The East Carolinian, April 12, 1983






Mz
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No�l
Tuesday, April 12, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000

Graduation Location
Ceremony Will Be Held In Ficklen Stadium
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Chancellor John M. Howell,
after reaching a compromise with
all parties, has reversed his deci-
sion to hold the Ma commence-
ment exercises at Minges Col-
iseum
Howell announced late Friday
thai the Maj o commencement
ceremony would be moved back
to Ficklen Statium, its usual sue.
1 or more than a week. Howell
and Assistant Dean i C. Rowe,
who ;s chairman of the Com-
mencement Committee, were
receiving strong resistance from
graduating senior- to their plan to
move this year's ceremony to
Minges Coliseum which only
hold's 6,900 people rhe 6,900
figure included graduates and
faculty, putting actual available
seating at about 5,000. Past com-
mencement crowds have been
estimated at 13.(XX).
Ficklen was originally
unavailable because a $163,000
renovation project on the
stadium's football field was
scheduled to begin later this
month.
I Cl political science senior
Mike Wat kins had been cir-
culating a petition asking that the
ceremony be returned to Ficklen.
Other students were upset because
Rowe was only issuing two tickets
per student to the commencement
exercises.
Rowe had planned to set up
outdoor speakers for those unable
to get inside Minges and closed-
circuit television coverage for 200
others.
Howell said student resistance
to the plan was one of the factors
in his decision to return the
ceremony to Ficklen under a new
format where graduating students
as well as visitors will be seated in
the stands leaving only the band-
shell and speakers platform on the
sidelines at the south end of the
stadium.
"A major factor was that 1
began to see that they were not go-
ing to start the project as early as 1
had originally understood
Howell added.
Howell said that the length of
time between graduation and the
time the renovation was going to
start became "shorter and
shorter" and so he felt the
ceremony could be switched back
to Ficklen.
"There was a lot o student
discontent with the decision to
have it in Minges Rowe said,
adding that Howell .ad been con-
sidering alternatives for several
days. "Construction will be tak-
See GRADUATION, Page 7
Pt�0�t Bv CINDY (&Ll-
The site was chosen
Ficklen Stadium will be the site of next month's commencment ceremonies for FCl
by the university administration after students objected to the limited seating for family and friends
available in Minges Coliseum
Legislature Approves Funding For Banquet

i
legislator David V hitley
opposes banquet funding
B DARRYL BROWN
.sisij.fi: rw frditnr
The SGA Legislature voted
Mondav night to appropriate $752
to fund its annual awards ban-
quet, despite heavy opposition to
the measure which allows student
fees to pay for non-student guests
at the banquet.
I ast year legislators paid for in-
dividual tickets to finance the
banquet.
I egislator David Cook led the
opposition to student funding of
the banquet, noting that the SGA
had cut food and entertainment
expenses from the budget of other
groups in efforts to trim SGA
allocations.
Da id Whitlcv, chairman of the
appropriations committee, also
argued against the funding, citing
a guideline o the appropriations
committee that prohibits the
allocation of student activity fees
for "social events with no educa-
tional or social value Whitley
said some people could consider
the giving out of awards at the
banquet a service, but he did not
think it was.
Supporters o the measure,
which passed by a vote of 17 to
13, included SGA President Eric
Henderson. Henderson said the
cost of this year's banquet is lower
than last year's, and noted that
the room in which the event will
be held does not cost anything.
The banquet will be held in the
multi-purpose room of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Henderson also said entertain-
ment at the event would be pro-
vided free by a student of the
School of Music, and that the ap-
propriation must be made im-
mediately to allow the caterer,
Servomation, time to plan the
event.
Legislator Bob Morgan also
argued for the bill, saving that
SGA members work several hours
a week all year without pay and
"this is the only thing we'll be
asking for ourselves
The bill provides $752 for a
banquet and reception for 110
people, including members of the
legislature, the SGA executive of-
ficers, members of the honor
board, selected faculty, guests and
other SGA staff members.
The measure originally contain-
ed an additional $100 appropria-
tion for wine at the reception, but
it was brought out in debate that
student fees cannot be used to
purchase alcoholic beverages, ac-
cording to the policy of the ECU
Board of Trustees and the SGA.
In other SGA business, the
Legislature passed a resolution
urging that graduation be held on
a Saturday in future years, to
allow friends arid relatives o
graduates the chance to attend the
ceremony without having to leave
work or school. Graduation is
scheduled to be on a Fridav at 9
a.m. this year.
The legislature deb
resolution that would ask
school administrator.
the day of ihi- yeai s coi
meni to Saturday. �
represents the gra
senior class preside
against the measure h
would be difficult for n
pie. especialh speakers,
plans and reservations at sucl
late date.
He said the switch could in-
terfere with some gradual
to get married the da after
graduation. He also said the
ministration would be verv reluc-
tant to chanee the dav.
Researcher Speaks On
'Dealing With Disaster'
a. �J �
A special program coordinated
b a nationally-known researcher
will be held Tuesday night to pro-
vide emotional support for people
who were involved in the explo-
sion at the Village Green Apart-
ment complex last month.
Dr. Susan McCammon, assis-
tant pro lessor in the the
psycholog) department, with the
support ol Elmer Meyer, vice
chancellor for student life, has in-
vited Jack Smith, a post traumatic
stress researcher at Duke Univer
sitv to present a program titled
"How Do We Deal With
Disaster'1"
Smith will lead a community
and survivor debriefing for people
somehow involved in the disaster.
Meyer worked with McCammon
to form a special committee on
post traumatic reactions.
McCammon said the evening,
program, which will be held at 7
p.m. at the Catholic Newman
Center (953 E. 10th St.), is open
to the entire Greenville and ECU
communities. This includes sur-
vivors ot the explosion, their
friends and family members and
other interested community
members.
McCammon said tnai sne
decided to form the committee to
deal with the mental health con-
cerns of people involved with the
explosion. She noted that the
ECU campus ministers had pro-
vided some immediate emotional
response to the disaster during
their visits to the hospital and dur-
ing the ordeal. "I wasn't aware of
any other response from the men-
tal health community McCam-
mon added.
McCammon said the ad hoc
committe modeled its ideas after
the past traumatic stress work that
was done in Kansas City, Mo
following the 1981 hotel disaster
that claimed 111 lives and injured
more than 200 people. Smith was
one of the people who worked on
post traumatic stress after that
disaster.
McCammon noted that the
Village Green disaster had "some
similarities" with the Kansas City
disaster because it was
"completely unexpected" and
"not an act of God McCam-
mon added that both disasters
were the result of "a failure of
technology
McCammon said that it's im-
portant, when an abnormal tragic
event takes place, to help people
involved in the disaster to unders-
tand, intergrate and live through
the experience.
McCammon noted that because
an event is not normal, there are
certain expected predictable reac-
tions that people will have, such
as shock and disbelief. To others
who were present at the time of
the explosion, there was an
automatic response to take action
to aid those injured in the explo-
sion. A third reaction is "a period
of assessment" when people in-
tegrate what has happened and
finally experience the full impact
of the disaster.
"We felt like it was important
to let people know that these reac-
tions are normal responses to ab-
normal situations McCammon
said.
According to McCammon some
ECU students involved in the
Village Green incident have been
experiencing several kinds of post
traumatic stress symptoms. She
noted that some have complained
of recurrent nightmares, trouble
concentrating, fear that the
disaster will happen again and
problems with school.
The program tonight will be
giving these people an opportuni-
ty to share their feelings with
others, McCammon said. "We
want to legitimize the reactions
that they're feeling and let them
know this is normal she added.
McCammon also added that a
person who experiences
"unusually persistant" post
traumatic stress should seek pro-
fessional help.
Smith will lead an open discus-
sion and then participants will
break into small groups for
discussion. McCammon said that
students involved in the Jan. 8 fire
at the Tau Kappa Epsilon frater-
nity house are also invited to at-
tend this program.
Fraternity Members
Charged In Assault
Greek Week
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
ECU fraternit and sorority members pulled out all stops last week
to celebrate Greek Week. For more pictures of the event, see the
special feature on page 5.
By MARY TOWNSEND
Staff V� rite
The first of 12 East Carolina
University students facing assault
and hazing charges in connection
with Omega Psi Phi initiation
practices was found guilty last
week of assaulting a pledge
brother.
Wayne P. Smith, an ECU
graduate student was granted a
prayer for judgement (a postpone-
ment of sentencing) from Judge
Robert Wheeler. Wheeler wants
to hear the remaining 11 cases
before sentencing Smith. Smith
was found not guilty on the haz-
ing charge.
Tony Micheal Jones, 20, filed
the hazing and assault charges
against 12 students, most of
whom are Omega Psi Phi fraterni-
ty members.
Jones, a former Omega Psi Phi
pledge, testified he suffered
serious injuries requiring medical
attention when he and other
pledge brothers were assaulted by
a group of Omega Psi Phi frater-
nity brothers on Feb. 10.
Smith, not an Omega Psi Phi
member, was also present accor-
ding to Jones' testimony. Jones
testified that he and the other
pledges were visiting some of the
Omega Psi Phi fraternity brothers
at a Wilson Acres' apartment the
evening of the alleged assault.
Jones said they were coming
down a flight of stairs when
group o around 12 fraternity
members and Smith began pun-
ching and kicking them.
Jones also said he had bee:
victim of hazing on Feb. 4 wl
he and the other pledge broth s
were forced to eat drv gr
drink scalding water. Jones sa
later that evening he was slapped
and paddled. According to Joi
testimony. Smith was an act t
participant in the hazing
Smith, charged with hazing a
assault inflicting serious in ury,
pleaded not guilty on both counts.
and testified that he had not been
present the evenings of the alleged
assault and hazing.
Smith, found innocent of the
hazing charge, will be sentenced
when the remaining cases are
tried. The remaining 11 students
charged by Jones for similar
fenses were granted a three-week
continuation. The continuation
was granted when the lawyei
representing all 11 defendants
withdrew from the cases due to a
conflict of interest.
According to Assistant Director
of Campus Public Health
Safety Francis Eddings, this is the
first official hazing case in more
than eight years.
School Funding Will Be A 'DeadIssue'
With the new executive officers
about to be sworn in, the con-
troversy surrounding the funding
of academic departments may
well become, in the words of Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer, a "dead issue President-
elect Paul Naso has said he is in
favor of funding projects that
receive no state funding and
which benefit the school.
Outgoing SGA President Eric
Henderson recently stated his
disapproval of funding various
schools in the university, such as
the School of Music. The dean of
the music school, Charles
Schwartz, said his department
depends on funds from the SGA
to finance the projects of the dif-
ferent music ensembles. He said
state law forbids the funding of
certain activities that he feels are
vital to the music school and the
university.
SGA Speaker of the House
Gary Williams rebutted the charge
by Henderson that academic
departments abuse the legislature.
He said the SGA is not funding
the schools directly, but indirect-
ly, through student organizations,
such as The Student Forum for
Musical Instruments, that are
separate from the individual
academic departments.
Williams said the SGA funds
the School of Music for activities
that are beneficial to the school as
a whole. He said the decision to
fund these departments is based
on the same criteria as other stu-
dent organizations.
Both Williams and Dean
Schwartz admitted their is some
overlap in the SGA funding into
the instructional side of the
department.
Schwartz said the School of
Music depends solely on the SGA
to fund extracurricular activities
that by law cannot be funded b
the state.
Vice Chancellor Meyer, advisor
to the SGA, said he believes the
legislature as a whole should
decide what to do with the money
they appropriate.
Dean Shwartz did say that their
original request of funds from the
SGA for $56,000 has been altered
considerably after consultation
with Williams. Shwartz said he is
not taking advantage of the SGA,
but is only trying to get money for
music programs that enhance the
reputation of ECU.
f





(She lEaat �awltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.5
P
Tuesday, April 12,1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Graduation Location
Ceremony Will Be Held In Ficklen Stadium
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SMI �rilf
Chancellor John M. Howell,
after reaching a compromise with
all parties, has reversed his deci-
sion to hold the May commence-
ment exercises at Minges Col-
iseum.
Howell announced late Friday
that the May 6 commencement
ceremony would be moved back
to Ficklen Statium. its usual site.
For more than a week, Howell
and Assistant Dean C. C. Rowe,
who is chairman of the Com-
mencement Committee, were
receiving strong resistance from
graduating seniors to their plan to
move this year's ceremony to
Minges Coliseum which only
holds 6.900 people. The 6,900
figure included graduates and
faculty, putting actual available
seating at about 5,000. Past com-
mencement crowds have been
estimated at 13,000.
Ficklen was originally
unavailable because a $163,000
renovation project on the
stadium's football field was
scheduled to begin later this
month.
ECU political science senior
Mike Watkins had been cir-
culating a petition asking that the
ceremony be returned to Ficklen.
Other students were upset because
Rowe was only issuing two tickets
per student to the commencement
exercises.
Rowe had planned to set up
outdoor speakers for those unable
to get inside Minges and closed-
circuit television coverage for 200
others.
Howell said student resistance
to the plan was one of the factors
in his decision to return the
ceremony to Ficklen under a new
format where graduating students
as well as visitors will be seated in
the stands leaving only the band-
shell and speakers platform on the
sidelines at the south end of the
stadium.
"A major factor was that I
began to see that they were not go-
ing to start the project as early as I
had originally understood
Howell added.
Howell said that the length of
time between graduation and the
time the renovation was going to
start became "shorter and
shorter" and so he felt the
ceremony could be switched back
to Ficklen.
"There was a lot of student
discontent with the decision to
have it in Minges Rowe said,
adding that Howell had been con-
sidering alternatives for several
days. "Construction will be tak-
See GRADUATION, Page 7
�I
Pfeoto By CINDY WALL
The site was chosen
Ficklen Stadium will be the site of next month's commencment ceremonies for ECU
by the university administration after students objected to the limited seating for family and friends
available in Minges Coliseum.
Legislature Approves Funding For Banquet
4
Legislator David Whitley
opposes banquet funding
By DARRYL BROWN
AuiiUnl Ne�� Editor
The SGA Legislature voted
Monday night to appropriate $752
to fund its annual awards ban-
quet, despite heavy opposition to
the measure which allows student
fees to pay for non-student guests
at the banquet.
Last year legislators paid for in-
dividual tickets to finance the
banquet.
Legislator David Cook led the
opposition to student funding of
the banquet, noting that the SGA
had cut food and entertainment
expenses from the budget of other
groups in efforts to trim SGA
allocations.
David Whitley, chairman of the
appropriations committee, also
argued against the funding, citing
a guideline of the appropriations
committee that prohibits the
allocation of student activity fees
for "social events with no educa-
tional or social value Whitley
said some people could consider
the giving out of awards at the
banquet a service, but he did not
think it was.
Supporters of the measure,
which passed by a vote of 17 to
13, included SGA President Eric
Henderson. Henderson said the
cost of this year's banquet is lower
than last year's, and noted that
the room in which the event will
be held does not cost anything.
The banquet will be held in the
multi-purpose room of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Henderson also said entertain-
ment at the event would be pro-
vided free by a student of the
School of Music, and that the ap-
propriation must be made im-
mediately to allow the caterer,
Servomation, time to plan the
event.
Legislator Bob Morgan also
argued for the bill, saying that
SGA members work several hours
a week all year without pay and
"this is the only thing we'll be
asking for ourselves
The bill provides $752 for a
banquet and reception for 110
people, including members of the
legislature, the SGA executive of-
ficers, members of the honor
board, selected faculty, guests and
other SGA staff members.
The measure originally contain-
ed an additional $100 appropria-
tion for wine at the reception, but
it was brought out in debate that
student fees cannot be used to
purchase alcoholic beverages, ac-
cording to the policy of the ECU
Board of Trustees and the SGA.
In other SGA business, the
Legislature passed a resolution
urging that graduation be held on
a Saturday in future years, to
allow friends aAd relatives of
graduates the chance to attend the
ceremony without having to leave
work or school. Graduation is
scheduled to be on a Friday at 9
a.m. this year.
The legislature debated a
resolution that would ask the
school administration to change
the day of this year's commence-
ment to Saturday. Cook. vho
represents the graduating class as
senior class president, argued
against the measure because it
would be difficult for many peo-
ple, especially speakers, to change
plans and reservations at such a
late date.
He said the switch could in-
terfere with some graduates' plans
to get married the day after
graduation. He also said the ad-
ministration would be very reluc-
tant to change the day.
Researcher Speaks On
' Dealing With Disaster'
A special program coordinated
by a nationally-known researcher
will be held Tuesday night to pro-
vide emotional support for people
who were involved in the explo-
sion at the Village Green Apart-
ment complex last month.
Dr. Susan McCammon, assis-
tant professor in the the
psychology department, with the
support of Elmer Meyer, vice
chancellor for student life, has in-
vited Jack Smith, a post traumatic
stress researcher at Duke Univer
sity to present a program titled
"How Do We Deal With
Disaster?"
Smith will lead a community
and survivor debriefing for people
somehow involved in the disaster.
Meyer worked with McCammon
to form a special committee on
post traumatic reactions.
McCammon said the evening,
program, which will be held at 7
p.m. at the Catholic Newman
Center (953 E. 10th St.), is open
to the entire Greenville and ECU
communities. This includes sur-
vivors of the explosion, their
friends and family members and
other interested community
members.
McCammon said that sne
decided to form the committee to
deal with the mental health con-
cerns of people involved with the
explosion. She noted that the
ECU campus ministers had pro-
vided some immediate emotional
response to the disaster during
their visits to the hospital and dur-
ing the ordeal. "I wasn't aware of
any other response from the men-
tal health community McCam-
mon added.
McCammon said the ad hoc
committe modeled its ideas after
the past traumatic stress work that
was done in Kansas City, Mo
following the 1981 hotel disaster
that claimed 111 lives and injured
more than 200 people. Smith was
one of the people who worked on
post traumatic stress after that
disaster.
McCammon noted that the
Village Green disaster had "some
similarities" with the Kansas City
disaster because it was
"completely unexpected" and
"not an act of God McCam-
mon added that both disasters
were the result of "a failure of
technology
McCammon said that it's im-
portant, when an abnormal tragic
event takes place, to help people
involved in the disaster to unders-
tand, intergrate and live through
the experience.
McCammon noted that because
an event is not normal, there are
certain expected predictable reac-
tions that people will have, such
as shock and disbelief. To others
who were present at the time of
the explosion, there was an
automatic response to take action
to aid those injured in the explo-
sion. A third reaction is "a period
of assessment" when people in-
tegrate what has happened and
finally experience the full impact
of the disaster.
"We felt like it was important
to let people know that these reac-
tions are normal responses to ab-
normal situations McCammon
said.
According to McCammon some
ECU students involved in the
Village Green incident have been
experiencing several kinds of post
traumatic stress symptoms. She
noted that some have complained
of recurrent nightmares, trouble
concentrating, fear that the
disaster will happen again and
problems with school.
The program tonight will be
giving these people an opportuni-
ty to share their feelings with
others, McCammon said. "We
want to legitimize the reactions
that they're feeling and let them
know this is normal she added.
McCammon also added that a
person who experiences
"unusually persistant" post
traumatic stress should seek pro-
fessional help.
Smith will lead an open discus-
sion and then participants will
break into small groups for
discussion. McCammon said that
students involved in the Jan. 8 fire
at the Tau Kappa Epsilon frater-
nity house are also invited to at-
tend this program.
Fraternity Members
Charged In Assault
Greek Week
MX By GAVE WILLIAMS
ECU fraternity and sorority members pulled out all stops last week
to celebrate Greek Week. For more pictures of the event, see the
special feature on page 5.
By MARY TOWNSEND
Staff Writer
The first of 12 East Carolina
University students facing assault
and hazing charges in connection
with Omega Psi Phi initiation
practices was found guilty last
week of assaulting a pledge
brother.
Wayne P. Smith, an ECU
graduate student was granted a
prayer for judgement (a postpone-
ment of sentencing) from Judge
Robert Wheeler. Wheeler wants
to hear the remaining 11 cases
before sentencing Smith. Smith
was found not guilty on the haz-
ing charge.
Tony Micheal Jones, 20, filed
the hazing and assault charges
against 12 students, most of
whom are Omega Psi Phi fraterni-
ty members.
Jones, a former Omega Psi Phi
pledge, testified he suffered
serious injuries requiring medical
attention when he and other
pledge brothers were assaulted by
a group of Omega Psi Phi frater-
nity brothers on Feb. 10.
Smith, not an Omega Psi Phi
member, was also present accor-
ding to Jones' testimony. Jones
testified that he and the other
pledges were visiting some of the
Omega Psi Phi fraternity brothers
at a Wilson Acres' apartment the
evening of the alleged assault.
Jones said they were coming
down a flight of stairs when a
group of around 12 fraternity
members and Smith began pun-
ching and kicking them.
Jones also said he had been a
victim of hazing on Feb. 4 when
he and the other pledge brothers
were forced to eat dry grits and
drink scalding water. Jones said
later that evening he was slapped
and paddled. According to Jones'
testimony. Smith was an active
participant in the hazing.
Smith, charged with hazing and
assault inflicting serious injury,
pleaded not guilty on both counts,
and testified that he had not been
present the evenings of the alleged
assault and hazing.
Smith, found innocent of the
hazing charge, will be sentenced
when the remaining cases are
tried. The remaining 11 students
charged by Jones for similar of-
fenses were granted a three-week
continuation. The continuation
was granted when the lawyer
representing all 11 defendants
withdrew from the cases due to a
conflict of interest.
According to Assistant Director
of Campus Public Health and
Safety Francis Eddings, this is the
first official hazing case in more
than eight years.
School Funding Will Be A 'DeadIssue'
With the new executive officers
about to be sworn in, the con-
troversy surrounding the funding
of academic departments may
well become, in the words of Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer, a "dead issue President-
elect Paul Naso has said he is in
favor of funding projects that
receive no state funding and
which benefit the school.
Outgoing SGA President Eric
Henderson recently stated his
disapproval of funding various
schools in the university, such as
the School of Music. The dean of
the music school, Charles
Schwartz, said his department
depends on funds from the SGA
to finance the projects of the dif-
ferent music ensembles. He said
state law forbids the funding of
certain activities that he feels are
vital to the music school and the
university.
SGA Speaker of the House
Gary Williams rebutted the charge
by Henderson that academic
departments abuse the legislature.
He said the SGA is not funding
the schools directly, but indirect-
ly, through student organizations,
such as The Student Forum for
Musical Instruments, that are
separate from the individual
academic departments.
Williams said the SGA funds
the School of Music for activities
that are beneficial to the school as
a whole. He said the decision to
fund these departments is based
on the same criteria as other stu-
dent organizations.
Both Williams and Dean
Schwartz admitted their is some
overlap in the SGA funding into
the instructional side of the
department.
Schwartz said the School of
Musk depends soWy on the SGA
to fond extracurricular activities
that by law cannot be funded by
the state.
Vice Chancellor Meyer, advisor
to the SGA, said he believes the
legislature as a whole should
decide what to do with the money
they appropriate.
Dean Shw&rtz did say that their
original request of funds from the
SGA for $56,000 has been altered
considerably after consultation
with Williams. Shwartz said he is
not taking advantage of the SGA,
but is only trying to get money for
musk programs that enhance the
reputation of ECU.
I

