decent job. But what was
eing gifted people turning th
it, trying to adjust the si
11
P.
M A
SMOKEY
PART
I
r

II
W1NN0
C. n.
THURSDAY, APRIL 21
12:00 NOON-?
Rain Site: Mendenhall Student Center

CANNES fhM
PLSTIWVi WINNER
V BtST SCWENP-wA
KiA MARK
a MAF
IlM v! '
TWiW

�� - - -
��f�M� " .
m m i iwii"





IONS
ortune
ist
Old Time
ographs
it ted-A
ourself
-Funky,
Tattoo:
vnobs"
EES
Continued From Page 8
"People expect me to remain ageless, and it's
damn hard he says. "Because, you see, with
my being ageless, then they re ageless. As long
as 1 am young and ebullient and peppy to my
audience, then it's as though they are at least
that young.
"It's very hard and as one grows older, it's
more and more difficult to make it all work to
keep it up
But aside from a few gray hairs in his
mustache and a fighting weight of 165 instead
of his htgh school 155, Short at 58 looks much
the same as he did 20 years ago. Back then he
was performing in clubs in New York to an en-
thusiastic � but small � group of Bobby Short
tans; his reputation was high among the elite of
Manhattan, but his security, both professional
and financial, was somewhat precarious.
It was the early '60s and although his name
appeared on the best-dressed lists in Esquire
and Harper's Bazaar, Short sometimes found
himself walking around Manhattan with only a
dime in the pocket of his immaculately-tailored
suit.
'That was the Bad Period he says, referr-
ing to his career in 1964 and 1965, when he
seemed to be going nowhere. "I cannot tell you
the impact that the arrival of rock music had on
the music world in the '60s. It was something
that has not happened since and hadn't hap-
pened before � in my music life. 1 couldn't
find a decent job. But what was really sad was
seeing gifted people turning themselves inside
out, trying to adjust their styles to rock
Never-Ending
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 19, 1983
11
During that period he almost left music for
the men's clothing business.
"Well, 1 knew a little bit about men's
clothing says the man who has his shirts
made for him in London and buys his Italian-
made shoes in France or Italy. Fortunately, for
his fans and fans-to-be, Short stayed where he
belonged � perfectly tailoring his songs, not
suits � thanks to a contract he signed in 1968
with the Cafe Carlyle. "It was a lifesaver for
me he says now.
But there's more to Bobby Short than music
and fine clothes: dignity, sorrow, a fascination
with African art and American abstract expres-
sionism, a deep affection for language, an
ability to laugh at himself, patience, and a
clear, unflinching understanding of what his
work is all about.
"What I do has to be a lonely pursuit,
although people see it as being so glamorous
he says. "But at a certain point in your career
you come to understand what the bottom line
is. It's work.
"You get into a cab and you're all dressed up
in your black tie and the driver has had a bad
day at work and he wants to know where
you're going so dressed up, and most of the
time the truth is I'm going to work where
maybe I'll have as bad a day as the cabdriver.
It's not all glamorous.
"And you come to understand that after you
perform, you leave the Carlyle � which is
rocking with romance and high spirits and the
bubbling champagne � and you mount the
stairs and take off your wet shirt and put on
your dry shirt, and you walk from the hotel
down the street by yourself and you get in a cab
and go home. Alone
Understand, there's no self-pity in what
Short is saying. It's just that people expect
something from him and he gives it to them. He
is, above all else, realistic about who he is.
"I'm a working stiff he says, laughing.
And just how close is the image to the man?
How did a poor boy from Danville, 111. � the
ninth of 10 children � whose father was a
miner and mother a domestic worker, come to
epitomize style and class and elegance and
grace? Will the real Bobby Short please stand
up?
He leans forward in his chair instead: "I
don't have two personalities. I have a profes-
sional side, yes. But I don't change very much.
I've tried very hard to put it all together. I thing
playing game's is such a tedious business � for
the person the games are being played upon
and the person who's playing them. It makes
for such a splitness in your life.
"I'm the first person to admit that I come
from very humble beginnings and my audience
understands that
He sings so much these days that he has pro-
blems with his throat, but Short still loves his
work. "I like making people feel happy, mak-
ing them feel good � because that makes me
feel good he says. "1 think with most per-
formers, if you get right down to the roots, that
is what pleases them.
"And if you have it within your means to
give somebody else that kind of a feeling of
pleasure, it's almost a sin not to give it. You
must. It's your obligation
Fortune Teller Ruble Slated For Mall
Students will be able to have their fortunes told this Thursda on
the University Mall when fortune teller Marcella Ruble returns to
ECU for another "Barefoot on the Mall The annual festival
begins at 12 noon; rain site is Mendenhall Student Center.
COMING SOON
Look for
MOVIE
VI i � I I
jyQg in an
vmmm upcoming
issue
of your
I college
I news-
" paper.
T MISS IT!
WINNER ACADEMY AWARD
BEST FOREIGN FILM
l�
.Brilliant"
- Richard Freedman NEWHOtlSE NEWSPAPERS
r richly deserved its Oscar
Richard Sch.kel. TIME
CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL WINNER
BEST SCREENPIAV
"Shouldn't be missed'
-DcMd Arisen NE.VbWEErs
"Extraordinary
Judrth COST SATURDAN REVIEW
"Superb! Brilliant:
SheiLi Bensor. LA TIMES
7n incredibly dynamic
performance, a
dazzling
tour-de-force.r
rvithkvi. L.I �
NEW YORK DAIL NEWb
"This film is a
work of art
MEPHlSTO a film by ISTVAN SZABO BdSed on Waui Manns novel
Starring KLAUS MARIA BRANDAUER. KRYSTYNA JANDA ILDIKQ BANSAOi HUlF HlH'Pr
Screenplay by PETER DOBAI and ISTVAN SZABO Cmematoyr aphv by LAjOS KOUAi
A MAFILM OBJECTIV STUDIO Production In cooperatfon with MANFRED DURNIOK PHO'DiX r'M'
tr ARALraS FBJ RELEASING CORPORATKtfl
This Wednesday Night - 8 PM - Hendrix Theatre, MSC
LOST
Black Art Portfolio
Between Friday and Monday
Very important it is returned.
Is of no value to anyone else.
Reward being offered.
Coll Danny Gairher at 752-0168
COM�ONOUT
THE PUTTINGS FINE!
PUTT-PUTT
758-1820 ALL YOU CAN l-LAY
TOSPMOMLYSMt
12
P.O.
27SJ4
The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
Weds.
Ladies Night with Fat Ammons Band 8:30-2:30
A11 Ladies Free tilt 9:00
Happy Hour 5:30-9:00
Thurs.
The Alamo's 1st Ladies Lockout
with DJ Don Vickers
A11 Ladies Free all night
WRQR will be doing live Remote
from 8:30-11:30
For the Ladies free draft, wine and
Champagne from 8:30-10:00
Men in at 10:00pm
Fri
So Admission till 8:00-A11 Greek Members 501
25draft All Sight.
Late Sight Happy Hour 11:00pm-1:00am
Music by request with WRQRs Kirk Williams
3t� The Main Attraction
Doors open at 7:00 Happy Hour 7-9:00pm.
C loved Sundaw rxcrpl for special events
IIA4 S Mrmonal l�r
crtKs from (.rrrnvillr irp�rt
Pfco- 757-O0O5 f,H addmoajl .nrrm
j BREAKFAST SPECIAL
7521411
ATTENTION
E.C.U. STUDENTS & FACULTY
Ope�
ANNOUNCING
HUCKELBERRY'S
"GET AQU AINTED"
SPECIAL
(Formally Biscuit Town-Across from Crows Nest)
tn
ve
�&�
� ������
� �������������-�
(6am till 11am Mon. thru Sat.)
Any of the combinations below for only 79C
Ham & Cheese-Sausage & Cheese
Ham & Egg-Sausage & Egg
Egg & Cheese
(with purchase of any Beverage per order)
CHICKEN SPECIAL

