The East Carolinian, April 5, 1983






otto iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.S , h
Tuesday, April 5,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Page
Circulation 10,000
X

Boudreaux Says Aid Subject To Delays, Cuts
By EMILY CASEY
�Miff Writer
ECL' Director of Financial Aid
Robert M. Boudreaux claims that
federal financial aid programs still
remain "sacred cows" despite ef-
forts by every administration
since Lyndon Johnson to cut
them.
Boudreaux, who made his com-
ments during Thursday's staff
development program put on by
the Division of Student Life, also
said that because of frequent
allocation delays in three major
federal aid programs, students
were being forced to apply for
"sure money" offered in other
programs at higher interest rates.
Boudreaux cited the National
Direct Student Loan program, the
Supplemental Educational Op-
portunity Grant and the federal
work-study program as three aid
packages experiencing delays.
The "sure money" Boudreaux
was referring to was partially
from Pell Grants, which is an en-
titlement program, and partially
from the Guaranteed Student
Loan Program. The Guaranteed
Student Loan Program offers the
student loans at a nine percent in-
terest rate, while the often-
delayed National Direct Student
Loan charges only a five percent
rate. "The total dollars for finan-
cial aid has not decreased any
Boudreaux said. "We see a
change in the way the financial aid
dollars are distributed
Boudreaux also claims that the
new student financial aid pro-
posals for the 1983-84 fiscal year
are "moving towards" a 40 per-
cent self-help requirement of the
students total educational costs.
Currently there is no self-help
percentage limit being assessed.
Boudreaux said that the delays
in the financial aid packages were
causing some students to drop-out
of college and others to not bother
to attend. This is the third year
that students have been experienc-
ing delays. Boudreaux also said
that some students who were on
the "boarder line" of financial
aid eligibility were often opting
not to apply for aid packages.
Boudreaux said he did not feel
that student default rates on loans
were significant enough to cripple
the federal aid packages. He said
the national default rate on the
National Direct Student Loan was
between 13 and 15 percent, but
that this figure was a compounded
figure kept since the program's in-
ception in 1958. Boudreaux said
that during that same period ECU
students have maintained a
default record of only 6.2 percent.
Besides making direct loan
payments, some students apply
for various cancellation clauses
which allow the student to supple-
ment work in their field as a way
of liquidating the loan.
Boudreaux told the group that
assembled for Thursdav's Student
Life breakfast that "These are the
best of times and these are the
worst of times" for financial aid.
He was referring to the fact that
the aid programs have been ex-
panding through the years and
now were reaching students from
both the poor and middle income
ranges, but that because of fiscai
belt tightening, the program- were
now being faced with the
possibility of cut backs and
amendments.
Gloria Swanson Dies
World News A t A Glance
A View From The Top
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
The height of Pirate country, on the top of College Hill, turned into a thinly populated area as FCC
students headed out of town for the Faster weekend last Friday, as can be seen from a bird's eye view.
Evelyn King Set For Minges
The Student Union Major At-
tractions Committee has an-
nounced that Evelyn Champagne
King and special guest the Dazz
Band will perform in the last ma-
jor concert at ECU this semester.
The pair will perform in Minges
Coliseum on Saturday, April 23,
the final weekend before exams
begin at the university.
Both groups currently have hit
records on national charts. Accor-
ding to Billboard magazine, the
Dazz Band's latest hit, "On the
One is now number nine on the
black singles chart, and the album
of the same name is currently
number 12. King's latest album.
Get Loose, is number 24 and her
single is number 22.
"We really are pleased to an-
nounce this concert said Jerry
Dilsaver, chairman of the Major
Attractions Committee. He noted
that the concert was scheduled on
the same day as the ECU purple-
and-gold football game, giving
students one last chance for a
break before exams begin the
following Wednesday.
The committee, which is
responsible for booking all major
bands to ECU and has brought
.38 Special and Joan Jett to
Greenville last year, had planned
to have two concerts this spring.
Dilsaver said Kenny Loggins was
tentatively scheduled to appear in
Minges, but he broke his ribs in a
fall off of a stage and his doctor
would not permit him to perform
until the ribs healed. The ap-
pearance at ECU could not be
rescheduled.
Student tickets will cost $7.50
for the Evelyn King-Dazz Band
concert and must be purchased at
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center. They
will be sold through 4 p.m. April
22 to students with current ID and
activity cards. Tickets for the
public and at the door will be
S9.50. The concert will begin at 8
p.m. in Minges Coliseum.
NEW YORK � Actress Gloria Swanson died
peacefully in her sleep early Monday. She was 84.
A New York Hospital spokesman said Miss Swan-
son, who had been admitted to the hospital on
March 20, "passed away peacefully in her sleep
He said the family requested that further details of
her illness and death not be released.
SALT LAKE CITY � A slow-moving storm
caused near blizzard conditions in Utah with
40-inch snows. High winds, rain and fog were
blamed for six deaths in California and New York.
ST. LOUIS � Oilspill experts Monday battled
high water and swift currents on the Mississippi
River in vacuuming crude oil leaking from a barge.
It was one of four barges that smashed into a
bridge, sank and started scattered waterfront fires
Sunday.
WASHINGTON � President Reagan is ex-
pected to receive within two weeks the final report
from his special panel trying to find a home for the
new MX nuclear missile, deputy press secretary
Larry Speakes said Monday. Sources said Reagan
was preparing for a major speech April 11 to
discuss the future of the controversial missile
system.
MOSCOW � The official Communist Party
newspaper, Pravda, said Monday Washington's
regret over Soviet rejection of President Reagan's
latest arms proposal was a "hypocritical" attempt
to blame Moscow for the failure to reach an arms
accord.
ARANYAPRATHET. Thailand � Vietnamese
troops overran the headauarters of Cambodian
coalition leader Prince Norodom Sihanouk Mon-
day, and Thai warplanes bombed Vietnamese
forces holding a small patch of Thai territory near
the border with Cambodia, officials said.
AMMAN, Jordan � Jordan's King Hussein and
Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat today held their
third straight day of talks on President Reagan's
Middle East peace plan and one Palestinian official
said the two would issue a joint statment. Arafat
failed Sunday to give Hussein a go-ahead to join
negotiations with Israel.
HEBRON. Israeli-occupied West Bank �
American medical experts today began in-
vestigating the cause of apparent poisonings that
have affected some 800 school girls m the West
Bank during the past two weeks. At the United Na-
tions. Arab nations requested an urgent meeting
the Security Council to consider the poisonings
WALDHEIM, West Germany � Thousand
anti-nuclear protesters formed a human chain
Monday around a U.S. Army missile base in
Waldheim. capping an Easter weekend
demonstrations throughout Western Europe in
which hundreds of thousands deplored the arms
race.
CINCINNATI � Walter Alston. "1. former
Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers' manager, im-
proved steadily Monday at Deaconess Hospital and
doctors reduced his medication. Alston suffered a
heart attack Friday night.
ECU Examines Biotechnology
A major symposium titled
"Biotechnology: Macromolecular
Synthesis Through Genetic
Engineering" will be held this
Thurdday and Friday in the Brodv
Medical Sciences Building
Auditorium.
The symposium was developed
by the departments of chemistry
and biology in the arts and
sciences and the deparment of
microbiology in the School of
Medicine. It will feature speakers
from several universities and cor-
porations throughout the nation.
According to chemistry pro-
fessor Dr. Donald Clemens, the
coordinator of the project, the
field oi molecular biolgy is rapidly
developing, particularly as it ap-
plies to genetic engineering.
"Molecular biology promises to
influence � if not dominate �
major industries Clemens said.
Chancellor John Howell will
open the program at 8:50 a.m.
Storaska Talks On Rape Prevention
With Unique Style And Dedication
By PATRICK O'NEILL
si.ff Writer
Ever since Fred Storaska
witnessed the gang rape of an
11-year-old girl by a group of
teenage boys, he has been trying
to teach people how to prevent the
same experience. He managed to
stop that attack and carry the
young girl home to her family. He
was at ECU last week to give a
seminar on rape and rape preven-
tion.
After the shocking experience,
Storaska decided to begin to study
the topic of assaults and rape. To
his surprise, he discovered there
On The Inside
Announcements
Editorial
Entertainment
Sports
Classifieds
Page 2
Page 4
Page 6
Page 8
Page 10
For a total recap of the ex-
citing NCAA championship
game see SPORTS page 8. The
N.C. State Wolf pack's last se-
cond basket to clinch their
first national title is their first
since 1974. ECU offers it
warmest congratulations to
the Wolfpack and all their
fans. GET DOWN
was a sort of "taboo" associated
with the treatment of rape educa-
tion. In November of 1964
Storaska put together his first
program titled, "Prevention of
Assaults on Women
Over the 19 years he has been
lecturing, Storaska has updated
and expanded his original pro-
gram, which he has delivered to
over a million students at over 600
colleges.
Storaska's method of presenta-
tion was discomforting to some
who attended his lecture in Hen-
drix Theatre last Tuesday.
However, most students were im-
pressed with Storaska and felt his
use of humor while discussing a
difficult subject was an aid in
relaxing his audience.
"I was impressed said ECU
art student Kara Hammond, "He
brought up a lot of ideas 1 hadn't
thought about
Storaska had "a totally dif-
ferent approach said another
ECU art student, Jane Heilman.
"He made people laugh
Russ Harvey, an ECU political
science student, said he thought
Storaska's lecture was "very in-
formative" and made a lot of
sense. "1 agree 100 percent with
his methods Harvey said.
Paul Sumrell, director of Pirate
Walk, ECU's student escort ser-
vice, was also pleased with the
program. Sumrell said he thought
more women would use the escort
service since it was recommended
by Storaska. "A lot of women are
embarrassed to use Pirate Walk
Sumrell said, "because (they
believe that) other people might
think they can't take care of
themselves
To some who attended the lec-
ture, it appeared that Storaska
went off his subject at times.
Often his jokes about sexaulity
would be directed at women in the
audience.
Storaska told several stories
about his own experiences of hav-
ing to use his self-defence tactics,
once to fend off an attack by
youths on a New York City sub-
way. "He could have presented
his lecture in a lot less time
commented one ECU student.
After the lecture, Storaska talk-
ed informally with a group of
students. He spoke about dating
relationships between men and
women. Storaska told the
students that if they met a person
they were really physically at-
tracted to, they should try just go-
ing up to that person and asking
them if they'd like to make love.
"Try it sometime Storaska said.
"I was really hoping he was go-
ing to be different after I met him,
said one ECU student who met
Storaska after his lecture. "But he
wasn't at all.
Take That!
MMM � STAMLBY LBASY
The frustration mounted and got the best of this ECU student, who
decided to give a locked door the old Texas swing one good tiaae
thought ao one was looking.
Thursday. The first day will in-
clude general discussions of the
methodologies of gene cloning.
DNA synthesis, construction of
high expression vectors. DNA
transer and tissue cultrue. Fidav's
program will involve applications
of genetic engineering technique
Hunger Walk
To Raise Aid
For Starving
The 12th annual Crop-Walk for
Humanity sponsored by the
Greenville-ECl Hunger Coali-
tion, is slated for Saturdav. April
16.
The 20-kilometer 02 4-mile)
route of the w alk was approv ed by
city officials last week, and an
escort will be provided b the
Greenville Police Department.
The walk is supported bv ECU
students and campus organiza-
tions to raise money to help
hungry people both locally and
abroad. Participants in the event
get sponsors to pledge a donation
for every kilometer they walk.
The funds from the project are
divided, with 25 percent to be us-
ed for local hunger relief and 73
percent for a dozen hunger relief
organizations throughout the
world.
This year's local funds will be
donated to Greenville's Church
Ministries United, a relief agency
of 11 local churches that gives
direct food aid to poor residents
of Greenville. Each pledger can
designate a world organization to
which his or her donation shoud
go.
The course of the walk winds
through the streets of Greenville,
with seven stops along the way.
Refreshments are available at
some check points and a free
lunch is provided after the Walk
at the Baptist Student Center, the
final checkpoint.
Students interested in par-
ticipating in the walk may stop by
tables outside the Student Supply-
Store. In past years, ECU
students have been responsible for
the walk bringing in funds total-
ing more than $5,000.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 5, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENT!
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would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nounctmcnt form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager.
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
oltice in the Publications
Building. Flyers and handwrit-
ten copy on odd sixed paper can-
not be accepted
There is no charge for an-
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline for an
nooncements is 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesdayv tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received alter these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
BEST BODY CONTEST
Are you a KNOCK OUT' if so,
why not enter the Best Body
Contest sponsored by NAACP to
be held on April 22 at 8 00 in
Memorial Gym First and Se
corvd place prizes will be award
ed For more information, call
'S7 3340 or 752 S5M Deadline for
entries is April l
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
A three part workshop on
asrtiveness is offered at no
cost by the University Counsel
mg Center Thursday March 31,
April 7 and 14 Alt three sessions
will be conducted from 3 pm 4
pm 305 Wright Annex (757 6661)
The workshop will focus on help
in numbers distinguish between
trw�ir assertive, aggressive, and
rxm assertive behaviors Par
ticipants can learn how to ex
press themselves directly and
openly, and respond to interper
sonai situations m a manner
which neither compromises in
dividual beliefs nor offends
others. Please call counseling
-enler for registration
BAKE SALE
The Phi Alpha Theta History
Honor Soceity is sponsoring a
bake sale Wednesday, April 13
irom 9 00 to 2 00 The location is
�n Brewster BA 314 beside the
History office Proceeds will aid
in aqumng needed lOurnals for
Joyner Library
Following the Bake sale there
will be � meeting April 13 at 2.30
in the Todd Room
MCAT-KAPLAN
COURSE
Attention all pre med
students A representative from
Kaplan will be at ECU on Satur
day. April 16th. at 10 00 a.m to
present a mmicourse on how the
k apian course can improve your
MCAT scores We are looking
for twenty interested persons to
sign up lor the course in order
tor the Kaplan course to be
taught at ECU this summer. The
meeting is to be held in the
Biology Reading Room and is
tree to the public so any in
'erested persons may simply
come on April 16th or contact the
n-otogv Department
PHI ALPHATHETA
The date of the Phi Alpha
Theta Cookout has been changed
from April 15 to April 8. There
will be burgers, beer, hot dogs.
etc. Everyone is welcome.
Tickets will be available in the
History office (BA 316) from
Tuesday April 5 through Friday
April I and also at the picnic.
Admission is students $2.00 and
faculty $2.50.
Also the final meeting of the
year will be April 13 at 2:30 in
the Todd Room The elections
for officers of 1983 84 will be
held All members are urged to
attend
The Buccaneer Staff will be
taking pictures of Phi Alpha
Theta tor the yearbook on April
6 at 2 45 All members make an
effort to attend Dress ap
propriately.
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOP
On April 13, from 3 00 4 00
p.m the ECU Career Planning
and Placement Service will pre
sent an INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOP in
Mendenhall 221 All are
welcome!
BINGO PARTY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring another
Bingo ice Cream Party on Tues
day April 12 at 700 p m in the
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi Purpose Room.
All students, faculty, staff,
their guests, and dependents are
welcome to join in on the fun.
Play bingo, eat delicious ice
cream, and win prizes! Eight
different Bingo games are
played and the admission is only
25 cents per person
This is the last Bingoice
Cream party for the Spring
semester, but watch tor an
nouncements about our summer
parties in the East Carolinian
and on Bullentin Boards around
campus
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOP
The ECU Career Planning ana
Placement Service's next
resume workshop will be held
April 13. 1983 from 1 30 2 30
pm Please note that it is
scheduled to be held in
Mendenhall 221
SPRING SEMESTER
GRADUATES
Remember to pick up your
cap and gown from the Student
Supply Store. East Care ina
University, April 5, 6, or 7.
These Keepsake gowns are
yours to keep, providing the
graduation fee has been paid
For those receiving a Masters
Degree, tne fee pays for your
cap and gown, but there is an ex
tra tee of $11.75 tor your hood
GRADUATION
In an effort to expand the
limited seating for this year's
commencement proceedings,
two classrooms will be set up in
the Mingest Building with a
Closed circuit coverage of the
ceremony Each classroom will
accommodate about 100 people
and will have a six foot T.V.
screen No ticket is required
PITT COUNTY
HEALTH FAIR
The East Carolina University
School of Medicine is sponsoring
the Pitt County Health Fair on
April 22 and 23 at the Carolina
East Mall There will be over 20
community organizations in
volved in providing screening
and education during the two
day period Any student
volunteers willing to help with
health screenings and education
will be appreciated For more
information or to volunteer,
please call the Health Education
Office at 757 6510 We need your
participation in making this
Health Fair a success!
ASPA
American Society for Person
nei Administrators will hold its
83 84 elections On April 6 at 3 pm
in Room 207, Rawl. All in-
terested individuals wanting to
hold an office contact Dr.
Tomkiewicz or Brad Edwards
Wanted are new and present
members to help shape ASPA
progressive future To do your
part, get involved and become
an officer ASPA is ready for
you Are you ready for ASPA 7
SAM
The Society for the Advance
ment of Management will meet
Tuesday. April 5, in Rawl 104 at
400. The guest speaker will be
Grit Garner, an ECU graduate
and a Harvard MBA graduate
Mr Garner will speak on the
concepts of establishing and
running a new company This
will be the last speaker for the
Spring semester All parties in
terested are welcome to attend
NO JOB, now what;
On April 19 at 3:00 p m in
Mendenhall 221, the Career
Planning and Placement Ser-
vice has invited the Personnel
Manager of a major bank to talk
on his perceptions of the iob
market for college graduates.
Other job search considerations
will also be discussed.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Members, our next biweekly
meeting will be held on Thurs
day. April 7 m room 244 MSC at 7
p m Any unfinished semester
business such as already late
due payments will be handled
We will also discuss our plans to
attend GBP's national conven
tion m Atlanta. GA this weekend
and a short meeting for those
taking the trip will follow the
regular meeting
TAXES
WE'VE HAD ENOUGH
Are you sick of paying taxes
Well did you know that 64 per
cent opf your federal tax dollar
goes directly for �n- support of
the military budget and past
war bills We might as well
make our checks directly
payable to the Pentagon! If
you've had enough, then Oin
other ECU students and Green
ville residents for a demonstra
tion. It will be held at the inter
nal Revenue Service office in
GreenviHe on Tax Day ApriT 15.
The theme of the demonstration
is tentively set to be "Taxation
without Representation " Be at
the IRS office on 1st street at
noon "Money for Jobs Not for
War For further information
call 758 4906
SCHOOL OF ART
The School of Art is offering
the initial Wellington B Gray
Memorial Scholarship for
undergraduate students of
junior and senior rank who are
currently enrolled full time in
the School of Art and majoring
in Art Education The Well
ington B. Gray Memorial
Scholarship is the amount of
500 00 To qualify, a student
must have a grade point
average of 3.5 in hisher major,
and an overall average of 3.0.
Slides of five works (name, title,
media, date) must accompany
the scholarship application
form Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art
Office The deadline tor all com
pleted application material is
April 14, 1983 The scholarship
will be awarded before the end
of this acadmic year.
PSICHI
Psi Chi presents topics to help
the listener to open herhis mind
to many different areas in the
field of Psychology On April 5.
Tuesday, in Room 129, Speight,
at 730 pm it will be no different
Psi Chi proudly presents Dr. T.
Durham His topic will be
Masturbation Come and clear
up any questions you may have
on this topic. This lecture is open
to all
ARM WRESTLING
Trying to form an arm wrestling
club If interested, first meeting
will be Thursday April 7. at 5 00
pm, Room 102 Memorial Gym
For further information contact
Curtis Sendek 752 9601
CLASSIFIED ADS
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Return 10 THE CAST CAROLINIAN
office �f 3:M Toesday before
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Name
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FRISBEECLUB
Frisbee Club The snow has
melted and warm weather is
hopefully with us for the rest of
the semester Come to the bot
torn of college hill on Tues and
Thurs. at 400 and enjoy the
wonderful game of ultimate
frisbee Club meetings are Mon
day nights Rm 248 MSC at 8 00
Anyone interested is welcome to
attend
SIGMA THETA TAU
Sigma Theta Tau. Beta Nu
Chapter is having their Spring
Banquet'Educafional meeting
April 19, 1983 at 6 00 pm at the
Greenville Golf and Country
Club. The speaker will be Dr
Lucie Young Kelly, the national
president elec' of Sigma Theta
Tu She will speak on "Using
Research to Change Practice"
Dr Kelly is a Professor of
Public Health and Nursing and
serves as editor of Nursing
Outlook Registration fee is $9 00
which includes dinner and
gratuity Students and inductees
will pay $6 00 Make check
payable to Sigma Theta Tau,
Beta Nu Chapter and return to
Carol Cox, ECU School of Nurs
ing by April 12. 1983 Include
name, address, number atten
ding and names of guests
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Nu
Chapter is having their Spring
induction Aprit 23, 1983 at the
Jenkins Auditorium at 1100 am
Dr Helen Yura will speak on the
"Nurse as Scholar"
Beta Nu is having a business
meeting Monday, April 25, 983
at 7 00 pm at the School of Nurs
ing, room 203 All new inductees
invited'to attend
BAHAI ASSOCIATION
OF ECU
The Bahai Club of ECU will
meet Tuesday April 5 in Room
241, Mendenhall Student Center.
The Bahai faith teaches the con
cept of Progressive Reveala
tion. This means that in each
period of history God sends a
Manifestation to guide mankind.
Bahai s believe Baha'u'llah'
(The Glory of God) is God's
Messenger for this age. You are
cordially invited to come share
your thoughts with us.
CHAIRPERSON AND
MEMBERS NEED
if you like variety entertain
ment and want a challenge,
become the chairperson or
either a member on the Student
Union Coffeehouse Committee.
For more information, contact
the Student union (Room 234) at
757 6611, (Mi 210
PHI SIGMA PI
ELECTIONS
Phi Sigma Pi's Tau Chapter
will hold 1983 84 elctions on
Tuesday, April 5. 1983 at 5:00
p m in Rawl 130 All brothers
please attend this important
meeting
SUMMER SCHOOL
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits
for Summer School 1983 will be
accepted jin the Cashier's Of
fice, Room 105. Spilman
Building, beginning April 5.
Room assignments will be made
in the respective residence hall
offices on April 7 and April 8
Thereafter, they will be made in
the Office of Housing Opera
tions. Room 201, Whichard
Building The rent for a term of
summer school is $120 for a
semi private room and $180 tor a
private room. Additional rent in
the amount of $20 is required for
Jarvis HaM
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy,
provided such rooms are to be in
use this summer, are to make
reservations on Thursday, April
7. All other students may
reserve rooms on a first come,
first serve basis on Friday,
April 8
Residence halls to be used for
women are Greene, Slay (first
floor for mobility impaired
students) ana Jarvis. Men will
be housed in Fletcher, Slay
(first floor for mobility impaired
students) and Jarvis Halls.
PRIME TIME
New location Nursing
Building Lecture Rm 101.
Thursdays 79 p.m. Sponsored
by Campus Crusade for Christ
You are invited to come
CANOE TRIP
The Outdoor recreation center
(or the Department of
Intramural Recreational ser
vices is sponsoring a canoe trip
on Wednesday, April 13, 1983
The trip is suitable tor beginning
or experienced canoers Trip
participants will meet behind
Memorial gym at 3:00pm on
Wednesday for a liesurely pad
die down the Tar River lasting
approximately 2 hours Par
ticipants should arrive back at
Memorial gym at 6 00 pm Ad
yince registration and payment
($3 00 per person is due by 4:00
pm on Tuesday, April 12, 1983
Groups are welcome For
registration or more informa
tion call or stop by rm 113
Memorial Gym, 757 6911 or
7 5 7 6 3 8 7)
WALT DISNEY
WORLD
Representativeds from Walt
Disney World in Orlando. FL
will be at UNC Chapel Hill April
7 at 7 00 pm to interview col
lege students majoring in retail
management, hotelrestaurant
management, recreation and
park administration or business
for summer or fall employment
The Magic Kingdom College
Program includes a minimum of
30 hours of work per week and
students will be eligible for
special Disney arranged nous
mg near the Walt Disney World
resort area Students will
receive first hand experience
while studying the practices and
philosophies employed by the
Disney management team.
There will be a presentation
about the program given and in
terviews will te'iov afterwards.
Students must be earning
academic credit while working.
Interested students need to con-
tact Nancy Fillnow
READ PAGE 29
If you have a brown Universi
ty Catalog, then it might help
you to read page 29 about the CP
and PS
WEST AREA CAMPUS
"West Area Gets High" on
Wednesday. April �th from 1 5
pm in the parking lot adjacent to
Clement and White dorms
Come join us and find our what
The Alternative really is.
FIRST AID
FOR TOTS COURSE
The Pitt Cokunty Health
Department will sponsor a First
Aid tor Tots course for parents
of plreschool children, on Thurs
day, April 7th, form 700 900
p.m. The program will be held in
the Health Department Con
ference Room Parking and en
try to the conference room are
at the rear of the main building
There is no cost for this pro-
gram.
Topics covered will include
Respiratory Emergencies.
Bleeding and Bandaging. Shock.
Poinsomng. Specific Injuries.
Safety and Prevention
Pre registration is recom
mended For additional infor
mation and pre registration.
call Sue Evanko at 752 4141
JUMP ROPE FOR THE
HEART EQUIPMENT
The Equipment has arrived
Jump ropes. T shirts and Warm
up suits are here Wind breakers
and prizes are on the way The
date is April 23 The place is
Minges Coliseum.
IFCPAGENT
The Miss ifc Pagent .$ to be
held on April 25th at 7 00 p m
Applications need to be turned in
by 5 00 p m on Wed April 6fh
So all you Greeks need to pick
your BEST BABES NOW
LEGAL ISSUES
AFFECTING WOMEN
The ECU Committee on me
Status of Women will be presen
ting Greenville attorney Ann
HerfeHmger on Thursday during
its lunch time learning senes m
Mendenhaiis cafeteria RM
221)
HeffeHinger will be gw.ng a
lecture titled "An update on
Legal issues AHecfmg Women
m North Carolina "
The format calls tor lunch a'
noon (brown bagging .s permit
ted) followed at 12 30 by Metfeif
ingers lecture The lecture is
free and open to an ECU
students and employees as well
as the general public
BIOTECHNOLOGY
SYMPOSIUM
A symposium with the latest
new discoveries la
Biotechnology will be held Tt�us
and Fn m the Brodv Medical
Sciences Building Auditorium
Registration is at 8 15 a m The
public is invited free of charge
S. R. A.
Escorts are needed for the
Escort Service Anyone in
terested in being an escort
please contact your dorm direc
tor if you are a dorm resident of
if you live off campus contact
me SGA oHice
TAXES
volunteers from the ECU Ac
counting Society and the Na
tional Association of Accoun
tants will be in the mam lobby of
Mendenhall Student Center to
help individuals prepare tax
returns from 4 to 7 pm each
Tuesday in March, and
Tuesdays and Thursdays m
April through April 15.
PUT A LITTLE HEART
IN YOUR SOUL
The horeitm anno A - .
Humanit, s v.om �� tf
The walk ajiM 'a�e pi�e or Apf
'6 beginning at Green Sc-
park atSKaT- awyws �
terested n rtp ryj :or. � �
Hunger Coai'�'On me'
Thursdar n.gnrs � ' � .
the Newman Cen'e ��
Tenth Street or cai j. -
NEWMAN
The Cathode Newma Com-
munity invites all iff
students to participate M etc 1
activities and worxsrup se
vices Mass is ceieO'a
Weonvoay even.ngs a' 5 X-
The East Carolinian
urn �
PuOl'Sheo ever Tjevsa.
and Thorsda Oaf ftf
academic rear ai
Wednesdav dur.ng the turn
mer
The Eas' Carolinian is
official newspaper of Eas'
Carolina universe, c�
opera'ed and published foi
and by trie students of Eas'
Carolina University
Subscription Rate � � �
The East Carolinian otticci
are located m me Oo $
Building on tt�� campus o
ECU. Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Sena ac
aress changes to Tne Eas'
Carolinian. Old it
Bulding. ECU Green.
NC 27834
Telephone 757 �!? �)�'
6309
!
i Delisioso!
iBii
Estudiantes!
I