anfrf" - O " &,
�-�-���-
,flS-(fc





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 12, 1983
Announcements
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ment will run as long as you
want ana suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity.
The deadline tor an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
tor the Tuesday paper and 3
P m Wednesdayy for the Thurs
oay paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
Departments
CANCER RESEARCH
Drs Mary J and Spence O
Raab both m the Department of
Hematclogy and Oncology at
ECU Medical School, will speak
on The Future of Cancer
Research" at the AED meeting
on Tuesday. April 12, at 7:30
p m m Flanagan 307 All
members and interested per
sons are encouraged to attend!
There will also be a meeting of
Old and new officers of AED at
7 00 p.m in the conference
room
AMBASSADOR PARTY
The Ambassador's end of the
� ear part is scheduled for Sun
ray. April 24 1983 at 6 00 the
Vice Chancellor and his wife will
t.e hos'mg the party and maps to
'heir home can be picked up at
he Alumm Center if you plan to
attend you must sign up by
Wed April 20th m the
Taylor Slaughter Alumni
Center The scholarship. Am-
bassador of the Year, and other
awards will be announced at this
tme We will look forward to
seeing everyone there
FRISBEECLUB
Come to the bottom of college
rues and thurs 4:00 and
� cot ECU'S ultimate
fanatics: the Irates
"ad a great year and
should most certainly be on top
Club meetings are
- jnts B 00 MSC Rm.
.4 Mciio Hello Nags Head see
you ths weekend at the irates
end of the ear party.
BEST BODY CONTEST
There will be a Best Body Con
test, April 22 1983 m Memorial
Gym beginning at 8 00 pm. 1st
and 2nd place plrizes will be
awarded A disco will follow this
event Sponsored by NAACP
Limited supply of tickets
available, price $2 00 Admis
Sion S2 00
FREE BAHAMA
VACATION
You've been waiting all year
and now it here the second an
nual BAHAMA MAMA PARTY
sponsored by Budweiser and
Hawaiian Tropic. The Party is
on Monday. April 25 (the day
before reading day) and begins
at 300! Tickets are on sale right
now for S3 00 and entitle YOU to
a drawing for a FREE TRIP TO
THE BAHAMA'S for "two" for a
week, and also a glimpse at the
V!SS HAWAIIAN TROPIC
BIKINI CONTEST. YOU also
get a Hawaiian Tropic viser, a
Budweiser mug , and best of
alla afternoon of listening to
the SUPER GRIT BAND while
enjoying ALL THE FREE
BEER YOU CAN DRINK
Ticket sales are limited so pur
chase your tickets NOW! For
more information call 752 5543.
"Hey Bud, Lets Party
PRCCLUB
The PRC Club will Imeet Tues.
April 12, in Brewster D 102 at 6
p m. Tom Hartman, Superinten
dent of Cape Hafteras Nat'l
SeashoreFort Raleigh, will be
the guest speaker His topic will
be "How Agency Policy is Im-
plemented in the Field
MARKETING FILM
SERIES
The Department of Marketing
and the American Marketing
Association present a Marketing
Film Series which will provide
information about marketing
opportunities and show the
relevance of marketing to cor
porate objectives and method of
operation Topics will include
"Marketing Research" (April
13) and "Retailing" (April 14)
The films will be shown in Raw!
130 at 3 00 on both days All in
terested ECU students are in
vited to attend
PRINTMAKER
WORKSHOP
Jacob Landau, well known
printmaker, painter, and
distinguished professor of Pratt
Universiy, will conduct a morn
ing and afternoon printmaking
workshop seminar on April 14,
1983 Morning time. 8:30-12,
afternoon. 130 5. There will be
a slide presentation and lecture
that evening in Jenkins
Auditorioum at 7:30 that is open
to the general public.
HANDGUN CONTROL
Does the fact that more than
20,000 Americans die from nan
dgun violence each year upset
you? If so, you are encouraged
to take a minute and stop by the
table m front of the Student Sup
ply Store tommorrow. Wednes
day, April 13th, from 12 to 3 pm.
information on how you can
show your concern to our public
officials will be available
READ PAGE 29
If you have a brown Universi
ty Catalog, then if might help
you to read page 29 about the CP
and PS
DUNKING BOOTH
FOR RENT
Dunking booth for rent at
$25day or 1100week BIG
MONEY MAKER. Contact War-
ren Co. jaycees, P. O. Box 431.
Warranton, N. c. 275t9 or call
(919) 257 121 or 257 1710.
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of PM Sigma Pi's
national honor fraternity ex-
tends congratulations to the
following new brothers: Rusty
Foster, Debbie Albutton. Jill
Cargile, Eleanor Avary, Jane
Jefferey, Linda Wilson, Lynne
Frye, Caroline Haynas, Blake
Eudailey, Barbara Chadweii,
Georgia Mooring, Donna
Zekonis and Danlse Gerard.
We're proud of you
Tau Chapter will conduct Its
final business meeting on
Wednesday, April 13, at 5:00 pm
in Rawl 130. All brothers please
attend this meeting. We will
discus's plans for Founder's day
and Beach Week as well as old
business.
FREE SHOW
You can see ECU'S Playhouse
Production of "Our Town"
FREE. Simply sign-up to usher
for any night, or matinee perfor-i
mances on the 15th and the 19th.
You must sign-up in advance.
Stop by the drama dept. office
for more information.
ECGC
Rev. June Norrls, pastor of
the Metropolitan Community
Church in Raleigh, will be the
featured speaker at the ECGC's
meeting. Rev Norris will speak
at 7:30 p.m. at the Newman
House, 953 E. Tenth ST. All In-
terested persons are invited.
SCHOOL OF ART
The School of Art Is offering
the initial Wellington B. Gray
Memorial Scholarship for
undergraduate students of
junior and senior rank who are
currently enrolled full-time in
the School of Art and majoring
in Art Education. The Well-
ington B. Gray Memorial
Scholarship is the amount of
500 00. To qualify, a student
must have a grade point
average of 3.5 in hisher major,
and an overall average of 3.0.
Slides of five works (name, title,
media, date) must accompany
the scholarship application
form. Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art
Office The deadline for all com-
pleted application material is
April 14. 1983 The scholarship
will be awarded before the end
of this acadmlc year.
BAKE SALE
The Phi Alpha Theta History
Honor Soceity is sponsoring a
bake sale Wednesday, April 13
from 900 to 2:00. The location is
in Brewster BA 314 beside the
History office Proceeds will aid
in aquiring needed journals for
Joyner Library.
Following the Bake sale there
will be a meeting April 13 at 2 30
in the Todd Room.
BINGO PARTY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring another
BingoIce Cream Party on Tues
day April 12 at 7:00 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Canter
Mulfi Purpose Room.
All students, faculty, staff,
their guests, and dependents are
welcome to foln in on the fun.
Play binge, aat delicious Ice
cream, and win prizetl Eight
different Bingo games are
played and the admission is only
.25 cants par parson.
This is the last BingoIce
Cream party for the Spring
semester, but watch for an
nouncements about our summer
parties in the East Carolinian
and on Bullentin Boards around
campus.
PITT COUNTY
HEALTH FAIR
The East Carolina University
School of Medicine is sponsoring
the Pitt County Health Fair on
April 22 and 23 at the Carolina
East Mail. There will be over 20
community organizations in-
volved . In providing screening
ane) education during the two
day period. Any student
volunteers willing to help with
health screenings and education
will be appreciated. For more
information or to volunteer,
please call the Health Education
Office at 757510. W need your
participation in making this
Health Fair a successl
CANOE TRIP
The Outdoor recreation center
for the Department of
intramural-Recreational ser-
vices Is sponsoring a canoe trip
on Wednesday, April 13, 1903
The trip Is suitable for beginning
or experienced canoers. Trip
participants will meet behind
Memorial gym at 3:00p.m. on
Wednesday for a liesurely pad
die down the Tar River lasting
approximately 2 hours. Par
ticipants should arrive back at
Memorial gym at 6:00p.m. Ad
vance registration and payment
(13.00 per person is due by 4:00
p.m. on Tuesday, April 12, 1983.
Groups �rt welcome. For
registration or more Intorma
tlon call or stop by rm. 113
Memorial Gym, 757-4911 or
757-4317).
NEW OWNERSHIP
Cousin's Pizzeria of raliegh
with stores in Cary, Morrisvill
and New York City is proud to
announce that we have moved to
the Great Greenvill Area. We
will be located at 321 E Tenth
St. at the corner of Charles St
formerly Famous Pizza. We are
looking forward to working with
the students with our daily
specials and with future events.
Thank you.
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOP
On April 13, from 3:00-4:00
p.m the ECU Career Planning
and Placement Service will pre-
sent an INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOP in
Mendenhall 221 All are
welcome!
ABORTIONS UP
lO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$185.00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further intormatior call
832 0S35 (Toll Free Number
800-221 2548) between 9 AM
ind 5 P.M. Weekdays.
RALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigt
WOMEN'S HEALTH
UtrtlNDON. Sfoo thats mode eis�r by
h8J wor- .en o' the neming Center Counselors ore
avanaoie day ono night to support and unoer
stana you Your safety, comfort and privacy ore
assured by the coring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1st & 2nd Tnmester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � Free Pregnoncy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 7t1-55S0 OAY OB NIGHT �
Health core counseling TucDCUar
and educdtion for wo- 'nc �LCMIWto
JenofoMoges CENTPP
The Wachovia
Grad Plan
After you finish, it's a good start.
SM
�Established
� Teller n8
� MasterCard
�Ready ReservAccount
The Wachovia Grad Plan gives you all the banking
services you'll need - and a Personal Banker to help you
make the best decisions about your financial future.
If you're graduating this year and plan to live in North
Carolina, see a Personal Banker at the Wachovia office
nearest your campus. Or fill out and mail the coupon below
to receive the Wachovia Grad Plan information kit.
Member F.DIjC.
I will be graduating this year and
plan to live in N.C. Please send me the
Wachovia Grad Plan information kit.
Wachovia
ttecfom. Bank & lust Company, HA
R(LBoi3Bl8
i. NX. 27102
Name
Permanent Mailing Address
City
State
Zip
School Name
4
"f
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may mm mt form at rvajHff or
uao � separate shoot of paper Iff
you nood more lino. There oro 33
units por lino. Each lottor,
tuation mark and word
counts os ono unit. Capttelixa
hyphenate words property.
space at and of "no if
doesn't fit. No ads will bo oc
copttd over the phone Wo
reserve the right to refect any pd.
?5� per line or fraction of a tat.
Please print kfietyt Use capital and
lower caM letters.
�stojrn te THE CAST CABOUNIAN
�Mice bf 3:P�
NUB
Address
CirySute.
No
. at 73 per ine S.
PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
All stdudents who plan to
declare physical education as a
major during the spring
semester or who intend to stu-
dent teach during the spring
semester should report to
Minges coliseum at 10:00 am on
Thursday, April 26, 1983 tor a
motor and physical fitness test.
Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a prere-
quisite for official admittance to
the physical education major
program. More detailed infor
mation covering the test is
available by calling 757 6442.
WEST AREA CAMPUS
"West Area Gets High" on
Wednesday, April 20th from 15
pm in the parking lot adjacent to
Clement and White dorms.
Come join us and find our what -
The Alternative really is
SIGMA THETA TAU
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Nu
Chapter is having their Spring
BanquetEducational meeting
April 19. 1983 at 6:00 pm at the
Greenville Golf and Country
Club. The speaker will be Dr.
Lucie Young Kelly, the national
president-elect of Sigma Theta
Tu. She will speak on "Using
Research to Change Practice
Dr. Kelly is a Professor of
Public Health and Nursing and
serves as editor of Nursing
Outlook Registration fee is S9 00
which includes dinner and
gratuity. Students and inductees
will pay Vj 0C Make check
payable to Sigma Theta Tau,
Beta Nu Chapter and return to
Carol Cox, ECU School of Nurs
ing by April 12. 1983. Include
name, address, number atten
ding and names of guests.
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Nu
Chapter is having their Spring
induction April 23, 1963 at me
Jenkins Auditorium at 11:00 am.
Dr. Helen Yura will speak on the
"Nurse as Scholar
Beta Nu is having a business
meeting Monday. April 25, 1983
at 7:00 pm at the School of Nurs
ing, room 203. All new inductees
invited to attend
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOP
The ECU Career Planning and
Placement Service's next
resume workshop will be held
April 13, 1983 from 1:30-2:30
p.m. Please note that it is
scheduled to be held in
Mendenhall 221
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The GreenvillePitt County
Special Olympics Spring Games
will take place on Thursday.
April 14 at the East Carolina
Track (bunting Field) from 9:30
am to 2 00 pm. volunteers are
needed to serve as "Buddies"
and "Huggers If interested
please attend a volunteers
meeting on Tuesday, April 12 at
the ECU track at 3:00 pm or in
Minges coliseum. Room 136 in
case of rain, if unable to attend
volunteer meeting call 752 4137
exf. 201 days or after 5:00 pm
call 752 8272 or 758 7805.
NO JOB, NOW WHAT?
On April 19 at 3:00 p.m. in
Mendenhall 221, the Career
Planning and Placement Ser-
vice has invited the Personnel
Manager of a major bank to talk
on his perceptions of the job
market for college graduates.
Other job search considerations
will also be discussed
AMBASSADORS
The last General Meeting of
the ECU Ambassadors will be
held on Wed April 13, 1983 at
5:00 pm in the Mendenhall
Multi-Purpose room. We will
elect our '83'64 officers at this
meeting. Plans for our end of the
year party will also be announc
ed. If you are an Ambassador
who will be graduating in May
or in Summer School please call
the Alumni Center and let them
know (757 6072)
CERAMICS
ECU Ceramics Guild Spring
sale Thursday, April 21, 1983 on
ly 9 00 am - 6:00 pm on the ter
race beside the gallery at
Jenkins Fine Arts Building.
MCAT KAPLAN
COURSE
Attention all pre-med
students A representative from
Kaplan will be at ECU on Satur
day, April 16th, at 10:00 em to
present a minicourse on how the
Kaplan course can improve your
MCAT scores. We are looking
for twenty interested persons to
sign-up for the course in order
for the Kaplan course to be
taught at ECU this summer. The
meeting is to be held in the
Biology Reading Room and is
free to the public so any in-
terested persons may simply
come on April 16th or contact the
Biology Department.
ALL ORGANIZATIONS
To all organizations wishing to
be represented in the 1962 S3
yearbook please contact Tam-
my Edwards at the Buccaneer
office as soon as possible The
number is 757 6501
STUDENTS
FOR CHRIST
Back to the Bible Let's get
back to the Bible! informal
group Bible discussions; Men
110 Belk, 7:30 pm Tuesday.
Womens 212 Mendenhall, 7:30
pm Thursday. Everyone is
welcome!
TAXES?
WE'VE HAD ENOUGH
Are you sick of paying taxes?
Well did you know that 64 per
cent opt your federal tax dollar
goes directly for the support of
the military budget and poast
war bills? We might as well
make our checks directly
payable to the Pentagon! If
you've had enough, then join
other ECU students and Green
vilie residents for a demonstra-
tion It will be held at the inter
nal Revenue Service office in
Greenville on Tax Day April 15.
The theme of the demonstration
is tentiveiy set to be "Taxation
without Representation Be at
the IRS office on 1st street at
noon "Money for jobs-Not for
War For further information
call 758 4906
STUDENT
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
"Student volunteers ere need
ed to take parts � and 11 of the
National Teachers Examination
on April 21st from 1 00 pm �
6:00 pm el igibie students ere se
cond semester sophomores or
first semester juniors
The Stdate Department of
Public instruction (Raleigh,
N.C.) has asked East Carolina
University to assist in the
validation of the NTE Students
who are eligible and wish to
volunteer should register in the
Dean's Office of the School of
Education or call Ect 6271. no
later than 5:00 pm on April 5th.
There will be no charge for
this test The test scodres will be
used for validation purposes on
ly. Volunteers will have excused
absences from classes on April
21st between 1 00 p m and 6 00
p.m.
PARKS,
RECREATIONS
AND CONSERVATION
To all Parks. Rrecreetions.
and Conservation Majors,
minors, ano faculty. Do not
forget our fantastic evening of
dining and dancing during the
PRC Spring Banquet This gala
event will occur Friday, April 15
from 6:00 pm 1 00am at the
Holiday Inn. Tickets �rt
available at the PRC building
For more info call 757-i
HELP NEEDED
On Tuesday April 19th Th�
Boy Scouts of America w.n o
holding its annual Goia R jsr a'
the Unviersity m h,ch 300 -a-
dicepped boys will c�r' c :��'
The Carnival tpe ��f'
scheduled for I 30 to Appro.
imatet 1) 00 am The -
terested m assisting .n tn.s iw
thwhiie experience should cor
tact Dr Dave Porrr�a M.nges
Cotesium 757 6441
TAXES
Volunteers from The EC j -
counting Society aoe th Sa
tionai Association of Accou-
tentj will be in the mam ooc .
MendenrvaH Student Centc kj
heip 'individuals prepare a�
returns from to 7 p m ea -
Tuesder ,n March. a
Tuesdays and Thursdays
April through April 15
S. R.A.
Escorts are needed or �-
Escort Service Anyone
terested m being an esc
please contact your dorrr a,rec
tor
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN
COMMUNITY
The Catholic Newman Com
munity invites all interested
students to participate m their
activities and workship ser
vices. Mass is celebrated on
Wednsday evenings at 5 00 p m
at the Newman Center (953 E
10th street) to'lowed by a prfr
gram and meal Sunday Mass is
celebrated at 12 30 pm on Son
days m room B 103 of the
Biology Building For more in
formation call 753 4216.
The East Carolinian
5rmg the catfms corn .
1925
Published every Tijesoa,
and Thursday during ��
ecedemtc year and eve
Wednesday during the s �
mer
The East Carolinian s me
official newspaper of Eas
Carolina University, owned
Jperated and published tor
ind by me stuoents of Eas'
'aroiine University
.(inscription Rate: tit yearly
The East Carol,n,an offices
are faceted in the Old Sewtit
Building en the campus of
ECU. Greenville. N.C.
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The Eas?
Carolinian. Old South
Building, ECU Greenville.
NC 27834
Telephone 757-434. �37,
6J09
ENTERTAINMENT
Fantasy
ECU Jazz Band
Kneewalkers
Gary Kern
Trinidad Tripoli Steel Band
X-tra, X-tra
Final Act To Be Announced
ATTRACTIONS
MarceUa Ruble-Fortune
Teller and Palmist
Antique Images- Old Time
Costumes Photographs
Caricatures Unlimited-A
New Look At Yourself
The Rose Tattoos-Funky,
Daring, and Fun Tattoos
PLUS LOTS OF GREAT FOOD
AND
DS AND CURLEY, I
T-Shirts on Sale; Monday 18
Student Center
n
State
B PATRICK 0'NEII.i
An investigation
team from the State
Board of Education
has handed ECU s
teacher education
programs a two-year
probation. According
to acting Vice
Chancellor for
Academic Affairs
Angelo A. Volpe, the
decision was not
unexpected and
means that ECU
teacher education
prograi
ly given
provisK
as opi
usual
prova!
Volt
assuranj
state's
the red
accredit!
national
questioi
of EC
He sai
would
studerr
Scholars
to.
A memorial
scholarship fund has
been established at
ECU to honor the late
David Martin of
Raleigh, the ECU
senior broadcasting
student who died m
the March 2 explosion
at Village Green
Apartments.
The scholarship is
intended to assist
outstanding ECL
student
broadc
are un
the fui
ship awj
ing of
The
and
Commi
drama
deport
minister
ship,
for the
-entj
Coca-Cola
To The E
By MILLIE WHITE
Malt Vkntrr
The Eastern Carolina Cod
Cola Bottling Comparn m
presented the ECU School
Medicine with the company
former bottling plant in GreeJ
Mile.
The 17,5000-square-l
building is located on the corrl
of Dickinson Avenue and P
Street. The gift includes the CM
pany's storage facihtv and an a
jacett lot.
� - -
-
$3000.no
$?,noo s
� FREE KM?
S�e
?
E.C.U.
Coml
who: Eveh
MW,
When: Satl
Where:

t
THURSDAY, APRIL 21
12:00 NOON-?
Rain Site: Mendenhall Student Center
Ticl
Record
Price:
Studt
$7
T$-M S�:





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 12, 1983
.ffcoac.
1cck�ed.

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P NEEDED
9tt1
ll Gold Rjsh a'
- ' � oa'e
m S or
��a Age
�KES
rtn Na
� � 'ax
� ' p - e� K
Ma and
" " rsOavS in
S R A
I hi t axl Carolinian
and ever
g s ne
' Easf
ea tor
� Eas'
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South
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6364 �37
TIONS
Fortune
Umist
is- Old Time
otographs
limited-A
t Yourselj
oos-Funky,
un Tattoos
CEES
State Puts Education Program On Probation
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff V riler
An investigation
team from the State
Board of Education
has handed ECU's
teacher education
programs a two-year
probation. According
to acting Vice
Chancellor for
Academic Affairs
Angelo A. Volpe, the
decision was not
unexpected and
means that ECU
teacher education
programs were actual-
ly given a "two-year
provisional approval"
as opposed to the
usual five-year ap-
proval.
Volpe repeated his
assurances that the
state's decision, like
the recent denial of
accreditation from a
national group, never
questioned the quality
of ECU's programs.
He said the decision
would not penalize
students enrolled in
these programs.
Last month, the
National Council for
Accreditation of
Teacher Education
(NCATE), denied ac-
creditation to ECU's
teacher training pro-
grams. Richard W.
Warner Jr dean of
the School of Educa-
tion said that both the
state and NCATE
sent their "site
teams" to evaluate
ECU at the same
time, but that both
teams made indepen-
dent decisions.
Neither Warner or
Dean-elect Charles
Coble felt the state's
decision was a
response to the
NCATE denial. "I
suspect the members
of the two visiting
teams talked with
each other, but I
would not presume to
say that the state
evaluation team was
dictated to by the
visiting team from the
national council
Warner said.
"They're (the state)
not following
NCATE added Co-
ble. "There's was a
separate committee
looking at the same
study and making
essentially the same
decisions. They raised
legitimate issues
There are 11
disciplines at ECU
that fall under the
jurisdiction of the
School of Education.
They include elemen-
tary and secondary
education, special
education, music
education, art educa-
tion, home economics
education, driver and
traffic safety educa-
tion, health and
physical education,
school and communi-
ty health, library
sciences and theater
arts.
The NCATE and
state evaluations both
cited ECU teacher
Scholarship Set Up To Honor Martin
programs as lacking a
centralized authority
in its programs.
"There did not ap-
pear to be a single unit
charged with over-all
responsibility for
coordinating all mat-
ters related to teacher
education the state
report said.
NCATE also claim-
ed that there was not a
coordinating agency
for all the teacher
education programs
at various campus
locations and that
there were excessive
facultv work loads in
special education.
Coble, who said he
fully expected the
state's decision to
grant provisional ap-
proval to ECU, said
the system of gover-
nance is very
technical.
"We have to work
out a more agreeable
governance structure
that will have the ap-
pearance and
substance of confor-
ming to their stan-
dards Coble said.
"We're just beginning
to develop the
stratestv to do this
Volpe and Warner
both agreed with Co-
ble that the matter
would be corrected
during the next
academic year.
"We'll go ahead and
do what needs to be
done to obtain ac-
creditation Volpe
said.
Volpe and Coble
both indicated that
several steps had
already been taken to
remedy the criticisms
leveled by the two
educational bodies.
t CU e� Bureau
A memorial
scholarship fund has
been established at
ECU to honor the late
David Martin of
Raleigh, the ECU
senior broadcasting
student who died in
the March 2 explosion
at Village Green
Apartments.
The scholarship is
intended to assist
outstanding ECU
students in the field of
broadcasting. Efforts
are underway to build
the fund in time to
make the first scholar-
ship award in the spr-
ing of 1984.
The Scholarship
and Recruitment
Committee of the
drama and speech
department will ad-
minister the scholar-
ship. A spokesman
for the committee said
students will have to
apply for the money,
but criteria for the
award have not been
set yet.
Spearheading the
ECU faculty effort to
establish the fund is
Dr. Carlton Benz of
the ECU Department
of Drama and Speech
broadcasting division.
According to Scott
Parker, general
manager of the ECU
Playhouse, the Sun-
day, April 17, perfor-
mance of Thornton
Wilder's Our Town
has been dedicated to
Martin, and proceeds
from that perfor-
mance will go to the
scholarship fund.
"This provides
everyone in the cam-
pus and community
who knew David an
opportunity to con-
tribute to the scholar-
ship fund and also at-
tend a performance
that is specifically
dedicated to David's
memory he said.
Benz pointed out
that those who cannot
attend the April 17
performance of the
play but still wish to
assist with the
scholarship fund
should make their tax-
deductible donations
payable to the East
Carolina Theatre
Foundation and send
them in care of the
David Martin
Memorial Scholarship
Fund to the Depart-
ment of Drama and
Speech, ECU, Green-
ville, N.C 27834.
Further informa-
tion about the
scholarship fund is
available by telephon-
ing 757-6390.

Coca-Cola Donates Vacant Building
To The ECU School Of Medicine
By MILLIE WHITE
Surf � riler
The Eastern Carolina Coca-
Cola Bottling Company has
presented the ECU School of
Medicine with the company's
former bottling plant in Green-
ville.
The 17,5000-square-foot
building is located on the corner
of Dickinson Avenue and Pitt
Street. The gift includes the com-
pany's storage facility and an ad-
jacent lot.
Tom Segrave, vice president
and general manager of the Coca-
Cola company, presented the deed
to the property to Vice Chancellor
and Dean William E. Laupus and
ECU Medical Foundation Presi-
dent Edwin W. Monroe on behalf
of the company's board of direc-
tors.
"We are grateful to Mr.
Segrave and Coca-Cola for their
continuing support to the School
of Medicine Laupus said. He
added that Dickinson Avenue and
the surrounding areas open a
number of possibilities for future
use by the university, but im-
mediate plans call for the building
to be used as a storage facility for
the university and medical school.
According to Segrave, the
building was given to the medical
school because the company knew
that the school could use it to their
advantage. Giving the building
"is a continuing effort for us to be
a supportive industry in the med
school Segrave said.
ITALIAN NITE
SPAGHETTI
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
�Choice of Pastas
�Choice of 3 Sauces
�Fresh Hot Breads
�Shoney's Own Special
Baked
'Spaghetti
99
I l AT .
Ti?fe
EVERY WEDS.
5 PM-10PM
�i-ii-
vA.Tn
ALL
YOU
CAN
EAT
SOUP
- AND
SALAD
S4.99


SHONEYS
205 Greenville Blvd.
Dr. William Laupus
EARN nVFR $1000.00 PFR MONTH
If you are d natn, physics, chenistry jr enji n�vn ny major with j
"8" averaqe or better, earn over . per unth through your
junior and senior years sumers included! Tne Navy's NUP0C
(Nuclear Propulsion Officer) Collegiate Program is looking for
qualified individuals. Other benifits include:
� $3000.00 cash bonus immediately upon acceptance into program
$22,000 starting salary - $40,000 after just four years
FREE Medical Dental care and nany other TAX FREE benefits
30 days PAIO annual vacation
1 year graduate level training
Immediate responsibility
Valuable engineering experience
Fducation benefits
Job security with fast promotions
If you're interested in finding out nore, send resume or
transcripts I :
FRANK WIGGINS
U.S. HAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho IV .
Raleigh, NC 27609
Or cal1 1-800-662-7231
8ari-4pn, MonFri.
See the Havy's Flight Oenonstration lean
"Blue Angles" Saturday, April 23rd at
the Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry
Point, NC.
E.C.U. Major Attractions
Committee Presents:
who: Evelyn King wSpecial guest
Dazz Band
when: Saturday,April 23, 8:00pm
Hawaiian Tropic
and
Budweiser
Where: Mjjjggg Coliseum
Tickets are now on sale at:
Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center
Record Bar at Carolina East Mall in Greenville
Apple Records in Greenville
Record Bar in New Bern
Price:
Student
$7.50
Public
$9.50
At The Door
$9.50
Present
The 2nd Annual
Bahama Mama
Party
Featuring
The Miss Hawaiian Tropic
Bikini Contest and the SUPER
GRIT BAND!
Monday, April 25 3:00 pm At
The KAPPA SIGMA HOUSE
Tickets $3.00
The Tickets entitle you to a Drawing
for a week in the BAHAMAS for two,
a Hawaiian Tropic viser, Budweiser
mug, and a afternoon of listening to
the SUPER GRIT BAND LIVE while
enjoying
ALL THE FREE BEER
YOU CAN DRINK
Call 752-5543
� � �





i
T
I
SUie �aat (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, om
Mike Hughes, �����, ,w
WAVERLY MeRRITT. amoMrf,� ClNDY PLEASANTS, spans Eduor
Scott Lindley, �,��,�, ��,� Greg Rideout, mm ��
ALl AFRASHTEH, Crrrf Manager STEVE BACHNER, ��mOTn�, ��
Stephanie Groon, outow M���r Juliana Fahrbach, siyieEduor
Clay Thornton. Tecmcai sum Todd Evans, produce Manage,
April 12. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
SGA Funding
Arts Biting Off More Than We Can Chew
About two weeks ago, outgoing
SGA President Eric Henderson of-
fered some solutions to what he
sees as an abuse of SGA funds.
He cited several facts and
figures, including the student
legislature's funding of the schools
of Music, Art and Speech and
Drama. Last year, these three
departments received 44 percent �
although petitioning for even more
� of the budget pie, with the
School of Music taking the biggest
slice � $26,479.
This year's petitioning is ex-
pected to be about the same, if not
worse. The School of Music has
already requested $56,000 in stu-
dent funds for the 1983-84
academic year, a request which, if
granted by the SGA, would leave
the legislature with about $4,000.
(The SGA should have about
$120,000 to work with, but after
the executive budget and the
reserve fund are subtracted, the
figure stands at approximately
$60,000.)
According to Henderson, under
the current practice of petitioning
and funding, smaller groups and
organizations � groups that really
need the money � have very little
chance.
In the case of the School of
Music, a large chunk of that
department's SGA allocation goes
toward non-student projects and
expenses, such as office equip-
ment. Sure, the schools of Music,
Art and Speech and Drama may
well be in dire need of office equip-
ment, but not at the students' ex-
pense.
Nevertheless, despite affirma-
tions by former Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs Robert
Maier that each academic depart-
ment receives adequate funding
from the university, music school
Dean Charles Schwartz contends
that "about one-third of our
operating budget is dependent
upon SGA funds
All academic departments
receive funding through student
tuition. And most operate suc-
cessfully within the confines of
that budget. Granted, concerts,
lectures and other academic lux-
uries may well necessitate the peti-
tioning of SGA funds. But when a
handful of university departments
consistently seek more than half of
the SGA's allocating budget for
operating expenses, then it would
seem those individual departmen-
tal budgets are in need of
reorganization.
It's time they realize the SGA is
not responsible for making up the
difference on their poorly-planned
budgets. Such continuous alloca-
tion only encourages these schools'
dependence on funds they
shouldn't receive in the first place.
As a result, student SGA monies
are consistently spent for non-
student expenses, while those pro-
jects which may directly benefit the
students must suffer for lack
of funds
This sad fact was exemplified
earlier this year in the infamous
"bus snelter" issue. Granted, stu-
dent opinion on the need for addi-
tional bus shelters was mixed at
best. What's so unfortunate,
however, is that even if the consen-
sus had recognized the need for
new bus shelters, the SGA didn't
have the funds to pursue the pro-
ject past the paper stage.
And why didn't they have the
money9 Because almost half of the
SGA's money was burned up by
the aforesaid schools even before
fall semester 1982.
In an effort to combat the ever-
increasing petitioning from various
university academic departments,
Henderson has proposed a
decrease in student SGA fees. At
present, the SGA receives approx-
imately $7.75 from each student's
fees at the beginning of the year.
Under Henderson's plan, that par-
ticular fee would be cut by $3 per
student, decreasing the SGA's
total allocating budget to about
$22,000.
But decreasing student fees by
$3 isn't what ECU needs. A $3 sav-
ings is practically worthless
anyway, especially when one con-
siders other college expenses.
Why not maintain the $7.75 stu-
dent fee and use a bit more discre-
tion in allocating funds? Is that
asking too much? Just because the
SGA has a little extra money
doesn't mean it has to hand it all
over to the School of Music for a
few new chairs. There are plenty of
worthy student-centered organiza-
tions on campus whose financial
needs have been overlooked for
too long.
For example, more students are
involved in fraternities and
sororities than in the Arts, yet the
Inter-Fraternity Council has been
consistently denied office space.
Their sincere need of that office
space was perhaps best illustrated
in the recent explosion at Village
Green. Most of the IFC's files
were, for lack of other space, kept
at Village Green, and subsequent-
ly, were lost.
Student funds could also be put
toward increasing handicap access
in the older buildings on campus.
Tremendous strides have, indeed,
been made in this area, but without
a doubt, there is plenty of room
for improvement.
In our opinion, the SGA should
review these and similar proposals
before appropriating $26,479 to
the music school again. It's high
time someone else got a big slice of
the SGA pie.
PRESIDENT
ROY WILLIAMS'
ISALWAVS
m,AT LEAST
DURING
VlSITiM(q
HOURS
Bermudez Plots Attack From All Sides
Invasion Of Nicaragua
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � The second civil
war in four years is currently raging in
Nicaragua. Our associate Jon Lee
Anderson has been traveling with the
rebel forces inside the country. Here is a
recent report:
The man directing the invasion of
Nicaragua is Enrique Bermudez, who
used to be the defense attache in
Washington for the late dictator
Anastasio Somoza.
As Bermudez explains it, the main at-
tack on Nicaragua is coming from Hon-
duras in the north. Miskito Indian guer-
rillas are operating on the Atlantic Coast
in the northeast. Finally, another rebel
group is maneuvering along the Costa
Rican border to the south.
Bermudez says he is directing the
three-pronged civil war from Honduras
by means of a central command center
inside Nicaragua. He uses both human
messengers and coded radio com-
munications.
Government forces have retreated,
says Bermudez, leaving the rebels a
chance to occupy territory and distribute
arms to the native population. The most
significant development, the exiled
leader claims, is the way the peasants
have rallied to the rebel cause. He
predicts the civil war will be largely a
rural operation, and he is confident that
his forces will control the countryside.
Thus, the situation in Nicaragua ap-
On Death And Dying:
Ways I'd Hate To Go
I guess we all start thinking about
death at some time in our lives. And be-
ing an extremely skinny columnist whose
favorite targets are football players and
Sumo wrestlers, 1 find myself thinking
about the inevitable more and more all
the time.
But it's not so much an obsession as it
is a fascination. To put it in the ver-
nacular � as much as I hate the ver-
nacular � death is awesome.
I'm not really sure just how I want to
go, but 1 have narrowed it down to a few
ways I definitely don't want to go.
MIKE HUGHES
k-�
First of all, I don't want to be squash-
ed on the side of the road by a Mack
truck like some disobedient mutt or an
armadillo with tunnel vision. Maybe it
wouldn't be such a bad way to go, but I
just don't want a bunch of tourists driv-
ing by on their way to Florida to scrunch
their faces as they straddle by and ask,
"Oh gross, Agnes, what the hell was
that?"
I don't want to go in an electric chair
either. I'd look ridiculous with my hair
standing up and my arms and legs smok-
ing.
Since I don't want to have too many
enemies when I go, I don't want to
drown face-down in a water fountain
either. I know how angry I get when I
have to wait five minutes behind some
water buffalo just to get a drink.
I'm afraid of heights, so I don't think
I'd want to fall out of an airplane or die
of a Midol overdose.
I don't want to choke to death on a
piece of chewy, nasty meat or day-old
bread, so I don't eat at Mendenhall
anymore.
Being also closterphobic, I don't want
to be smothered by a fat person who
loves pizza and tomato juice but doesn't
take showers.
I don't want to keel over standing in a
soup-line in Bethel.
I don't want to be served up as the
main course at a Pygmy international
food fest.
I don't want to be stampeded by a
herd of angry yaks in southeast Africa
while taking part in a native ceremonial
dance.
I don't want to be eaten alive by
anything, especially a fiock(?) of
belligerent penguins.
I don't want to be mistakenly locked
in a pet store at night and killed by
pirhannas, boa constrictors or fumaga-
tion.
I don't want to go to a Special Olym-
pics track meet and catch a misthrown
shotput or an errant javelin in the
mouth, ears, or especially in the groin.
I don't want to die choking on a
mouthful of popcorn at a Jerry Lewis
film festival, because people might think
I was laughing.
I don't want to be smothered in
peanut butter and eaten by a swarm of
cockroaches while watching old Ozzie
and Harriet reruns on a large-screen TV.
I don't want to be hunted down like a
rabid skunk by an angry posse just
because I have three overdue library
books.
I don't want to be locked up overnight
in a walk-in safe with a wild animal or a
Jehova's Witness.
I don't want to get smashed up in an
auto accident, because I just bought a
new pair of fuzzy dice for the rear-view
and got the hole in my roof fixed.
And finally, I don't want to be tor-
tured to death by having to read old
copies of The Ebony Herald, having to
listen to WZMB's philosophical DJs or
for that matter, having to reread my
own columns.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, friend,
confidant and bowling partner of the in-
famous Stan Landers, didn 't realize how
many Mormons attend ECU.
pears to be similar to that in El
Salvador: The government controK the
cities, while the rebels control the out-
back. The difference is that in
Nicaragua, it's the leftists who are trying
to defend the cities against anti-
communists in the hills.
Bermnudez insists his people will keep
fighting "as long as there is a Marist-
Leninist regime in Managua
DEADLY LOOPHOLE A
dangerous loophole in the nation- en-
vironmental laws permits businesses that
generate up to one ton of toxic wastes
each month to dispose of them in cit
dumps. But unfortunately, such dumps
were never constructed to handle toxic
wastes.
Under the loophole for smaii in-
dustries, even the most deadl of
chemicals, including dioxins and PCBv
can be dumped in urban sites � as long
as the monthly total for each business
does not exceed one ton. This adds up
Nearly 2.7 million tons of toxic wa:e-
are dumped in city sites every year Th
is nearly six percent of the nation's
hazardous wastes.
Last year, former Environment Pro-
tection Agency Administrator Anne
Burford teamed up with industrial
bigwigs and successfully defeated a
legislative effort to close the loopnoie.
Now that she is no longer around. Con-
pen will try again.
FAMILY AFFAIR: Alter the Sosiet
Union invaded Afghanistan
December 1979. the Kremlin installed a
its puppet president former deputy
premeir Babrak Karmal. he left his wife
behind in Czechoslovakia, where he had
been living in exile, and took up
residence with a mistress in the presiden-
tial palace in Kabul.
Karmal's mistress was assigned to
oversee at least three goernme
ministries. Her brother landed a
lucrative post as the head of the Na-
tional Institute of Carpets. Rugs and
carpets are among Afghanistan's fead.r
exports.
Karmal then selected his own first
cousins as the chief of the secret police.
the minister of defense, the minister oi
finance, the ambassador to Hungar
and the charge in Washington. DC
Another first cousin was named to a
high public-health post.
HEADLINES AND FOOTNOTFS
Naval surveillance systems could proe
invaluable in the patrol of U.S. coastal
waters for illegal drug shipments. But an
unpublished government audit disclose
that the Pentagon is reluctant to get in-
volved. It seems the brass hats fear their
secret weapons could be exposed during
ensuing court cases.
� A recent Social Secuntv Ad-
ministration search for unauthorized
recipients of benefits turned up tew
cheaters, but the effort wasn't all for
naught. In the process of analvzing the
check-cashing habits of recipients, ac-
cording to the internal review it was
discovered that the Treasurv Depart-
ment could delay payment deposits a
few extra days and save the taxpavers
about $100 million a year.
Copynjhl. MM
I nited Feaiurt Svnd.�ir. Inc
Starvation: 'Hidden Holocaust Of Our Time'
By PAT O'NEILL
NEWS FLASH � 50,000 die Monday
from starvation.
That's right, 50,000 people died
yesterday from "dramatic starvation
But there won't be any newspapers car-
rying the story, because frankly, it's the
kind of stuff people would rather not
know.
United Nations figures show that
almost 20 million people die each year
from hunger, yet we live in a world of
plenty. Most of us have never experienc-
ed the pains of hunger, so we're unable
to conceptualize the horror of this all-
too-common occurrence.
Next Saturday, the GrecnvilleECU
Hunger Coalition will be holding the
twelfth annual "Walk For Humanity
The Walk is an opportunity for us to
make a small contribution to the
elimination of hunger in our world.
By walking, we attempt to empathize
with the millions of poor people
throughout the world who also walk,
not by choice but by necessity. Statistics
show that women and children in poor
rural villages all over the world often
spend half their day walking to obtain
water. By Walking, we also raise funds
for both local and international hunger
relief.
Twenty-five percent of the funds rais-
ed from the Walk will be used by Green-
ville's Church Ministries United to pro-
vide food for Greenville's needy citizens.
The other 75 percent will be used by any
of its 14 internationally-recognized
religious and non-religious hunger relief
organizations. The individual who
makes a donation to the Walk can
choose which of the international groups
he or she wishes to support.
Now is the time you must all decide
whether you plan to participate in the
Walk or not. Some of you may choose
to walk; others may want to pledge a
friend who's walking. As you're making
your decision, keep in mind that:
� 700 million (although some
estimates claim the figure is as high as
one billion) people are starving.
� As many as half the children born in
some third-world countries die before
their fifth birthday.
� One-fourth of the world's people
have only contaminated water to drink.
� There are 17 million men, women
and children wandering homeless or liv-
ing with only the barest of shelters in
refugee camps.
Hunger may not be on the front page;
JLat V K within our rane of
2Sfi but ll docs ��� It �s the hid-
den holocaust of our time, and it can
and must be stopped.
wJhJT� 2 unough r�ources in this
workl to end hunger if we can only find
more. w�� share. So come on - "Put
Saturda6"11D yOUF SOk" waik
mv
Ti
Restai
Greenville
Weds.
adies il
All I dJiel
Haprx Hi
Thurs.
Thi Alan
withDJll
All I a I
u RQR h
m
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Champai
Men in
Fri.
Va Admu
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Sat.
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AT LEAST
DURING
VISITING
HCURS
aragua
ai in I .
�ntrols the
�i the out-
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ai e trying
i
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i Man
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A
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such dumps
landle toxic
tall m-
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and PC Bv
business
- ddd up-
wastes
ar. Th;v
Anno
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ated a
ophole.
: I
� � e So iet
an in
t3 t u a-
deputy
� � �
he had
k up
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ernmeni
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leading
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:isster ot
Hungar
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named to a
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But an
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Depart-
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Time'
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million men, women
denng homeless or liv-
rsl of shelters in
be �n the front page;
b? within our range of
but it does evist t ,s the hid-
locausl ot our time, and it can
st he stopped
le are enough resources in this
end hmer it e can only find
to share So come on � "Put
earl in your sole and walk on
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL i -83 5
Greek Week Filled With Celebration
Greek Week
Pholo By GARY PATTERSON
Fraternity life's cup runneth over this past week as Greeks of all stripes took to partying all oer
Greenville. The festivities started with the Inter Fraternity Council Banquet and went on to include
such events as Kappa Sig's Funky Nassau, Kappa Alpha Track Meet, Phi Tau Sprint Fling. Pi Kap
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Field Day and climaxed with the big bash at Mosier's Farm. If most of the soro
members don't make it to class this week, the administration should understand
Carolinian understand. The hard work the different members of the Greek sys
causes throughout the school year deserves a blow-it-out blast at the end of the sen
to the those who went overboard � take two aspirin.
fraternitv
The Last
r worthy
ne advice
The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
Wed
s.
ladies Night with The Fmbers
All Ladies Free till 9:00
Happy Hour 5:30-9:00
8:30-12:30
Thurs.
The Alamo's 1st ladies Lockout
with DJ Don tickers
All Ladies Free all night
H RQR will he doing live Remote
from 8:30-11:30
For the Ladies free draft, wine and
Champagne from 8:30-10:00
Men in at 10:00pm
Fri.
SO 4
o Admission till 8:00-All Greek Members
25draft All Sight.
Late Sight Happy Hour 11:00pm-1:00am
Music by request with H RQR's Kirk Williams
Sat.
orth Tower
Doors open at 7:00 Happy Hour 7-9:00pm.
PL�DGr&S
P?ES�MT
I MM N Memorial l)r
tcrow from (.rtcnvilli irpnri
( losed Minda. except tor special events PInnm � mm for additional information
&ne
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MonThurs.4PMto1 AM
Friday 4 PM to 2 AM
Sat. 12 Noon to 2 AM
Sun. 12 Noon to 12 Midnight
FREE DELIVERY
1403 Dickinson Ave.
GREENVILLE, NC
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1 L.
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1 Hem4.95
2 Items5.70
3 Itemsa.45
4 Items7 20 i
5 Items7 95 i
Extra SauceFree I
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Price Per Item75-
The above prices do not include 4 tax
Buy 1 get 1 free is Back!
Buy one 16" 2-item or more pizza
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Hasting's Ford on
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Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
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$295
Pizza inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
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i
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
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:
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Stop in soon for all of your
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Cigarettes 65
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Have a safe Easter weekend.
Low, Low qgs prices





J

JHEf AST CAROLINIAN APRIL 12, 1983
Cliches Hide The Mark Rather Than Hit
� WKSLEYt, HPPKKT
WASHINGTON
(UPI) � Cliches ar
the name of the game,
so to speak, in
Washington. Some
call it bureaucratese
or government gob-
bledygook.
Academics at ECU
call it jargon. But a
rose is a rose is a rose.
It's still a cliche.
The current one
around town is "he's
on a roll meaning
�ie person is enjoying
a streak of success.
Senate Republican
leader Howard Baker
was one of those using
that one.
That cliche pro-
bably will outlast the
previous one,
"infrastructure
which President
Reagan trotted out
late last year to
describe his ad-
ministration's pro-
posal to rebuild the
nation's network of
highways and bridges.
The Reagan ad-
ministration also pro-
vided us with a couple
of other cliches,
equally terrible, "the
window of
vulnerability" and
"social safety net
The first one refers to
the nation's defense
against outside
enemies; the second
refers to the basic
welfare programs for
the needy.
Going backwards in
time, we got a bagful
of cliches in the '70s.
When two people
went "eyeball to
eyeball they were
confronting each
other in a showdown.
"Keep on truckin"
black evangelist Tom
Skinner said. He
meant, keep pluggin'
ahead.
Or there was the
"scenario the plan
or way something was
supposed to unfold or
occur. Or two of the
worst, "interface
meaning points of
contact, and "bottom
line an accounting
term meaning about
the same thing as the
last word or that of
ultimate importance.
During Watergate, refusing to follow
former White House orders.
Counsel John Wesley Others came out of
Dean III kept saying the '60s. "Bite the
"at that point in bullet President
time a phrase about Lyndon Johnson and
twice too long, and tens of thousands of
tLsk. academic definition
Originally. a f" the term
"summit" meant a charismatic, which
meeting of the highest comes from the Greek
leaders, and was used word for grace. No
to refer to a gathering anybody particularly
of the Western heads appealing js
White House chief of
staff Alexander Haig
referred to the
"firestorm" that
followed the
"Saturday night
massacre" of ad-
ministration officials
others said. "Fish or
cut bait Rep. Mor-
ris K. Udall, D-Ariz
said. Somebody else
phrased it "paint or
get off the ladder
They all meant to get
started doing the hard
A wareness Week Opens Eyes To Handicapped
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
"Wising Up On the
Handicapped" is the
theme of this year's
Handicap Awareness
Week, which begins
today and runs
'hrough Thursday.
A full program of
activities is designed
to create an awareness
of the problems and
.ipabilities of the
handicapped within
the Greenville com-
munity and on ECU
campus.
As in the past, the
activities of the week
were coordinated by
ECU graduate
students in the
Department of
Rehabilitation
Counseling. This
year's coordinators
are Kathy Wilson,
Sandy Jackson and
Betty Waters.
Dr. Sheldon
Downes, chairman of
i he Department of
Rehabilation Studies,
and C. C. Rowe,
coordinator of Han-
dicapped Student Ser-
vices. are advisors to
the three coordinators
and the Handicap
Awareness Commit-
tee. Downes em-
phasized fthat Han-
dicap Awareness
Week is not affliated
with any national or
state programs. "It's
strictly an ECU and
Greenville event
Downes said. This is
the third year ECU
has held the event.
f Handicap
Awareness Week is
sponsored by the
ECU Student Govern-
ment Association and
the Pitt County Com-
mittee for Employ-
ment of the Han-
dicapped.
Downes noted
several areas that will
be addressed by the
series of seminars,
workshops, booths
and films. Topics in-
clude:
� Public awareness of
the problems of the
and assist the han-
dicapped.
� Exhibits of many
innovative devices
developed to assist the
handicapped.
� Explanations of
how affirmative-
action laws help the
handicapped.
Downes called af-
fimative action a
"very powerful law"
that helps the han-
dicapped in many
ways.
According to
Wilson, the planning
for the event started
in January. "We hope
that the simulation ac-
tivities, awareness
booths, seminars
and entertainment
scheduled for this
year's Handicap
Awareness Week will
create an awareness
within the ECU cam-
pus as well as the
handicapped in every- Greenville community
day living situations, as to the problems
such as obtaining
employment and pro-
per work conditions
and the various ways
that handicapped peo-
ple are assisted.
� Displays by the
many organizations
and societies that help
and capabilities of the
handicapped, "Wilson
said.
The similation ac-
tivities allow those in-
terested to experience
certain handicaps
such as blindness or
using a wheelchair.
The activities will take
place everyday from
noon to 4 p.m. on the
campus mall.
Awareness booths
will be set up by
various groups that
do some type of work
with handicapped
people. Booths will
also be set up on the
campus mall from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Both
activities will be mov-
ed to the main lobby
of Mendenhall in the
event of rain.
Several seminars,
lectures and films will
be held at various
campus locations
throughout the three
days.
On Tuesday even-
ing Chet Motter-
shead, N.C. State
Liaison for the Inter-
national Year of
Disabled Persons, will
deliver a keynote ad-
dress in the Biology
Auditorium of the
ECU Science Com-
plex. Other speakers
include Dr. Hal
Shingley, Director of
Greenville's TEACH
Program; Ms. Mary
Elesha-Adams, a
clinical specialist with
Greenville's Regional
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The very best in Solid Gold Rock and RoU
with WITN's Greg Allinson
Rehabilitation
Center; Mr. Kay
Mclntyre also a
clinical specialist with
R.R.C Dr. Stephen
Thomas, assistant
professor in the ECU
Vocational Evalua-
tion Program; Dr.
Betty Levey, ECU
special education pro-
fessor; Rickey Mimms
from Raliegh's Voca-
tional Rehabilitation
Center and Dan le
Roux of the Eastern
Carolina Vocational
Center.
ECU campus at-
torney Dr. David
Stevens will open the will provide singing
program tonight at 7 entertainment on
p.m. in the Biology Tuesday night follow-
Auditorium (Room ing the film.
103). The film "The
Invisible Barrier" will
be shown. Thursday
night at 7 p.m. in
Wright auditorium,
ECU'S "sign to song"
acting troupe
"Fantasy" will per-
form. Fantasy has
become nationally
known for their
musical interpreta-
tions through sign
language.
The "Caswell
Choir" from Kinston
Wilson said she
hopes that the 3-day
event will help the
handicapped to
become more aware
of the resources
available to them
within the Pitt County
area.
Wilson said that
Mimm's topic,
"handicaps and the
employment pro-
cess is an area that
needs to be discussed.
of government � the
president, the British
prime minister, the
French president, the
West German
chancellor.
Now, almost any
important meeting
becomes a "summit"
� President Jimmy
Carter's 1978 summit
on the Middle East, or
the upcoming
"summit of in-
dustrialized nations"
in Williamsburg, Va
in May.
Then there was that
memorable day in
1962 when a seat mate
in a Chicago taxi got
out and said to the
driver, "Have a nice
day Millions of
people repeated that
now boring farewell.
President John F.
Kennedy was first
described as
' charismatic . "
Sociologist Max
Weber had an
charistmatic.
President Dwight
D. Eisenhower chip-
ped � Ike was a
golfer but no pun is
intended � in with
the term "finalize
He might have said,
simply, finish.
But for outright
creativity. Western
ranchers come up
spontaneously with a
crack that com-
municates immediate-
ly in a way that
everybody
understands.
"Cut that out �
you're scarin' me
said a rancher when
told his cattle were
out of the pasture and
running down the
highway.
Or this one: "He
went around me like I
was tied a South
Dakota rancher said
about a fast driver
who passed his pickup
truck at high speed
Weekend
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April 15th,16th& nth
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it 7 Days a Week it
Gradual
Coat From Page 1
ing place at the time
Rowe added, "but
they're (contractors)
going to leave a little
sector clear for the
platform party
How-ell said the
ceremony won't be as
"pretty" because the
graduate procession
will have to walk up
through stairways
underne th the
stadium.
According to ECU
Athletic Director Ken
Karr, the football
field had needed
"massive renovation"
for more than two
years, but that delays
in the approval of
state funds had kept
the project in limbo.
Karr said the field
needed to have a new
irrigation system in-
stalled, and it als(
to be regraded
reseeded.
"The field is
worst shape ml
history of the ui
sity said ECU
football coach
Emory,
couldn't even
cows on it
Emory, a tw
graduate of
called gradual
"the most lmpol
event of the year'f
said he under;
the students prol
He had made thel
gestion to use
stands in Ficl
before How ell hai
nounced his chanl
plans.
According
Rowe. some
students had
participating
black-market ai
SRA Holds R
For Presidenc
By DARRYL
BROWN
ul:nt No� Editor
The Student
Residence Association
is holding a run-off
election today for
president of the
organization, and the
winner will be sworn
in at the SRA banquet
tomorrow, said Dean
of Residence Life
Carolyn Fulghum.
Last week's election
for the chief executive
of the organization
ended with onb
votes separating
two candidates oi
almost 700 ball
cast. Dann V!
received 331 v
while his Oppoj
Mark Niewald re
ed 329.
Niew aid
mediately called
the run-off eiecl
because his rotai
within two percenj
White's. The eled
committee
Fulghum had
question ab
Group Studies
The University
Committee on the
Status of Minorities
will be conducting its
annual forum next
Monday from 4 p.m.
to 5 p.m. on the mall.
This year's pro-
gram will be in the
form of
discussion
Chancellor
a panel
featuring
John M.
Howell and Vice
Chancellors Elmer
Meyer and Angelo
Volpe as panelj
Dr. Clinton R D
mg. chairman of
committee, will s
as moderator
The forum
begin with 1
remarks from
three admmistraj
in which they will
dress questions
mitted in advancel
leaders oi the stu
minority groups
open question
Treat the ere'
Every
Monday
NoC
757-1955
Every Monc
o me year
pizza tor me
and we'll trc
numbers of
service zonel
Or ptck
Two pizzas for the price of
When it corn
Not qocl
L
P.T.A. "Hada
no
Gety
Call P.T.AI
� - - - - � -
��fc �-W' fcl Ml- rf�i I H -� Wl �M� .�to,