(llam-9pm Mon. thru Sat.)
Two piece chicken dinner our choice. Fries &
Biscuit included!
(with purchase of any Med. or Lg. Beverage per order)
ONLY 99
��
tttim mm 1111
RIB SPECIAL
(11am till 9pm Mon. thru Sat.)
Two Jumbo Beef Ribs. Fries. Biscuit
(with purchase of any Med. orLg. Beverage per order)
ONLY $1.99
if TDaystWtek if
123


I





-���
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
April 19. 1983 . Page 12
Four-Day Stretch Keeps Bucs Busy
' -7" V'�
V?v�r
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
ECU senior John Hallow was the Pirates' main force on offense
during this weekend's busy slate. The defending ECAC-South
champs still have a chance of making this year's tournament.
Denkler Receives $2,000
Student-Athlete Scholarship
ECU basketball All-American
Mary Denkler has been selected as
one of ten student-athletes
throughout the nation to receive
an NCAA post-graduate scholar-
ship.
The award is for $2000 and is
for post-graduate studies at the
school of her choice. "I can't
believe I got it said Denkler.
"I'm really happy and pleased
and honored
A senior majoring in Urban
planning, Denkler carried a 3.2
average into the current semester
and will graduate at the end of
summer school.
"I wasn't really expecting to get
the award, so I haven't thought
about which schools I'm going to
apply to Denkler said. "I've
been thinking about getting into a
business program, but I'm still
undecided at this point.
Denkler, from Alexandria, Va
is the first East Carolina athlete to
ever be selected for this
prestigious award and was one of
only four choosen from the Divi-
sion I level.
Denkler capped off her il-
lustrious four-year career averag-
ing 22.5 points and 7.8 rebounds
per game, and finished as the
number two all-time Lady Pirate
scorer.
Denkler says she owes a lot of
thanks to Ernie Schwarz (ECU
faculty representative to NCAA)
for getting her the application,
and to her coach, Cathy Andruz-
zi.
"I feel so proud for Mary and
happy for East Carolina An-
druzzi said. "I know how hard
Mary's worked from being with
Mary Denkler
her for four years. She's not only
worked hard on the court, but off
the court too. This is a reward for
an individual who has never given
up and has worked hard to repre-
sent her team and University to
the highest limits. This is what
athletics is all about
'Near Perfect Ball Player
Committed Only Two Errors
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
Described by Head Baseball
coach Hal Baird as one of the best
defensive players in North
Carolina, Senior Centerfielder
Robert Wells has made only two
errors so far in his career as a
Pirate.
Wells leads the Pirates with a
.308 batting average and has ac-
cumulated 29 total bases in just 26
games. He also has 18 runs and
nine sacrifices.
Besides great plays in the field,
Wells knows how to manipulate
opposing pitchers. He has 16
walks this season and needs only
five more to become ECU's all-
time career leader.
Wells hails from Wilson and
became interested in baseball at a
very early age. "Our home is right
in front of a minor league
stadium, and my dad used to be a
batboy for them he said.
"When I became five, I started
being their batboy, and I've been
interested in baseball ever since
Wells started playing organized
baseball when he was seven and in
later years, he was honored with
the Clint Farris Award, signifying
him as the most outstanding
baseball player in the Wilson
County area.
"That award had special mean-
ing to me Wells explained,
"because it was the last year it was
presented. Mr. Farris passed away
three months after I was
honored
At James Hunt High School,
Wells was named an all-area per-
former for three consecutive
years. During his senior year, he
was recipient of the Golden Glove
award as the best outfielder on his
team.
Upon graduating, Wells turned
down a full scholarship from a
community college to attend
ECU. He saw limited playing time
as a freshman, but moved into a
starting position as a centerfielder
when he was a sophomore. Along
with his starting role, Wells was
also awarded a scholarship.
Wells, along with the rest of the
team, is hoping to gain yet
another conference title cham-
pionship this year. And according
to Baird, if the other players can
perform like Wells, the Pirates
certainly have a great chance.
By KEN BOLTON
Aatotaal Sports Editor
Two conference losses, one
win, one tie and a loss to the
University of North Carolina
completed a busy four-day stretch
for ECU as the Pirates record
dropped to 16-14-1.
But even with their 2-3-1 mark
in the ECAC-South conference,
the defending champion Pirates
still have a chance of making this
year's four-team tourney.
ECU is one of only four teams
in the running that has an overall
winning record. At the end of the
regular season, a selection com-
mittee composed of conference
athletic directors will choose the
four teams.
Sunday's 6-3 loss to Richmond
was the last conference game of
the year for the Pirates. ECU had
four ECAC-South games rained
out this year.
The lengthy stretch started on
Thursday night with a 9-1 loss to
the Tar Heels and former Rose
High pitcher Roger Williams.
Williams returned to Greenville
to limit the Pirates to only two
hits in seven and one-third inn-
ings, raising his record to 6-2.
While the Pirates were unable
to do any damage against
Williams, the Tar Heels had little
trouble with five different ECU
pitchers � including regular right
Fielder John Hallow.
UNC opened the scoring in the
first inning when Drex Roberts led
off with a single. Jeff Hubbard
followed with another single and
Roberts scored when center
fielder Robert Wells mishandled
the ball.
B.J. Surhoff singled aiid a
groundout by Mike Jedziniak
drove in Hubbard to make the
score 2-0.
The Tar Heels added two more
runs in the third on a two-run
homer by Pete Kumeiga following
a walk to Hubbard.
A home run by Roberts in the
fifth and a double steal in the
eighth made it 6-0 with one frame
left.
But the Tar Heels weren't
finished. Walt Weiss opened the
top of the ninth with a single, and
after Roberts reached on an error,
Hubbard delivered an RBI single.
Surhoff then grounded out to
score Roberts, and a wild pitch
brought home Hubbard.
The Pirates added their lone
run in the bottom of the ninth
with two consecutive singles by
Hallow and Todd Evans and a
pair of walks to Daniel Boone and
David Home.
The victory raised UNC's
record to 33-7 and marked the se-
cond time this year that the
Pirates had lost to the Tar Heels
by a 9-1 score.
ECU bounced back on Friday
to defeat American University in
the first game of a scheduled
doubleheader. The second game
was called after seven innings
because of darkness with the score
tied 1-1.
In the first game, Hallow was
again the main force for the
Pirates, as he went two-for-four
with an RBI and a run scored.
Bob Davidson gave up only
four htis and struck out five in
raising his record to 2-4.
The game was delayed for 25
minutes as American was late in
arriving. It didn't take ECU long
to warm up, however, as the
Pirates scored in the first inning.
With one out, Hallow singled
and moved to third on a walk to
Todd Evans. After a fielders-
choice grounder by David Wells,
Hallow scored as he and Wells ex-
ecuted a double steal.
The Pirates added two more
runs in the third on a triple by
Tony Salmond and RBI singles by
Hallow and Wells.
American rallied to tie the score
with three runs in their half of the
third inning. A single by Steve
Salem, a double by Greg Wells
and a triple by Mike Spring scored
the first two runs, and a groun-
dout tied the score at 3-3.
ECU added three more runs in
the fifth to put the game away. A
hit batsman, a wild pitch and a
passed ball allowed Evans, who
had singled, to score.
Winfred Johnson and Mark
Shank proceeded to walk, loading
the bases. Jack Curlings was hit
by a pitch and Salmond hit a
sacrifice fly to score two more
runs.
On Saturday, ECU lost to the
William and Mary Indians by a
5-4 score in ten innings. The In-
dians had rallied to tie the score in
the bottom of the seventh on two
unearned runs.
Although they only lost on the
scoreboard by one run, the Pirates
