The East Carolinian, March 31, 1983








She iEaat (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 Nofc
Thursday, March 31, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Naso, Williams Win SGA Elections
B DARRYl BROWN
uulxal Nrw I dilur
Paul Naso outdistanced Tory
Russo by more than 300 votes
esterda and was elected presi-
dent of Student Government
Association for the 1983-84
school year. Lindsey Williams
won the vice presidency by a com-
fortable margin over both her op-
ponents, and Sarah Coburn and
Becks Talley, who ran unoppos-
ed, were re-elected secretary and
treasurer for the SGA. respective-
ly.
There were 128 ballots cast for
Naso, amounting to 59 percent of
the vote, as opposed to 881 votes
for Russo. Williams won by a
landslide over Tim Mertz and
David Futrell, collecting more
votes than her two opponents put
together. She received 1077 votes,
compared to 505 for Futrell and
553 for Mertz.
Talley received 1916 votes and
Coburn won with 1915 votes.
In contrast to last year's bitter
and controversial race for the
SGA presidency, Russo graciously
conceded to Naso late last night.
"1 extend my full congradulations
to Paul and look forward to
working with him next year he
said.
"It really feels good said an
elated president-elect Naso. He
thanked all the people who sup-
ported him and said he looks
foreward to working with them in
the fall.
Naso first priority is to establish
the communications network he
promised during the election cam-
paign. He said he looks forward
to getting all groups on campus
involved in the SGA.
Elections chairperson Joy
Wilkins was pleased with student
participation in the election. "I
thought the turnout was ex-
cellent she said. She compared
the moce than 2100 ballots cast by
students Wednesday to the ap-
proximately 1200 votes cast in last
fall's SGA legislative elections.
Approximately 20 percent of
ECU's more than 13,500 studnets
voted in yesterday's election, a
figured considered high in com-
parison to some previous student
elections. ECU, like most college
campuses, has a tradition of voter
apathy in school elections as well
as state and national elections.
In the previous election last spr-
ing for SGA executive officers,
about 2800 students voted. That
contest, however, saw a five-way
race for SGA president and no
candidates ran unopposed.
Wilkins said the elections pro-
cess came off without a hitch.
"We had some good support
from groups she said.
Wilkins said she did not expect
any charges to be filed by can-
didates or any election results con-
tested.
President-Elect Paul Naso
Officials Using Team Effort
In Bid For Re-Accreditation
Voting For SGA Officers
Photo By CINDY WALL
EC I students cast more than 2100 ballots Wednesday in the annual spring elections for SGA officers.
oting tables were set up in from of the student store and 19 other locations on campus. Turnout was con-
sidered excellent b Elections Chairperson Joy W ilkins. Only about 1200 students voted in the fall elections
for the SGA legislature. The election process came off without a hitch and no results are expected to be
:ontested.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
University officials are using a
team effort to regain accreditation
from the National Council for Ac-
creditation of Teacher's Educa-
tion for the ECU School of
Education, which was denied its
request for accreditation earlier
this month.
ECU Chancellor Dr. John M.
Howell is keeping in regular con-
tact with the three people who are
most involved in the r e -
accreditation effort: acting Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Dr. Angelo A. Volpe, current
Dean of the School of Education
Dr. Richard W. Warner Jr and
newly appointed Dean-elect Dr.
Charles R. Coble.
Coble, who will take over
Warner's post on May 6, is confi-
dent that NCATE will grant ac-
creditation to the School of
Education during the next
academic year. "We plan to
vigorously pursue re-accreditation
by NCATE Coble said in a re-
cent interview.
Volpe agreed with Coble,
claiming the NCATE denial is on-
ly temporary and will be cor-
rected. "Not only will we seek the
renewal of accreditation, but we
intend to build upon our already
excellent teacher education pro-
grams, which we consider among
the finest in the state Volpe
said.
Warner, who will be taking a
leave of absence to enter the
seminary, said he will be activelv
invoked in the early efforts to
correct the areas of ECU's teacher
training program that are unac-
ceptable to NCATE. "I don't
think there's any question that the
university is capable of meeting
the requirements Warner told
The East Carolinian. "Everyone
that I talked to believes the ac-
creditation is important and that
we're going to do the things we
need to do to be reaccreditated
Howell said NCATE Joes not
approve of the "administrative
structure" of the K I teacher
training program. I think that
NCATE has one view,and we nave
a different one Howe said.
Howell added that EC l 's
diverse program comes from the
administrative structure of the
East Carolina Teachers College.
"We administer the program ii
more decentralized wa than
thev'J ic TE) like to see it ad-
ministered Howell -aid. He
also said the School oi I I ition
doesn't "have am objections to a
more cent rail conti
non Because I
rule put in effect b NCATE,
official findings of Ktiga-
tion into ECU's program will not
be made public he secc -
week of April. According to
NCATE's Executive Director Dr.
Lyn Gubser, the gag rule is
designed to give the institution
question a chance to respond I
the accreditation dcv.
Henderson Says SGA Shouldn't Fund Schools
B GREG RIDEOl T
St�i tdilor
Outgoing SGA President Eric
Henderson offered some solutions
Wednesday to what he sees as an
abuse of SGA funds. Henderson
said the funding of academic
departments from student activity
fees is wrong and should be stop-
ped.
The specific targets of Hender-
son's suggestions are the School
of Music, School of Art and the
School of Speech and Drama.
These academic departments
received 44 percent of the 82-83
SGA budget, with the School of
Music getting the biggest slice of
the pie � $26,479.
Henderson pointed out that not
only do these three schools get the
most money, but they get money
for the same thing from both the
SGA and the university.
According to a Dec. 20, 1982
memorandum from Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Robert Maier to SGA Vice Presi-
dent Bob Mills, all academic
departments and schools get thr
necessary amount of funds for
operation. The letter states that
the School of Music is not depen-
dent on other funds for such pur-
poses.
Vet, in letter from Dean of the
School of Music Charles Schwartz
to Maier, Schwartz asks Dr.
Maier to find some way to
stabilize the SGA allocation
because "about one-third of our
operating budget is dependent
upon SGA funds
According to a copy of the
university budget for the School
of Music and a bill submitted last
year to the SGA for funds, line
items (the area money will be used
for, such as "Repairs and
Maintenance") are the same.
They asked for money for the
same thing from both places.
Henderson believes the School
of Music is the biggest abuser of
the present system, yet he says the
Playhouse and Visual Arts Forum
(School of Art) aren't far behind.
Academic departments are
funded by tuition fees, Henderson
says; activities are funded by the
SGA. He said he sees no harm in
funding a concert or an art
display, but only if the money is
for a specific project; not for a of-
fice equipment.
Henderson said that under the
present system, small groups have
no chance. And, he says, "thev
are the ones that reallv need our
help
The SGA appropriates money
each spring for the next academic
year. Groups who wish to receive
funds must submit a budget at this
time. This year the SGA will have
about SI20.000 to allocate. After
the executive budget and reserve
fund is subtracted, there will be
approximately S60,000 left. The
School of Music, through two
budget requests, has asked for
$56,000.
The SGA, Henderson says,
should also fix some of its own
broken rules. One SGA guideline
stipulates that no appropriation is
to be used for travel. Vet. each
year they fund the School of
Music for travel expenses He
beliees it should be one wa or
the other.
Henderson also believes the Ap-
propriations Committee of the
SGA should work harder in
researching the requests from
groups. He believes this could be
accomplished b having the
legislature meet twice a month in-
stead of once a week. Each off-
week would be used for commit-
tee work.
House Passes Drunken Driving Bill;
Senate Must Work Out Differences
RALEIGH (UPI) - The state
House turned back renewed ef-
forts to amend Gov. James B.
Hunt Jrs anti-drunken driving
proposals Wednesday and gave
the measure final approval, 110-3.
The measure was returned to
the Senate, which must decide
whether to concur in House
changes or resolve differences bet-
ween the two versions in a con-
ference committee.
Sponsors said it will be sent to
conference to consider House
changes made after the package
passed the Senate earlier this
month.
"There are some changes which
we must look at said Sen. Hen-
son Barnes, D-Wayne, the Senate
sponsor. "They are substantive
enough we could not explain them
to the Senate on a concurrence
vote.
But Barnes said the House
changes were "not anything so
substantive that they cannot be
resolved" and predicted a com-
promise would be reached in "a
week or so
The bill, introduced on the first
day of this year's session, contains
three major provisions aimed at
reducing drunken driving in
North Carolina. They are:
A new driving-while-impaired
law with mandatory jail terms for
serious offenses and tougher
license suspension requirements
for violators.
An increase in the legal drink-
ing age for beer and wine to 19
from 18.
A dramshop law making
bars, restaurants and stores liable
for accidents caused by underage
or certain intoxicated customers.
Although the basic provisions
of the bill are identical, a House
committee made major changes to
the measure before sending it out
for a vote.
One major difference involves
the dram shop. The Senate ap-
plied the provision only to sales to
underage customers by bars,
restaurants and stores, but the
House extended it to obviously in-
toxicated customers.
The House and Senate versions
also differ on the requirements for
mandatory jail terms for major
drunken driving violations and
fees charged to convicted drunken
drivers for various services, in-
cluding limited driving privileges
and mandatory alcoholism screen-
ing.
The House debated the bill for
just over an hour Wednesday, tur-
ning back renewed attempts to
raise the drinking age for beer and
wine to 21 and to ban open beer
and wine containers in cars.
Similar amendments were
defeated during earlier debate.
Rep. Bruce Ethridge,
D-Omlow, proposed an amend-
ment raising the drinking age to
21 in one-year increments. The 19
drinking age proposed in the bill
would go into effect this October,
but Ethridge wanted to raise it to
20 in 1984 and 21 a year later.
The proposal was recommend-
ed by the Governor's Crime Com-
mission, he said, and would save
the lives of an estimated 45 to 50
teenagers annually.
A split drinking age of 19 for
beer and wine and 21 for liquor
and mixed drinks sends "mixed
signals" that beer and wine cause
fewer drinking problems,
Ethridge said.
Ethridge's amendment was
defeated 64-50.
Rep. Dan Lilley, D-Lenoir,
proposed an amendment barring
the transportation of open beer
and wine containers in the
passenger compartment of cars.
He was defeated Tuesday on a
similar amendment changing a
section of the bill allowing
passengers, but not drivers, to
drink beer and wine.
cy i
1 f illiii�
iV
11
I
Vice President Lindsey Williams Treasurer Becky Talley
1983-84 SGA Executive Officers
Secretary Sarah Coburn
Seabolt Moves To UNC Hospital
Richard Seabolt is the only
ECU student to remain hospitaliz-
ed as a result of the March 2 ex-
plosion at the Village Green
Apartment complex that killed
one student and injured a dozen
others.
Seabolt is in stable condition at
North Carolina Memorial
Hospital in Chapel Hill. He was
transferred there from Pitt Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital March 17.
Seabolt was transferred mainly as
a convenience to his family.
According to a hospital
spokesman, Seabolt is suffering
from a "closed-head injury"
which severely injured the left side
of his brain, leaving the right side
of his body paralyzed.
Seabolt's mother, Mrs. Doris
Ann Seabolt, told The East
Carolinian in a telephone inter-
view from her son's hospital room
that her family feels "real en-
couraged" by her son's improve-
ment.
Mrs. Seabolt said she has
received encouragement from the
occupational and physical
therapists working with
her son. "We have great faith
he'll recover fully she said.
Seabolt is expected to undergo
an extensive period of rehabilita-
tion.
Mrs. Seabolt said she hated to
leave Greenville. "We have never
been treated better in our lives
she said. She said the staff at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital did a
"wonderful" job and wished to
thank them for her family and her
son.
Mrs. Seabolt also thanked
members of the Pi Kappa Phi
fraternity (to which her son
belongs) who have been keeping
in touch with her.
���Min��
4fcg 0
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31T 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Car ninian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd sued paper can
not be accepted.
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column tor
publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
tor the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesdayy for the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
MCAT KAPLAN
COURSE
Attention all pre med
students A representative from
Kaplan will be at ECU on Satur
day April 16ttl. a' 10 00 a m to
present a mim'course on how the
Kaplan course can improve your
MCAT scores We are looking
for twenty interested persons to
sign up for the course in order
for the Kaplan course to be
'aughf a'ECU this summer The
"ee'mg is to be held m the
Biology Reading Room and is
tree to the public so any m
terested persons may simply
ome on April 16th or contact the
Biologv Club for more mtorma
��on
CHEMISTRY
