The East Carolinian, April 14, 1983






�he lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 Notf
Thursday, April 14,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
ECU May Get Student-Run Research Group
By DARRYL BROWN
tviiMini Nn� t fin
ECU may become the first
public university in North
Carolina to host a Public Interest
Research Group � a student-run,
student-funded organization that
works on public policy issues of
interest to students and the com-
munity.
PIRGs are concerned with a
wide range of issues including
consumer protection, en-
vironmental preservation,
political reform, energy policy
and social justice. They have been
responsible for the passage of
laws in many states and often
publish surveys and reports on
regional, state and national issues.
PIRGs, started by consumer
advocate Ralph Nader in 1970,
are non-partisan groups currently
active in 25 states, Canada and
Australia. Nader, who lectured at
ECU last month, found enough
interest and support among the
administration and students for a
PIRG on campus to send a
representative from his
Washington office to ECU to help
start a local branch of the
organization.
Jason Adkins, who works for
Nader in Washington, will be at
ECU through Tuesday
distributing pamphlets, showing
films and answering questions in a
effort to inform students about
PIRGs. Ruffin Slater, from the
PIRG at Duke University in
Durham, will also be available to
talk on activities in North
Carolina.
A film followed by a lecture-
discussion, which will explain the
objectives of Public Interest
Research Groups and how
students can start a local chapter
and become involved, will be
shown today at 4 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center room
221.
PIRGs are controlled by a stu-
dent board of directors who
oversee all of the organization's
activities and who hire a profes-
sional staff to run the organiza-
tion and maintain programs when
students are on vacation or leave
school.
PIRGs are funded through stu-
dent activity fees. The student
body of a university must pass a
referendum adding three to six
dollars to annual student fees to
finance the organization.
Student class projects and
school research activities are often
tied into PIRG programs. North
Carolina schools that presently
have PIRGs include Duke Univer-
sity, Elon, Guilford and Davidson
colleges.
A table will be set up in front of
the Student Supply Store with
more information on PIRGs and
signs will announce additional lec-
tures and films throughout the
weekend.
Dorm Receives $250 Prize
Slay Wins Energy Contest
Domino's Delivers
Tony Ereddia (far left), the owner of nine Domino's Pizza restaurants in North Carolina and Georgia, and
Claude Jones (next to Ereddia), an ECU graduate and general manager for Domino's, visited Chancellor
Howell's office Wednesday to present him with a $22,500 check for the ECU's athletic drive.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wrttn
Slay Residence Hall is the win-
ner in the 1983 Student Residence
Association Energy Contest. Dur-
ing a 10-week period, Slay
residents worked together to save
a cumulative average of 19.19 per-
cent in their expected energy
usage. They saved a total of
11,021 kilowatts, which amounted
to a $531.19 energy cost reduc-
tion.
Clement Residence Hall, with a
average of 17.08 percent, was se-
cond and Scott dorm took third
place with an average saving of
13.5 percent.
Heckling College Speakers Denounced
(CPS) � Worried that students
are using "the hecklers' veto" to
suppress free speech on campuses,
five college associates have issued
a joint denunciation of student
behavior that recently stopped
United Nations Ambassador
Jeane Kirkpatrick and Saudi Ara-
bian Oil Minister Sheikh Ahmed
Zaki Yamani from completing
campus lectures.
In their statement, the five
groups also noted the rude
behavior that former Black Pan-
ther Eldridge Cleaver has met on
campus travels over the last year
for the Rev. Sun Myung Moon's
Collegiate Association for the
Research of Principles.
"The 'hiss and boo when they
go beyond brief expressions of op-
position and become instruments
to silence those with whom one
disagrees, are inappropriate the
statement read.
The statement, signed by the
American Council on Education,
the National Coalition of In-
dependent Colleges and Universi-
ty Students (known as COPJS,
the U.S. Student Association, the
National Organization of Black
University and College Students
and the American Association of
University Professors (AAUP),
called on schools and students to
take steps to assure speakers get to
speak.
"It is a very dangerous situa-
tion says Dr. Alfred Sumberg
of the AAUP, when freedom of
speech is denied for any reason.
"We will always have dif-
ferences of opinions and ideas on
campuses, and 1 think that's
great says Sara Thurin,
COPUS's president. "But the
goal of the statement is to make it
clear we don't support a hecklers'
veto
There were a rash of such
'�vetoes" in March as
Kirkpatrick, Yamani and Cleaver
were all foiled in attempts to
deliver speeches.
Kirkpatrick made it through a
troubled March 2 talk at the
University of Minnesota, but later
in the month was prevented from
speaking by some 800 Berkeley
demonstrators against the Reagan
administration's policies in El
Salvador.
Yamani never got to deliver a
March 28 speech at Kansas State
because of heckling from the rear
of the auditorium he was speaking
in. Police eventually arrested five
people after KSU President
Duana Acker failed to persuade
the hecklers to quiet down.
Wisconsin students on March
18 forced Cleaver to stop a speech
on that campus for the second
time this school year.
Cleaver has long been victimiz-
ed by campus hecklers. In
February, 1982, Yale students
booed him off their stage. Last
May one Berkeley student threw a
punch at him while hecklers
repeatedly interrupted the former
radical as he attempted to deliver
his address.
"It has always happened says
American Council on Education
spokesman Bob Aaron. "We said
the same thing (about letting peo-
ple speak) at the time of the Viet-
nam war
"I don't think it's rampant
now Thurin says. "But it is
something that could grow
Some don't see much there to
grow. "I haven't found (heckling)
to be a problem says Carol
Bruckner of the William Morris
Agency in New York, which
books many campus lecture tours.
Slay received $250 in prize
money for their victory. Second
place won $200 and third received
$150.
According to SRA energy con-
test chairman Mark Niewald, five
other residence halls received a
$100 bonus for saving a total of
five percent or more during the
contest. Tyler, Fletcher, Garret,
Umstead and White residence
halls rounded out the top eight
finishers. All saved five percent or
more.
Niewald said he was very proud
of all the residence hall students
for the tremendous efforts. "We
saved $6,247.73 of residents'
money Niewald said. He added
that this money could be used for
"improvements" in the residence
halls.
Denise Gibson, energy officer
for Slay, received the SRA's
outstanding energy officer award
for her efforts at publicizing and
directing the Slay effort. "I think
it's great Gibson said.
"Everybody pitched in and
helped, and we did it
Slay is a co-ed residence hall.
Niewald also lives at Slay and
helped Gibson promote the con-
test.
Gibson said she posted signs to
remind Slay residents to save
energy. "I put up signs
everywhere she said.
Gibson also said she gave
residents energy-saving tips such
as encouraging them to watch
television in groups and to shut
off unnecessary lights. She kept
hall residents informed on a week-
ly basis of Slay's standing in the
contest.
During the Easter weekend.
Slay residents held a "black-out
party" at which everyone shut off
all lights and unplugged electrical
appliances. Residents who left for
the weekend were asked in ad-
vance to disconnect unneeded ap-
pliances.
The party was held in the lobbv
of thehaJU. "Weturned out ait the
lights, ate popcorn and watched
TV Gibson said.
Niewald Elected SRA
President In Run-Off
Blake, Shondell To Debate El Salvador
Two Greenville school teachers
have arranged for a debate on El
Salvador and the impact of U.S.
policy there between Assistant to
the Chancellor Charles R. Blake
and ECU Catholic campus
minister Sister Helen Shondell.
Blake is veteran of both the
Korean and Vietnam wars and a
former policy advisor to the
Secretary of the Air Force.
Shondell, a Catholic nun, has
been an outspoken critic of U.S.
policy in Latin America.
Frank O'Neal and Ron
Hochmuth, history teachers at
C.B. Aycock Junior High School,
both invited Blake and Shondell
to conduct the debate before four
8th and 9th grade classes Friday.
"I feel like it's the school's
responsibility to present a balanc-
ed prospective and let the student
make the choice O'Neal said.
"We wanted the students to sec
that the United States is a prisoner
of its past O'Neal said, "We
still have a lot of history to over-
come O'Neal added in a
reference to what he termed
"questionable" decisions in past
U.S. Foreign policy.
"I'm trying to present both
sides O'Neal said adding that he
saw his role in the debate as a
"devil's advocate
Blake, who has spoke on
foreign affairs before at Aycock,
had offered to debate either side
of the issue. He added that he
wasn't planning to be a hawk, but
instead would present a more
moderate opinion that premised
on the preservation of the Monroe
Doctrine. "There are merits on
both sides of the issue Blake
said. He added that his hope was
that students, after hearing the
presentation, would have "greater
insights into the complexities of
international relations
Blake's daughter attends school
at Aycock.
Shondell, who is the local con-
tact for the Carolina Interfaith
Task Force on Central America,
an inter-denominational religious
organization opposed to some
U.S. policies in Central America,
said she hopes the debate will en-
courage students to become better
informed on critical issues.
"I hope they (students) will be
able to more critically evaluate
what our government is doing in
Central America Shondell said.
She claims that U.S. military aid
to El Salvador is being used for
the wrong purposes. Blake in-
dicated that he disagreed with
some things going on in El
Salvador, but he saw no correla-
tion between U.S. policy there
and Soviet policy in Poland or
Afghanistan.
"We really don't move in with
tanks and a strong arm (like the
Soviets)" Blake added.
Mark Niewald won the run-off
election for Student Residence
Association president Tuesday,
defeating Danny White by a vote
of 384 to 310. The run-off was
called by Niewald after last week's
regular SRA elections for ex-
ecutive officers, in which White
outdistanced Niewald 331 to 329.
According to SRA rules, a run-
off can be demanded if the margin
of victory is less than two percent.
Both candidates won their own
residence halls by a large margin.
White taking Umstead and
Niewald winning in Slay. Elec-
tions committee chairman Ed
Dougherty said heavy campaign-
ing in the hard-fought race still
yielded a poor student turn-out at
the polls, with only about 700 out
of 5000 resident students casting
ballots.
Niewald was sworn into office
Wednesday night along with other
new SRA officers at the organiza-
tion's annual banquet at the Holi-
day Inn.
"We're going to try to be an ex-
it
Mark Niewald
elected StLA President
pansionist administration
Niewald said. He said he wants to
improve communication between
dorms and make students aware
of the purpose of the SRA, and
what it can do for them and the
community. He said he wants
students to feel he and the SRA
are always available.
'Men Of ECU' Unpopular, Unsold
The men of ECU are still lying
in boxes waiting to be bought �
that is the "Men of ECU" calen-
dars. Because of production pro-
blems that delayed the arrival of
the 14-month calendar, only 500
of a total order of 5,500 have been
sold.
ECU Buccaneer Editor Lisa
Coleman, who coordinated the
production of the calendar, said
former ECU art student Mitch
Perkins took more time than ex-
pected to Finish the calendar.
Perkins was hired last fall by
the Buccaneer to photograph the
models and layout the calendar.
He was paid $50 per-month over a
four-month period to complete
the job. "Perkins had, to take
more time to get the quality he
wanted Coleman said. "If it
(the calendar) had just been
thrown together, it wouldn't have
sold.
Because of the delay, the Men
of ECU calendars weren't
delivered until the end of January
� a difficult time to sell calen-
dars.
Coleman also said that she
didn't have enough funds in her
budget to advertise the calendar to
maximize sales. "We advertised
the calendar three or four times in
The East Carolinian Coleman
said. "I don't have the money in
my budget to put another ad in
The East Carolinian
Coleman plans to sell the calen-
dars at booths set up in the lobbies
of women's residence halls before
exams begin. She also plans to sell
them during next Thursday's
Barefoot on the Mall program.
The Buccaneer held a contest in
November to choose the 17 men
whose pictures appear on the
calendar. "We had 80 to 90 guys,
and in two nights of judging, we
narrowed the field to 17 Col-
eman said. She added that the ap-
plicants were chosen by a female
panel.
Coleman claims that the calen-
dar baa received praise from the
art community for its high quali-
ty. Perkins has told Coleman that
a New York firm has shown in-
Rockin' For Charity
Fraternities oa
a rock-a-taoa for the
teresVin marketing Vhe calendar Supply Store Wedaeaday. The Alpha Sifs spoaeor the
?
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14. 1983

Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed m the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms art
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd siied paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column tor
publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
tor the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesdayy for the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to ail
campus organizations and
departments
SOCIAL WORK
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications are now being ac
cepfed tor the David B and
Wiila H Stevens Scholarship for
undergraduates enrolled in the
D'VSion of Social Work The
$500 00 Scholarship will be
awarded tor the fall semester of
183 The recipient will be
selected on the basis of
Kadem.c excellence financial
need good citizenship, and
dedication to the Social Work
and or Criminal Justice profes
sons Applications are available
and should be returned to) in
the Division of Social Work,
room 314 Allied Health building
Deadline April 20 1983 For
more information call 757 6961
Ex! 219
OUR TOWN IS FREE
Sign up to usher and see
ECU s Playhouse production of
Our Town (Thurs 14th
through 19th) Free! You may
S'gn up to usher for ma'inee per
? ormances on Friday 15th or
Tuesoay 19th stop by Drama
Depf office for more informa
fion Everyone welcome!
MUSICALE
Sigma Alpha iota presents its
aiLai composers Musicaie on
i'�a� April 19 at 7 30 p.m. in
� ft J Fetcher Recital Hall
The program will consist of
A.rxs compossed by ECU
s'uden's and alumni Selections
to be pierformed .nciude eloc
fronic vocal and instrumental
compos'ions
ECU POM PON
SOUADTRYOUTS
The ECU Pom Pon squad will
begin tryoufs on the 23rd Of
April Actual auditions on the
24th Mus' be present at both
days o practice to audition
Mee'Sa'urday at 10 a m .n Flet-
cher V jsic Building lobby ready
to practice
r
HEY BUD, LETS
PARTY! I
The Last Big Bash is
here, the second annual
BAHAMA MAMA PARTY Spon
sored by Budweiser and
Hawaiian Tropic. The Party is
on Monday, April 75 (the day
before reading day) at the Kap
pa Sigma House and begins at
3:00 pm ! Tickets art on safe
right now for S3.00 and entitle
YOU to see the MISS
HAWAIIAN TROPIC BIKINI
CONTEST, a Hawaiian Tropic
viser. a Budweiser mug, and
best of all an afternoon of
listening to the SUPER GRIT
BAND while enjoying 30 KEGS
OF BEER The winner of the
bikini contest wins an all-
exense paid trip to DAYTONA
BEACH to compete in the na-
tional competition, a chance to
win a PORSCHE, and be launch
ed on a modeling career! So,
girls it may be worth while to
enter (if interested call RANDY
EVANS at 752-8125). Ticket
sales are limited so purchase
your tickets NOW in front of the
student store! For more infor
mation call 752 5543
ECU BAHAI CLUB
The Bahai Club of ECU will
have its final meeting of this
semester Tuesday April 19 in 241
Mendenhail from 11 until noon
Bahai's believe that human be
ings have been created to know
and to worship God, the
Almighty and the Loving and the
Provider of all mankind.
Baha'u'liah (the prophet
founder of the Bahai faith)
teaches that God is the ever
forgiving and the Most Compas
sionate
BEST BODY CONTEST
Come help iudge the
KNOCKOUT ! on April 22, 1983 at
8 00 pm in Memorial Gym After
the contest, there will be a disco
lasting until 7 00 am Advance
tickets will be sold for S2 00. Ad
mission at the door is also $2.00
STUDENTS FOR
CHRIST
Let's get back to the Bible! In
formal group Bible discussions:
Mens 110 Belk, 7 30 PM Tues
day Womens 212 Mendenhail,
7 30 PM Thursday Everyone is
welcome!
SGA TRANSIT
MANAGER
Anyone interested in applying
for SGA Transit manager for the
1983 84 school year may do so in
228 Mendenhail Student Center.
Please come by before Monday,
April 18th. at 5 00 p.m.
SAB.MEETING
There will be a meeting of the
Student Athletic Board tonight
at 7 00 All members are asked
to attend
YHDL
the Young Home Designer's
League meets Tuesday the 19th
at 5.30 at the Plain Jane's
Restaurant.
ALPHA OMICRON PI
BIG BROTHERS
The Big Brothers of Alpha
Omicron Pi will have a meeting
on Tuesday, April 19 at 4 30 p.m.
All Big Brothers are encouraged
to attend this meeting. The Big
Brother Banquet will be held on
Monday. April 25.
INDTSTUDENTS
The INDT Club is holding a
Spaghetti and Beer Supper on
Thursday April 21, at 6:00 pm. It
will be held at the Tar River Apt.
Clubhouse. Students interested
in attending should see any IN-
DT. Club member for tickets.
You must purchase your tickets
by 4:00 pm on April 20.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
LECTURE SERIES
The East Carolina University
Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures loins
with the Sigma Upsilon Chapter
of Phi Sigma lota in announcing
the second lecture in their series
of lectures for 1982 83
Professor Nancy Mayberry
will read a paper, "The Doctrine
of the Immaculate Conception in
European Art and Literature
from the Middle Ages to the
Baroque on 9 April 19U. to
begin at 730 p.m. in the Coffee
House of Mendenhail student
Center A reception will follow
FRISBEECLUB
Get into Ultimate Frisbee!
The I rates play every Tues. and
Thurs, 4:00, at the bottom of col-
lege hill, we'll teach you to play
throw, catch etc The weather is
great see you this weekend at
Nags Head for the I rates end of
the year BASH Be there or
don't.
FANTASY
Fantasy an evening of sign
and song Thursday. April 14,
1983, 730 pm Place: Wright
auditorium, ECU Campus. Free
to ECU students and the general
public Fantasy is a group of
hearing and hearing impaired
students who interpret popular
music in sign language tome on
out tor an enjoyable evening.
SCUBA DIVING
TRAVEL
ADVENTURE
Scuba Diving Travel Adven
ture's Dive Cozumel, Mexico on
the beautiful Yucatan peninsula.
Aug 3. 19S3 to Aug. 10, 1983
Group trip for certified divers,
two boat dives daily and
unlimited shore diving, meals,
lodging and air fare from
Raleigh Non-divers welcome
Call Ray Scharf at 757 4441.
NO JOB, NOW WHAT?
On April 19 at 3:00 p.m. in
Mendenhail 221, the Career
Planning and Placement Ser
vice has invited the Personnel
Manager of a major bank to talk
on his perceptions of the job
market for college graduates.
Other job search considerations
will also be discussed.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
ECU Law Society final
meeting. Election of new of
fleers. Thursday. April 21st,
Mendenhail, Room 244 at 7 30
p.m.
BUCCANEER BABES
interested in finding out about
the Buccaneer Babes? There's a
meeting April 14 at 7:00 in
Schales Fleldhouse (behing
Fickieni All members and in-
terested persons art asked to at-
tend.
PUT A LITTLE HEART
IN YOUR SOUL
The twelfth annual Walk for
Humanity is coming up soon.
The walk will take place on April
H beginning at Green Springs
park at 1:30 a.m. Anyone in-
terested in helping come to the
Hunger Coalition meetings on
Thursday nights at 7:00 p.m. at
the Newman Center, 953 East
Tenth Street, or call 752-42H.
ALL ORGANIZATIONS
To all organizations wishing to
be represented in the 1982 S3
yearbook please contact Tam-
my Edwards at the Buccaneer
office as soon as possible. The
number is 757 4501
SPECIALOLYMPICS
The GreenvillePitt County
Special Olympics Spring Games
will take place on Thursday,
April 14 at the East Carolina
Track (bunting Field) from:30
am to 2:00 pm. volunteers art
needed to serve as "Buddies"
and "Huggers If interested
please attend a volunteers
meeting on Tuesday, April 12 at
the ECU track at 3:00 pm or in
Minges coliseum, Room 134 In
case of rain, if unable to attend
volunteer meeting call 752-4137
ext. 201 days or after 5:00 pm
call 752-1272 Or 751 TtOS
PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
All stdudents who plan to
declare physical education as a
major during the spring
semester or who intend to stu-
dent teach during the spring
semester should report to
Minges coliseum at 10:00 am on
Thursday, April 24, 1983 for a
motor and physical fitness test.
Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a prere
quislte for official admittance to
the physical education malor
program More detailed infor-
mation covering the test is
available by calling 757 4442
MARCHING PIRATES
Drum Major tryouts are on
Monday, April 1 at 4:00 p.m. in
the band room All members
from this past fail are eligible to
vote.
f 1�-
CLAssiimi ais ! .
tou may um me torm at nfjm or j ���� ' uee � separate thee of paper if t . Zm�
you nee literatim. There ere 33 T"�' onltt per tin. Etc lottor. pumv i �. .�� ��0. �
tuetkm mark and wortf space j counts as on unit. Capitalize and j Hyphenatewords properly. Loavo space at and of Una if word ooesnt fit. No ads will be ac cepted over the phono. We reserve the riohf to reect any ad. All ads most ae prepaid. Enclose j ?5� per line cr fraction of a kac. Please print legibly! Use capital end lower case tetters. ������ THE EAST CAROLINIAN 1 office �i J t Toeaeay eefort 1








p�
1Ii
High School
ECU On 'Sc
CERAMICS
ECU Ceramics Guild Spring
sale Thursday, April 21, 1��3 on
ly 9:00 am 4:00 pm on the ter
race beside the gallery at
Jenkins Fine Arts Building
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
On Tuesday, April 19th The
Boy Scouts of America will be
holding its annual Gold Rush at
the Unviersity in Which 300 hart
dicapped boys will participate.
The Carnival-type event is
scheduled for 1:30 to Approx
imately 11:00 am. Those in-
terested in assisting in this wor-
thwhile experience should con
tact Dr. Dave Porretta, Minges
Colesium 757 4441
TAXEST
WE'VE HAD ENOUGH
Are you sick of paying faxes?
Well did you know that 44 per
cent opf your federal tax dollar
goes directly for the support of
the military budget and poast
war bills? We might as well
make our checks directly
payable to the Pentagon! If
you've had enough, then join
other ECU students and Green-
ville residents for a demonstr a
tlon. It will be held at the inter
nal Revenue Service office in
Greenville on Tax Day April 15
The theme of the demonstration
is tentlvely set to be "Taxation
without Representation Be at
the IRS office on 1st street at
noon. "Money for jobs Not for
War For further information
call 751 4904.
CADP
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol Drug Program
April 14 at Mendenhail Student
Center at 4:15. Maps for the par
ty will be given out
NCSL
Attention, all members! The
final-yes, the FINAL meeting of
NCSL for this semester is com
ing Monday night at 7 p.m All
members must attend we need
to get our summer plans
straight and find out how to get
in touch with you! Whatever you
do, please make sure you attend
this meeting-Mood ay night, 7
p.m In room 212, Mendenhail.
Be there or else
INTER VARSITY
I know all of you are here at
college getting all the education
you will need for the future,
right? Well, let me ask you what
you art doing about your Chris
tian education. You need to grow
in that area also, come to inter
Varsity on Wednesday nites at
4:30 in Biology N102 and learn
how to prepare for you big
finals.
AMA DINNER
BANQUET
The American Marketing
Association's annual dinner ban
quet will be held Thursday.
April 14 at 4 00 pm at Western
Siiilin Steak House on Tenth
Street The guest speaker will be
josh Rogers, owner of PTA Piz
za, who is a graduate of ECU
Elections will be held for next
years officers All members are
urged to attend
BEST LEGS
Congratulations �o Todd
Engles. winner of the first an
nual Alpha Omicron Ps Best
Legs contest AH participants
may come by trie AOPi house
anytime to pick up your prize
PRIME TIME
Thursday night in 101 Nursing
Building at 7 00 p m Sponsored
by Campus Crusade for Christ
Everyone is invited to come
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
The fine! �?�- y �f
Philosophy Ciub wif be hex; or
Monday April l�
Mendenhaii 247 at 4 00 c � ri�
ciub will elect officers v -
�3 14 term All member -
trestec n oerg �- �. t,f
urgeo to attend Ttte iKesc
t-on following me elector-� t�
on D M Arms'rong 1 baHej
Truth eno Know'eoge a
'er-ested please attend
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
since 1925
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday during the sum
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for
and by the students of East
Carolina University
Subscription Rate: S20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU, Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The East
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Building, ECU Greenville,
NC 27834
Telephone: 757-4344, 4347,
4)09
TWIT
�HmjTmaAJ'e f
I
I
i-y U Jewiery I
HAVING PROBLEMS
with
DRUGS?- ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
SCHQOL?
We Can Helpt!
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL DRUG PROGRAM
301 SOSErwInBldg
757-6793
By DARRYL
BROWN
AMiM! New, E.4uv
ECU will be con-
ducting its annual
Scholars Weekend
Sunday and Monda.
hosting over 100 of
North Carolina's
finest high school
students in hopes of
recruiting them for
the university.
The high school
students, each recom-
mended by their prin-
cipal or guidance
counselor and having
a SAT score over
1100. will be guests of
:he university. Thev
ill stay in dorms, al-
iened classes and par-
ticipate m a score of
activities planned to
give them a sample of
college life at ECU.
"It's basicallv a
recruitment ct
get good stud
posed to ECl
Dr David San
professor
English depa
and chairman
Scholars
Committee
said student;
able to :a!k i
chairmen of
ments in hi
hope to maj
minor, and vsi
numerous
and discuss
topics such asl
cial aid. r I
grams and car
by ECL facultl
and student?
Several
eluding a Ian
quet Sunda
which Chari
John Howei
speak, are plai
A7JTIC
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Al
752-7303
FRI SAT
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�� 11
mawmma�-Sm
JMIemV
THE STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
For 2 Day Representatives for 1983-84
You can pick up applications at
MendenhalVs information desk
until April 1 1983 at 5:00p.m.