were outhit by the Indians, 11-2.
William and Mary starter Alan
Zoldark held the Pirates to only
See INDIANS, Page 14
Pirates Ready For Purple-Gold
After several weeks of learning
new drills, techniques and fun-
damentals, the ECU football team
will cap off spring practice Satur-
day when they suit up for the an-
nual Purple-Gold game.
"I feel that overall we have had
good work this spring and shown
signs of improvement in some
areas said Head Coach Ed
Emory. "We are throwing the ball
better, our quarterbacks have im-
proved, and our line has made
great strides
Offensively, Emory has been
especially pleased with the team's
overall performance. "Our
receiver situation looks real good,
and that's an area entering the
drills we had some real reserva-
tions about, but we appear now to
have quality and depth
Three players are fighting for
the starting wide receiver position:
returning junior starter Ricky
Nichols, junior college transfer
Henry Williams and red shirt
Chris McLawhorn.
"All three of these young men
have outstanding speed, spring
speed, and provide us with quality
and depth Emory said.
"Competition is keen right now
and that's what we want
In addition to receivers, the
other major question mark on of-
fense for the spring was the
development of Kevin Ingram at
quarterback and finding a good
backup quarterback.
"Kevin has really come on this
spring Emory noted. "He's out
front, but John Williams has real-
ly closed the gap. If John can
come as far in the next eight days
as he has in the last eight days, it
will be a real competition for star-
ting quarterback duties.
"And Brian Herndon, red-
shirted last season, has shown
some outstanding qualities to be a
contended in the future.
In the back field, tailback Tony
Baker and fullback Earnest Byner
are leading the way, but quality
depth is lacking. Pat Bowens has
shown major improvement over
the last week at fullback, while
Bubba Bunn is back in competi-
tion at tailback. Jimmy Walden
has been lost for the spring at
tailback with a groin pull.
"Our offensive linemen have
made great strides Emory said,
"but injuries have become a real
problem. Six players are out of
practice, but this has opened the
door for others to get a better
chance to play. My concern is
developing some depth and you
can't do that with injured
players
Those out with injuries include.
Jeff Autry, arm surgery; Mac
Powers, a crushed ankle; Robert
Alexander, kneecap surgery;
Shawn Brady, an ankle injury;
Scott Totten, ankle injury; and
Tim Mitchell, a knee injury.
All of the players were expected
to make major contributions, but
Emory is still keeping a positive
attitude. "A red shirt and two
transfers have developed and are
going to be fine ones for us on the
line Emory said. "Ricky
Hilburn and Greg Sokolohorsky
have transferred in and done a
fine job. Freshman Tim Dumas is
running first team left tackle right
now
Improvement on defense has
been much slower, but Emory ex-
plained that the loss of several
players has meant a great deal of
rebuilding for the four new defen-
sive coaches. "We went back to
square one he said, "started ail
over and have been working on
technique and fundamentals.
"The first defensive group ap-
pears sound, with our secondary
in the best shape ever, but depth
continues to be our defensive pro-
blem
Presently, the strongest area on
the team is the linebacker posi-
tion. Last season, the Pirates had
as many as 11 linebackers out at
one time with injuries and had vir-
tually no depth in the secondary.
Five players are now fighting for
the two starting linebacker spots.
Mike Grant, who was out last year
with knee surgery, is competing
with last year starter P.J. Jordan.
Grant was the team's leading
tackier two years ago.
Two other linebackers. Lam
Berry and Ron Reid, were both
out with injuries last fall and are
back. "I'm real pleased to see that
our secondary may be the
strongest we've had since I've
been here Emory said.
See LINEBACKERS, Page 14
Wins
En Route to UNC-C Championship Title
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
After winning seven of the last
eight games within two days, the
Lady Pirate softball team whip-
ped Western Carolina, 10-2, for
the UNC-Charlotte tournament
title this weekend.
Before reaching the champion-
ship game, the Pira'es shut out
Appalachian State, 4-0, eased past
UNC-Chapel Hill, 9-3, and left
Virginia Commonwealth behind,
10-3.
On Saturday, the Lady Bucs
squeezed by hosting UNC-
Charlotte, 4-3, to end round-
robin play. Now in double
elimination, the Pirates again beat
Virginia Commonwealth, 7-3, and
went on to defeat UNC-Chapel
Hill, 7-1, marking the sixth vic-
tory this season the Bucs have had
over the Tarheels.
With a 7-0 win over Western
Carolina, the Lady Pirates ad-
vanced to the finals. But WCU
was seeking revenge and nailed
the Bucs, 4-2, in the first of two
championship games.
But when the title was on the
line, the Lady Bucs pulled
through. After scoring one run
each in the first, second and
fourth innings, the powerhitting
squad knocked seven runs in the
fifth inning to seal the lid on the
championship.
In the first inning, Cynthia
Shepard hit a triple and came
home after a throwing error wa.�
made by WCU.
Fran Hooks then hit a single ii
the second inning, and Gingei
Rothermei reached on a throwing
error to move Hooks to third
base. Melody Ham came in and
hit a sacrifice fly to right center-
field to bring Hooks in.
In the fourth inning, Sandy Key
got on base when WCU's third
baseman made an error. Melody
Ham then got a single. Key ad-
vanced on another error, and pit-
cher Jeanette Roth brought Ham
in with a base hit.
WCU scored one run each in
the first and fourth innings, giving
the Bucs a 3-2 lead at the top of
the fifth.
But the narrow margin
wouldn't prove to last very long.
this weekend's UNC-Charlotte
� �� "trim,
vahuMe player in
The Lady Pirates exploded for
seven runs in the fifth inning, with
senior Yvonne Williams starting
the hitting streak off.
Williams and Shepard both had
singles to land on base, and team-
mate Mitzi Davis then knocked a
double to score both runners
Junior Jo Landa Next, Clavton
hit a single and Hooks connected
for one to score both Clavton and
Davis. Ham's following single
then scored Hooks.
With Ham on base, Key singled
to bring her in. The last run of the
inning came when pitcher Jeanette
Roth reached on an error and
Yvonne Williams hit a single to
score Key.
The championship contest was
the ninth game in two days, and
ECU Head Coach Sue Manahan
telt the Pirates definitely got
enough playing in. "It was a lot of
softball Manahan said, referr-
ing to the two-day tourney. "I'm
very pleased with the way we
Pyed, especially since we plaved
so much. The team reallv pulled
together
Both Shepard and Williams
were named as the tournment's
co-most valuable players, and Jo
ckSSl ?,ayton rcccivcd lhe
V01 Glove award for best
fielder.
.Jn hitters in the cham-
wonship game were Ham, who
went three-for-four and Hooks,
k? 'wo-for-four. Ham also
ee runs batted in.
IT Lady Pirates, now 25-8,
�p��y their last regular season
jame today against Campbell at 3
P.m. The Bucs will then go to the
�te playoffs.
(E
Man
:
- :
-
M.
Hi
ECU
The Lady Pirate
tennis team came
back to win two out
of three doubles mat
ches to edge out
yjslC-Charlotte. 5-1
Sunday
Recording to Head
Coach Patricia Sher
man, the match ma�
ed the team's bes' pe-
formance all season
"Everyone plaec
their best tennis of the
entire year to defea:
an excellent Charlotte
team � a team :r.
nas beaten man
teams that have
heaten us she said
��Janet Rus
played exceptional
well in a three n
plus match and
doubles team ol
Tolson and Christine
have played excellent- C
lv of late
The Lady Pirate-
are now 8-9.
In singles. Su
Romeo (C) def Der
bie Christine. 6-4,6-3
Katherine T
EC AC
The EC Ac -
conference boa
last week and
nounced firm p
several area, m
near future
James Mad
University P-
Dr. Ronald B
ner, chairman
ECAC-South basl
ball group, MM
ed that the
basketball toi
ment will be he d
IliU in H
burg. Va Ma
8-10.
The 1985 u
ment will be hek
William & Mar; -
TheCatal
Billv S
& The Georgi.
New
Ga
BYOB.Bnn�oofO.
C.O. Tankard Di!
L