DEPARTMENT
SEMINAR
Dr .1 Ron Mass Department
of Health and Human Services.
Public Health Service, NIH, Ha
� onal Institute of Enviromental
Health Research Triangle Pa k
aiii present a seminar entitled
selected Recent Developments
Mass Spectromtry and their
Applications to Enviromental
Problems' Friday April 1, 1983.
.00 p m . Flanagan Building
Rm 201 Refreshments will be
served in room 204 following the
seminar
WEST AREA CAMPUS
West Area Gets High" on
Wednesday. April 20th from 1 5
pm in the parking lot adiacent to
Clement and White dorms
Come Oin us and find our what
The Alternative really is.
ECU SURF CLUB
Attention ECU Surf Club
Members Meeting Thursday
night at 7 p m in the Cof
feenouse in MendenhaM Student
Center Last Meeting of the year
so attendence is mandatory
Plans about Easter contest and
final plans of the year.
WZMB
The Electric Rainbow Radio
Show rocks Greenville on
WZMB Friday at 4 p.m.the
album special will be "Heavy
Metal Thunder a collection of
ami by various heavy metal
sands Keith Mitchell is your
host on Greenville's lammingest
WZMB
SAM
The Society tor the Advance
ment of Management will meet
Tuesday. April 5. in Raw! 104 at
4 00. The guest speaker will be
Grif Garner, an ECU graduate
and a Harvard MBA graduate
Mr. Garner will speak on the
concepts of establishing and
running a new company This
will be the last speaker for the
Spring semester All parties in
terested are welcome to attend
CHAIRPERSON AND
MEMBERS NEED
If you like variety entertain
ment and want a challenge,
become the chairperson or
either a member on the Student
Union Coffeehouse Committee
For more information, contact
the Student Union (Room 234) at
757 6611. ext 210
BAHAI ASSOCIATION
OF ECU
The Bahai Club of ECU will
meet Tuesday April 5 in Room
241, MendenhaM Student Center
The Bahai faith teaches the con
cept of Progressive Reveala-
tion This means that in each
period of history God sends a
Manifestation to guide mankind
Bahai's believe Baha'u'llah'
(The Glory of God) is Gods
Messenger tor this age You are
cordially invited to come share
your thoughts with us
ARM WRESTLING
Trying to form an arm wrestling
club If interested first meeting
will be Thursday April 7, at 5 00
pm Room 102 Memorial Gym.
For further information contact
Curtis Sendek 752 9601
INTER VARSITY
Inter Varsity is for you! Come
spend an hour and a half with us
and smg your praise to the Lord
We meet on Wednesday nights
at 6 30 m Bioiogy N102
FACULTY,
STAFF AND
STUDENTS
The Junior Panheliemc Coun
cil will be sponsoring an Easter
Egg Hunt for the children of the
faculty, staff, students and sur
rounding area The event will
take place on the ECU Mall at
4:00 pm on Thursday March 31.
Prizes will be awarded to the
children!
FIRST AID
FOR TOTS COURSE
The Pitt Cokunty Health
Department will sponsor a First
Aid for Tots course for parents
of plreschool children, on Thurs
day. April 7th, form 7 00 9 00
pm The program will be held in
the Health Department Con
ference Room. Parking and en
try to the conference room are
at the rear of the mam building
There is no cost for this pro
gram
Topics covered will include
Respiratory Emergencies,
Bleeding and Bandaging. Shock,
Poinsoning, Specific Injuries,
Safety and Prevention
Pre registration is recom
mended For additional intor
mation and pre registration,
call Sue Evanko at 752 4141
FRISBEECLUB
Fnsbee Club The snow has
melted and warm weather is
hopefully with us for the rest of
the semester Come to the bot
torn of college hill on Tues. and
Thurs at 4 00 and enjoy the
wonderful game of ultimate
fnsbee Club meetings are Mon
day nights Rm 248 MSC at 800.
Anyone interested is welcome to
attend
CONGRADULATIONS
Congradulations to Mike Mor-
ris for winning the All Campus
Wrestling title in the 134 lb.
category Also, congr adulations
to John Nix and Keith Parham
for their tremendous showing in
the TKE Boxing Tournament.
And good luck to the undefeated
"A" and "B" softball teams of
Kappa Sigma. Bring home the
cup!
TAXES
Volunteers from the ECU Ac
counting Society and the Na
tional Association of Accoun
tants will be in the main lobby of
Mendenhaii Student Center to
help individuals prepare tax
returns from 4 to 7 pm each
Tuesday in March, and
Tuesdays and Thursdays in
April through April 15
GRADUATION
In an effort to expand the
limited seating for this year's
commencement proceedings,
two classrooms will be set up in
the Mingest Building with a
Closed circuit coverage of the
ceremony. Each classroom will
accommodate about 100 people
and will have a six toot T.V.
screen. No ticket is required
CLASSIFIED ADS
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you need mort linos. There �ro 33
units por lino. Each letter, punc-
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nyphenat words properly Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't tit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone Wo
reserve the right to reiect any ad.
All ads must bo prepaid. Eadotc
75 per line or fraction of a hue.
Please print legibly Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return la THE CAST CAROLINIAN
office �i 3:P� Tutsdajr before
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T . LLJL LL
PSICHI
Psi Chi presents topics to help
the listener to open herhis mind
to many different areas in the
field of Psychology On April 5,
Tuesday, m Room M9, Speight,
at 7 30 pm it will be no different.
Psi Chi proudly presents Dr. T.
Durham. His topic will be
Masturbation Come and clear
up any questions you may have
on this topic This lecture is open
to all
ASPA
American Society tor Person
nel Administrators will hold Its
83 84 elections on April 6 at 3 pm
in Room 207, Rawl All in
terested individuals wanting to
hold an office contact Dr.
Tomkiewicz or Brad Edwards
Wanted are new and present
members to help shape ASPA
progressive future To do your
part, get involved and become
an officer ASPA is ready tor
you Are you ready for ASPA
ECGC
The ECGC will have a wine
and cheese social Monday, April
4 at 8 00 pm So bring your
favorite wine or cheese to the
Newman House, 953 East loth
Street Come join the festivities!
SIGMA THETATAU
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Nu
Chapter is having their Spring
BanquetEducational meeting
April 19. 1983 at 600 pm at the
Greenville Golf and Country
Club The speaker will be Dr.
Lucie Young Kelly, the national
president elect of Sigma Theta
Tu. She will speak on 'Using
Research to Change Practice"
Dr. Kelly is a Professor of
Public Health and Nursing and
serves as editor of Nursing
Outlook Registration tee is $9 00
which includes dinner and
gratuity Students and inductees
will pay $6.00 Make check
payable to Sigma Theta Tau.
Beta Nu Chapter and return to
Carol Cox. ECU School of Nurs
ing by April 12. 1983 Include
name, address, number atten
ding and names of guests
Sigma Theta Tau, Beta Nu
Chapter is having their Spring
induction April 23, 1983 at the
Jenkins Auditorium at 11 00 am
Dr. Helen Yura will speak on the
"Nurse as Scholar
Beta Nu is having a business
meeting Monday, April 25. 1983
at 7 00 pm at the School of Nurs
ing, room 203. All new inductees
invited to attend
PHI ETA SIGMA
Students to be initiated into
Phi Eta Sigma are remind to be
at the multi purpose room, Men
danhall Student center, no later
than 7 15 p.m. on Thurs , Mar
31.1983
PITT COUNTY
HEALTH FAIR
The East Carolina University
School of Medicine is sponsoring
the Pitf County Health Fair on
April 22 and 23 at the Carolina
East Mall. There will be over 20
community organizations in-
volved in providing screening
and education during the two
day period Any student
volunteers willing to help with
health screenings and education
will be appreciated. For more
information or to volunteer,
please call the Health Education
Office at 757 6510 We need your
participation in making this
Health Fair a successl
SCHOOL OF ART
The School of Art is offering
the initial Wellington B Gray
Memorial Scholarship for
undergraduate students of
junior and senior rank who are
currently enrolled full time in
the School of Art and maioring
m Art Education The Well
ington B Gray Memorial
Scholarship is the amount of
50000. To qualify, a student
must have a grade point
average of 3.5 m hisher major,
and an overall average of 3.0
Slides of five works (name, title,
media, date) must accompany
the scholarship application
form Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art
Office The deadline for all com
pleted application material is
April 14, 1983 The scholarship
will be awarded before the end
of this acadmic year
WOULD YOU LIKE TO
BE AN AMBASSADOR
What exactly is an ECU Am
bassador The East Carolina
University Ambassador's will
be hosting an open house March
31st from 7:30 until 900 pm at
the Taylor Slaughter Alumni
Center across from Spilman. All
interested people are urged to
attend! Drop by and see what
the ECU Ambassadors are real
ly like!
PHI SIGMA PI
ELECTIONS
Phi Sigma Pi's Tau Chapter
will hold 19S384 elctions on
Tuesday, April 5, 19S3 at 5 00
p.m. in Rawl 130. All brothers
please attend this important
meeting.
IFCPAGENT
The Miss IFC Pagent is to be
held on April 25th at 7 00 p.m.
Applications need to be turned in
by 5:00 p.m.on Wed. April 6th
So all you Greeks need to pick
your BEST BABES NOW
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
A three part workshop offered
at no cost by the University
Counseling Center Thursday
March 31, April 7 and 14 All
three sessions will be conducted
from 3 pm 4 pm 305 Wright An
nex (757 6661). The workshop
will focus on help in numbers
distinguish between their asser
five, aggressive, and non-
assertive behaviors. Par
ticipants can learn how to ex-
press themselves directly and
openly, and respond to interper
sonal situations in a manner
which neither compromises in
dividual beliefs nor offends
others.
HAPPY
EASTER
SUMMER SCHOOL
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits
for Summer School 19S3 will be
accepted jin the Cashier's Of
fice. Room 105, Spilman
Building, beginning April 5.
Room assignments will be made
in the respective residence hall
offices on April 7 and April a.
Thereafter, they will be made in
the Office of Housing Opera
tions, Room 201, Whichard
Building. The rent for a term of
summer school is $120 for a
semi private room and SIBOfor a
private room Additional rent in
the amount of $20 is required for
Jarvis Hall.
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy,
provided such rooms are to be in
use this summer, are to make
reservations on Thursday, April
7. All other students may
reserve rooms on a first-come,
first serve basis on Friday,
April I.
Residence halls to be used for
women are Greene, Slay (first
floor for mobility impaired
students) and Jarvis. Men will
be housed in Fletcher, Slay
(first floor for mobility impaired
students) and Jarvis Halls.
ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
SCHOLARSHIP
The Past President's club of
the ECU Alumni Association is
offering a scholarship to an Am
bassador in order to express
theii deep appreciation tor the
vast amount of volunteer ser
vice thai the ECU Ambassadors
contribute to the progress and
welfare of East Carolina univer
sit. The recipient must be an
ECU student who is a member in
good standing of the ECU Am
bassadors and must be of such
classification as to be a senior m
the fall semester of 193 Any
Ambassador who is interested
should pick up an application
after March 21, 1983 m the
TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center Applications should be
completed and turned in by
April l. 1983
SPRING
CARNATION SALE
The Clothing and Textiles
Association Spring Carnation
Sale has been postponed until
March 31st Come and purchase
a flower for a friend from 10 00
am to 300 pm m front of the Stu
dent Supply Store
CAREER CHOICE
The Strong Campbell interest
inventory is offered every Tues
day at 4 PM in 305 Wright An
nex, when school is in session
with the exceptions of examina
tion period and registration
day This is available to an
students at no cost No formal
registration is required
PLANT SALE
The ECU Biiogy Club is av
,ng a plant sale at the Biology
Dept Greenhouse Thursday
March 31 from 7 30 am I 00
p.m. and Friday April 1 from
9 00 1100 am Everybody
Welcome
S. R. A.
Escorts are needed y �-(
Escort Service An,one -
terested in being an v jrl
please contact your occ" �?
tor it you are a dorm -es
if you live off campus cOMacI
the SGA office
CANOE TRIP
The Outdoor recrea'tor ecMar
for the Depar'n-f
intramural Recreatiora Mt
vices is sponsoring a caoe It c
on Wednesday Apr.i 13 9(3
The trip is suitable for beg rm nc,
or experienced canoe's 'C
participants will mee' Of nc
Memorial gym a' 3 00c m v
Wednesday for a Wesure , mc
die down the Tar Rive' as
approximately 2 hou's Paj
tictpants snouid a"ve tacn �-
Memorial gym at 6 0C r m
vance registration ana tae"
($3 00 per person ,s due x
p m on Tuesday Apr.i I 9(3
Groups are welcome Far
registration or more nformi
tion can or stop o� rm
Memorial Gym 75? �:
7 5 7 6317)
WALT DISNEY
WORLD
Representativeds from Wait
Disaey World m Orlando. Fl
will be at UNC Chapel Hill April
7 at 7.00 p.m to interview col
lege students maioring m retail
management, hotel'restaurant
management, recreation and
park administration or business
tor summer or fall employment
The Magic Kingdom College
Program includes a minimum of
30 hours of we'k per week and
students will be eligible for
special Disney arranged nous
mg near the Walt Disney World
resort area Students will
receive first-hand experience
while studying the practices and
philosophies employed by the
Disney management team
There will be a presentation
about the program given and m
ter news will follow afterwards
Students must be earning
academic credit while working
interested students need to con
tact Nancy Fillnow
The Fast Carolinian
5eri"t 'r cvmpui 1
Published ever, I' .v,zi.
anti Thursday Cu' ng Ma
academic year ano e.er�
Wednesday during ?� iv-
mer
The Eas' Carolina M
official newspaper of Eas
Carolina University Dwnec
operated and pubisnec '�
and by the students of Eas
Carolina Un.versify
Subscription Rate 176 paarti
The East Carolinian offices
art located m the Old Sc.�
Building en the campus �
ECU. Greenville, N C
POSTMASTER Senc ac
dress changes to The Eas
Carolinian. Old Sou
Building. ECU Gree �
NC 77834
Telephone 757 43 U8J
MM
4&tetet�erii
U-Filler-up gas station

