The East Carolinian, April 7, 1983






ft
x.

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(ftariilttTtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.STNoF fC
Thursday, April 7,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Petition Objects To Commencement Location
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Slaff Writer
An ECU senior slated to
graduate in May is circulating two
petitions protesting the universi-
ty's decision to hold commence-
ment exercises indoors, where
limited seating will keep many stu-
dent's friends and family from at-
tending.
Mike Watkins, a political
science student, began circulating
his petitions on Monday. He plans
to present the petitions to
Chancellor John Howell and C.
C. Rowe, chairman of the ECU
Commencement Committee,
sometime next week.
The commencement program is
normally held in Ficklen Stadium,
which has a seating capacity of
35,000. But, because the
stadium's football field is schedul-
ed for renovation on May 1, this
year's ceremony will instead be
held in Minges Coliseum, which
seats about 6,500.
Because of the change, seniors
are being issued tickets for their
families to attend the ceremonies.
Each graduate will only receive
two tickets, but may request more
if they're available.
Because of fire and safety
codes, only 5,000 tickets can be
issued for the indoor exercises.
Normally, attendance at com-
mencement exceeds 13,000.
Watkins claims he is circulating
the petition to "bring notice" to
the university that signees of the
petition think it's an injustice that
the football field is given priority
over graduation.
His petition asks that the 1983
graduation exercises be held in
Ficklen Stadium. "We believe
that it would not effect the foot-
ball team or inconvenience the
university to delay repair of the
football field until after gradua-
tion Watkins wrote.
"We feel this way because
graduation from college only
comes once and that the football
team will still be here next year
Watkins said. "But, seniors will
not be here come the start of the
1983-84 academic school year.
"I have paid enough fees at this
university Watkins said. "I
know that part of these fees have
gone to the football program
through the athletic program
Watkins said another part of
his fees are used for graduation,
and he believes seniors are entitled
to the best facility available for
their commencement program.
"I just think that somehow the
priorities of the university got
mixed up Watkins said.
Athletic Director Dr. Ken Kan-
claims the field repairs cannot be
delayed. "The renovation should
have been done a year ago Karr
said, adding that ECU officials
were advised by engineers to begin
the renovation as soon as possi-
ble.
Karr said the stadium field has
needed "massive renovation" for
two years, but, because state ap-
proval was required, the project
was delayed.
Karr said the field is scheduled
to be ploughed April 25 to begin
the renovation process and
prepare the field for a new irriga-
tion system. The field also has to
be re-graded and re-seeded to
make the surface ready for use by
September.
The ECU football team has
their first home game set for
September 17.
When informed of Watkin's
petition, Chancellor Howell said
it was unlikely that he would
change the commencement plans
that arc now in place. Howell
noted the repair of the football
field was a lot more complex than
just re-sodding the surface, and he
also feels that Minges will be ade-
quate for the event. "The ade-
quacy of Minges is better than the
way it's always stated Howell
said. He said the fact that 13,000
people attend graduation is an
"over-estimate
Howell said he would give the
petition consideration, adding
that this was "a very emotional
issue" with some people. Howell
also claimed that the petition is
probably being signed by students
who aren't graduating. Watkins
See KARR, Page 5
Mike Watkins
.dislikes Minges location
Photoj By CINDY WALL
Reaction To Graduation In Minges
David Howell, Senior, English
� "I'm not fond of the idea. It
just seems ridiculous to squeeze
people in. It's also insulting for
people to have to come hun-
dreds of miles and then have to
watch the ceremonies on
closed-circuit television
David Franks, Senior, Com-
mercial Art � "It's ridiculous
that students can only receive
two tickets to the graduation
exercises. For that reason, I'm
opposed to the plan
Stephanie Colton, Senior,
Foods and Nutrition �
"Because I'm graduating in
December, the decision really
doesn't effect me. But, if I was
graduating, I would be real
disappointed because there are
more people than two 1 would
want to invite
University Officials Plan New
Kitchen Wins On Mendenhall
By MILLIE WHITE
Staff Writer
Tired of waiting in line at Jones
cafeteria and the Mendenhall
Snack Bar just to get something to
eat? Well, help is on the way.
Plans are being made to add a new
wing to Mendenhall Student
Center which will house two
separate dining facilities and
meeting rooms.
The new wing is presently only
in the planning stages, however,
and the addition must first be ap-
proved by the UNC Board of
Governors in Chapel Hill. Accor-
ding to the director of
Mendenhall, Rudy Alexander, the
proposal is in the "very early
planning stages; nothing is
definite
If approved, the building will
take roughly three years to com-
plete, making it available for use
in the fall of 1986. though pro-
bably not ready most current
students.
Funding for the project will
come mainly from a Mendenhall
reserve fund which will exceed SI
million at the time of construc-
tion. Additional funding will
come from student fees, but Alex-
ander said that the increase in fees
will be "nominal
"1 certainly do not think that
the increase will be unreasonable
from anyone's point of view
Alexander said. He added that
"with SI million on reserve, the
cost should be quite reasonable
The location for the new wing
has not yet been determined, but
an architect will be hired by the
university to make the decision.
"After we firm up what we want,
the architect will look at
Mendenhall and give us his idea of
what would be the best location
says Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
of Student Life.
Mendenhall was chosen as the
site for the new eating facility bv
dining consultants Don Jacobs of
the University of Pennsylvania
and David Kramer of Duke
University. After careful observa
tion Jacobs and Kramer conclud-
ed "that the site selection ot
Mendenhall is correct
The main purpose of the new
wing would be to offer more din
ing facilities to students. Two din-
ing areas would be located in the
building. One of the dining rooms
would seat 300 to 400 people while
the other facility would serve ap-
proximately 100 students.
The smaller dining area would
serve as a luncheon buffet in the
afternoon and as a catered dining
room for group meetings at night.
ECU meal plan use has increased
from 794 to 1500 in three vears.
Proposal To Cut Fees Meets Opposition
By GREG R1DEOUT
Nt� t dilor
A proposal by SGA president
Eric Henderson to cut the amount
of money the student legislature
receives from each student has
met with opposition from the ad-
ministration and other SGA of-
ficials. Henderson made the
recommendation at the March 4
meeting of the Board of Trustees
without consulting the legislature.
The proposal would cut the stu-
dent activity fee by $3. At present,
each student pays approximately
$7.75 per year to the SGA.
The proposal is being studied
by the finance committee of the
Board of Trustees. If passed, they
will recommend to Chancellor
John Howell that fees be cut. The
proposal will then have to be ap-
proved by the UNC Board of
Governors before it takes affect.
The measure is expected to be
voted on at the next trustees
meeting.
Henderson is not obligated to
bring the poposal before the
legislature, but both vice
chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer and Speaker of the House
Gary Williams feel all SGA
members should be aware of the
proposal and have a chance to
debate its merits.
Vice Chancellor Meyer said that
he thought Henderson had "no
right" to bring the measure before
the trustees without the
legislature's approval. Meyer had
no comment on the merits of the
proposed cut.
Henderson's reasons for the ac-
tion center around the funding of
academic departments. The cut,
he said, would basically eliminate
the money that the SGA currently
appropriates to the School of
Music, School of Art and the
Department of Drama and
Speech. Henderson said that
decreasing fees in a time of infla-
tion will help students financially.
Speaker of the House Williams
believes that although there is no
rule that says the legislature has to
approve the measure, he would
hope the trustees understand the
importance of a chance for the
SGA to debate the proposal.
Williams said he is personally
against the measure. He said it
would being going backwards and
would not permit the legislature
enough flexibility.
The amount of money the SGA
currently receives is approximate-
ly $120,000 per year. If the $3 cut
is put into affect, the budget will
be around $59,400. That would
leave close to $22,000 to ap-
propriate to student organizations
after the executive council budget
is subtracted.
SRA
By DARRYL BROWN
Aistsuat New, t diior
Elections for officers of the
Student Residence Association
Wednesday resulted in clear deci-
sions for all offices except the
presidency, where a margin of on-
ly two votes out of almost 700
separated the candidates and
caused indecision among election
officials.
In a hard fought race, Danny
White edged out Mark Niewald by
331 votes to 329 for the top spot in
the SRA. However, no official
winner was declared because of an
uncertainty in election rules regar-
ding the possibility of a run-off.
Niewald immediately called for a
run-off election, but SRA election
rules are vague and subject to in-
terpretation in the situation, ac-
cording to elections Chairman Ed
Dougherty.
"The rules aren't clear as far as
we are concerned Dougherty
said. He conferred with Dean of
Residence Life Carolyn Fulgrum,
who oversees the SRA, and said
they will probably seek a legal in-
terpretation of the rules from the
university attorney. "The ques-
tion is whether there will be a run-
off election. We'll make that deci-
sion on Friday Dougherty said.
Niewald claims because his
total was within two percent of
White's, he can demand a run-
off. Dougherty and other officials
are unsure whether a run-off is
permissible when only two can-
didates ran in the original elec-
tion.
If a run-off is held, it will take
place next Tuesday. The president
and other executive officers are
supposed to be sworn in at the
SRA banquet next Wednesday.
For other executive offices,
Donna Marie Wells was elected
See ELECTION, Page 5
� STAMLKY LSAftY
TMsm
of the
Going For The High Note
major is climbing the sculpture of a musical not ia frost
bwldiag. Is that the oahway he can reach high C?
Student Objects To War Monument With Segregated Names
An ECU student has protested to Greenville and
Pitt County officials that a monument on the lawn
of the Pitt County courthouse is a reinforcement of
the "segregational attitudes" that once were com-
mon in the South.
Glenn Maughan, a student in the School of
Education, sent letters to several city and county
officials complaining of the word "colored" that is
engraved into the stone set beneath the memorial
commemorating Pitt County Civil War dead.
"My displeasure is not with this vertical
cenotaph (a monument honoring a dead person
buried elsewhere), but with a horizontal slab
beneath it that 'honors' the dead from other
wars Maughan wrote in his letter to officials.
"On this piece are numerous names. Yet the
homage paid to those who died in defense of our
country is less than adequate Maughan wrote.
"It would seem that those who designed, built and
engraved the monument sought more to remind
those, who view the piece, of our segregational at-
titudes than to honor the dead
Maughan's basic objection was not only to the
placing of names by race, but the use of the term
"colored
Maughan sent copies of his letter to the Pitt
County Board of Managers, the mayor of Green-
ville, the Pitt County district attorney and a senior
superior court judge.
Maughan was told in response to his letter to Pitt
County Manager H. R. Gray that the word
'colored' would be removed from the marble slab
during the summer.
In his ietter, Gray said the issue was brought to
the attention of county officials several years ago,
and he thought that the problem had since been
resolved.
Gray said a veterans organization that had
prepared the slab sometime in the 1950s was
originally contracted to have the monument cor-
rected. He and the present board of commissioners
were under the impression that the corrections had
been made.
Gray extended the boards "regrets" to Maughan
that the correction had not been made. "The
board wishes to offer its apologies to yon, Oray
wrote.
In a follow-up letter to Maughan, Oray said the
county had contacted a monument company to
take the word 'colored' off the slab, but he said
work could not be done until July or August so as
to insure a professional job. "We have instructed
him to correct the situation at the earnest possible
date during those months Gray wrote.
"The corrections will be made Gray said.
"I've already given the orders to have it done
Pleased with the results, Maughan said he was
satisfied that the corrections would be made. "I
didn't see any reason for it to be there in the first
place Maughan said. "It was nice of them (the
veterans group) to memorialize the people who
in a war, but it was a disgrace to do it in the
See ECU STUDENT,
� � I. i,�i�WW,MHl� i 9t'
mmmmmn ��
mi
w,�- . � � . Tp) fim Ym
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DfefhfAtptMA