J9 1913 Page i;
Fridaj
lii in
la u led
(game
tilings
score
a as
the
Oil!
nl
: m
? in
i the
I
li
�ders-
e b
Busy
Hallow and Wells.
American rallied to tie the score
with three runs in their half of the
third inning A single by Steve
Salem, a double bv Greg Wells
and a triple bv Mike Spring scored
the first two runs, and a groun-
dout tied the score at 3-3.
CD added three more runs in
the fifth to put the game away. A
hit batsman, a wild pitch and a
passed ball allowed Evans, who
had singled, to score.
Winfred Johnson and Mark
shank proceeded to walk, loading
the bases, lack Curlings was hit
b a pitch and Salmond hit a
sacrifice fly to score two more
run
On Saturday, ECU lost to the
William and Mary Indians by a
5 4 score in ten innings. The In-
dians had rallied to tie the score in
the bottom of the seventh on two
unearned runv
Although they only lost on the
scoreboard by one run. the Pirates
vere outhit by the Indians, 11-2.
William and Mary starter Alan
Zoldark held the Pirates to only-
See INDIANS, Page 14
rple-Gold

to the
tier
trn is
piude:
Mac
M -
uury;
and
ported
but
itive
two
iq are
n the
ck
I
te a
right
has
y ex-
eral
;al of
lefen-
c coaches. "We went back to
square one he said, "started all
over and have been working on
technique and fundamentals.
'The first defensive group ap-
pears sound, with our secondary
in the best shape ever, but depth
continues to be our defensive pro-
blem
Presently, the strongest area on
the team is the linebacker posi-
tion. Last season, the Pirates had
as many as 11 linebackers out at
one time with injuries and had vir-
tually no depth in the secondary.
Five players are now fighting for
the two starting linebacker spots.
Mike Grant, who was out last year
with knee surgery, is competing
with last year starter P.J. Jordan.
Grant was the team's leading
tackier two years ago.
Two other linebackers. Larry
Berry and Ron Reid, were both
out with injuries last fall and are
back. "I'm real pleased to see that
our secondary may be the
strongest we've had since I've
been here Emory said.
See LINEBACKERS, Page 14
Eight Wins
onship Title
Ham
ich in
Jiving
op of
irgin
long.
T�SO�
in
The Lady Pirates exploded for
seven runs in the fifth inning, with
senior Yvonne Williams starting
the hitting streak off.
Williams and Shepard both had
singles to land on base, and team-
mate Mitzi Davis then knocked a
double to score both runners.
Junior Jo Landa Next, Clayton
hit a single and Hooks connected
for one to score both Clayton and
Davis. Ham's following single
then scored Hooks.
With Ham on base, Key singled
to bring her in. The last run of the
inning came when pitcher Jeanette
Roth reached on an error and
Yvonne Williams hit a single to
score Key.
The championship contest was
the ninth game in two days, and
ECU Head Coach Sue Manahan
felt the Pirates definitely got
enough playing in. "It was a lot of
softball Manahan said, referr-
ing to the two-day tourney. "I'm
very pleased with the way we
played, especially since we played
so much. The team really pulled
together
Both Shepard and Williams
were named as the tournment's
co-most valuable players, and Jo
Landa Clayton received the
Golden Glove award for best
fielder.
Leading hitters in the cham-
pionship game were Ham, who
went threc-for-four and Hooks,
who was two-for-four. Ham also
had three runs batted in.
The Lady Pirates, now 25-8,
will play their last regular season
game today against Campbell at 3
p.m. The Bucs will then go to the
state playoffs.
ECU Netters Defeat 49ers
The Lady Pirate
tennis team came
back to win two out
of three doubles mat-
ches to edge out
UNC-Charlotte, 5-4,
Sunday.
According to Head
Coach Patricia Sher-
man, the match mark-
ed the team's best per-
formance all season.
"Everyone played
their best tennis of the
entire year to defeat
an excellent Charlotte
team � a team that
has beaten many
teams that have
beaten us she said.
"Janet Russell
played exceptionally
well in a three-hour
plus match and the
doubles team of
Tolson and Christine
have played excellent-
ly of late
The Lady Pirates
are now 8-9.
In singles, Susan
Romeo (C) def. Deb-
bie Christine, 6-4, 6-3;
Katherine Tolson
(ECU) def. Kellie
Kayton, 6-2, 6-2;
Janet Russell (ECU)
def. Dorothy Brown,
6-0, 5-7, 7-6; Janet
Redford (ECU) def.
Mary Anne McKen-
na, 6-1, 5-7, 6-3; Ann
Mendel (C) def. Kim
Harrison, 6-1, 6-1;
and Mary Taylor (C)
def. Lori Reep, 6-1,
6-2.
In doubles, Tolson-
Christine (ECU) def.
Romeo-Kayton, 7-6,
6-3; Russell-Redford
(ECU) def. Brown-
Susan Marston, 6-2,
7-5; and Taylor-
McKenna (C) def.
Harrison-Reep, 6-4,
6-0.
On Thursday, the
Pirates suffered a 7-2
loss against Peace
College. Second-
seeded Katherine
Tolson was the only
ECU player to win her
singles match. Tolson
then teammed with
Debbie Christine and
added another victory
with a three-set win in
doubles.
In singles, Traci
Shelton (P) def.
Christine, 7-5, 6-4;
Tolson (ECU) def.
Amy Maddox, 6-1,
6-2; Whitney Bales
(P) def. Russell, 6-4,
6-2; Leanna Lewis (P)
def. Redford, 3-6,
7-5,6-1; Lori Past (P)
def. Harrison, 7-5,
2-6, 6-3; and
Llewellyn Powell (P)
def. Reep, 6-1, 6-2.
In doubles, Tolson-
Christine (ECU) def.
Bales-Maddox, 1-6,
6-1, 6-3; Shelton-
Lairs (P) def. Russell-
Redford, 2-6, 6-1,
6-1; and Taft Powell
(P) def. Harrison-
Reep, 6-1. 6-3.
The Lady Pirates'
last match will be
Tuesday when they
take on William &
Mary. Matchtime is
3:30 p.m.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 19, 19t3
13
m
Each of these advertised items is required to be reedtfy sverieWe for sole et
i below the advertised price in each AAf Store, eicept as spectftcelry noted
in this sd
etor
u
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED Set. April 23 A&P IN GREENVILLE, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Greenville Square Shopping Center
It) Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N. C.
YOUE l&P G0U1ITB7 STORE
ECU tennis player Debbie Christine, the team's number-one seeded
player, belts out a serve during a recent Pirate match.
EC A C Makes Plans
The ECAC-South
conference board met
last week and an-
nounced firm plans to
several areas in the
near future.
James Madison
University President
Dr. Ronald B. Car-
rier, chairman of the
ECAC-South basket-
ball group, announc-
ed that the 1984