Located under the'BIG FLAG
across from Pitt Plaxa

jon 264 Bypass.Now open for business
Stop in soon for all of your
petroleum needs
Cigarettes 65
also air � water for your convenience
Have a safe Easter weekend.
Low,Low gas prices
If You've Had a Hard Day ??
The Carolina Opry House Does
Help us Celebrate a
HARD DAYS NIGHT
Every Thursday
Free Admission for Everyone
and
The very best in Solid Gold Rock and Roll
with WITN's Greg Allinson
We're Taking You
Back in Time
For the Time of Your Life!

� -1 �
�r
s
I BREAKFAST BAR OFFERING!
� Freshly Scrambled Egg � Homemede Button Biscuits a Bacon
� Country Mb Gravy � Horn Fried Potato � Southern Styie Ortts �
Homemade Muffins � Link and Patty Sausag � A Choice oi
"Bhonsys" Own Spsclsl Fruit Toppings �Qratod Amsrtcsn CUmi �
PLUS Ths Fruit Bar featuring s vsrtoty of trash fruit and
SH0NEY&
205 Greenville Blvd.
�asAJiiiasA.il
8ATUROAV-SUMOAY
aMOUOAY
�as AJiaas am
Also Opan
Friday-Saturday Nights
HAVING PROBLEMS
with
DRUGS?- ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
L?
IS YOUR CAR READY FOR
THAT BIG TRIP HOME
WE CAN GET
YOU THE
iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiim
SEIKO SALE
Best Prices and Best Selection
Jk
SAVE 20 to 70 ON
SELECTED GROUP OF
SEIKO WATCHES
Visit our showroom and discover
an exciting array of Seiko watches.
For School- Work-Dress-Sports
Hurry Limited selection!
We Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL ft DRUG PROGRAM
301-303 Erwia Bldf.
757-6793
g 12SpJ
Coggins Car Care S
756-5244
4Ay�
SEIKO

The World's most
recognized brand name.
J.D. Dswson Company
Jewlen-Gtmorogisu
GntmHOtLocmtkmonly
2ME. 10th Si.
GrmkvHBg, W.C 27934
752-11$$
I
I
Democrats
Outside N
RALEIGH (UPI)
� Former Con-
gressman Richardson
Preyer said Wednes-
day a Democratic
fund raising organiza-
tion is seeking out-of-
state contributions,
even though
Democrats criticized
Republicans for using
the same tactics in
1982.
"We neer attemp-
ted to say we would
not raise money from
out-of-state said
Preyer, chairman of
the North Carolina
Campaign Fund.
"When you have a
Senate race with say
$14 million, which has
been suggested for the
(Jesse) Helms' cam-
paign, you have to go
out of state to combat
that. 1 don't think we
have a credibility pro-
blem
Preyer's comments
were in response to
commercials being
aired by the Jesse
Helms for Senate
Committee. The com-
mittee's ader-
tisements attack the
Campaign Fund for
receiving contribu-
tions from out of state
and claim the cam-
paign fund has ac-
cepted contributions
from "ultra-liberals
"Our ad points out
that (Gov.) Jim Hunt
in 1982 said that out-
of-state campaign
contributions create
'obligations you
ought not to have.
After making that
statement, the gover-
nor has junketed to
New York and Atlan-
ta to entice big cam-
paign contributions
from wealthy liberals
and union leaders
said Mark Stephens,
the committee's
treasurer. "Jim Hunt
simply has said one
thing and done
another
Prever said Hunt
had attendee
raisers in Ne
and Atlanta,
ed "the point
to make is thaj
raising funds
broad base oi
and we are n
any special
The adverti
sounds likn
made of boi
tists, but thai
the case
"We wish
raise all the c
funds we will
North Carol
combat the ('
Congressionj
Preyer said. '
is impossible.
The Congi
Club was fot
Helms and in I
has been cnti
Democrats
ing campaigi
from out-ol
Carter Wrd
Congressional
executive dfe
said the org
was not fun
committee"
tisemer
The da:
Preyer's ne
ference. I I
Sam Ervin c
growth of c
organization
Congress
and the Ci
Fund "unfoi
and said it
tnbuted to
cost of politij
state. The 8(
Democrat
WRAL-F V
Raleigh he t
see fund raij
other politj
tivities in the j
regular
oreanization:
4 � I f P
(Richard) i
entrusted "J
paign for reel
the Repur
tiona! Coi
then there wj
have b e
W atergate.
"The ver
ABORT iv
TO I2i I
OF PREG
Control anc
1 Preqnanc Co�
�yrttw ,narr
131-0535 ,Tol
wc :5�
ana 5PM teH
HALEIGMS
HEA
ORGAN)
-
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
JOSEPH'S
Maintenance Contracts I
tor IBM's, Remington
SR101'S Typewriters
752-0545
cut and ptaca or typawrtia
�j�VdisT
BjF ?S asjS j aaseBBBB�Al
X
I
ii
il
I
I
Send a celebration
of spring.
Easter is
Sunday. April 3.
TheFTDQoiyof
Sprint" Bouquet
GncnvUU
flower Shop
1127 Evm Strmt
759-2774
Send your thoughts
�jjUmgm
�1 �





r
Pteone.
m -
r
1�I�!�

�.
-r- 4 fit
'
I P R 1 N y
'ION SALE
CHOICE
S R. A.
h are neaj for ,�e
bervce Anyone ,n
� be.ng �n escort
�t�c1 �ovr dorm a!r((
I �ow a e a dorm revdent
ve ot� campus contaci
� -�ce
CANOE TRIP
' � lor recreation center
!�� Department 0f
� Recreational ser
I sponsoring a canoe tr,p
�eson� April 13 1933
p s su.table for beginning
enced canoers Trip
� ' " "l( rn��t behind
� J�m at 3 OOp m on
�� � 'or a iiesureiy pa0
� "v Tar R.ver lasting
ately 2 hours Par
� Is snouid arrive back at
I -�mat600pm Aa
eo s'raon and payment
S rt" person is due by 4 00
Tjesday April Ij, 1983
. I are welcome For
It on or more mforma
r Stop by rm H3
Gym. 7S7 6911 or
- � 6 31

I he Kasl Carolinian
BMC tns
: sited every Tuesday
r :iv during tne
� K e�r and every
-1 during the sum
e Eas' Carolinian is the
� Asoaper ot East
� versity, owned
�nd published tor
the s'uoents of East
I - n versify
Subscription Rate 170 yearly
Hw East Carolinian offices
irt located in the Old South
Bui'dmg on The campus of
ECU Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER Send ad
Ganges t�, The East
ii�n Old South
. ECU Greenville.
s: rs34
Telephone 757166, 6367,
.30�
CocttDCAl
St
R OFFERING!
hlm�"� Butt�rmMk Biscuits � L
�d Potatoes � South� Styte Ortta �
tnd Patty Stutaga � A Cho4c� of
Ppinga 0 Gratad American
varlaty of frsh fruit and
MOMDAV-raiOAV
� � am tiaaA.H.
SATUHDAY-auaiOAY
4 HOLHOAVt
� AM HMWM
Also Open
Fridoy - Saturday Nights
Midnight.
litfiiftiittiiiiiiiMitMiiiiitifiniiiiiiftiiiuitiitiittfHniitiittiiS
SALE I
id Best Selection
o to 70 ON 1
GROUP OF I
ATCHES 1
room and discover I
Lv of Seiko watches.
�rk-Dress-Sports
rited selection! I
;iKO
fid's most 1
brand name.
son Company
'tmologists
Location only
10th St.
'V.C. 27834
I6O0
I
a
�ak�-
Democrats Seek Money
Outside North Carolina
RALEIGH (UPI)
� Former Con-
gressman Richardson
Preyer said Wednes-
day a Democratic
fund raising organiza-
tion is seeking out-of-
state contributions,
even though
Democrats criticized
Republicans for using
the same tactics in
1982.
"We never attemp-
ted to say we would
not raise money from
out-of-state said
Preyer, chairman of
the North Carolina
Campaign Fund.
"When you have a
Senate race with say
$14 million, which has
been suggested for the
(Jesse) Helms' cam-
paign, you have to go
out of state to combat
that. 1 don't think we
have a credibility pro-
blem
Preyer's comments
were in response to
commercials being
aired by the Jesse
Helms for Senate
Committee. The com-
mittee's adver-
tisements attack the
Campaign Fund for
receiving contribu-
tions from out of state
and claim the cam-
paign fund has ac-
cepted contributions
from "ultra-liberals
"Our ad points out
that (Gov.) Jim Hunt
in 1982 said that out-
of-state campaign
contributions create
'obligations you
ought not to have
After making that
statement, the gover-
nor has junketed to
New York and Atlan-
ta to entice big cam-
paign contributions
from wealthy liberals
and union leaders
said Mark Stephens,
the committee's
treasurer. "Jim Hunt
simply has said one
thing and done
another
Prever said Hunt
had attended fund
raisers in New York
and Atlanta, but add-
ed "the point we want
to make is that we are
raising funds from a
broad base of people
and we are not tied to
any special group.
The advertisement
sounds like we're
made of bongo lef-
tists, but that is not
the case
"We wish we could
raise all the campaign
funds we will need in
North Carolina to
combat the (National)
Congressional Club
Preyer said. "But that
is impossible
The Congreesional
Club was founded by
Helms and in the past
has been criticized by
Democrats for seek-
ing campaign funds
from out-of-state.
Carter Wrenn, the
Congressional Club's
executive director,
said the organization
was not funding the
committee's adver-
tisements.
The day before
Preyer's news con-
ference, former Sen.
Sam Ervin called the
growth of campaign
organizations like the
Congressional Club
and the Campaign
Fund "unfortunate
and said it has con-
tributed to the high
cost of politics in the
state. The 86-year-old
Democrat told
WRAL-FM in
Raleigh he prefers to
see fund raising and
other political ac-
tivities in the hands of
regular party
organizations.
"If President
(Richard) Nixon had
entrusted his cam-
paign for reelection to
the Republican Na-
tional Committee,
then there would not
have been a
Watergate he said.
"The very use of
money on an enor-
mous scale, as the
Watergate hearing
showed, is one of the
greatest evils in this
nation today
Preyer said he
agreed with Ervin but
added that as long as
the Congressional
Club is well-funded,
Democrats will have
to raise money out of
state.
"We will not try to
take the place of the
Democratic Party but
we will try to help
finance the cam-
paigns he said.
Preyer also said the
Campaign Fund had
made "some
mistakes" in its ac-
tivities and cited a
newspaper ad it ran
criticizing Helms and
Sen. John East,
R-N.C, for their
positions on social
security.
"We will attempt to
focus a lot more on
the issues. Beginning
in May we will put out
a weekly fact sheet on
where Helms stands
on the issues, such as
the environment and
women Preyer said.
"You win on the
issues, but the way
campaigns are con-
ducted it takes a lot of
money to run them
Hunt Visits Pitt Co.
North Carolina
Governor James B.
Hunt Jr. was in
Greenville Monday to
attend dedication
ceremonies for Green-
ville's new water
treatment plant and to
address state school
officials attending the
Rural Education In-
stitute Conference.
Hunt said the new
water treatment facili-
ty, which can produce
12 million gallons of
water per day, "is an
excellent example of
Greenville's growth
and progress and its
wise planning
During the Rural
Education Institute
Conference, Hunt ad-
dressed issues shaping
public education in
North Carolina. "Our
future will be as great
as our children are
smart
Grad Student Wins
Trash Can Contest
The Campus
Beautification Con-
test, designed to
create attractive trash
receptacles and im-
prove the appearance
of the campus, has
selected graduate stu-
dent Susan Davenport
as this year's winner.
The second place
winner was Chi
Omega Sorority.
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Sorority received
third place.
The Physcology
Department extended
its appreciation to
Judy Andrews, Ray
Honeycutt, Shannon
Williams, BQTT,
Lambda Chi Alpha,
Kappa Alpha, Phi
Kappa Tau and Zeta
Beta Tau for their
help during the pro-
ject.
The contest was
judged be faculty
members Larry
Bolen, Wilburn
Castellow and
William
Grossmuckle.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
115.00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information call
837 0535 (Toll Free Number
1 MO-221 25) between 9 A.M
and S P.M. Weekdays.
RALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St.
Raleigl
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABORTION: a difficult dea-
DEPEND ON. sion that s made easier by
fhe women of the t-iemmg Center Counselors are
available day ana night to support, ana under-
stand you Your safety comfort and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � TuesOay � Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st & 2na Trimester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
nSntfrf' THE FLEMING
and education for wo-
nen of an ages CENTER
cut and place on typewrit
WoM
afiMrf
ff
1
I
I
aVfTkA4fa�
2tOfT
inr fejiB ����Ai i
by Le lewfcry I
� Ul�jSmL73W?
L
JJ
I
J
LETTERING
With the purchase of a greek jersey or
crewneck or hooded sweatshirt.
OFFER GOOD THURSDAY,ARCH 31 through
SATURDAY, APRIL 2,1983
Send a celebration
of spring.
Easter is
Sunday, April 3.
The FTD� Glory of
Spring � Bouquet
Greenville
Flower Shop
1027 Evans Street
Phone 758-2774
Send your thoughts
withspedal care
aajqaaaaeaaai�
Tran��orW MMf A��wn
�ri983 Boosts Transwortd
Dehvery Association
Clip this coupon and save
Thursday March 31-Saturday April 2
H L Hodges offers you free lettering
when you purchase a greek jersey or
crewneck or hooded sweatshirts.
Kick off Greek Week '83 in a
NEW jersey or sweatshirt.
HL HODGES OX
2K E.POT1 St GREENVUE
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 31. 1983 3
Time is running out.
Make appointments now to have
your yearbook portraits made.
Sign up sheets located outside
the Buccaneer Office.
Portraits
have been extended till
April 12th
Monday-Fri.
9-12; 1-5
at the Buccaneer Office.
Also, all campus organizations
wishing to be represented in the 1983
Buccaneer please contact the Buccaneer
at 757-6501 as soon as possible.
Ask for Tammy Edwards.
A
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Presents It's
PRE GREEK WEEK
TIP OFF
NCAA STYLE
COME OUT TO PAPA KATZ
AT 7:30 APRIL 4th AND
TCH THE NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP
GAME WITH US ON OUR
WIDE SCREEN TELEVISION
! AND DRINK FREE BEVERAGES
ALL NIGHT LONG
AWARDED
r TIME!
1) ALBUMS FROM RECORD BAR
2) 2 DINNERS FOR 2 AT PHAROS
3) GIFT CERTIFICATE FROM QUICKSILVER RECORDS
4) 2 SIX FOOT PARTY SUBS FROM SUB STATION II
5) 1 MONTH MEMBERSHIP FROM AEROBICS WORKSHOP
6) BANANA SPLIT FROM HEART'S DELIGHT
COVER CHARGE:
MEMBERS: S3.00-GUESTS: $4.00
MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR
REMEMBER: FREE BEVERAGES, DOOR PRIZES
GET BACK EARLY AND PARTY WITH US
SPONSORS INCLUDE:
BONDS, VARSITY BARBER SHOP, CHICOS, PHAROS,
QUICKSILVER RECORDS.RECORD BAR, OVERTONS,
SUB STATION O, HEART'S DELIGHT,
AEROBICS WORKSHOP, ROCKET MUSIC.
HODGES SPORTING GOODS
0t lllllll' IP
��-����"��� ����" � mvm.