?
2toe
(Earultntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 Nog ,�
Thursday, April 7, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Petition Objects To Commencement Location
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Stall Wnici
An ECU senior slated to
graduate in May is circulating two
petitions protesting the universi-
ty's decision to hold commence-
ment exercises indoors, where
limited seating will keep many stu-
dent's friends and family from at-
tending.
Mike Watkins, a political
science student, began circulating
his petitions on Monday. He plans
to present the petitions to
Chancellor John Howell and C.
C. Rowe, chairman of the ECU
Commencement Committee,
sometime next week.
The commencement program is
normally held in Ficklen Stadium,
which has a seating capacity of
35,000. But, because the
stadium's football field is schedul-
ed for renovation on Mav 1, this
year's ceremony will instead be
held in Minges Coliseum, which
seats about 6,500.
Because of the change, seniors
are being issued tickets for their
families to attend the ceremonies.
Each graduate will only receive
two tickets, but may request more
if they're available.
Because of fire and safety
codes, only 5,000 tickets can be
issued for the indoor exercises.
Normally, attendance at com-
mencement exceeds 13,000.
Watkins claims he is circulating
the petition to "bring notice" to
the university that signees of the
petition think it's an injustice that
the football field is given priority
over graduation.
His petition asks that the 1983
graduation exercises be held in
Ficklen Stadium. "We believe
that it would not effect the foot-
ball team or inconvenience the
university to delay repair of the
football field until after gradua-
tion Watkins wrote.
"We feel this way because
graduation from college only
comes once and that the football
team will still be here next year
Watkins said. "But, seniors will
not be here come the start of the
1983-84 academic school year.
"I have paid enough fees at this
university Watkins said. "I
know that part of these fees have
gone to the football program
through the athletic program
Watkins said another part of
his fees are used for graduation,
and he believes seniors are entitled
to the best facility available for
their commencement program.
"1 just think that somehow the
priorities of the university got
mixed up Watkins said.
Athletic Director Dr. Ken Karr
claims the field repairs cannot be
delayed. "The renovation should
have been done a year ago Karr
said, adding that ECU officials
were advised by engineers to begin
the renovation as soon as possi-
ble.
Karr said the stadium field has
needed "massive renovation" for
two years, but, because state ap-
proval was required, the project
was delayed.
Karr said the field is scheduled
to be ploughed April 25 to begin
the renovation process and
prepare the field for a new irriga-
tion system. The field also has to
be re-graded and re-seeded to
make the surface ready for use by
September.
The ECU football team has
their first home game set for
September 17.
When informed of Watkin's
petition. Chancellor Howell said
it was unlikely that he would
change the commencement plans
that are now in place. Howell
noted the repair of the football
field was a lot more complex than
just re-sodding the surface, and he
also feels that Minges will be ade-
quate for the event. "The ade-
quacy of Minges is better than the
way it's always stated Howell
said. He said the fact that 13,000
people attend graduation is an
"over-estimate
Howell said he would give the
petition consideration, adding
that this was "a very emotional
issue" with some people. Howell
also claimed that the petition is
probably being signed by students
who aren't graduating. Watkins
See KARR, Page 5
Mike Watkins
.dislikes Minges location
Photos By CINOY WALL
Reaction To Graduation In Minges
David Howell, Senior, English
� "I'm not fond of the idea. It
just seems ridiculous to squeeze
people in. It's also insulting for
people to have to come hun-
dreds of miles and then have to
watch the ceremonies on
closed-circuit television
David Franks, Senior, Com-
mercial Art� "It's ridiculous
that students can only receive
two tickets to the graduation
exercises. For that reason, I'm
opposed to the plan
Stephanie Colton, Senior,
Foods and Nutrition �
"Because I'm graduating in
December, the decision really
doesn't effect me. But, if I was
graduating, I would be real
disappointed because there are
more people than two I would
want to invite
University Officials Plan New
Kitchen Wins On Mendenhall
By MILLIE W HITE
staff Wrilw
Tired of waiting in line at Jones
cafeteria and the Mendenhall
Snack Bar just to get something to
eat? Well, help is on the way.
Plans are being made to add a new
wing to Mendenhall Student
Center which will house two
separate dining facilities and
meeting rooms.
The new wing is presently only
in the planning stages, however,
and the addition must first be ap-
proved by the UNC Board of
Governors in Chapel Hill. Accor-
ding to the director of
Mendenhall, Rudy Alexander, the
proposal is in the "very early
planning stages; nothing is
definite
If approved, the building will
take roughly three years to com-
plete, making it available for use
in the fall of 1986, though pro-
bably not ready most current
students.
Funding for the project vvill
come mainly from a Mendenhall
reserve fund which will exceed SI
million at the time of construc-
tion. Additional funding will
come from student fees, but Alex-
ander said that the increase in fees
will be "nominal
"I certainly do not think that
the increase will be unreasonable
from anyone's point of view
Alexander said. He added that
"with SI million on reserve, the
cost should be quite reasonable
The location for the new wing
has not yet been determined, but
an architect will be hired by the
university to make the decision.
"After we firm up what we want,
the architect will look at
Mendenhall and give us his idea of
what would be the best location
says Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
of Student Life.
Mendenhall a chosen as the
site for the new eating facility bv
dining consultants Don Jacobs of
the University of Pennsylvania
and David Kramer off Duke
Universiiy. After careful observa
tion Jacobs and Kramer conclud-
ed "that the site selection ol
Mendenhall is correct
The main purpose of the new
wing would be to offer more din
ing facilities to students. Two din-
ing areas would be located in the
building. One of the dining rooms
would seat 300 to 400 people while
the other facility would serve ap-
proximately 100 students.
The smaller dining area would
serve as a luncheon buffet in the
afternoon and as a catered dining
room for group meetings at night.
ECU meal plan use has increased
from 794 to 1500 in three vears.
Proposal To Cut Fees Meets Opposition
By GREG RIDEOUT
Nrwi Editor
A proposal by SGA president
Eric Henderson to cut the amount
of money the student legislature
receives from each student has
met with opposition from the ad-
ministration and other SGA of-
ficials. Henderson made the
recommendation at the March 4
meeting of the Board of Trustees
without consulting the legislature.
The proposal would cut the stu-
dent activity fee by $3. At present,
each student pays approximately
$7.75 per year to the SGA.
The proposal is being studied
by the finance committee of the
Board of Trustees. If passed, they
will recommend to Chancellor
John Howell that fees be cut. The
proposal will then have to be ap-
proved by the UNC Board of
Governors before it takes affect.
The measure is expected to be
voted on at the next trustees
meeting.
Henderson is not obligated to
bring the poposal before the
legislature, but both vice
chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer and Speaker of the House
Gary Williams feel all SGA
members should be aware of the
proposal and have a chance to
debate its merits.
Vice Chancellor Meyer said that
he thought Henderson had "no
right" to bring the measure before
the trustees without the
legislature's approval. Meyer had
no comment on the merits of the
proposed cut.
Henderson's reasons for the ac-
tion center around the funding of
academic departments. The cut,
he said, would basically eliminate
the money that the SGA currently
appropriates to the School of
Music, School of Art and the
Department of Drama and
Speech. Henderson said that
decreasing fees in a time of infla-
tion will help students financially.
Speaker of the House Williams
believes that although there is no
rule that says the legislature has to
approve the measure, he would
hope the trustees understand the
importance of a chance for the
SGA to debate the proposal.
Williams said he is personally
against the measure. He said it
would being going backwards and
would not permit the legislature
enough flexibility.
The amount of money the SGA
currently receives is approximate-
ly $120,000 per year, if the $3 cut
is put into affect, the budget will
be around $59,400. That would
leave close to $22,000 to ap-
propriate to student organizations
after the executive council budget
is subtracted.
SRA Elections Indecisive In Presidential Race
By DARRYL BROWN
Aisistaal New Mttor
Elections for officers of the
Student Residence Association
Wednesday resulted in clear deci-
sions for all offices except the
presidency, where a margin of on-
ly two votes out of almost 700
separated the candidates and
caused indecision among election
officials.
In a hard fought race, Danny
White edged out Mark Niewald by
331 votes to 329 for the top spot in
the SRA. However, no official
winner was declared because of an
uncertainty in election rules regar-
ding the possibility of a run-off.
Niewald immediately called for a
run-off election, but SRA election
rules are vague and subject to in-
terpretation in the situation, ac-
cording to elections Chairman Ed
Dougherty.
"The rules aren't clear as far as
we are concerned Dougherty
said. He conferred with Dean of
Residence Life Carolyn Fulgrum,
who oversees the SRA, and said
they will probably seek a legal in-
terpretation of the rules from the
university attorney. "The ques-
tion is whether there will be a run-
off election. We'll make that deci-
sion on Friday Dougherty said.
Niewald claims because his
total was within two percent of
White's, he can demand a run-
off. Dougherty and other officials
are unsure whether a run-off is
permissible when only two can-
didates ran in the original elec-
tion.
If a run-off is held, it will take
place next Tuesday. The president
and other executive officers are
supposed to be sworn in at the
SRA banquet next Wednesday.
For other executive offices,
Donna Marie Wells was elected
See ELECTION, Page 5
���� �� STANLEY LCAKY
Going For The High Note
This mask major is climbing the sculpture of a musical note in frost
of toe musk building- Is that the only way he can reach high C?
Student Objects To War Monument With Segregated Names
An ECU student has protested to Greenville and
Pitt County officials that a monument on the lawn
of the Pitt County courthouse is a reinforcement of
the "segregational attitudes" that once were com-
mon in the South.
Glenn Maughan, a student in the School of
Education, sent letters to several city and county
officials complaining of the word "colored" that is
engraved into the stone set beneath the memorial
commemorating Pitt County Civil War dead.
"My displeasure is not with this vertical
cenotaph (a monument honoring a dead person
buried elsewhere), but with a horizontal slab
beneath it that 'honors' the dead from other
wars Maughan wrote in his letter to officials.
"On this piece are numerous names. Yet the
homage paid to those who died in defense of our
country is less than adequate Maughan wrote.
"It would seem that those who designed, built and
engraved the monument sought more to remind
those, who view the piece, of our segregational at-
titudes than to honor the dead
Maughan's basic objection was not only to the
placing of names by race, but the use of the term
"colored
Maughan sent copies of his letter to the Pitt
County Board of Managers, the mayor of Green-
ville, the Pitt County district attorney and a senior
superior court judge.
Maughan was told in response to his letter to Pitt
County Manager H. R. Gray that the word
'colored' would be removed from the marble slab
during the summer.
In his letter, Gray said the issue was brought to
the attention of county officials several years ago,
and he thought that the problem had since been
resolved.
Gray said a veterans organization that had
prepared the slab sometime in the 1950s was
originally contracted to have the monument cor-
rected. He and the present board of commissioners
were under the impression that the corrections had
been made.
Gray extended the boards "regrets" to Maughan
that the correction had not been made. "The
board wishes to offer its apologies to you Gray
wrote.
In a follow-up letter to Maughan, Gray said the
county had contacted a monument company to
take the word 'colored' off the slab, but he said
work could not be done until July or August so as
to insure a professional job. "We have instructed
him to correct the situation at the earliest possible
date during those months Gray wrote.
"The corrections will be made Gray said.
"I've already given the orders to have it done
Pleased with the results, Maughan said he was
satisfied that the corrections would be made. "I
didn't see any reason for it to be there in the first
place' Maughan said. "It was nice of them (the
veterans group) to memorialize the people who
died in a war, but it was a disgrace to do it in the
See ECU STUDENT,

I d�lft.lMMIH
I
�� nt pmmfc





THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 7, 1983
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. m Weanesaavv tor the Thurs
�av paper No announcements
received atter these deadlines
a ill be printed
This space is available to all
ampus organizations and
. i-tments.
AMBASSADORS
The last General Meeting of
NW ECU Ambassadors will be
reid on Wed , April 13, 1993 at
S 00 pm in the Mendenhali
" ilti Purpose room We will
elect our 83 84 officers at this
- ee' ng Plans tor our ena of the
.ear party Wili also be announc
H vou are an Ambassador
who will be graduating in May
� n Summer School please call
the Alumni Center and let them
�.now i757 6072)
KYF
Mngs Youth Fellowship
have its next meeting on
iav April 11 at 8 00 pm in
VISC 'ne'e wil be a time of Bi
StuoOy ana fellowship,
a' ?. etreshments
CORSO
To an Socal Work and Correc
M rraiors ana intended ma
rs CORSO will meet 4 II 83 at
the Belk Building in room 103
� "s f. oe he'd tor of
s tor me organization.
STUDENTS FOR
CHRIST
Bs.k to the Bible Let's get
M the Bifcie1 informal
: Bible discussions Men
Belfc 7 30 pm Tuesday
Aomens 212 Mendenhali. 7 30
Thursday Everyone is

ARM WRESTLING
To all you strong and strong
women, trying to form an Arm
Arestimg club if interested, the
'st meeting will be today
Thurs April 1) at 5 00 pm Rm
102 Memorial gym Everyone
he is jvelcomed For further in
formation contact Curtis Sendek
(1 -52 9601
GAMMA BETA PHI
Members our next biweekly
�meeting will be held on Thurs
, April 7 in room 244 MSC at 7
r- r Any unfinished semester
business sucn as already late
�� payments will be handled
Ae win also discuss our plans to
attend GBP s national conven
- m Atlanta GA fh s weekend
and a short meeting for those
taking the trip will follow the
i -?guiar meeting
PARTY PARTY
You've been waiting all year
and now it herthe second an-
nual BAHAMA MAMA PARTY
sponsored by Budweiser and
Hawaiian Tropic The Party is
on Monday, April 25 (the day
before reading day) and begins
at 3 00! Tickets are on sale r,ght
now tor $3 00 and entitle YOU to
a drawing tor a FREE TRIP TO
THE BAHAMA'S tor two for a
week, and also a glimpse at the
MISS HAWAIIAN TROPIC
BIKINI CONTEST Ticket sales
are limited so purchase your
tickets NOW! For more intor
mation call 752 5543 "Hey Bud,
Lets Party "
READ PAGE 29
it you have a brown Universi-
ty Catalog, then it might help
you to read page 2? about the CP
and PS
SIGMATHETATAU
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Nu
Chapter is having their Spring
Banquet Educational meeting
April 19 1983 at 6 00 pm at the
Greenville Golf and Country
Club The speaker will be Dr.
Lucie Young Kelly, the national
president elect of Sigma Theta
Tu She will speak on "Using
Research to Change Practice
Or. Kelly is a Professor of
Public Health and Nursing and
serves as editor of Nursing
Outlook Registration fee is $9.00
which includes dinner and
gratuity. Students and inductees
will pay $6.00 Make check
payable to Sigma Theta Tau,
Beta Nu Chapter and return to
Carol Cox, ECU School of Nurs
ing by April 12, 1983. include
name, address, number atten
ding and names of guests.
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Nu
Chapter is having their Spring
induction April 23, 1983 at the
Jenkins Auditorium at 11 00 am
Dr. Helen Yura will speak on the
Nurse as Scholar
Beta Nu is having a business
meeting Monday, April 25 1983
at 7 00 pm at the School of Nurs
ing, room 203 All new inductees
invited to attend
CHAIRPERSON AND
MEMBERS NEED
if you like variety entertain
ment and want a challenge,
become the chairperson or
either a member on the Student
Union Coffeehouse Committee
For more information, contact
the Student Union (Room 234) at
757 6611, ext 210
BUCCANEER
To all organliations wishing to
be represented In the 183 S3
yearbook please contact Tam-
my Edwards at the Buccaneer
office as soon as possible The
number Is 757501.
NO JOB, NOW WHAT?
On April 19 at 3:00 p.m. In
Mendenhali 221, the Career
Planning and Placement Ser-
vice has invited the Personnel
Manager of a major bank to talk
on his perceptions of the job
market for college graduates.
Other job search considerations
will also be discussed.
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOP
The ECU Career Planning and
Placement Service's next
resume workshop will be held
April 13, 1983 from 1:30 2:30
p.m. Please note that it is
scheduled to be held in
Mendenhali 721
BINGOICE CREAM
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring another
Bmgo ice Cream Party on Tues-
day April 12 at 7:00 p.m. in the
Mendenhali Student Center
Multi Purpose Room.
All students, faculty, staff,
their guests, and dependents are
welcome to join in on the fun.
Play bingo, eat delicious ice
cream, and win prizes! Eight
different Bingo games are
played and the admission is only
.25 cents per person.
This is the last BingoIce
Cream party for the Spring
semester, but watch for an
nouncements about our summer
parties in the East Carolinian
and on Bullentin Boards around
campus
WEST AREA CAMPUS
West Area Gets High" on
Wednesday, April 20fh from 15
pm m the parking lot adjacent to
Clement and White dorms
Come join us and find our what
The Alternative really is
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The GreenvillePitt County
Special Olympics Spring Games
will take place on Thursday,
April 14 at the East Carolina
Track (bunting Field) from 9:30
am to 2:00 pm Volunteers are
needed to serve as "Buddies"
and "Huggers' if interested
please attend a volunteers
meeting on Tuesday, April 12 at
the ECU track at 3 00 pm or in
Minges coliseum, Room 136 in
case of ram If unable to attend
volunieer meeting call 752 4137
ext 201 days or after 5 00 pm
call 752 8272 Or 758 7805
PHI ALPHATHETA
The date of the Phi Alpha
Theta Cookout has been changed
from April 15 to April 8. There
will be burgers, beer, hot dogs,
etc Everyone is welcome.
Tickets will be available in the
History office (BA 316) from
Tuesday April 5 through Friday
April 8 and also at the picnic.
Admission is students- $2.00 and
faculty $2.50.
Also the final meeting of the
year will be April 13 at 2:30 in
the Todd Room The elections
for officers of 1983 84 will be
held. All members are urged to
attend.
BAKE SALE
The Phi Alpha Theta History
Honor Soceity is sponsoring a
bake sale Wednesday, April 13
from 9:00 to 2 00 The location is
m Brewster BA 314 beside the
History office Proceeds will aid
in aquiring needed journals for
Joyrter Library
Following the Bake sate there
will be a meeting April 13 at 2 30
in the Todd Room
CAMPUS SERVICE
worship service will be held
Sunday, April 10, 193 in Jenkins
Auditorium at 11 am The
Father and Son Male Chorus will
be the guest singers Commu
mon will be given at 10 30 am
Everyone is invited to attend
FIRST AID
FOR TOTS COURSE
The Pitt Cokunty Health
Department will sponsor a First
Aid for Tors course for parents
of pireschool children, on Thurs-
day. April 7th, form 7:00 9 00
p.m. The program will be held in
th� Health Department Con-
ference Room. Parking and en
try to the conference room an
at the rtr of the main building.
There is no cost for this pro
gram.
Topics covered will include:
Respiratory Emergencies,
Bleeding and Bandaging, Shock,
Polnsonlng, Specific injuries,
Safety and Prevention.
Pre registration is recom-
mended. For additional infor-
mation and pre registration,
call Sue Evanko at 7S2 4141.
SPRING SEMESTER
GRADUATES
Remember to pick up your
cap and gown from the Student
Supply Store, East Carolina
University, TODAY 11
These Keepsake gowns art
yours to keep, providing the
graduation fee has been paid.
For those receiving a Masters
Degree, the fee pays for your
cap and gown, but there is an ex-
tra fee of $11 75 for your hood
MCAT-KAPLAN
COURSE
Attention all pre med
students. A representative from
Kaplan will be at ECU on Satur
day, April 16th, at 10:00 a.m. to
present a minicourse on how the
Kaplan course can improve your
MCAT scores. We art looking
for twenty interested persons to
signup tor the course in order
for the Kaplan course to be
taught at ECU this summer The
meeting is to be held in the
Biology Reading Room and is
free to the public so any in
terested persons may simply
come on April 16fh or contact the
Biology Department
PARKS,
RECREATIONS
AND CONSERVATION
To all Parks, Rrecreations,
and Conservation Majors,
minors, and faculty Do not
forget our fantastic evening of
dining and dancing during the
PRC Spring Banquet. This gala
event will occur Friday, April 15
from 6:00 pm 1:00am at the
Holiday Inn. Tickets are
available at the PRC building.
For more info, call 757 6484
TAXES?
WE'VE HAD ENOUGH
Are you sick of paying taxes?
Welt did you know that 64 per
cent opf your federal tax dollar
goes directly for the support of
the military budget and poast
war bills? We might as well
make our checks directly
payable to the Pentagon! If
you've had enough, then join
other ECU students and Green
yiile residents for a demonstra
tion it will be held at the Inter
nal Revenue Service office in
Greenville on Tax Day April 15.
The theme of the demonstration
is tenttvely set to be "Taxation
without Representation Be at
the IRS office on 1st street at
noon "Money for Jobs Not tor
War For further information
call 7SI 4906
mzzzzznzm MWitiMMiiiiiiiiiiiiiuazznnsa
Slhpta (flfrt
fflratgrnttn
CHARGINGTHROUGH
THE 80
A new alternative
now colonizing at ECU
INFORMATIONAL
INTEREST MEETINGS
Thu 7pm - Room 221
Fri2:30 - Room 212
STUDENT UNION
S TOP B Y FOR MORE INFORM A TION!
A T OUR STUDENT UNION BOOTH
WEDNESDA F- FRIDA Y
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may mm mt form at r�ht or
um a saparato shaat of paper If
you nootf more linos. There f 33
units per lino. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phono. Wo
reserve the right to reiect any ad.
All ads must DO prepaid. Enclose
75 per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case Setters
nttstra sa THE EAST CAROLINIAN
offke � 3:H Teeadey before
Wimnli
Nan
Address.
J Buddhis
CityState.
No lines.
.�.
, si 73� per hue S.
.No. j�riinm