i
de la cocina
11 am- 10pm
HACHAS, GUACOMOLE, ENSALADAS, '
TOST ADAS, BURRITOS, TACOS,
ENCHILADAS, COMBINAGONES,
k ESPECIALIDADES, Y MUCHO MAS
S
de la cantino week days till 11:00
week ends till 1:00
I
SANGRIA, IMPORTED MEXICAN BEERS, J
TEQUILA SHOTS, STRAWBERRY MARGARITAS, J
S MARGARITA PITCHERS, PINA COLADAS, t
ACAPULCO COOLER, AMORE CHI CHI, ETC.
S21 Cotanche St GeoigMown Shops 757-1666 t
DAILY SPECIALS AT
.SUBdtrW
208 E. 5th St. 758-7979
MON.
SNAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA)
& CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2.09
1UES
SNAK ROAST BEEF, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
SODA FOR $2 09
WED.
SNAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1 59
THURS.
SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.89
Ftl.
SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND
A SMALL SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
UNDER NEW MANAGMENT
FAMOUS
PIZZA
3tC
DOC
DOC
DOC
321 F Tenth St.
LUNCH SPECIAL
Lasagna $2.99
served with hot garlic bread
and salad with choice of dressing
not Jor delivery
ONE WEEK SPECIAL
Small Pepperoni Pizza 5. 99
ends April 12th
not for delivery
HAPPY HOUR 2pm-closingl
Pitchers Beer $2.25
Mugs 581
CALL FOR FAST,FREE�
DELIVERY
P 758-5992 COUPON J COUPON� " I
$1 OFF ANY SMALL PIZZA 2 OFFANYLARGE .Hk'ZA
Coupon valid only for Deliveries Coupon valid only for Demes
Grad St
(Specify when ordering)
35CMT SKIING
AT SNOWSHOE
TJuri'sAlnwstHecwen!
To make great skiing even better
we're taking 35 off the price of lifts,
lodging, lessons and rentalsBLEvery
day from March 21 to the season's end
� So for late season savings on big
mountain skiing, it's Almost Heaven
at Snowshoe, call 304-799-6762.
Cnowshoe
lalaOJNTAlN RLSCXT
The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
' (Specify when ordering j
Weds.
Ladies Night with The Mighty Majors 8:30-12:30
All Ladies Free tiU 9:00
Happy Hour 5:30-9:00
Box 10, Snowshoe, Wkt Virginia 26209
Thurs. The Alamo's 1st Ladies Lockout
with DJ Don Vickers
A U Ladies Free alt night
WRQR will be doing live Remote
from 8:30-11:30
For the Ladies free draft, wine and
Champagne from 8:30-10:00
Men in at 10:00pm
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
No Admission till 8:00-All Greek Members
$1.00 25Kdraft All Night.
Late Night Happy Hour 11:00pm-1:00am
Music by request with WRQR's Kirk Williams
Sat.
Central Park �
Doors open at 700 Happy Hour 7-9HfOpm.
L
114 S. Memorial I.
crov. frwat (.rrratilh- liraon
Closed Sumlas except for special events k�m TST-aaas u �ni��i informal
Tuesday. Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
T sed Salad mav be substituted
c S v Vt -ytra
B GREG R1DEOIT
Nr� i a
Josh Rogers is nor your
typical business entrepeneur.
He doesn't wear three-piece
suits and fly around the world
throwing a million dollars here
and two million there He's a
Greenville resident and Wv2
graduate of ECU ho's attire
consists of jeans and tennis
shoes. He doesn't dabble in
Petro dollars; he makes pizzas
The pizzas, or "pie U
they're called m the business,
are prepared, cooked and
delivered from his Pizza Tran-
sit Authorits franchise at the
corner of 14th and Cotanche
Streets
Josh is the president and
founder of Rogers Food Inc a
company he started in Aiu
1982 hen he opened up PTA
No. Josh's parents weren't rich
and he hadn't won the Reader'�.
Digest sweepstakes. He was
just determined.
"1 was sitting outside a
friends house this summer
Josh said, "and 1 kept :
the Dominoe's man eo b. he
just kept coming and going 1
thought. "Gee. there must be a
lot off money in pizza in Green-
ville "
So Josh, a recen
matriculated busine �
ministration student who had
vet to find employment, decid-
ed to research the possibility of
Food Work
Thirty-five ECL
students and staff of
Servomation. the
campus food service
organization, received
certifcates Fnda
afternoon from the
Pitt County Health
Department saying
they had completed a
seminar on food
handling and sanita-
tion.
The employees,
who work at several
campus locations, had
to participate in two
davs of two-hour
classes
;ng with
tion of f
lne " "
. caning,
and cook