basketball tourna-
ment will be held at
JMU in Harrison-
burg, Va March
8-10.
The 1985 tourna-
ment will be held at
William & Mary in
Williamsburg, Va
while the 1986 tourna-
ment is scheduled for
George Mason
University in Fairfax,
Va.
Ben Carnevale,
who has headed the
ECAC-South for two
years, has been retain-
ed as the executive
director of the league.
A league office is
scheduled to be open-
ed in Richmond, Va
in the near future.
W&M Athletic
Director Jim
Copeland has been
named to head a com-
mittee to look into
possible expansion for
the league. Presently,
six schools compete in
the ECAC-South:
ECU, JMU, George
Mason, the Naval
Academy, the Univer-
sity of Richmond and
W&M.
Other areas of im-
mediate attention will
include negotiation of
a television package
and exploring the
possibility of non-
revenue sports com-
petition.
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Sunday, April 24th, 1983 W
featuring
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New Pitt County Fairgrounds, Greenville
Gate Opens at 11:00 - Bands Start at 12:00
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14
THE EAST CAROLON1AN
APRll 19, 1983
Linebackers Strong
Cont'd From Page 12
'Competition is good
and some depth is
possible.
Honorable mention
all-America Clint
Harris will be at free
safety with strong
support from
sophomore Vernard
Wynn and freshman
Marcus Somervillc.
Right cornerback
starter Chuck Bishop
returns this year, and
the left cornerback
spot ma be filled by
Junior Kola n d 0
Caparas, a transfer
from Furman last
season.
At tackles. Seniors
Steve Hamilton and
Hal Stephens have
secured their veteran
positions. At defen-
sive end, two other
seniors, Curtis Wyatt
and Jeff Pegues will
bring their experience
to try and make up
for the loss of all-
America Jody Schulz.
Although Emory
has quite a few con-
cerns about the team's
defense, his main
priority is to build
depth. "To play the
schdule we have, we
must find depth on
the defensive line he
said. "Our starters
are good ones, but we
just don't have what
we need behind them.
With eight new
coaches, Emory said
the team overall has
adjusted well to new
ideas and has improv-
ed. "As for the
meshing of our
players with the new
coaches, I don't think
anything more
positive could have
happened he said.
"The kids have amaz-
ed me with their abili-
ty to be flexible and
work with other
changes. This area is
no problem
The Purple-Gold
game will get under-
way Saturday at 7:00
p.m.
Game Rescheduled
The East Carolina
University football
game with the Univer-
sity of Miami has
been rescheduled for
Nov. 5 at the Orange
Bowl in Miami, Fla
at 2 p.m.
The game was
originally scheduled Miami-Notre Dame
to be played Sept. 24 on Sept. 24.
in Miami at 4 p.m. East Carolina and
The change was Miami both had open
mutually agreed upon dates on Nov. 5. The
between the two Pirates will open the
schools, following 1983 season on Sept. 3
CBS television's deci- against FSU in
sion to televise Tallahassee.
Lady Pirates Roll
Tug For A Cause
Sixty-four ai ea
teams are needed to
compete in the 1 ite
Beet rug-of-War tor
I aster Seals to be held
April 30th at the
North Carolina State
Fairgrounds. Groups
of 8-10 individuals
will join I ite Celebri-
Boog Powell in this
single elimination
i o u r n a m e n t ex-
travaganza to benefit
the handicapped
The purpose or the
eveni is to raise funds
� oi Easter Sea! service
programs for han-
apped children and
a d u 11 s in North
Carolina.
The event is spon-
I ite Beer and
i-sponsord b y
WRAI 101-FM. All
participants will
c e i v e specially
designed t-shirts, a
certificate for a free
taco from Taco Bell,
and refreshments
throughout the day.
Teams are formed
bv groups of friends
or business associates.
Participants must be
at least 18 years of
age. Teams will raise
the $100 entry fee by
obtaining a business
sponsor or by having
individual team
membes secure dona-
tions tow are the entry
fee. With or without a
business sponsor,
each team member is
encouraged to obtain
at least S10 in dona-
tions.
P r i e s will be
awarded in catagories
of both top fundrais-
ing and tug-of-war
competition. WRAI
Gi Ccmou'iaged Fangues andj
� , � , s �- � P " 9 Bags
Backpack, Campmq Equ.o
men' S'eii Toed Shoes D'ShesI
and Out '00 Diitff"1 Ne and
Used Hems Cowbo B
ARMY-NAVY
SOl i Evans
S'ree'
STORE
ABORTIONS
1 7i wee terminations
App ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
800 3210575
l ! A
101-FM will award
Panasonic AMFM
radios to each
member of the top
fund-raising team and
tote bags to the first
place team in the tug
competition. Trophies
will be awarded to
first, second, and
third place teams in
the tug competition.
The first round of
competition begins at
10:00 a.m Saturday,
April 30th. Teams are
encouraged to pre-
register by April 20th.
Entry forms are
available at the Easter
Seals Office at 3825
Barrett Drive,
Raleigh. To ensure a
spot for your team or
to obtain more infor-
mation, call Diana
Domby at 782-6376.
? �������-��?�'���
IEWE! r Pf
The Lady Pirates
rolled to an 8-1 vic-
tory over the Blue
Devils Saturday after-
noon, losing their on-
ly match in the
number one singles.
Duke's June
Alvendt downed Deb-
bie Christine in split
sets, preventing her
team from being shut
out.
In the number four
singles, Kim Harrison
was forced to split
sets. Besides Harrison
and Christine, the
Pirates lost only eight
other games the rese
of the day. ECU was
also awarded two
matches by default.
Saturday's Results:
June Alvendt (D)
defeated Debbie
Christine, 7-6, 1-6,
6-3; Kathenne Tolson
(ECU) defeated Lisa
Hench, 6-0, 6-0; Janet
Russell (ECU)
defeated Sue Jackson,
6-1, 6-1; Laura Red-
ford (ECU) defeated
Cynthia Pecena, 6-0.
6-0; Kim Harrison
(ECU) defeated
Jenifer Packer, 6-7,
6 2, 6-1; Lon Reep
(ECU)
default.
w on
by
In doubles:
Christine-Tolson
(ECU) defeated
Abrendt-Hench, 6-0,
7-5; Russell-Redford
(ECU) defeated
Pecena-Packer, 6-0,
6-1 and Harnson-
Reep (ECU) won by
default.
Indians Stop Bucs
j.jfc.tt fifutttiJ A-wua- ft�
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AII ork Done On Premises
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pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd
h
K
)
MS. 4PKIL 19, 00-1 00
25
All mMi fccovt i vws f�e M88 to el&o
ComeZafify.

Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Pirate Head Softball Coach Sue Manahan and Assistant Coach
Lynn Davidson discuss the progress of the 1 ad Pirates, who are
now 25-8.
Cont'd From Page 12
one hit in five innings,
as did reliever Buddy
Key.
Neither team scored
until the fourth inning
when the Indians
tallied on a single by
John O'Keefe and a
double by D.C.
Aiken.
ECU scored two
runs in the fifth to
take the lead but the
Indians scored a run
in their half of the in-
ning to tie the score at
2-2.
In the seventh, the
Pirates took a 4-2 lead
into the inning but
gave up a pair of
unearned runs to end
the game into extra in-
nings.
ECU wasted a
golden opportunity to
take the lead in the
tenth inning uhen
Hallow opened the in-
ning with a single and
took second on a wild
pitch.
But Hallow could
not advance any fur-
ther as the next three
Pirate batters struck
out.
The Indians scored
the winning run in the
bottom of the tenth
on Yolpfs two-out
sinele.
� ��
Sunday's con-
ference finale with
Richmond was once
again a case of the
Pirates jumping out
to a lead but not being
able to sustain it.
In the first inning.
KelK Robmette walk-
ed and scored on
Hallow's home run.
The Spiders put the
game away with two
runs in the seventh in-
ning with a single, a
walk and a two-run
double by Tubb
Pace.
The next couple of
weeks will be crucial
for the Pirates as the
seek to gain one of the
four conference
tournev berths.
On Tuesday night
at 7:30, the Pirates
will travel to Wilm-
ington to take on the
rival LNC-YA
Seahawks The
Seahawks will be ir.
Greenville for a return
matchup on Wednes-
day night. Gametime
is 00 p.m.
Items and Prices
Effective Wed. April 20 thru
Sat April 23 1983.
ADVERTSE0 ;TEM POLiC
cjore3 to t� 'eaOi'y aaaDie o'
ue n e�c "s-Dge' Sa on aiceo'
as jp�c ca'�y "Otod m th.aad II e
do fun oui of an .tern e ii om�t
you you' coce of a compaac e
�er" �h�n aa 'able 'enacting h�
sae sa fls cm a 'acec K :
m ent it �oo io purchase !��
acer' sec item at the adve't sec
prce li n 3C 3as
i.
Open Mon thru Sat 8am to Midnight
Sun 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd.

Greenville

COST CUTTER
70 LEAN
SOLD
IN A
Chub Lb
PAK
Total Price $4.90.
Coca-Cola
LUNCHEON MEAT
Armour Treet
12-Oz.
Can
FRESH CHEESE OR
Pepperoni
Pizza
2SCSO
For J SAVE
FRESH CRUSTY
f Hani Rolls
89
AEROSOL
HAIRSPRAY
Vuwitat Mrtk
$-149
3 a! � �
�imtt
cTFHo�SON
Strawberries
M38
fnl Miss Breck
� $413
m 9
Can
COST CUTTER IWS
IMITATION
12-Oz-
PKQ
12-Oz.
Pkg.
� - -j�
jp
f
Classified
FOR SALE
6CU STUDENTS UCult �tM
MtKOfflt tc at�r '�� markei at
me Pitt Co�fir� f'trovna
Blvtf Op" ���') S'v'a. nc
iunOav � til 1 Cra�H �oou tm
n.tur booi H Dne.i o�
old pos�c�r�s Dm"o�i '�u�
K 7SC KAMASAK �� i ��(
PncK 'o MM & o
QOOC CO��Ji'iW T" s s '
mo�orc�cl� M�� M ;��' C
� X SPECIAL II rtrrt" � :X
Good COrtO 'iO" A1"
B,HC NH 'C i W��� r o'
?r Call ?S2 4�3i
l�tJ CME�CwS,Crr�.tt
4.4 � �P�C S 2 -� rf � '
OOWS AM fv ������� � S
p B LOC� r "ulll f� -
pnerd �e it i �
-S2 4�15
:a albums of
CHOICE M oid �'a . x-
roc� cov �- "
T�fc� J ��'� c p. - s.
plylDKI! NC ati
CAB STEBEO CCVfE
and sp�fi
-tm C SE .E f :�
(OR SAlE f SHE!
SPEAKERS
IM Cai '�� �
FOB SAlE I
I SP�d Sr0� I � �
goufAi in Fall si E�
cef P"� HIS m best
C�H'5Jnc ��� 'v�9
I SPEED BiCTCwE M
internaoo :s ;� ;�
Eue'iK" iMt� a.fi�
ed M Car ' ��: - -
' C�" TS� JS -it'
�77 MGB ��� "
-SI Ui
: PANASCN ; TMKU1
jdw�t i�� p� '��"
� � ; "�: ��"
9 c� �"� jjs�
�ESVO�EBE� i� -
Mrqaif t �'��
i SALE i. I ��
S�l�5
FOB Si.E
9i-e�n S'M-
-S� "M3
EPR!GEB-CS ' -
3 CuoC hMH "
�S� M3
compac :e:
-si s�:
8EFmGEei�
i S cubic lad B? cand
�or S'SC C
�1 mONDA KL2SS � "� �
Ec cor� MM
�, �- S-iZ i
FOR SAE I
Grea' �or c:� 1
"SI �37J a�te' i z �
�?EPRIGERA-CS f -
On� ei
�fi- 5�'j �-� E�; I
S'SC C�" 'S� ;
DRESSER
STEREO a�C Sf
t�! Ipr vat G�ee
Can �� a �:
NEMOv'EEN S IE -
ED S20 As� "� s" -
: so s:x ca i $ea� 'Si-1
V A T E NJ i 11
" i t' S'f � I
pus F o� mor�
Men a' ?SI m
AtKEO
&K-ac- out
t . - ; - f ;
Synoect r�S
campus :
FEMitE
? �N'EOICI
R' o h aj
ip�s� N
Por IJI WMJ
stta


� �: ' s
�OOvm� E
Utf E I I
-
G . �
�-� V i
KR
-
-

- - i
-
PERSONAl
ADRs &-s ����
ail parties TV &e" :�
II 9�t us "ive'e I
shorts too�eo �ooc i- �� �
me �oud Nc � bm ��
semester Ou � r :�
ward to f Ni9Kt � �
another one N
PKTs
MDL � You re a 9
ma'e and end The
� ears have bee�-
sure �i't m.ss � ��� ��
Better .s � �� I ��' ��"� -
f�er�th,n9, .� � dO
ROOMMAlr
WANTED
FEMALE BOOM�
WANTED N s-J f
house Ne� home tm �
n StoAes rtt : sha'� - �
emaie roomma -
'eassmao-e -e- ;
pm Mon' a
weekends at :
PEMAlE rocmma-e ����
'c share nee en- -c oec �
townhouse � MaltjaMl -
�or me Sum me- ca rj-l
FEMALE - vv i'E
iaanted Ca r� :�:
: F E M A u E BOO��1
wanted lai a
Geor qeI I '
�"3 'S mo"h ACTSS " ��'
tram campus C "M�
ROOMVA-E VEECET
summe' BM o "
utiht.es Fa � "
a��.Ub4e Ca v
murmatior.
FEMALE -r.v �
ANTEC tr -i I
apt Ca �'� - x ��"�
ROOMMATE i"�- E D
sublease fil�
tna aHMm HJ-5HI
SEEDED FEMALE
-