Li�
By JAY STONE
Maff Wnwr
Dr. Jeffrey
Hopkins, a renowned
Buddhist scholar, will
be presentini
seminar at the
Street Methodist
dent Center on Si
day, April 9. t
Chrysler A it
WZMB
Keith Mitchell is your host tor
Greenville's only predominately
heavy metal show WZMB's
Electric Rainbow Radio show
airs Fridays from 3 pm to 6 pm
and Saturday nights from mid
night to 6 am. Album specials
are played at 4 pm and 2 am
respectively. Friday the album
special will be ZZ Top's new
album "Eliminator Saturday
night it's Gary Moore's album
"Corridors of Power the Elec
trie Rainbow Radio Show, don't
miss it!
BIOLOGY CLUB
Dr. J. C. Harvell will be pre-
sent at the Biology club Meeting
April 11th at 7:30 pm for a ques
tion and answer session. Dr.
Harvell is an ECU Medical
School Graduate and was on the
Admissions Board for 3 years.
Have your questions ready!
CERAMICS
ECU. Ceramics Guild Spring
sale Thursday, April 21, 1983 on
ly 9:00 am 6:00 pm on the ter
race beside the gallery at
Jenkins Fine Arts Building.
CORS
You are :ordially invited to at
tend the 2nd Annual Spring Ban-
quet on April 18, 7 pm at
Mendenhali Student Center, in
the Multi Purpose Room Please
confirm your reservations
through Jackie Odom at 757 6941
or 312 Allied Health We look for
ward to seeing yu there.
Deadline for reservations, April
7.
JAM
The Fountain of Lite Christian
Fellowship will be sponsoring its
First Annual Jam for Jesus
crusade Saturday, April 9 begin
ning at 6 pm. The Jam will be
held in Jenkins Auditorilum.
Colleges and universities
throughout North Carolina are
expected to attend so for a time
of praising the Lord, come out
and Jam with us!
CADP
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro
gram on Thursday April 7 in
room 247 Mendenhali Student
center at 4:15. if is important
that all members attend
SOCIAL WORK
The Social Work Interns at Pitt
Co. Memorial Hospital, Dept. of
Patient and Family Services are
coordinating a "Community
Services Fair" to be held April
5, 1983 9 am thru 3 pm. This
event will be held at the Belk
(Allied Health) Building, ECU
The purpose of the fair is to pro
vide community awareness of
human resources for citizens of
Pitt County. Students. Profes
sionals in the helping profession,
and citizens are invited to at
tend. We look forward to seeing
you there.
HANDICAP
On Tuesday, April 19th The
Boy Scouts of America will be
holding its annual Gold Rush at
the Unviersity in Which 300 han
dicapped boys will participate
The Carnival type event is
scheduled for 8 30 to Approx
imately 11 00 am. Those in
terested in assisting in this wor
thwhile experience should con
tact Or Dave Porrefta, Minges
Coiesium, 757 6441
NCSL
To all our NCSL members the
fun's over with people, so how
about we get back to business,
okay? The new year has started
and we've got things coming up
including the April IC at Wilm
mgton! And to any student who
still wants to find out what this is
all about-1 mean the North
Carolina Student Legislature or
NCSL is all about, why not drop
by? We'll look for you Monday
night at 7 pm in Mendenhali,
room 212! This meeting is very
important, so please attend,
okay?
FRISBEECLUB
Frisbee Club the irates play
ultimate on Tues. and Thurs
4:00, at the bottom of College
Hill, dub meetms are Mondays,
8 00. rm 248 MSC Anyone who is
interested m frisbee throw
ingcatching iaroppirtg?), runn
ing, getting a good workou' on
these remaining, beautiful spr
ing afternoons, or The Grateful
Dead should check us out
NEWOWNERSHIP
Cousin's Pizzeria of raliegh
with stores in Cary, Morrisvill
and New York City is proud to
announce that we have moved to
the Great Greenvill Area. We
will be located at 321 E. Tenth
St. at the corner of Charles St
formerly Famous Pizza. We are
looking forward to working with
the students with our daily
specials and with future events.
Thank you.
PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
All stdudents who plan to
declare physical education as a
major during the spring
semester or who intend to stu
denr teach during the spring
semester should report to
Minges coliseum at 10:00 am on
Thursday, April 26, 1983 for a
motor and physical fitness test
Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a prere-
quisite for official admittance to
the physical education major
program. More detailed irtfor
mation covering the test is
available by calling 757 6442.
STUDENT
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
"Student volunteers are need-
ed to take parts I and 11 of the
National Teachers Examination
on April 21st from 1:00 pm �
6 00 pm eligible students are se
cond semester sophomores or
first semester juniors.
The Stdate Department of
Public Instruction (Raleigh,
N.C.) has asked East Carolina
University to assist in the
validation of the NTE. Students
who are eligible and wish to
volunteer should register in the
Dean's Office of the School of
Education or call Ect 6271, no
later than 5:00 pm on April 5th.
There will be no charge for
this test. The test scodres will be
used for validation purposes on
ly Volunteers will have excused
absences from classes on April
21st between 100 p m and 6 00
p.m.
LONE RANGER?
Lone Ranger? Are you a Lone
Ranger Christian? Are you try
ing to make it on you own? Well i
am here to say that you need
fellowship and infer Varsity s
where you can meet that need
Come fellowship with us on
Wednesday nites at 6 30 m
Biology N102
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOP
On April 13, from 3 00 4 00
p.m the ECU Career Planning
and Placement Service will pre
sent an interviewing
SKILLS WORKSHOP in
Mendenhali 221 All are
welcome!
BIOTECHNOLOGY
SYMPOSIUM
A symposium with the latest
new discoveries In
Biotechnology will be held Thus
and Fn. in the Brody Medical
Sciences Building Auditorium
Registration is at 8 15 a.m The
public is invited tree of charge
IFCPAGENT
The Miss IFC Pagent is to be
held on April 25th at 7 00 p m
Applications need to be turned in
by 5:00 p.m.on Wed April 6th
So all you Greeks need to pick
your BEST BABES NOW
CANOE TRIP
The Outdoor recreation center
for the Department of
Intramural Recreational ser
vices is sponsoring a canoe trip
on Wednesday, April 13, 1983
The trip is suitable for beginning
or experienced canoers Trip
participants will meet behind
Memorial gym at 3 OOp m. on
Wednesday for a iiesureiy pad
die down the Tar River lasting
approximately 2 hours Par
tlcipanfs should arrive back at
Memorial gym at 6 00 p m Ad
vance registration and payment
($3 00 per person is due by 4 00
p m on Tuesday. April 12 1983
Groups are welcome
WALT DISNEY
WORLD
Representativeds from Aa �
D'sney World in Orianac f.
will be at UNC Chapei Hi Apr
7 at 7 00 P m to interview
lege students maior.ng n 'fj .
management, hotel res'au-a"
management, recrea'io-
park administration or ous -�
for summer or fall empio�
The Magic Kingdom College
Program includes a minimum �
30 hours of worx per we?� and
students will be ettgtb � �
special D'sney arrange -
ing near tne Wai' Disne Ac- -
resort area Students �
receive first hano exoer met
while studying the pract ces and
philosophies empioyea t, �-
Disney management iea �
There will be a presen'a- on
about the program given a-ic -
terviews will follow atera'cs
Students must be fa" ng
academic credit while worn 15
interested students naod I
tact Nancy f not
The East Carolinian
Serving- the campus CM m - -
since IW
Published every Tuesca�
and Thursday during mi
academic year ana ever
Wednesday during tne sum-
mer
The East Carolinian .5 ma
official newspaper of East
Carolina University, owes
operated, and pupiishec lay
and by the students of East
Carolina university
Subscription Rate. $20 yean,
The East Carolinian officer
art located m the Old South
Building on the campus :�
ECU. Greenville. N C
POSTMASTER Senc a
dress changes to The EaV
Carolinian. Old So"
Buildng. ECU Green�
NC 77834
Telephone 757 6344. si1
6109
NA
There will be a meeting of
Narcotics Ananymous on Sun
day. April the 10th m room 247
Mendenhali Student Center at
7 00
SJ
�Mteteito�-al
$?&
�if.
:
Pharo 's Now Has
the Best PIZZA
6 inch individual Plain only $2.45
each additional topping 50C
"V
jk-
Jf
12 inch Plain only $4.00
each additional topping 65C
16 inch Plain only $5.50
each additional topping 95C
Again, we use only tne best
Eat I nor Take Out
Ground Beef
Green Peppers
Italian Sausage
Mushrooms
Canadian Bacon
Black Olives
Pepperoni
Onions
Extra Cheese
BREAKFAST BAR OFFERING!
� Fraahly Scrambled Eoo. � Homamada Buttafmitk Blacwtta � Bacon
� Country MHk Gravy � Hoata Friad Potato � Southarn Styta Qftta �
Homaaiada Muffins � Link and Patty Saueag � A CHotca of
"Shonaya" Own Spaclal Fruit Toppings � Qratad Amartcan I
PLUS The Fruit Bar featuring a variety of fresh fruit and tc
SHONEYS
205 Greenville Blvd.
MOMOAY-miOAY
� a0 UI,11iA.H.
SATVmOAV-aUMOAV
AHOUOAVt
sao AMiao pm
AlaoOpan
Friday - Saturday Nights
Midnight
Pharo's S21 Cotanche St. Georgetown Shoppes
For take out call � 7S2-47e1
HAVING PROBLEMS
with
ORUGST ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
SCHOOL?
.ADULTS $100 TIL 530 � clim
ANYTIME
BUCCANEER MOVIES
�5)
Smuc SKt�. .�� , i
We Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL A DatUQ FBOOMAM
S01-S0S ErwInBldf.
737-6793
Now Showing
wi
v
1:10
3:10
5:10
7:10
9:10
it!
(CPS) � A contest
designed to help the
Chrysler Corporation
get the attention of
college students with
money to spend has
led the company
directly to yet another
student without
money to spend.
One of the first
winners of Chrysler's
nationwide Pentastar
Challenge Contest
was 24-year-old
UCLA engineering
major Pamela Stub-
blefield. who
she'll spend the el
$5000 prize payinj
financial aid
and completing
education.
About the onb
she'll get to
Chrysler product
the time being 1
using a Of
Charger free tj
year as one 1
awards for
the contest.
Chrysler, ho
plans to continl
tWvV
PH
6t
RunnerUp Prizes
2nd PRIZE
S50 00 PTA Pizza
3rd PRIZE
$25 00 PTA Pizza
I
The
Gr
After you fii
�Estal
�Telli
� Masi
�Reai
The Wachovia G
services you'll need
make the best decisil
If you're graduatil
Carolina, see a Persj
nearest your campus
to receive the Wach
I will be graduatu
plan to live in N.C. Pl
Wachovia Grad Plan I
V r







.p �. PSon ,








r - i

i i i
; 111L.�i.�-i

RANGER'

11. , IE WING
WORKSHO
KhNOLOGY
IPOS'
WALT DISNEY
WORLD
Rei � -� weds from Wai
n Orianoo. fl
� i- MC Chapel Hili Aprn
I' " I " ' "V-view coi
Its nj M ng in retail
hotel restaurant
�' recreation ana
. � � - t'lon or Dusiness
r �an employment
� . �. -gaorn College
. rfes a m.nimum of
� ork per week and
ti Kritl De eligible for
D sney arranqea rtous
- � Aa' Disney vVona
area S'udenfs will
K( �e � ���� lane experience
� �� 9 "tie practices ana
I m employee) by trie
��"agement team
ere will tie a presentation
� e program given ana In
a to ow afterwards
i f l must be earning
'ec t while working
"�erestea students need to con
Nancy Fillnow
A G L : T
OE TRIP
i
I
The Kast Carolinian
tmct 191
Put srvc every Tuesday
saay during the
tear ana every
Ae -fsaay during the sum
The East Carolinian is The
newspaper of East
Carolina university, owned.
Derated ana published tor
i � e students ot East
Carotin uiivers ty
Subscription Rate 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU, Greenville, N C
POSTMASTER Sena ad
trow changes to The East
Carolinian Old South
� ng ecu Greenville,
N : r83
Telephone 7S7 3�. J7,
a 30'
CorttotAl
81
OFFERINGS!
mad� Buttsrmilk Biscuits � Bacon
jt� Potstoss � Southern Style Grits �
nd Pstty Sauasgs � A Choles of
Vppings � Qrstsd Amsrtcsn Ch�t �
J wshsty of frssh frurt and tomato
MONO FRIDAY
�0 AMUM AM.
SATURDAY -SUNDAY
4 MOtlOAYt
� SO UM�sj
Also Open
Fndoy - Saturday Nights
Midnight-
12.00 TIL 5-30 ���&� Sill)
Shoupma Cent
I4r
iss� pic runes ntiti
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 7, 1983
Buddhist Scholar To Talk On Wisdom, Death
By JAY STONE
Staff Writer
be presenting a
seminar at the Fifth
Dr. Jeffrey Street Methodist Stu-
Hopkins, a renowned dent Center on Satur-
Buddhist scholar, will day, April 9, titled
"Wisdom, Compas-
sion, Death and Dy-
ing The seminar
will be divided into
separate sessions, the
first lasting form 10
a.m. till noon. The se-
cond session will
begin at 2 p.m. and
last two hours.
Dr. Hopkins, who
has served as
translator for the
Dalai Lama of Tibet
on two recent visits to
North America, is
considered by many
individuals to be the
most knowledgeable
western Buddhist
scholar. He is par-
ticularly acclaimed
for his understanding
af the concept of
emptiness or
Chrysler Aims Campaign At Campus Market
(CPS) � A contest
designed to help the
Chrysler Corporation
get the attention of
college students with
money to spend has
led the company
directly to yet another
student without
money to spend.
One of the first
winners of Chrysler's
nationwide Pentastar
Challenge Contest
was 24-year-old
UCLA engineering
major Pamela Stub-
blefield, who says
she'll spend the entire
$5000 prize paying off
financial aid loans
and completing her
education.
About the only way
she'll get to use
Chrysler products for
the time being will be
using a Dodge
Charger free for a
year as one of the
awards for winning
the contest.
Chrysler, however,
plans to continue its
effort � the only one
among U.S.
automakers � to get
a bigger piece of the
student market.
It is spending over a
half-million dollars
on its Pentastar
Challenge Contest, in-
troduced on campuses
across the country last
fall. Students willing
to fork out $2.50 for a
special calendar were
invited to solve a
series of riddles that
could ultimately lead
to the $5000 and free
use of the Charger.
The company's aim
wasn't obscure.
"Chrysler has lagg-
ed behind General
Motors and Ford and
even Volkswagen in
the youth market
admits John Owens of
Chrysler's marketing
and public relations
division in Detroit.
"Traditionally, the
demographics of
Chrysler owners are
people in the 45-to-60
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a
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to receive the Wachovia Grad Plan information kit.
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age bracket he says,
"but obviously, those
cats aren't going to
buy many more
cars
Thus, Chrysler has
come out with several
cars � the Omni,
Challenger and
Charger models �
which officials hope
will get them a larger
share of the youth
market. And games
like the Pentastar
Challenge will, they
hope, boost the share
immediately.
"Our aim is to in-
crease Chrysler's
penetration of the
(college) market
Owens said. "If we
can, we hope maybe a
student's first car pur-
chase will be a
Chrysler, and that
they'll stick with our
products. College
students, after all, are
likely to be upscale
buyers for the rest of
their lives
More and more
businesses, it seems,
are equally impressed
with the buying pat-
terns of the college
market. Liquor
manufacturers, audio
equipment firms and
cigarette companies
have already suc-
cessfully carved
niches in the student
marketplace, and
Hollywood has long
realized the college
audience can make or
break movies and
record albums.
nothingness.
Buddhism and
other eastern religions
concern themselves
particularly with gain-
ing insight into emp-
tiness. Realization of
emptiness is equated
with wisdom.
In addition to the
non-academic educa-
tion in Buddhism
which Dr. Hopkins
has pursued on his
own, he graduated
"magna cum laude"
in English literature
from Harvard Univer-
sity in 1963 and
received his docotrate
in Buddhist studies at
the University of
Wisconsin in 1973. In
addition, he has
published five major
books on Tibetan
Buddhism. He is
director of the Center
for South Asian
Studies at the Univer
sity of Virginia.
Dr. Hopkins is
coming to Greenville
at the invitation ol
Don Brown and a
"Darma discussion
group" which he
regularly hosts.
Brown says that the
lectures are free,
however a $10 dona-
tion is requested to
cover travel and
honorarium for Dr
Hopkins. Those in
terested in attending a
pot luck lunch are
asked to bring their
favorite dish.
STEAK HOUSE
Greenville.N.C.
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Chopped Sirloin $2.49
wsalad bar $3.49
Jlb. Hamburger w Baked Pot. $1.89
wsalad bar $2.89
Baked Potato wsalad bar $2.50
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
500 w. Greenville Blvd. 756-0040
N. C. State Wolf Pack
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in America!
"You never fail until
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Geep, Fielding
Waverly
Hawaiian Tropic
and
Budweiser
Present
2nd Annual
Bahama Mama Pa
Mon. April 25 3:00pm
At Koppo Siqmo House
Tickets $3.00
I will be graduating this year and
plan to live in N.C. Please send me the
Wachovia Grad Plan information kit.
Wachovia
Wachovia Bank & ftust Company, N A
Retail Banking Dspartmsnt
R0. Boi 3098
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entitles you
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W'