"�����W"
. -�� �� �� � � �� , t





uUfe 3Ea0t Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, 01 Manger
Mike Hughes, mmrmv
WAVERl V MFRRITT. Umm, C,NDY LEASANTS. i,mMm�r
SCOTI L.INDI FY. mm ita. �REG RlDEOUT. Mm��
A11 Ai rash n n , um� Steve Bachner. bmh
S11 ph mi Groon, o��. Juliana Fahrbach. som�
Q v Thornton. r����fs�tn�w Todd Evans. Production mmmm
March II, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Cancellations
Thursday Evening's Weather Almost As
Hazy As Friday Morning's Announcement
Without a doubt, the
unseasonable snowstorm that hit
Greenville last Thursday caught
many of us off-guard. Unfor-
tunately, it also exemplified a
minor communication gap bet-
ween administration and students.
As the hours o' Thursday night
passed, the snow and ice continued
to fall; school cancellations and
delays were repeatedly announc-
ed But no word on ECU classes.
Finallv. Friday morning, about
14 or so hours after the snow
started to fall, an announcement
or, at least, an attempted an-
nouncement � came. Actually,
the chancellor's decision in
reference to Friday's classes would
be more properly dubbed an exer-
cise in vaguery.
In so many words, students were
"informed" that classes would be
in session Friday morning and
afternoon, but that if getting to
class would pose some type of
hazard, they should not attempt to
make it to campus.
Although the announcement
certainly seemed sensible enough
at first, in actuality, it merely caus-
ed problems. Heeding the
chancellor's advice, and seeing for
themselves what they deemed
dangerous road conditions, many
students elected not to risk the
drive to campus. Surely, they
thought, instructors will unders-
tand. But in several cases reported
to us, such was not the case. Many
of those opting to miss class
because of unsafe roads were later
informed by teachers that their
absence was inexcusable, bringing
with it all the subsequent penalties:
i.e lack of sympathy, missed
course material, including quizzes,
tests, etc. In short, a lot of students
were penalized for using their
heads and following instructions.
Since considerably more than
half of ECU's student body com-
mute to and from campus, and
since many of the roads in and
around the various apartment
complexes were rendered practical-
ly impassable by the snow and ice
� even by morning � it is our opi-
nion that Friday morning classes
should have been cancelled.
However, all speculation on this
particular incident is expost facto,
and as such, is of no real conse-
quence. Furthermore, barring a
miraculous act of providence,
Greenville has probably seen the
first and last of this year's
snowfall. Realistically, then, the
event is behind us.
Nevertheless, the practice of
postponing and issuing vague an-
nouncements must be reassessed,
so as to avoid similar confusion in
the future. The administration
should take into consideration the
approximately 8,000 ECU com-
muters before deciding to keep
school open. Sure, some
"commuters" live within
reasonable walking distance of
campus, but a few thousand others
don't.
And if, after careful considera-
tion, the administration decides
classes will go on as scheduled, it
should be stated so, with no addi-
tions or implied exceptions.
Students are, for the most part, big
boys and girls. They know not to
drive if the streets around them are
under a sheet of ice. And, despite
the few aforesaid exceptions, most
teachers are quite understanding in
mitigating circumstances.
Nonetheless, we, as students,
should not be led to believe one
thing, only to find out later it isn't
exactly so.
MVVE KEN TRYING TO HAVE A BABY FOR YEARS,
SO we FINALLY LET TUEM ADOPT
The Problems With Particle-Beam Weaponry
Another Stupid Idea From Ronny
By JAY STONE
And now, another stupid idea from
the president of the United States.
Well, President Reagan is still on the
loose � God help us! His latest fiasco is
the idea of deploying laser and particle
beam weapons in space to serve as an
anti-ballastic missile system. This idea
rivals his proposal for curing the na-
tion's economic woes and unemploy-
ment via Reaganomics.
First, the idea of laser and particle-
beam weapons has already been in-
vestigated by a panel of physicists,
engineers and other academics at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
and their findings were published in
Scientific American magazine. Accor-
ding to an article by John Parmentola
and Kosta Tsipis in the April 1979 issue,
particle-beam weapons do not offer a
plausible defense against nuclear
weapons. (Particle beams are intense
beams of charged or neutral particles
that can carry a potentially destructive
energy force, capable, under certain cir-
cumstances, of melting a hole in a piece
of metal or of damaging shielded elec-
tronic circuits.)
Not until recently, however, has the
notion of exploiting particle beams as
the basis for a new class of weapons
come to be taken seriously in some
circles.
But particle-beam weaponry poses
problems, such as the tendency of charg-
ed particles to disperse (because the like
charges of the particles in the beam repel
one another in outer space.) Thus, the
beams lack the concentration required to
repel a massive nuclear attack. In addi-
tion, charged particles are deflected by a
magnetic field, similar to that which sur-
rounds the earth.
And even if these virtually insurmoun-
table problems could somehow
(hypothetical) be overcome, there are
numerous simple and inexpensive
countermeasures that could further
disrupt the efficacy of such a beam �
e.g destroying the beams with ex-
plosives, firing decoys along with
nuclear warheads in an attack, ejecting
aluminum chaff or smoke bombs ahead
of an oncoming warhead to foul the par-
ticle beam's optical detection apparatus
and radar.
Laser beam weapons are equally un-
workable, according to an article by
Kosta Tsipis in the December 1981
Scientific American.
To begin with, the laser that would be
required to do the joba 100-megawatt
hydrogen fluoride laser) does not exist,
and there is no indication that it could be
developed in the forseeable future. Even
if the laser itself and its energy-staging
system could operate with perfect effi-
ciency, such a continuous-wave
hydrogen fluoride laser would consume
some 660 kilograms of fuel for each
missile destroyed.
In order to shoot down 1,000 missiles,
then, each satellite would have to be sup-
plied with 660 metric tons of fuel, which
represents about 20 loads for the U.S.
space shuttle. The 50 satellites required
to insure continuous coverage of Rus-
sian launching sites would require 1.000
shuttle flights for the energy stores
alone. Four shuttle craft, each making
two trips per year, would take 125 yean
to deliver the fuel.
In addition, the laser space-based
weapon would be vulnerable to many of
the same countermeasures as the
particle-beam weapon. The Soiets
could easily destroy the satellites with
explosive devices, or they could destrov
the space shuttle while it was hauling the
satellites into space. This might, in itself.
trigger a confrontation.
Another consideration is that this ac-
tion would violate two of the treaties
that we have signed with the Soviets
simultaneously: the 1967 outerpace
treaty prohibiting deployment of nuclear
weapons in space, and the 1971 SALT
treaty, which prohibits building addi-
tional anti-ballistic missile systems.
This, too, might trigger a nuclear
showdown.
Furthermore, approximately S300
billion is currently being spent on laser
and particle-beam research. Add to this
the fact that further expenditures for
this doomed research will take even
more money out of economically-
starved social programs, and the result is
a real loser.
We watch with bated breath as the
Reagan regime degenerates into a
depressing farce, unexcelled in its zeal
for advocating stupidity as public policy
since the days of Herbert Hoover.
Analyzing The 20th-century Leper
Needs A Lot More Than Just Sym
Dear Stan Landers: I am a 26-year-old
female student from Chapel Hill and
have a terrible problem. Four years ago,
after an unfortunate fling with a
truckdriver named Jeb, I contracted
herpes.
I don't know if vou're familiar with
the prejudices people like me go
through. So one understands us or even
tries. They don't understand the disease,
so they criticize us. Everywhere I go, I
hear snickering behind my back. They
don't realize how difficult life has been
for me. I'm not one to feel sorry for
mvself, but the lack of sympathy I've
been subjected to for the past four years
has been pathetic.
Good Advice
With Stan Landers
I've tried counseling centers and
groups. I've tried medications and
treatments. I've even tried gargling with
Sani-Flush. But nothing works, Stan.
Like the lepers in biblical times, lama
social outcast. People don't want to be
seen with me, Stan. I feel like there's
nothing left to live for That's where
you come in. You could change all that
with a response to your readers, inform-
ing them that people with herpes are still
people, and that judging them hastily is
cruel and unfair. Thank you, sincerely,
SHUNNED IN SARATOGA.
Dear Sara: How dare you send me a
letter without at least warning me on the
envelope that you have herpes? I cringe
at the thought of how easily I could have
been infected. Thank God I had my
gloves on.
Anyway, Sara, I do understand that
you're feeling pretty low right now.
Yours is obviously not a simple(x) pro-
blem. You may well get sore at the
blistering comments you hear. But dear,
you've got to remember, social prejudice
is just a part of life � a necessary part, I
might add.
You compare yourself to a leper in
biblical times, as well you should. I
mean, think about it, Sara. If the lepers
had not been so well shunned in biblical
times, we might all look like human
scabs nowadays. You see, these things
have to be controlled. Wouldn't it be
terrible if we all contracted what you've
got? Yuk!
So, I hope you understand our point
of view a little better now. Sure, the
world is cruel, Sara, but it's at least good
to know that our cruelty has a purpose.
Good luck and good day.
Dear Stan Landers: Is there really an
Easter bunny, and if so, what do you
think his name is? CHANCELLOR
HO WELL
Yes, John, there is an Easter bunny.
His name is Melvin, and he lives in a lux-
urious hutch off Greenville Boulevard.
Dear Stan Landers: I have always con-
sidered myself a law-abiding citizen. I
like to do the right thing. But I don't like
to make waves or rock the boat, as it
were. This brings me to my problem. I
live in an apartment complex in Green-
ville, and I'm pretty sure the family liv-
ing downstairs is in this country illegally.
It probably wouldn't bother me so
much, except that one of the family's 20
kids, Raoul, discards his empty tequila
bottles in the parking lot at night. You
see, he and four others sleep in the fami-
ly car. And furthermore, tenants' pets
are disappearing left and right since they
moved in.
Now I know a person doesn't have to
be a wetback to sleep in a car or eat a
chihuahua, but I really wonder about
them. I just don't like the idea of having
foreigners downstairs. What, if anything
should I do? ALI ABDULLA ASAAM
Dear Abbi: Like most other
Americans, you are too quick to jump to
conclusions. You know what they say
about judging a book by its cover. But if
you are intent on pursuing this matter,
what you need is real proof. So, I sug-
gest you observe the family as much as
possible. Watch them play stickball in
Campus Forum"
the street. If they make the sign of the
cross before stepping up to the plate, call
immigration.
Editor's Note: Stan Landers recently
turned down a lucrative modeling con-
tract from the Jockey underwear com-
pany to pursue a career in hog farming.