- I
N
-
WOMEN S MEALW
CARE YOU CAN ajos"
DEPEND ON

- �-
SflTVTCES �
MOOha � ' -
Ph�- � ' �
rVX)t�Md � C�Vu m MM
Mec- core co - ' I
M
I

m w -f M





f
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 19. 1983
rates Roll
cs lost only eight
games the rese
da ECU was
awarded two
les b default.
day's Results:
c -Uendt (D)
iicd Debbie
line. 7-6. 1-6,
.athenne Tolson
I defeated Lisa
6-0, 6-0; Janet
(ECU)
ed Sue Jackson,
-l; 1 aura Red
ECU) defeated
iia Pecena, 6-0.
6-0; Kim Harrison
(ECU) defeated
Jenifer Packer, 6-7,
6-2, 6-1; Lori Reep
(ECU) won by
default.
In doubles:
Christine-Tolson
(ECU) defeated
Abrendt-Hench, 6-0,
7-5; Russell-Redford
(ECU) defeated
Pecena-Packer, 6-0,
6 1 and Harrison-
Reep (ECU) won by
default.
Stop Bucs
he lead in the
inning when
opened the in-
s ngle and
d on a wild
i could
Ivance an fur-
- the next three
- struck
- scored
in in the
the tenth
olpi's two-oul
� ��
c o n -
finale with
a.s once
tse of the
nping out
noi being
'am it.
' si inning.
nette walk-
scored on
Hallow's home run.
The Spiders put the
game away with two
runs in the seventh in-
ning with a single, a
walk and a two-run
double by Tubby
Pace.
The next couple of
weeks will be crucial
tor the Pirates as they
seek to gain one of the
four conference
tourne berths.
On Tuesday night
at 7:30, the Pirates
will travel to Wilm-
ington to take on the
nul UNC-W
Seahawks. The
Seahawks will be in
Greenville for a return
matchup on Wednes-
dav night. Gametime
is :00 p.m.
ADVERTISEO ITEM POLICY
( 'ese adveMsed items is re
ec to te reacj'iy available tor
sa-e n sac Kroger Sav on except
as spec 'icaiiy noted m this ad it we
do run out o' an item we will otter
you your choice of a comparable
tem hen a�aiabie reflecting the
sae 9airgs o a ranchec which
e�t tie yOo to purchase the
idveM'sed ite at the advertised
e within 30 days
V
P"ESH CHEESE OR
PePperon
Pizza
2 s 15 so
ijT save
�"J08
FRSH CflUSTY
) Kaiser
p Hard r0hs
6
For
89
rw