Wnt Eaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, ammntimmm
Mike Hughes, .����� tauor
WAVERLY MERR1TT. mmm of.���� C�NDY PHEASANTS, sporu Eduor
Scott Lindley. ���. mmm Greg r,deout- �� �"
Ali Afrashteh. m mm Steve Bachner, a.mi��
Stephanie Groon. a. � Juliana Fahrbach. .� m�
Clay Thornton, mm sr� ToDD Evans, n m�.
April 7, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Commencement
Still No Good Reasons Given
A word to the administration:
No, we haven't forgotten about it.
At the risk of monotonous
repitition, we would like to once
again express our disapproval of
the administration's plan to hold
commencement exercises in
Minges Coliseum on May 6.
As most of us are aware, this
issue has been getting a lot of news
and editorial coverage as of late.
And in each report, each article,
each editorial and column rests an
underlying sense of helplessness.
After all, once the administration
makes a decision, there's no turn-
ing back, right?
Well, realistically, there may lit-
tle we as students can do to change
commencement plans, but to sit
back idly and venture random
complaints accomplishes nothing
at all.
Therefore, we recommend to
those students concerned � and
judging from the number of calls
and letters we at The East Caroli-
nian have received, there an awful
lot of you � that you organize
yourselves and voice your collec-
tive disapproval.
A student's college graduation,
regardless of whether he or she
opts to participate in its ceremony,
is one of his or her most
memorable milestones. And con-
sidering the tremendous amount of
time involved in reaching that
plateau it would certainly be a
shame if a poorly-scheduled land-
scaping project should mar that
well-deserved celebration.
As previously mentioned, this
issue has already received as much
or more news coverage than most
other campus issues. Most of us
are well aware of the situation.
What we haven't been told,
however, is why the reseeding of
Ficklen Stadium's football field
can't be postponed a week. As of
yet, not one acceptable answer has
even been ventured to that end.
And why hasn't anyone given
any reasoning? Because, pure and
simple, there is no reason � not
one why the grass at Ficklen
Stadium can't wait a week.
ECU has a total of four home
football games again next year �
games against the likes of East
Tennessee State and Murray State.
Does the administration honestly
believe it has to impress Murray
State (wherever the hell that is)
with a well-landscaped football
field?
Perhaps it would be different if
we could lure a non-no-name team
to Ficklen. But that's another issue
entirely.
Indeed, this is an issue of
priorities. Unfortunately, it is also
an issue which exemplifies the poor
choice of priorities in effect at East
Carolina University.
Nuclear Industry Fighting
Back A t Taxpayers' Expense
Bv JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � Last week mark-
ed the fourth anniversary of the accident
at the Three Mile Island nuclear power
plant. That near-disaster scared a lot of
people, and it made millions of
Americans think twice about the rosy
assurances they had gotten over the
vears on the safety of nuclear power.
The Three Mile Island incident also
scared the pin-stripe pants off nuclear
power industry executives. They could
see their contracts and their jobs disap-
pearing in a puff of radioactive steam.
And in fact, the nuclear power industry
has gone into a steep decline since Three
Mile Island.
But the industry is fighting back with
a $30 million promotion campaign on
television and in newspapers. That, of
course, is their right. But here's the rub:
The nuclear power big shots want the
consumers to pay for their efforts to per-
suade the public that nuclear power is
good. If they have their way, the cost of
their propaganda campaign will be tack-
ed onto electric bills all over the country.
The industry makes no bones about it.
CHICAGO
Costly Stand-Up Act A Humorous Letdown
Rape 'Expert9 A Comedian
Shortly after the Three Mile Island inci
dent, nuclear power executives formed a
promotional group called the Commit-
tee on Energy Awareness. It is headed by
a former General Electric executive
named Harold Finger, who thinks it is
fitting and proper for electricity con-
sumers to pay for his group's media
campaign. "It's not propaganda
Finger said. "The costs should be allow-
ed
We have seen the committee's internal
planning documents, and we can tell you
the industry doesn't plan to stop with
straightforward advertising in the
media. The group wants to establish
itself as "more than a propaganda
machine If they can achieve this, the
pro-nuclear people plan to get friendly
columnists and editors to run editorials
and opinion pieces favorable to the in-
dustry.
Incidentally, one of the nuclear power
committee's documented lists several
"Potential Bad News" items to watch
for. Three of them were characterized as
"Start-up of nuclear units, raising elec-
tric rates "Three Mile Island anniver-
sary and "Nuclear industry's
30-million-dollar campaign
By PAT O'NEILL
Frederick Storaska came to ECU last
week. For two hours, Storaska perform-
ed one of the best stand-up comic acts
I've ever witnessed, poking fun at what
he obviously felt are our "standard"
20th-century sexual hangups. He is, in-
deed, an interesting and funny man. But
then again, anyone who charges $2,750
for a lecture should be at least somewhat
interesting.
The supposed topic of Storaska's lec-
ture was "How to Say No to a Rapist
and Survive" � not necessarily the basis
for your average stand-up routine.
Nevertheless, he found plenty of
"sex-related" tales and jokes � in-
cluding a lengthy treatise on his macho-
man football days � which he used to
entertain his audience of 200-300
(mostly women) while conveniently fill-
ing up his two-hour slot. But when all
was said and done, Storaska had spent
only about 20 minutes on the subject of
rape.
Don't get me wrong. I'm sure
Staoraka knows his stuff about rape.
For 19 years, he's been publically speak-
ing about sexual assault and its preven-
tion. And I assume he's done some
research. His suggestions were, for the
most part, constructive.
But Frederick Storaska is, first and
foremost, an entertainer, he is not an ex-
pert on rape. Sure, he gave scores of in-
citeful comments to the audience, but
realistically, he didn't say much that any
self-respecting woman didn't already
know.
Rape is a very serious subject. I
seriously question Storaska's use of
humor while addressing a topic of such
sensitive nature. I wonder how much
laughing a woman (having gone through
the horrifying experience of being raped)
would have done during his lecture. Not
much, I bet.
Storaska also made a few statements
regarding the causes of rape in our
violent society. The main cause of rape,
Storaska said, is the "double standard"
in our society that forces males into a
"success-achievement syndrome thus
relegating females as the victims. This is
a key point. Unfortunately, Storaska
didn't elaborate on it for very long.
He claims that young boys are taught
to associate aggressive behavior with the
path to manhood, while many young
women view passiveness as the key to
womanhood. Again, Storaska had a
good point, but why?
He didn't say.
What he did venture to say is that
there's a need to change the
"social-sexual stereotyping" in our
society and to give young people more
information regarding sexual matura-
tion and its subsequent behavior But
once again, he neglected to elaborate
I think Storaska needs to do a little
self-analysis regarding his own
"aggressive-success-achievement im-
age. Perhaps, he'd realize that his at-
titudes might be part of the problem
Sure, it's a lot of fun to stand in front of
an audience of a couple hundred giggl-
ing women and tell dirty jokes, but like !
said before, "Rape is a very serious sub
ject
In my opinion, Storaska's not the
"expert" rape lecturer he's built up to
be But then again, he is one helluva
comedian.
Reaking Cigs Have No
Place In A Classroom
By STEVE DEAR
This message is directed at all those
professors and graduate assistants who
blatantly ignore and offend their
students' rights to breathe fresh air by
smoking in the classroom. I've had
enough.
A semester has not passed in which I
have not had at least one or two instruc-
tors who smoke while teaching (or vice-
versa). Apparently, these people do not
care about their students' health or the
fact that their constant smoking may be
a distraction to the students.
Sure, if a student becomes irritated
enough, he or she can go directly to the
teacher and inform him or her of the
smoking problem. Of course, this is at
the student's own risk � the risk of be-
ing placed on the instructor's "black
list so to speak.
But that should not be so. Any stu-
dent who does not like his or her instruc-
tor's smoking should have his or her
wishes granted. The classroom is no
place for the leisure of smoking Of
course, these days, one does not -ee
many instructors sipping an ice-cold
beer during class � as it well should be
But that same teacher's cigarette smok-
ing, which affects everyone, is con
sidered acceptable.
This student would welcome with
open arms any SGA or university legisla-
tion banning smoking in classrooms
But it should not have to go that far. In
structors should have the common
courtesy (and sense) to refrain from sub
jecting their students to their fume
while they're supposed to be teaching.
The Eight-Fold Path To Eating Dinner In Peace
Repelling Doormat Religious Types
Dear Stan Landers: I am writing
about a problem I'm sure is shared by
many of your readers. It's a ruthless
sickness that affects millions of
Americans each day. It knows no racial
or economic boundaries, and it can at-
tack at any time, day or night. It's simp-
ly horrifying.
I know what you're already thinking,
Stan. But it's not herpes. In fact, it's
much, much worse. This is a sickness
that lurks in the shadows and waits for
its unfortunate victim to come home
Campus Forum
from school, work or whatever. And
then, when you least expect it. you 're at-
tacked!
No. Stan, it's not herpes, high blood
pressure or even cancer. Although, at
times, I must admit, I wish it were so
simple. My problem, Stan, is the Mor-
mons.
I could go on and on, Stan, but I think
that once you've said that, you've said
enough. I'm sure we've all probably ex-
perienced this terror at one time or
another. But I simply can't take it
anymore. They came during dinner three
Field Can Wait A � � Week!
4
L
Graduation for many college
students is a once-in-a-lifetime event.
As a graduating senior, I believe that
seniors should have priority over the
fixing of the football field. It would
not be an inconvenience to the football
team or the university. The football
field could be repaired right after
graduation and still be ready for the
football season.
I am not saying that the football
team is not an important part of East
Carolina University, but it will be here
next fall. Many of the graduating
seniors, unless they attend graduate
school here, will not be around next
year.
Michael Watkins
Senior, POLS
More Grad Blues
I would like to take a moment to ex-
press my opinion concerning the 1983
commencement exercises. I'm sure that
most of the senior class is quite aware
that this year's graduation will take
place in Minges Coliseum and not in
the customary Ficklen Stadium. As a
result, many parents, relatives and
friends who (had) wanted to attend will
not be able to do so due to limited
seating.
I personally have several relatives,
700 miles away, who would have liked
to see me graduate. However, the ad-
ministration has decided to house the
ceremony inside Minges so that the
renovation of the Ficklen Stadium field
could begin. Not that I feel the football
field doesn't need to be improved.
Lord knows it docs. For at least the
past three seasons, that field has look-
ed atrocious. I never knew that grass
had so many colors besides green until
I started attending ECU football
games.
Apparently, the administration feels
that with new, green grass, season
ticket sales will greatly increase,
thereby decreasing the financial losses
of the program. That field has waited
at least three years for a major facelift;
surely it can wait one more week.
In both the new classroom issue and
now this, Dr. John Howell appears to
me to be an overly protective
chancellor, one who takes an ivory
tower approach toward student affairs.
Perhaps he should take a long, hard
look at the students' needs rather than
trying to promote himself. It's a shame
that an event for the students must be
planned by people who have shown ex-
tremely little sensitivity to the students.
In closing, I would like to ask which
of the administrators would like to call
my 79-year-old grandparents in Buf-
falo to tell them they can't attend.
Alan Ziccarelli
Senior
Urban and Regional Planning
�- ��.� � � '
STAN LANDERS
Advice For Schleps
times last week and again this afternoon.
I've got so much Mormon literature on
my coffee table that I may never have to
buy another roll of toilet paper as long
as I live. It's getting to the point where I
don't even like to go home after class.
I've always trusted your opinion in the
past, so I now ask for your advice on
this matter: I hate to be rude, but how
does one go about getting rid of them
once and for all? I know you won't let
me down.
HIDING IN 3-B
Dear Hiding: First of all, let me assure
you that you're not alone. In fact, I'd
say that the majority of suicides in the
United States are probably Mormon-
related. Like cockroaches and gonor-
rhea, the Mormons just seem to carry
over from generation to generation.
This, of course, is not to say that
nothing can be done. In fact, thanks to a
little strategy, quick thinking and a gun,
they don't bother me anymore.
But if guns aren't exactly your style,
i ���-�� �miwuMii
rest easy; there are plenty of other op
tions. But for purposes of space. I'll on-
ly list a few:
� Have a friend slit their bicycle tire-
while you stall them inside.
� Hang a Brigham Young University
pennant on your front door, or greet
them at the front door wearing a navy
blue suit with a white shirt and shiny
black shoes, so they'll think you're
already a Mormon.
� Let them come inside, and then put
on a Led Zeppelin tape, fire up a joint
and offer them a beer.
� And if all else fails, borrow one of
your little sister's Donny and Mane
album covers and line the cat's litter bov
with it, or take a pencil and erase all ot
Marie's clothes.
Dear Stan Landers: I feel terrible. The
other day, I was in my roommates car.
and I had the misfortune of running
over a small dog on Greenville
Boulevard. I swear I didn 't even see htm.
All I could feel was this little bump. I did
hear a few things smash and break, but
when I looked in the rear-view mirror,
all I could see was this little white ball of
fluff running around in circles and yelp-
ing.
I was already late for my hair appoint-
ment, so I couldn't stop. But when I
came back by, he was gone. Stan, I feel
just terrible. What should I do?
SORRY ABOUT FIFI
Dear Sorry: I know how you feel
Running over a small animal is a terrible
experience. And those stains are almost
impossible to get out, let alone the slop
wedged in the tire treads. But look on
the bright side. At least it wasn't your
car!
Editor's Note: Stan Landers, a senior
from Hog lips, N.C is an expert on the
above issues, having once run over a
Mormon is his roommate's car.
GayC
O'NEIlf' PATRK K
$n mm
ECU gcograph
student Jeff Hamilton
was one of 150 peop
who attended the an-
nual N.C. Gay and
Lesbian Conference
at the University of
North Carolina at
Chapel Hill last wee
Hamilton is a
rnemb
Carohr
mumisl
of thl
bureau!
ecc:
provu
suppot
gav
wen
change
tha!
ECU Stu
Pro test in
Com From Page 1i

manneY thev did
Maughan. who i
received letter
Greenville Mayor Per-
Circle K
The ECU C rck K
Club, sponsor I b
the G r e e n
kiwams Club, at
ed the fcnii -
Carolina District
cle K conve- n
March 25-27, -
Charlotte. N C
Glenn Broc
elected dehgate
represented the c fc
and presented th
year-end reports and
award recotnmei
j
I
M:
N
Karr Says
Must Be R
Coat Vrom Page 1
aid he was allow ng
ail concerned studei
to sign the petition
Karr called the ue
an "agricultural pro-
Mem" because the
consulting ere
from Rivers and
Associates. Inc . of
Greenville, claim that
there may no: -
enough "good p
ing days" left to have
the work done in time
for next season "II
should have begun in
earls March Kan
added ,4The
timetable for the work
was set by the
suiting firm Kan
poij
I
.
-
pet
CO I
Election ?
Coat From Page 1
vice president. C
Duncan Arp
secretary. Juan Velas-
quez is treasurer arc
Karen Moore
publicity chairrr.a-
All ran unopposed.
In area residence
council elections
results were a
follows:
I
C
NOBS
I Jewfcry Repair
t JZA
j 2fOFF
� 14ft. Onto SefMin
by Lc5 Jewfery
I
I
I

I
ABORTIONS
AMlvMt7 04VS
CALL TOLL FREE





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 7, 1983
4v?r 04&J4,
Han
people more
se? natura-
behawor. But
elaborate.
to do a lutie
ng his own
.ement" mi-
Mat his at-
problera
d in from of
� ' s d giggl
. hut like I
serious sub-
not the
b nil up to
le helkna
-lave No
assroom
n stu-
i instruc-
e his or her
om is no
smoking. Of
�es not see
an ice-cold
tl should be.
ai ette smok-
ne, is con-
me with
� ersit legisla-
issrooms.
rial far. In-
"ic common
m sub-
ii fumes
leaching.
us Types
thcr op-
� pace, I'll on-
bicvcle tires
u
ing I niversity
01 greet
�scaring a navy
hirl and shiny
think you're
and then put
fire up a joint
' rrow one of
nny and Mane
litter box
� e all of
erribie. The
n roommates car,
� c of runnme.
(treenville
even see him
'his tittle bump. I did
" and break, but
i ww mirror,
hite ball of
� m circles and yelp-