Icy Streets Bring Hot Replies
I personally would love to thank the
person who made the decision for ECU
to open with no delays on Friday,
March 25. I have heard conflicting
views as to who is on charge of deci-
sions concerning the closing or delay-
ing of classes. So, my thanks goes to
Mr. PIC (person in charge).
Since I am neither a mountain goat
nor a native of the Alps, I'm not quite
adapted for slip-sliding my way to class
in the snow and slush. I never knew
how fun it was to slide down steps. (I
assume that Mr. PIC thinks walking
down steps is too mediocre.) Nor have
I tried to leap 33-degree puddles in a
single bound. (Mind you, that's loaded
knapsack included.)
Although radio announcements
stated that a traveller's advisory was in
effect, some instructors did not seem to
care. They gave tests anyway, and the
most profound statement 1 heard con-
cerning commuters was, "Oh well
Yet, crossing 10th Street Friday (1
live on the Hill) was very easy. Cars
were no problem. Do you know why
they were no problem? Because at 8
a.m. March 25, everything else was
closed!
Not to mention the fact that I just
love sitting through class and listening
to the drip, drip of my pants trying to
unload the snow that had gathered in
the cuff. Concentrating on the lecture
was fairly easy, except for that small
distraction. You see, my wet feet
weren't bothering me at all. By 9:00, I
could no longer feel them.
However, having class with no
delays was only half of my experience.
The other half was waiting for the an-
nouncement. (1 did not hear it until
almost 6:30). I get up before 6:30. That
is, normally 1 can be getting ready
before 6:30. But oh no! I had to wait,
which put me behind. Then it took
longer for me to reach my points of
destination because I own neither skis
nor wings.
Maybe instead of picking up his
check and making illogical decisions,
Mr. PIC would like to do something
different. So, the next time we have
weather conditions as we did Friday, I
personally invite Mr. PIC to share my
experience. I'm sure he'll love it as
much as I did.
Elaine Whitman
Freshman, Biology
Take A Bike Outta Crime?
While walking up the sidewalk at 9
p.m. on Monday night, I noticed four
black males, ages 12 to 15, on three
bikes approaching the bike rack bet-
ween Cotten and Fleming dorms. Ob-
viously, these characters didn't belong
or campus and one of them needed a
bike to have a four-man race.
I promptly called campus security,
who later stated that the youths fled
toward Cotanche Street when the of-
ficers approached.
No doubt these enterprising
adolescents had a handy pair of bolt
cutters to make their job easier.
If you have a bike, especially in the
$200-plus range, buy one of the new
U-shaped security locks. A quarter-
inch cable can be severed in one clip of
a bolt cutter, and a chain will only take
a few seconds more. Remember that
the police can't be everywhere on cam-
pus at once, so buy yourself a little ex-
tra protection.
Gary Patterson
Junior, Graphic Arts
Storaska
B PATRICK O'NfcILL
Staff vtmc
A crowd of more than 200 students tul
Tuesday night to hear Fredrick Storaska's
"How to say No to a Rapist, and Survr
Storaska used humor while addresj
serious topic of rape He stressed the imi
discussing rape and rape prevention in an
constructive manner.
"Rape is a crime of hatred and vi
Storaska said, "(and it's) the only cm
world where we call the victim the perpej
Storaska claims that the main cause of
double standard in our society that force
to a "success-achievement syndrome" ai
to be victims. "We can't very well blan
for the weaknesses of men, but we do,
said.
Storaska noted that because of cert;
tactics" society directs at women frorrj
they are children, rape instills a
"hopelessness and helplessnev ' in ma:
He said the image most people have ot
that of a monster. "The first thing to le
rapist is that you're dealing with a hui
Storaska said.
Storaska disagreed with what
"scream, struggle, fight, kick" md
prevention.
However, he did say he would not
any method a women used if that was
was most comfortable with. "I will n(
killing (the rapist) or submissM he
"We take a little boy and we 'each hn
� how to take Storaska said. "We
girl we teach her to be taken
that young boys see being agrc a- I j
FBI Expa
ACLU Qu
The Federal Bureau
of Investigation has
been issued new
guidelines giving the
organization greater
latitude to investigate
groups that have
shown a propensity
for violent criminal
activity.
The new guidelines
were announced
earlier this month by
U.S. Attorney
General William
French Smith. They
are not subject to
Congressional ap-
proval, but Congress
could pass a law to
supersede any part of
the guidelines. The
new rules took effect
March 21.
The revision of the
domestic security
standards are the first
such changes since
1975, when
disclosures ere
issued proving that
the FBI had abused its
power by engaging in
widespread spying on
Americans working in
civil rights, anti-war.
feminist, socialist and
Communist groups as
well as the Ku Klux
Klan.
The new guidelines
allow federal agents
to investigate
statements advocating
criminal activity or in-
dicating "an apparent
intent to engage in
crime, particularly
crimes of violence
The American Civil
Liberties Union is
concerned about the
possible investigations
Y . . e � . � .� t
�����: �
of
because :hey
ed as ad ocj
certain polij
have shown
crete acne:
violent natur
Greenville
Hugh Cox, i
legal work
local MCIX
said he w 1 !
that the
guideline-
in "abu
discretionary
eiven to
ment agencM
T
a ai
problem
Chape) Hil
Professor of
Pottitt. "W
to polkx
Poiii
been activ
liberties in
the ideu
FBI is relat
"Our histoi
scepticism
federal poll
PoUitl saic.
Cox caul
the new rulj
missued B
advantage
hypothetic
where a
disliking
group,
order the
vestigate
them fod
political gi
Co
Freedom
tion
"extremei
because i
series o
balance
federal cq
Coming to
Sui
Spen
MI
(Last arei
Advai
Doors Open 7:3i
Tickets
. � � 4b
- . �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31, 19t3
�,V .
m
j
I
FOR YEARS
om Ronny
satellites required
- v'rage of Rus-
d require 1,000
e energy stores
craft, each making
� tld take 125 years
asei pace-based
erable to many of
jasures as the
The Soviets
� the satellites with
the could destroy
as hauling the
lis might, in itself,
s that this ac-
�of the treaties
with the Soviets
1967 outerspace
deployment of nuclear
the 1 s-1 SALT
building addi-
sile systems.
ggei a nuclear
roximately S300
g pent on laser
arch. Add to this
hei expenditures for
tfill take even
ol economically-
. and the result is
bated breath as the
nerates into a
'died in its zeal
av public policy
� Herbert Hoover.
mpathy
make the sign of the
g up to the plate, call
unders recently
rative modeling con-
underwear com-
r in hog farming.
Replies
akt A Bike Ourta Crime?
�P the sidewalk at 9
ught, 1 noticed four
12 to 15, on three
mg the bike rack bet-
: : f leming dorms. Ob-
traders didn't belong
arnpUs and ope Q &
f to have a tour-man race
Promptly called campus security,
Mated that the youths fled
1 'tanche Street when the of-
p approached.
' dot these enterprising
' had a handv pair of bolt
r S Umake 'heir job easier.
have a bike, especially in the
range, buy one of the new
paned securit) locks. A quarter-
cawe ca be severed in one clip of
J" cuner, and a chain will only take
� second, more. Remember that
r.cecan the everywhere on cam-
Lr �nce- w y yourself a little ex-
protection.
Gary Patterson
Junior, Graphic Arts
How
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SWTWriter
A crowd of more than 200 students turned out
Tuesday night to hear Fredrick Storaska's lecture,
"How to say No to a Rapistand Survive
Storaska used humor while addressing the
serious topic of rape. He stressed the importance of
discussing rape and rape prevention in an open and
constructive manner.
"Rape is a crime of hatred and violence
Storaska said, "(and it's) the only crime in the
world where we call the victim the perpetrator
Storaska claims that the main cause of rape is the
double standard in our society that forces males in-
to a "success-achievement syndrome" and females
to be victims. "We can't very well blame women
for the weaknesses of men, but we do Storaska
said.
Storaska noted that because of certain "scare
tactics" society directs at women from the time
they are children, rape instills a feeling of
"hopelessness and helplessness" in many women.
He said the image most people have of a rapist is
that of a monster. "The first thing to learn about a
rapist is that you're dealing with a human being
Storaska said.
Storaska disagreed with what he termed the
"scream, struggle, fight, kick" method of rape
prevention.
However, he did say he would not be critical of
any method a women used if that was the one she
was most comfortable with. "I will not advocate
killing (the rapist) or submissions he added.
"We take a little boy and we teach him one thing
� how to take Storaska said. "We take a little
girl we teach her to be taken Storaska claims
that young boys see being agressive as the only way
to become a man, "and that young girls see being
passive as the only way to become women.
Storaska also disclaimed the common belief by
men that women have a secret desire to be raped.
"Nobody has a secret desire to be raped he
said
He also said that there was a need to change the
"social-sexual stereotyping" that is apparent in
our society. He said better information needs to be
provided to young teenagers regarding how they're
supposed to treat each other. Storaska said that
many young people are often manipulated by their
peers to act in certain ways.
Because of conditioning, Storaska said young
men often think they're supposed to act a certain
way. "You (men) weren't taught correctly; when a
women says no maybe she means no We teach
(men) very, very wrong
There was also a need to change the attitudes and
values that society often fosters regarding
masculinity and femininity,according to Storaska.
"If men and women don't change the attitudes
they have toward themselves and each other, we'll
always have rape in this world Storaska said.
"Women are raped because they're available
Storaska said, citing statistics showing most
women are raped in the daytime in their own
homes.
Storaska said 35 percent of the women raped are
raped by someone they know very well, such as
their husband or boyfriend. Another 35 percent are
raped by someone they know, possibly as an ac-
quaintance, and that only 30 percent of the women
raped do not know their assailant. He claimed 40
percent of those raped are between the ages of 8
and 14, while 60 percent are between the ages of 8
and 19.
"Rape is never the fault of the victim Storaska
said. "The double standard (women have been sex
objects and men have been success objects) is kill-
ing us slowly but surely
Storaska outlined his theory of rape prevention
in three parts. First, he said, the rapist must be
perceived (by the victim) as a human being. Se-
cond, an attempt should be made (by the victim) to
diffuse the violence being used by the rapist, and
thirdly, the victim should rely on the element of
surprise to prevent the rape from occurring.
He called his theory a type of "psychological
karate Storaska, an expert in the martial arts,
also said he recommended studying self-defense.
Storaska said a rapist suffers from "an intense
inferiority complex" and is usually an emotionally
disturbed person in search of respect, love,
understanding and empathy. He said the rapist is
operating on a "hate type of emotion" that he uses
to dehumanize his victim. "You want him (the
rapist) to perceive yor as a human being
Storaska said. "Treat him as a human being
Storaska said that any immediate response from
the victim in the "scream struggle, fight, kick"
mold could antagonize the rapist and increase his
violence. "You must always give yourself an out
Storaska said violence could be diffused in
several ways, but that it could best be done by us-
ing the element of surprise. "Surprise is always on
the side of the rapist Storaska said. "You have
to transfer the surprise from him to you He said
men are "easily stronger" and "easily faster" than
women, "but they are not smarter You want to
not physically over-power him, but emotionally
overpower him, he said.
He suggested women use verbal exchanges in
soft tones to diffuse the violence. Storaska told one
story of how a women prevented a rape by telling
her attacker that she'd really like to respond to
him, but this was an uncomfortable place because
there were rocks on the ground. She invited the
rapist to go for a walk to her place. When they
passed by a bar, she suggested they buy some beer
and the rapist agreed.
Once inside the bar, the woman used the first op-
portunity available to leap over the bar and yell to
the bartender to call the police.
Storaska also said that women could calmly tell
their attacker that they are menstruating and that
they'd like to go home and clean up first. Storaska
claims there are many superstitions associated with
menstruation, it may work to dissuade the at-
tacker.
Storaska also suggested two areas, the side of the
face and the testicles, where a woman could caress
the attacker gently, gaining his confidence, then
either poke him directly in the eye, or squeeze the
testicles to gain release.
Storaska said that another key to preventing
rape, especially by someone you know, is to turn
him off sexually. He suggested that women per-
form some sort of bizarre act, such as forcing one's
self to vomit or urinate on their attacker or letting
out a karate cry.
Storaska told of one woman who was told
several times how "classy" she was by a man who
was at a party. The man later dragged her into an
empty bedroom as she was coming out of the
bathroom. She immediately picked her nose and
wiped it on him to shock him. She managed to turn
him off sexually and escape unharmed.
Storaska was invited to ECU at the invitation of
the Student Residence Association and the Univer-
sitv Unions.
FBI Expands Jurisdiction;
ACLU Questions Changes
�c �
.0-
�0 i,
0 .
0 � - .
0
V �
��
3
�� �
The Federal Bureau
of Investigation has
been issued new
guidelines giving the
organization greater
latitude to investigate
groups that have
shown a propensity
for violent criminal
activity.
The new guidelines
were announced
earlier this month by
U.S. Attorney
General William
French Smith. They
are not subject to
Congressional ap-
proval, but Congress
could pass a law to
supersede any part of
the guidelines. The
new rules took effect
March 21.
The revision of the
domestic security
standards are the first
such changes since
1975, when
disclosures were
issued proving that
the FBI had abused its
power by engaging in
widespread spying on
Americans working in
civil rights, anti-war,
feminist, socialist and
Communist groups as
well as the Ku Klux
Klan.
The new guidelines
allow federal agents
to investigate
statements advocating
criminal activity or in-
dicating "an apparent
intent to engage in
crime, particularly
crimes of violence
The American Civil
Liberties Union is
concerned about the
possible investigations
of groups soley
because they are view-
ed as advocating a
certain policy but
have shown no con-
crete action of a
violent nature.
Greenville Attorney
Hugh Cox, who does
legal work for the
local ACLU chapter,
said he was concerned
that the new
guidelines could result
in "abuse" of the
discretionary leverage
given to law enforce-
ment agencies.
"It's always been a
problem said UNC-
Chapel Hill Kenan
Professor of Law Dan
Pollitt. "Who's going
to police the police?"
Pollitt, who has
been active in civil
liberties issues, said
the idea of having an
FBI is relatively new.
"Our history is one of
scepticism toward a
federal police force
Pollitt said.
Cox cautioned that
the new rules could be
missused for political
advantage. He used a
hypothetical example
where a president,
disliking a particular
group, decided to
order the FBI to in-
vestigate or harass
them for his own
political gain.
Cox said the
Freedom of Informa-
tion Act was
"extremely valuable"
because it offered a
series of checks and
balances on the
federal government.
Pollitt also felt that
the relaxation of the
rules could result in
some abuses of law
because they were too
narrow in focus.
"How do you know
who's violent?" asked
Pollitt in a reference
to the rule that states
only
4 'violence-prone"
groups will be in-
vestigated or in-
filtrated. "They (the
FBI) can think that
anybody will be
violent at some future
date How do you
define violence?"
Pollitt used the re-
cent example of
allegations made by
President Reagan that
the nuclear freeze
movement is in-
filtrated by Russian
agents. Pollitt felt the
FBI could perceive
groups which support
the freeze as poten-
tially violent.
Attorney General
Smith and FBI direc-
tor Will H. Webster
claim the new
guidelines will in
crease the effec-
tiveness of the FBI to
prevent violent
criminal acts.
Get your career off to a flying start
whiie you're still in college.
This is a great opportunity for special men who degree in law.
want to be leaders and have the drive to earn There are no interruptions of classes, no
the respect and self-confidence of a Marine on-campus drills or uniforms during the
Corps Officer. school year Initial training can he done in one
You can get started on a great career with us of two ways Freshmen and sophomores train
while you're still in college and earn up to in two six-week summer sessions and juniors
$100 a month in the Marine Corps Platoon have one ten-week session
Leaders Class PLC ). In PLC aviation we can If you're entering college or are already on
guarantee flight school and civilian frying your way to a degree check out the Marine Corps
lessons during your senior year. And in PLC law Platoon Leaders Class Make an appointment
we can guarantee summer employment in the with your Marine Corps (Hficer Selection
legal field while you're gaining your advanced Officer through your college placement center.
Coming to Carolina Opry House
Sunday, April 10
Spend an Evening with
MIKE CROSS
(Last area appearance until Autumn)
Advance Tickets - $5.00
Doors Open 7:30-8:15 - Adv. Ticket Holders Only
Tickets At: Carolina Opry House
Apple Records
Record Bar (Pitt Plaza)
for Further information CM
758-3943
beycucanbeone