sanitat
Acco'vi.i
Simon. E
of Food
course w i
full-time
employ ee
quired bvj
departmer
Simon
Allied Health
Holds Symposl
'
��� �
The Allied Health
Student Organization
is sponsoring its first
Allied Health Sym-
posium on Thursdav,
April 7, from B:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. in
Room -44
Mendenhall.
The president of the
organization. Mary
Dawn Cobb. hopes
the symposium will
become an annual
event. "The program
is geared for students
who are thinking
towards a career in
allied health but are
undecided she said.
"Whether or not it
will be a success
depends on the sup-
port we get and the
turnout
There are II
departments in the
allied health program,
and each will be
represei
speaker
morning
the symi
presen;
decribs
Allied
how
relate- �
Allied HJ
The . i
sion wi
speaker
ECU. w
mainly
fesskMial
the ABm
grams
Vincent
commuti
home hi
Pam
speak ci
study.
zarelli 1
tion a
orientc
STEAK HOUSE
Greenville,N C
Specials for April
ajmBBaBBaavjBJJpBBaBmmmmmmmml
Mon. 8oz Chopped Sii
j wsal.bar$3.
I Tues. Beef Tip;
wsal. bar
Wed. ooz Cubed SU
wsal. bar $3.
Thur. 8oz Sirloin
wsal. bar 4A
All Steaks served with
Baked Pot.
or Fries �� Texas
Clieck Your Pi
Weekend
2903E.10thSt.75
$49 w. Greenville RtvdA
� ��





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 5. 1983
.&P.
.Phone.
lie 01.
. -nckoaed
� �����-


1


II
!i
I
11IL -��1
ISSUESPUT A LITTLE HEART
L- A OMENIN YOUR SOUL
a- tin annual Aaik tor
s ,omng up soon
a ike cate on April
; �ing d' Green Springs
it 1 S 1 m Ai,one in
helping v ome to the
� ' Ofl ee'mgs on
Bhts a ' 00 d m at
N � enter 953 East
eel or call 752 4216
NEWMAN
Newman Com
. tes at interested

orkship ser
v i s eiebrgtea on
' rigs a' 5 00 p m
NOLOGY
SmUMi i
;es
The Fast Carolinian
tmpusi rvmunit
WKt ��'�
� every Tuesday
� rslay during the
a aae .ear and every
� � �. Turing the sum
� �' Carolinian is the
-ev.spaper of East
�s ��, owned.
operated and puDiishea for
me s'udents of East
m �a University
Subscription Rjte $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Send ad
sress changes o The East
n an Old South
ECU Greenville,
N I7S34
Telephone T57 6 36 437,
rfANAGMENT
OUS
ZA
"enth St.
ac
xk
SPECIAL
a $2.9V
t garlic bread
hoice of dressing
delivery
K SPECIAL
Woni Pizza $1.99
pril 12th
deliver
R 2pm-c.osing
leer$2.25
s58
FAST,FREE-
VERY
i coupon � Tn !
2 OFFANYLARGE.HZA
( oupon valid only for DeHvete j
'Specify when ordering j
L-ocated 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
' 0th St extension p
'ednesday
rsday
ORN
IMP
95
Baked Potato,
v be substituted
V xtra
Grad Starts Pizza Franchise
By GREG RIDEOUT
News Editor
Josh Rogers is not your
typical business entrepeneur.
He doesn't wear three-piece
suits and fly around the world
throwing a million dollars here
and two million there. He's a
Greenville resident and 1982
graduate of ECU who's attire
consists of jeans and tennis
shoes. He doesn't dabble in
Petro dollars; he makes pizzas.
The pizzas, or "pies" as
they're called in the business,
are prepared, cooked and
delivered from his Pizza Tran-
sit Authority franchise at the
corner of 14th and Cotanche
Streets.
Josh is the president and
founder of Rogers Food Inc a
company he started in August
1982 when he opened up PTA.
No, Josh's parents weren't rich
and he hadn't won the Reader's
Digest sweepstakes. He was
just determined.
"I was sitting outside a
friends house this summer
Josh said, "and 1 kept noticing
the Dominoe's man go by; he
just kept coming and going. 1
thought, 'Gee, there must be a
lot of money in pizza in Green-
ville "
So Josh, a recently
matriculated business ad-
ministration student who had
yet to find employment, decid-
ed to research the possibility of
opening up another pizza
delivery service in Greenville.
The first thing he did was
find out the pizza facts in
Greenville. After weeks of
research he came to one conclu-
sion � Dominoes made a lot of
Pizzas, but they made a lot
more money. In fact, Josh
says, they were in the top 10
percent in sales in the nation.
Once Josh had confirmed the
obvious facts, he went to
Durham. There he talked to the
founders of PTA and asked
them how to go about getting a
franchise. They told him how
much money he would need
(which he didn't have) and
what to do.
So, Josh went to the bank.
He needed around $60,000.
The bank told him he would
need an investor as colateral.
Still determined, Josh beat on
doors until he found a someone
to back him.
"Then Josh says, "I had
to learn about making pizzas
While Josh was finding a place
to locate his new business and
searching for equipment to
make the pizzas with, he went
to school. He learned about
PTA, its background and the
way they like their franchises
run.
Josh says that after he got
everything ready and had been
schooled in the fine art of pizza
making, it was time to open.
To foul things up, during the
grand opening in August of
1982, Josh caught
mononucleosis and had to stay
away from work for two
weeks.
"It wasn't easy to stay
away Josh says. But the
business thrived, and as Josh
says with a twinkle in his eye, it
"turned a small profit
A small business usually
doesn't turn a profit, if it turns
one at all, until after three or
four years. Josh says he was
helped by what he learned in
school. "The courses in ac-
counting come in real handy
he says.
Josh believes, though, that
the key to sucess in any small
business is getting along with
people. Josh knows ECU
students are his number one
customers. He feels that by
supporting ECU and by having
been a student in the School of
Business he has a better
understanding of the student-
consumer.
So now ECU, when you take
a bite of a PTA pizza (with all
fresh, natural ingredients), you
are helping one of your own
succeed in the world you're
about to enter. And besides,
you're hungry!
ECU Graduate Josh Rogers Ww,� Bv
STANLEY LEAR'
owns his own PTA pizza franchise
ATTIC
South
No 6
Rock
Nightclub
Food Workers Certified
Thirty-five ECU
students and staff of
Servomation, the
campus food service
organization, received
certifcates Friday
afternoon from the
Pitt County Health
Department saying
they had completed a
seminar on food
handling and sanita-
tion.
The employees,
who work at several
campus locations, had
to participate in two
days of two-hour
classes on topics deal-
ing with the preven-
tion of food-borne il-
lness, proper storage,
cleaning, preparation
and cooking of food
and proper use of
sanitation techniques.
According to Ira
Simon, ECU Director
of Food Services, the
course was only for
full-time Servomation
employees and was re-
quired by the health
department.
Simon said that all
the students who took
the course passed a
test on March 23 and
were awarded their
certificates. Jack
Weathersby, a
sanitarian with the
Pitt County Health
Department, ad-
ministered the pro-
gram which was free
of charge.
Wed.
STAR TREK
FILM FESTIVAL
STARTS
9:00
FREE ADM
FREK POPCORN
Thur.
MORSECODE
with Steve Morse
Lead Guitar Player
and
Song Writer of the
Girls Dorms
Don V Forget
it FREK it
ADMISSION
IN APRIL
(except concerto)
? ���������.
ASTR0TURF SHOES
FOR SOFTMU OR CAMPUS WEAR
20 OFF
oooo�oooo0�
ooo
r0006
oooog
QOOO
oo
Reg. $19.95 to $34.95
Sale $15.95 to $27.95
Good Thru
April 9,1983
9 STYLES TO CHOOSE FROM-NIKE, PUMA, CONVERSE, PONY, LOTTO & BATA
Foot-Joy
AUileticoUbrld
Carolina East
Mall
Open MonSat. 10 A.M. - 9 P.M.
Telephone 756-7550
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
Allied Health Club
Holds Symposium
The Allied Health
Student Organization
is sponsoring its first
Allied Health Sym-
posium on Thursday,
April 7, from 8:30
a.m. to 4 p.m. in
Room 244
Mendenhall.
The president of the
organization, Mary
Dawn Cobb, hopes
the symposium will
become an annual
event. "The program
is geared for students
who are thinking
towards a career in
allied health but are
undecided she said.
"Whether or not it
will be a success
depends on the sup-
port we get and the
turnout
There are 11
departments in the
allied health program,
and each will be
represented by a
speaker during the
morning session of
the symposium. Each
presentation will
describe what the
Allied Health pro-
gram is about and
how its teaching
relates to the field of
Allied Health.
The afternoon ses-
sion will feature three
speakers, all from
ECU, who will deal
mainly with the pro-
fessional aspects of
the Allied Health pro-
grams. Dr. Pauline
Vincent will speak on
community helth and
home health care, and
Pam Harvey will
speak on human milk
study. Robert Muz-
zarelli has a presenta-
tion on the goal-
oriented approach.
oCCENWLLC
, ILSOW
0
awhaleofamealT
Family Restaurants
vi'AiAivmAvm w j vvvyxcvccvi
All You Can Eat
Specials
TuesTrout for $2.99
Wed. Then. Bight
Shrimp for $5,90
105 Airport Ro� I Greenville, N.C.
'����
STEAK HOUSE
Greenville,N.C.
Specials for April 1983
Mon. 8oz Chopped Sirloin $2.99
wsal.bar $3.99
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
5 P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Tues. Beef Tips $1.99
wsal. bar $2.99
�LASAGNA
�SPAGHETTI
(Choice of 3 Sauces)
with Garlic Bread
$3.99
i all you can tat soup and salmi $4.99
Wed. 6oz Cubed Steak $2.69
wsal. bar $3.69
Thur. 8oz Sirloin $3.59
wsai. bar $4.59
All Steaks served with King Idaho
Baked Pot.
or Fries Texas Toast.
Check Your Papers
Weekend Special
2903 E. 10th St. 759-2712
500 w. Greenville Blvd. 756-0040
�L
ICVnVPWDAV " AA
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT OaTy
FLOUNDER DINNER
also Opan Fit and Salt
nights midntght-3 a.m.
Breakfast Bar open 6:00am.
SHONEYS
ATTENTION
E.C.U. STUDENTS & FACULTY
ANNOUNCING
� HUCKLEBERRY'S
W752-1411 D
o n "GET AQUAINTED
SPECIAL
(Formally Biscuit Town-Across from Crows Nest)
iM�M�.tM�t�W�WW�.WMW�W�M�W���.�W�.�W�.�t��W.W���M���MH�.�����M�.���M��.���t�W
AKF AST SPECIAL (6am till llam Mon. thru Sat.)
Any of the combinations below for only 79 C
Ham & Cheese-Sausage & Cheese
Ham & Egg-Sausage & Egg
Egg & Cheese
(with purchase of any Beverage per order)
�����������������������
IMW�W�MMMMM�Mlt�M��WtM�M�Mf ?���
(Uam-9pm Mon. thru Sat.)
Two piece chicken snack our choice, Fries &
Biscuit included!
(with purchase of any Med. or Lg. Beverage per order j
ONLY 99
i��.�����
� RIB SPECIAL (Horn till 9pm Mon. thru Sat.)
) Two Jumbo Beef Ribs, Fries, Biscuit
(with purchase of any Med. orLg. Beverage per order)
ONLY $1.99
�k TDaysaWeek it






THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 5, 19�?
She lEafit (Earnluuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, gmmi iw
Mike Hughes. x-amr�i�"
WaVERU MfcRRITT. Oto�wp WwM ClNDY PLEASANTS. ��,���
Scott Lindley. ��, � Greg Rideolt, v�, &�
ALl AFRSHTEH. c hIm �frr STEVE BACHNER. Emmmmtmt Eftv
Stephanie Groon. c.� ���� Juliana Fahrbach. so�
Cl v. Thornton, v k-��� Todd Evans, p .� n
rfl'ItliMI NWV" LSI"
Apr 5. N83
Opinion
Page 4
83 SGA Execs
Signaling A Hopeful Turnaround
We at The East Carolinian
would like to officially extend our
congratulations to Paul Naso,
Lindsey Williams, Becky Talley
and Sarah Coburn, the newly-
elected (and re-elected) 1983-84
SGA executive body.
We commend you on your
responsible actions before, during
and since Wednesday's election.
Your adherence to the election
guidelines � especially in relation
to campaigning � was commen-
dable and at least indicated to us
your responsible attitudes toward
your positions. In short, this year's
election was the breath of fresh air
the ECU student body needed.
It goes without saying that the
majority oi us hope this responsi-
ble attitude will carry on
throughout your terms of office.
We hope this signals the reversion
oi ECU politics to its intended
state. You have been elected by the
students and, thus, have been
charged with the task of represen-
ting the students in those ways you
see as most beneficial.
This entails not only keeping an
open ear � open to students, open
to change, etc. � but a firm hand
when necessary. It entails a sup-
portive attitude toward the univer-
sity and its "constituents It en-
tails accessibility. And most im-
portantly, it entails sincerity.
Ideally, any student government
should represent the collective
voice of its constituent students.
Needless to say, however, where
13,500 persons are involved, your
decisions and actions will never be
without objection and opposition.
Nevertheless, if you approach the
issues and problems you'll be faced
with sincerity and with the best in-
terest of the students in mind,
you'll find the majority of your
fellow students and legislators very
accepting.
But to delve further into the
ideals behind student government
and "elected officials" would
surely only repeat what we're all
well aware of.
Thus, suffice it to say that we at
The East Carolinian hope to
establish a good working relation-
ship with the SGA. However
critical it may be at times, we offer
our support and, once again, our
congratulations.
Try Bringing Up The Rear
Got A Hobby
For all of those faithful readers who,
for one reason or another, have never
acquired a hobby, here are a few short
lines on my favorite avocation � butt-
watching.
You know, there's probably nothing
as fascinating and multi-purposed as the
human rear end. Practically everything
we do centers in some way around the
butt.
Probably what makes for most of the
fascination is that the butt comes in
many shapes and sizes. I personally like
to sit here in my office and observe the
various types that walk by on their way
to class:
MIKE HUGHES
4.
First of all, there's the "small but
cute" one that draws barks and growls
from passing observers. Girls with
"small but cute" butts wear shorts in
February and generally make "D's" in
library science. They try to act em-
barassed when guys whistle, but practice
strutting three to four hours a week in
front of a mirror.
Then, there's the "rather large" butt.
Girls with "rather large" rear ends
spend half their life trying to hide their
posteriors in painfully tight Calvin Klein
jeans and the other half trying to fish
out keys and loose change from their hip
pockets.
There's the "very large" butt, which
frequently, yet unintentionally, bumps
TO MISS
simm
AGAINST IK
FORCES OF .
COMMUNISM
HOW CAM WE
KEEP DRAM
LIKE THAT ON
THE A�?�
m SEND MEPICS
TO BJSNWOL
ofif&htfm 3W. WPW? C(M.
-Campus Forum
passers by in crowded areas. These girls
also make attempts � mostly unsuc-
cessful � to divert attention from their
rear ends by walking at night a lot and
sitting whenever possible.
And then, of course, there's the
"enormous" butt, which simply cannot
be hidden. Girls with "enormous" butts
make their own clothes out of old sheets,
tents and canopies. They have names
like Bertha, Beulah, Ethel and, of
course, Wanda. They don't like to ride
bikes because of tremendous tailwind
problems and frequently wear shorts
just to spite society.
But on the other end of the spectrum,
there are the "no-butts Having little
more than the necessary divider, these
girls frequently wear belted underwear
and have drawers full of multi-colored
suspenders. They, too, try to hide their
amusing rear ends by giving themselves
fancy names, like "svelte" or "petite
Then, of course, there are those butts
which simply elude classification. These
are my personal favorites. You know,
the ones with one big lump and one
small lump. Understandably, these girls
generally walk with a tremendous limp
and wear hoop skirts.
Unlike the old standby hobbies �
stamp- and coin-collecting � beginning
and intermediate buttwatching is
primarily cost- and boredom-free. So,
introduce a kid to bu'twatching today.
You'll be glad you did.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, the
world's first absurdist columnist, likes
to snort Right Guard deodorant spray
while writing the scripts for all of Calvin
Klein's jeans commercials.
Communists Armed To The Teeth
Over the past couple of weeks, there
have been several articles in The East
Carolinian dealing with U.S. policy in
Central America. Sad to say, though,
these articles have been written in the
MarxistLeninist "viewpoint" of pro-
communist writer Patrick O'Neill.
The first twisted perversion by
O'Neill is that Nicaragua is not a
Marxist state. For those who would
choose to believe this, I have a choice
piece of underwater real estate in
Florida for sale. Nicaragua is quickly
following the example of the Soviet
military state known as Cuba.
At present, Cuba has 225 Soviet-
built MIG fighter bombers and will
soon receive four Russian Foxtrot sub-
marines. The Cubans are literally
"armed to the teeth" with Soviet
planes, helicopters, ships, etc The
military structure is, indeed, for-
midable, with a total of 555 warplanes,
and one can be sure they weren't ship-
ped there to drop care packages.
Russia is using Cuba as a base to ex:
port communism throughout Central
America. Cuba, in return, is using
Nicaragua to spread violence and ter-
ror throughout the region. Several
communist guerrillas were recently
caught smuggling Soviet arms to the
rebels in El Salvador. The rebels were,
of course, from Nicaragua. The
Nicaraguans admitted on videotape
that they were helping the communist
guerrillas in El Salvador.
In 1979, the government of
Anastasio Somoza was overthrown
and replaced with a Marxist govern-
ment known as the Sandanistas. The
Sandanistas promised the people free
elections in 1981. The elections were
never held; nor will they ever be. The
leader of the Sandanistas met with
Soviet leader and ex-KGB head Yuri
Andropov. The topic of the discussion:
how to spread the cancer known as
communism to the peoples of Central
America.
Intelligence reports have verified
that human rights conditions in
Nicaragua are "deplorable One
might ask why O'Neill and the
Carolina Interfaith Task Force on Cen-
tral America (CITCA) back this
repressive, imperialist regime. The
N.C. Council of Churches also back5
the Sandanistas. The "Council" has
for years used religious donations to
export the cause of communism. The
Council's Marxist donations were the
subject of a recent episode on CBS
TV's 60 Minutes.
The United States has a moral
obligation to help any nation achieve
democracy. If the U.S. is involved in
the de-stabilization of Nicaragua to
free the people of its communist
"shackles so much the better.
The Reagan administration has ask-
ed for an additional $110 million in aid
to El Salvador. Liberal members of the
House of Representatives worry about
the additional aid because of "shades
of Vietnam This way of thinking is
totally unrealistic.
El Salvador needs the money to sup-
ply ammunition for its troops. The
money will also go for training in Hon-
duras and El Salvador. The bottom
line is this: If the government were
about to fall, the U.S. would be literal-
ly forced to send troops to the area. As
U.S. Senator John East has put it,
"The dominoes do. fall .
Were El Salvador to fall,
Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica,
Panama and Mexico would be sure to
follow. If Russia were to succeed in
"liberating" Mexico, the United States
would have the added burden of a
communist front. Thus, a war started
in the Middle East or elsewhere
couldn't receive enough U.S. attention
for fear of a communist invasion from
our southern border.
The way to prevent this frightening
scenario is to allow El Salvador to fight
its own war. By spending additional
U.S. funds and advisers to the wartorn
region, El Salvador will prevail in its
struggle against the expansion of
Soviet terror and bloodshed. O'Neill
and the CITCA would have to find
another communist cause in this event.
Keith Brittain
Senior, Finance
$3,997,000,000 Error
Hey, Jay. I was impressed with your
Thursday editorial on the absurdity of
Reagan's proposal for laser beams in
space. All those facts from Scientific
American had me scratching my head
and saving, "Gee, this guy has reallv
done his homework You had built
up a lot of credibility, and I was lapp-
ing up every word, almost convinced.
How could 1 argue with Kosta Tsipis1
But then vou slipped a brick in with
the oatmeal: 5300 billion last year for
space-laser research? Come on. Jay'
We all know you're a bright guy, but
give the rest of us a little credit too. We
ain't that gullible. That's more than
the entire 1982 defense budget. Please,
no more bricks. Some people may ac-
tuallv trv to swallow 'em.
If the figure is S300 million, as I
suspect, then why quibble about
peanuts. John East probably spends
that much on newsletters. And like the
billions wasted by NASA on moon
shots, there may be some great spm-off
technology. Even if we never incinerate
a single incoming Russian 1CBM. we
may at least develop something that
will burn off warts.

Gordon I pock
Senior. English
Editor's Sote: As you "suspect
the 5300 billion figure is a
typographical error and should hae
read $300 million. Thank you for br-
inging this to our attention.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
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letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Catholic Priest Braves The Storm,
War
SuRE.nfcAVIQlM SPORT,
n
By PAT O'NEILL
"This thing (the nuclear arms race) is
not going to be turned around until the
law is engaged, and taxes must be refus-
ed. Young men must refuse to register
for the draft. We must go up against the
military bases and the political centers of
decision-making. And so, we must break
the law because death is legalized to-
day
The Rev. Philip Berrigan, April
I, 1983, shortly before his arrest at the
Pentagon
Father Berrigan was arrested last Fri-
day at the Pentagon, the five-sided
military structure Berrigan calls the
"Temple of Death He claims his ar-
rest total, which dates back to the Viet-
nam era, approaches 50. He has received
about two dozen active sentences for his
resistance to war � one a 39-month
federal prison rap resulting from his
destroying draft card files in 19.
Whether one agrees or disagrees with
the resistance tactics of Philip Berrigan
and his brother Rev. Daniel Berrigan,
one can't help but admire their faith and
dedication.
The Berrigan brothers have never fad-
ed away. They were able to recognize
that the struggle for world peace didn't
end at the conclusion of the Vietnam
conflict. They knew that the world could
never really be at peace as long as it's in-
habitants were being faced with the pro-
spect of mega-death. They realized that
military spending, in and of itself, was
an act of violence, that each bomb con-
structed, every soldier trained,
represented a theft from the poor, who
are left without their vital needs being
met.
The Berrigans are both facing the
possibility of spending up to 10 years in
prison for the symbolic destruction of
two nuclear missile nose cones in 1980.
Their actions, they claimed, were
justified by the Biblical passage that
states: "They shall beat their swords in-
to ploughshares
Disarmament is not going to be
done by government Berrigan said.
"It's going to be done by the people
Millions of people must take to the
streets to protest, a prospect which, I'm
sure, doesn't thrill many Americans who
have become dangerously used to allow-
ing their political leaders a free hand at
handling tough decisions.
Berrigan also pointed out an obvious
problem he sees in relying on the
legislative process to rid our world of
nuclear weapons. "One of the kisses of
death he said, is that (the nuclear
freeze) goes to the very people who are
most responsible for the crime of
nuclear brinksmanship today � the
political community here in this country
� for redress
Unfortunately, Berrigan is right. It
certainly does seem unlikely that the
legislative process will ever really budge
unless the people utilize their constitu-
tional rights and begin to stop this in-
sane arms race. Indeed, many of us may
have to go beyond simply demonstrating
and begin to consider what our tax
dollars are being used for. "The law
(which requires us to pay taxes for war
preparation) from many aspects is the
problem Berrigan said. "We must
break the law
The immorality of the law has been
apparent throughout our great nation's
history. Brave people have opted to
break these laws to facilitate change. To-
day, the law has reached its most mad-
dening stage. Yes, I agree with Philip
Berrigan; the law must be broken
because "death is legalized today
Priest Arr
Peace activist human law can be
Father Philip Bcr- broken if it was con-
rigan was arrested Fn- trary to God's laws
day at the Pentagon He said free men and
as part of a Good Fn- women must do so in
day protest, while his order to free
brother Father Daniel themselves from the
Berrigan was also ar- law.
rested for similar ac- Berrigan was relcas-
tions in New York ed. pending a court
Several ECU students date, shortly after his
took part in the arrest. Berrigan said
Washington. DC, people all over the
demonstration. world were taking
Berrigan. who was part in Good Friday
arrested while � ar- protests against the
ticipating in a nuclear arms race
"die-in" at the Berrigan. who with
Defense Department, his brother visited and
said he has been ar- lectured in 35 Western
rested more than SO European cities last
times for similar ac- spring, praised the
lions. The demonsra- people of Western
tion, according to Europe for the
Berrigan. is a Simula- "great peace efforts"
tion of what would but added that their
happen if a nuclear depth of resistance
explosion occurred. was not as strong as in
At the Defense the U.S. peace move-
Department. Berrigan ment.
told the group that They (Western
"this is where the la Europeans) don't
begins, right here, na- know as much about
tional law and im- civil disobedience,
pirial law. This is (and) they don't know
where the great cor- as much about real.
porations and banks serious non-violent
legislate their laws; resistance Bernga-
where wealth and said,
privilege are legalized; Berrigan. who E
where the poor are currently awaiting II
sold out; where the appeal decision on al
young get registered destruction of goverrj
and conscripted. (This ment proper.v charge.
is where) the Pen- claims he has beer
tagon derives it's life, sentenced to tail anc
right here; where the prison terms on mor
bomb becomes the than two dozen occas
law. just as the six- sions. His longest
gun was the law of the sentence. 39 montl"
frontier federal prison
Berrigan likened resulted from his pan
the proliferation of ticipation in ihf
nuclear weapons to destruction of iraf
the crucifixion. He files during the Viet
said todav's laws nam War
lesahze a "second On Sept 9, 19�
great crime of historv. the Berrigan broth
the legal extinction of and six others went n
humankind to a General Ekett!
Bernean said a nuclear weapoi
Greenvilli
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Q) AGAINST TH�
ST FORCES OF
COMMyKSM
NP MEPKS
EUttlWOL
-
77?? FeeA
hing my head
guy has really
ou had built
and I was lapp-
mosl convinced.
Kosta Tsipis?
i brick in with
las; year for
me on. Jay!
�right guy. but
recht too. We
s more than
mdget. Please,
people may ac-
v; K million, as I
quibble about
bably spends
And like the
NASA on moon
great spm-off
�e: incinerate
Man ICBM, we
something that
Gordon Ipock
semor. English
"suspect, "
'ure is a
hould have
ou for br-
Forum Rules
" welcomes letters
� iev Mail or
ein the Old
m Joyner
rification, all let-
name, major and
� phone number
-oris). Letters
� � ritten pages,
� printed. All
editing for brevi-
nd no personal
mined. Students,
ing letters for this
at they are limited
e Storm,
a-Death'
ir reiving on the
' rid our world of
One of the kisses of
is that (the nuclear
erv people who are
h!e for the crime of
"Ksmanship today � the
�"unity here in this country
I rt�n�eiy, Berr.gan ,s right. It
, seem unlikely that the
fvprocess will ever really bodge
OPW utilize their constitu-
ents and begin to stop this in-
mrace. Indeed. many of us may
go beyond simply demonstrating
I l� consider what our tax
are being used for. "The law
requires us to pay taxes for war
�-ion) from many aspects is the
' � Berngan said. "We must
' e law.
hnmorality of the law has been
throughout our great nation's
�rave people have opted to
laws to facilitate change. To-
f fiaw has rehed its most mad-
In ,1 l a�ree with Philip
f?M u law must be broken
death is legalized today "
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 5, 1983
Priest Arrested In Protest
Peace activist
Father Philip Ber-
rigan was arrested Fri-
day at the Pentagon
as part of a Good Fri-
day protest, while his
brother Father Daniel
Berrigan was also ar-
rested for similar ac-
tions in New York.
Several ECU students
took part in the
Washington, D.C
demonstration.
Berrigan, who was
arrested while par-
ticipating in a
'die-in" at the
Defense Department,
said he has been ar-
rested more than 50
times for similar ac-
tions. The demonsra-
tion, according to
Berrigan, is a simula-
tion of what would
happen if a nuclear
explosion occurred.
At the Defense
Department, Berrigan
told the group that
"this is where the law
begins, right here, na-
tional law and im-
pirial law. This is
where the great cor-
porations and banks
legislate their laws;
where wealth and
privilege are legalized;
where the poor are
sold out; where the
young get registered
and conscripted. (This
is where) the Pen-
tagon derives it's life,
right here; where the
bomb becomes the
law, just as the six-
gun was the law of the
frontier
Berrigan likened
the proliferation of
nuclear weapons to
the crucifixion. He
said today's laws
legalize a "second
great crime of history,
the legal extinction of
humankind
Berrigan said a
human law can be
broken if it was con-
trary to God's laws.
He said free men and
women must do so in
order to free
themselves from the
law.
Berrigan was releas-
ed, pending a court
date, shortly after his
arrest. Berrigan said
people all over the
world were taking
part in Good Friday
protests against the
nuclear arms race.
Berrigan, who with
his brother visited and
lectured in 35 Western
European cities last
spring, praised the
people of Western
Europe for their
"great peace efforts"
but added that their
depth of resistance
was not as strong as in
the U.S. peace move-
ment.
They (Western
Europeans) don't
know as much about
civil disobedience,
(and) they don't know
as much about real,
serious non-violent
resistance Berrigan
said.
Berrigan, who is
currently awaiting an
appeal decision on a
destruction of govern-
ment property charge,
claims he has been
sentenced to jail and
prison terms on more
than two dozen occas-
sions. His longest
sentence, 39 months
in a federal prison,
resulted from his par-
ticipation in the
destruction of draft
files during the Viet-
nam War
On Sept. 9, 1980,
the Berrigan brothers
and six others went in-
to a General Electric
nuclear weapons
facility in Pennsyl-
vaina and hammered
on two missile nose
cones and poured
their own blood on
blue prints. They
claimed their actions
where morally sup-
ported by the Biblical
passage that says,
"They shall beat their
swords into
ploughshares The
Berrigans and two of
the others were con-
victed and received
three 10-year
sentences.
"As well as we
could, by symbol, we
pointed out that disar-
mament is not going
to be done by govern-
ment Berrigan said.
"It's going to be done
by the people. All of
us have to pick up
responsibility for
these weapons �
something we haven't
done to any great ex-
tent in the past
According to Ber-
rigan, his appeal has
been in limbo since
May. Former U.S.
Attorney General
Ramsey Clark handl-
ed the appeal for the
eight activists.
Berrigan said he
was not frightened by
a long prison
sentence. "I've done a
lot of jail time, and I
have a deep apprecia-
tion for what people
in jail do to keep the
conscienceness of
those outside honest
and true and non-
violent he said.
While the pro-
testors were in
Washington, D.C
the participants
distributed flyers to
people on the streets
that explained the ac-
tivities of the group.
Commenting on
consumer activist
Ralph Nader, who
visited ECU two
weeks ago, Berrigan
said Nader is a
"complex character"
who is dedicated to
his job. Berrigan's on-
ly criticism of Nader
was that he has never
really understood
non-violence and non-
violent resistance.
"He's a person of
enormous influence,
and all sorts of very,
very decent young
Americans would be
introduced to civil
disobedience if Ralph
Nader were to do it
periodically
Doctors First To Die
A large number of
physicians would be
killed in a nuclear
war, practically
eliminating any
possibility of any
medical treatment for
most survivors, accor-
ding to a University of
North Carolina at
Chapel Hill School of
Medicine doctor.
Dr. Ross Simpson
made his comments in
a lecture Wednesday
to the ECU School of
Medicine's weekly
Grand Rounds lecture
series.
According to ECU
assistant professor of
Humanities Dr. John
Moskop, who arrang-
ed Simpson's visit,
Simpson's major con-
clusion was that there
is "no sense" in talk-
ing about preparation
for or treatment after
a nuclear war because
there can be no effec-
tive medical response
and thus physicians
arc in the best posi-
tion to realize that
prevention is the only
effective response.
Simpson, a member
of a group known as
"Physicians for
Social Responsibili-
ty" pointed out that
heart disease is one of
the greatest risks of
death for Americans
today, but he added
that for today's young
people the threat of
dying in a nuclear war
may be a greater
threat than heart
disease.
Physicians for
Social Responsibility
is an organization
made up of medical
doctors and other
professionals who are
working to prevent
nuclear war on the
grounds that preven-
tion is the only way
that the incurable
medical consequences
of radiation exposure
can be alleviated.
Moskop is working
on plans to begin a
local chapter of
Physicians for Social
Responsibillity.
Simpson is an assis-
tant professor
specializing in car-
diology.
The Ground
Rounds lecture series
is conducted by each
department within the
School of Medicine
on a weekly basis.
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4-