r my hair appoint-
stop But when I
tone. Stan, I feel
i H hat should I do7
sorryabout nn
� 1 know how you feel.
ver a small animal is a terrible
nd those stains are almost
f get out, let alone the slop
the tire treads. But look on
� side At least it wasn't vour
YsNote: Stan Landers, a senior
Klips. c is an expert on the
'sues, having once run over a
a his roommate's car.
Gay Conference Deals With Societal Hostility
st.ff �w�
ECU geography
student Jeff Hamilton
was one of 150 people
who attended the an-
nual N.C. Gay and
Lesbian Conference
at the University of
North Carolina at
Chapel Hill last week.
Hamilton is a
member of the East
Carolina Gay Com-
munity and a member
of their speakers
bureau. He and other
ECGC members are
providing community
support for the ECU
gay community, as
well as working to
change the attitudes
that many people
have towards
homosexuals.
"When you try to
live an alternative
lifestyle in a
predominately
heterosexual society,
people do tend to get
hostile � especially
here in the South
Hamilton said.
The conference,
"Survival in a Hostile
Society provided 26
workshops, many of
which dealt with the
question of why social
attitudes are often
hostile towards
homosexuals.
Hamilton believes
that a "big com-
munications gap" is
responsible for a lot
of the hostility. "It's
like the old saying
'ignorance breeds
fear " Hamilton
said. "People don't
know how to react to
fear
Several of the
don't understand that
the only thing that
makes a homosexual
different from anyone
else is his or her sexual
preference. One
workshop was design-
ed specifically for
workshops at the con- people who had come
ferencc dealt with to the conference
issues related to the from rural areas,
fact that many peopje Topics included
ECU Student Writes Letters To City Officials
Protesting 'Segregation' Tone Of Monument
Com From Page 1
manner they did
Maughan. who also
received letters from
Greenville Mavor Per-
cy R. Cox and
Superior Court Judge
David fc Ried Jr
said he didn't think
the corrections would
have been made if he
hadn't written his let-
ters.
Reid said in a letter
to Maughan that he
empathized with
Maughan's feeling
Circle K Club Honored
The ECU Circle K
Club, sponsored by
the Greenville
Kiwanis Club, attend-
ed the Annual
Carolina District Cir-
cle K convention,
March 25-27, in
Charlotte, N.C.
Glenn Brock, the
elected deligate,
represented the club
and presented the
year-end reports and
award recommenda-
tions for the club.
The club received
three major awards
out of the five possi-
ble catagories.
The club entered
the awards competi-
tion for the Annual
Achievement Award,
Single Service,
Outstanding Club
President, Ourstan-
ding Circle K
Member, Outstanding
Non-circle K
Karr Says Ficklen
Must Be Reseeded
Cont From Page 1
said he was allowing
all concerned students
to sign the petition.
Karr called the issue
an "agricultural pro-
blem" because the
consulting engineers
from Rivers and
Associates, Inc of
Greenville, claim that
there may not be
enough "good grow-
ing days" left to have
the work done in time
for next season. "It
should have begun in
early March Karr
added. "The
timetable for the work
was set by the con-
sulting firm Karr
said.
Watkins said he
wanted to make the
point clear that he was
not trying to
downgrade the (ECU)
athletic program, the
football program or
the football team. "1
think the football pro-
gram is a vital part of
ECU Watkins said.
"But, more attention
should go to gradua-
tion and other
academic events in-
stead of the non-
academic events
Any student
wishing to sign the
petition may do so by
contacting Watkins at
7S8-3960.
Member.
The club received
district recognition by
winning the Annual
Achievement Award
in the Bronze Divi-
sion, the highest
award of the division.
In overall district
competition, the club
won Outstanding
Club President
through ac-
complishments of
Teresa Dietz.
The Outstanding
Non-Circle K Member
Award was won by
Owen Kingsbury, the
faculty advisor to the
club. Kingsbury i
works for the Depart-j
ment of Chemistry as'
a scientific!
glassblower. This isj
the first time this
award has been
presented to the ECU
club.
that it was an
"ultimate insult to the
black men and women
who served and died
but because of their
race are not allowed
the dignity, even in
death, of being
recognized as equal
citizens
Reid wrote
Maughan that the
memorial should
serve "as a reminder
to those of us who are
over 40 years-of-age
of the Herculean pro-
gress that our state
and nation has made
in race relations over
the past 30 years
Maughan said he
was disappointed by
the letter he received
from Cox, which only
informed him that the
city had "no jurisdic-
tion" of the memorial
which is on Pitt Coun-
ty property
"I didn't really
want to hear his legal
position on the mat-
ter Maughan said.
"I wanted more of a
moral response
Maughan, a Viet-
nam war veteran, said
he plans to
"follow-up" on the
correction work on
the monument to
make sure it gets done
this time.
religious attitudes
about homosexuality
and the legal restric-
tions North Carolina
laws place on
homosexual relation-
ships. In North
Carolina it is illegal to
engage in both anal
and oral sex.
According to
Hamilton, there have
always been convic-
tions in North
Carolina for enmes-
against-nature cases,
and people in North
Carolina are serving
prison time for the
charge. Convictions
can result in prison
sentences of up to 10
years, Hamilton said.
The religious ques-
tion has also been sen-
sitive for the gay com-
munity, Hamilton
said. Many fun-
damentalist Christian
leaders often preach
that homosexuality is
a sin.
ECU gay students
have complained
about members of
campus Christian
groups calling them
up anonomously on
the phone and telling
them to repent for
their sins.
Most child
psychologists think
sexual preference is
determined between
the ages of five to
seven years.
"Psychologists are
beginning to think
that sexuality of any
type is determined by
both genetic and en-
vironmental factors
claims the brochure
prepared by N. C.
State University's Gay
Association.
Another brochure
published by St.
John's Metropolitan
Community Church
in Raleigh states that
"There is no firm
basis for condemning
homosexuality
Such condemnation is
based on tradition,
personal opinion or
ambiguity
Hamilton hopes
that the ECGC will be
able to receive SGA
funds to prepare
similar brochures for
ECU students
Tom Chorlton. ex-
ecutive director of the
National Association
of Gay and Lesbian
Democratic Clubs.
and Janelie lavell, a
journalist and manag-
ing editor on the
North State Reader,
presented talks to the
group.
The conference also
addressed a fun-
damental question of
how to change hostile
attitudes Hamilton
said education was a
ke factor in changing
the negative attitudes
many people have
toward homosexuals.
"Groups that present
talks hke we do here
help a lot he said
He claims he has
received a lot of
positive feedback
from people who have
listened to his talks
Other topics ad-
dressed in the con
ference included:
Coming Out-How to
C ope. G a
Democrats looking
Toward 1984: Parents
of Lesbians and Gay
Men; Gays m the Pro
fessions and lesbian
and G a v Health
Issues.
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Election Results
Cont From Page 1
vice president, Carl
Duncan Arp is
secretary, Juan Velas-
quez is treasurer and
Karen Moore is
publicity chairman.
All ran unopposed.
In area residence
council elections,
results were as
follows:
West Campus:
Pamela Harris, presi-
dent; Deborah Nunn,
vice president, Denise
Clark, secretary; Nan-
nette Brett, treasurer.
Central Campus:
Sid Rabon, president;
Noel Ann McDaniel,
vice president; Debra
Louise Wells,
secretary; Bill Kirby,
treasurer.
3&
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when every message
and even- nomento
is cherished
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M





THt KASI CAROI INIAN
Style
APRIL 7, 1983
Page 6
Playhouse Presenting
Wilder's 'Our Town'
Donna Lynn Cooper and Jeffrey Bennighofen in a scene from Our Town.
Wioto By CARLTON BENZ
One of the most cherished and popular plays in
the history of American theatre, Thornton Wilder's
Our Town, will be presented by the East Carolina
Playhouse in ECU's McGinnis Theatre April 14-19,
with nightly performances set for 8:15 p.m.
This Pulitzer Prize-winning chronicle of the way
life was lived in a fictitious little New Hampshire
town in the gentle, early years ofthe century is a
touching celebration of being alive.
It is a drama of the daily affairs of love, marriage
and death in Grover's Corners (population 2,642)
that kindles a poignant glow as it points out the
little-realized beauties of everyday moments.
"It's a model of reality on the American mentality
of having materialistic values, and ignoring our
neighbors' real needs he said.
Our Town presents the point that one has to live in
the moment � every moment
Playwright Wilder assures this by allowing the au-
dience to eavesdrop on the characters inside their
homes, in their exchange of gossip on street corners
and at their gathering on a hilltop cemetery The
characters themselves are simple and amusing
There's a bright girl, Emil, whose childhood,
courtship, marriage, death and wistful brief reisita
tion to life are the focal points of the play There's
the earnest boy-next-door, George. who woos. mar-
ries and mourns her. Through them the audience will
join the masses of those who. since the pla's
brilliant success on Broadway in 1938. surrender to
its pleasure and leave with hope tor their future.
Special matinee performances have been schedul-
ed for Friday. April 15, and Tuesday. April 19. both
at 1 p.m.
Tickets for Our Town may be purchased at the
box office in Messick Theatre Arts Center, corner of
Fifth and Eastern Streets. Greenville, each wee
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m Telephone reer vat ions
may be made by dialing 75-6390.
Stricter Handgun Controls Now Being Sought
t
By STEVE DEAR
Staff W rttrr
The second of two parrs.
Despite the lack of any effec-
tive federal handgun law, Han-
dgun Control Incorporated feels
confident that stricter local,
state, and, most especially,
federal laws will be passed and
enforced in the future. The bill
Berrigan
Gets On
Soapbox
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Stall Writer
This is the first of two parts.
Catholic priestpeace activist
Father Philip Berrigan was ar-
rested on Friday for his part in a
demonstration at the Pentagon in
Washington D.C. Berrigan,
whose arrests number near fifty
has been sentenced to active jail
and prison sentences on at least
two dozen occassions.
In the 1960's, Berrigan
together with his brother Father
Daniel Berrigan spearheaded the
anti-Vietnam war effort. But
unlike other big-name protestors
from that era, the Berrigan
brothers continue to struggle for
peace and justice.
Today, their focus is directed
at the nuclear arms race as oppos-
ed to a specific war. Their names
are known throughout the world.
On Friday, Berrigan gave a two-
part interview to The East Caroli-
nian. The first part, which was
conducted before Berrigan's ar-
rest, is recorded below. The se-
cond part which was conducted
after Berrigan's arraignment, will
appear next week.
E.C You've been active in
Peace and Justice work for
almost 20 years. Is your work
Peace and Justice more critical
today than it was during Viet-
nam?
BERRIGAN: Much more critical
and that's simply because of what
technology has done at the urging
of the super powers, especially
our government, because we've
led the arms race for about 37
years now. We've taken every
major new technical step in the
arms race � the introduction of
new weaponry and now, of
course, the stuff being deployed
is first strike weaponry and our
policy fits the weaponry. This is
to say that when the technology
became available to bring
counterforce weapons into
military targets then we created a
policy to fit the weapons. So as
the "Bulletin of Atomic Scien-
tists" tells us, we're 4 minutes to
12 and probably closer to nuclear
war now under Reagan then we
have been in any time since the
Cold War began in 1945. So
things are very critical � yes.
E.C During the Vietnam period
a lot of the resistance work and
work for Peace and Justice was
being done by College students.
Are you disappointed with what
you see coming out of the col-
leges now in terms of social
justice issues?
BERRIGAN: I'm extremely
disappointed by the response
See THE PENTAGON, Page 7