FHt EASl CAROI INIAN
Style
MARCH 31. 1983
Page 6
TVie? 4 ctfw� Company
A Feast Of Shakespeare And Moliere
By DARRVl BROWN
and MIKE HAMER
MWM
The Acting Company, in a
two-mght stint last week at
ECU's McGinnis Theater,
returned to the classics of
Western comedy for its repetoire
with the interesting combination
of Shakespeare's Twlfth Night
and Moliere's Tartuffe. While
both plays are widely known,
their juxtaposition in a double
bill provides an interesting op-
portunity for comparison.
Moliere, writing his play in
France more than 60 years after
Shakespeare and with no
knowledge of the English Bard,
created a farce lighter in many
ways than Twelfth Night, but
with a more direct social criticism
and harder lesson on human
nature. Tartuffe is a biting con-
demnation of hypocrisy, religious
extremism and personal vanity
hidden within a hilarous proven-
cial farce.
The play, as presented by The
Acting Company in a rhymed-
couplet translation by contem-
porary poet Richard Wilbur, wa
performed on a lavish, realistic
set reminiscent of a painting by
Moliere's seventeenth century
contemporary, Vermeer. Direc-
tor Brian Murray created a fairly
traditional production with
realistic costumes of the period.
Nd experimental theater here, no
new focus on oft-neglected
subplots, no original interpreta-
tions. Still, the cast was so
vibrant, and Murray so compe-
tent within his standard staging,
that the play glowed with a
polished professionalism and a
non-stop energy. Slapstick and
campy humor, essentially
Americanized, sanitized corn-
media dell'arte, were used to
delightful effect.
There were no weak perfor-
mances in the production, but a
couple of cast members should be
pointed out for particularly
strong performances. Philip
Goodwin gave an intriguingly
twisted portrayal of Tartuffe as
the hypocrite you love to hate.
Lynn Chausow as the nosey,
outspoken maid Dorine, was a
audience delight with a face to
launch a thousand laughs. J. An-
drew McGrath made Cleante the
intelligent voice of reason and
moderation that he should be.
For a time-honored, realistic
production of Moliere's play in
English, it is hard to imagine a
better one. Still, with a young,
energetic troupe such as The Ac-
ting Company, one might hope
for a little more originality in
conception to match their com-
petence . i performance.
Watching Twelfth Night on
Friday was like being at a six-
teenth century party with some of
the wittiest and most funloving
folks around. The general reac-
tion at the end of the play was
"Oh, do it again The play was
written to be performed for the
feast of Twelfth Night the joyful
climax of the Renaissance
Christmas season, and it certainly
was full of joy and full of fun.
The great entertainment of the
play was not in the plot line itself
� that was rather difficult to
follow � but rather it was in the
richness of the characters in the
play-and in the richness of the ac-
ting that brought these characters
Tartuffe (center) prays that he isn't caught.
to life. The set was very simple; it
did not call attention to itself,
and so it thrust more attention on
the acting.
One of the favorite characters
in the play turned out to be Feste,
the Fool, who was played by
Philip Goodwin. Megan
Gallagher, who played the part of
Viola, also turned in an excellent
Richard S. Iglewski as Sir Toby
Belch and Lynn Chausow as
Maria gave hilarious perfor-
mances. Also worthy of special
mention were David Mams as
Malvollio and Jack Steklin as Or
sino.
Michael Langham directed this
production. According to Dr.
David Sanders, who teaches the
Shakespeare course here at ECU,
this production was a "good,
steady, conservative, sound pro-
duction that didn't take any
chance and did not explore any
subtexts
Gun Control: An End To Russian Roulette
The first of two installments.
By STEVE DEAR
If yesterday was an average kind of day, then ap-
proximately fifty Americans were killed by han-
dguns.
In Washington,D.C, in an office tucked in
among the numerous governmental office buildings,
a small staff coordinates the national lobbying effort
designed at obtaining what they consider to be com-
mon sense laws that will make this country safer for
all its inhabitants, regardless of social, racial, or
economic status. (They stress the fact that handgun
violence affects anyone, whether rich, poor, black,
white, etc.).
The organization is Handgun Control Incor-
porated, headed by Pete Shields, a former DuPont
executive who quit his job and started working full
time for the handgun control movement after his son
was shot to death with a handgun in 1974.
Perhaps the poster HCI distributes demonstrates
what its members consider to be a dire need for
stronger national handgun laws. It reads:
LAST YEAR, HANDGUNS KILLED
48 PEOPLE IN JAPAN.
8 IN GREAT BRITAIN.
34 IN SWITZERLAND.
52 IN CANADA.
58 IN ISRAEL.
42 IN WEST GERMANY.
10,728 IN THE UNITED STATES.
GOD BLESS AMERICA
STOP HANDGUNS, BEFORE THEY STOP YOU
figures are based on 1979 statistics, the 1981
statistics show an increase in handgun-related deaths
to over 20,000 (11,258 of them murders) in the U.S
and 275 handgun-related homocides in North
Carolina in 1980).
All the countries mentioned above enforce strict
national handgun laws. In fact, citing a correlation
between much lower rates of all violent acts and
strict handgun control laws in their countries, of-
ficials in those foreign coutries state that they cannot
comprehend why the U.S. does not have stricter na-
tional handgun laws. (Ironically, Japan's laws were
established by the U.S. military establishment that
governed Japan after World War II).
HCI refers to the handgun violence situation in
the U.S. as "The American Handgun War citing
the fact that during the peak seven years of the Viet-
nam War more than 42,300 soldiers were killed in
action; and, during that same period, 52,000
American civilians were murdered with handguns in-
side the U.S.
Upon hearing such a fact, and also the fact that
each American has a one-in-fivc chance of himself
or a member of his family being threatened with a
handgun, the favorite weapon in crime, one might
wonder why tough handgun laws were not passed
long ago. One of the reasons is what Shields calls in
his book. Guns Don't Pie � People Do (recently ac-
quired by Joyner Library), "the overrated clout of
the pistol lobby Although an overwhelming ma-
jority of citizens favor strong handgun laws, most
members of Congress receive very large campaign
contributions from the long established National Ri-
fle Association, which also organizes its many
members in lobbying their members of Congress to
oppose new (and old) handgun legislation. Also, un-
til recent years, Congress has not heard from any ex-
isting large handgun control group. However, HCI
now claims to have nearly 700,000 members.
Another reason Shields suggests is the myths and
misinformation about handguns that exist
throughout the country. HCI considers the NRA to
be largely to blame for the spread of this. For exam-
ple, the NRA often refers to part of the second
amendment citing the right of the people to keep
and bear arms shall not be infringed However.
the U.S. Supreme Court on five separate occasions
has ruled that the second amendment was only in-
tended to protect members of state militias from be-
ing disarmed by the federal government.
Despite the wide variety of state and local han-
dgun laws, the U.S. lacks any federal handgun law
HCI considers that to be the major reason why state
and local laws are virtually ineffective. For example,
the guns used to shoot John Lennon in New York
City and President Reagan (a member of the NRA)
in Washington,D.C. were purchased in Hawaii and
Texas and easily transported (because of their con-
cealability) to those cities, which are considered to
have some of the toughest handgun laws in the coun-
try.
The strictest limitation on handguns in the U.S. is
that they may not be imported. However, handgun
parts may be imported, assembled and purchased in
the U.S. In 1981, over 2.5 million handguns were
domestically produced.
Under the present national law, the 1968 Gun
Control Act (which the NRA is fighting to repeal).
any person can buy a handgun from any one of the
170,000 handgun dealers. The would-be purchaser is
required to fill out a federal form on which he places
his name and adress and claims that he is 21. not an
ex-felon, drug addict, or mentally incompetent.
Satterfield And Smith Prove
To Be 'Crafty' In Competition
�V CIMOV VAU.
Above (left to right): Joha Satterfield ami Terry Smith. Below: Smith, SatterfkM.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff ViMw
Art professors came out major
winners in a crafts show spon-
sored by the North Carolina
Museum of History.
ECU assistant professor in
design and woodworking, Terry
Al Smith, took home first place
honors for his wooden rowing
shell along with a $3,000 cash
prize.
ECU design and metal pro-
fessor, John E. Satterfield, won
third place for his jade and sterl-
ing silver pin, "Jade Up Pin
Satterfield won a $500 prize.
"I'm delighted Smith told
The East Carolinian adding that
his one person craft is totally
functional � and sea worthy
The rowing shell was built with
the intention of rowing it on the
Tar River Smith said, "the way
it looks was a result of what it
was designed to do
Smith's craft is currently on ex-
hibit in the museum's show
through June 30. The spruce-
wood boat and oars are for sale
for $2,500.
According to Smith, the cur-
rent North Carolina Museum of
History's show is the first craft
show the museum has exhibited
as well as "the biggest craft show
in all of North Carolina history
The show is also the first juried
exhibition of North Carolina
crafts.
"Of course I'm very pleased
Satterfield said adding that his
pin, constructed of silver and
titanium, was "one of a series of
experiments" he's been doing in
dealing with color.
Governor James B. Hunt, Jr.
was on hand to announce the
winners on March 17 during the
museum's preview party.
The show is sponsored by the
NC Museum of History
Associates. Admission is free. Se-
cond place honors went to
Wesley A. Manctni of Concord
for his quilt called
"Mumbo-Jumbo
Smith said that he and Satter-
field s accomplishments speak
very highly of the overall qualitv
of ECU School of Art
Consumer's Friend
Nader Visits ECU;
Writer Plays Host
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
World known consumer activist
Ralph Nadar visited East Carolina
for three days last week. He spoke
on Consumerism Update: Where
has it been-where is it going?
During his visit he gave a personal
interview to East Carolinian staff
writer Patrick O'Neill.
O'NEILL: Should nuclear power
plants be shut down or should we
just improve their safety
features?
NADER: I think they should be
shut down. Right now they're
contributing 11 percent of our
electricity (needs). We waste over
50 percent of electricity in this
country which could be reduced
substantially it's not needed,
it's too dangerous and too expen-
sive. Also if we drop the myth that
we're going to be able to rely on
the nuclear future, we'll spend
more effort and time on solar
energy development of all kinds,
passive and active as well as
energy efficiency.
O'NEILL: What is your message
to college students who want to
become active in consumer pro-
tection work?
NADER: Just find a group and
join it, or start a student Public
Interest Research Group that
students have in 24 states. I've
left, at the Joyner Library, a
description of the student Public
Interest Research Groups and ex-
actly how to organize one. 1 am
very pleasantly surprised that
some of the top administrators in
this university are favorably in-
clined to such activity.
O'NEILL: Can students really
make a difference?
NADER: They are making a dif-
ference. They made a difference
in the 1960's. They're making a
difference now on environment,
on issues of national arms con-
trol, civil rights, educational
quality.
O'NEILL: What role should the
faculty and administration play in
getting students involved in con-
sumer issues?
NADER: I think first by putting
more consumer protection issues
m the economics courses and
political science courses. These
are economic and political issues
of great importance. They should
not be treated with minimal atten-
tion Secondly, they should en-
courage clinical course credit so
students working on consumer
projects, whether food and nutri-
tion, or housing or city hall, can
get course credit for their ac-
t�viuesThirdiy, they should en-
courage students to organize their
own Public Interest Research
Group.
See NADER,
Jackson Show
A Real Killer
B STANLE1 LEAftl
MNMh
Last Sundays Joe Jackson
concert in Raleigh proved, not
too surprisingly, to be one of the
best shows NC. State's Reynolds
Coliseum has seen in a long
while.
Jackson is a veteran of the
music business who has proven
himself over the course of man
albums. Onl recen. has he
received an mass adulation, due
mostly io a hot pop effort titled
Sight and Day and some desen. -
ed MTV exposure But wane as
his popularity might, he has
always been in the forefront as an
innovator and an electric live per-
former.
Clad appropriately in zoot suit,
the multi-talented performer (he
plays percussion, alto sax and
piano) quickly established a rap-
port with his audience and his au-
dience responded by being as at-
tentive and genuinely interested
in the show as any I've seen V
these things go. this is no small
achievement.
Oh ye, the capacity house also
had a great time, when Jackson
finally got around to playing
piano with his hit single
"Steppm Out the crowd :
ly brought the hou-e down with
its frenzied cheering.
The WQDR NX Stai
sored show compete �
cond appearance in as ma
nights of The English B.
Chapel Hill's Memorial Ha
from what 1 rear. The Be
its own by drawing a :e:
crowd: three cheers foi the
modem" intiapc Hil