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JOHN WIST A
VISIO
� Could Be 19m Bes: Net t
of the Year a: e -
FRI
50 c Admissi
HAPPY � ,
HOUR 65C veraH
SUN
DREAMS
Free Admission with Ai
Record Hugger Can
I.F.C. Weekend 100AD
any Sight for l.F.C. - Panhei
E.C.U. Major Attractions
Committee Presents:
who; Evelyn King wSpecial guest
Dazz Band
when: Saturday,April 23,8:00pm
where: Minges Coliseum
Pharo 's Now Has
the Best PIZZA
6 inch individual Plain only $2.45
each additional topping 50C
Tickets are now on sale at:
Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhail Student Center
Record Bar at Carolina East Mall in Greenville
Apple Records in Greenville
Record Bar in New Bern
12 inch Plain only $4.00
each additional topping 65C
16 inch Plain only $5.50
each additional topping 950
Again, we use only the best
Eat In or Take Out
Ground Beef
Green Peppers
Italian Sausage
Mushrooms
Canadian Bacon
Black Olives
Pepperoni
Onions
Extra Cheese
rhcBimmi. In bone, fa
and ruw
rhoFMRax In Km
rvi and given
Onlx $31.
W V : .r i-u-i mSc SI �
Njwid Jrr� iv �:r �iv�-�.
i�sr� e oiorj n i�r at ca. � BMM
NMVA
frVi-125-12Li2j$-12 L
We haw lots of styles in ymmr n
Mafo
everyone
your s
UVVe made a
fashion out
of comfort.
Price:
Student
$7.50
Public
$9.50
At The Door
$9.50
Pharo's S21 Cotanche St. Georgetown Shoppes
For take out call � 752-4761
with the best beer prices in town
Come enjoy, the fun, the Sun
on Pharo's beautiful
TV Osf Slop Shop
jorSur. VLtdtki.
SetKtxm 6 Stntce
Carolina East
Twin Rivers
MonSI
Ytsa MauerCjtrd





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7jo Mom ,

iiL i 1 , . I J 1
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
rh� final meeting of rn�
.oprv ciub win b h�tj on
W � a� Apr.I nth m
v-c!e�nan 247 a' 6 00 p m The
ut � ii elect orf.cer tor the
13 84 'frm ah members in
�ei'ea in being an officer are
gta 'o attend The present
mi og nta election will be
� D V Armstrong's belief.
N ana Knowledge All in'
r -o riease attend
PROBLEMS
-rlth
ICOHOL?
HOOL?
FAMILY?
an Help
Iplng Students
IOL & DBUG PROGRAM
p Erwin Bldg.
57-6793
IS
ff
Beef
ppers
usage
oms
Bacon
lives
ironi
ns
heese
town
Sun
High School Students Can See
ECU On 'Scholars Weekend'
ByDARRYL
BROWN
Assistant News Editor
ECU will be con-
ducting its annual
Scholars Weekend
Sunday and Monday,
hosting over 100 of
North Carolina's
finest high school
students in hopes of
recruiting them for
the university.
The high school
students, each recom-
mended by their prin-
cipal or guidance
counselor and having
a SAT score over
1100, will be guests of
the university. They
will stay in dorms, at-
lend classes and par-
licipate in a score of
activities planned to
give them a sample of
college life at ECU.
"It's basically a
recruitment effort to
get good students ex-
posed to ECU said
Dr. David Sanders, a
professor in the
English department
and chairman of the
Scholars Weekend
Committee. Sanders
said students will be
able to talk with the
chairmen of depart-
ments in which they
hope to major or
minor, and will have
numerous lectures
and discussions on
topics such as finan-
cial aid, honors pro-
grams and campus life
by ECU faculty, staff
and students.
Several meals, in-
cluding a large ban-
quet Sunday night at
which Chancellor
John Howell will
speak, are planned for
the high school
students, and recrea-
tional activities such
as a Sunday night
social and a college
bowl competition, are
planned for the
students. Tickets to
the ECU production
of Our Town and a
concert by the School
of Music will be
available to the
guests, and some
tickets will be given
out as prizes at
weekend events.
Sanders said
students invited to the
Scholars Weekend are
from all regions of
North Carolina and
are interested in a
variety of majors and
careers, including
science, English, art
and music. "We write
to every (high) school
in the state Sanders
said of the commit-
tee's efforts to recruit
high achievers to
ECU.
About 25 ECU
faculty members and
a half dozen honors
students, as well as
the ECU am-
bassadors, are involv-
ed in preparing for
and hosting the
recruitment weekend.
Sanders said,
however, that all ECU
students can help give
the guests a good im-
pression of the
school. "We hope
(ECU) students will
make them feel at
home he said.
�� �?�??��.?��
ATTIC
752-7303
FRI SAT
ATTIC
C0M�0N0UT.
THE PUTTINGS FINE!
OpanUNoonOiiy
Pvtt-PtmGolft
r SLafTr0n �VttYDAYf
VJffWnVBaa, N.C. at ,n �� f�s m
758-1820 ALL YOU CAN PLAY ro��2�
TO ATM ONLY $3.00
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JOHN WIST A
VISI�
"Could Be the Best New Band
of the Year at the Attic"
FRI
HAPPY
HOUR
50 C Admission
65 C Beverages
SUN
DREAMS
Free Admission with Attic
Record Hugger Card
I.F.C. Weekend 100ADM
any Night for I.F. C- Panhellink
PU'm $n�'i
is a neu) restaurant
m dacont otun
cjreertuiLle that:
J5J&S�L PtSJJWCE
m rrfth ,t beWaar, pan. Jack, and horr,)
Fj&rra?Es oal y specials
( fcr only JL? r" tUw )
M49 TAA&-0&7& -(Juwl �� js 55
Watch for the opening
of the Old Jail
with all ABC permits
I he Bimini .In bone, black
and navy.
The Del Ray In bone, na y,
red and preen.
Only $31.
Son 102 or over, add $2 fur pair.
Special orders, no extra charge.
Some coii-rs are special order.
Sizes 6 colors ma vary at each store.
NMwww
tvz-n5-125-125-12
We haie lots of styles in your size.
But mil all stzes in all styles. I
The Btminj
��?

3SaW .?Kiii
�"Mt

W'

1 Ik Del Rav
Make
everyone watch
your step.
We've made a
fashion out
of comfort.
I he One Stop Shop
for Sizes, Widths,
'Selection & Service
ve�culxr
Carolina East Mall Greenville 756-8944
Twin Rivers Mall New Bern 633-2141
MonSat. 10 am to 9 pm
Visa MasierCard Accepted Revelations Made in U.S.A.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APK1L 14. 1903 3
The SUPER GRIT BAND and the I
Miss Hawaiian Tropic Bikini Contest! I
Monday, April 25 3:00 pm At Jfcs
The KAPPA SIGMA HOUSE
Coll 752-5543
ENTERTAINMENT
Fantasy
ECU Jazz Band
Kneewalkers
Gary Kern
Trinidad Tripoli Steel Band
X-tra, X-tra
Final Act To Be Announced
ATTRACTIONS
Marcella Ruble-Fortune
Teller and Palmist
Antique Images- Old Time
Costumes Photographs
Caricatures Unlimited-A
New Look At Yourself
The Rose Tattoos-Funky,
Daring, and Fun Tattoos
PLUS LOTS OFGREA TFOOD
AND
EDMONDS AND CURLEY, EMCEES
T-Shirts on Sale; Monday 18
Student Center