HCI hopes to become federal law
is the Kennedy-Rodino Crime
Control Act.
If passed, this bill would place
tight restrictions and checks on
the manufacturing, selling, pur-
chasing, and transferring of han-
dguns in the U.S. HCI stresses
that it would still allow handguns
to be purchased by "responsible,
law-abiding" citizens. HCI also
stresses that this bill aims at
preventing handgun violence.
The buyer would have to be
checked out by the police during
a twenty-one day waiting period
in order to receive a license to
carry a handgun. Among other
things, the bill would also
establish mandatory jail
sentences for the possession of a
handgun during the commission
of a federal felony.
The Kennedy-Rodino bill,
which both the 96th and 97th
Congresses did not finish acting
upon, will probably go before the
House Juciciary Committe in the
presently assembled Congress. As
far as the bill's chances for going
before the House Juciciary Com-
mittee, "it re.nains to be seen
(whether or not it will) but it
has a better chance than it has
ever had because we have had so
much support according to
HCI Legislative Assistant Bar-
bara Barchord.
Here in North Carolina, the
system for handgun purchasing is
completely decentralized and
there are few formal re-
quirements, according to HCI. In
order to buy a handgun in North
Carolina an individual must
receive a "Permit to Purchase"
from the county sheriff. Each
sheriff is required by law to
satisfy himself as to the appli-
cant's good moral character. All
records are kept at the county
level. Yet, different counties have
different procedures as to waiting
periods, records checks and per-
sonal references. In his book,
Guns Don't Die � People Do
(recently acquired by Joyner
Library), HCI chairman Pete
Sheilds states that North
Carolina has "the kind of system
that would be greatly improved
by a federal handgun law
The rapidly growing North
Carolina handgun control move-
ment is being spearheaded by
Winston-Salem resident Hal
Brown. Like Sheilds, Brown lost
his son to handgun violence. Last
year, Brown's son was murdered
with a handgun while attending
Vanderbilt University in
Nashville. Since then, he has
devoted much of his time to coor-
dinating educational activities,
liaisoning with law enforcement
officials, publicizing the issue,
and all the other activities that
HCI does at the national level.
Working closely with Brown is
UNC-Chapel Hill professor
Howard Aldrich, whose close
friend was murdered with a han-
dgun. Aldrich describes the han-
dgun control movement in North
Carolina as being "just in the
early stages However, he feels
that in recent years active citizen
participation has greatly increas-
ed. "When John Lennon and
President Reagan got shot public
awareness mushroomedwe're
amazed at the spread of HCI par-
ticipation
Aldrich emphasizes the fact
that handgun violence can affect
anyone, no matter their political
affiliation. Therefore, he hopes
all citizens will become involved.
"It's not just a left versus right
type of issue. We hope it will at-
tract all those who are concerned
about the safety of people
Concerning the state's current
politicians' stance on handgun
controls, Aldrich is optomistic
dispite the fact that Senators
Helms and East, and most of the
state's representatives, are oppos-
ed to strong handgun legislation,
"Helms and East seem pro-
handgun We're more op-
timistic about Hunt" Aldrich ad-
ded.
Like HCI, Aldrich's main con-
cern is organizing those who want
strong federal and state handgun
laws (an overwhelming majority
Greenville Gala: Springfest
Is Just Around The Corner
By MIKE HAMER
and STEVE DEAR
Suff V, htm
Greenville and Pitt County
residents, including ECU
students and faculty will be
treated to a day of free music,
dance, magic, mime, and arts and
crafts. All of these arts will be
featured at Springfest '83 which
will take place in downtown
Greenville this coming Saturday,
April 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
According to Billy Stinson, one
of the coordinators of this annual
event, "We're spotlighting local
artists and entertainers from the
city and from the county. The ci-
ty and county have been working
together on this thing
m&, m
Many facets of art and craft-
work will be demonstrated and
will be on sale at the Springfest.
Robert Daniel will be doing a
watercolor demonstration; Paul
Hamilton will give a pottery
demonstration; Cindy Singletary
will give a calligraphy demonstra-
tion; Beth Howard will
demonstrate hand-tied fringe;
Anna Hammond and Joyce Grif-
fin will demonstrate stained-
glass; Blackie Smith will be
demonstrating basket weaving;
Betsy Markowsky will be spinn-
ing and weaving; and the quilters'
guild will be working on a quilt.
There will also be pottery,
jewelry, and barn signs for sale.
There will be several events of
particular interest to children.
The Sheppard Memorial Library
Puppet Show will be entertain-
ing. John Williams, from Ayden,
will be presenting magic and
balloon sculpture, and Sports
World will be presenting clowns
and chickens on roller skates.
Chickens on roller skates? The
Curtain Players will be perform-
ing their excellent mime also.
Many fine musical acts will br-
ing bluegrass, jazz, folk, country,
rhythm and blues, and barber-
shop music to the Downtown
area. Musicians and times of
their morning and afternoon per-
formancs are as follows:
10:00 Billy and Sandra Stinson
10:15 Scrappy and Harry
10:30 Mike 'Lightnin ' Wells
11:00 Greenville Barbershop
Chorus
11:20 Chuck Ball and Laurie
Lofton
11:50 The Hometown Boys and
the
Craven County dog-
gers.
12:30 The Sting Rays
1:10 North Carolina Sym-
phony
Brass Quintet
1:45 The Wallace Family
2:25 ECU Jazz Bones
3:05 The Rutabaga Brothers
and the Lemon Sisters.
All kinds of foods, from hot-
dogs to baked goods will be
available at Springfest. Balloons
will be given free of charge to all
those attending the Springfest.
According to Elizabeth Stewart,
corrdinator of the event, par-
ticipants are urged to come to
Springfest and share their talents
on the street.
Springfest '83 is the first event
in a two week "Eastern Carolina
Arts Festival" from April 9-23.
Some highlights of the two week
festival will be a concert by the
North Carolina Symphony Brass
Quintet at A.J. Fletcher Music
Hall on Saturday evening at 8
p.m a performance by the ECU
Symphonic Wind Ensemble at
Wright Auditorium on Sunday
evening at 8:15 p.m a Barber-
shop Harmony Workshop on
Monday evening at the Jaycee
Park Recreation Center from
7:30 � 9:30 p.m The East
Carolina Dance Theatre Group
who will perform at 1:20 p.m. at
the Bethel Elementary
Auditorium on Tuesday the 12th;
also, the Spring Sacred Concert
which will be presented by the
Greenville Boys' Choir on Tues-
day at 7:30 p.m. at St. Paul's
Episcopal Church; the Carolina
Opry House Music and Dance
Night on Tuesday, April 19; the
Best Lunch Theatre Ever at 800
p.m. on Wednesday, April 20, at
the ECU Willis Building on Fri-
day and Saturday, Aprill 22 and
23; and the Annual Sidewalk Art
Show from 11:00 a.m. to 4 p.m.
on Saturday, April 23rd at the
Greenville Museum of Art.
This is only a small sampling of
the many events that will be tak-
ing place during these two weeks.
Anyone wishing for more infor-
mation on upcoming events can
call The Pitt-Greenville Arts
Council at 757-1785.
"People don't realize how
much political power they
havethey don't realize that
they don't have to be pushed
around or take it (the lack of
political representation) sit-
ting down. People have to
recognize the positive role they
can take
of citizens) in order to get "as
much political credibility as the
NRA" (whose membership
represents a small minority of the
public).
The main recommedation
HCI, Sheilds. and Aldrich sug-
gest for citizen involvement is, as
Aldrich puts it, "let the politi-
cians know of your interest
They suggest personal letters
directly sent by each concerned
citizen to his or her politician.
"People don't realize ho
much political power they
havethey don't realize that they
don't have to be pushed around
or take it (the lack of political
representation) sitting
downPeople have to recognize
the postive role they can take
Aldrich said.
Currently. HCI is mounting a
large national postcard campaign
it calls "To the U.S. Ccngres'
through which it hopes to obtain
the names and signature of more
than one million citizens
to be sent to Concre-
In his book. Sheilds sum-
marizes the beliefs of HCI b
stating. "Wethe ma.iontv.can
winif we care enough to use
our political power
ECU students will be able to
sign these postcards and receive
more information about how
they can express their concern for
handgun controls next Wednes-
day at a table to be set up in front
of the Student Supph Store rrom
12 to 3 p.m.
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Spring
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R!1
I - ;
Pager
es en ting
Town9
gossip on street corners
hering on a hilltop cemetery. The
es arc simple and amusing.
. Emily, whose childhood.
. t eath and wistful brief revisita-
?cal points of the play. There's
door, George, who woos, mar-
rhrough them the audience will
a ho, since the play's
Iwa n 1938, surrender to
v foi their future.
ances have been schedul-
d 1 uesday, April 19. both
a be purchased at the
e its Center, corner o'
eenville, each weekday
I elephone reservations
$90
Sought
on't realize how
cal power they
on't realize that
ave to be pushed
Ke it (the lack of
resentation) sit-
People have to
positive role they
HCl is mounting a
postcard campaign
- I s ongress
it hopes to obtain
i d signatures of more
ne million citizens
( ongress.
- book, Sheilds sum-
fs of HCl b
'We the majority can
ire enough to use
wer
EC will be able to
Is and receive
rmation about how
express their concern for
next Wednes-
Ix set up in front
i Stud Supplj Store from
12 to 3 p.m.
v
'The Pentagon Epitomizes Legal Lawlessness'
Continued From pu g ?C: There are students who are is to annmarh thP n.a.p om.mc
Continued From pagf 6
from the campuses, and yet i
would deem it unfair to blame
that upon the students. Students
college students particularly hiah
school students perhaps less so
are whipping boys in society'
They are underestimated and
they are underinvolved and they
are treated contemptuously by
what they are taught. They are
not fitted for any role except
channeling into the production-
consumption cycle of this society
I would tend to blame college ad-
ministrators and particularly the
people of the classroom, those
� ho teach college students for the
stagnation and the lethargy and
indifference and the careerism of
students today.
EC There are students who are
interested in resisting the nuclear
arms race, but may don't know
where to start. A lot of them also
feel overwhelmed by a sense of
hopelessness and helplessness.
What advice can you give these
students who want to get involv-
ed?
BERRIGAN: Well, it's very dif-
ficult to get involved on a campus
itself if you don't have kind of
joint committees between
students and faculty members.
And if the faculty members are
dead, as they tend to be on vir-
tually every campus in this coun-
try, then the students don't have
too much opportunity to
organize on their own they don't
have the resources very frequent-
ly. So the only alternative to that
is to approach the peace groups
in the respective cities or towns
where the campuses are and try to
link up with them, or to try to
establish outside contacts and
periodically, like with the
students we have for this
demonstration at the Pentagon,
go to key demonstrations around
the country. Of course, a greater
effort and expense. It's most un-
fortunate and I hope it shows
signs of changing, that is this
situation with the campuses, but
campuses are rather deadly places
today.
E.C You are a person who
devotes your life's worth to the
effort for world peace. Are you
hopeful?
BERRIGAN: One has to be
hopeful because if one becomes
despairing and if one becomes
convinced that this is too big an
obcenity to turn around and to
forestall, that is disarmament of
world justice and peace, then one
kind of joins up with the war-
monger and the warmongers have
their way with one. They con-
strict one; suddenly you're join-
ing up. If one has to go into the
luxury of self-pity and then figur-
ing that he or she has done their
part, then of course you're all
finished and you have in effect
joined them. A person of self-
respect and dignity and non-
violence and belief just cannot do
that, you cheapen yourself too
much.
E.C Does the Pentagon repre-
sent the epitpmy of this
lawlessness in our society?
BERRIGAN: Your words are
very well chosen. The Pentagon
actually epitomizes this legal
lawlessness. From any legal
standpoint, whether it be from
divine law or decent, just human
law, the Pentagon is terroristic.
The Pentagon is an institutional
terrorist. It's illegal. A lawless en-
tity; and that's why it's par-
ticularly significant in a half
hours time for many of these
folks to break the law at the Pen-
tagon, as they will, by blocking
entrances, by pouring their own
blood and by just raising an out-
cry against that massive lesion
over on the Potomac. E.C
What is the message you all are
bringing to the Pentagon today.
What are you saying to all the
people who work there?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 7, gg 7
Berrigan
BERRIGAN. Weil let's take the
symbol of blood. On the one
hand, blood is a symbol, since it's
voluntarily shed by the people
who pour it on that bloodletting
building over there. Blood says
you've got to stop the bloodshed
and war is always about bloodsh-
ed, it's always about killing peo-
ple and on the other hand it's a
statment by people such as these
that they will never shed blood.
Somehow we have to, the people
of the earth, come to the convic-
tion that under no circumstances
will they shed blood. That is the
only factor that's the only
discipline and conviction that's
going to save us from extinction
on this earth. We have to draw
the line at killing.
Surf Was Up; It May
Never Be The Same
By CLAY
THORNTON
Staff W rilrr
for that warm Florida
sun to scorch our
deprived Greenville
skin and, of course,
everyone made plans
The other day I was
looking at the poster
for a new Grade B ex-
ploitation farce called
Spring Break, and the Plans do change
tag line "The reason Each morning of
most students go to the vacation we were
college in the first up late checking out
place" made me the waves, what little
reflect fondly on the waves there were; try
truly memorable spr-
ing break that 1 had
Vern hanging 5 or
some wall of water
out of the North East.
I never saw any of
that. We did
this year.
For years now, I've
been a serious surfer,
ECU student and Surf
Club member. Spring
Break '83 was,
perhaps, the Surf
Club's finest week in
the sun, highlighted
by a collegiate surfing
tournament on a big
Florida trip to
Melbourne Beach.
It was a classic
scene and we made
sure that we played it
up. We had a dozen
surfboards atop a 10
man ECU van com-
plete with our "cool"
camping geer hanging
out the back.
We were all ready
to surf every day until something tourist-
�un went down, oriented every night
too, but to tell the
truth, I have a hard
time recalling that
also.
We kept this kind
of lethargic lifestyle
2-3 feet. What do you up for at least 3 or 4
do when there are no days until there was
waves? The surfers
say when you can't
surf, you drink. And
so, after a few at-
tempts at riding the
small ones we would
all scatter in search oi
refreshment.
This was the
ultimate in leisure liv-
ing. There was a cons-
tant flow of seafood,
the latest in women's
swimwear and plenty
of our favorite
beverages. There was
always optomistic
conversation about
how big the waves
were going to be
"tomorrow" and talk
of BZ catching 10
footers in the nude or
talk on the Mexican
radio of an upcoming
storm. Storms mean
two things to camping
surfers: gocd strong
waves and very wet
sleeping bags.
The last couple of
days of the trip were
spent near historic St.
Augustine, the loca-
tion of the contest,
spending more money
on ourselves and tell-
ing more lies to one
another. As it
turned out, all of
those tall drinks and
small waves paid off
and we took second
place out of six in the
tournament. Well,
how 'bout that?!
LIV1 ON THE SUNS
The critics agree
Richard Pryor is the funniest man in America.
" 'Richard Pryor Live on the
Sunset Strip' is a rare experience
of its kind, often hilarious and
very moving He is one of our
great originals "
- V.iw.nT CJafr) S TIMES
"Almost nobody but
Pryor can be so
funny and so honest
at the same nme
- Enc Orbet. HOI STOS POiT
" 'Richard Pryor Live on
the Sunset Smp' realizes -
better than we have seen
before � the range, heart
and acerbic brilliance of America's
best and most original comic actor"
��� I A TIMES
"For anyone interested in witnessing a
performance by the greatest stand-up comic
�live A performance that turns stand-up
comedy into an
�)vt Scoo TOKOKTO GLOBE AND MAIL
"Richard Pryor in 'Sunset Stup' is the
funniest man in America
-t�W. CHICAGO TRIBIXE
" 'Richard Pryor Live on
the Sunset Strip'is
hysterically funny "
-k�W. WASCTV
"Prvor's gifts as a comic
are so extraordinary that
now. with the added
emotional depth that he
brings to his routines,
he's near overwhelming
LA HEftALD-EXAWMt
"Outrageously funny
. an exhilaratingv
entertaining hour and
a half with t brilliant
comic actor
ATLAVTA COMSTnVTKjN
" Richard Pryor is
older, wiser, runnier better
than ever
� a��n Ekm. CHICAGO SUW.TU4CS
Richard Pryor is unrestrained
a spirited, uncomgibly funny
Sunset Scrip set
- Gut AimM. WASMNOTON fOST
so�snsi�2SS5S5SPS AS'Ajtcxxx'o. A�HA�peofKM
WVO�.IVEO.TH�Sof.S�'S'8ie MM �n3 P-OOoCtO Ov �maDIVO� D-CTW ov JO� LATON
FaWwdB�4�r�AUv�r
"KU SPRING BREAK ON THE DOOR
ATTIC
THUR-MORSE CODE
featuring Steve Morse lead guitar
player and Songwriter of the
��?��
i
50C BREAK ON THE DOOR
MMmmmmmwmnwrw
ALSO
THE STINGRAYS
Thurs 7 pm � Fri, Sat 5, 7, 9 pm
Hendrix Theatre, AASC � Admission:
ID & Activity Card Or AASC Membership
FRI-SAT BADGE (50ECU)
SUN. - PEGASIS ROX (50CECU)
SAT, � SU N. N.C. Championship Foots bo II
Tournament $1,000 IN CASH Prizes
WANTED
Student Union Cof-
feehouse Committee
chairperson or
member. Call
Mendenhall Student
Center at 757-6611,
ext. 210.
15
ECU DISCOUNT
on ait prescription
eyeglasses
315 Park View Commons
Across from Doctors Park
Open 9 5 30
Mon- Frl.
752-1444
icians
the
EAST CAROLINA PLAYHOUSE
presents
- � M WLDEI7S PJUTZES PRIZE-WINNING CLASSC
OUR TOWN
McGmnis Theatre - Ajori! 14-19. 8 15 pm
Genea Putc S4 00 ECU Sudanis S2 50
Cd 757-6390
UPTOWN GREENVILLE
757-7649
STARTS TOMORROW
$oo ALL
TIMES
ALL
ONE YOUNG CADET
WHO WAS TAUGHT
HONOR, INTEGRITY
AND DISCIPLINE
WILL UNCOVER THE
TRUTH AND YOU
WILL DISCOVER
THE LIE.
THE
LORDS or
DISCIPLINE
SHOWS
MON-FRI 7:10-fc00
SAT-SUN 3:30-5 20-7:10-9:00
Time is running out
Make appointments now to havs
your yearbook portraits made.
cinema 1m2'3
PITT-PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
HELD OVER
3rd Big Week!
?ringfest in Greenville.
a b
Like it's really, totally,
the most fun
a couple of bodies
can have.
You know?
" - - $
MATS $2.00
FMSTSHOW
EVERYDAY,
SHOWS
mm4 3-7.45-fcQO
SAT-SUN 3:15-5:10-7:03
Sign up sheets located outside
the Buccaneer Office.
Portraits
have been extended till
April 12th
Mondoy-Fri.
9-12; 1-5
at the Buccaneer Office.
Also, all campus organizations
wishing to be represented in the 1983
Buccaneer please contact the Buccaneer
at 757-6501 as soon as possible.
Ask for Tammy Edwards.

�� -�
. -�





t
IMF EASTCAROl IN1AN
Sports
M'KI! 7, ISM
Page
Johnson Bangs Fifth Against VWC
By KEN BOITON
Freshman Winfrcd Johnson ran
his record to 5-1 and slammed his
fifth home run of the yeai
Wednesday afternoon as the ECU
Pirates defeated Virginia
Weslevan 8-5
Johnson's opposite-field shot
came in the first inning after Todd
Evans had reached on a single.
Johnson, the stocky right-
hander from Elizabcthtown,
C , gave up five hits and one
run in eight innings before being
replaced by relievers Phil Spring
and Kirk Parsons in the ninth inn-
ing
After taking the lead on
Johnson's homer, the Pirates add-
ed two more runs in the second in-
ning.
Freshman David Home led of
the inning with a single, but was
out at second on a fielder's-choice
grounder by Tony Salmond.
With Salmond on first, Jack
Curlings .grounded out, moving
Salmond to second. 1 eft fielder
Mark Shank followed with an
RBI single, and stole second.
Kelly Robinette then drove in
Shank with another RBI single to
make the score 4-0.
Both teams added a run in the
third inning to make the score 5-1.
In the fourth, the Pirates
registered their sixth run on a
single by Robinette, a passed ball,
And a sacrifice fl by John
Hallow.
After both teams wasted scor-
ing opportunities in the sixth inn-
ing, ECU added its final two runs
in the seventh.
With one out, Blue Marlin
reliever Joel Gravitt walked
Robert Wells and David Home.
Gravitl was then replaced by
reliever Scott Monds.
Monds was greeted by Curlings'
groundei to shortstop Glen Pi
zanello thai loaded the bases after
Pizzanello was unable to throw
anyone out.
Monds then walked Shank, for-
cing home Wells from third.
Robinette followed with a
groundei thai second baseman
Frank Gilliken couldn't handle,
bringing home Home with ECU's
final run.
After the game, 1I coach Hal
Baud felt relieved to get the win
� something the Pirates had only
done once in the last five games.
"We needed this win real bad
stated Baud. "We came out sw-
inging real good and got a good
margin early
The Pirates needed that early
margin as VWU came back to
score four runs in the ninth inn-
ing.
With Spring replacing Johnson
on the mound, the Blue Marlins'
bats came alive with four straight
hits.
Right fielder Joey Holland
reached safely on a base hit back
up the middle. After Pizzanello
got to first on an error by
Robinette, Steve Barnett followed
with a base hit into right field,
driving in Holland.
Gilliken then lined a base hit in-
to left field to score Pizzanello.
Andy Hesington got a base hit in-
to center field and designated hit-
ter John Abbate doubled to make
the score 8-5.
Spring was then replaced by
senior Kirk Parsons, who popped
up Matt Eshelman and loe
DiGiacomo to end the threat and
the game.
Robinette. the 5-8 senior from
Prince George, Va was the
Pirates' main force on offense, as
he went four tor-five
The defending PC south
champs out hit the Blue Marlins
13-10 to end a three-game losing
streak.
I he Pirates are now 15-9 and
travel to James Madison I imersi-
tv for a conference match at 5:00
p.m. fhursday afternoon.
Piteher Winfred Johnson
Lady Bucs Capture
Two More Victories
CHAPEI HIl L - The I ad
Pirate softball team might not
have won as decisively as before,
but they still were able to pull off
two victories over UNC-Chapel
Hill Tuesday.
ECU won both games, 1-0,
moving its record to 11-4 overall.
The Tar Heels fell to a 7-9 mark
In the first game. Pirate
Jeanette Roth held the Tar Heels
scoreless, giving away to Fran
Hooks in the sixth inning. Roth,
now 4, then came back to shut
out the Heels once again in the se-
cond contest.
The Pirates got their only run in
the fifth inning of the first game.
Power hitter Cynthia Shepard
singled and moved up on an out.
Jo I anda Clayton then singled her
to third.
Sandra Kee knocked a line dm e
that was caught at shortstop. A
throw was then made to first in an
effort to double up Clayton, and
Shepard tagged up and sprinted
home to score the Pirates' winn-
ing run.
In the second game, the game
remained scoreless until the
seventh inning when Yvonne
Williams reached on an error.
That's when Shepard came
through, hitting a triple to bring
W llliams in.
Shepard had two hits m the se-
cond game and was the onlv hitter
to have more than one hit in both
games bv either team.
Head Coach Sue Manahan was
not loo pleased about the teams'
overall play, but was happv to get
the two wins, "l think when
games are close, it's nice to come
out on top Manahan said.
'There was no intensity on either
team's part. We were lucky that
they were no more intense than we
were I don't know if we were
tired or looking ahead (to Florida
State). It's difficult to be upset
when you win
Manahan complimented Roth
on her exceptional performance.
"1 think Jeanette kept us in both
games she said. "She kept them
off balance in both games
ECU hosts two-time defending
national champion Florida State
on Thursday. Gametime is 5:00
p.m.
Pirates Suffer Loss
To ODU Monarchs
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
In a game that started out go
for FC I I uesdav night, the
Pirates couldn't hold on in the
middle innings and went on to
lose to Old dominion 13-2.
The Pirates lumped out to i.n
early 2-1 lead in the fourth inning
when Kelly Robinette opened
inning with a double to right i
scored on John Hallow's home
run over the right field fence.
Hut the lead didn't last I
and the Pirate offense fizzled. On-
lv one other Pirate got as fai .� se-
cond base the rest of the night as
ECU onlv managed five hits
of the Monarchs all night.
ODU gained the lead foi good
with two runs in the fifth inning.
With one out. ECU pitcher Bob
Davidson hit 1 ennv Koperna and
after a second out. Nick Boothe
banged a two-run homer to right-
center field for a 3-2 lead
The Monarchs added another
run in the sixth and salted the
game away with five rims m the
eighth.
A iih one out, Torn Re-
doubled to left and Tim Di
reached on an infield hit V
Joe Millis singled in k. -
koperna got a bast hit 1
ba-es
Third baseman Rob c.
then delivered a triph
�rner. Three sti
Aalks accounted for the ia- i
� the inning and a � I ?ad
rhe Monarchs weren't thn
� . , In the ninth Di
walked and Millis sing .
up Koperna's RBI
With runners on first a
Boothe hit his second homei
the night I Irive in trm
finish up the scoring.
It was the third straij ��� I i
Pirates, a statistic it ha
head coach Ha: Bait d . ncei
"This is the worst streal
playing since I've been
Baird commented "Right i
I'm beginning to
abilitv to beat the good teams
ECl slugger Fran Hooks connects with a pitch from I N(
opponent. The Bucs won both games in the doubleheader.
Robinette Displays Potential
B RANDY MEWS
Miff Vnlrr