V
Hit It
iginaiiy, a
Immit" meant a
bung of the highest
Jiers. and was used
lefer to a gathering
Ihe Western heads
jovernment � the
Indent, the British
e minister, the
ich president, the
German
iceilor.
low. almost any
ortant meeting
lie- a summit"
denl Jimmy
18 summit
he Middle East, or
upcoming
n ra I of i n -
ized nations"
liamNburg, Va
,t
there as that
irable day in
a hen a scat mate
Chicago taxi got
nd said to the
"Hae a nice
Mi lions of
epeated that
.ireueil.
rsideni John F.
a h first
:d as
id
Max
an
academic definition
for the term
charismatic, which
comes from the Greek
word for grace. Now
anybody particularly
appealing is
charistmatic.
President Dwight
D. Eisenhower chip-
ped � Ike was a
golfer but no pun is
intended � in with
the term "finalize
He might have said,
simply, finish.
But for outright
creativity, Western
ranchers come up
spontaneously with a
crack that com-
municates immediate-
ly in a way that
everybody
understands.
"Cut that out �
you're scarin' me
said a rancher when
told his cattle were
out of the pasture and
running down the
highway.
Or this one: "He
went around me like I
was tied a South
Dakota rancher said
about a fast driver
who passed his pickup
truck at high speed.
RR.C.
- . DNSEPVATtCN
ftScT
,� By 3 30 njfcSQAC- NMCJT

lACULTY !
Y'S
ill
$&�?.
rOH,
rows Sest)
m Mon. thru Sat.)
ice, Fries &
W per order;
ru Sat.)
Biscuit
e per order)
Graduation Moved
Coat From Page 1
ing place at the time
Rowe added, "but
they're (contractors)
going to leave a little
sector clear for the
platform party
Howell said the
ceremony won't be as
"pretty" because the
graduate procession
will have to walk up
through stairways
underneath the
stadium.
According to ECU
Athletic Director Ken
Karr, the football
field had needed
"massive renovation"
for more than two
years, but that delays
in the approval of
state funds had kept
the project in limbo.
Karr said the field
needed to have a new
irrigation system in-
stalled, and it also had
to be rcgraded and
reseeded.
"The field is in the
worst shape in the
history of the univer-
sity said ECU head
football coach Ed
Emory. "You
couldn't even graze
cows on it
Emory, a two-time
graduate of ECU,
called graduation
"the most important
event of the year" and
said he understood
the students problem.
He had made the sug-
gestion to use the
stands in Ficklen
before Howell had an-
nounced his change in
plans.
According to
Rowe, some ECU
students had been
participating in a
black-market attempt
to secure extra tickets
to the commence-
ment. Some
graduating seniors,
not planning to par-
ticipate in the com-
mencement exercises
had been requesting
their two tickets
anyway and passing
them on to desperate
friends in need of the
extras.
Rowe said that the
new decision "doesn't
change anything" as
far as the ticket issue
is concerned. Rowe
explained that
because there's still a
possibility of bad
weather conditions on
May 6, the graduation
could still be held in
Minges. Rowe added
that only those with
tickets would be
allowed inside in this
situation.
Students are still
being asked to pick up
their first two tickets
and make requests for
additional tickets if
they're needed.
Howell and Rowe
both believe that
because the com-
mencement is on a
Friday instead of
Saturday the crowd
will be less. Howell
said the 13,000 figure
was an
"overestimate
Rowe added that
8,000 to 8,500 would
more likely be the tur-
nout.
Both Howell and
Rowe said they believ-
ed that the new loca-
tion would be
satisfactory to
everyone. "If more
poeple are happy,
fine Howell said.
SRA Holds Run-Off Election
For Presidency Of Organization
By DARRYL
BROWN
Assisiant New Ediior
The Student
Residence Association
is holding a run-off
election today for
president of the
organization, and the
winner will be sworn
in at the SRA banquet
tomorrow, said Dean
of Residence Life
Carolyn Fulghum.
Last week's election
for the chief executive
of the organization
ended with only two
votes separating the
two candidates out of
almost 700 ballots
cast. Danny White
received 331 votes
while his opponent
Mark Niewald receiv-
ed 329.
Niewald im-
mediately called for
the run-off election
because his total was
within two percent of
White's. The election
committee and
Fulghum had some
question about
whether a run-off
could be held when
only two candidates
ran in the original
election and delayed
announcing the run-
off until Friday.
After a meeting Fri-
day morning, they
decided the second
election would take
place today and its
outcome would be
final, regardless of the
margin of victory.
Only an absolute tie
could force another
run-off, according to
outgoing SRA presi-
dent Tory Russo.
Voting stands will
be open until 4 p.m.
today in the campus
dormitories, and can-
didates were allowed
to continue their cam-
paigning this week.
The SRA will swear
in all new executive
officers at the
Wednesday banquet,
and it will approve its
new logo for the up-
coming year.
Group Studies Minority Status
The University
Committee on the
Status of Minorities
will be conducting its
annual forum next
Monday from 4 p.m.
to 5 p.m. on the mall.
This year's pro-
gram will be in the
form of a panel
discussion featuring
Chancellor John M.
Howell and Vice
Chancellors Elmer
Meyer and Angelo
Volpe as panelists.
Dr. Clinton R. Down-
ing, chairman of the
committee, will serve
as moderator.
The forum will
begin with brief
remarks from the
three administrators
in which they will ad-
dress questions sub-
mitted in advance by
leaders of the student
minority groups. A
open question and
answer session will
follow their remarks.
Special requests are
being sent byihe com-
mittee to campus
organizations asking
that they submit ques-
tions related to the
concerns of minority
students. Downing
asked that these ques-
tions be received
before April 18, the
date of the forum.
Questions should be
addressed in written
form to Dr. Mary
AiLEL. Rose .special
assistant to the
chancellor (room 104
Spilman).
The forum is
designed to "to be a
positive exchange
related to the con-
cerns of minority
group members
Downing said.
Ti
Treat the crew and wen treat you
; � in
tfJ
Every
Monday
&
Tuesday
Night
No Coupon Necessary
757-1955
Every Monday and Tuesday night, every week
of the year, order any large 2 or more topping
pizza for the crew, ask for the "Family Night Special"
and we'll treat you to your own small pizza with the same
numbers of toppings FREE and delivered free in our
service zone, in 30 minutes or tess.
L
Or pick up two pizzas in 15 minutes.
Two pizzas for the price of one now that's a treat you cant beat!
When it comes to f pizza, pta comes to you.
Not goo! with any other special
P.T.A. "Had a piece lately" t-SWrts
now on sale
Get yours today!
Call P.T.A, for your order.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APR1I it im 7
dKOFVED
CLASS RINHS IMP
CLASS RINGS INC
Now when you buy any ArtCarved
college ring, you not only get one nng
loaded with style and quality, you
get two. A great college ring�and a
diamond fashion ring. FREE. Its a
beauty�10K gold with a genuine 2
point diamond. Retail value� $60. The
perfect way to express yourself, your
style, or your feelings for that special
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April 13,14,15
Wednesday,
Thursday,
Friday
Deposit Required MasterCard or Visa Accepted
Time9-4 p, tudent Supply Store Lobby
c 1983 AnCarvad ass
Support The Businesses
That Support ECU
University Book Exchange
Domino's Pizza
Overton's Supermarket
Todd's Stereo
H.L. Hodges Sporting Goods
The Elbo Room
P.T.A.
Western Sizzlin' Steak House
Goodyear
AtBarre
Campus Alcohol and Drug Program
Coin and Ring Man
Sweetings Shoes
TacoCid
420 Crab
ZaJes Jewelers
Western Steer
Lanteres Jewelers
Nutri-System
Carry Copy Center
Pet Village
Malpass Mufflers
Tar Landing Seafood
Boyd's Barber Shop
Sammy's Country Cooking
Aerobic Workshop
Dieuers Bakery
Marathon
Robinson's Jewelers
The Flower Basket
The Wash House
AAP
Plain Jane's
Georges Coiffeurs
Golden Dragon
Arby's
Morgan Printers
Shoney's
J.D. Dawsoa
TeJereut T.V.
Plaza Shell
StyftagSaMa
Buck's Gulf
Mitchell's
Les Jewelers
Balloons Over Greenville
Optical
Jefferys
United Figure
Bill's Fast Food
Mitchell's Hair
and Wine
Taff's Office Supply
The Atk
Body
The Subway
Backstage 1
A ecu Copy
BuhUhUl I 'ii' u
- - - -��






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
APRIL 12. 1983
Page 8
ECU Lends
Hand With
'Godspell'
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
GODSPELL. a dinner theatre at the
Rjmada Inn in New Bern, April 21-23
and 28-30. Dinner will begin at 7p.m. and
the show at 8:15 p.m.
After a long hard day of
classes, many ECU students relax
with their favorite soap opera or
beverage, but Paul Baker has
other plans. Baker, a sophmore
majoring in dance, drives to the
Footlight Theatre in New Bern
after clases to rehearse Godspell.
He's the show's choreographer.
Last summer. Baker was assis-
tant choreographer for Godspell
at the Liberty Carter in
Kenansville. "Some people from
Footlight saw me in Godspell at
the Liberty Carter and asked me
to choreograph for them he
said.
Baker, from Pink Hill,
displays remarkable drive and
ambition toward a career in pro-
fessional dance. Even his Sun-
days are reserved for rehearsal.
Now that takes dedication.
Godspell is a musical collage of
song, mime, and dance in vignet-
tes based on the New Testament.
The production draws most of its
ten-character cast from the New
Bern community. Two ECU
alumni. Dennis Dellimar and
Willie Sumner, play major roles.
Dottie Holliatschek, the
Footlight's director of publicity,
explained there is no lead
character in Godspell. Every
character is on stage at all times;
an occasional spotlight will focus
on a character for a solo perfor-
mance. "There's a lot of dancing
and it's all very energetic said
Holliatschek.
English grad Dellimar will play
John the Baptist. He also
directed The Prime of Xfiss Jean
Rrody last winter.
Sumner's character, Steven,
theoretically represents Jesus
Christ. Sumner, who graduated
last year with a major in drama,
began working in Footlight with
a minor role in Guys and Dolls
last fall. For The Prime of Miss
Jean Brody, he was assigned the
position of props manager. His
dedication to the Footlight
Theatre lanu d him the oppor-
tunity to serve as assistanat direc-
tor for the musical The King and
I which will appear next fall.
Baker is undecided about his
plans for the future. He will
choreograph Godspell again this
summer at the Liberty Cart. He
will continue working on the re-
quirements for his dance degree
at ECU this fall. Baker is an in-
spiration to his ECU colleagues,
satisfying academic requirements
while strenthening his dance
skills.
Tickets are available at Bran-
ches Department Store and the
Harvey Mansion Restaurant,
both in New Bern. Because
Godspell will be presented as a
dinner theater, reservations must
be made two days in advance.
The Footlight Theatre is a non-
profit community theater that
gives talented dancers and actors
of all ages, including ECU
students, a chance to perform
and enhance their skills.
Averaging three productions a
year, the Footlight presented
Guys and Dolls, and The Prime
of Miss Jean Brody, last year.
Godspell in April is special for
another reason: In 1977, the
Footlight opened with a produc-
tion of Godspell.
Next year's production plans
include The King and , The Fan-
tastiks, and The Madwoman of
Chaillot.
"We encourage anybody to
come and try out for the plays
said Ms. Holliatschek. She said
they post audition schedules in
local New Bern newspapers and
in the entertainment section of
the Views and Observer.
And don't forget Godspell,
coming up April 21-23 and 28-30.
Edmonds And Curley Return To Host 'Barefoot On The MalV
Professional M.C.s Edmonds and Curley will return to host the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee. Also on the
festival "Barefoot on the Mall" for the second straight year on mall will be fortune-teller Marcella Ruble, tattoo artists The
Thursday, April 21 on the University Mall. The annual celebra- Rose Tattoos, Antique Images Photography. Caricature
tion of the spring season begins at 12 noon and is sponsored by Unlimited, at well as plenty of food.
Lange: A Painful Struggle
By DAVID ROSENTHAL
Rolllaf Stoat
NEW YORK � "I'll tell you
something Jessica Lange is say-
ing. "1 wouldn't for anything in
the world go through my life
again. I wouldn't. It's been real
painful. I mean, even with all the
joy, it's been � God � painful
She shifts left, then right, then
down, then up again. "I always
go through anything. I explore
everything to the fullest whether
good or bad.
"Now, 1 feel a whole period of
my life coming to a close and
something else opening up. I
don't know what it is, but I sense
it's going to take me into the
realm of � this will sound corny
� self-examination
'HftCKjfcis. the brink of a new
cydev Tnis one will last nine
years, Miss Lange has been advis-
ed, until she is 42. And whatever
happens in 1983 will set the ir-
revocable path. It is a propitious
time then for assessing.
All this comes when Jessica
Lange's movie career has never
been more promising. She cur-
rently is starring in two highly ac-
claimed films, Tootsie and
Frances, and for both she receiv-
ed an Academy Award nomina-
tion (last night she won the Best
Supporting Actress award for her
role in Tootsie). This is the first
time since 1944 that someone has
been nominted for two acting
Oscars in the same year.
But still, she feels uncertain.
"You know she says, "I've
always had this sensation that
I've no connection to the person I
was yesterday. It's not so bad
now, but there was a period of
my life when I didn't even feel
connected to the person I was 10
minutes ago. It was kind of
frightening at one point � kind
of free-floating in the present
with no tentacles touching down
anywhere
Yet, it couldn't have been so
awful, could it? This is a sur-
vivor, a victor, the beautiful
mother of a beautiful child.
It is not enough. Jessica I ange
wants it all. To be the best, know-
ing full well the impossibiht of
superlatives. The craving tor
perfection. Hers. The world's.
"A lot of the lifestyle I've
engaged in during the past is go-
ing to have to be eliminated she
says. "The thoughts come quick-
ly, quietly, barely audible amid
the cries for cheesburgers and
tuna. "I've always put myself,
my desires, first. And I don't
think it's the way the human
spirit was meant to exist. RealK.
what I'm looking for is to live in
some kind of state of grace
Miss Lange was born in rural
Minnesota but moved 18 times
with her family. Her father was a
See JESSICA. Page 9
Rocks Best Bet
Punks Get Even Tougher
The Clash: like most art forms, punk rock Is effective on more than just one level
By JOSEPH B. MORTON
StaH Writer
Has complacency rendered the bond between rock
music and its audience uncertain? Have imagina-
tions been stifled so that rock's remains lie with the
greedy record magnates? Rock's best purpose, to
criticize familiar social problems, has been aborted
through commercialism; however, that purpose has
resurfaced through a renewed intersest in the punk
movement.
In the fifties, fledgling rock music appalled our
elders who clasped their hands over their ears and
listened only with distaste to music that would later
become a socially relevant art form and instant
channel for self-expression; rock provided both
player and listener, the rebellious young, with a vent
for hostility.
The recent frustrations of some of the legendary
pioneers of rock indicate a loss in the fan's ties to
the flagrantly remembered purpose of the medium.
Before disbanding, the Who, a band that always
pushed for a little extra during its live performances,
complained that today's record-buying public lacks
enthusiasm � even anger, if you will. This new
breed of video-game-playing zombies can no longer
see the Who perform. Does it even care?
Another profound and still prolific band. Pink
Floyd, led by the anarchic Roger Waters, put
together an album and a film based on that album
that deal specifically with the artist's alienation
from his audience. (Both the film and album are ap-
propriately titled The Wall.)
Much of rock's energy was buried with legends
like former Rolling Stone Brian Jones, Janis Joplin,
Jimi Hendrix, and the "lizard king Jim Morrison.
Morrison, excruciatingly labelled a "pop star con-
stantly challenged his audiences passivity with his
own brand of shock treatment.
Where is the anger? Where is the energy?
Today, much of rock is written, arranged and
produced according to a set formula. Very few peo-
ple really dance to "rock 'n' roll" anymore, so it
has become rock sans roll.
The rock called "punk" has itself survived the
adversity that it gravitates toward and has revived
the attention to politics, sorrows, struggles, living
conditions and other gritty, gut-level stuff that rock
used to be made of. The U.K. was the setting tor the
eruption of the punk movement: the Clash, the Sex
Pistols, Sham 69 and many other bands led the way
by attacking the boring, worn out rock morals of the
70s and exploiting the stagnation that had become a
staple of the decade. During this time, late 70s, runk
surfaced in the United Statis with very little response
one way or the other. Since then, punk has found
domestic success with the help of changing tastes in
music, changing attitudes, radio airplay (thanks in
part to the resurgence of AOR) and record com-
panies' inevitable interest in the commercial poten
tial of the genre.
Punk bands of the 80s play at their audiences
rather than to them. The Dead Kennedvs, Black
Flag, X, Circle Jerks, and the always-violent Fear
are just a few of the bands who keep their music
political and far less commercial than todav's "new
wave" bands. When Fear blast the refrain "1 don't
care about you; fuck you" at their audience, thev
not only provoke a violent response from most club
crowds, but also evoke reflection on the themes of
alienation, apathy and rejection in societv. So, like
most art forms, punk is effective on more than one
level.
Punks don't have to be addicted to drugs or par-
ticularly disturbed to be good punks; but a certain
attention to unconventional clothing and hairstyle is
a good iconoclastic way of expressing a punk stance.
The music provides a promiscuous freedom for its
disciples, so that involvement doesn't necessarily
mean that hate, hate, and more hate is the onlv thine
you'll get out of it.
While rock (n roll) remains only an item for a
good time, punk rock carries over into its follower's
lives by giving them a precise definition of the situa
tion they re in. Fun is fun, but it shouldn't consume
anyone s life. One could view today's punk move-
me?. !� !?" our c,dcrs viewed earlv
�?.Lll ?! Ut m?t Pf0 arcnt that narrow-
minded. The musical inclination of most rock au-
diences isn't even worth noting. So 1 won't
It's one of the prototypes of punk, Iggy Pop who
sums up the increasing demand for prog?es!fve
music when he sings "I need more rcss,vc
Jessica La
A Rags-Ti
ontinued From Page 8
salesman, the travel-
ing kind Also a
coach, a dreamer, a
teacher, a dnrie-
When his teenage
daughter hoppec
freight train one p:
ing, Al Lange ap-
predated the gesture
He thinks it's fine she
became an actress �
since that's what she
wants � but just last
Christmas. with
Frances and Tootsie
hauling in the crow
Al suggested Jee go
back to college for a
law degree, just ;n
case.
He wanted, the
say, to be a iawe:
Dorothy, his a
wanted to dance V
says Miss Lange's
2-year-old ba
Alexandra, whose
father is Mikhail
Baryshmko. favors
her grandmothers.
Al and Dorothy live
in hfickerson, M;nn
which isn't real! i
town, just a dot in the
wild not tar h
Lake Superior
onl Neer. mile- fi
Miss Lange-
cabin in tiolyoke
Miss Lange owns I
acres, her parent- -i-
She had beer.
desperate. . raz.
Raenou to ce:
of these parts when
she wa young Now
she returns all the
time. You pees
Mi- Langes er-
book from Ctoquet
High School, u
her intelligent, open
face pops out like a
beacon from the faces
of the rifle-tea
typing whizze- and
home-ec queens
There she grins, an
"A" student. Na-
tional Honor Society.
star of the senior cla-s
production, of Rebel
Without a Cause.
When she left for
Minneapolis, for her
art scholarship at the
uniersit. she me: a
photographer named
Paco Grande and
never looked back
The countr girl arc:
the displaced
Spaniard ran to
Europe and around
the United Sta es
And een:u.iii. in
190 the wed.
4,With m hus-
band, when we were
together during the
early ears, the rea
Strong years, we were
inseparable Miss
Lange rememK s
"We lied. literally,
in this truck together.
and we'd go
without
am-
ma
atte
war
Other ise,
the : .�
launched i
tra
America in
Gr
ed aril
opera '
' aC
too There i
the Great
The-
she
�r
mime
" iti .
M
sio:
dili
achsev i
fullne-
on.
-
p
Dei.