0OHh
cn.
THURSDAY, APRIL 21
12:00 NOON-?
Rain Site: Mendenhall Student Center
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3te East (Karnltoian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, ci v,a�r
Mike Hughes, wjj
WAVERLY MERRITT. omum of i i r, ClNDY PLEASANTS. sporu Fdnor
SCOTT LlNDLEY. Bus,� Vj-w GREG RlDEOUT. e�,Eduor
AL1 AFRASHTEH. Cm Wa�u.f,r STEVE BACHNER, Entertammtnt Edor
Stephanie Groon. cmwm �� Juliana Fahrbach, s,w ����
Clay Thornton. r�c &���� Todd Evans, w��� Manager
April 14. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
A New Issue
Avoiding Trouble Through Ambiguity
Since we're all pretty much sick
and tired of reading and writing
about death, destruction and the
SGA week after week, and since
"nobody ever reads editorials
anyway (a fact well-documented
by a recent East Carolinian poll)
this short editorial will set out to
accomplish nothing except
maybe filling up what would other-
wise be a ridiculous looking white
space
With this is mind, an editorial
becomes infinitely more easy to
read, and especially to write. After
all, how can one fail if one at-
tempts nothing? One can't. Two
may be able to, but one certainly
can't.
It would, perhaps, be easy
enough to comment on at least one
of the issues in our troubled world
or on our troubled campus. There
are certainly plenty of other things
to write about, but who wants to
read about something of impor-
tance when he or she can read
something totally ambiguous and
unimportant like this? (A show of
hands is not necessary.)
And if you think about it, there
are only about thiee issues that
most students care about anyway:
sex, drugs and money. But it just
so happened that there isn't
anything much going on these days
in the sex, drugs or money worlds
(other than the fact that sex and
drugs are costing more than ever).
Hence, this purposeless essay.
If this were an editorial with a
goal, if it were supposed to help
sway opinion one way or another,
it probably wouldn't work
anyway, right? Right.
Furthermore, The East Caroli-
nian has been blindly accused in
the past of imposing its radical
biases � liberal one issue, conser-
vative the next � on the student
community twice a week. So, we
felt it best to write something
middle-of-the-road "for a
change Like our mothers always
told us, "If you don't have
anything nice to say, don't say
anything at all
Then again, Mom never had to
deal with the SGA. Not that
there's anything wrong with the
SGA. Heavens no! It just seemed
like a good thing to say in a mean-
ingless editorial, which, incidental-
ly, is what this is.
No, we certainly don't want to
get anyone angry with us, especial-
ly the SGA or the administra-
tion. Not that they get angry easily
and act on ridiculous impulses. Of
course not. It's just that we'd just
hate to offend someone in an
editorial.
So, as far as we're concerned, at
least for today, life's just keen at
ECU. We've got no gripes, no
complaints, no suggestions. Sure,
we could gripe, complain or sug-
gest a few things here and there,
but then we'd be taking a stand.
Thus, this editorial would have a
purpose which, of course, it
doesn't.
No purpose, that is, except that
which was earlier stated � filling
space � a purpose, which, we
might add, has been duly ac-
complished.
This editorial has been brought
to you in part by Frank, who
delivers The East Carolinian
faithfully every Tuesday and
Thursday so that you can read
meaningless editorials like this
one.
M H.
Art, Business Students:
'Two Peas In A Pod?'
By PAT O'NEILL
Art students and business students:
two peas in a pod.
I can hear the cries of resentment
already. "Blasphemy screams the art
major. "How dare you compare me
with those talentless capitalists
"Absurd responds the business ma-
jor. "Don't categorize me with that
bunch of flakes
Sorry folks, but when you come right
down to it, there's not a whole lot of dif-
ference between these two groups of
people. (My apologies to the excep-
tions.)
Ralph Nader's visit to ECU a couple
of weeks ago merely reinforced what I
already believe. "Our country was not
founded by business majors Nader
said. Nor, might I add, was it founded
by art majors. But both of these groups
certainly played a role in the founding of
this nation, and both should be concern-
ed about where it's headed.
Nader said that lethargy is the most
important power in the world. I agree.
And I might add that "apathy is the
other side of ignorance The key words
are lethargy and apathy. Ignorance is a
condition that I can tolerate, but the
other two ah, they can destroy the
world! With ignorance, one is afflicted.
Apathy, on the other hand, is a cons-
cience choice.
Many times I have heard comments
from business majors about stories ap-
pearing in The East Carolinian:
"Business majors don't care about
what's going on in El Salvador I was
told. "We want to know about jobs
Art students often echo the perennial
student cry: "I have no time for social
action; my work is all so consuming
Nader also mentioned that Americans
watch an average of 25 hours of TV each
week. I wonder how many people who
claim a lack of time are avid television
watchers.
You don't have to be a corporate
president to know that what's happening
in El Salvador is vitally important to the
business world. The whole world is in-
tricately connected by business transac-
tions. Any responsible businessperson
should be able to see the necessity of
knowing what's going on in El Salvador
� or any nation, for that matter.
Last October, I wrote a feature story
about a group called Artists for Sur-
vival, an organization whose members
attempt to reach people emotionally
through the language of art Their ex-
hibitions include works expressing the
horror of war and also a vision of peace
and joy. In short, these artists use their
work to make important social
statements.
After I wrote this story, I was hopeful
that I would get some positive feedback
from ECU art students. My hopes soon
faded. Perhaps my writing colleague Jay
Stone sums it up best: "It's simply not
chic to give a damn about other people's
suffering he told me. Nor is it chic to
care about our role in their suffering, I
might add.
Raplh Nader showed us what happens
to our world when big businesses decide
to abuse it. He referred to pollution,
white-collar crime and the various types
of advertising he referred to as
"corporate violence Today's business
majors have a responsibility to rid their
discipline of this violence Nader speaks
of.
Art students are truly blessed with the
ability to graphically express emotions,
both their own and ours. It's a shame
that they're unable (mainly because of
society's economic priorities) to fully use
this ability to improve our world.
Mark Twain once said, "Don't let
your studies interfere with your educa-
tion Once again, I agree. The world is
getting smaller and smaller � the
bombs, bigger and bigger. Let's begin to
work together to make it "chic" to care
about the suffering people in it.
DIDy0UWTO,WAlT6R?( THE GOVERNMENT WILL
BUV OUR HOUSE AT PRE-P10X1N PRICES
Perhaps, Just Perhaps, It Needed Salt
Column In Poor Taste
Dear Stan Landers: You are a sick
man. Your advice last week about the
Mormons was in poor taste, even for
you. Comparing these Latter Day Saints
to the likes of cockroaches and gonor-
rhea was not only the ultimate affront
but also illustrated your lack of
understanding about the Church of
Christ.
STAN LANDERS
Expert Retractions
And for you to condone � let alone
suggest � those delinquent "remedies"
only further exemplifies your inade-
quacy as an adviser and as a human be-
ing. How would you feel if I fired those
same jokes and suggestive comments at
the Pope? How would you like that,
huh? Personally, I don't know how you
can slep at night, having offended as
many people as you probably do every
dav. God help vou.
BEARING THE CROSS IN
GRIMESLAND
Dear Bearing: I'm certainly glad you
wrote in about those unfortunate
typographical errors in last week's col-
umn. Quite honestly, when I saw the
paper last Thursday. I was shocked.
And please be assured, those responsible
received 30 lashes (not to mention 30
phone calls).
Also, thank you for your concern
about my sleeping habits. But honestly,
there's really no need for you to worry; I
sleep fine.
One final note: Vou shouldn't feel like
you have to threaten me with Papal
jokes. After all. being Polish, I'm sure
the Pope has heard them all. Never-
theless, I'd love to hear them
sometime but only if they're good.
Dear Stan Landers: Do you watch the
Smurfs? A nd if so, who's your favorite
one?
CHA NCEL L OR HO H EL L
Well, I must admit that because of
several unfortunate previous
engagements on Saturday mornings
(most notably, sleeping), I haven't been
able to keep up with the Smurfs lately,
but being a lifetime fan of blue midget
women with bright yellow hair, I'd have
to say my favorite character is definitelv
Smurfette.
Dear Stan Landers: Since it's April,
and the end of the semester is fast ap-
proaching, I was wondering if you have
any helpful hints on how to achieve
maximum output on exams with a
minimum effort. I know how concerned
you are about student welfare. I know
you want everyone to do web
her exams, because know an
about us. I know you've go: a: lea
few studying guidelines iha: . .
beneficial. And I know vou won : :
down. Thanks.
FLUNKING IN FLETCHER
Dear Flunking: It's no wonv
why you're flunking. For a girl who
knows as much as you. vou're sure �
moron. What makes vou think ! ;a:e
about how anyone else does in school? I
don't have any examv
Dear Stan Landers: Do
play video games? And if �� vhkh a
your favorite one? Also, did the) c
decide where graduation is f
held this vear? I sure hopt .r
Ficklen!
CHANCELLOR H
Dear Chancellor Howeli: New cobk
on, John, we've been thro :v
before. The limit is one letter a ee
I've bent the rules before, but this me,
I'm drawing the line.
Editor's $ote: Stan Landers, a
horoscopy and herbal science m
from somewhere in southern Call)
and a Libra born during the Year I
Ox, may or may not gradual- in May
depending on how the seasi
transcend his emotional art physkc
presence on May 6 and whether r �
he passes Library Science
Campus Forunr
SGA Funding Draws Mixed Views
I would like to thank the staff of The
East Carolinian for the fine editorial in
Tuesday's paper, in which they took a
stand on attempting to educate the stu-
dent body on SGA funding.
It was pointed out that the schools of
Music and Art continue to request an-
nual funding from the SGA for their
operating budgets. Having lived with a
music major for two years, I have
witnessed the shortcomings the music
school has had to contend with.
However, I would like to address the
issue of whether or not this is fair.
First of all, although the schools of
Music, Art, etc do not receive all the
funding they need, neither does anyone
else. The business and medical schools,
for example, don't request annual
funds from the SGA, yet no one would
argue that these schools are just as
well-known and have tight budgets
they must also meet.
I wrote a letter to the Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs Dr.
Robert Maier earlier this year, and in
so many words, he said that the School
of Music was receiving the same pro-
portional amount as every other school
and department on campus. So is this
really fair that these schools should
receive additional funds from student
activity fees over and above what they
receive from tuition and state taxes?
Just to reiterate, it is the Student
Government Association. Every stu-
dent � all 13,500 � is a member of the
SGA. We are here to represent student
organizations. There are more than 200
student groups on campus recognized
by the Division of Student Life. Last
year, fewer than SO of these groups
received funds from the SGA.
Therefore, is it also fair to numerous
student groups to be denied funds
while schools and departments are con-
tinually funded?
I hope the upcoming SGA leaders
will consider these points when
distributing student fees in the future. I
feel it is way past time the entire stu-
dent body takes a stand and demands
what is truly theirs.
Bob Mills
SGA Vice President
On The Other Hand
This letter is in response to the
"SGA Funding" editorial in the Tues-
day, April 12 issue of The East Caroli-
nian.
First off, I believe that the Arts use
the money to put the school's best foot
forward in the outside community. The
Arts programs at ECU are among the
best in this part of the country. The
School of Music, which you so wan-
tonly paint as the villain of all of the
SGA's financial problems, is one of the
finest music programs from a state-
supported university in the nation. You
don't see North Carolinians (or South
Carolinians or Virginians) flocking to
State or Chapel Hill for music educa-
tion, because those schools' programs
aren't up to the same level as ECU's
School of Music (if those schools have
programs at all). The same goes for the
schools of Art and Drama.
Secondly, you suggest that the Inter-
Fraternity Council needs the money
because they have "been consistently
denied office space Maybe, but the
IFC doesn't get money from the SGA.
The IFC gets its money from frat dues.
And I may be wrong (correct me if I
am, IFC), but I don't think that the
IFC would want to raise frat dues just
for office space, because, at the present
time, that is the only way they can get
the money.
Thirdly, I don't really think that this
is so pressing a problem to the SGA. I
really think that it is just some personal
vendetta that Eric Henderson has
against the School of Music.
David R Pavne
Freshman, Drama
SGA Eats
I am writing this letter to protest the
SGA's actions on April 11. In this
meeting, the SGA appropriated funds
for its own banquet. I am a member of
the SGA Appropnations Committee
Currently, we are in the process of
?�i?minin8 appropriations for the
1983-84 school year. This vear. the
SGA has approximately $60,000 for
appropriations to student groups We
Je"lv requests for more than
J2U0,000. In our process of budget cut-
ting, the first item cut for all student
groups was food (banquets).
By appropriating student funds for
us own banquet, the SGA has set itself
upon a pedestal above all other student
organizations. The purpose of SGA is
ZJ� studcnts, not to abuse their
recs rhe appropriation for the ban
hff not�y Pays for SGA legislators.
no �r.th?r datcs � � Aether or
not then; dates arc ECU students. This
Jnnr�pn?tl0n is a blatant misuse of
wuh 22Tfcesl � � �nsu,t
S ry�Ur ic"lators and demand that
they reconsider their actions.
Jim Ensor
Junior, Business
Forum Rules
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wonder to me
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hope it's in
I ORHOWELL
How ell: Now come
en through thi
letter a week.
but this time.
n landers, a
science major
hern California
the Year of the
jduate in May,
seasonal vibes
h and physical
whether or not
ixed Views
: Music.
David R. Payne
f reshman, Drama
SGA Eats
mg this letter to protest the
ns on April 11. In this
he SGA appropriated funds
1 banquet. I am a member of
'A Appropriations Committee.
e are in the process of
fng appropriations for the
hool year. This year, the
J has approximately $60,000 for
opriations to student groups. We
ed requests for more than
I "0,000 In our process of budget cut-
'he first item cut for all student
I as food (banquets).
I Kv appropriating student funds for
own banquet, the SGA has set itself
lupon a pedestal above all other student
forganizations. The purpose of SGA is
Ito serve students, not to abuse their
Fees. Tn� appropriation for the ban-
quet not only pays for SGA legislators.
If it for their dates as well - whether or
pot their dates are ECU students. This
Expropriation is a blatant misuse of
four student fees. I ask you to consult
v.uh your legislators and demand that
they reconsider their actions.
Jim Ensor
Junior, Business
Forum Rules
i �Zne Ea5t Carolir�an welcomes letters
TnT,lng ali po"1' �f ��- Mail or
S2L TL& our �ffic the Old
South Budding, across from Joyner
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14. I9�3
Stress Of Village Green Explosion Discussed
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Suft V incr
Jack Smith, a na-
tionally known post-
traumatic stress
researcher, was in
Greenville Tuesday to
lead a discussion
among students in-
volved in the March 2
explosion at the
Village Green Apart-
ment complex.
Seven ECU
students displaced by
the explosion did not
attend Smith's discus-
sion at the urging of
their attorneys.
One ECU student
was killed and a dozen
others were injured in
the explosion.
Smith came to
Greenville at the in-
vitation of ECU and
Greenville mental
health experts who
were concerned about
the effects the explo-
sion is having on
those involved.
Kenneth Haigler,
an attorney represen-
ting the seven ECU
students who didn't
attend Smith's pro-
gram claimed that
because his clients
were already receiving
"quality medical
care" he felt it was
best for them not to
attend.
Haigler initially
claimed that his firm
was unable to find out
who was sponsoring
the program. "We
contacted two or three
people with the
university and never
got our calls return-
ed Haigler said.
Later, Haigler
claimed his secretary
had never actually
made the calls to ECU
officials, but had in-
dicated on a note that
she had done so. It
was "a little case of
trying to please the
boss Haigler said.
Smith, a Vietnam
veteran, decided to
research post-
traumatic stress when
he returned from
Vietnam and realized
the mental health pro-
fession was unable to
meet the post-war
stress needs that he
and other veterans
were having.
Smith informed the
five students who at-
tended the discussion
that post-traumatic
stress disorders were
normal human
responses to disaster
situations. "It's a
very powerful pro-
cess, but it's one that
occurs over time, and
it will pass on Smith
said.
Smith said the
students were going
through a rebuilding
process that-would br-
ing them back into the
real world.
Smith said one of
the symptoms of post-
traumatic stress was
intrusive thoughts"
which conjured up
images, in daydreams
or nightmares, of the
tragic event they ex-
perienced.
Smith said that
those involved in the
explosion might also
experience mental tur-
moil such as loss of
concentration, a fail-
ing memory and feel-
ings of helplessness.
He said some people
may fear that the
disaster will happen
again. Smith said loud
noise or a certain
location can cause this
to hannen.
Smith said that peo-
ple may experience
guilt and will often
ask themselves "What
if questions.
On the positive
side, Smith noted that
people involved in a
tragic event will often
adopt some type of
"survivor mission" as
a way of creating a
positive lesson from
the tragedy.
Smith said his own
Vietnam experience
was an example of a
positive experience
emerging from a
tragic event. "It (the
Vietnam experience)
has become a positive
thing in my life
Smith said.
Assistant Professor
of Pyschology Susan
McCammon, a coor-
dinator of the event,
said that at least one
student who had in-
itially planned to at-
tend the discussion
called her on Tuesday
night to inform her he
would not be atten-
ding because his at-
torney had advised
him not to.
"One wonders
what the motives or
the assumptions the
attorneys may have
been making in advis-
ing their clients not to
attend a presenta-
tion said one
member of the special
committee, adding
that the law firm
should have done a
more thorough check
on the committee's
work before advising
their clients not to at-
tend.
In concluding,
Smith told students
involved in the explo-
sion to talk with other
people who went
through the ex-
perience and seek pro-
fessional help if they
need it. "It's a normal
process and what I
want to suggest is that
they accept the fact
they're going through
a process Smith
said.
The people involv-
ed in coordinating the
discussion said if
those involved con-
tinued to have pro-
blems dealing with the
explosion, they
should get in contact
with one of the people
listed below.
� Bob Moore at the
Pitt County Mental
Health Center -
752-7151.
� Mary Smith at the
REAL Crisis Center
- 758-HELP.
� George Weigand
at the ECU Counsel-
ing Center �
758-6661.
� James McCallum
at the Student Health
Center - 758-6841.
� Any member of
the Campus Clergy -
the Rev. Dan Ear-
nhardt - 758-2030, the
Rev. Stuart LaNeave -
758-2030, the Rev
Bill Hadden
758-2030. the Rev
Bob CLyde 752-464
or Sister Helen
Shondell - 752-4216.
April SALES
53O0
-3�EEN.
. G r r
-
PKP Inducts Members
The Phi Kappa Phi
academic honor socie-
ty held its annual in-
duction ceremony
Tuesday night, with
about 150 ECU
students being in-
itiated into ECU's
most distinguished
academic organiza-
tion.
Students must have
a 3.8 grade point
average as a junior or
a 3.6 gpa as a senior
to qualify for the na-
tional honor society.
Former ECU
Chancellor John D.
Messick was given the
first honorary
membership of the
ECU chapter.
Messick was
chancellor from 1947
to 1959 and is respon-
sible for increasing
the size of the student
body, faculty and
campus area. He was
the first chancellor to
lobby the state
Legislature to make
ECU a university.
Lisa Ryan was
given the award as the
university's outstan-
ding senior for this
year. Ryan, a French
major, is the universi-
ty's nominee for a na-
tional Phi Kappa Phi
graduate school
scholarship.
Bobby Aswell, Jr.
was named the
outstanding freshman
at ECU. Aswell is a
computer science ma-
jor with a 4.0 grade
point average.
ECU faculty
members James
Bearden, Janice
Faulkner and Tinsley
Yarbrough were also
initiated.
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1Mb EASTCAKOI INIAN
Style
APRIL 14, 1983
Page 6
Dillard 's Latest Continues In
Pulitzer Prize Winning Style
By MIKE HAMER
Staff Writer
The island where I live is peopl-
ed with cranks like myself. In a
cedar-shake shack on a cliff �
but we all live like this � is a man
in his thirties who lives alone with
a stone he is trving to teach to
talk.
In Teaching a Stone to Talk
(Harper and Row), Annie Dillard
continues in the tradition of her
1975 Pulitzer Prize winner,
Pilgrim at Tinker Creek.
Dillard's writing and her powers
of observation are every bit as
acute as they were in Pilgrim; her
vision and writing have matured
in the intervening years.
As in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek,
there is a common thematic
thread binding these essays
together. That thread is the
search for God among all of the
many and strange ways that crea-
tion manifests itself to man. Ms.
Dillard once explained to an in-
terviewer that, "Art is my in-
terest, mysticism my message,
Christian mysticism
In the essay "Teaching a Stone
to Talk Dillard begins with a
description of the eccentric young
man described above who actual-
ly is, in fact, trying to teach a
stone to talk. She goes from there
to a meditation about the impor-
tance of observing nature that
has a Zen quality to it. She says,
"That is why I take walks: to
keep an eye on things Annie
Dillard's sense of humor is
especially evident in this essay.
Annie Doak Dillard was born
in 1945 and grew up in Pitt-
sburgh, Pennsylvania. Much of
her early life was spent with such
books as Wuthering Heights, The
The Dodge Shelby Charger:
Detroit's New Tun' Machine
By GORDEN IPOCK
Staff Writer
A dozen years ago, G.M Ford and Chrysler were
healthy and happy. Car sales were booming, par-
ticularly in the under-30, performance-car market.
When it came to building asphalt burners for lead-
footed teenagers, foreign car manufacturers weren't
even in th same bracket with Detroit. The big three
had the lucrative youth market to themselves.
But after a decade of leapfrogging gasoline prices,
seven-liter V8s have gone the way of the dinosaur.
The money that used to buy Road Runners and
GTO's is now buying Z-Cars and Supras, and
domestic car sales have sunk so low that the big three
nearly became the big two.
But Detroit is ready to recapture some of that lost
performance market. For the first time in several
years, Detroit is building fast cars again, cars that
handle well and are fun to drive.
The 1983'2 Dodge Shelby Charger is the best
combination of economy and spirited performance
to ever come out of Detroit. A radical departure
from earlier speed machines, the new Shelby is a
design that Ford and G.M. will surely copy. It is
radical in two respects.
First, the new Charger is nothing like the two-ton
torpedo that is seen churning down dirt roads and
bulling through cow pastures each week on the
Dukes of Hazard. The big orange Dodge Charger
that the Dukes affectionately refer to as "General
Lee" is as out of step with Chrylser's present think-
ing as the Dukes are with life in Manhattan. Chrysler
has staked its future on front-wheel-drive cars, and
the new Charger with a transversely-mounted, in-
line-four-cylinder engine coupled to front-wheel-
drive is on the cutting edge of Chrysler's new
technology.
Perhaps even more surprising, especially to Ford
devotees, is that Carroll Shelby, the Lemans winning
Texan that created a legend with his Ford-powered
Cobras and Shelby Mustangs in the 60s, has teamed
up with Chrysler to lead their charge back into the
performance arena. Who would have ever thought
Shelby, retired to chicken ranching and selling his
own brand of Texas chili, would be squeezing extra
horsepower from a four-banger Dodge.
But squeeze and tweak he has. With basic back-
yard engineering - raising compression, advancing
spark, enrichening the carburetor, retading cam-
shaft timing and lowering the final-drive ration �
Shelby has the 2.2 liter engine pumping out 107
horsepower, strong enough to push the 2400 pound
car through the quarter-miler in 15.9 seconds at 86
mph. That's faster than Firebird Trans Am, Camaro
Z-28, Datsun 280-ZX, Porsche 924 and Toyota
Supra � all cars that cost considerably more than
the $8,300 Shelby Charger. Top speed is 117 mph.
Also, the Shelby corners like a go-kart. No big
suspension modifications by Shelby. Just shorter,
stiffer springs heavier shocks and 15-inch, 50-series
See DETROIT, Page 7
Five Little Peppers, Gone With
the Wind, From Here to Eternity,
and Native Son. When she was
ten she discovered The Field
Book of Ponds and Streams,
which became a workbook for
many sessions in neighborhood
ponds and brooks.
After she graduated from high
school in 1963, Annie Doak went
to Hollins College, near Roanoke
in southwestern Virginia, where
she studied English and creative
writing. She received her BA in
1967 and her MA in 1968. She
wrote her master's thesis on
Thoreau's Walden. In 1974 she
published Tickets for a Prayer
Wheel, a collection of poems
soon forgotten when Pilgrim at
Tinker Creek appeared the same
year. In 1977 she published Holy
the Firm, a much shorter book
with a more overtly religious
tone. In 1982 Dillard published
Living by Fiction, a book of
literary criticism.
Like Thoreau, Dillard's source
of inspiration comes primarily
from nature. This was the case
throughout PUgrim at Tinker
Creek. But here the inspiration
comes from other sources as well:
from travel, books, children, her
past, and, in one instance, from a
singing group playing in a
Catholic church.
One of my favorite sketches in
this book is "Living Like
Weasels Here Dillard describes
the rare excitement of meeting a
weasel in the wild. She takes the
encounter a step further. She
says,
missed my chance. I should
have gone for the throat. I should
have lunged for that streak of
white under the weasel's chin and
held on, held on through mud
and into the wild rose, held on
for a dearer life. We could live
under the wild rose wild as
weasels, mute and uncomprehen-
ding. I could very calmly go wild.
I could live two days in the den,
curled, leaning on mouse fur,
sniffing bird bones, blinking,
licking, breathing musk, my hair
tangled in the roots of grasses.
This is an excellent book.
There's nothing political or
earth-shattering here, just some
of the best nonfiction meditative
prose being written today.
Ho�o t, CINDY WALL
Rutabagas and Lemons perform at Springfest.
Rutabagas And Lemons
Were More Fun Than
Just About Anything
By ZACK PERKINSON
SlsffWrtter
Gather round, O my children,
and 1 will tell you of an age long
forgotten in the mists of time. An
age before rock n' roll, before
electronic distortion, before
record companies dictated the
tastes of the generations. It was a
time of zoot suits, hep jive, and
Louis Jordan. Jitterbugging was
an art that your parents knew
before the mortgage and the doc-
tor's bills erased their memories
and time itself seemed to be ac-
celerated by technology
Oh, come on, when is this guy
going to get to the point? Right
now. And the point is fun.
Unrestrained, un-self conscious,
worthwhile fun. How many times
have you gone downtown trying
to have a good time and ended up
walking home with your hands in
your pockets wondering why you
even went out at all? Well, if you
came to see the Rutabaga
Brothers and Lemon Sisters Fri-
day and Saturday night at the
New Deli then you kn6w thav
there were about 250 people who
had more fun than just about
anybody in town on those two
nights. It's virtually impossible
for anybody (and that includes
business majors, med students,
and East Carolina instructors) to
not have a good time seeing the
Rutabagas. They set an atten-
dance record at the Deli' Friday
night and then broke it Saturday
night, that's impressive.
Their music is an ecclectic
blend (rather than array, because
of the connecting thread of
upbeat rhythm and blues) of
some of the jumpingest tunes of
the past fifty years. Louis Jor-
dan, the Boswell Sisters, Lee
Dorsey, and the Burnette
Brothers are just a few of their in-
fluences. They are what Manhat-
tan Transfer would be if the
Transfer didn't have a slick
showbiz veneer. For those old
enough to remember, Dan Hicks
and the Hot Licks are probably
the closest musically to the
Rutabagas and Lemons. Tight
vocal harmonies by Laura, Sue,
and Amy Lemon (the shy girls'
stage names � their real names
are Laura Davis, Sue Luddeke,
and Amy Hazard) along with the
rock steady rhythm of
bassistvocalist Mike Hamer and
drummer Bobby Aiken are the
foundation of their sound.
Guitarist John Worthington is
perhaps the best in Greenville,
playing a clean, unpretentious
wyle that points up the Lemons'
harmonies and his own rockabilly
singing. Amy Lemon blows a
mean sax when she isn't crooning
and even pitches in with a rhythm
guitar and flute when the need
arises. They are truly versatile.
So, if you want a good time, go
see the Rutabaga Brothers and
the Lemon Sisters. Take six and
call me in the morning. It's just
what the doctor ordered.
God And Politics
Berrigan Jailed For Beliefs
Springfest '83 Survived Gloomy Weather
�V CINOY WALL
Scenes from Greenville's Springfest '83 (clockwise from top left): ECU student Luke Smith has
his arm painted; Big Bird gives a piggy-back ride; student Lisa CrapdU looks on while mnlti-
talented balloonist twists away. The overcast skys held no one back.
iijlfpljljiifiijl
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff WrMtr
The second of two parts.
E.C Do you think that the news media is respon-
sive to the criticism of what is deemed as a double
stance by Reagan on disarmament?
BERRIGAN: I think they are now for a variety of
reasons. Reagan's popularity polls at the present
time are at an all time low because of what is called
the surrogate scandal out of the E.P.A. That's one
reason, then too, less and less do the American peo-
ple believe in his true sincerity towards disarma-
ment.
E.C You mentioned before that the legislative pro-
cess is not the answer to stopping the arms race
because they're redressing their own evils. That's
pretty frustrating to a lot of Americans (that the
legislative process doesn't work). What are you tell-
ing people who want the process to work or who
want to begin a new process?
BERRIGAN: I'm saying that the law is increasingly
evidenced as being very much central to the pro-
blem. Without getting into it real heavily, the law in
any society like our own funds to represent the
powerful, the wealthy, the privileged. They tend to
get the kind of law that they need in order to max-
imize their own profits and to enhance their own
power. Our socity is cetainiy an example of that. The
lobbies that operate against the U.S. congress in
order to get their way, the kind of legislation that
they need to override any sort of voice from the peo-
ple.
E.C What should people do then?
BERRIGAN: Well the people have to, if you will,
raise a counter balancing lobby. They have to create
an oppostion party. They have to take to the streets
by the millions, hopefully and preferably non-
violently, in order to compensate and overcompen-
sate for this voice in government which is overriding
right now. The poor are being sold off, even the
middle class people are being affected. The straight
middle class people are losing their homes. Farmers,
who could be judged among the middle class, are
losing their farms in really considerable and shock-
ing numbers. So, the representation of even the mid-
dle class is something of a thing of the past, right
now.
E.C What would you counsel people to do? To pull
out of the whole legislative process, not write letters
to their congress people, and senators, get into a
more direct action type of resistance.
BERRIGAN: Well if American people could unders-
tand that the only truly effective way of operating
publicly and politically is to do the right thing. If
they could maybe sift that statement through and
look at it in some depth, not to go with the represen-
tatives, not to go with politicians, not to trust them
but to trust their own consciences and to do the right
thing. And if something is unjust and needs pro-
testing, and dissent and resistance, to do that that's
always been the role of the people in a society like
our own and there's no substitute for it, there never
will be.
E.C It seems to me that, looking back at what you
and Dan wrote during the Vietnam era, your greatest
sense of frustration came from the so called liberals.
What's your message to people working in social
justice areas outside of direct action opposing the
arms race?
BERRIGAN: I'd try to point out as gently as I could
that the approach of most liberals is a faithless ap-
proach. They don't believe in any higher power,
practically and seriously, than the machinery of the
state.
E.C Would you tell Mother Theresa, for instance,
that she needs to stop what she's doing and work to
resist the arms race?
BERRIGAN: Yes I think probably 1 would. I'd ask
Mother Theresa to reflect on the fact that India's a
nuclear power, and has exploded nuclear devices
with the help of Canada and with the help of the
U.S. India is a quite shocking variance from the ex-
ample of Ghandi today, and Ghandi is a national
hero over there, all the Indians claim him as such. I
would point that out to her and then perhaps I'd
even suggest that the crimes that she faces every year
in tending the poor are caused by a system which is
corporate, and its political structure, and its not
enough for her, or any of us, to bind up the wounds
of the poor and to give them hospitality and food
EC. How many times have you been arrested? Do
you ever keep track of it?
BERRIGAN: No. It probably would approach SO
now. I don't know. I don't care.
Detroit S
Continued From Pag
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General Pul
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i