Although ECU lost Bob Patter-
son and Bill Wilder to the profes-
sional ranks from last year's
NCAA playoff team, the Pirates
have yet another pro prospect
playing for them this year.
That prospect is Senior Short-
stop Kelly Robinette. He is cur-
rently batting .285 and went four-
for-five in yesterday afternoon's
8-5 victory over Virginia
Weslevan. Robinette is also se-
cond on the team in assists with
61.
The four-vear starter only
began playing organized baseball
in the ninth grade, but his natural
abilitv quickly surfaced. In his
first year at Prince George High
School outside Richmond, Va he
was named as an all-conference
performer. He went on to earn all-
state honors and played the East
all-state team as a senior.
Upon graduating, Robinette
Pirate Club
Kicks Off
Fund Drive
The East Carolina University
Educational Foundation, known
as the Pirate Club, officially kick-
ed off its spring fund drive
throughout the Carolinas and
Virginia. The 1983 theme is "Join
the Pirate Attack
Local Pirate Club chapters will
have dinner meetings as their ma-
jor function for fund-raising dur-
ing April, May and June. Various
Pirate athletic officials and
coaches will attend the meetings.
The Pitt County Pirate Club
has adapted its own theme as
"The Siege of '83" in conjunction
with the overall theme. The siege
will be conducted by 14 Pirate
ships, all with captains,
lieutenants and mates in April.
This will be a county-wide concen-
trated effort to contact the entire
populous for new memberships
and increased value of old
memberships.
was offered several scholarships
to play baseball, but ECU was his
number one choice the whole way.
Coach Baird (ECU head
coach) was the one who really in-
fluenced me to come to ECU
Robinette said. "He's a good
coach and a nice guv. and he-
showed the most interest in me. I
also like the campus a lot, and 1
knew FCC had a strong baseball
program
Robinette's statistics have im-
proved throughout his eareei at
ECU, and Coach Band lias
nothing but praise to offei about
his senior leader, "kellv is a large
pan o! out program, and he's
played in almost every game since
coming here as a freshmen. He's
an extremely hard worker, and he
has a good shot at making the
pros
Robinette is also the first playei
Baud signed when he became
head coach at ECU in 1980.
4
r n
Although Robinette has ex-
perienced many thrilling moments
while playing for the Pirates, his
game winning hit against Ohio
University sticks out most m his
mind. Fast season he hit a
dramatic two-run. two-out double
to lift the Pirates to a 6-5 victory.
Robinette describes this year's
team as having the potential to be
lust as good as last year's ECAC-
South championship team. "Our
pitching has been shaky at times,
and our hitting should be better
he said, "but if we put it all
together we have a good shot at
winning the conference again
Robinette is an Industrial
Technology major, but he is
uncertain about what he wants to
do when he graduates. "I was
thinking about helping out as a
coach, but my dream is to play
professional ball
With the kind oi season
Robinette is having, that dream
should one dav become a reality.
Pirate Mark Hardy controls hail in indoor soccer game earlier
this year.
Soccer This Weekend
The Budweiser FCC Spring
Soccer tournament will be held
this Saturday behind Ficklen
Stadium.
The Pirates will plav North
Carolina Weslevan at 1:30 p.m.
on Saiurdav. and lion College
will take on Atlantic Christian
College at 11 a.m.
The championship game will be
played after the games on Saiur-
dav .
Karr: 9-2, 8-3 Record Not Realistic
Shortstop Kelly Robinette
"With the increasing costs of more emphasis on our fund-
college athletics, it is imperative
that we provide an increased,
strong scholarship base explain-
ed Executive Secretary of the
Pirate Club Richard Dupree.
"Our strong committment to
NCAA Division-I athletics puts
raising for 1983
For further information about
Pirate Club activities, contact
Richard Dupree, Pirate Club,
ECU, Greenville, N.C. 27834; or
call 919-757-6178.
By CJND1 PLEASANTS
sport rdiliw
(ran in
Because of the caliber of teams
ECU will be up against this fall,
the 1983 schedule has been
described by many as being an
unrealistic one.
Florida State, Southern
Mississippi and the Univ. of
Florida are a few of the teams the
Pirates will meet this fall.
Head Coach Ed Emory does
not consider the schedule to be a
negative factor. "It's there and
we're gonna play it Emory said.
"It won't be an excuse for why we
did good or why we didn't do
good
Athletic Director Dr. Ken Karr
explained why the schedule was
devised like it was. "We don't
have a lot of latitude in our
scheduling he said. "Our con-
stituency wishes our program to
continue at Division- level and to
continue at this level, we must
meet the criteria set forth
According to Karr. ECU must
play a minimum o seven out ol
11 games against Division-1
teams. In order to maintain a
Division-1 status, he explained.
ECU must have eight sports other
than football and a women's pro-
gram.
"For us to fulfill that sort of
total program, we have to see a
large portion of income in foot-
ball Karr said.
Neither Dr. Karr nor F.arline
Feggett, the Assistant Athletic
Director for Business Affairs,
would comment on the athletic
department's present deficit
As in the past. ECU has been
scheduled to compete against
teams who are already successful
in that area. "We have to play
teams that have been more suc-
cessful Karr said, "and show
the ability to put 40,000-plus into
the stadium
Does Karr believe this year's
schedule is unrealistic for the
Pirates? "1 think our constituency
has to realize that while we're
upgrading the program, the fool
bail schedule will be a difficult
one.
'Fhey can't expect us to be B '�
or 9-2 overall agains- these teams
That is not realistic.
"We should aspire to win
against these teams, but it's going
to take a few years to develop a
program of this caliber of com-
petition
Obviouslv, time and monev will
be the deciding factors as to
whether or not ECl will reach us
quest. Fact: Without proper fun-
ding, the ECl football program
ill remain stagnated Fact:
Rigorous scheduling will continue
tor a long time to come. Fact:
W inning seasons may not be a
consistency. Fact: Emory and the
coaching staff believe the Pirates
can be successful despite such
obstacles. Fact: It's defimtelv
tough to be a Pirate.
(Correction: Western Carolina
Football Coach Bob Waters also
serves as the universitv's athletic
director. 1
Snea
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Wicc 8
t vwc
Pitcher Winfred Johnson
Suffer Loss
J Monarchs
va ith one out, Tom Reichel
hied to left and Tim Drugala
:hed on an infield hit. After
Joe Millis singled in Reichel.
k perna goi a base hit to load the
Third baseman Rob Giland
hen delivered a triple into the
d corner. I hree straight
accounted for the last run
nning and a 9-2 lead.
' Monarchs weren't through,
- In the ninth, Drugala
d and Milliv singled, setting
� erna's RBI single.
inners on first and third,
hil his second homer of
� drive in three runs and
up the scoring.
the third straight loss for
v a statistic that has
ach Hal Baud concerned.
is the worst streak of
- since I've been here
tented. "Right now
- to question our
H the good teams
���- i ��� -hi mm
"pm?
pols hall in indoor soccer game earlier
is Weekend
and Lion College
Atlantic Christian
at 11 a.m.
hampionship game will be
ifter the games on Satur
Not Realistic
he program, the foot-
hedule will be a difficult
ther
irline
�hletic
flairs,
letic
been
lamst
sful
rplav
suc-
.how
into
mi 's
the
pency
-e're
' expect us to be 8-3
9-2 overall against these teams,
i hat is not realistic.
should aspire to win
nnsl these teams, but it's going
take a few years to develop a
program of this caliber of com-
petition
Obviously, time and money will
be the deciding factors as to
whether or not ECU wUI reach its
quest. Fact: Without proper fun-
d�Jg. the ECU football program
will remain stagnated. Fact:
Rigorous scheduling will continue
tor a long t.me to come. Fact
Winning seasons mav not be a
consistency. Fact: Emory and the
coaching staff believe the Pirates
ntL f SUC"essful d�pite such
touih ,csk Fact: ,f's definite,y
tough to be a Pirate
toSSfe1 Western Carolina
Football Coach Bob Waters also
TrYl 3Vhe umversitys athletic
director.)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 7. 1983
Sneaker Sam Sez
Softball Favorites
Midway through
the intramural soft-
ball season, several
teams appear to be
standouts in their
respective divisions.
The Bombers are
knocking the cover
oft of the bali in the
men's independent
division, while the
vcock Swat Team
looks like the top
men's residence hall
team. Lambda Chi
ipha appears to be
strong contenders in
the fraternity "A"
division.
I he ever-impressive
Heartbreakers are
slugging their way to
the women's indepen-
dent title. In the
women's residence
hall division, the Cot-
ton Creamers are run-
ning through their
competition, while
Sigma Sigma Sigma is
scoring big among the
sororities.
learns Getting Set
For Plaoffs
s the volleyball
season sets into its
final week of action.
several teams are
showing playoff
potential. The Flem-
ing Q's seem to have
taken control in the
women's residence
hall division, while in
the women's indepen-
dent division, the Barr
Bodies are battling the
Atomic Girls. The
sorority race appears
to be led by the Delta
Zeta team.
In the men's divi-
sions, it is the Jones
Enforcers Level II
leading the spiking at-
tack for the residence
halls and On Your
Knees for the in-
dependents. The
fraternity division
shows Pi Kappa Phi
in fine form for the
"A" division and
Sigma Tau Gamma in
the "B" division.
Playoffs are set to
begin Monday, April
18.
Home Run Derby
Tuesday, April 12 is
the day to prove
you're the best hitter
at ECU. Entries for
the home run derby
will be taken until the
day of the derby.
Come on out to the
women's varsity soft-
ball field between 3:30
and 6:30 to see if you
can hit the longest
ball.
Golf Classic
With warm weather
here once again, it's
time to dust off the
clubs and swing into
the intramural Golf
Classic. Last year,
Sigma Phi Epsilon
won the fraternity
division in team com-
petition, while the
Bull City Boat People
took top honors
among the in-
dependents. Both
teams will be back to
defend their titles.
Entry dates for this
swinging affair are
April 5-13. Competi-
tion will be held April
13-14 at the Ayden
Golf and Country
Club.
Putt-Putt For The
Fun Of It
Intramurals is
sponsoring a Putt-
Putt tourney at Putt-
Putt Golf and Games
today, April 7. En-
tries for this in-
dividual event will be
taken up until tee off
time. The person with
the lowest score in
each division by 11:00
p.m. will be crowned
champion.
Canoe Trip Plann-
ed
The Intramural
Outdoor Recreation
Center is sponsoring a
canoe trip on Wednes-
day, April 13. The
trip is suitable for
beginning or ex-
perienced canoers.
The trip participants
will meet behind
Memorial Gym at
3:00 p.m. on Wednes-
day for a leisurely
two-hour paddle
down the Tar River.
Interested par-
ticipants should
register by 4:00 p.m.
April 12 at the Out-
door Recreation
Center, 113 Memorial
Gym. So get some
friends together or
sign up by yourself,
lots of fun is ex-
pected.
Valvano Misses Court
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI) - Kurt C.
Stakeman, a Wake
County assistant
district attorney, was
looking through Tues-
day's court calendar
and noted North
Carolina State basket-
ball coach Jim
Valvano was schedul-
ed to appear on a
speeding violation.
Stakeman decided
that Valvano had a
good enough reason
for a delay so the case
was postponed.
Valvano returned to
Raleigh late Tuesday
afternoon after
guiding the Wolfpack
to the NCAA basket-
ball championship.
North Carolina
State had been
described throughout
the tournament as a
Cinderella team and
Stakeman said he
wasn't about to haul
Valvano into court.
"I wasn't about to
break any glass slip-
pers yesterday
Stakeman said. "1
saw his name on the
calendar and realized
that in the heat of the
moment, he may have
forgotten that
Valvano's new
court date is May 3.
Stakeman said the
case was continued
just as a lot of other
cases are continued
when a person is sick
or out of town with
good reason on the
day of the trial.
Valvano was citied
Jan. 20. for allegedly
going faster than the
45 mph speed limn
near the North
Carolina State cam-
pus.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
tiai.oo Prtgwwcv Ttat. airt
Control. �n ProWom
Pra�nany Ceumalinfl. For
lurtaar information call
�J3 C535 (Toll Fro Number
�Ot-lIl-lMa) aatwaaa � AM
ina i P.M. Waaktfay.
KALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West M"rean St.
Ral.iat
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN mamatka UMuuitdecP
DEPEND ON. ston that s mode easte by
the women of the l-tommg Center Counselors ore
available day ana night to support and under
stand you Your safety, comfort ond privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday � Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st & 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Earty
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY Ofi NIGHT �
Heatthcare.counseiing TUC Cl CMIMf
and education for wo- 'nC r�-CMIIM�
men of on oaes CENTER
. Clilf
0
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
(Jrta (Et?t
JrTratmutg
CHARGING THROUGH THE 10'of!
A new altLKraiti.vQ.
now cclonlz,ng at ECU
INFORMATIONAL
INTEREST MEETINGS
Thu. , 7 PM - Room 221
Fri2:30-Room 212
STUDENT UNION
�T0P BV FOR MORE INFORMATION!
AT OUR STUVENT UNION BOOTH
WEVNESVAV - FRJVAV
William doaan t talk about lit �
. Mo a one o ttvm. a mm
I by parxoraa !��� paopla. A
bnliiont come ittoaa mmd ftras at
proooaaerous ipaad. Ha s this generation �
finast comadian
LAUGHS
Show Album
r
I
6.49lp 6.99tape
In a world tuil o tia�oa tntnaa. Untie
Floyd may be the lb �Ojaat. Ttus guy �
wild. And wildly tunny Tuna in to tn
Uncle Floyd Snow Album Hoar tna madness
tnat s vaulting on waird man n-om local
notoriety to national insanity
r
SALE ENDS APRIL 1 3
Record Bar
RECORDS TAPES a AUTTLE BIT MORK
P1TT PLAZA CAROLINA EAST MALL
Women's Head Softball Coach Sue Manahan discusses strategy with her assistant, Lynn
Davidson.
Pros Hope To Master Course
AUGUSTA, Ga.
(UPI) � Two titans
of the tour, both
hungering to snap out-
of slumps, and an
itt-bitty guy with a
big game will be feel-
ing more pressure
than most when the
annual rite of spring
known as the Masters
begins Thursday.
For all their past
glories, Tom Watson
and Jack Nicklaus are
very much aware that
the column under
uins remains blank
tor 1983. Indeed, it's
hard for them to
forget when they are
constantly being
queried about their
shortcomings.
Each has played in
only six tournaments
this year, and both
have four finishes in
the top 10. But while
Nicklaus claimed the
runner-up spot in the
Inverrary, Watson's
best has been a tie for
fifth in the Andy
Williams.
In their exalted
positions, however,
they measure their
success on the major
championship scale,
and in that regard
their real seasons
begin at Augusta,
where Nicklaus holds
the record with five
titles, the first coming
in 1963, and Watson
has won twice.
"You can say I'm
in a slump if you
want Watson said.
"We all have swing
problems from time
to time and I'm hav-
ing some problems.
But I'm feeling a lot
better about my game
now.
"I'll be right in
there again. I'm not
as concerned about
my game as I was a
couple of weeks ago. I
really wasn't playing
that well going into
the TPC but I had two
good rounds there,
and the third round
was the best I've
played this year
Nicklaus, who as is
his custom came to
Augusta National last
week for three days of
practice, also says he
feels comfortable with
his game and he also
points to the third
round of the Tourna-
ment Players Cham-
pionship two weeks
ago, when he shot a
68 for the best score
of anyone in the
round.
"I've been working
very hard on my
game Nicklaus said.
"I've been pointing
toward the majors,
and I feel I'm playing
well enough to win. I
certainly feel I should
be considered among
the favorites
The "little" guy in
the Masters picture is
Tom Kite, who has a
remarkable reputa-
tion for falling just
See KITE, Page 10
SATURDAY
APRIL 9,1983
r
i
i
i
i
I OFFER GOOD WHEN USING
bring this ad for a
FREE WASH
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
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I
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I
I
I
SECOND WASHING
MACHINE ALSO
"Huff n' fold
service availoble-tittendants
on duty 7 days r x k
coupon expires
APRIL 9 th

flWASrf
HOUSE
10th St. Across from
Krispy Kreme (752-4117)
14th St. 1 Block from
the "Hill" 7SJ-?434)
Tar Landing Seafood
ResUurut
uoteavaxr
r , vyilsc
N
AWHMJ0FA MEAL.
Family Restaurants
SHIRTS
Sportshirts ond TEE shirts are
REDUCED
SHOES
Sale Shoes of prices lower than ever.
10S
ta��aaUHim�imiWUll�liliUII
All You Con Eat
Specials
aByoaauieat
for oib $5.99
kNIglitCNdy
Greenville, N.C j
APPAREL
Tennis wear-Raincoats - Bike Jackets -Much More
Our sidewalks will be full of savings!
��� Don't Miss It. �����
HJ HODGES CO.
i