1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
APRIL 5. 1983 Page6
Outsiders'
Is Coppola's
New Gamble
By CORNELL MEDLOCK
Staff U riltt
The opening scene in Francis
Ford Coppola's The Outsiders is
perhaps the most iconographic
scene in any of his films. As the
three protagonists walk the noisy
streets of an every city, they do in-
deed draw images that set the
tone for the entire story; and, by
doing so to rock music, the
group's march becomes a
rebellious statement that they, as
young people, are tired of being
ignored by the authority figures
that dot the rest of the film.
The Outsiders (currently held
over at Greenville's Plitt Enter-
tainment Center) is based on the
now-classic youth novel of the
same name and uses the point of
view of the young 'rebel to, as
point of view does, win the
reader's sympathies. Apparently,
the book does just that and has
been floating around junior high
school libraries since it was
published in 1967 (see the March
29 edition of The East Caroli-
nian).
The book's theme of aliena-
tion, the selling point for restless
young readers, does come across
in the film version, but in a slight-
ly awkward, forced and more
melodramtic fashion. At times
throughout the film, Coppola's
direction evokes the old Bowery
Boys Dead End Kids series, not
unfitting in this context, but a lit-
tle odd in a current film.
But Outsiders works best on a
lyrical level. This tale of tough,
switchblade-toting protagonist
"greasers" who fight an endless
losing battle with the affluent,
socially superior kids from the
other side of town has the look of
Gone With the Wind in many
places. Coppola shot most of the
film on location in Texas, but us-
ed elaborate, perfectly lit sound-
stages for many key scenes.
The performances by principle
players, except for awful Diane
Lane, are just what the director
must have wanted. Especially
good are C. Thomas Howell as
REVIEW
Ponyboy and Ralph Macchio as
Johnny. Their style of acting is,
at moments, marvelously
method-inspired. For actors so
young, this is no small achieve-
ment. You can also cheer as Leif
Garrett gets ousted and gape in
wonderment at Matt Dillon's
amazing good looks; this film can
only give the already hot teen
idol's career a boost.
Finally, it is hard to say if The
Outsiders, combined with his
other new youth film, The Black
Stallion Returns, can save Cop-
pola's floundering Zoetrope
Studios. Both films are aimed at
younger audiences, which com-
prise most of the movie-going
public, but the former has an ap-
peal that seems curioulsy male;
and only time will tell if the kids
will be willing to leave video
games long enough to see them.
If not, then Coppola won't sur-
vive that initial gamble, One
From the Heart, that is still
costing him dearly.
The youthful cast of Francis Coppola's The Outsiders. The new film is based on the S.E. Hinton novel of the same name.
Canadian Bands Doing Well In States
By MIKE HAMER
Staff � riirr
Red Rider
eruda
When 1 was an adolescent
growing up in northern Vermont,
most of the pop music that I
listened to was from radio station
CKGM in Montreal. It was on
this station that I first heard The
Beatles and The Rolling Stones
and their contemporaries in the
early and mid-sixties. The Cana-
dian stations always impressed
me as having a bit more class
than their American counter-
parts. This was true of the Cana-
dian television stations, also.
Perhaps it was because they could
pick and choose the best of the
American stuff before they
broadcast.
Besides Neil Young and Joni
Mitchell, some Canadian musi-
cians who have achieved success
in the U.S. in the past have been
The Band, Gordon Light foot,
The McGarrigle Sisters, Buffy
Ste. Marie, Ian and Sylvia, and
The Guess Who. Most of these
have been songsmiths of a very
high calibre.
A current group of Canadian
rockers have achieved a large
degree of commercial success in
the U.S. These bands include
Rush, Loverboy, Billy Squier,
Chilliwack, and Aldo Nova. Red
Rider is perhaps the most
politically oriented of these
bands.
Neil Young, Joni Mitchell and
Red Rider have all spent some
time in Toronto; Red Rider still
live in Canada, while Neil Young
and Joni Mitchell live in the
States. They are original artists,
and all three face the world head-
on in their songs.
Seruda is Red Rider's latest
album. The very fact that the
group named their album after
one of this century's greatest and
most radical poets should tip the
listener off to the political orien-
tation of this record. Songwriter
Tom Cochrane challenges the
listener to face up to the political
realities of the day. He urges
those who listen to become in-
volved in the modern world
before that world swallows them
up. In "Sights on You
Cochrane says, "He's on the
front lineHe's set for the
killIt's happening thenAnd it's
happening stillDog eat
DogYou've got to change it
Cochrane refuses to give in to
cynicism; he reflects a faith in life
here on the planet. In "Human
Race my favorite song on the
album, Red Rider jubilantly sing
on the chorus, "Knocked me
down but I got back up1 got
myself in the race again
Red Rider is a tight band. Ken
Greer's lead guitar work and
Steve Sexton's keyboards shine
throughout the record. In fact,
the one instrumental, "Light in
the Tunnell is one of the best
cuts on the album. On "Walking
the Fine Line" and "Napoleon
Sheds His Skin Greer and Sex-
ton's instrumental voicings save
the songs from being boring.
About half the songs on this
record are strong, and the other
jhalf sound too similar � a
specific problem with Side 2 of
the album. Only on "Crack the
Sky" does Cochrane manage to
change the pace and dare to be
more abstract and lyrical with his
music.
If this band could put together
a record with eight strong songs
instead of only three or four, they
could become one of the best acts
of the eighties. They have the vi-
sion and the musicianship to do
it.
Neil Young
Trans
Over the years Neil Young has
become notorious for his many
changes in direction, and Trans is
no exception to this rule. In this
record one sees Young, the con-
temporary songwriter, making a
statement about the computer
and showing a certain confusion
about how to deal with it � as
are most artists these days.
Young uses a voice decoder and
an octave splitter on about half
of the songs on the album, with a
mechanical-sounding rhythm sec-
REVIEW
tion backing him up. An imper-
sonal mood is thus created which
reinforces Young's lyrics. This is
the case in "We R in Control
Here the strange voice says, "We
control you floor to floorWe
control you door to door We're
controlling while you sleep
Most of the lyrics on the com-
puter songs cannot be understood
without benefit of the lyric sheet.
I think my favorite lyrics on the
records are in the song
"Computer Cowboy Here
Young sings with tongue Firmly
placed in cheek: "Well the cattle
each have numbersAnd they all
eat in a lineWhen he turns the
floodlights on each night Of
course the herd looks perfect
Besides the computer songs.
Young has two new pop songs
that have some fans have come to
love. I personally preferred the
1967 Buffalo Springfield version
of "Mr. Soul" to the one on this
record. One song docs work on
this album, though, and that's
the last one, "Like An Inca
Like the contemporary poet
Hayden Caruth, Young places
the primary tension of today in
the fact of the bomb's existence,
he sings, "Who put the
bombOn the sacred altar?Why
See JONI MITCHELL, Pafe 7
Runaway Car
Ocasek Finds His Niche
By DAVID GANS
Evelyn King Teamed With Dazz Band For Concert
Hot pop, soul singer Evelyn 'Champagne' King is the headline attraction la a concert that
her with rhythm and bluessoul artists The Dazz Band. The show is slated for Saturday, April 23,
at 8 p.m. in Minges Coliseum. Tickets are priced at $7.50 for ECU students and $9.50 for the
public. All tickets sold at the door will be $9.50. Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office,
MSC, Apple Records and both Greenville Record Bars. The concert is sponsored by the ECU
Student Union Major Attractions Committee.
OAKLAND, Ca. � From the first sounds heard
on his first solo album Beatidude � machines call-
ing the name of his keynote protagonist, "Jimmy
Jimmy" � Ric Ocasek's fear offor the human race
in these dehumanizing times is established as a major
theme of his work and the driving force behind this
uneasy man's uneasy musical quest. The men and
machines sing together throughout Beatitude, from
the subtly inserted descant "America" in "Jimmy
Jimmy" to the drunk-with-anticipation boys and
vocoders in the majestically horny "I Can'fWait
The slightly mysterious guitaristvocalist, co-
founder and sole songwriter of the Cars, is tall and
entirely too gaunt and wraithlike to be very appeal-
ing to the eye from a distance. He sports a head of
thick black hair which rises like a rather ill-fitting
helmet above bis narrow face and sweeps back
behind a sizable pair of ears. He's all elbows and
Adam's apple but up close his hard appearance is
warmed by kindly eyes, a generous smile and an ex-
ceedingly soft-spoken manner.
It's tempting to presume that since Ocasek is a shy
and awkward looking man, his alienated and
hungry-hearted songs come straight from his own
life. But what songs are about is one question and
what they're for is another. When dealing with an
inquisitive musical intellect such as Ocasek's, you
can never be entirely sure that his lyrics aren't aimed
at the concerns of the audience he intends to reach
rather than some internal demons of his own. Or
maybe they're just convenient syllables to stretch
across the musical constructions which are the real
object of his explorations.
Still, even if the lyrics are casually tossed off, what
one chooses to write about � disavowals of personal
intent notwithstanding � is often a valid window on
the author's subconscious. Neil Young explains that
good art, honestly conceived and presented, will
yield different meanings to each person who ex-
amines it. Each of us forms a picture of the artist out
of what we sec in his creations � not his own con-
text, though, but through our own knowledge and
emotions. Therefore, though it's easy to draw con-
clusions about Ric Ocasek from the words and music
on Beatitude, it's also a little unfair.
"These are bio questions Ocasek chides gently
when I attempt to fill in a little about his personal
history. Yes, they arc, but Ocasek's Geffen Records
bio tells nothing about bis background. He has been
married since 1972 and has two children, but "I
don't really like to print anything about them
because my kids have to go to school here. I try to
Ocasel
Continued 1- rum Page
keep m famiij
separate, so I don'
say much about
Ocasek never rais
his voice � he ma
the most impe
bable man in rev
but he keeps
private truths
himself and at
same time leU
know that they're g(
mg to sta private.
"Mid-30s is aboi
as specific as anyor
will get abo,
Ocasek's age.
suspect that
the upper
least. He's old enouf
to remember a Be
era poetr pan I
called Beatitude
which he
name of his aibu
"Without knowi
Joni
New SI
Continued in
should v.? d
All
way?
All in al 1 wo
that this �
be con-
better u b
of some
American vjrs
and Zuma
Young has tc
and I enjo
but the :r.
to makv
Joni Mitchell
Wild ThinS, Run
Jon. v ;
Run Fas: j
following :� -
album fron
Light. �-
top ten -J
chell is a j
some new
Here,
orientation
records a:
more of a : cl
sound- � .
sition, but
Rather, it
is alwa exc
One rea-
is in the ex� I
cians on I
Shone- back
with his in
Larry Cai
guitar work, I
back or. dtu
the cre
Pastonus was n

- �� T -� T.