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MRU 14, 9
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the help of the
ariance trom the ex-
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Detroit Still In The Race
15
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3
I ontinued Krom Page 6
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)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 14, 19�3
Page 8
Pirate Signees Add Needed Height
Six high school basketball star
players signed a grant-in-aid with
ECU Wednesday, national sign-
ing day. This represents the most
players ever to sign with the
Pirates on the initial signing day.
"We are very pleased with all
six of these young men said
Head Coach Charlie Harrison,
who led the Pirates to a 16-13
finish this year. "Not only are
these fine basketball players, but
we've also signed quality young
men.
"All six players are coming to
East Carolina because they want
to play for the Pirates and not
because someone else did not
want them. We watched their pro-
gress all season and noted that
each one got better as the season
progressed. We feel this is impor-
tant, and an indication that their
talent level has yet to peak
The six include three conference
players-of-the-year, four with all-
state recognition and the possibili-
ty of one becoming the first seven-
footer in Pirate history.
The list includes: Leon Bass, a
6-10 center from Florence, S.C
Roy Smith, a 6-7 12 forward-
center from Gastonia; Derrick
Battle, a 6-6 forward from Nor-
thern Nash; William Grady, a 6-2
guard from Patterson, N.J Keith
Sledge, a 6-3 guard from Roanoke
Rapids; and Jack Turnbill, a 6-9
center from Wilmington.
Bass, only 17 years old, has an
arm reach of 7' 1 and has grown
5 12 inches over the last year. He
averaged 15 points, 10 rebounds
and three blocked shots per game
under Coach Jeff Scott. Among
his honors were all-five 4-A
Region, all-Pee Dee Region and
all-City.
"Leon will be a seven footer,
and there's just no telling how big
he will be Harrison said. "He
has great size with a great pair of
hands and a fine shooting touch.
Leon also has quick feet and a
willingness to work to get better.
Only his strength is a question
mark at this point
Bass selected ECU over Clem-
son, Virginia Commonwealth and
Tennessee-Chattanooga.
Smith averaged 21.6 points,
12.8 rebounds and five blocked
shots per game in leading Coach
G.C. Harrell's club to a 21-4
overall record, winners of the
Western 4-A conference. As the
pivot man for Hunter Huss,
Smith was named the player of-
the-year in the conference, along
with honorable mention all-state,
all-Piedmont, all-Gazette Land
and the Gastonia Gazette player-
of-the-year.
"Roy knows how to score
Charlie Harrison
Harrison said. "He's extremely
quick, quick around the basket
and a quick jumper. Roy has
grown progressively better
throughout the season. We feel
very good about his being a player
for us right now
Clemson, South Carolina and
Western Carolina were Smith's
final choices before deciding on
ECU.
Battle, player-of-the-year in the
Big East Conference, averaged 18
points, 14 rebounds and two
blocked shots in leading Coach
Bobby Dunn's club. He was nam-
ed honorable mention all-state,
all-Big East for two years, all-
region and second team all-East.
The power forward has started
for three seasons, is an outstan-
ding triple and vertical jumper in
track (fourth in state in triple
jump), and shoots over 60 percent
from the floor and 70 percent
from the line.
"Derrick is a quality person
and quality athletesummed up
Harrison. "He's a very good
shooter, plays big and plays hard.
We hope for an immediate con-
tribution
Other schools seeking Battle
were UNC-Wilmington, Furman
and Jacksonville.
Grady had actually signed wtih
an early committment in
November with ECU, another
first for the Pirates. He's a 6-2
guard from Eastside High in Pat-
terson, N.J. His honors this year
included second team all-state,
all-league, all-area and all-Passiac
County. In addition, Grady has
been selected to play in the
Bridgeport Classic, pitting the all-
stars of New Jersey versus those
of New York and Connecticut.
"William is the type young man
that not only can play various
roles on the basketball team, but
will be a great asset off the court
with his tremendous attitude.
He's a very enthusiastic young
man that has a way of being con-
tagious Harrison said.
Grady decided on ECU over
Rutgers, Boston University and
Northeastern.
Sledge received national
recognition by being selected to
BASKETBALL WEEKLY'S
honorable mention all-America
prep team. The big guard of small
forward in the Northeastern Con-
ference this season. Sledge has
been recognized as all-state, all-
East and all-conference for two
years, under coach Terry Fraaer.
"Keith is really a good
shooter said Harrison. "He can
flat fill it up. With hard work he
will be an asset to our program.
He has fine athletic ability, as
good an athlete as Bruce Pear-
tree
Those in the final runmng for
Siege were UNC-Wilmington.
Detroit, Virginia Commonwealth
and UNC-Charlotte.
Turnbill gives the Pirates added
size at 6-9, having played center
this season for New Hanover after
playing forward the previous
year, he averaged 15 points and 12
rebounds while receiving all-
conference and honorable men-
See NEW, Page 9
Lady Bucs Bring Home Wins
ROCKY MOUNT � The
North Carolina Wesleyan Bishops
stole nine bases and took advan-
tage of four ECU errors Tuesday
afternoon to defeat the Pirates
5-4.
The loss was ECU's second in
as many days to the Bishops. On
Monday afternoon, NCW banged
out 16 hits and scored 12 runs to
overpower the Pirates.
ECU has now won just two of
their last eight games and are cur-
rently 15-11.
Tuesday's game saw the
Bishops score an unearned run in
the bottom of the tenth inning to
pull out the victory.
With one out, NCW left fielder
1 sr Moochie Medley reached op an
' r -errot and sioft second? After
another out, pinch-hitter Ron
Shorter ended the game with a
single to center field.
The Pirates had tied the score in
the eighth inning on freshman
Winfred Johnson's second home
run of the game.
ECU got a much better perfor-
mance on the pitcher's mound
than in Monday's contest. As
compared with the 16 hits Mon-
day night, the Bishops managed
only seven hits in Tuesday's game.
Pirate starter Charlie Smith pit-
ched the first five innings, giving
up four runs while walking five
and striking out one.
Bob Davidson came in for
Smith in the sixth, and did not
allow another run until Shorter's
game-winning hit.
The main problem � one that
head coach Hal Baird said was as
much the pitchers' fault as the cat-
cher's � was the ability of Jhfc
NCW players to steal bases.
The Bishops snagged nine bases
on the afternoon � five of them
by second baseman Richard Mat-
tocks � which was two more than
the total of base hits.
Two errors and a stolen base by
Mattocks in the first inning
resulted in NCW's first run.
The lead didn't last for long,
however, as ECU played long ball
in the second inning. Todd Evans
sent the first pitch of the inning
deep over the center field fence to
tie the game.
Only two pitches later, Johnson
put the Pirates in the lead with his
sixth home run of the season.
After ECU scored a run in the
third, NCW bounced back to
score twice in their half of the inn-
ing.
After leading off with a walk.
Mattocks proceeded to steal se-
cond and third. Terry Coates
walked and also stole second, and
then Mike DeLeone got the first
hit of the day off Smith, scoring
Mattocks.
A squeeze bunt by Charlie
Simpson scored Coates and NCW
took a 4-3 lead after three innings
with only two base hits to their
credit.
There was no more scoring until
Johnson's homer in the eighth
temporarily tied the game.
With their current 15-11 record,
ECU will have to win some impor-
tant games down the stretch if
they hope to be invited to the
ECAC-South tournament � in
which they won last year.
This weekend, the Pirates will
play four big conference games in
three days. � all away.
On Friday afternoon, ECU will
play a doubleheader with
American University. On Satur-
day, ECU plays William and f
Mary and travel to the Unfvertfty
of Richmond on Sunday.
In a non-conference game, the
Pirates host the UNC Tar Heels
tonight in a 7:00 p.m. game at
Harrington Field.
Bishops' Speed Downs Bucs
Photo By OAKY PATTERSON
Pirate first baseman Todd Evans displays total concentration on
foul ball hit by N.C. Wesleyan player. Evans had a home ran in
yesterday's loss to the Bishops.
Denkler Receives Honor
ECU all-America forward
Mary Denkler received yet
another post-season award by be-
ing named to the National Sport-
swriters' Women's Basketball all-
America team.
The 6-0 Lady Pirate senior,
who scored 1,789 points in her
brilliant four-year career, was
listed as an honorable mention
choice.
This is the second all-America
team Denkler has been honored
by, the first being a first-team
selection on the Women's Basket-
ball News Service.
The voting was done by 24
sportswriters from around the
country and was sponsored by
The Virginian-Pilot and The
Ledger Star.
The Lady Pirate softball team
blew the Louisburg Hurricanes
away Tuesday, winning both
doubleheader games, 13-4 and
3-0.
In the opener, the two teams
were tied 3-all, but the Bucs
scored five runs each in the last
two innings to gain an eight-run
lead.
ECU Head Coach Sue
Manahan was delighted at her
team's showing. "This is the first
time we have really exploded this
year she said. "It was very ex-
citing
The Pirates had 17 hits and
committed three errors, while
Louisburg finished with 11 hits
and five errors.
Leading hitters for the Pirates
were: Fran Hooks, three-for-five;
Cynthia Shepard, two-for-four;
and Robin Graves, who went two-
for-four.
The Lady Bucs won their sixth
shutout victory in the second
game. In the eighth inning, ECU
freshman Carla Alphin reached
first base on an error by the short-
stop. Hooks then singled and with
runners on first and second,
senior centerfielder Mitzi Davis
hit a triple. Davis went three-for-
four to lead the Pirates.
"In the second game, we had a
little trouble keeping the ball
down Manahan said, "because
their pitcher (Carnetta Williams)
was pitching so fiat.
"She started the first game, and
we had trouble with her then, but
they switched pitchers in the fifth
inning
Now 16-7, the Lady Bucs will
play at the UNC-Charlotte Invita-
tional this weekend.
Pitelli, George Honored
Freshman Chris Pitelli and
Junior all-America Nan George
were top award recipients at the
annual ECU varsity swimming
and diving awards banquet Mon-
day night.
Pitelli, from Cranbury, N.J
won the Most Outstanding Male
Swimmer award, while George, of
Manassas, Va won the Top
Female award on the basis of her
all-America status in the 1983 Na-
tional meet.
The Most Outstanding Diver
award went to sophomore Scott
Eagle of Winston Salem.
The coaches award, given to the
athlete deemed "most
coachablc was presented to
sophomore Nancy James of
Winston Salem.
Nancy Ludwig, a freshman
from Middlesex, N.J and Jef-
frey Ritins, a freshman from
Boothwin, Pa both received
most improved awards.
Overton 's Dedication Propels ECU Sluggers
By KEN BOLTON
m�Ubi Sport Milor
For the last 14 years, there has
been one figure on the Pirate
baseball diamond that has con-
tributed greatly to the stability of
the ECU program.
That person is Gary Overton,
ECU's assistant baseball coach
for the last seven seasons.
But Overton's committment to
the ECU program goes far beyond
his seven years as assistant coach.
From 1969-73, while he was atten-
ding ECU, he was the team
manager of the Pirates.
Then, in 1974, Overton worked
as a graduate assistant and, in
1977, he began serving as assistant
coach.
The 31-year old Ahoskie native
has totally committed himself to
baseball here at East Carolina.
"ECU baseball is my pride and
joy Overton stated during a re-
cent Pirate practice. "I owe a lot
to the program because it has
given so much to me
When asked about the possibili-
ty of making a move to a head
coaching job somewhere, Overton
rejects the possibilities for now.
"At this point, I'm very content
with what I'm doing the sandy-
haired coach responded. "I'm
really happy here; happy with the
people I'm associated with and
with the city of Greenville
In past summers, Overton has
served as head coach of ECU's
summer league team. But with the
recent abolishment of the summer
league program, things won't
quite be the same this year.
"When I first heard about the
league being dropped, I thought
'Gosh, what am I going to do?
pendered Overton. "But this way
we're going to be able to do a lot
of extensive recruiting.
"We will be able to strengthen
that area (recruiting) by making as
many contacts as possible
Besides looking at future pro-
spects, Overton will also work at
ECU's popular summer camp
(June 14-20 and July 17-22). He
will also help out at Clemson and
N.C. State's camps.
As a rule, outfields at ECU
have been fundamentally sound
for years � a fact that parallels
Overtons work.
Overton and head coach Hal
Baird split most of the instruc-
tional duties, but the outfield is
Overton's forte on defense.
Offensively, his main job is one
that is famous for bringing the
second-guessers out of the wood-
work � third base coach.
Most people aren't aware of the
complexities involved in coaching
third base. His decision of
whether or not to send the runner
home can make the difference bet-
ween victory and defeat.
"When you're out there, you
have to always stay two or three
plays ahead Overton stated.
"There are a lot of factors that go
into making a decision
Overton said that there were no
less than five factors that had to
be considered in each situation.
Among them were: the spot in the
batting order, the number of outs,
the depth and positioning of the
outfielders and the speed of the
baserunners.
But the most important con-
sideration .according to Overton,
is the score. "We definitely take
less chances when we're behind
he said. "When we're ahead, it
gives us a better opportunity to
take chances
The Pirates have been going
through one of the worst slumps
in recent history over the last cou-
ple of weeks. But Overton is pro-
ud of the way that the team has
continued fighting.
"The record is disappointing,
but the play has not been Over-
ton commented. "We haven't had
the breaks that we've gotten in the
past, and we haven't reached our
peak yet.
"The team morale is very
good he added. "The players
are disappointed in the record
(15-11) but morale isn't affected
by the record. If anything, it has
pulled them closer. They are a real
good group of men
The Pirates hope to repeat as
champs of the ECAC-South con-
ference, and the next couple of
weeks will be crucial for their
chances.
If the ECU players can match
the 14-year dedication of their
assistant coach, then those
chances will be pretty good.
Sneaki
Track Meet Mars
The Intramural
Track Meet was heia
last week and four
teams turned out to be
the stars of the she
Thunder N' Lighten-
ing took top hone
the Independent divi-
sion with 71 points
Jones surpassed eer
men's residence hail
with a total of 52
points. Kappa Sign
finished ah.
every fraternitv
they achieved a total
of 54 points lr
women's div;
Tyler put togi
impressive team
collecting 63 poir
which
honors among
women's tear
Home Run Derti
Results
Muscular .If
drews erne
home run derr. �
ner b
home run �
Players
Cont'd From Pae 8
tion all-state
for Coach Bill Vn
"Jack can
either srr.a
ward noted H
nson. "He is ai
cellent shooter
can reall pass
basketball lack
does some th
can't tea.
loves to r
game. Obv:
adds size foi
bring rh
r-
i
! FREE
I OFFER GOC
I SECOl
MAC i
"fli
I Service avo
I on duty
I
I
I
I
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I
coupon expire
April 20th
o
H
itm s
sth SI
The
ECU
with NX. Wtsieyaa
?