10
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
APML7.WC
?
Waltrip Prepares For Trans- South 500
And Hopes Charm Will Hold Again
DARLINGTON,
S.C. (UP1) � For
Darrell Waltrip, odd-
numbered years at
Darlington Interna-
tional Raceway hold a
certain charm.
"I've always run
real well here at Darl-
ington in odd-
numbered years the
Franklin, Tenn
driver said Wednes-
day on the eve of time
trials for the Tran-
South 500 � formerly
the Rebel 500.
"I can't really ex-
plain why that is, but
I just hope things con-
tinue that way he
said.
Waltrip won the
Rebel 500 in 1977,
1979 and 1981. This
year's edition is
scheduled to get under
way Sunday.
"Really, though,
I've always run real
well at Darlington and
Junior's cars have
always done real well
here he said, referr-
ing to car-owner
Junior Johnson.
The starting flag is
set to fall at 1:15 p.m.
Sunday for a 36-car
field. Pole qualifying
is set for 3 p.m.
Thursday when the
first 18 starting pos-
tions will be determin-
ed in time trials.
The rest of the field
will be set in second-
round qualifying Fri-
day at 1 p.m. and a
late-model sportsman
race is set for Satur-
day on the 1.4-mile
oval.
"I'm so anxious
about the TranSouth
500 that I got into
town last night
Waltrip said. "I can't
wait. We need to get
going and the way to
do that is with a win
Waltrip could use a
victory � or a good
finish � to overcome
an early-season deficit
in the Winston Cup
point standingv
Waltrip stands 24th in
the standings. 240
points behind leader
Neil Bonnett.
"We'e got 2
races left on the
Winston Cup
schedule to catch up.
and I truly and
honestly believe we
can do it Waltrip
said.
Buddv Baker.
Harr Gant and Tim
Richmond agreed
with Waltrip's predic-
tion Benn Parson's
19SO track record of
1 55 8 miles per hour
will be broken Ih �
la �
" There are a lot I
capable ars in the
(race), and when they
get together anthing
can and Joes �
pen said Baker,
two-time Darling
winner
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
Catcher Jack CarMttgs takes his turn against ODl Tuesday.
Kite Confident
Cont'd From Page 9
short of greatness.
His record of con-
sistency at Augusta is
as good as anyone's
over the last seven
vears, hut he has yet
to come away with the
winner's Green
Jacket. During thai
span. Kite has finish-
ed among the top six
all but once, tying for
fifth place last yeai
with Watson.
"There have been a
number of times 1
could have won. but
just didn't said the
5-foot-8. 155-pound
Texan, winner of the
Vardon Trophy for
low stroke average the
last two years. "If I
play well, I can still
beat them. I'm not the
wimp some people
seem to think I am. 1
hit the ball 255 to 260
vards. I'm not a crip-
ple
Still, the par2,
040-yard Augusta
National is known to
favor the long hitters,
a typical example be-
ing Craig Stadler, last
year's winner follow-
ing a playoff with
another big blaster,
Dan Pohl. Stadler
says his current game
is just about on a par
with this lime last year
and that his con-
fidence level jumped
considerably after ty-
ing for second in last
weekend's Greater
Greensboro Open.
"There's something
about this golf course
that makes me con-
centrate better and
swing well Stadler
said. "I've been hit-
ting the ball a lot bet-
ter the last couple of
weeks and 1 like my
chances here
Classifieds
PERSONAL
HEY � Slick Hope �ou had a
nice one Take care b swee'
and don t torget 'o qe' �he qu
Love r-easeban
TO THE GIRL WHO s'iII exci'es
me Good thmqs come in !i
and m vour case you ve qd a
pair tha' ius' on t quit Happ
;jnd O'i'ridav KIM Love
always � B
TO THE GIRL WITH THE ra
diant tace Sorry we couldn t
elope a' 'rte Empire S'ate
Building It was very temptcnq
after such a super weekend
Hope this doesn t mean the
honeymoon m the islands is
cancelled' Remember about the
strawberries, champagne and
golf course this summer You
have an open invite all summer
BOB
IS LEARNING SPANISH A
BITCH' Causing your hair to
tall out' Call me � I can help
Tutoring available flexible
hours KERRI 757 38
WANTED
R POOl Have a happy birth
day Remember you can never
party 2 much!
CRANK UP THAT VICTROLA
Put on your rockin shoes hey
hey Saturday night one more
Saturday night Steve Ton,
David Bob Blade Jodi JeM.
Blulu Vern Chris Wayne
Mer.le Big Dave Jim I dor I
know maybe it was the roses
LAM ITS ME' You �re my
sunshine and the love ot my life
You make all my rainy days
seem less so I love you' Always
D W P
FROM THE OFFICE OF THE
FUTURE DCP Session was
great but can you catch
anything in a hotlub' Looking
forward to Wil with our interns
in tow
TO BIG DAVE the world s
foremost trouser trout fisher
man l hate to tell you this, see
ing as you're my roommate and
all. but I've got some good news
and some bad news The good
news is I think I'm gay The bad
news is l think you re kinda
cute Love always. BIG MIKE,
aha. the Puerto Rican Yak
Duker
ROOMMATE
WANTED
3 ROOMMATES NEEDED for
Georgetown Apts! Call 7S4 4.94
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share two bedroom
apt. t block from campus Call
HMM1
ROOMMATES WANTED FOR
summer Apartment is furnish
ed Split rent and utilities
Cypress Gardens Apartments -
1U. 757 iS�7
SERVICES
ATTRACTIVE MODELS
WANTED tor figure �
intimate apparel
photography Excellent pay
Send figure photo and personal
information to P.O Box 113,
Rocky Mount. N C 27401 1�13.
ENERGETIC Part time
salesperson needed Available
mornings and Saturdays. Ex-
perience preferred but not
necessary Apply in person.
Leather n Wood. Ltd Carolina
East Mall No phone C-fla.
MATURE RESPONSIBLE
PERSONS WANTED FOR sum
rrer sub leasing in 2 bedroom
townhouse swimming pool. $240
plus utihlies. 757 3�040t 757 17IS
SUMMER JOBS Two water
satety instructors. R N and arts
and crafts director For infor
mation write Ed Hodges. Jr. 115
E nth Street. Washington. N.C.
27889
TELEPHONE ORDER
TAKERS needed immediately
for summer only Call Sharon
between 8 a m only 754 7600
Pleasant telephone voice and
manner imperative Must be
able to begin immediately and
work 8 a m to 4 p m Knowledge
ot watersports and equipment
important
NUTRIQUIK ENTERPRISES
authorued Yukia Foods
Distributor has income oppor
tunity available Part time
employment encouraged
Presentation to be held at
Ramada Inn on Friday. April 8
at �. 11 l and 3 Public invited
For more information, call
758 7243
2 bedroom townhouse with new
carpet located at River Bluff
behind Papa Kati For more m
formation, call 754 3844 and ask
for Steele or Kevin
PERSON(S) WANTED to
sublease 2 bdrm townhouse at
Cherry Court May through
August For more mfo. call
752 373�
APARTMENT FOR RENT
May 1st $24$. month 2 bedroom,
758 4911
SEEKING THAT SPECIAL
PERSON? Black, educated,
mature male interested in
sports, scifi. tail, disco music,
detectivecomedy movies �
seeking college female of like
tastes. Godliness, friendliness,
neatness a plus � no potheads.
gays or drunks Serious replies
only Call before 11 p m Vince
� M� Unistead (919) 758 9794
NEED SUMMER BOARDING
WITH LOW RENT? Subleasing
two bedroom apartment at Col
lege View, only $180 plus
utilities 752 733$
FOR SALE
WANTED VERY LIGHT por
table typewriter by 429 Call
now 355 4353 or 757 4413, ask for
Julie Fay
RIDES
RIDERS NEEDED 2 riders to
Atlanta Share gas Leave la.m.
April 14 Return Monday April
17 754 1944
MISC.
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALL
Reasonable rates. Call 758 9533
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
WANTEDtosublease one-room
apartment at Tar River Estates
this summer Apt. is beside
large swimming pool, has patio
and is located 5 minutes from
campus Call 7S4-4424 for more
information.
LOOKING FOR AN APART
MENT?? We re graduating this
semester and need someone to
take our lease in May
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff:
Welcome to our flea market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd. Open every Saturday and
Sunday 8 til 5. Crafts, tools, fur
mture. books, etc. Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' items
Real bargains
K2 7S0 KAWASAKI, 1981, $1,400
Priced to sell Great bargain
Good condition This is a real
motorcycle Make an offer. Call
7S1-493S.
650 SPECIAL II Yamaha $1,200.
Good condition. An excellent
bike Need to sell Make an of
fer. Call 75135.
Ift3 CHEVY Custom Deluxe 10,
4x4 4 speed, sliding rear win
dows, AMFM, cassette. PS
P.B Lock-in hubs. Rally wheels
Priced to sell. $10,500 Call
7 $1-493$
ZENITH ZT I Terminal w built
in audiodial modem, $415,
GEMINI 10 printer $335 See
Austin bulletin board for
�IT 7S-010.
FOR SALE: Ludwig snare
drum, stand, pad. $50 00
75at4
10 ALBUMS OF YOUR
CHOICE, newold hard to por.
rock, coun, jaii. clas, only $70 00
Take 1 years to pay in 8 easy
payments No dealers please
Call today. 7 58 0207 ask for JAY
SCHWINN VARSITY, good
cond. $75.00 Must sell 752 8544
WOODEN BAR ml 1 chairs, $90
bargain! Desk, $35 Call Bjorn at
751 7854.
CAR STEREO COMPLETE
with amfm receiver, equalizer
and speakers. M watts and like
mm. Call ST EVE at 75�-o0�i.
POR SALE: FISHER S30
SPEAKERS. Will sell cheap.
$154. Call 7S4477.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING!
SERVICE, experience, quality
week, IBM Selectric typewriter
Call Lanie Shive 754 $301 or
GAIL JOYNER 7S4-1441
TYPING Term papers, thesis,
etc Call Kempie Dunn. 751 4713.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE Complete audio repair
calf after 4pm Mark 752 1744
MOVING? NO Ob too large or
srnaH' Reasonable rates, call
754 9511
TYPING � II V'ars experience
C�H JSS-4'� after J:34 p.m
NljfB:07TYPINGT Call Cindy
l$S-4744 after 5 00 10 years ex
�eneflce IBM tVpe Soen.
tr�mm�rrT�� chexfced.
CGM�ONOUT
THE PUTTING'S FINE1
Play Both Courses
FREE with Th� Purchase Of A
2 Gam Ticket At The Regular
Price ($3.00) With
This Coupon
Pwtt-Futt Golf A Gome
10th St Extension VR YDA Yf 0pcn 12 Noon �y
Greenville N C P.O. Box 3214
758 1820 ALL YOU CAM PLAY v �J4
TO ePM ONLY $3.00
NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MVKE YOU THIS OFFER.
It you re a musician whos serious
about performing, you should take a
serious hvk at the Army
Army bands offer you an avei ige
of 40 perrormaiKes a month In even
thing rrom concerts to parades
Army band also oner you a
chance to travel
The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii. Europe and all
across America
.And Army bands offer you the
c hance to play with gcxxl musicians. Just
t i quality, you have to be able GO sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills
ru u
It s a genuine, rig
diate opportunity
Compare it to your civil " rs
Then write Army Opportunities PO
Box 500 No HoUywood CA9I60i
ARMY BAND.
BEAU YOU CAN BE
� vu.
L4

V
. .� �
- � � Sav
Qua'1' � � Aes � � 1
N ne Sold to I iea ��-
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Apm 5
thru Sat April 9. 1983
ae a' st: r�M p .
fv- I these adve sex 'e-s s-e
j e: I e eaj . a.a ate I
iae " eaC �� Sa. - ei:er-
as spec ' a rioted n 9 a
a �
1c run out
aa? a
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tejm ye" a-a abe reflect �;
sae sa� rga � a a 'Chech m '
A em � - . . &, ih
dver11se " ai tne dwer11se

1


Open Mon thru Sat 8am to Midnight
Sun 9 am to 9 prr
600 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
)
.i
REGULAR OB LIGHT
Coors
COST CUTTER
70 Lean
Ground Beef
FRESH FRle
7 Sour Cream
M
Doz
12-Oz.
Cans
fc
m
rs
Lb.
MT DEW.
0,ET PEPSI OR
LD. "
SOLD IN A 5 LB. CHUB PAK
TOTAL PRICE $4.90
NORTHERN
Bafhrnnm Ticciu
MOMHeRHi
�"
SAVE
30
$
Ar COUNTRY C no
ASSORTED JACRiET,
ES
2-Ltr.
N.R.
Btl.
SAVE
39c
KELLOGGS
Corn Flakes
Ctn.
SfSffSSSS
18-Oz.
Box
24-Oz
Loaves
�" " T N
KROGER
Salad
Fressing
Ki
Jk�wtt8 l�UM
y
COST CUTTER
Sticed Bacon
Lb.
,J.

- ��-�
U.S. FANCY
Fresh Red Delicious
Head Lettuce Apples
� ft
Hd �





ttardeer
A BACON & EGG
BISCUIT AND FLORIDA
ORANGE JUICE 990
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants Please
present coupon before ordering.One coupon per customer
per order please Customer must pay any sales tax due.
Coupon not good in combination with any other offers.
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours through April 13,1983.
c 1983 Hardens Pood Systems Inc
BCEB OJ REDUCED BACON BISC
Yfardecr
TWO HAM
BISCUITS $1.39
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants.
Please present coupon before ordering.One coupon
per customer per order please. Customer must pay
any sales tax due. Coupon not good in combination
with any other offers.
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours April 14-20,1983.
C 1983 Hardees Pood Svstems inc
2 HAMBISC 2 LtSS MAMBlSC
Hardecr
TWO STEAK
BISCUITS $1.49
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants.
Please present coupon before ordering.One coupon
per customer per order please. Customer must pay
any sales tax due. Coupon not good in combination
with any other offers. 'Chopped beefsteak
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours April 21-27, 1983.
C 1963 Hardees Food Systems Inc
2 SKBISC 2 LESS SK BISC
Hardecr
A BACON & EGG
BISCUIT AND FLORIDA
ORANGE JUICE 990
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants. Please
preser oupon before ordering.One coupon per customer
jer order please. Customer must pay any sales tax due.
jpon not good in combination with any other offers.
fer good during regular breakfast menu
hours April 28-May 4,1983.
c 1963 Hardees Food Svstems inc
BCEB OJ REDUCED BACON BISC
�����������Hi
.Hardecr
TWO HOT
HAM 'N' CHEESE�
SANDWICHES $1.99
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants. Please
present coupon before ordering One coupon per customer
per order please Customer must pay any sales tax due
Coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours through April 13,1983.
C 1963 Hardees Food Systems Inc 2 MMCZ 2 LESS HMCZ
ttardecr
A BACON CHEESEBURGER,
REGULAR FRIES AND MEDIUM
SOFT DRINK $2.19
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants.
Please present coupon before ordering.One coupon
per customer per order please. Customer must pay
any sales tax due. Coupon not good in combination
with any other offers.
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours April 14-20,1983.
C 1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc
BCB REGFPV MEODK MEAL DEAL 8 CB
ttardeci
A BIG DELUXE� BURGER,
REGULAR FRIES AND MEDIUM
SOFT DRINK $1.79
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants.
Please present coupon before ordering.One coupon
per customer per order please. Customer must pay
any sales tax due. Coupon not good in combination
with any other offers.
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours April 21-27,1983.
C 1963 Hardees Pood Systems inc
DEL REGFBV MEDDK MEAL DEAL DEL
ttardeer
TWO HOT
HAM 'N'
SANDWICHES $1.99
TM
Offer good at participating Hardees restaurants. Please
present coupon before ordering One coupon per customer
per order please.Customer must pay any sales tax due
Coupon not good in combination with any other offers.
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours April 28-May 4,1983.
c 1963 Hardees Food Systems inc
2 HMCZ 2 LESS MMCZ

Vaa- k'










Title
The East Carolinian, April 7, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 07, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.262
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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