APKlt
1981
Page 6
novel �t" the same name.
States
REVIEW
on ba king him up. An imper-
is thus created which
reinforces oung's lyrics. This is
the ca-e in "We R in Control
Here the strange voice says, "We
you floor to floorWe
itrol you door o door We're
- a rule you sleep
Mosl ' H,e lyrics on the com-
;annot be understood
. benefit of the lyric sheet.
favorite lyrics on the
are in the song
omputer Cowboy Here
gs uith tongue firmly
n cheek: "Well the cattle
have numbersAnd they all
eat in a line When he turns the
on each nightOf
he herd looks perfect
the computer songs,
'uo new pop songs
me fans have come to
i personally preferred the
o Springfield version
Mr Soul" to the one on this
rd One song does work on
though, and that's
last one. "Like An Inca
tne
contemporary poet
Havden Caruth, Young places
the primarv tension of today in
� the bomb's existence.
vings. 'Who put the
bomb On the sacred altar?Why
See JOM MITCHELL, Page 7
ar
Niche
pal intellect such as Ocasek's, you
rel sure that his lyrics aren't aimed
I the audience he intends to reach
)e internal demons of his own. Or
convenient syllables to stretch
:al constructions which are the real
iorations.
he Kncs are casually tossed off, what
mte about � disavowals of personal
inding � is often a valid window on
ronscious Neil Young explains that
conceived and presented, will
neamngs to each person who ex-
v. us forms a picture of the artist out
r his creations � not his own con-
V through our own knowledge and
Itore. though it's easy to draw con-
ic Ocasek from the words and music
also a little unfair.
e questions Ocasek chides gently
�to fill in a little about his personal
y are, but Ocasek's Geffen Records
jabout his background. He has been
'72 and has two children, but "I
je to print anything about them,
have to go to school here. I try to
f 1 r my CAROLINIAN APRIL 3. IM3
Ocasek Toyed With Photography And Poetry Before Music
Continued From Page 6
keep my family
separate, so 1 don't
say much about it
Ocasek never raises
his voice � he may be
the most impertur-
bable man in rock �
but he keeps his
private truths to
himself and at the
same time lets you
know that they're go-
ing to stay private.
"Mid-30s" is about
as specific as anyone
will get about
Ocasek's age, but I
suspect that he's in
the upper 30s, at
least. He's old enough
to remember a Beat-
era poetry pamphlet
called Beatitude from
which he took the
name of his album.
"Without knowing
what the word meant,
I thought it meant the
attitude of the Beat
poet Ocasek recalls.
"Beat attitude But
he went to Catholic
schools; didn't he
learn about the
beatitudes there?
"Well, that's funny,
'cause the Catholic
religion doesn't go by
the Bible. They
seldom follow it and
they never talk about
it. In the first grade
you learn about the
Ten Commandments
and then you live in
fear from that day
on
Oscasek is a loner
from way back.
Photography was his
escape for a few of his
teenage years, and
then when he was 16,
after his family mov-
ed to Cleveland from
his native Baltimore
he immersed himself
in the exquisitely
logical world of elec-
tronics. He built a
powerful transmitter
and earned a first-
class broadcast
license, allowing him
to remain invisible
while talking with
other invisible people.
During an aborted
college career he
rediscovered music
(he'd played guitar
for awhile at a very
early age). It would be
facile to say that
Ocasek's electronic
bent accounts for the
mechanical flavor
which gives rise to fre-
quent accusations
that the Cars' music is
souless and artificial.
"Aah, they just say
Joni Mitchell Explores
New Styles On 'Wild'
Ci -�5"ued From Page 6
should we dieIf it comes our
way?"
All in all I would have to say
that this record is too scattered to
be considered as one of Young's
better albums. It lacks the units
of some of his past efforts like
American Stars and Bars ('77)
and Zuma ('75). I like what
Young has to say on this record,
and I enjoy most of the melodies,
but the themes are too disparate
to make this a great album.
Joni Mitchell
Wild Things Run Fast
Joni Mitchell's Wild Things
Run Fast had the difficult task of
following her blockbuster live
album from 1980, Shadows and
Light, which is one of my all-time
top ten albums. Like Young, Mit-
chell is also experimenting with
some new sounds on this record.
Here, she is leaving the jazz
orientation of her last three
records, and she is playing with
more of a rock sound. The music
sounds like it is in a state of tran-
sition, but it is never boring.
Rather, it is always changing � it
is always exciting.
One reason for the excitement
is in the excellence of the musi-
cians on the album. Wayne
Shorter is back on this record
with his impeccable horn playing.
Larry Carlton adds some fine
guitar work, and John Guerin is
back on drums. When I looked at
the credits and saw that Jaco
Pastorius was not playing bass I
was prepared to be disappointed,
but Larry Klein fills Pastorius'
shoes quite excellently, in fact.
Lionel Ritchie puts in a guest spot
on vocals, as does James Taylor.
As always, Mitchell's rhythm
guitar work is of the highest
quality.
The enigma of love is one of
Joni Mitchell's perennial sub-
jects, and her tone appears to be
altogether more optimistic on this
album. This is evident in "Solid
Love" and in "Love which is
her musical rendition of Corin-
thians 11:13 � that perennial
favorite which speaks about a
love that must be so much more
than sounding brass and tinkling
symbals. In "Underneath the
Streetlight Mitchell sings, "Yes
I do � I love you!I swear on the
blinkin' planes above I do!On
the truck at the stoplightWith
his airbrakes moaning
My favorite songs on this
record are the title song, "Wild
Things Run Fast" and "Chinese
Cafe" is a real gem of a song.
Here Joni Mitchell confronts the
middle age which she and her
contemporaries find themselves
dealing with. She weaves a tale of
acceptance and sadness that is
reinforced by the chorus line,
"Nothing lasts for long and is
juxtaposed against that haunting
love song from the fifties,
"Unchained Meoldy There
really isn't one weak song on this
record.
These Canadians have given us
quite an impressive batch of good
songs in the past. I really don't
feel that they're going to let up
any time soon.
- SATURDAY-
APRIL 9,1983
SHIRTS
Sportshirts and TEE shirts are
REDUCED
SHOES
Sale Shoes at prices lower than ever.
APPAREL
Tennis wear-Raincoats - Bike Jackets -Much More
Our sidewalks will be full of savings!
�� Don't Miss It. ���
� I
ca
210 fcHPTH St GREENVUE
that 'cause we're
tight Ocasek snaps.
Then he chuckles
briefly. But elec-
tronics is really not a
bad metaphor for a
creative process such
as songwritftig.
Careful calculation
and attention to detail
are all in service of a
net effect: a circuit is
designed to turn on a
particular light in a
certain place or to
send your voice to
Paris while you re-
main safe in your
basement. Painstak-
ing attention to com-
ponents and sub-
systems reflects a con-
sciousness of the in-
terlocking nature of
whole systemes such
as radios, pop songs
and civilizations.
Ocasek's music is
sonically and
rhythmically ex-
ploratory, lyrically
expressive, darkly
humorous at times
(but always dark) and
ruefully and ironically
romantic. Many of
his songs have tandem
rhythmic pulses, like
the Earth turning
many times within the
grander sweep of its
orbit around the sun.
This clockwork aspect
gives Ocasek's singing
a heightened humani-
ty, as though he pic-
tures himself in a
�landscape of
mechanical things,
searching for that
"other soul who sees
into (his) own to
borrow a phrase from
Jackson Browne.
There's a concep-
tual counterpoint in
Ocasek's music. It's
evident in "Sneak At-
tack in which he
sings buoyantly,
about the new brand
of high-tech warfare
that is soon to afflict
our planet. " 'Sneak
Attack' is just a
parody of the com-
puter world and
satellites he ex-
plains. "It's about
when both countries
put satellites up in the
ionosphere and use
them for trigering
their missile things.
The USA sends up a
code, and then Russia
tries to scramble the
code by sending up a
different one. It's a
war on this little ball
out in space � a cold,
computer war that's
constantly being up-
dated and changed.
That rinky-dink
melody makes it
sound almost like a
happy song
Once he explains it,
the song's irony is
clear. Barring that,
though, isn't it likely
that the humorous in-
tent of Ocasek's song
might bypass the
listener, even one with
an ear tuned to the
speaker, or an eye to
the lyric sheet? "A lot
of people tell me
that he laughs.
"But jeez, you know,
that's okay. People
are always trying to
make whatever you
write fit into their
reality Again, the
Cheshire giraffe fades
away leaving only a
helmet of black hair
suspended in space
where the artist once
was sitting: "Lyrics
are a personal thing.
It's a lot harder to
make something ac-
cessible to a lot of
people than it is to a
few guys with stilet-
toes on the corner
"I live in a world of
night screams and
rainbows he sings
again and again at the
end of "Time
Bomb a phrase that
pretty well describes
the infra, the ultra,
and all that lies bet-
ween, saying what a
perfect paradox life
is. His litany of ir-
reconcilable coex-
istences � "Lonely
hearts and dispas-
sionate pigs
"wasted envy and
beatitudes" � is
punctuated here and
there by the phrase,
"and I'm sitting on a
time bomb What
isn't clear is whether
the bomb is the planet
itself or this one tor-
tured narrator who
sees the desperation in
a situation others take
for granted.
On Beatitude.
Ocasek sometimes
seems so terrified of
his own perceptions,
so protective of his
frightful urges, that in
order to sing, he has
to pull the words out
of himself in bursts of
menacingly mild
vocalizations that
sound like a cross bet-
ween Norman Bates
and the Elephant
Man. There's no lack
of soul here; it's just
trapped in a cold,
hard context.
"I see people get
ting less and less
motivated to want to
do anything, because
they're so afraid
ofI don't know
what they're afraid of
� technology,
maybe, or advance-
ment
CAN DO
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-t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
APRIL 5, 1983 P�c 8
Pack Fulfills Destiny
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
(UPI) � North Carolina State,
putting a glorious finishing
touch on a masterpiece of a
season, won the NCAA basket-
ball championship 54-52 Mon-
day night on a dunk by Loren-
zo Charles at the buzzer.
The Wolfpack, down 52-46
with 3:19 to go and appearing
in serious trouble, rallied in the
final minutes to conclude its
storybook season and ended
No. 1 Houston's 26-game win-
ning streak. Getting excellent
shooting from long distance,
N.C. State was able to pull
back.
Sidney Lowe hit from 22 feet
with 3:04 remaining to make it
52-48. Following a missed foul
shot by Michael Young. Dereck
Whittenburg took over. The
6-foot-1 guard who missed six
weeks this season because of a
broken foot, hit from 25-feet to
pull the Wolfpack within two.
He then buried another shot
from 2" feet with 1:59 remain-
ine to tie it 52-52.
Foul shooting, a major pro-
blem for the Cougars all
season, came back to bedevil
them once again. Alvin
Franklin missed the front end
of a 1-and-l and the Wolfpack
gained possession and called
time. NC State worked patient-
ly for the final shot and with
the clock winding down, Whit-
tenburg tossed up a 30-footer
that failed to hit the
backboard. But Charles, sta-
tioned to the right of the rim,
leaped for the ball and stuffed
it home.
In winning its first national
title since 1974, N.C. State beat
one of college basketball's
fiercest teams as the Wolfpack
following stormed the court at
the University of New Mexico.
The No. 14 Wolfpack was
given little chance this year
after Whittenburg was sidelin-
ed with his injury. But N.C.
State regrouped and won con-
siderable sentimental support
along the way.
By completing its whirlwind
season at 26-10, N.C. State has
more losses than any NCAA
champion. But that in no way
diminishes the many ac-
complishments of the
Wolfpack, which beat Georgia
67-60 in the semifinals.
Houston, a 7-point favorite,
entered the game coming off a
resounding 94-81 victory over
No. 2 Louisville. The loss thus
denied Houston coach Guy
Lewis, with the Cougars 27
years, the crown in his fourth
trip to the Final Four. Houston
closed the year at 31-3.
Houston, which has relied on
devastating force all season
long, turned to finesse in the se-
cond half as it rallied from a
33-25 deficit to a 44-37 lead
with 8:28 to go. North Carolina
State, regarded by many as
having little chance of mat-
ching up well with Houston,
played a patient, perimeter
game but refused to slow the
tempo excessively as had been
anticipated.
For Houston, Akeem Ola-
juwon, the 7-foot center, had
20 points, 18 rebounds and
seven blocks. But he was the
only member of the celebrated
Phi Slama Jama fraternity to
turn on the Wolfpack. The two
other members of the vaunted
front line, foul-ridden Clyde
Drexler and Larry Micheaux,
had just four points each. Ben-
ny Anders provided some life
in the second half with 10
points and Michael Young,
who averaged nearly 18 points
a game this year, was limited to
six.
The Cougars shot just 38
percent from the floor and a
dreadful 53 percent from the
line.
Charles, a 6-7 sophomore,
finished with just four points.
Thurl Bailey added 15, all in
the first half, and Whittenburg
had 14. All of N.C. State's se-
cond half points came from its
guards from long range except
for Charles' basket and a free
throw by Terry Gannon.
NCSU guard Dereck Whittenburg shows his title-winning form in an
earlier contest against ECU. The Pirates only lost to the NCAA champs
by eight points, 57-49.
Pirates Suffer Dual Setbacks
Over Easter Holiday Break
Rv K F N ROI TON r
By KEN BOLTON
Assistani Sports Fdllor
The Easter holiday was not a
very successful one for the ECU
baseball team, as the Pirates lost
to UNC-Wilmington on Friday
afternoon and dropped a 9-1 deci-
sion to the UNC Tar Heels last
night in Chapel Hill.
In last night's contest with the
nationally 12th-ranked Tar Heels,
Brad Powell limited the Pirates to
six hits and struck out 10 while
raising his record to 6-1.
For the Pirates, Charlie Smith
dropped his record to 3-2 with the
loss.
The Tar Heels jumped out to a
4-0 lead in the first inning. With
one out, Jeff Hubbard hit Smith's
first pitch over the right field
fence for the game's first run.
B. J. Surhoss then followed with
a single, and after a walk and a
passed ball, Scott Johnson
delivered a two-run single.
Mike Jedziniak singled Johnson
home to make the score 4-0 after
the first inning.
The Tar Heels added another
run in the fourth inning when
Walt Weiss singled singled to left
field and came home on Hub-
bard's second RBI of the game.
ECU scored their only run in
the sixth inning when Kelly
Robinette and John Hallow singl-
ed and Robinette came home on
Todd Evans' fielder's-choice.
UNC conyerted again in their
half of the sixth inning with Hub-
bard driving in another run to give
him 3 RBI for the day.
As disappointing as the UNC
loss was, it still wasn't as bad as
the loss to the Seahawks on Fri-
day.
ECU starting pitcher Bob
Davidson did every thing that a
coach could ask of a pitcher, as he
allowed only one run on only
three hits.
But the Pirate bats were silent
and were not able to supply
Davidson with any help in the 1-0
loss.
The UNC-W loss was the se-
cond shutout in the last three
games for the Pirates. That mark-
ed the first time since 1979 that an
ECU team has been shut out twice
in one season.
In carving the finest perfor-
mance of an ECU pitcher this
season, Davidson only walked one
batter and struck out 12.
Carl Willis, UNC-W's starting
pitcher had a lot to do with the
silent ECU bats. Willis allowed
only four hits in raising his record
to 5-2.
The Seahawks scored the
game's only run in the fourth inn-
ing when Chris Cubbage led off
the inning with a homer to left
field.
ECU's biggest threat came in
the eighth inning when Tony Sal-
mond reached on an error to lead
off the inning.
Salmond moved to second on a
sacrifice bunt and to third on a
groundout, but was left stranded
when Robinette grounded to short
to end the inning.
With the two losses. ECU drops
to 14-8 on the year.
The Pirates play host to Old
Dominion tonight in a "r:00 p.m.
contest at Harrington Field.
ECU Budget Concerns Emory
By CINDY PLEAS A NTS
ECU shortstop Kelly Robinette eyes UNC-Wilmington pitcher in Fri-
days loss to the Seahawks.
White Outhurdles Foster
At Duke Invitational
ECU's Craig White beat out
former Olympian Charles Foster
to win the 110-meter high hurdles
even: at the Duke Invitational
Track Meet held this weekend in
Durham.
White beat out Foster in a time
of 14.04. It was Foster's first loss
eer to a collegiate runner.
Nathan McCorkle placed se-
cond in the 200-meter race in 20.9,
while two-time Ail-American
Greg Lawson was first in 20.8.
McCorkle's time was the fastest
of his career.
Pirate Chris Brooks took first
in the long jump with a leap of
24'7 while teammate Chris
McLawhorn was fourth at
23'3 12
The mile-relay team of Eddie
Bradley, Rueben Pierce, Willie
Fuller and Ray Dickerson took
first place in 3:13.7 while
defeating second place West
Virginia by 40 yards in the pro-
cess.
"I'm real proud of these kids
said coach Bill Carson. "We're on
an upward swing and that's good
for a freshman team
The Pirates will be in action
next weekend when they compete
in the Dogwood Relays in Knox-
ville, Tennessee.
Mabry Sets Record
rS�fc�J'
?
Delphine Mabry set a meet
record to take first place in the
800-meter event in 2:11.6 at the
George Mason Invitational this
weekend in Fairfax, Virginia.
The ECU women placed run-
ners in almost every event against
such teams as Villanova, Penn
State, Georgetown and Wake
Forest.
Aside from setting a meet
record, Mabry also placed in a
Field event. She was fourth in the
long jump, with a leap of 17'
9 12
In the 100-meter dash, Robin
Cremedy and Terissa Hudson
both had qualifying times of 13
seconds flat. In the finals,
Cremedy Finished second, while
Hudson placed fourth.
Cremedy and Cathcart both
placed in other individual events.
Cremedy was seventh in the 200 in
26.4, while Cathcart took fourth
in the 400 in 57.4.
The 4 x 100 relay team of Hud-
son, Mabry, Cathcart and
Cremedy had their best showing
of the outdoor season, placing se-
cond in 48.SO.
Shot-putter Amy Bowen has
continuously improved
throughout the year and finished
seventh in this meet with a throw
of 35'10
ECU will travel to Chapel Hill
next weekend where they will
compete in the Carolina Relays.
Sports F.dilor
ECU Head Football Coach Ed
Emory has a dream. For three
years he has worked toward
building a team that can reckon
with the likes of the Florida States
and the West Virginias in
Division-I play.
When it comes to motivation,
determination and raw talent,
ECU is comparable to such teams.
But, unfortunately, ECU lacks
the most basic factor necessary in
order to rank with the
powerhouses in the nation �
money.
FSU spends approximately five
million dollars per year on its
football program, and West
Virginia spends more than two
million dollars annually. How
much does ECU spend? Almost
one million dollars.
Emory, however, remains both
optimistic and realistic when
discussing funds within the pro-
gram. "We've come a long way in
three years he said. "Dr.
How ell and Dr. Karr have made
commitments, and Dr. Karr has
personally gone out and solicited
money to help us out Dr.
Howell has constantly pushed the
one-million-dollar "Commitment
to Quality" fund, and the Pirate
Club has just begun its spring
fund drive, "Seige of 83 which
will be held throughout the
Carolinas and Virginia.
Emory cited three major pro-
blems which he deems as the most
dire needs at the present time. The
first on the list is coaching
salaries. "Something has got to be
done he said. "We can't expect
to build a top-notch program if
we can't offer our coaches
reasonable incomes. The lifeline
of our program is the personnel
One assistant coach on the ECU
staff earns $16,000 per year, and
Emory receives $33,000 annually
� making him one of the lowest
paid Division-I coaches in the
country. In comparison, Western
Carolina's head football coach
earns $39,000 each year.
According to Athletic Director
Dr. Ken Karr, the money is not
available so that coaching salaries
can be upgraded. "Our past pro-
gram's severe spending has caused
our limited funding. The money
just isn't there. We've spent more
than we're able to generate
The second priority on Emory's
agenda is a new weight-training
facility which would be located
next to Scales Fieldhouse. "We
need that for convenience, super-
vision, selling prospective players
and to prevent loss of time
Ed Emory