II 14. l�W
Page 8
eight
cognition b being selected to
BASKETBALI WEFKLY'S
morable mention all-America
prep team The big guard of small
ward in the Northeastern Con-
ence this season. Sledge has
en recognized as all-state, all-
ast And all-conference for two
years, under coach Terry Frazier.
"Keith is really a good
cr �aid Harrison. "He can
it til! it up With hard uork he
� 11 be An aset to our program.
I has fine athletic ability, as
od an athlete a Bruce Pear-
�se in the final running for
rge ere UNC-Wilmington,
Virginia commonwealth
d L N. c harlotte.
nbill gie- the Pirates added
6-9, having plaed center
s season tor New Hancner after
ard the previous
lie averaged 15 points and 12
;j- while receiving ali-
enee and honorable men-
Set NEW, Page 9
e Wins
nlj two base hits to their
There was no more scoring until
on'v homer in the eighth
a tied the game.
N th their current 15-11 record.
ill hae to win some impor-
games dov-n the stretch if
pe to be invited to the
s uth tournament � in
the vson last year.
This weekend, the Pirates will
ill big conference games in
la. - � ail away.
I da afternoon, ECU will
a a doubleheader with
American University. On Satur-
ECU plas William and
and travel to the University
ond on Sunday.
n-conference game, the
si the INC tar Heels
a 7:00 p.m. game at
n field.
i
s Bucs
ow 16 the lady Bucs will
e I NC-C harlotte Invita-
is weekend
rge Honored
Most Outstanding Diver
went to sophomore Scott
oi V inston Salem.
'aches award, given to the
deemed "most
was presented to
re Nancy James of
Salem.
Ludwig, a freshman
m Middlesex, N.J and Jef-
Ritins, a freshman from
hwin, Pa . both received
I improved awards.
luggers
r ference, and the next couple of
weeks will be
chances
las
1.
crucial for their
he ECl players can match
14-year dedication of their
distant coach, then those
chances will be pretty good.
W
�.Lu
�V OA�V PATTMSOM
dugout duriag recent bout
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14, 1983
Sneaker Sam Sez
1 rack Meet Stars.
The Intramural 770
Pomt total coming to up action of co-rec
Dennis Lowery basketball enters
1 rack Meet was held collected 745 ooirm n , . 25� u�� ,tS
i.�i week anH frtnr ,a , po,nts to last week, the action is
last week and four take second while Ken as wild as ever The
teams turned out to be jyree took third with h gh- coHng Ladies
the stars of he show. 695 points, both hit- Choice are Ltroyng
Thunder 'N' Lighten- ting four home runs. The nets 2
,ng took top honors ,n In the women's And Fortune areTx
the independent div division, Angela! ctdput a Hd on
Sl0n with 71 points. Robb.ns scored 355 their basket. The En-
,0neS S3Sen f�r first and forc� looked very
mens residence hall Stacev Weitzel came impressive in their
,th a total ot 52 ,n second, with 135 early games, but the
points. Kappa Sigma points. Wild Turkeys and
Mn.shed ahead of their reckless play are
every tratern.ty as Softball Swinging certainly a team to be
thev achieved a total Toward Playoffs reckoned with. Just
of 54 points. In the With the regular who will be the cham-
women s division, season nearing a
Tvler put together an close, the high-
impressive team by powered action of the
collecting 63 points softball playoffs is
which took top about to begin. Next
honors among the week, the pressure- Golf Classic
women's teams. packed playoffs You can still play in
begin, so come out the golf classic at
Home Run Derby and see who claims Ayden Golf and
Results the title. Country Club if you
Muscular Jeff An- tee.off by 4:00
drews emerged as the The Mixed-Up Action today. So get your
home run derby win- Of Co-Rec Basket- clubs together and
ner by hitting six ball shoot for the lowest
home runs with his As the crazy, mixed score.
pions � come on out
and see as playoffs
begin Thursday, April
21 in Memorial Gym.
Lady Buccaneers Breeze Past
ACC After Devastating Loss
ECU tennis player Janet Russell was the lone Pirate victor in
Monday's match with Guilford College.
After an 8-1 loss
against Guilford Col-
lege (16-0) on Mon-
day, the ECU
women's tennis team
bounced back with a
9-0 victory over
Atlantic Christian
College Tuesday.
In Tuesday's singles
matches against ACC,
Katherine Tolson
(ECU) def. Leyne
Summerlin, 6-1, 6-0;
Debbie
Christine(ECU) def.
Susan Dickerson, 6-1,
6-0; Kim Harrison
(ECU) def. Bonnie
Fussell, 6-1, 6-1; Lon
Reep (ECU) def.
Catherine Williams,
6-4, 6-7, 6-0; Laura
Redford (ECU) def.
Karen Mallelo by
default and Robin
Biel (ECU) def. Mary
Davies by default.
In doubles, Russell-
Redford def.
Summerlin-
Dickerson, 7-6, 6-3;
Christine-Tolson def.
Mallelo-Davies by-
default; and Reep-
Harrison def. Fusell-
Williams, 6-4, 6-3.
In Monday's singles
matches against
Guilford, Karry Ken-
nedy (G) def.
Christine, 6-1, 6-0;
Janet Russell (ECU)
def. Julia Tupper.
6-2, 6-3; Lilly
Carpenter (G) def.
.Redford, 7-6, 6-4;
Melonv Bischoff (G)
def. Reep, 6-0,6-0;
Tammy Strickland
(G) def. Harrison,
6-2, 6-1; and Kimber-
ly Eastman def.
Robin Biel, 6-0, 6-0.
In doubles,
Kennedy-Tupper (G)
def. Russell-Redford.
6-2, 6-3; Carpenter-
Bischoff (G) def
Christine-Harrison,
6-2, 6-3; and Nahcy
Heller-Eastman (G)
def. Reep-Biel, 6-2,
6-2.
The Lady Bucs will
play at Peace College
today at 2:30 p.m.
and on Saturday, the
tennis team will take
on the Duke Universi-
ty Club team at 11
a.m. A rescheduled
match will be played
on Sunday when ECL
hosts UNC-Charlotte
at 10 a.m.
Players A dd Size
Cont'd From Page 8
nor, all-state honors
tor Coach Bill Wade.
"Jack can play
either small or big for-
ward noted Har-
rison "He is an ex-
cellent shooter and
can really pass the
basketball. Jack just
doe- some things you
can't teach and he
loves to plav the
game Obviously, he
adds size for us. but
it's
the
most important,
size on
perimeter
Turnbill selected
ECU over several Sun
Belt schools, as well
as West Virginia,
Clemson and Ap-
palachian State.
With six already
committed, there is a
possibility that ECU
may sign one or more
players prior to next
season.
BOXING
At the Starburst 11 Nite ClubDisco -
K inston
Exciting Amateur Boxing Action
at its Finest
Tonight -9:00pm
Doors Open at 8pm -
Admission $4.00
Exciting action featuring
STARBURST BOXING TEAM
of Kinston vs
WAYNE COUNTY BOXING TEAM
of Goldsboro a�
Elizabeth City Boxing Team
of Elizabeth City,NC
Join
the
Pirate
Attack!
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
bring this ad for a