'I ki
M I
very -s
tha
DOBK
H
Bu
v ler
Pa" S
"1
jority
disgus I
in 1
the
lives
v

it's i p
i
i
It's be
Ba. i
Ma

a big Dij
la
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Would like to than!
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?





APRI1 12. IW1
Page S
On The Mall'
tial Fentommittee. Also on the
larcella Ruble, tattoo artists The
lages Photograph). Caricatures
food.
uggle
i
itul
li is not enough. Jessica 1 ange
i i he the best, know-
. ' . well the impossibility oi
The craung tor
on. Hers The world's.
"A lot of the lifestyle I've
iged in during the past is go-
be eliminated she
Th ights come qukk-
. . � barek audible amid
the es for cheesburgers and
lTve aiuas put myself,
desires, first. And 1 don't
� it's the ua the human
' was meant to exist. Really,
I'm looking for is to live in
ne kind of state o grace
Mis I ange was born in rural
Minnesota but moved 18 times
with her famiK. Her father was a
See JESSICA, Page 9
1st Bet
Tougher
Jessica Lange fs Career
A Rags- To-Riches Story
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 12, 1983
ontinued From Page 8
salesman, the travel-
ing kind. Also a
coach, a dreamer, a
teacher, a drifter.
When his teenage
daughter hopped a
freight train one spr-
ing, Al Lange ap-
preciated the gesture.
He thinks it's fine she
became an actress �
since that's what she
wants � but just last
Christmas, with
Frances and Tootsie
hauling in the crowds,
Al suggested Jessie go
back to college for a
law degree, just in
case.
He wanted, they
say, to be a lawyer.
Dorothy, his wife,
wanted to dance. Al
says Miss Lange's
2-year-old baby,
Alexandra, whose
father is Mikhail
Baryshnikov, favors
her grandmothers.
Al and Dorothy live
in Nickerson, Minn
which isn't really a
town, just a dot in the
wild not far from
lake Superior and
only seven miles from
Miss Lange's log
cabin in Holyoke.
Miss Lange owns 120
acres, her parents 40.
She had been
desperate, crazy.
Ravenous to get out
of these parts when
she was young. Now
she returns all the
time. You peer in
Miss Lange's year-
book from Cloquet
High School, where
her intelligent, open
face pops out like a
beacon from the faces
of the rifle-team stars,
typing whizzes and
home-ee queens.
There she grins, an
"A" student, Na-
tional Honor Society,
star of the senior class
production, of Rebel
H ithout a Cause.
When she left for
Minneapolis, for her
art scholarship at the
university, she met a
photographer named
Paco Grande and
never looked back.
The country girl and
the displaced
Spaniard ran to
Europe and around
the LJnited States.
And eventuallv, in
1970 they wed.
"With my hus-
band, when we were
together during the
early years, the really
strong years, we were
inseparable Miss
lange remembers.
"We lived, literally,
in this truck together,
and we'd go for days
without speaking to
anybody else except
maybe a gas-station
attendant when we
wanted to fill up.
Otherwise, it was just
the two of us, kind of
launched in space,
traveling around
America in this old
truck
Grande was obsess-
ed with sex, death and
opera. Miss Lange
had her obsessions,
too. There is always
the Great World Out
There obsession, and
she's been through
ones about painting,
mime, the occult and,
of late, acting.
Miss Lange's obses-
sions, though, go in
cycles. She works
dilligently at them,
achieves an ease and
fullness, then moves
on. Such was the
obsession with
Grande, it seems, and
the obsession died
long before the mar-
riage ended just a
couple of years ago.
She pursued mime
in 1971 when she Hew
to Paris for an ap-
pointment with
Etienne DeCroux, the
master of mime. She
spent the next two
years living in a gar-
ret, working some
with the Opera Comi-
que. "I knew im-
mediately I was
good Miss Lange
says. "It came very,
very easily. And I find
that the easier it
comes, the faster 1
lose interest
But there was no
audience for mime,
even on the Parisian
streets. So she got on
a plane and left. She
is an abrupt woman.
When she skipped
Paris, she left a fur-
nished apartment.
"1 think the raaT
jority of people set-
tle she says with
disgust. "They settle
in relationships, in
their jobs, in their
lives. They just settle.
And that's something
� and I'm not saying
it's a positive thing �
but something I've
never been able to do.
It's been the source of
a lot of pain
Back from the con-
tinent, she found
waitress jobs in
Manhattan and did
some modeling. Then
came a screen test for
a big Dino De
Laurentis movie spec-
tacular, King Kong.
Hundreds of inter-
views were arranged.
Quotes were
manufactured, fed to
the press. When she
went to the screening,
she covered her eyes
with her hands.
It was two lonely
years before more
work. There was
money from Kong to
buy a rural Wisconsin
homestead. Then
there was Bob Fosse.
He fell in love, then
cast Miss Lange as a
one-woman Greek
chorus in All That
Jazz. No one really
noticed. Next:
Jessie: Did you ever
see How to Beat the
High Cost of Living?
Me: No.
Jessie: You'll live.
OK, just as you
might be ready to trot
out the violins, just
when Miss Lange was
drinking too much in
a Raleigh N.C
motel, suffering
through a play called
Angel on My
Shoulder (at the old
Village Dinner
Theatre), director
Bob Rafelson drop-
ped in. He cast her in
his version of The
Postman Always
Rings Twice.
There was hot
chemistry onscreen
between her and Jack
Nicholson, but people
weren't ignited. The
good news was the
critics. They went
from saying how pret-
ty Jessica Lange look-
ed to commenting
favorably on her ac-
ting.
It was a
breakthrough.
See LANGE'S, Page 10
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and other gritty, gut-level stuff that rock
made of. The U.K. was the setting for the
f the punk movement: the Clash, the Sex
pam 69 and many other bands led the wa
lg the boring, worn out rock morals of the
ploiting the stagnation that had become a
le decade During this time, late 70s, punk
the L'nited Statis with er little response
k the other Since then, punk has found
uccess with the help of changing tastes in
inging attitudes, radio airplay (thanks in
e resurgence of AOR) and record com-
pilable interest in the commercial poten-
genre
lands of the 80s play at their audiences
n to them. The Dead Kennedys, Black
arcle Jerks, and the always-violent Fear
few of the bands who keep their music
id far less commercial than todav's "new
ids, When Fear blast the refrain "I don't
li you; fuck you" at their audience, they
Jrovoke a violent response from most club
it also evoke reflection on the themes of
apathy and rejection in society. So, like
rms, punk is effective on more than one
lon't have to be addicted to drugs or par-
listurbed to be good punks; but a certain
o unconventional clothing and hairstyle is
loclasuc way of expressing a punk stance,
provides a promiscuous freedom for its
ho that involvement doesn't necessarily
hate, hate, and more hate is the only thing
cut of it.
Nck ('n' roll) remains only an item for a
punk rock carries over into its follower's
ring them a precise definition of the situa-
te in. Fun is fun, but it shouldn't consume
fe. One could view today's punk move-
music as our elders viewed early
11, but most people aren't that narrow-
The musical inclination of most rock au-
W even worth noting. So I won't.
lof the prototypes of punk, Iggy Pop who
Jthe increasing demand for progressive
In he sings "I need more
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?
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 12, 1983
Lange's Long Affair With 'Mischa'
Subject She Considers Most Private
Continued From Page 9
Postman's editor,
Craeme Clifford, was
chosen to direct
Frances. He gave
Miss I ange the lead
role, and how she ran
with it. A major
motion-picture per-
formance by someone
once written off as
professionally dead.
She shot the female
corned) lead in Toot-
sie immediately after-
ward, and now
evcryo e wonders out
loud whether there is
a part Jessica I ange
can't do
1 he New York
Times has proclaimed
her to be. along with
Meryl Streep, one o
the two most sought-
after properties in
Hollywood. With
Miss Streep pregnant,
the job opportunities
�or Miss I ange are
ripe. And Miss 1 ange
who earned
$350,000 for Tootsie
and is showing a
healthy interest in
Frances revenues with
her two percent of the
producer's gross � is
discussing retirement.
It is an alien con-
cept, or should be, it
seems, to a 33-year-
old actress ap-
proaching peak earn-
ing power, explosive
popularity and over-
due fame. But Miss
Lange is serious; since
filming Tootsie and
Frances, she hasn't
accepted any of the
umpteen offers flow-
ing to her.
"I'm just not going
to do this for very
long she says of her
acting career. "I real-
ly don't think I will.
I've never found a
natural ease in mak-
ing movies. It has no
harmonious life of its
own
There are main
reasons to believe
these are more than
the facile sentiments
of a poseur. This is no
glitzy girl, no photo-
opportunity party
hound, but smarter
than most folks in the
business and smart
enough to know it.
"There's a very low
standard of morals in
Hollywood Miss
Lange says. "There
are a lot of people
with very little cons-
cience. I'd say 70 per-
cent of the business is
illusion. No, delu-
sion. People are
deluded in what's lm-
portaht, in values.
False ideas are impos-
ed on your life that
really have nothing to
do with any kind of
universal truth
Miss Lange will
talk about her career,
her life, her family,
but virtually never
about her loves. She
met Baryshnikov
soon after she finish-
ed King Kong. They
have now been
together, off and on,
for seven years. It has
been a private
romance with a very
public child. Alexan-
dra (whom they call
Shurs) stays largely
with her mother.
"When 1 first met
Mischa Miss Lange
says, "there was
something so familiar
about him that he felt
like a brother.
Physically, emo-
tionally, everything.
Even though there
was a tremendous
a tea that was
unspoken � because
of language problems
� it wasn't one of
those relationships
where you meet so-
meone and there's an
immediate history. It
wasn't even
something I
understood. That was
the immediate
response. 1 don't
know if 1 feel that
way now � it's seven
years down the road,
it has a history of its
own
For his part,
Baryshnikov finds
Miss Lange far more
confident than ever
and praises her art to
the skies. He does,
however, sound a tad
bemused by her cur-
rent ambivalences. He
attributes a lot of it to
her most recent job.
"I think this
Frances Farmer
period will just pass
he says. "I think she's
playing this role for a
little too long. It
would be real stupid
of her not to work a
lot now. But 1 think
she will take big
chances in terms of
her career and in her
life. She won't listen
to anybody, anyway;
she will do what she
wants to do
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4.XMMM! Nocl� t �i.
The North Carolina V,
Bishops erupted tor
eighth inning U
and defeat the ECl Pu
in a Monda afternoon :
Harrington Field
The visitors from neu-
Mount punched ml l� I
five different ECl p tchci
process of wn: -
game � .
After
season with an imprc
start. ECL ha
of the la
ly stands a !
One bij
slump
statt. is wa
afternoi
esleya
lead after the 1
with the
Richard Mattock
over the : .
starter Bo Da
In the third i
was re
Butler, but H .
batter ; - -
Charhe Simpson a
Medley
Butier �a -
McClanahar
Lady
Although the 1 a
ball team could
termed "underd -
name going
Thursday doub
Flo- da Sta -
FortunateU. the Bc- die
live up to theii name
the shocked
e ampton FSl b
first came. 2-0.
The Lad) Pirates i d
cond contest. 4-0. before the LaM
Noles scored two runs in - j
and knocked n three more it
fifth to to wm. 5-4.
FSl. now 52-5, is - d
the best slow-pitch
in the country nd
reason, head coac � v
Manahan wa-
the plaers" perfc no . ce "1: wj
a good team effort she s;j
��fhe kev thing is thai i
learn we ca -
did that today
"When the started
didn't give up -
back "
In tlK rst game, the
charged a: the Seminoles, -
the onl two runs by dtha te
in the first inning l
illiams go: a doub
Hooks reached on an a
first inning. Daus th
score V illia m
Oayton. CL
brought Hooks
Clat, scored wh� eFS
cher dropfx J
home. The Ptra e Nj
off to car . - fifth s
SO far this ear FSl I
hits against leanetu R
first game
In the ve
enjoyed a four- run le.
ECU
B RXMn MEWS
xi�ff W - �
rei
Freshman Chris B
first place in tht
second consecutive mtt
ECL men's track lean
in the Carolina Re.a
weekend in Chape' H I
Brooks, a freshman
Raleigh, out-jumpec
competitive field will
23' 10 1 2 He was also i�.tor
at the Duke Imttattonal
weekend.
Mabry
B RAND MFS
staff Wmtt
Delphine Mabr set a
record to take first place in
800-meter event in 2:11.6 �
George Mason Invitational
weekend in Fairfax. Virginia
The ECU women placed
tiers in almost every event agj
such teams as Villanova.
Stale, Georgetown and
Forest
Aside from setting a
record. Mabry also placed