Emory said. "We've done a great
job with what we have, but
weightlifting has become such a
big point in recruiting
When asked about the possibili-
ty of a new weight-training facili-
ty, Karr pointed to a picture of a
large building hanging on his wall.
"Do you see that he replied.
"That plan has been ready for
two years Karr was referring to
a 3.8 million-dollar multi-purpose
building. "The needs go
beyond a weight-training center
Karr said. "We need a large facili-
ty to encompass coaches offices.
classrooms, locker areas, sports
medicine and sport information.
It's vitally necessary for these to
be housed within a single unit
According to Karr, the building
should be placed between Scales
Fieldhouse and Minges Coliseum
for convenience purposes.
The Athletic Director said the
facility was now on a "wish list
and that the athletic department
"must place these things on a
backburner because of shortage
of funds
Emory's third primary concern
is the limited recruiting budget.
The football program has approx-
imately 8O-to-$90,000 to spend for
recruiting. Emory gave an exam-
ple of just how limited funds are
in comparison to other schools'
budgets. "At UNC, just printed
materials for recruiting would be
that much he said.
Once again, Karr explained that
the recruiting budget, as well as
other athletic funds, cannot be
changed until the athletic depart-
ment's budget is repaired. "We
need to sell tickets and fund
revenue sports he said.
"Student fees, private sectors and
ticket sales are the major funds
for the athletic program.
"Unless you show growth in
these sources, you can't expand
the program.��
(�s & �� first of a two-part
y �� ' ECU football pro-
�" � tha athletic depart-
Ake
HOUSTON (UP!
� The former Pea
Corps volunteer whj
steered Akeem Abdi
Olajuwon to thl
University
Houston sa Ol
juwon would be pla)
ing toda for Nortj
Carolina State
former N.C Stai
coach Norm Sio;
had shown so ml
respect
scouting abiliu ai
for the potential
African player
As it turned ou
"coin flip" b Q I
Pond in La(
Nigeria, causi
to phone H
Coach Gu Lev I
fice in Sept . 1980,
stead of th
Carolina State athlet
office
Pond -aid he
spoken p e nal
with I e
previous year, �.
Lew is had se
nuinely interested.
Also. a
coaching turnover
N.C. State at it
time was a I
Pond said j
from h home
Ridgev.a. N c
The North
State program n
on Olajuwon d
Pond, 42.
blood
Wolfpack b
Pond' brother, Ni
ECU catcher Jack1
l'NC-ilmington.

Green
Mostdelivl
truequalit
delivery c
PIZZA IN!
all that!
Wi
pi;
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ou
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iCKIl s -v! !�! "
' V-f!

Ions hiv titltwinmng form in an
e onh lost lo the MAX champs
tbacks
reak
ts Willis allowed
raising his record
iwi scored the
the fourth inn-
ibbage led off
homer to left
threat came in
� :r Ton) Sal-
an error to lead
ed to second on a
u : to third on a
as left branded
' ftte grounded to short
u ' sses, ECU drops
-8 the year.
play host to Old
in a :00 p.m.
Harrington Field.
Emory
" e've done a great
�hat we hae. but
has become such a
recruiting
� ed about the possibili-
a a eight-training facili-
i to a picture of a
ding hanging on his wall.
� . e that he replied.
� has been ready for
: A years " Kan uas referring to
a 3.8 million-dollar multi-purpose
building "The needs go
"eight-training center
lid "We need a large facili-
to encompass coaches offices,
dassi �oms, locker areas, sports
medicine and sport information.
It's itail necessary for these to
be housed within a single unit
rding to Karr. the building
should be placed between Scales
Fieldhouse and Minges Coliseum
for convenience purposes.

The Athletic Director said the
lit) uas now on a wish list
and that the athletic department
"must place these things on a
back burner because of shortage
of funds "
Emory's third primary concern
limited recruiting budget.
football program has approx-
imately 0-to-S90,000 to spend for
recruiting. Emory gave an exam-
ple of just how limited funds are
in comparison to other schools'
budgets. "At UNC, just printed
materials for recruiting would be
that much he said.
Once again. Karr explained that
the recruiting budget, as well as
other athletic funds, cannot be
changed until the athletic depart-
ment's budget is repaired. "We
need to sell tickets and fund
revenue sports he said.
'Student fees, private sectors and
ticket sales are the major funds
for the athletic program.
"Unless you show growth in
these sources, you can't expand
the program
(This is the first of a two-part
series on the ECL football pro-
gram and the athletic depart-
went. J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 5, 1983
Akeem An NCSU Dream
HOUSTON (UPI)
� The former Peace
Corps volunteer who
steered Akeem Abdul
Olajuwon to the
University of
Houston says Ola-
iuwon would be play-
ing today for North
Carolina State if
former N.C. State
coach Norm Sloan
had shown some
respect for his
scouting ability and
foi the potential of
African players.
As it turned out, a
"coin flip" by Chris
Pond in Lagos,
Nigeria, caused him
to phone Houston
Coach Guy Lewis' of-
fice in Sept 1980, in-
stead of the North
( arolina State athletic
offices.
Pond said he had
spoken personally
with Lewis the
previous year, and
I ewis had seemed ge-
nuinely interested.
lso, a head
coaching turnover at
N.C. State at that
nine was a factor,
Pond said Saturday
from his home in
Ridgeway, N.C.
The North Carolina
State program missed
on Olajuwon despite
Pond, 42, having
blood ties to
Wolf pack basketball.
Pond's brother, Nick,
played there from
1953 to 1957 and
Pond himself spent
time as a youngster in
Raleigh, the site of the
State campus.
He fondly
had played against
Chieh. D.T. knew,
but Norm wouldn't
even ask
Pond received other
turn-downs to get
Chieh a scholarship
remembers collecting from Maryland coach could afford college,
soft drink . bottles Lefty Driesell, State When Pond walked
States.
"They didn't want
the African to be a
burden on the United
States Pond said.
In Olajuwon's case,
Pond said, his father
Women
around Reynolds Col-
iseum during sum-
mers when his family
was down from Mont-
clair, N.J.
"I would have liked
for Akeem to go to
N.C. State. But they
hadn't shown any in-
terest before on other
players 1 told them
about. They said they
didn't want to have to
assistant coach Marty
Fletcher, former East
Carolina head coach
Dave Odem and
Duke's Bill Foster.
"They thought I
was blowing hot air
he said.
Coach Dean Smith
at North Carolina did
give African John
Richards a try out, but
Richards wasn't good
develop them Pond enough to make the
said.
Pond said when he
made visits in the late
1970s to the United
States, while he was
working as coach of
the Central African
Republic team under
contract to the State
Department, he con-
tacted then N.C. State
head coach Sloan and
others in his area
about African
players.
"Norm wasn't in-
terested in David
Chieh when all he had
to do was ask David
Thompson about the
kid Pond said.
"D.T. (Thompson)
had gone to Africa
with me on a tour and
team.
"I had all these kids
like Akeem lined up
to come over there. I
had a pipeline. 1 had
worked in 44 coun-
tries in Africa. It was
just a matter of fin-
ding a place that
would be receptive to
them Pond said.
There were pro-
blems with visas.
Pond said he had to
have written
assurances of a
scholarship or some
other financial ability
to pay for college
before the American
Embassy in an
African country
would grant an athlete
a pass to come to the
to the telephone com-
munication center in
Lagos to find a place
for Olajuwon to try
out, "1 flipped a coin
on whether I should
call N.C. State
anyway. The coin
came up Houston
At that crucial mo-
ment, Pond said he
did not know if State
had hired a coach to
replace Norm Sloan.
"If they didn't have
a head coach, how
was anybody going to
make a decision
Pond said. "I wanted
a decision-maker to
be in town
Pond did not get
Lewis, who was out.
His secretary told
Pond of the week
Lewis would be in,
and with that infor-
mation Pond helped
book Olajuwon on a
flight to New York
and then Houston.
Olajuwon got off a
plane at Houston In-
tercontental Airport
and asked a cab driver
to take him to the
"University of
Austin" where Guy
Lewis was coach. The
cabbie let him off in
front of Lewis' win-
dow.
Lewis has said the
first time he saw Ola-
juwon move around a
basketball court he
knew he had a poten-
tially awesome per-
former.
The pipeline ap-
parently is flowing
more easily now. In
the Houston area
alone, Yommy
Sangodeyi plays for
Sam Houston State
University and Aniset
Lavodrama plays for
Hosuton Baptist.
Both Africans are key
players.
That, despite the
hindrance from
American Amateur
Basketball Associa-
tion Executive Direc-
tor Bill Wall, Pond
said.
"Wall should be
blasted for his
backward ways. He
wrote a letter to my
boss saying there was
no African who could
run with a Division 1
basketball team. Can
you imagine0
"I was trying to br-
ing a team of Africans
on an exhibition tour
two years ago Pond
said. "Wall said it
was the craziest thing
he'd ever heard of
The ECU women's Wilmington Thurs- The Lady Pirates
tennis team improved day, losing 7-2. will play away at Old
its record Saturday by ECU's Galen Treble Dominion today at 2
defeating Harvard's downed Lance p.m. The men will
junior varsity squad, Thompson, 6-3, 7-6, travel to UNC-
6-3. and Jeff Farfour eas- Charlotte on April 6.
In singles, Debbie
Christine(ECU) def.
Jaret Caplan, 6-1,
2-6, 6-3; Katherine
Tolson (ECU) def.
Sue Morganstein, 6-1,
6-0; Janet Russell
(ECU) def. Andrea
Girlcn, 6-2, 6-0; Kcn-
dal Webb (H) def.
Lori Weep, 6-0, 6-0;
and Liz Simmons (H)
def. Kim Harrison,
6-0,6-0.
In doubles, Russell-
Redford def. Caplan-
Girlcn, 6-7, 6Ar 6-3;
Tolson-Christine def.
Joff-Wcbb, 7-5, 6-3;
and Simmons-Pierce
def. Reep-Harrison,
6-3, 6-0.
The women are
now 5-6.
The ECU men's
tennis team won only
two singles matches
against UNC- Jeff Farfour
ed past Clayton
Pressley, 6-4, 6-0, to
finish as the Pirates'
lone victors. The men
are 4-6, and UNC-W
is now 9-5.
r.AK!5 JEVE1 1 V5
ES'�8 ,i-l�D 1912
GKEFNVILLE N C
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o ?. iMi
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send a letter of qualifications to:
FRANK WIGGINS
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Or call 1-800-662-7231
8an-4pn, MonFri .
Se the Navy's Flight Demonstration Tean
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Cl CsmoufUfetf Fatigues
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TACOI WEDNESDAY
ECU catcher Jack Curlings prepares for Bob Davidson's next delivery in Friday's game with
I -Wilmington.
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CHARGING THROUGH THE 80'6
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INFORMATIONAL
INTEREST MEETINGS
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SPECIAL
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 5, 1983
Classifieds
USPA Choice 8m. Chuek - Bom In
ROOMMATE
WANTED
I ROOMMATES NEEDED tor
Georgetown Apts! Call 75 4�5
SERVICES
MISC.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, �xperience. quality
work, IBM Selectric typewriter
Call Lame Shive 7Sf SMI or
GAIL JOYNER 7S 102
TYPING Term papers, thesis,
etc Call Kempte Dunn, 752 47J3.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE Complete audio repair
call after 6 p.m Mark 752 1W
MOVING? No Ob too large or
imalP Reasonable rates, call
759533
TYPING � 12 years experience.
Call 355 �74 after 5:30 p m
WANTED
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALL
Reasonable rates. CallI 751 �533.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
WANTED to sub lease one room
apartment at Tar River Estates
this summer Apt is beside
large swimming pool, has patio
and is located 5 minutes from
campus. Call 7S� 4?4 for more
information.
LOOKING FOR AN APART
MENT7T We're graduating this
semester and need someone to
take our lease m May.
2 bedroom townhouse with new
carpet, located at River Bluff
behind Papa Kati For more in-
formation, call 75 344 and ask
for Steele or Kevin.
PERSON'S) WANTED to
sublease 2-bdrm townhouse at
Cherry Court May through
August For more info, call
752 373
FOR SALE
WANTED FEMALE
bartenders lor part time and
summer 0b Apply between 2
ana 4 Thursday March 24th At
tic 103 E 4th Street
ATTRACTIVE MODELS
WANTED lor figure �
intimate apparel
photography Excellent pay
Send figure photo and personal
information t0 P O Box 1613,
Rocky Mount. N C 27801 113.
ENERGETIC Part time
salesperson needed Available
mornings and Saturdays. Ex-
perience preferred but not
necessary. Apply in person.
Leather n wood. Ltd Carolina
East Mali No phone calls.
MATURE. RESPONSIBLE
PERSONS WANTED FOR sum
mer sub leasing in 2 bedroom
townhouse swimming pool, $240
plus utilities, 757 3�0� Ot 757 1715.
SUMMER JOBS: Two water
safety instructors. RN and arts
and cralts director For intor
mation write Ed Hodges. Jr. 215
E nth Street Washington. NX
27M�
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff:
Welcome to our flea market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd Open every Saturday and
Sunday t til 5. Crafts, tools, fur-
niture, books, etc. Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' items
Real bargains
TWIN BED WITH FRAME, box
spring, mattress, table chest.
Good condition, call 752-3522.
K2 750 KAWASAKI, Wl, $00.
Priced to sell. Great bargain.
Good condition. This is a real
motorcycle. Make an offer. Call
752435.
50 SPECIAL II Yamaha SI.200
Good condition. An excellent
bike. Need to sell Make an of
fer Call 752 4935.
192 CHEVY Custom Deluxe 10,
4x4 4 speed, sliding rear win
dows, AMFM, cassette. PS,
P.B. Lock-in hubs. Rally wheels
Priced to sell. 110.500. Call
752 4935
FOOD LION
Those triett good thru
Saturday April 9, 1983
USOA
5 Lb. Plea Or Hart � Frith Pail,
6roun4 Beef a-
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Lb.
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Chuck
Roast
4 8 Lb. ft - .
Smoked Picnics u 78
Lb.
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:
Quart
Baa
USD Cbalaa - F- ily Ptek A a
Cube Steak Lb 24g
Strawberries
TbtMtftJB Siotiiaii
Gripes
u99
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ABORTIONS UP
lO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S1S5 00 Pregnancy Test. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
132 0535 (Toll Free Number
BOO 221 254) between � AM
and 5 P M. Weekdays.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion a difficult deo
DEPEND ON. sion that's made easiei by
-ie women of the riemmg Center Counselors are
avanoDie Jay ana night to support ana under
s'ana vou Vour safety, comfort and privacy are
assured Dy the caring start ot the Fleming Center
SERVICES � Tuesday - Saturaay Aportion Ap-
pointments � 1st & 2na Trimester Abortions up tc
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � Ah inclusive Fees � insurance
Acceptea � CALL 781-5550 DAY C NIGHT �
Health care counseling jije; FLEMING
and education for w sriiTrn
men of an ages CcNTcR
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
'C Greenville Blvd.
753023 �24 MRS.
PLAZA SHELL
24 hour Towing Service
U-Haul Rentals
Available
Complete Automotive
Service
24 hr. lowing Service
Jartran Rentals Available
Buck's
Gulf
2701 E. 10th St.
58 10JJ
put $'
is d neco restaurant
in doajnt own
areenuille thai I
S WfTHH WALKING PtSJAHCI
i�n ftHh �t brtii'Mi' pmnamg jnckt and hook barn)
SERVES HOME-STYLE EOoa
(usually f v-�-t ablet frmoar�d doilu)
� HAS FRESH BAKED BREAf?
FEATURES &ALLY SPECALS
(-tnr- ��Ly m plu tax )
RAS HAPPY HOUR OAL 77ESmy
46 PM I � rar a 12 em cup of kud )
HAS TAKB-OCTS rJU �,n m s7
Watch for the opening
of the Old Jail
with all ABC permits
�-w�.i�m i
m.Ti jnriM mM ' ' i "w1 ��-
PkS. �f 12 12 Oz. Cim
Miller
Pkf af 6 12 Oz. CiitRis ft U.
SeMHz
$J59
1.5 Lita
e�i�U�
r - BargaatY Baarff taraaa1, Rilaa.
alii Blue. Plak CkaklW. Baa R.tt
GalloWine
2 Liter
Qaart
yj-ow
SODRI
SODRJ
119 Sheets 2 Ply
So-Dri
Towels
Why Pay S9
-A. fc
4.5 0i. U.CkaakTaaa la OH
Duke's
Mayonnaise
iVfkf Way Ptf M.
�Ny
NvoaaA5E
J
'CS.
tamua
Half Gallon Dnald Dock � w:
Orange 4
Juice r
Fvm
399
It 0t. � Cattlatarff'Taiat PtttBaakar Bill
Hot Dog Sauce
489
10 Oaata
r
14 Oz. Caa - Attartaa' Et3 �� 0t. Uaa�1Maar�aaii Site Cat Ut
Jeno's Pizza Rf Wo Dog FoodtS Purina 100