15
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I HI fcASTC AROt INIAN
Mk H 1983
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Jem public
ips and ex
ne I am
.�prised that
tdn ni 'rators in
in ' i � i ably in-
. h activit
.dents really
in making a dif
a difference
Thev're making a
fi environment,
al arms con-
rights, educational
nat role should the
irtistration play, in
;nts involved in con-
I think first b putting
mer protection issues
'mics courses and
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omic and political issues
importance. They should
treated vvith minimal atten-
ondly, thev should en-
ig clinical course credit so
udenu working on consumer
ojects, whether food and nutri
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land
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St NADER, Page 7
iackson Show
Real Killer
B STANLEY lhR
Muff Wrilrr
ast Sunday's Joe Jackson
COiucM in Raleigh proved, not
tOC �)! p; iMiigK , u tig onc Qf tne
bes s u, t state's Reynolds
Co. -cum has seen in a long
Wh ie
Jackson is a veteran of the
sic business who has proven
iselt ovei the course of many
Bums Onl recently has he
received anv mass adulation, due
me-tiv to a hot pop effort titled
Night ami Day and some deserv-
ed MIA exposure. But wane as
his popularity might, he has
�vas been m the forefront as an
itnovatoi and an electric live per-
fOt mci
I Clad appropriately in zoo! suit,
the multi talented performer (he
plav- percussion, alto sax and
pi quickK established a rap-
po with hi-audience and hisau-
dieiivC icsponded bv being as al-
ter, oc and genuinely interested
in show a- anv I've seen As
these things go, this is no small
achievement.
Oh yes, the capacity house also
haci a great time; when Jackson
finally got around to placing
piano with his hit single
"SU'ppm' Out the crowd near-
ly brought the house down with
its enied �. heering.
The WQDR N.C. State spon-
iOred -how competed with the se-
cond appearance in as many
nig - of The English Beat in
Chapel Hill's Memorial Hall. But
from what 1 heat. I he Beat held
its owi hv drawing a respectable
Nader Advocates Civic Career
PhOtO B, S16NIEV IEA8Y
Jackson blowing s�.
Continued From Page 6
O'NEILL: Do you think it's a
matter of time before nuclear
weapons are used?
NADER: Yes, especially it there's
a desperation situation any
county that thinks that it's do-
main is in jeopardy, whether it's
the U.S. or South Africa is going
to use it(a nuclear weapons
response). The question is can we
rapidly develop a massive sanitv
movement in the world and do
what no one else has done in the
history of mankind � abolish
these weapons? Every weapon
that's been developed has been us-
ed.
O'NEILL: Many people see
working for a large corporation as
their only choice when entering
the job world. Are there other
choices?
NADER: I'm not suggesting that
you shouldn't consider business
careers. I'm saying that you
should also consider non-business
or civic careers. You should con-
sider starting your own civic
groupthe biggest environmental
group in the country was started
bv Yale University students in
1970 (National Resource Defense
Council). Think about it. You
might want to work for a few
years and get some experience in
traditional business. Keep your
options open so after you pay
your school debts you can go into
something that's more coneenial
to your values or more of a
challenge But don't get locked in
O'NEILL: There's a lot of social
justice issues you've discussed
with us. Many people think the
possibility of nuclear was as
transending as all other issues. Do
you rank issues in terms of their
importance?
NADER: You have to bring a
society forward on more than one
front. Even as important as
nuclear war prevention is it
hypothetically everybody sort of
dropped what they were doing in
the civic area and went on the
nuclear arms (issues), then you'd
have enormous pressure building
up that would weaken even the
arms control movement. You'll
have stronger arms control move-
ment if you reduce unemployment
in this countryso you have to
have some people working on
unemployment. You'd have a
stronger arms control movement
if people just worked on electing
political candidates that were go-
ing to recognie that importance.
You'd have a stronger arms con-
trol movement if you improved
the quality of education in this
countryyou do have to keep a
diversified civic action going on
various fronts.
O'NEILL: Do you believe that
nuclear deterance can hold out0
Do we have that kind of time0
NADER: We don't have all that
kind of time because more coun-
tries are getting nuclear weapons.
but I'm not so sure that just put-
ting all the effort on that area
wouldn't actually slow down that
objective.
O'NEILL: If you were 18 years
old now. would you be a conscien-
tious objector to the military
draft?NADER The freedom
oppose our unjust war is cm
to our whole system of civil lib
ties) We get into wars i �
where Congress doesn't de
the war. people don't have a
referendum on the war -
people in the White House and
Pentagon decide that we're going
to get involved in a police action
Vietnam wa a police act
Korea was a police action T
not constitutionally proper I
would prefer to activ
against that kind I p her
than just say. well I do: vant I
go in and I'll lust vlear b
a military hospital for t�
as a concientic . - bjeci
much more important I � :age
in opposition!to these p
O'NEILL: What do
about using landfills I
dous waste disposal"1
NDER We have I
ing in terms ��� dumping
wastes) m some rerr. tc ea.
because they gradually w
their way to ground water 5
and they'll spread
years later people mav
that there is a waste e: -
crowj.
ree cheers for the
�nv
derns" in Chapel Hill.
15
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mi FASTI AROI INI AN
Sports
MARCH SI, ls�M
'dC
Pirates Split, Run Record To 14-6
B KEN BOI TON
vMManl Sport b dllw
For the first time in 76 games,
the ECU Pirates were held
without a run Tuesdav afternoon
as Baptist College defeated the
Pu ates 10 on a seventh-inning
sacrifice t1
1 he Pirates bounced back on
Wednesday, however, to defeat
I i Wilmington 6-5 on Todd
1 sans' ninth-inning RBI.
1 he two-game split gives the
Pirates an overall record of 14-6.
Baptist is now 7-10 while the
Seahawks dropped to 11-10.
In Tuesday's game, ECU
managed onl three hits off of the
same Baptist ballclub that they
had scored 13 runs and 17 hits on
the previous dav
After the game, lei coach Hal
Band was confused as to the
reason for the rare shutout. "I
can't fathom 17 hits one dav and
then we don't scratch the next on
a guv who reallv wasn't that
good Baird stated.
ECl had many scoring oppoi
tumties but couldn't capitalize, as
the Pirates left seven men on base.
In both the third and fifth inn-
ings. ECU got a man all the way
to third base, only to be left
stranded as the next batters were
unable to bring them home.
Baptist scored the game's onlv
run in the seventh inning when se-
cond baseman Billv Harden singl-
ed and stole second.
After Harden was sacrificed to
third. Steve I sMg then hit a short
fly ball to center fielder Robert
Wells.
Harden had no intention of try-
ing to score on the fly ball, but
when Wells dropped the ball
preparing to throw. Harden
scooted home with what proved to
be the game-winning run.
The Pirate pitching staff could
not be blamed tor their perfor-
mance luesdav afternoon, as
starter Robbie McClanahan and
reliever Chubby, Butler combined
to hold the Buccaneers to only one
run on nine hits.
Butler, who came on in the
sixth inning to take the loss, saw
his record iiop to 2-1.
Butler saw his luck take a turn
for the better the next afternoon
in the contest at Wilmington. He
was the pitcher in the game when
ECU scored the game-winning
run in the ninth inning.
The Wednesday afternoon
game started off slowly, as neither
team scored a run until the fourth
inning.
The Seahawks scored a run in
the fourth and the Pirates scored
one in the fifth to take a 1-1 tie in-
to the sixth inning.
With one out in the sixth. Evans
drew a walk off UNC-W starter
ECU spark plug kell Robinette shows the form that has made him a
professional prospect after four ears as ECl 's shortstop.
Kenny Smith.
ECU freshman sensation Win
fred Johnson, who was also the
Pirates' starting pitcher, then
delivered a two-run homer over
the right field fence to give the
Pirates a 3-1 lead.
The two-run shot bv Johnson
was the only two earned runs the
Pirates would score on the after-
noon, as the Seahawks committed
three errors
Following Johnson's home run.
ECL scored two more runs in the
sixth inning after Robert Wells
reached on an error
David Wells then greeted Smith
with a double and Ton Salmond
followed with a sacrifice flv. scor-
ing Robert Wells. The next batter.
Jack Curlings, delivered a single
to score David Wells.
The Seahawks came bask to tie
the score with three runs in the
eighth inning.
Designated hitter Mike Anl i
opened the inning with a single.
Bob Bryant walked, and Ken
Jones hit a double, scoring Antle.
With one out and men on se-
cond and third. Roger Hudson
doubled, scoring both runners
and tying the game at 5-5 Bui
then struck out the nev tw
ters to set up the ninth
� ss
W -h one out. Kelh K
rcashed on an en
third on John Hallow5
Evans then follow; I
slow groundei nd I
Hallow at sec nd B it
Seahawks were .
up Ivans at I
?sed home plate "
g run
Butk
5-1 with the vici
W's Smitl
winnini

also bi �
treali
The Pirat
w ilHan
Soul
n, and I �i he S
Harring
on. Ga
is 5:00 p
Lady Pirates Sweep Pair As
Clayton Goes Five-F or-Seven
Pirate Tamara
front end of a
Photo Bv GARY PATTERSON
Franks takes a swing in Tuesdav's game against UNC-W. Franks went two-for-three in the
doubleheader.
The Lady Pirate softball team
combined for 26 hits and commit-
ted just one error to trounce the
L'NC-W'ilmington Seahawks, 7-0
and 6-0, in a home doubleheader
contest Tuesday.
"Everybody was anxious to
play since our weekend games
were snowed out said Head
coach Sue Manahan, "We show-
ed a lot of enthusiasm, but 1 don't
feel we're up to our potential
yet
In the first game, the Bucs went
out in front, 6-0, after the first
two innings. Their final run was
scored in the fifth inning.
The Lady Pirates had 13 hits,
seven runs and one error, while
the Seahawks finished with five
errors and just three hits.
ECU'S Jeanette Roth, now 5-4,
pitched the first shutout game.
Leading hitters for the Pirates
were: Cynthia Shepard, two-for-
four; Mitzi Davis, two-for-two;
Jo Landa Clayton, two-for-three;
and Tamara Franks went two-for-
three. Clayton and Stacy Boy�
both had doubles
No plaver from I St. -W
more than one hit.
In the second contest,
Pirates went scoreless the I rsl two
innings before popping one run in
the third and two more in
fourth to take a 3-0 lead. The
Pirates also went scoreless in the
fifth inning but came bad gaii
three runs in the sixth for a I
lead.
The Bucs had 6 runs, 13 hits
and no errors The I ad
Seahawks finished with three hits
and six errors.
Fran Hooks, who now has a 3-0
record, pitched for the Pirates
Shepard who was two-for-four,
hit a homerun in the sixth inning.
Yvonne Williams knocked
homerun right before Shepard's
slam.
Clayton went three-tor -1
and Franks was two-for-three
against the Seahawks. UNC-Wfs
Pam Oliver hit a triple, finishing
Davis Powers Lady Sluggers
B RANDY MEWS
suff Wnirr
With a .550 batting average.
ECU All-American Mitzi Davis
continues to be a dominating
force on the Lady Pirate softball
team.
Davis, last year's Most
Valuable Player, currently has 22
hits in 40 at-bats. She has 16 runs-
batted-in this season and has a
career batting average of .443.
1 as! year, Davis helped the
Pirates to a 42-13 record and a
fourth place finish in the nation.
The 5-5 power-hitter was named
as an All-America selection last
season.
Davis hails from Taylorsville.
N C. and became interested in
softball back in elementarv
school. "I started playing in
fourth grade, and just kept up
with it through junior high and
high school she said.
In high school, Davis was in-
solved in all sports. She was an
all-conference performer in
volleyball and softball, and was
named conference player o the
year tor three consecutive seasons
in softball. During her senior
year, she was named an all-state
performer.
Davis came to ECL on a double
scholarship for softball and
volleyball. She serves as a hitter
for the volleyball team and has
been a three-year starter on the
softball team.
Softball coach Sue Manahan
described Davis as "someone you
can always count on to come
through for you.
"She always gives 100 per cent
and is the kind of person you
would always like to have in key
situations Manahan added.
Although playing two collegiate
sports lakes up most of Davis'
time, she says she has no desire to
change her lifestyle.
"There are some things I'm am
unable to do because of playing
sports, but I'v had the chance to
travel and have met so many peo-
ple. I wouldn't give it up for
anything stated Davis.
Davis, who is majoring in com-
mercial recreation, plans to serve
an internship at Carswell Air
I
ECU All-America Mitzi Davis
Force Base in Texas this summer.
She then hopes to travel overseas
to pursue a career in recreation.
"Whatever Mitzi decides to
do Manahan said, "she will go
far in this world. She's easy to
talk to and she can get along with
anybody
Davis has had an illustrious
career with the Pirates, and has
enjoyed her four years here at
ECU. She has been the recipient
of many awards, but what sticks
out most in her mind was being
named All-America.
With Davis on the squad, ECU
has been national contenders for
the last two years, and Davis
believes that they can do even bet-
ter this year. "We have more
depth, and we're stronger than we
have been in the past. I'm excited
about this being my last year, and
I want to take it all
Harrison Signs Wilmington Cager As
ECU Basketball Future Looks Upward
Wilmington New Hanover
High School basketball player
Jack Turnbill has made a commit-
ment to East Carolina University
to play basketball.
The 6-9, 185 pound senior was
named honorable mention all-
state just yesterday Playing a for-
ward position for the first time
ever this season, Turnbill averag-
ed 15 points and 12 rebounds per
game.
"We are very pleased, very hap-
py to get this commitment from
Jack said Pirate coach Charlie
Harrison. "Jack gives us some
size, but most importantly, size on
the perimeter. He can play either
small or big forward in our offen-
sive scheme.
"We feel Jack is an excellent
shooter and can really pass the
Coach Charlie Harrison
basketball. He does some things
you just can't teach. He's only 17,
but already 6-9 and he will get
stronger.
"Jack loves to compete. One of
the things we look for in a recruit
is how they progress during a
season. Jack has gotten pro-
gressively better his senior year
Turnbill was recruited by Sun
Belt schools, Southern conference
schools. West Virginia and made
a visit to Clemson of the ACC. He
narrowed his choices to East
Carolina and Appalachian State
before selecting Harrison and the
Pirates.
"For a kid his size, he has good
quickness and excellent shooting
ability noted his high school
coach Bill Wade. "We moved
Jack from center with his back to
the basket this year, to playing
him outside facing the basket.
After Christmas he really had
adapted and his averages were
more like 20 points and 14 re-
bounds per game
Turnbill is the second player to
commit to ECU thus far. Earlier,
it was announced that defensive
star William Grady, 6-2 guard
from Eastside High in Paterson,
NJ, signed a grant-in-aid under
the new early signing rules of the
NCAA
j-for-tw �
Mai
.
iive and ffens s pla
"We ai
w hat d
� - us - .
earning difft
need 1 continue 1 pla � .
team ball.
"It wjs g ean
� rt
On pril 5, the Lad
will go up jl iNt. Far
Heels al I CI leads 1
Two games er
be cause oi bad ca
been re rieduled V" :
u; plays VCL
idei . : Oi r
s.c. s
in a doi t .
Tw. tin . defending
champion I lorida v . -
here on April 7 1 the 1 ad �
Pirates oametirne is 3 p.n
Pf�oto B. G�v P4TTE8SON
No. 1 seed Ted l.epper takes a baseline forehand wmg against a Har-
vard opponent in Tuesday's match.
Net ters Improving
The ECU men's tennis team
was edged out. 5-4, by Harvard's
junior varsity team Tuesday The
Pirates won two singles and
doubles matches.
Head Coach Pat Sherman,
however, thought there were
many good aspects in the match
despite the loss.
"I'm very pleased with their
play against Harvard � a very
strong team she said. "It was
the best match of the spring for
the men, and despite a new line of
injuries, they played well as a
team.
"I wasn't satisfied with the
men's movement before today but
that improved against Harvard
In singles. Ken Klinfeld (H) def.
Ted Lepper, 3-6, 6-4. 6-1; Mark
Goodman (H) def. Paul Owen,
6-2, 0-6, 6-2; Galen Treble (ECU)
def. Craig Tebbe. 4-6. 7-5, 6-4;
Jack Simon (H) def. David
Creech, 7-6 (12-10). 6-1; Cole
King (ECU) def. Jamie Paul. 6-1,
6-3; and Matt Porteus H) def
Tom Battle. 6-1. 6-3.
In doubles. Khnfeld-Tebbe H)
def. Lepper-Battle. 7-6, 6-2;
Owen-King (ECl del Paul-
Simon. 7-5, 5-7, 6-3; and Creech-
Treble (ECldef Keith Collar-
John Dijohn. 4-b. t-4. 6-2
The Pirates are now 5-4 and are
scheduled to plav UNCAV at 3
p.m todav
The Lady Pirate tennis team
captured a 6-3 win over I INC
Wilmington b winning five of six
singles matches
"They've been practicing super
hard all season and have greatls
improved at all positions �
singles and doubles Sherman
said.
In singles. Debbie Christine
(ECU) def. Jill Amos. 6-0. 6-2;
Kathenne Tolson (ECU) def.
Angie Frazier, 6-1. 6-0; Janet
Russell def. Lee Ann Barklev.
See TENNIS. Page 10
Sn
(ok H
( hanH
SFARI IIM1
Hou
.
. 111
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THEEASTCAROl JNI1AN
MARCH 31.1983
Page 8
b 14-6
and tying the game at 5-5. Butler
in then struck out the next two bat-
ihe ters to set up the ninth-inning
fK-n heroics
I)er With one out, Kelly Robinette
the icached on an error and moved to
third on John Hallow's single.
Ison 1 vans then followed with a
the slo grounder to second, forcing
Her- Hallow at second. But the
Seahawks sere unable to double-
up I ans at first, and Robinette
crossed home plate with the winn-
ing run.
ells Butler improved his record to
5 I with the victory, while UNC-
ith YA Smith dropped to 3-3.
nd
I lie victor) snapped a six-game
winning streak for the Seahawks
I ovei the Pirates that goes all the
waj back to 1980.
Foi the Seahawks, now 11-10, it
also broke an eight-game winning
streak.
The Pirates return home to face
. n and Mary in an ECAC-
Sou conference game this after-
noon, and host the Seahawks at
Harrington field Friday after-
noon Gametime for both games
is ; 00 p.m.
r �
lg e,
ison
Pair As
For-Seven
one-for-two to lead Seahawks.
Manahan has been pleased so
fai with her team's tough defen-
sive and offensive play.
"We are learning more about
what different indiiduals will do
us she said. "The players
arning different roles and we
need to continue to play unselfish
�am ball.
"It was good overall team ef-
Rwo
n in
I
the
:
hits
I
Iv
iris
April 5, the Lady Pirates
wiil go up against the UNC Tar
Heels at home. ECU leads that
Two games were cancelled
because of bad weather and have
rescheduled. On April 13,
E CI plays VCU in a
.hleheader at 3 p.m. On April
e Bucs confront N.C. State
. ibleheader at 3 p.m.
I Ao-time defending national
champion Florida State will travel
here on April 7 to play the Lady
Prates. Gametime is 3 p.m.