I
FREE WASH j
OFFER GOOD WHEN USINGl
SECOND WASHING
MACHINE ALSO
"fluff n fold
Service available- attendants
on duty 7 days a week
Bausch & Lomb
Soft Lenses
COMPLETE
Includes initial eye examination, lenses, care
k't, instructions and follow up visits tor one
n.onth. ECU student ID. required.
100
99
FREE
$30
STUDENT MEMBERSHIP
for Graduating Seniors
SIGN UP
at
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
1983
- Monday,April 18 -
- Tuesday,April 19 -
10:00 am to 3:00pm
coupon expires
April 20th

tt
eWASH
HOUSE
10th St. Across from
Krispy Kreme (752 6117)
nth S' l Bloc; from
the "Hill" (752-9636)
OPTOMETNC
�Y�CAR�G�H1�R
Of Qrmiwlte w
228 GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Peter Holds
NOW LOOKING GOOD
COSTS LESS
Your free
diamond
SUPER BEACH '83
-Sunday,April 24th 1983 �
ing
The Cotolinas The Showmen

Billy Scott �
The Georgia Prophets
The Castaways

New Pitt County Fairgrounds
makes the
jiSilS
even
better.
Greenville
Gate Opens at 11:00 - Bonds Start ot 12;00
BYOB (Bring Your Own Beer) No Gloss or Bottles
IDs Checked ot Gate
-Tickets: Advance - $5.00 �At Gate - $7.00
Ticket Locotion GREENVILLE - Record Bar,Pitt Plazo
&
Sponsored By c.o. Tankard Distributing Co.
IKORVED"
CLASSRINGSINC
Now when you buy any ArtCarved
college ring, you not only get one ring
loaded with style and quality, you
get two. A great college ring�and a
diamond fashion ring, FREE. Its a
beauty�10K gold with a genuine 2
point diamond. Retail value�$60. The
perfect way to express yourself, your
style, or your feelings for that special
someone. Available exclusively from
your ArtCarved Representative for a
limited time only.
PI Kappa Phi
April 13,14,15
Wednesday,
Thursday,
Date ?r'yTime.
piace Student Supply Store Lobby
Deposit Required. MasterCard or Visa Accepted
1983 ArtCarved Ciass R�ngs mc