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64S
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
�XPRIl 12. 1983 Page u
Bishops Outslug Slumping Pirates
B KEN BOLTON
vMMaai s,�iv t dilor
The North Carolina Wesleyan
Bishops erupted for six runs in the
eighth inning to break a 6-6 tie
and defeat the ECU Pirates 12-6
in a Monday afternoon contest at
Harrington Field.
The visitors from nearby Rocky
Mount punched out 16 hits off of
five different ECU pitchers in the
process of winning their 22nd
game against only three losses.
Alter starting off the 1983
season with an impressive 10-2
start, ECU has now lost four out
of the last five games and current-
lv stands at 15-10.
One big reason for the current
slump is the failure o' the pitching
staff, as was the case Monday
aftei noon.
Wesleyan jumped out to a 3-1
lead after the first two innings,
with the main blow being a
Richard Mattocks two-run homer
over the right field fence off ECU
starter Bob Davidson.
In the third inning, Davidson
was replaced by reliever Chubby
Butler, but Butler only retired one
batter and gave up RBI singles to
Charlie Simpson and Mooehie
Medley.
Butler was replaced by Robbie
McClanahan, who retired the side
after giving up a run-scoring
single to Vince Chamberlain.
After the top half of the third
inning, the score was 6-1, and
things were looking bleak for the
defending ECAC-South champs.
But the Pirates came back to tie
the score with two runs in their
half of the third and three runs in
the sixth inning.
With one out in the bottom of
the third, Pirate first baseman
Todd Evans doubled to deep
center field. After David Wells
reached on an error, freshman
designated hitter Winfred
Johnson drove home Evans with a
single.
With men on first and second,
N.C. Wesleyan shortstop
Chamberlain mishandled a
Robert Wells grounder, allowing
David Wells to score.
The Pirates added three more
runs in the sixth on three hits and
a pair of walks.
Second baseman Tony Salmond
opened up the inning with a slow
roller down the third-base line for
a base hit. After walks to David
Home and Jabo Fulghum loaded
the bases, Kelly Robinette singled
to drive in Salmond.
With no one out and the bases
full of Pirates, John Hallow miss-
ed a golden opportunity to add to
his RBI total. (Hallow is the all-
time ECU RBI leader with 96.)
The senior Greenville native,
who also played noseguard on the
ECU football team his first two
years at ECU, hit a sharp
grounder to first baseman Mike
DeLeone. DeLeone threw to
home plate for one out, and cat-
cher Toby Holliday threw back to
DeLeone for the double play.
That brought up Evans, who
greeted Wesleyan starter Larry
Parr with a two-run double to the
left-center gap to even the score at
6-6.
Neither team scored in the
seventh, setting up the six-run
outburst by the Bishops in the
eighth inning.
After a single by Medley and a
throwing error by Fulghum put
men on first and third. Holliday
singled up the middle to drive in
Medley and Willie Arrington.
Senior reliever Kirk Parsons
was sent in to replace Mc-
Clanahan, and after a sacrifice
bunt, Mattocks drove in Holliday
with a single up the middle.
Mattocks then proceeded to
steal second and went all the way
to third on a ground out. Not con-
tent with his progress to that
point, Mattocks decided to steal
home. Parsons' throw was not in
time and Mattocks slid in under
the tag of Fulghum to make the
score 10-6.
A single by Terry Coates, a
double by DeLeone and a single
by Simpson added two more runs
and chased Parsons.
Brian Peterson, the fifth Pirate
pitcher, came in and recorded the
final out.
Besides Evans, who had two
hits, drove in two runs and scored
two runs, Kelly Robinette had a
good day at the plate for the
Pirates.
See ROBINETTE, Page 13
N Mwoir.
Mattocks 2b
DeSota dti
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VI cone It
Simpvon 'h
Mcdlcx if
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Salmond ;t
Home Jb
Fulghurr (
Totals
�b r I H
? 02
4 0 10
5 i ; :
110 0
4 0 11
? o o o
4 110
: : i o
110 0
2� f � 5
K.C.Waakyaa 123 mate-12
EaatCaratJn ol'Oo:ooo �
DP - NC 1. tCL 0 LOB - NC� 6. ECU � 2b -
VI cone, bin- (2) b - DeLeone HR � Mattocks
�P- P" 16-01. IP - McClanahan (?
Records - M'k 22-J; ECL 1? 10
Lady Bucs Surprise Seminoles
Although the Lady Pirate soft-
ball team could hardly ever be
termed "underdogs that's the
name they had going into last
Thursday's doubleheader with
Florida State University.
Fortunately, the Bucs didn't
live up to their name. Instead,
thev shocked two-time national
champion FSU bv winning the
first game. 2-0.
The I adv Pirates led in the se-
cond contest, 4-0, before the Lady
Noles scored two runs in the third
and knocked in three more in the
fifth to to win. 5-4.
FSU, now 32-5, is considered
the best slow-pitch softball team
in the country. And for that
reason, head soft ball coach Sue
Manahan was obviously proud of
the players' performance. "It was
a good team effort she said.
' The key thing is that we have to
learn we can beat the best, and we
did that today.
"When they started to hit, we
didn't give up. We tried to come
back "
In the first game, the Lady Bucs
charged at the Seminoles, scoring
the onlv two runs by either team
in the first inning. Yvonne
Williams got a double and Fran
Hooks reached on an error in the
first inning. Davis then hit a fly to
score Williams and Jo Landa
Clayton. Clayton's single then
brought Hooks to the plate.
Clayton scored when the FSU cat-
cher dropped the ball on a slide
home. The Pirates held the Noles
off to capture their fifth shutout
so far this year. FSU had just two
hits against Jeanette Roth in the
first game.
In the second game, the Pirates
enjoyed a four- run lead after the
first inning. Williams reached on
a fielder's choice and Hooks
reached when an error was made
at second. Senior Mitzi Davis then
tripled and scored on a single
from Yolanda Clayton. Robin
Graves moved Clayton to third
with a hit and she came in on a
sacrifice fly by Tamara Franks.
FSU scored two runs in the
third inning and knocked in three
more in the fifth to go ahead.
The absence of right fielder
Cynthia Shepard was definitely
noticed in ECU's lineup.
Shepard's grandmother died last
week. "Cyn is the sparkplug of
the team Manahan said. "She's
a threat everytime she comes to
the plate. You can look at the
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Sue Manahan
North Carolina doubleheader and
see that.
"She figured in both of the runs
in that. Her speed makes her
capable of advancing at anytime,
but too. we're a team, and one
player doesn't make or break us
she added.
Manahan and the team were
well-aware of FSU's status, and
the head coach explained why the
Lady Noles are regarded as the
top squad in the coi iry.
"What makes them number
one is that they have 13 full
scholarships "Nobody else can
approach that. Thev have a
$186,000 budget, and that doesn't
include their grants. Nobody else
has that
What does ECU have? "Our
budget is only $17,000, and that
includes everything. If you look at
it from a dollar standpoint, they
should not lose
Since the AIAW was discon-
tinued this year, the women now
compete in the NCAA. The Lady
Pirates will not have the oppor-
tunity to play in a national NCAA
slow-pitch championship since
one is not held, but Manahan said
post-season competition is not
totally out of the question. "We
have a state tournament and then
the ASA (American Softball
Association) is sponsoring an in-
vitational she said.
Next year, the Pirates wil switch
to fast-pitch and Manahan is
looking forward to the change.
"N.C. State has already commit-
ted to go to fast pitch and N.C.
State, we understand, is dropping
softball for soccer next year.
We'll be ready for fast pitch.
We've already recruited with that
in mind
ECU Frosh Finish On Top
B RANDY MEWS
surf U nler
1 reshman Chris Biooks took
first place in the long jump for the
second consecutive meet as the
ECU men's track team competed
in the Carolina Relays this
weekend in Chapel Hill.
Brooks, a freshman from
Raleigh, out-jumped a highly
competitive field with a leap of
23' 10 12. He was also victorious
at the Duke Invitational last
weekend.
Craig White, who just beat out
former Olympian Charles Foster
in the 110-meter hurdles in a
previous meet, had trouble jump-
ing the seventh hurdle and only
managed a fourth place Finish.
His time of 14.14 was still only
less than a second from qualifying
for the Nationals, and he is ex-
pected to do so before the season
is over.
In the 100-meter dash, Nathan
McCorkle placed fifth in 10.76,
but could have done better as
evidenced by his relay time of 9.8.
That realy team of Terry
Brown, Joseph Dingle, Erskine
Evans and McCorkle finished
third in the 400-meter race in
40.32 seconds.
"That was the first time this
year I've tried an all freshman
combination in the 400 relay
said head coach Bill Carson.
"They did very well under the cir-
sumstances
The Pirates will travel to Rich-
mond, VA next weekend to com-
pete in the Richmond Invita-
tional.
Golfers Place Fifth
Mabry Sets Record
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
Delphine Mabry set a meet
record to take first place in the
800-meter event in 2:11.6 at the
George Mason Invitational this
weekend in Fairfax, Virginia.
The ECU women placed run-
ners in almost every event against
such teams as Villanova, Penn
State, Georgetown and Wake
Forest.
Aside from setting a meet
record, Mabry also placed in a
field event. She was fourth in the
long jump, with a leap of 17
9 12
In the 100-meter dash, Robin
Cremedy and Tcrissa Hudson
both had qualifying times of
13.00. In the finals, Cremedy
finished second, while Hudson
placed fourth.
Cremedy and Cathcart both
placed in other individual events.
Cremedy was seventh in the 200 in
26.4, while Cathcart took fourth
in the 400 in 57.4.
The ECU golf team had their
best performance of the year this
weekend, finishing fifth among 12
teams at the UNC Invitational in
Chapel Hill.
Chris Czaja led the Pirates in-
dividually with a three-day total
of 220 strokes. He was followed
by freshman: David Doolby and
Roger Newsom who Finished with
221 and 222 respectively.
Rounding out the top five for
the Pirates was Kelly Stimart with
223 strokes and David Woodward
who shot a 224.
Bill Brooks of Guilford won in-
dividual honors for the tourna-
ment with a 213. Florida's Chip
Hall also finished with 213, but
Brooks was victorious in the
playoff round.
In team standings, UNC took
first with 858 strokes, NCSU was
second with 860, Wake Forest
shot a 865 and Duke had 875.
ECU and Guilford tied for the
fifth spot with 885 strokes each.
Head coach Jerry Lee was very
proud of his teams high finish. "T
was extremely pleased with our
teams performance, and it felt
especially good to beat such teams
as Florida and South Carolina.
"On the second day, everyone
on our team shot par or better,
giving us the second best round of
the tournament Lee added.
The Pirates will close out their
season next weekend when they
compete in the Old Dominion In-
vitational in Nags Head.
Pfto'OS B� GA8 P4TTEISO.
ECL third baseman David Home tags out N.C. edevan's Mike
DeLeone as he unsuccessful) attempts a head-first lide.
Pirates Place Fourth In
N.C. State Invitational
After a well-plaved
doubleheader against FSU, the
ECU women's softball team
followed with a disappointing
fourth-place finish at the N.C.
State Invitational in Raleigh this
weekend.
In the quarterfinal game on
Saturday, the Pirates fell to Nor-
thern Kentucky. 3-0. N. Kentuckv
scored all three runs in the third
inning. The Lad Bucs had nine
hits and two errors, while N. Ken-
tucky had six hits and one error.
ECU's Fran Hooks was the onlv
leading hitter, going two-for-
three.
On Fridav. the Lad) Pirates
lost to N. Kentuckv. 11-1. ECU
scored its only run in the fourth,
while N. Kentuckv knocked 10
runs in the same inning.
Following the big loss, the Bucs
came back by downing Western
Carolina. 9-8. The Pirates had a
6-2 lead at the bottom of the
third. WCU retaliated bv scoring
two runs in the fourth and three in
the fifth, but ECL came out on
top by adding three runs in ihe
fifth inning. ECU had 17 hits and
two errors, while WCU had IS
hits and one error.
The Lady Pirates then went up
against hosting N.C. State. B:
the Bucs weren't too congema; In
eight innings. ECU captured a 4-2
victor) over the Lady Woifpack
Tied 2-all. the Pirates scored two
runs in the eighth to win.
ECL had 11 hits and one en
and the Pack finished wtih 10 h ts
and six errors Leading hitters
were: Hooks, three jr;
Williams, two-for-four, Ham -
two-for-three: and Roth wc
two-for-three.
"I think we came out a little I
vesterdav (Fridav) after the game
wtih Florida State Manahan
said. "Northern Kentuckv car
out ver strong. 1 think thev sur-
prised us a little because thev were
so consistent at the plate
Despite disappointment.
Manahan still saw mam positive
aspects. "We had two good games
against Western (Carolina) i
State she said. "We hit the ball
hard. We did a good defensive
in the mud
Now 14 the Ladv Pirates will
play Louisburg toda at 3 p m.
The game scheduled for Wed
dav against Virginia Com-
monwealth has been cancelled
Pttoto By GARY PATTERSOaj
ECU Golf Coach Jem Lee instincts team member on finer points
of the snort game during eartier practice ronnd.
-J
-� ff�i an'nnm � t m
-�





t
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 12, 1983
-4-
?
Seve Shows 'Em At Masters
AUGUSTA, Ga.
(UP1) � It's a good
thing Seve Ballesteros
doesn't like playing
on this side of the
ocean.
If he did, he'd take
a lot of dollars away
from American
golfers and convert
them into Spanish
pesetas.
Ballesteros earned
$90,000 � approx-
imately 11 million
pesetas � Monday by
winning the Masters
for the second time.
But he says he'll make
only three more U. S.
appearances this year
� in the Westchester
Classic, the U.S.
Open and the PGA
Championship �
because of his com-
mitments in Europe.
"1 won't even be
able to play in the
Tournament of
Champions because
it's the same week as
the Madrid Open he
said. "I made that
commitment before 1
won the Masters
Tom Watson,
Ballesteros' playing
partner Monday and
at times his closest
pursuer, said he'd like
to see the long hitting
Spaniard play the
U.S. tour. "Seve ob-
viously has his
reasons for not doing
so said Watson.
"He gets guarantees
in Europe and has to
limit his play because
of his back
"One of these
days said
Ballesteros, who
makes his home in
Santander, Spain,
"I'll come over and
play the tour for a
vear to see how good I
am
He showed that
Monday when, star-
ting the day one shot
behind co-leaders Ray
Floyd and Craig
Stadler, he played the
first four holes in
4-under to vault into a
three-stroke lead and
then coasted home
with a 3-under-par 69
that gave him a total
of 8-under 280 and a
four-shot victory over
runnersup Ben Cren-
shaw and Tom Kite
who had 68 and 69
respectively.
"To go birdie,
eagle, par, birdie; to
go 4 under in the first
four holes, that was
the key said
Ballesteros. "I don't
know if that's the best
start 1 ever had, but it
was the most impor-
tant
"Ballesteros got off
to such a great start it
put a damper on
everyone's spirit
said Kite, who has
been sixth or better
seven times in the past
eight Masters but
never a winner. "It
was like he was driv-
ing a Ferrari and
everyone else was
driving a Chevrolet
When he heard
that, Ballesteros quip-
ped, "Back home, I
ride a bicycle
Ballesteros, who
turned 26 Saturday,
said he wasn't surpris-
ed no one made a run
at him after he
jumped into a com-
manding lead. "The
key on this course is
you have to wait for
the birdies he said.
"On the last round, if
you're three or four
behind and try to
make birdies, they
never come. Try to
play aggressive and
this course will kill
you
Ballesteros, winner
of the British Open in
1979, was 10-under
after making a
15-footer at the ninth
hole but seemed to be
slipping a bit when he
took bogeys at 10 and
12 and when he
salvaged a par at 13 he
figured it was time to
start playing safe.
"After 13 is when I
told my caddy 'from
here to the last hole,
we have to play it in
par he said. "We
did. Good thing too
Watson closed to
two strokes at the
eighth hole when he
sank a 25-foot eagle
putt. But Watson,
another two-time
Masters champ, then
had a string of three
straight bogeys and
although he closed to
three back when he
birdied the 13th, it
was all over when he
took a double bogey
at 14.
"The 14th sealed
my coffin said Wat-
son. "The lights went
out for me. As 1 said
earlier in the week, I
had to play my best to
win and I didn't play
my best
Watson, with a 73,
and Floyd, who had a
75, tied for fourth,
five shots behind
Ballesteros. Hale Ir-
win had a 69 Monday
and Stadler a 76 and
they wound up in a tie
for sixth at 286. Lan-
ny Wadkins (71), Dan
Pohl (71) and Gil
Morgan (74), who led
at the end of the rain-
delayed second
round, were at 287
and the only others
under par for 72
holes.
Arnold Palmer, one
shot off the lead after
the the first round,
saw his score climb
day by day to finish
far back in the pack at
8-over 296. Jack
Nicklaus had to
withdraw at the start
of the second round
because of back
spasms. The only
amateur to play the
last two days was
James Hallet of South
Yarmouth, Mass
and he wound up at
297.
This was only the
second time and the
first in 10 years the
fourth round of the
Masters was played
on a Monday. That
happened because the
second round was
rained out Friday and
plans to play 36 holes
Sunday were thwarted
when Saturday's
round couldn't be
completed before
dark.
Pack May Still Meet With President
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UP1) � North
Carolina State
University basketball
officials didn't hear
from the NCAA in
time Monday, so a
meeting with Presi-
dent Reagan was
cancelled.
The Wolfpack
basketball team,
which won the NCAA
championship last
week, had been in-
vited to the White
House for congratula-
tions from the presi-
dent. But Wolfpack
officials wanted to
clear the trip first with
the NCAA.
Wolfpack officials
had to cancel their 5
p.m. appointment
with Reagan because
the NCAA had not
told the university by
10:30 a.m. whether
the team could go.
Capitol Broad-
casting, owner of
several broadcast sta-
tions, had offered to
pay the $118 fare for
15 team members, for
a total of $1,770.
Coaches and their
wives were going to
pay their own way.
Rudolph Pate, vice
chancellor for foun-
dations and university
relations, said the trip
had to be postponed
when word did not
come from the NCAA
as expected.
Pate said the White
House appointments
officer he contacted
asked him to let him
know when the
NCAA decision was
made. Pate said he
thought there was a
good possibility the
invitation to meet
with the president
would be re-extended.
The seats had been
reserved for the team
on a flight leaving
Raleigh-Durham Air-
port at 2:45 p.m. The
meeting with Presi-
dent Reagan was
scheduled for 5 p.m
and the team was to
be back in Raleigh by
8 p.m.
Capitol Broad-
casting offered Friday
to pay the plane tare
nmmmmmmmimwmr
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
FOUR (4) Tacosi
for just M.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
8:00pm til doting
with purchase of 4 tocos C
for the team
members. Neil Juvin.
station manager, said
before the day was
over his office had
been advised 15 team
members would be
going.
"It seemed it was
all rolling at that
time Kuvin said.
"Nobody could point
to a line or a
paragraph in the rules
that would rule it
out
But later in the day,
Kuvin said, he was ad-
vised the NCAA rules
committee had ques-
tions about the offer.
Photo By GABY PATTERSON
Six women and four men cheerleaders will make up the 1983-84
cheerleading team. Pictured above are (Front row) Sophomore
Karen Hall, an art major; (second row, I to r) Junior Patti Harrill.
an interior design major: Senior Scott Perry, a computer science
major; Senior Cindy Batson, a business major; (third row) Junior
Renee Myers, a business major; Sophomore Lisa Lyon, a computer
science major; Senior Jennifer Cooper, a dance major; (fourth row)
Sophomores Robbie and Ronnie Rice, both computer science
majors; and (fifth row) Sophomore James FJkins. a pre-
environmental law major. Cooper and Perry will serve as co-
captains next year.
Open Mon thru Sat 8am to Midnight
Sun 9 am to 9 pm
nv 600 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
KEtotrooNAA
OlVlttSnCJrUSIrtZIl
VSVS.SNS.XNS.VXNXSVNNS.S.NiVXN.VN.N.XN.XXN.VX
&?&
XSN.VVN.vN.
752-0476
Cquhtrv Cookie
Large Plate,
r
lMeat
All you can eat Vegetables
BreadTea
$3.85 Tax
WZMB
Now accepting applications j
for the following positions:
lAssistant G.MProgram Dhi
News Director
Production Manager
Traffic Director
Deadline for applications
4-15-83 except Program Director
which is 4-13-83 at noon.
10-Oz.
Pkg-
BRAWNY
HHMMiiUmWM
Items and Hnces
Effective Wed April 13 thru
Sat. ApriM6. 1983
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
EaC o these advert se3 tarns t re
qurej to b� '�a: . available 'or
save �i each Kroger Sa� o" eicec'
as specifically no tad - this ad it we
do run out of an item �� will ot'er
�ou your choce of a compa'aD e
terr when available reflecting the
same savings or a ramchec wtfccft
win entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the aoe't sed
price within 30 days
t

�t
?
FROM THE DEL!
EXTRA LEAN
Roast Beef
$99
Lb.
SAVE
90c
Paper Towels
69
T
Jumbo
F"ESH CRUSTY
u wiser
Harrf Rolls
99
CAMBELLS
Tomato Soup ?��
10V-Oz.
Can
EMBASSY
Grape
Jelly
32-Oz.
Jar
FIRST OF THE SEASON
CALIFORNIA
Strawberries
$449
Full
Quart
ECU'S Daid UdN r
third-inning grounder
Robine
Cont'd Fmm Page 11
The ser
�stop had �
five tr:r
and drove � �
runs.
After :� gaune,
ECL head coat Ha
Baird cited
pitching rod
as keN to the
come
Classi
PERSONAL
F ��RES fROV �� .ocks �
tilings U �ro.� L :a-
party : muc" �!� j- Mi
diyH ift�i, Fraja �
HOLLYWOOD � i :c � -�
ou cleaned rha- bM � Do I
you know tha' sr�a. "�$ c-e�w
and toiie' Mwr s' c� We -�
eOonti� more a���nait ��'
vow � �� 'Ms' �.ftp � v��
e re gonna ac some'ng
K it! Wha' happened bj ,o�.
Saturday n.gn" s?oac ,e, a
damn anymore Aic .a va
that I m an ooe on L A S
BEWARE OF THE M!DGETS
They re taking c�e- � mv c
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROCMVATE
WANTED to snare y�c rjed'oor-
apt 1 block "srr :ampvs Cai
'4' IJ
ROOMMATES 4N't:
summer Aparmei' s �. - -
ed Split ren' a"e � rs
C�pr�lGj-Of i;j �-?-�� -
" m is'
FEMALE ROOMMATE ir-eoeo
to share e�cene�' Nab bed'oor
townhouse at MMbmcM ft � I
tor the Summer Ca. "� �C'
FEMALE BOCMMi-E
wanted caii '$: :m:
ROOMMATE HEECET FOU
summer Pr ,ji, - v-rc
room m tour bedroef novse
Located ntar t r
11 (Ml month plus ; � t
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE experience gua-n
�or IBM Se�e" c Hpe� r
Call Lanie Mm S1 U' or
GAIL JOYNER "5 b�:
TYPING Term papers thesis
e�C Call Kemp Dunn -5: A-JJ
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SE R
VICE Complete audic 'epa-
C�Hj��rp m Mark �: ' m
AOVING� No 100 to aroe or
m�M! Reasonable rates can
7j�tsn.
TYPING � U years experience
Cam MS-4t7� afterJe o wl
NEED TYPING' Can C�v
355 �-�� affcn 5 M '� tears e
I BAA type Spelling.
�few ma- �frars thechee)
IS LEARNING SPANISH A
��TCH Ca�s�tg yavr a- hi
'an o�t� ca" a�-lcp haip
Tutor,ng available MtukU
N�r�. KERRI Iff n�.
TYPINC ANO �APHICS -
Rush jbs PerMene ana
Call S Ham.itpn
'���� or L rSlxtHttil
S��4Jl
FOR SALE