U
�?.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, stall:
Welcome to our flea market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd Open every Saturday and
Sunday I til 5 CralH. tools, lur-
mture, books, etc. Displays ol
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' items.
Real bargainsII
K: 7S0 KAWASAKI. IfSI. SI.400
Priced to sell. Great bargain.
Good condition. This is a real
motorcycle Make an oiler. Call
75244JS.
tso SPECIAL II Yamaha Si.200
Good condition An excellent
Bike Need to sell. Make an of
?er Call 7S2 443J.
l�8I CHEVY Custom Deluxe 10,
tx4 speed, sliding rear win-
dows AMFM, cassette. PS
PB Lock in hubs. Rally wheels.
Priced to sell. S10.SO0. Call
�5: 4935.
. ALBUMS OF YOUR
CHOICE, newold hard to por,
rock coun. iaii, clas. only S70.00
Tike 1 years to pay in � easy
payments No dealers please.
Call today 7S8 0207 ask for JAY.
CAR STEREO COMPLETE
with am fm receiver, equalizer
and speakers. 30 watts and like
new Call STEVE at 7S4-4045.
FOR SALE: FISHER S30
SPEAKERS Will sell cheap.
$;� Call 7S-t�77.
FOR SALE: Burgundy 77-inch
10 speed Shogun bike. Just
pougnt in Feb Toe clips. Ex-
cellent price $125 or best offer.
Call 752-049 and leave message.
10 SPEED BICYCLE: Windsor
international S12S or best offer.
Enceiient shape, have barely us-
ed it Can't afford to move with
it Call '52 0854 Jennifer.
177 MGB Asking tlOOO Call
'52 ms
; PANASONIC THRUSTERS. 2
advents. 2 Sony speakers, new,
must sell Call 7S2 2340. ask for
� and Judy
KENMORE REFRIGERATOR:
' 2 years old 2 5 cubic feet.
Available May 1. 5125 Great
Bargain, call 7 5? 8005
4 SALE 12 Blazer cheap
'58 885
FOR SALE 13 cubic foot
whirlpool refrigerator Avacado
green. 5 feet tall Best offer. Call
'58 1303
REFRIGE�ATOR FOR SALE:
I cubic toot Whirlpool Avacado
9reen. 5 ft tall Best offer Call
758 1303.
COMPACT OED, best Offer,
'58 5202.
REFRIGERATOR 1 year old,
5 5 cubic feet Beautiful condi
tion $150 Call 752 9449
'8 HONDA XL2S0 �� helmet
Exc cond 500 3 cycle trailer
with straps 512$. 757 1233.
FOR SALE 5 cubic ft refng
Great for dorm, $125 Call
'58 9372 after 6 p.m.
REFRIGERATOR FOR SALE
One year olds 5 cubic toot
relrigeratorfreeier. Exc cond
5'SO call 7S4-9279.
ORESSER. COMPACT
STEREO, and queen sue sofa
bed for sale Good condition
Call Kirk at 7S�-70f.
SEW QUEEN SIZE WATERB
ED $700 Also new Shogun 25 in
12 sp. $700. Call Scott, 7SB 7119.
PERSONAL
ADP's: Girls, it was the party of
all parties The beer and liquor,
' got us there quicker Your
shorts looked good as we knew
they would. No time left this
semester, but we're looking for
ward to P Night It will be
another one to remember.
PKTs.
MDL � You re a great room
mate and friend The past 7
� ears have been a lot of fun. I
sure will miss ya next year. You
better visit me a lot. Thanx 4
everything Luv ya! GG.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
MATE to share 2 bedroom
trailer one mile from ECU cam-
pus. For more in forma tin, call
Helen at 7SMII1 after 4:34.
WANTED: WOMAN to star
2 bedroom duplex May July 31.
Furnished, grand piano,
sundeck Less than 1 mile from
campsis. SUsmonth. m-1077.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share two bedroom
townhouse at Tar River Estate.
Rent plus deposit $iso and hall
expenses Nonsmoker, please.
Rhone 7SWW.
WANTED? WE NEED ONE
female to share our townhouse
one block from campus. $90 per
month plus one-third utilities.
Available May-summer or fall if
"�oded. Please call 7S�-Se�7.
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
SUMMER : 3BDR Apartment in
Wilson Acres. lJ rent and
utilties. Call 752 3201
ROOMMATE NEEDED
RIVERBLUFF Apartments.
Total, rent and utilities.
$130 person Call Jeff Mitchell
at 757-0443. Call in mornings or
4-7.
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
SHARE turn 7BRD. townhouse
May Aug. V4 month plus 13
utilities. Call 758 7138
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, experience, quality
work, IBM Selectric typewriter.
Call Lanie Shive 7 58 530i or
GAIL JOYNER 7S4 1042
TYPING: Term papers, thesis,
etc Call Kempie Dunn. 752-4733.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER-
VICE: Complete audio repair
call after t p.m. Mark 752 1294.
MOVING? No job too large or
small! Reasonable rates, call
7519533.
TYPING� U years experience I
Call 355 4974 after 5:30 p.m.
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy
355 4748 after 5:00. 10 years ex
penence IBM type. Spelling,
grammar errors checked.
10 YEARS TYPING:
Reasonable rates, spelling,
punctuation and grammar cor-
rections, proofreading. Call
CINDY 4 a.m. p.m at 355 2444
TYPING AND GRAPHICS-
RUSH JOBS Portfolio and
references. Call S. Hamilton
7516917 or L. Piantadosia,
754-041
WANTED
WANTING TO BUY: DOUBLE
BED Call 754 S444
MARRIED COUPLE NEEDS 1
or 2 bedroom apartment from
May 20 to Aug. 20. Have own fur
niture Desire apartment with
pool privileges. Ask for Dalton
from 5 8 p.m. at 757-1944.
WANTED MUSICIAN tor Bap
tist Church. Call 522 3078 after
4 00.
MISC.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 3 bedroom
house New home fully furnished
m Stokes area. To share with
female roommate and owner �
reasonable rent Call after 5:30
o m Mon-Fri. anytime
weekends ph. 7S2-124.
PEMALE ROOMMATE needed
share excellent two bedroom
townhouse at Wedgewood Arms
tor the Summer. Call 754-4707
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Call 757 7347.
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted for summer, for fall.
Georgetown Apts
S73 75month. Across street
trom campus. Call 7S4-4�:
ROOMMATE NEEDED for
summer: $90 per month plus 13
utities Fully furnished. Pool
available Call 754-3711 for more
information.
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED to share two-bedroom
apt Call after 5:00 7;30-
ROOMMATE WANTED TO
sublease Eastorook apt. 13 rent
and utilities. Call 7S2-H40.
NEEDED: FEMALE ROOM
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALLII
Reasonable rates Call 754 9533.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
WANTED to sublease one
bedroom apartment at Tar
River Estates this summer. Apt.
is beside large swimming pool,
has patio and is located 5
minutes from campus. Call
754-4474 tor more information
LOOKING FOR AN APART-
MENT?? We're graduating this
semester and need someone to
take our lease in May.
2 bedroom townhouse with new
carpet, located at River Bluff
behind Papa Katz For more in
formation, call 754 3444 and ask
for Steele or Kevin.
APARTMENT to sublease for
summer at Cannon Court. Bus
route to ECU. If interested, call
7S7-14I
APARTMENT FOR
SUBLEASE: 1 BDRM. APT. ful-
ly furnished and equipped. Air
cond. paid for with rent.
7S2
APARTMENT FOR RENT:
2 bedroom River Bluff Poolside j
5245 month 7 58 4842
TAKE OVER LEASE BEGINN-
ING MAY. 1 bedroom. 1 131
blocks from campus. Energy ef-
ficient. Handicapped features.
For more into, call 754-9353.
APT FOR RENT both summer I
sessions. lOe-B Eastbrook
1125 month Fully furnished.
MALE 754-5144.
FURNISHED 3-BEDROOM
APT. TO SUBLET: May
August. For more info, call
3SS-67t3.
FOR RENT: EFFICIENCY
garage Apt. 3 blocks from ECU.
Occupancy Aug. 1. Deposit and I
lease. $135 plus utilities. Call
7$2J2M.
EMPLOYMENT
NATIONAL FIRM interviews I
for summer jobs. S310 wkly.
Hard workers only Tue, Wed,
Thurs, Apr. 19-31, 4-7 Brewster
D-30S.
GEMINI SHIRTS. INC. Rocky I
Mount, N.C has summer jobs
available for interested
students. Jobs consist of travel-
ing to national motorcycle races
and working in souvenier con-
cession stand. Good pay. Con-
tact Eric Kavit at 1-444-4947.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN tmemottadmexfioeef
DEPEND ON. sion that's made e'isier by
� e wor" er o the Meming Center Counselors are
jvaiiaoie day and night to support and under
stana you Your sateh. comfort and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1st & 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
i B Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Earry
Pregnancy Tests � AH incisive Fees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
Health care counseling jg FLEMING
and education for wo
menof
$145 00 Pregjnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counsehng. For
further information call
432-0535 (Toll Free Number
40-321 7$44) between A.M
and S P.M. Weekdays.
R ALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
f 1? Wost M�rtn ft.
RaleU
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Saturday, April 23,1983
USB C.OieO B�f R4444
��!� (SlUoe FREE) 10 M Lb. A�. .
Bottom Rounds u, M58
$toVft
8r f7j8T)
(CiHWCtJ
USDA Cboiea Btaf Round - Whole
10-12 Lb. Average
(Sliced FREE)
Lb.
Holly Farm - Grade A Chicken
Drumsticks
Or Thighs
USDA
CHOICE
Lb.
USDA Clioiet - Boot Roatd BoHom
Round
Ql Bi I s
Roast
Lb.
Holly Firms - Ortae A
Chicken
Breasts
2 Liter
I.S Liter - Hty. B4r�.�.y Baraiaay Rbie
Ckiklli BUat, Flak Chiklii, Rii R�t�
Gallo
Wine
fk�. oft -11 Ox. etat
Miller
1.S Litar - Raa. Piak. Gala1. Wkitt Ckibiii
Taylor Lake
Country
6.5 0zLt.ekaakTaaa.leOil
22 Ounce
YJfJtK'
Quart
�ky Fay '1.09
Duke's
Mayonnaise
F
Wky Fay M.3S
Wm�jv
99 59
4 Faek -1 Fly
Del Monte Catsup Page Toilet Tissue
489
4.5 Oz. - Liver Kioto Natrtf $��� - Cat F��
S Lk. - Criakit Cat
Purina 100 Cga Interstate Potatoes
14 0i. Caa � Aitorteej
1 Lk. - Feee Te�e
10 Oaaaa
AlpO Dog Food ip Margarine Quarters I Jeno's Pizza
13 Oz. Ba- � Flan.
Folger's Coffee

Juice
IWHrTEHouff
APPtE
JUKE
Why Pay '1 69
119 Sb��fs 2 Piy
So-Dri
Towels
WKyPa, 59
SODRI
SO-DRI
0DR!
ffwry
-





i

16 THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 19, 1983
ECU
DINING
SERVICE
WANTS YOU
to attend the intra Squad
PURPLE AND GOLD
FOOTBALL GAME
on
- Saturday�April 23rd
BUTFIRST:
Have your pregame meal
on Purple and Gold Night
in College Hill Dining Hall
Ribeye Steak
Baked Potato and Sour Cream
Broccoli Spears with
Cheese Sauce
Dinner: 4:30 -6:30pm
Whole Baby Carrots
Salad Bar
Desserts
Beverages
Game Time: 7:00pm
We are within walking distance ofFicklin Stadium
price only $3,75 person
(lower with discount coupon)
Save 75' College Hill Dining Hall valid 4-225-4
Discount Coupon
off any Meal �
I Good 4-225-4 Save 75'
Ribeye Steak 18oz. Serving per person "All you can
eat" available on second entree plus vegetables,
salad bar, beverages and deserts.
Meal Plans Welcomed
ES
BBS
I





Title
The East Carolinian, April 19, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 19, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.265
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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