299
1 U. - Pad Ta-ja
22 Oaaca I Caaat - Faaa Taea NaetartarUat �a � Oz. - Attartt4 T.fart 1- 1 U. Na4 laea
Dove liquid p Buns & Rolls light If Lively Katrine Qaartert
yikY vi
MQN
Z
4 Pack Assorted
Cottonelle
Toilet Tissue T?

Wy TM '1 9
49 0. 1i S-f'erf
Detergent
JfWy
.
Ha' Gail SO- 0'
Wisk
F3,
�HI 111 I I II
n�WtllHIUI.I�





CAMPUS COUPONSSAVINGS
Warning: These coupons are coded and serially numbered
Any misuse can lead to federal prosecution
Sare5(Koff Soft Afate Sane
from Bones find.
TO DFAtf R Bornes-Hind Pharmaceuticals, Inc. will
reimburse you for the face value of this coupon plus 7
handling allowance provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales and that upon request you agree to furnish proof
of purchase of sufficient product to cover all redemptions.
Coupon is void where faxed, prohibited or restricted by
low ond moy not be assigned or transferred by you. Cosh
value M2CT Customer must pay any applicable tax. for
redemption moil to Bornes-Hind, PO Box 1442, Clinton
Iowa 52732 COUPON EXPIRES DEC 31. 1983
0DD77 101012
To order call toll-free:
1-800-621-8200
(In Illinois call 1-800-972-8302)
Ask for TIME offer T79943
Or mail to:
TIME
541 North Fairbanks Court
Chicago, Illinois 60611
See SPECIAL STUDENT OFFER
on other side.
SAVE 25c
on your favorite
&p; style
Now you can have your own
thick plush QT beach towel!
Suntan
lOTrONI
A $12.00 retail value, yours for only s95
(Ordering instructions on reverse side )
Win a
Pioneer Progression IV Stereo!
All free from Campus Coupons and
Pioneer Electronics U.S.A. Inc.
I
I
L
Enter and win a Pioneer Progression IV Stereo'
Name
Address
Cty
State
School
. Z.p
Age .
Summer Phone (.
School Phone
.m f ?
Mail to Campus Sweepstakes, P.O. Box 14845, Chicago, IL 60614
Contest Rules:
Soeepstates i � an :�� :jiiege jwsneanc
�� � ' - - ' a$:
I �-� torn
i entry - -���� v �. ' -
�-
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4 Winnet ot trie cneet Progress . - ��� � age ;r �
I . � � eg( � 5� - �� � -
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5 This Sweet �-� �
I E Federa se ir: �; QMS M Bn
j . � � . - � � -���-���-�-�'� ���-�� . -� .

I 7 The � Mj njes � lm
STORE COUPON
SAVE 25 ON
TC IX DEADER yck. are au'hored'c ac as our
agerv lot lha wdsmpnor o) 'r s coupon irVe mH
'�e'fbu'se vou 'ace vaiue o'us Jt Mara�� :
eact1 coupor ' nas Dee- used r accordance
a �� out customer o"e' Vox; wne-e proniDi'eci
�a�ea a resic-ed Dy ia Cast- adampMn .aiue ' 20 o' t� This coupor is
orassigaD'e invoices proving purchase o suffoenl s'ock to cover coupons
presented -nust be snown upor reques' Man couoor's �� Fl CKEH PO Box
1020 Ointon. Iowa 52734 Resnbursarnantmlbenvidei .� wta kstnbutoral
iKi'mercriand'se GoodonivonFL'CKER5paci - . � �� se constitutes fraud
250 B
Coupon Expires 12 31 84
0166815
EM5DD 10Dflb2
I
OFFICIAL ORDER FORM
"DO IT" T-SHIRT
FROM � iottiiiiip
LISTERINE
Complete this order form and mail with $2 99
(check or money order only) and one
UPC symbol from any size Listenne
for each T-Shift ordered, to
LISTERINE T-SHIRT
PO Box 9910. St Paul. MN 55199
I
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MEDIUM
LARGE
X-LARGE
t please print)
uM De usac
Slate
Apt
Zip
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STORE COUPON
5(Ki
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� ,jrjn CAnnca nwvauoi ji, ivdj �m- - m
�L50c C ni68550J
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TO THE DEALER: Vou are duoned lo act as
our agent lor redemption ot this oupon we n
reimburse vou lor the tare waiue ot this toupon
or it coupon cans lor tree merchandise e win
reimburse you tor such tree goods plus ?C nan
rftng provKtefl that you and the consumer have
complied with the teims ot our coupon otler Void
where prohibited taxed or restricted by 'aw
dood only m U S A and U S MiMaiy bases over
seas Cash value i ?0 ot 1C 'he consumer must
pay any sales tax FRAUD CLAUSE Any other
application constitutes traud Invoices proving
purchase within the last 90 days ot sufficient
stocx lo cover coupons presented lor redemption
must be made available upon request Otter iim
ited to one coupon per specified product and sut
Mail coupons to WARNfR I AMBERT COMPANY
PO BOX 1737 CLINTON IA S?734
COUPON EXPIRES AUGUST 31. 193
ru
a
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a
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The $93 BritRail Youth Pass
If ou art1 under 2o. vou can iran-l for consecutive dass h rail
anywhere in Knland Scotland or UaJo for onh Sl I S ' Wuh ower
H.lHKi trains a da servng 2.ihhi sOBOBS, HntRail provides a fist
frequent and ecnnomicaJ v.av lo travel The flcxibilitv of the Pa will
help ou to make the best use of our time in BriOiB The louth Pass
enables vou to travel long distances quickh and comfortablv the tnp
from London to Ednbttfgh takes lust oer 41. hours and it s -�H miles'
It's also ideal for das trips from London to places like Oxford. Bath
Stradord or York iou can also bu a 14 da 21 da or one month
outh Pass for Sl. SIN.s or SM I S If vou plan to travel to the
European Continent or Ireland, vou can sae even more b combining
a Sea Pass uith vour touth Pass
The Youth Pass and Seapass must be purchased in North merica before vou depart for Europe.
This is Kodak's newest
professional motion picture
Mm now adapted tor
sW! use in your 35mm
camera! See the back of
trie attached coupon and
discover what the quality
film can do for your
photography.
- DAYS
U DAYS
21 DAYS
1 MONTH
iOtTH
PVSS
own
lift
$: 15
ORDER FORM
Ol TH PVVNITH
OWWAI SLVPVSS
r Ron IRILISD
101 TH Pss�ITH
KOI N0TR1P gtf�S
Fl Kttff IRELKSD
1118
lc
JM.s
SJO
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51H!
1220
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1218
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SJS)
M il i.k tr I S
jnic
!� t-ni li�v-ct
Vddrrvi
( itv MJtC Zip
� rut thi cimpom fUomg u ith cheek � m me � � I
�VRML 6.V0 THIRD AEM E NE� iORk N MM
tor further mtormalu-n - his k thi N
! LNTROPU TORY OFFER
" �
D HeresmyS2 Rush me 2 rolls of 20-exposure Kodak 5293
(Otter limited to 2 rolls per customer
Name
Address
Prints and Slides from the same roll
Mail to Seattle Fi.mvVorks
500 3rd W PO BoxC-34056
Seattle. WA 98124
SAVE 25$ ON
The Trade Secret
for Beautiful Hair
Try jhirmack and give your hair the caretu
attention it deserves Every shampoo.
mstant conditioner deep conditioner
and hair spray has been professionally
formuiatea and salon testea
'V V





CAMPUS COUPONSWIN A PIONEER STEREO!
?
THEREALBEAUTYOFSOFTMATE
SALINE IS THE WAY IT WORKS.
08170383
Soft Mate Saline for soft contacts quickly adjusts to the pH
of your eyes so they feel better. And look better.
To get your own
or
beach towel
send this coupon with your name, iaress and Zip
code a check or money order for $7 95 and a UPC
code number from a QT bottle or tube to
QT Beach Towel Offer
P.O. Box 4303
Young America, MN 55399
Make checks payable to QT Beach Towel Offer
Please do not send cash
A thick, plush QT beach towel.
A $12.00 retail value, yours tor only $7.95
Perfect to use when you get your tan in
one day with QT.
Name
Address
City
State
Allow 6-8 weeks to- delivery Otter expires 9 30 83
Void where prohibited taxed or restricted Good only in U.S.
The towel pictured on the reverse side ,s an iiluH-ttononhe '
beach towel The towel you will receive measures 36 x 60 and �
white with blue and brown stripes and the QT logo
rn
The smartest and most economical way to follow
the latest news from the worlds of:
QnSoftMote
Sdmc from Barnes-Hind.
Good on 8 oz. and 12 ox. sizes. J
ofl TIME s S1 50 cover pnce with this
special student rate of usl 40C an issue'
TIME s basic subscription rate is 79C an issue )
For fast service call this toll-FREE number
800-621-8200
(In Illinois call 1-800-972-8302)
Ask for TIME otter T79943
Or mail this order form in today!
Yes! Sei i me ssues I TIME it
� redil . ��� �� � �� ' ��'� ' : : ��' 5Sue � "
order 25. maximun '04
Isave ; � . -� .��;� T ME sbas - � :
scnptran rate is 79c ai
Payment enclosi I B i � ��
Campus Coupons will send a lucky winner a Pioneer PnaaMonlV
S?ereo listen? The ultimate expression of excellehce in high fidelrty
components. See contest rules and entry blank on reverse side.
I
tVve
S
scv
V
sv
-as
tioO
fcc

J
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i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
INCREDIBLE MmmCOLM!
INCREDIBLE SAVINGS!
Here's your chance to use the film Hollywood's top filmmakers use in
their rnulti-million-dollar productions now adapted for use in your
35mm camera at a cost less than you're use to paying for film Enjoy
micro-fine grain, nch colors and shoot in bright or low- light at up to 800
ASA Use it INDOORS OR OUT, without a filter. And GET PRINTS.
SLIDES. OR BOTH with this profes-
sionally versatile film. Don't miss your
chance to be shooting this incredible
film. We can only make you this
great offer because we're con-
fident you'll become a regu-
lar customer once you've
tried it Fill out coupon and
mail today to the address indicated
on other side
SAVE 25c
on Flicker"
Extra savings on the
extra safe women's shaver
with the convenience of
5 blades in each shaver.
5 blades in each shaver. � 2jfL�"?!i?J
25c
STORE COUPON
SAVE 25c
on Ricker
25c
i
V
A(
Ski
v ti
TtflCEADAY
k�o, in otter for -�V1
��M. I

t0
t�,lce
it
� ��

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isTeR�e
SH1BT
Wye
tn
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It
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Color
Do � TiC�
ADav
50�cP�
rrtp'
nt
ONUV
a
da?
iss
yestet
Com
Do
on
pietety
Order form
revei
se
sde
STORE COUPON
USTERlNi
To Dealer, for reimbursement send to
ntemationai Piaylex. inc Box 1031 Clin-
ton iowa 52734 We wM pay vou 25c plus 7c per coupon
handl.ng provided vou and the consumer nave complied
th tne terms of the offer Consumers must pav sales taxes
Offer limited to one coupon per Jhirmack package Cash
value 1 20 of 1C Good m U S only- void where prohibited
Not valid on 15 or 2 0 oz tnal size Sgim a
C � X OFFER EXPIRES Apni 30 1984 �0
Listerine Antiseptic kills the germs that
can cause bad breath. Use Listerine
twice a day. One time for you.
A second time for someone else.
And save 50c with this coupon on
any size Listerine.
50�
ON ANY SIZE
LISTERINE
DOIT!
TWICE A DAY.
vv
01 251 CC
33oOO UDoOa
STORE COUPON





Title
The East Carolinian, April 5, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 05, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.261
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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