����&���� 1111Jim 11
eCU STUDENTS, laortty ftN
hj aar Moa make �
Ceajaty Pf �����!
'�CbNja n North S'ttnt'ot
���� Op�� avery Sahpr�ay an�
�"tey � W S. Crafts. Nwtt. tar
"ilkn. kMkv etc OnpKn �
� I





�r


)
'holo By GARY PATTERSON
cheerleaders will make up the 1983-84
r d above are (Front row) Sophomore
(second row, I to rt Junior Patti Harrill.
senior Scotl Pern, a computer science
on. a buineN major; (third row) Junior
i lajor �v�phomore I ia I on, a computer
iniferooper. a dance major: (fourth row)
Ronnie Rice, both computer cience
lophomore Jame hlkins. a pre-
I.ooper and Pern will sene as co-
AOv'ERTlSED ITEM POLICY
1 ' ese advertised items is re
sd to be readily available for
sale in eacri Kroger Sav on. except
as specifically noted in this ad If we
Jo run out of an item we will offer
� Xi your choice of a comparable
teni when available reflecting the
same savings or a rainchoch which
entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
D' e within 30 days
41
i
wast Beef
$3"
SAVE
90c
FRESH CRUSTY
Kaiser
Hard Rqhs
6990
M
4
1
IHEjASTCAROLlNlAN APRIL 12 1983
13
Hart Named Assistant AD
East Carolina
University Director of
Athletics, Dr. Ken
Karr, has announced
the selection of Dave
Hart, Jr, to fill the
position of Assistant
Athletic Director for
Marketing.
Hart, 34, comes to
East Carolina from
LeGrange, KY, just
outside Louisville,
where he served as
head basketball coach
at Old ham County
High School from
1977 to 1982. During
his coaching at
Oldham, Hart became
heavily involved in
high school sports
marketing that receiv-
ed national recogni-
tion.
Within two years of
accepting the position
at Oldham, the atten-
dance for
creased from 150 to a
sell-out situation on
season tickets of 3200.
Hart's efforts were
noted in an article he
authored for Scholar.
ty Mtfzto. as well
. ia speaking to the
Naitonal High School
Coaches Association
in Indianapolis.
"We need fulltime
attention in the areas
sales nad advertis-
ing said Karr. "Our
need is to increase
revenue capabilities
for football, basket-
ball and baseball.
With the restructuring
of our operations to
involve this fulltime
Position, I feel we are
taking positive steps
for our athletic pro-
gram
Worthy
ia- of promotions, ticket A graduate of the
University of
Alabama in 1971,
Hart played basket-
ball under CM.
Newton, and then
worked as a graduate
assistant in the pro-
gram while earning
his master's degree in
itn.
Han will assume
duties at East
Carolina the final
eek of April.
INGLE WOOD
Calif. (UPI) - James"
Worthy, the NBA's
top draft pick last
year, is out for the
season with a broken
leg and
surgery
With
Lucas.
"I don't feel too
good right now, I'm
sort of down Wor-
thy said Monday.
will not be able to
return until late in the
playoffs, if at all. �
Since McAdoo has
been sidelined. Wor-
thy has made more
il! nde� ?2S? " 4" iny na$ m� more
Tuesdav il "52 M cham' �han 60 percent of his
esday to pions without him, shots from the field
the floor, coming up
with all the big
plays
"I'm just numb
said Coach Pat RUev.
"I'm just concerned
about James Worthy
the man. I don't give
a damn about the
season "
ECU
third-
�hote By OAKY PATTERSON
SEELirtr xromt -w� ���-�
fuse the bone together Worthy smiled and
with screws, the Los said, "Why nof TTy
Robinette Turns Hat Trick
Cont'd From Page 11
The senior short-
stop had three hits in
five trips to the plate
and drove in a pair of
runs.
After the game,
ECU head coach Hal
Baird cited the lack of
pitching
as keys
.ome.
"We're not getting
good enough pitching
and not getting the big
defensive plays when
we need them Baird
stated. "But the kids
are playing hard
The Pirates are cur-
rently going through
one of the worst
and defense slumps that Baird can
to the out- remember in his four
years at ECU, and
with some important
games coming up in
the future, Baird is
optimistic about the
remainder of the
season.
"I hope we can turn
things around Baird
commented. "The ,
key will be if we can Thursday
get a couple of well- will play
pitched games
The Pirates
will
face the same
Wesleyan team on
Tuesday afternoon at
3:00 in Rocky Mount.
After that game,
ECU will face intra-
state rival North
Carolina at home on
night and
four con-
ference games in three
days this weekend.
Angeles Lakers an-
nounced Monday.
The loss of the stan-
dout 6-foot-9 for-
ward, who suffered a
fractured tibia just
below his knee in Sun-
day night's game
against the Phoenix
Suns, hurts the
Lakers' chances of
becoming the first
team since 1969 to
repeat as NBA cham-
pions.
"We've had very
serious injuries this
year said guard
Magic Johnson, "but
this one really hurts
won it without me last
year
Dr. Stephen Lom-
In the last seven
gmes before being
injured he had shot a
sizzling 76 percent.
'It puts a lot of
r� r (A
KytigfeM
the most It's going to James will be ready to
a big effect on return to action in ap-
bardo will perform pressure on everybody
the surgery which now said guard
will consist of inser- Michael Cooper
ting one or two screws 'James was starting
io hold the fracture in to pl�y niagnificent
postion whde it is basketball. He was
healing in Centinekj playing both ends of
Hospital.
"We feel optimistic
about his eventual
return said Lakers
team physician Dr.
Robert Kerlan.
"Without complica-
tion, the prognosis for
the future is excellent
and it is expected that
GROMt m n -
w
Remounts
Custom Design
Repair
All Work Done On Premises
:
p
1
i
i
i
i
i
�i
MKMI
Classifieds
PERSONAL
F PRES FROM the looks of
�imgs. u proved U can never
party 2 much What are bir
days 4 anyway. From X.
HOLLYWOOD. It's about time
� ou cleaned that old V.W. Don't
ou know that shaving cream
ana toilet paper stick? We're
e.Kientiy more dependable than
ou � at least when we say
e re gonna do something we
do itl What happened to you
Saturday ntght? Nobody gives a
damn anymore! And you say
'hat l m an "odd onei l. 4 S.
PEWARE OF THE MIDGETS:
TieY re taking over the world
ROOMMATE
WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE
"ANTED to share two bedroom
ap' i block irom campus. Call
'57 3912.
ROOMMATES WANTED FOR
summer Apartment is furnish-
ed Split rent and utilities.
Cypress Gardens Apartments �
M� 757 ISI7.
female ROOMMATE needed
'o share excellent two-bedroom
'ownhouse at Wedgewood Arms
'or the Summer. Call 7S4-4207.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
"ANTED: Call 7$I JMJ.
"OOMMATE
summer
room m
located
�M SPECIAL II Yamaha S1.3M.
Oood condition. An excellent
MM. Noad to soli. Make an of
for. Call WHWS.
!�� CHEVY Custom Deluxe 1.
Got speed, sliding roar win
dows, AMFM, cassette. P.s
P.M. Lock-in hubs, Rally wheels
Priced to soil. tlO.SM. Call
7sa-et�.
2 ALBUMS OF YOUR
CHOICE, new old hard to por,
rock, coon iau, cla� only STt.M
Take years to pay in � easy
payments. No dealers please
Call today. 7a-ta07 ask for JAY-
WOODEN EAR w 7 chairs. M
bargain i Desk, uj Call Ejom at
7�7tSe.
CAR STEREO COMPLETE
with amtm receiver, equalizer
and speakers. M watts and like
now. Call STEVE at WMgS.
FOR SALE: FISHER S3
SPEAKERS. Will sell cheap.
ga Call 7st-a?77.
l4e EUICK LA SABRE: Ex
cellont consition. Now tiros,
S37S. Call 7St-o4Q.
FOR SALE: Burgundy 27-inch
10 speed Shogun bike Just
bought m Fob. Toe clips. Ex-
cellent price $115 or best offer.
Call 7sa-04oo and leave message.
10-SPEEO BICYCLE: Windsor
International $11$ or best offer.
Excellent shape, have barely us-
ed it. Can't afford to move with
it. Call 7SI-�5. Jennifer
177 MOB Asking SI000 Call
7S2-OMS.
LOOKING FOR AM APART
MENTTT We're graduating this
semester and nood someone to
take our lease in May.
J bedroom townhouse with new
carpet, located at River Bluff
behind Papa Kati. For more in-
formation, call 7Se-jo4e and ask
for Stoole or Kevin.
PEHSON(s) WANTED to
sublease 2 bdrm townhouse at
Cherry Court May through
August. For more info, call
7S2-3730.
logo View, only
utilities. 7S2-72M.
SIM plus
APARTMENT to sublease for
summer at Cannon Court. Bus
route to ECU. If interested, call
7S7 U20
THE BLOODMOBILE SPON
SORED BY PANHELLENIC
will be held on Wed. Apr. u and
Thurs. Apr. U from u 00 to 4 00
p.m. at MendenhaM A donation
would b� greatly appreoated
CREENMILLRUN: 1 bedroom
apt. for rent May Aug. Com
pletely furnished, air condition-
ing, pool, basketball court. Call
757 1445.
the team
Worthy was injured
with 10 seconds left in
the third quarter of
the Lakers' 101-95
loss at the Forum.
After attempting to
tip in a missed shot;
he landed on his left
leg and then tumbled
to the floor with Suns'
forward Maurice
proximately six mon-
ths
Worthy was being
counted on the give
the Lakers the offense
off the bench that
thev lost when Bob
McAdoo sustained a
broken bone in his
foot one game after
the All-Star break.
McAdoo probably
T Shirts. Stooping Bags
Ut.fl
ARMY-NAVY
STORE IS-1
ABORTIONS
l M woe ken
. yn. Ma 7 Days
CALL TOLL-FREE
i-tat-ni-asrs
ss
CAN DO
25 Offset Resumes
Photocopies
5C
for
S12.50
- �
Claw - oe-
E m -
�&! !e -52 1233
L DOVNTOvN
412 EVANS MAi
NEED SUMMER BOARDING
WITN LOW RENT7 Subleasing
two bedroom apartment at Col-
:A7TTIC ATTir:



752-7303
WED
ATTIC
'ONE NIGHT ONLY

COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
oiC Greenville Blvd.
754-3023 - 24 MRS.
PLAZA SHEL
24 hour Towing Service
t-Haul Rentals
Available
rTrmffilnii
i'M. month
'S� 0501
NEEDED FOR
Private, furnished
four-bedroom house,
near Traffic Office.
plus 14 utilities.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, experience, quality
��rk. IBM Seloctric typewriter
Co Lan.e Shive 7M-SMI or
GAIL JOYNER 7Se-loo�.
TAPING: Term papers, thesis,
��. Call Kempie Dunn, 758-0713.
AOlO ELECTRONICS SER-
VCE Complete audio repair
C er pm- 7I��Wo-
moving? No ion too largo or
"nail! Reasonable rates, call
" mr
T r ping � 11 yoars experience
C" ,Si'7 rtor I:So p.m. �
NEED TYPINGT Call Cmdy
3� �74t after S:M. 10 yoars ex-
oenence IBM typo. Spelling,
grammar errors chocwod.
H LEARNING SPANISH A
B'TCHT Causing your hair to
�all out' call mo � I can help,
tutoring available, flexible
"ours. HERRI 717-HSt
TV�ING AND GRAPHICS �
�ush jobs. Portfolio and
Florences. Call S. Hamilton
7Mm �r L. Piantedesia
WWi.
FOR SALE
l ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff:
Welcome to our No market at
m� Pitt County Pairgrounds
'ocatod on North Greenville
8lvd Open every Sahjrdaiy anal
Sunday l til S. Crafts, toots, hjr-
nifure, boats, etc. Displays of
old postcards, buttom,
P'stois and cot lectors'
I j bargantsil
K1'S� KAWASAKI, 1MI, SI,W.
J Priced to sell Groat bargain.
Goon condition. This is a real
I "motorcycle Make am ottor CaM
'Mtis.
1 PANASONIC THRUSTERS, 2
advents, 2 Sony speakers, new,
must sell. Call 7S2-23M, ask for
Rick and Judy.
KENMORE REFRIGERATOR:
I 13 yoars old. 2.S cubic foot.
Available May I, SI25. Groat
bargain, call in aoos
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: BLUE and orange
MacGregor gym bag in BC-IOJ.
Browstor BMg Monday April
11 about 13 90 Must have back
with all contents. No questions
asked. Call ?sa t-us or contact
Political Science Department at
Browstor.
WANTED
t ONLY$2.00 ADMISSION FOR E.C.L. STLDETs�
THUR
FREE
ADMISSION
FOR LADIES �
TILL 10:30
50 BEVERAGE:
TILL 11:00 :
i
a
a
i





ft
?
ft
ft







�k



�t�
ft
�k
-k
�k
JOLLY'S PAWN SHOP
�E X-RAVES
CORNER OF GREENE ST.
A PACTOLUS HWY
GREENVILLE NC
7S2-5758
�CCEPT�ta AHr i;iuioyaiui
FOX COu-H�L
ALL TftAMSACTKHtSCONFIOEMTIAI.
WE BUY
SILVER
AND GOLD
Fri.
Jd?
WANTED: WOMAN TO SHARE
2 bedroom duplex May July $1.
Furnished, grand piano,
sundock. Lass than I mile from
campus. UlSmoath. 7Sl-ign.
WANTED: VERY LIOHT par-
fabte typewriter by ���. CaM
Julie Pay now, at 3SS-4UI or
7S7-04U.
WANTING TO BUY: DOUBLE
BED. Call 7SO-S4Q4.
?GIRL DORMS DON'T FORGET
FREE ADMISSION IN APRIL :
(EXCEPT CONCERTS) ?
ft
ft
we nvt moot wvsnToav or
�cw a ueeo McncMiuacMM
�� ecu at wwotasAia eoot
wt havs cur our ff-wnis ggg
go ournw rnoM tmo racToav
JOLLY'S PAWN SHOf
Spend Yomr Summer
at
aims
T.ys
ruonrrunc
Lno� onacTion or sxacmomes
AUirm udkii
sTcnaos
can oaoios with ta�s a vtuni
C-UJILMINGTON
Register for Summer S� ssitms
For information contact:
Director of Summer Sessions
P.O. Box 3725. UNC-Wilmington
Wilmington, N.C. 28406
or call (919) 791-4330 ext. 2195
r
RIDES
RIDERS NBEOEO: 1 riders to
Atlanta. Share gas. Leave t a.m.
April 14. Return Monday April
17. 7M-PH4.
MISC.
MOVING NO JOB TOO
LAROS OR SMALL!)
Eoaaawabja ratas. caW 7BMSU.
RESPONSIBLE BRSON(S)
WANTSD la �� Han un riam
at Tar Rivor Estates
Apt. is beside
I pvvlp RoM gVAIn
la located S rnimiH
CaM 7S9-0434 N
YOGI
VANTSYOU
AT
T)ominion
Ata m, am n. wttmm u
����� HmmmfmWm)mf
H�,fnrkpjta
TnwoJ
Farioartkafi
TVftrfOfflw.
.sn 75711, rstlax
Thursday is the last day to
get your picture
taken for the
yearbook-
come on up
between 9-12 or 7-5
� -l � i � � ' "
�ni m 'Q� ii� ii 1BN11 ifcmm.ua,
� i





14 THE EAST CAROLONIAN APRIL 12, 1983,
Pirate Club Willl
Raise Money
Through April
During the month
of April, the ECU
Pirate Club will at-
tempt to raise
$300,000 in the Pitt
County area.
The Pirate Club is a
non-profit organiza-
tion which provides
financial support in
the form of scholar-
ships to the athletic
department.
On Tuesday, April
5, the Pitt Coun-
ts Greenville Chapter
of the Pirate Club
kicked off its' Spring
Fund Drive, known as
the "Siege of 83
This is a United Way
type approach which
is designed to per-
sonally contact in-
dividuals in all facets
of public and private
sector employment.
chancellor John
Howell and Greenville
businessman Les
Garner are Com-
manders of the Siege
ol "Fleet which is
divided according to
profession or location
of business.
Charles Shavitz,
Student Assistant in
the Pirate Club, is
Captain of the Pirate
Ship "ECU Student"
and is assisted by
lieutenants represen-
ting the S G A,
sororities, frater-
nities, residence halls,
and other ciubs and
organizations. As part
o the current siege,
all graduating
students are being of-
fered free, one-year
memberships in the
Pirate Club. These are
worth $30 and entitle
the new member to all
privileges associated
with that level of giv-
ing; Purple Report
newsletter, decals,
membership cer-
tificate and card, as
well as priority to pur-
chase season tickets to
home and away
games. Most im-
portantly, they get the
satisfaction of know-
ing they are helping to
provide scholarships
for talented
studentathletes.
According to
Shavitz, if East
Carolina is to con-
tinue its expansion
from a primarily
regional university in-
to one of a national
scope, the Pirate Club
must increase from its
current level of 1,750
members to more
than 3,000 for ECU to
remain competetive in
Division I-A.
As Pirate club
memberships and
contributions in-
crease, the athletic
program is able to use
revenues for
operating expenses
and facilities im-
provements, as well as
for increased Financial
guarantees which are
necesary to bring
powers into 35,000
seat Ficklen Stadium.
Graduating
students should sign
up for free member-
ships at the Student
Supply Store on Mon-
day, April 18 and
Tuesday, April 19
from 10 a.m. until 3
p.m.
Complete Automotive
Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jartran Rentals Available
Buck's
Gulf
2701 E. 10th Si.
758-103J
Plain

is a new restaurant
in docuntoivn
qreenvilie that:
S WfTHIti WALKING PtSVWCB
.� 4Hh �t bet-u�r pondmd jacH and book teorn)
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 12, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 12, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.263
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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