I





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14, 1983
?
Classifieds
Handball Tryouts Held
PERSONAL
PARENTS COMING DOWN
FOR THE WEEKEND? What,
you're not living in your dorm �
but with your boyfriend? Ned a
quick decorating Ob in your
room to make it look likt you
really live thereT Take It from
experience � you NEED OUR
SERVICES! We supply torn
porary. last-minute room decor
Plan ahead you'll find our
prices reasonable. WE HAVE
SYMPATHY! Call Tracey, Wen
dy Amy (TWA) We 9�t there
before they do Call 7S7-04S1.
O. I hope that your 72nd birth
day is everything you want it to
be WHAT? You heard me the
first time. C.
TO AGNES Perhaps this an
cient Chinese proverb will ex-
plain my reluctance better than
I could the other night: "FATTY
AND SKINNY WENT TO BED;
FATTY ROLLED OVER. AND
SKINNY WAS DEAD Please
fry to understand. Love. Slim
ROOMMATE
WANTED
Call Lan.e Shive 7S0-S301 or
GAIL JOVNER 7Sa ItHl.
TYPING: Term papers, thesis,
etc. Call Kempie Dunn, 7S7-47M.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER-
VICE: Complete audio repair
call after p.m. Mark 7IM7N.
MOV I NOT NO tob too large or
small I Reasonable rates, call
7SB-W33.
TY PI NO � U years ex per ienc e
Call MMgN after 5:30 p.m.
NEED TYPING? Call Cindy
355740 after J:00. 10 years ex-
perience IBM type. Spelling,
grammar errors checked.
IS LEARNING SPANISH A
BITCHT Causing your hair to
fall out? Call me � I can help.
Tutoring available, flexible
hours.JCERRI7S7-31S.
TYPING AND GRAPHICS �
Rush jobs. Portfolio and
references. Call S. Hamilton
7SI-��!7 or L. Piantadosia
WWII.
LOST AND
FOUND
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share two-bedroom
apt. 1 block from campus. Call
757 3�1J.
ROOMMATES WANTED FOR
summer Apartmenf is furnish-
ed. Split rent and utilities.
Cypress Gardens Apartments �
He. 757 157.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share excellent two bedroom
townhouse at wedgewood Arms
lor the Summer. Call 7S-107.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Call 752 2301.
7 FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted for summer, for fall.
Georgetown Apts
573 75month Across street
trom campus. Call 750-45.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for
summer: $90 plus 13 utilities.
Fully furnished Pool available.
Call 751 3711.
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED to share two-bedroom
apt Call after 5:00 750-30.
ROOMMATE WANiED TO
sublease Easrbrook apt. 13 rent
and utilities. Call
NEEDED FEMALE ROOM
MATE to share 2 bedroom
trailer one mile from ECU cam
pus For more informatin, call
Helen at 752 2171 after 4:30.
WANTED WOMAN to share
1 bedroom duplex May-July 31.
Furnished, grand piano,
sundeck Less than l mile from
campus 5125 month. 752 1077.
SERVICES
LOST BLUE and orange
MacGregor gym bag in BC 102,
Brewster Bldg Monday April
u about 12:00. Must have back
with all contents. No questions
asked. Call 75 MiS or contact
Political Science Department at
Brewster.
WANTED
2 bedroom River Bluff. Poolside
5245month 750-042.
FOR SALE
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff:
Welcome to our flea market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd. Open every Saturday and
Sunday � til 5. Crafts, tools, fur-
niture, books, etc. Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' items.
ReaI bargains! I
K2 750 KAWASAKI, 10)1, 5100
Priced to sell. Great bargain.
Good condition. This is a real
motorcycle. Make an offer. Call
7 51-40 JS.
�50 SPECIAL II Yamaha �l,200.
Good condition. An excellent
bike. Need to sell. Make an ol-
fer. Call �1-43S.
ltn CHEVY Custom Deluxe 10,
4x4. 4 speed, sliding rear win
dows, AMFM, cassette. P.S
f 8 Lock in hubs, Rally wheels.
Priced to sell, 010,500. Call
751-4035.
20 ALBUMS OF YOUR
CHOICE, newold hard to por,
rock, coun. an, clas, only $70.00
Take 3 years to pay in 0 easy
payments. No dealers please.
Call today, 7S0-0107 ask for JAY.
CAR STEREO COMPLETE
with amfm receiver, equaiiier
and speakers. 30 watts and like
new. Call STEVE at TSO-etS.
FOR SALE: FISHER 530
SPEAKERS. Will sell cheap,
SI SO. Call 7S0-W77.
FOR SALE: Burgundy 27-inch
10 speed Shogun bike. Just
bought in Feb. Toe clips. Ex-
cellent price 4125 or best offer.
Call 752-044 and leave message.
10 SPEED BICYCLE: Windsor
international S12S or best offer
Excellent shape, have barely us-
ed it. Can't afford to move with
it. Call 752-0054. Jennifer.
177 MGB Asking $1000. Call
757-0405.
2 .PANASONIC THRUSTERS. 2
advents, 2 Sony speakers, new,
must sell. Call 7S2-2340, ask for
Rick and Judy.
KENMORE REFRIGERATOR:
l 12 years old. 2.5 cubic feet.
Available May 1, $125. Great
bargain, call 752-0005.
4 SALE: '02 Blaier cheap! I
7 50-005.
FOR SALE: 13-cubic-fOOt
Whirlpool refrigerator. Avacado
green, S feet tall. Best offer. Call
750-1303.
Tryouts for the
South Region Men's
Team Handball
Squad will be held at
ECU'S Memorial
Gym on Sunday,
April 17. U. S. Olym-
pic Committee's 1983
National Sports
Festival is scheduled
for June 19 to July 3
in Colorado Springs,
Colorado.
The South Region
for the USDC Na-
tional Sports Festival
is the states of Texas,
Oklahoma, Arkansas,
Alabama, Flordia,
Georgia, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Mississip-
pi, North Carolina,
Tennessee and South
Carolina.
All expenses
associated with tryout
participation must be
paid by the can-
didates; however, if
selected, transporta-
tion to and from Col-
orado Springs, hous-
ing, food, and com-
petitive attire will be
provided by the U. S.
Olympic Committee.
Selected players
must be available for
pre-festival practice
and competition in
Colorado Springs for
June 19 to July 3.
Team handball
should not be confus-
ed with the American
four-walled handball.
The European team
handball is an ag-
gressive game of
throwing, jumping,
running, catching and
defensive moves that
develop natural
athletic skills. Simply
stated, team handball
is soccer with hands,
ice hockey without ice
and water polo
without water.
Interested can-
didates should have a
background in one or
more of the following
sports: basketball,
baseball, volleyball,
water polo or soccer.
Eleven ECU
students have par-
ticiplated in previous
National Sports
Festivals and former
ECU athlete, Sam
Jones, is currently on
the U. S. National
Women's team.
Team handball has
been an Olympic
sport since 1972, and
the United States both
a men's and women's
team in the 1984
Olympic games in Los
Angeles.
Tryouts will be held
from 9 a.m. until 1
p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m.
te -
PERSON(S) WANTED TO
sublease 2 bedroom townhouse
at Cherry Court. May Aug For
more info call 752 373
WANTING TO BUY: DOUBLE
BED Call 7SO-5404
MISC.
MOVING? NO
LARGE OR
Reasonable rates.
JOB TOO
SMALL!)
Call 750533.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, experience, quality
work, IBM Selectric typewriter.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
WANTED to sub-lease e�-
bedroom apartment at Tar
River Estates this summer. Apt.
is beside large swimming pool,
has patio and is located 5
minutes from campus. Call
750-4424 for more information.
looking' Vor AN APART
MENT?? We're graduating this
semester and need someone to
take our lease m May
2 bedroom townhouse with new
carpet, located at River Bluff
behind Papa Kati. For more in
formation, call 750 3044 and ask
for Steele oiKevln
APARTMENT to sublease for
summer at Cannon Court. Bus
route to ECU If interested, call
757-1420.
APARTMENT FOR
SUBLEASE: 1 BDRM. APT. ful
ly furnished and equipped. Air
cond. paid for with rent.
751-0205.
The htndball action will be hot and heavy this Sunday in Memorial
Gjm
sX.
Mast
tm
SHIRTS UNDER '5" EACH
You II spprec.aH ttitst �� T SHIRTS PIUS PfUCt OUSTIRS - Musclt
T Shirts Shiinmel Shirts an Lsiies ftibml Chemist �� stretch lace tniii
all in a �n�e �anety ot celorj an sues Pnctd al aaeer $5 00 aach T�ey �
be gone soon so come in an select yeers new'
Carolina East Mall
7S697OT
SHIRTS
April 15th,16th& 17th
Buy one 14oz T-Bone Reg. Price $6.99
Pay only price $3.50 Second T-Bone
All steaks served with King
Idaho Potatoes or Fries -Texas Toast
salad Bar only $1.00 with this special
.X
)jf
TSSF
1 -
I � -
�vt.
APARTMENT FOR
RENT:
.m,m�,�,��m��mmmmmmmmm
Announcing the 3rd Annual
Carnival Sidewalk Sale
to be held April 20,1983
Watch for our ad in the nextj
L�$sueofJtoeEast�
STUDENT
SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by
East Carolina University
Featuring Prime Rib
Every Fri.� Sat. Night
Now Serving 14ozT-Bone
April Lunch Specials Mon-Sat 11-2
Jr. Sirloin $2.19 wsalad bar $3.19
Chopped Sirloin $2.49
wsalad bar $3.49
lb. Hamburger wBaked Pot. $1.89
wsalad bar $2.89
Baked Potato wsalad bar $2.50
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
500 w. Greenville Blvd. 756-0040
v:
IBREAJCFASTBAR OFFERING!
� FreeMy Scrambled E0g� a Homatnad ButtarmMk ftoacutta � lac
� Country MHk OraHry � Hoata Fried Potato � � Soutt�arn StytaOritaa
Homemade MutUna � Link and Patty Sauaaoe � A Ofeotce of
�8oSo�aya"Own6pa�lalFrvWToppinfltaOratadAmarlcan-
PLUS Tha Fruit Mf .featuring a variety af free" tmH and
bWMbWJWMN
� 0YJt11�Jft.
AHOUDAYt
� 0 AJH1M M
Also Open
Friday - Sa4uwioy MoojMa
Midniqht-3om
SHOMBYS
205 GrOTtvilfe Blvd.
fW"fS'SSfs'sW- '
'SSSSSSSSSS
'SSSSSSSSSSSSSSS,
Uptown Clothing Company
For Spring Fashions purchased with you in mind
Men's & Women's Designer Fashions
Hang 10 Sportswear - Reduced 40
Palmetto Shouts 17.00
Lordlsaac Shorts 16.00
Happy Leggs 17.00
Tom Boy Shorts 11.95
Palmetto Knit Tops 13.95
Jordache Knits 13.95
Equitation Knits 11.95
Chic Knits 13.95
Chic Jeans 23.00
Calvin Klein 24.00
Lee 23.00
Levis 21.00
Zena 24.00
TresJolie 19.95
Sasson 18.00
Bill Blass 20.00
YARD SALE at bond's
Saturday, April 16
FEATURING
Group A lPr. For $15 2 Pr. For $25 3 Pr. For $30
Group B 1 Pr. For $20 2 Pr. For $35 3 Pr. For $45
Group C 1 Pr. For $25 2 Pr. For $45 3 Pr. For $60
ZT3jsiZI
HUNTING & FISHING SUPPLIES
and
APPAREL
by Robert Bruce,Court Casual and Boast.
Tenniswear by Loomtogs,Bike jackets,Ski Jackets
and Raincoats by Abel are reduced - giving - you
- Values never before offered.
Hang 10 Swim Suits - Reduced 50uo
Tops by You Babes,Avcr Mui,Tom Boy,Espirit
Greenville Square Shopping Center
(In Tha Cornar, At Greenville Square)
756-9509
Hours: 10-6. Mon-Sat
BONDS
218 Arinegon
fircciwilic.lix:
756-6001
s�V�S&
KL HODGES COt
210 E. Fifth Street
Qrccnv.flc.rtX.
SPORTING
� � I

�� �m�mmimmmuimmmim0k
I
� I, �'��� -
� "B��na�il
l�





Title
The East Carolinian, April 14, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 14, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.264
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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