Photo By GARY PATTERSON
baseline forehand sning against a Har-
latch.
mproving
:am
Lrd
(The
land
tan,
rere
itch
Iheir
ray
(.was
for
e of
a
6-3; and Matt Porteus (H) def.
Tom Battle, 6-1, 6-3.
In doubles, Klinfeld-Tebbe (H)
def Lepper-Battle. 7-6, 6-2;
Owen-King (ECU) def. Paul-
Simon, 7-5, 5-7, 6-3; and Creech-
Treble (ECU) def. Keith Collar-
John Dijohn, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2.
The Pirates are now 5-4 and are
scheduled to play UNC-W at 3
p.m today.
The Lady Pirate tennis team
captured a 6-3 win over UNC-
Wilmington by winning five of six
singles matches.
'They've been practicing super
hard all season and have greatly
improved at all positions �
singles and doubles Sherman
said.
In singles, Debbie Christine
(ECU) def. JiU Amos, 6-0, 6-2;
Katherine Tolson (ECU) def.
Angie Frazier, 6-1, 6-0; Janet
Russell def. Lee Ann Barkley,
See TENNIS, Page 10
Sneaker Sam Sez
I'o-Rec Bowling
Champs Found In
SPARE TIME
The co-rec bowling
finals took place
Tuesday, March 29 as
Tom Barringer led his
team, SPARE TIME,
to the king pin title by
decisively defeating
the Jarvis STRIKE
OUTS 1706 to 1631
The STRIKE OUTS
got to the finab' ac-
tion by defeating this
vear's favorites
I UCKY STRIKES by
10 pins, while SPARE
TIME outbowled
defending champs
WORLD IV in
semifinal action. The
champs bested their
team most every
match, moving from
their first score of
1434 to 1625 in
semifinal action and
Finally to win overall
n8h team score
honors (and the All-
Campus title) with
their score of 1706.
Track Meet
The intramural
track meet is schedul-
ed for the afternoon
of April 6. Entry
deadlines for this
meet is this Friday,
April 1. Get those en-
tries in before the
finish line.
on Thursday, April 7.
Entries for this in-
dividual event will be
taken up until tee
time. The person with
the lowest score in
each division by 11:00
p.m. will be crowned
champion.
Putt Putt For The
Fun Of It
lntramurals is
sponsoring a Putt
Putt tourney at Putt
Putt Golf and Games
Reggie Jackson Of
ECU
The Intramural
Department is spon-
soring a Home Run
Derby for those who
think they can hit a
long ball. Entries for
this event will be
taken until the day of
the derby, which will
be held Tuesday,
April 12 on the
women's varsity soft-
ball field beginning at
3:30 and ending at
6:30.
Canoe Trip Plann-
ed
The Intramural
Outdoor Recreation
Center is sponsoring a
canoe trip on Wednes-
day, April 13. The
trip is suitable for
beginning or ex-
perienced canoers.
The trip participants
will meet behind
Memorial Gym at
3:00 p.m. on Wednes-
day for a leisurely
two-hour paddle
down the Tar River.
Interested par-
ticipants should
register by 4:00 p.m.
on April 12 at the
Outdoor Recreation
Center, 113 Memorial
Gym. So get some
friends together or
sign up by yourself.
Lots of fun is ex-
pected.
Backpacking In The
Uwharie
Get away from it all
in a primitive retreat
with a program
geared toward the
beginning backpacker
but suitable for all
levels of outdoor en-
thusiasts. The ln-
tramurals Department
is offering a
backpacking trip
which will provide
two days and nights in
the beautiful Uwharie
National Forest on
April 8-10. Reserva-
tions must be made by
3:00 p.m. April 5 on a
first-come-first-serve
basis. Limited space
and equipment are
available, so sign up
today and become a
part of the great out-
doors.
Intramural Council
Representatives
Facility Hours For
Easter
Memorial Gym and
pool will close at 5:00
p.m. on Friday April
1 and will remain clos-
ed through Easter
Monday. Minges pool
Friday night and Sun-
day free swim will
also be cancelled.
Memorial Gym will
reopen Tuesday,
April 5.
Applications are be-
ing accepted through
April 8 for the posi-
tion of council presi-
dent council represen-
tatives. The Advisory
Council includes a
representative from
each of the par-
ticipating divisions.
Principal duties of the
council include
recommendation of
policies and pro-
cedures for the In-
tramural program,
reviewing disciplinary
matters, and advising
the IRS staff of stu-
dent concerns. Ap-
plication forms are
available in 204
Memorial Gym. Get
involved in the ECU
Intramural program.
Olympic Tryonts
Scheduled At ECU
The U.S. Olympic
Committee's 1983 Na-
tional Sports Festival
is scheduled for June
19 to July 3 in Col-
orado Springs, Col-
orado. Try outs for
the South region
men's team handball
squad will be held in
Memorial Gym, Sun-
day April 17 from
9:00 a.m. until 1:00
p.m. and from 5:00
p.m. until 7:00 p.m.
Anyone interested
should contact Dr.
Edwards in 204
Memorial Gym.
Interested can-
didates should have a
background in one or
more of the following
sports: team hand-
ball, basketball,
baseball, volleyball,
water polo, and soc-
cer (goalies). If
selected for the South
squad, transportation
to and from Colorado
Springs, housing,
food and competitive
attire will be provided
by the U.S. Olympic
Committee. Selected
players must be
available for pre-
festival practice (five
days) and competition
in Colorado Springs
from June 19 to July
3. Candidates should
contact: Mark Noble,
South Men's Coor
dinator, 14020 Glen-
view Drive SW, Hunt-
sville, Alabama
35803. (205) 453-0240
or (205)882-9115.
Houston Could Be New Dunk Doctors
LOUISVILLE, Ky.
(L PI) - The top-
ranked Houston
C ougars have the look
of Louisville's 1980
NCAA championship
"Doctors of
Dunkenstein senior
Rodney McCray of
the second-ranked
I ouis ille Cardinals
said Wednesday.
"Houston reminds
me of the 1980
(Louisville) team he
answered when asked
b reporters to
describe the Cougars
(30-2), who meet the
Cardinals (32-3)
Saturday evening in
the NCAA Final Four
semifinals in Albu-
querque, N.M.
"They run well �
expecially their
center added the 6-7
McCray, who was
wearing a red wind-
breaker and red and
gold USC baseball
cap.
McCray, his 6-9
brother Scooter Mc-
Cray and 6-8 center
Charles Jones will
draw the crucial
assignment of con-
fronting a muscular
Houston front line
anchored by 7-foot
Akeem Abdul Oli-
juwon.
"It looks like their
whole starting five
can run said an ad-
miring Rodney Mc-
Cray, who has averag-
ed 11.1 points and 8.5
rebounds this year, up
slightly from the 9.6
point and 7.4 rebound
average of the 1980
championship year.
McCray said a por-
tion of each practice
this week has been
devoted to trying tc
counter Houston's
primary offense �
which involves trying
to get the ball inside
to its big front line �
"so we know what to
do
Part of the
Louisville strategy in-
volves having its long-
armed high leapers try
to deny the ball to the
inside players and,
failing that, to col-
lapse on the inside
ball handler to create
turnovers.
"It should be an ex-
citing game Mc-
Cray said. "I think we
match up pretty well
until we get to the
center spot
McCray was named
to the 1980 all-
tournament NCAA
team in Indianapolis
led by "Dr. Dunkens-
tein" himself,
Louisville's All-
America guard Dar-
rell Griffith.
Scooter McCray
played just three
games in the 1979-80
season because of a
knee injury and was
reshirted.
Although taller
than his young
brother, Scooter said
his mother decided
against having any
more children when
she had Rodney and
"saw how big he
was
EUROPEAN SUMMER TRAVEL
EURAIL YOUTHPASS$290 for 1 month
In Europe, go any where,any time,
as frequently as you want-
purchase before you leave home
FREE
passport pictures with purchase of
international air ticket.
Book new for best fares and scheduling
for summer travel.
Come in for Eurailpass application and its map:
Q QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
-p rx 319CotacheSt.
'M Greenville, N. C. 2 7834
W Phone 757-0234
OVER 100
SHIRTS HUST BE SOUM
NAME &WW0 K SIGNER SSdRttWEAR
1 PAY mW CASH Om- NO CHECKS
O
ii r I'l'P
Ml
a
Items and Prices
Effective Wed March 30
thru Sat. April 2 1983
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Eacr- of these advertised items is re
quired to be reediiy available 'or
sale in each Kroger Sav on. except
as specifically noted in this ed if we
do run out of an item we will offer
you your chotce of a comparable
item when available, reflecting tne
same savings or a ramcheck which
will entitle you to purchase tre
advertised item at the advertised
price within 30 days
Open Mon thru Sat 8am to Midnight
- Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
Ttmm IBMMB
trwnwmi
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QMLM JH C��
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FACTORY Bur OVT: . ClOSEOUTS � SANtfAJPI�TttK
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ATHLETIC fOCMM
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Tiwi.i-iwMinu -��m�.i
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! 1 DAY ONLY! CASH ONW'NO CHECKS
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99
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PREMIUM
12-Oz.
KROGER TWIN, FLAKE
COMBO OR BUTTERMILK
Brown 'n Serves
11 -Oz.
Pkgs.
Cans
p HUtt NAcA fcfcND IIW�NT0Rr ttUST & SolO!
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lara a�MW
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adkJas
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i ���!������
mm
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m
MCqUTMUJ
0� 3 CANS
FRIDAY APRIL 1st
MGtHOURSALl!
10 A.M. TILL 4 P.M.I
HOLIDAY INH'J&k
TAB, DIET COKE OR
Coca-Cola
save!
30
KROGER GRADE 'A
Large Eggs
59
DUMIT 2 DOZ. AT 59�
ADDITIONAL DOZ. 69
KROGER FROZEN
Orange Juice
6-Oz.
Cans
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Pepperidge �
Farm Cakes
17-Oz.
Pkg.
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Totino's Pina
SWEET RIPE
ineapples
(iiawfap-
uE?3!
11-Oz
PKQ.
99
Jumbo
8-Slze
KROGER
NATURAL FLAVOR
Ice Cream
LAVS
Potato
Chips
LIMIT 2
WITH $10.00
PURCHASE
rfmfe
'
I
-MM





'
10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 31. 1983
?
Tennis Scores
Cont'd From Page 8
6-4, 6-1; Laura Red-
ford (ECU) def.
Allison Shoulars, 6-0,
6-0; Natalie Brown
(UNC-W) def. Laurie
Reep, 6-2, 6-3; and
Kim Harrison (ECU)
def. Sarah Uminski,
6-3,6-4.
In doubles, Arnos-
Frazier (UNC-W) def.
Russell-Redford, 6-4,
7-5; Tolson-Christine
(ECU) def. Barclay-
Shoulars, 6-0, 6-1;
and Uminski-Sharpe
(UNC-W) def. Reep-
Harrison, 5-7, 6-4,
7-6.
The Lady Bucs are
now 4-6 and will take
on Harvard women's
junior varsity team
Saturday at 2 p.m.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
TYPING � W years experience.
Cl' 3i -0�74 after 5:30 p.m.
WANTED
TO THE ROOMMATES WITH
PLAID UNDERWEAR: I've
decided to 90 public with my in-
formation Please stop by and
pick up your copies ot Real Men
DOn't Wear Slippers. Surprise!
Love. THE PORN QUEEN
BEETLE, what a great year!
This was it Find too ways. My
keys are in the trunk How do we
get out ot this parking lot' I
fhmk those people are in our
seats What? Next month!
PVBC and FBCO Halloween
with Shortcake and monster
Reading the Bible! Thanx tor
the best one! Happy A and 1 love
you Your, PUNN-KIN
TO ANWAR We express our
heartfelt sympathy and con-
dolences on the demise of your
father May God rest his soul
Your friends at the ISA.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
3 ROOMMATES NEEDED for
Georgetown Apts! Call 7S8 4A95
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED for summer to share
2 bedroom house Close to cam
pus and laundry Call LISA or
LONNIE 7S 8S6�
ROOMMATE(S) WANTED
Responsible female or male
wanted to share a 3 bedroom
condo with a working male R.N.
Great arrangements May have
pet. Call Rich Hall at 7S 777
anytime
SERVICES
WANTED: FEMALE
bartenders for part time and
summer 10b. Apply between 2
and 4 Thursday. March 24th. At-
tic. 103 E 4th Street.
ATTRACTIVE MOOELS
WANTED for figure �
"intimate apparel"
photography Excellent pay
Send figure photo and personal
information to P O Box U13.
Rocky Mount. N C 27001141J
ENERGETIC Part time
salesperson needed. Available
mornings and Saturdays. Ex
penence preferred but not
necessary. Apply in person.
Leather 'n' Wood, Ltd. Carolina
East Mall. No phone calta
MATURE. RESPONSIBLE
PERSONS WANTED FOR sum
mer subleasing in 2 bedroom
townhouse swimming pool. $740
plus utilities. 757 3�04ot 757 17JS.
SUMMER JOBS: Two water
safety instructors, R.N. and arts
and crafts director For infor-
mation, write Ed Hodges, Jr. 215
E. 11th Street, Washington, N.C
27M9
Air cone, pool. Responsible per-
sons call 75 37 for more info.
Reasonable price.
SUMMER LEASE AVAILABLE
for 7 bedroom apt. Need respon-
sible girls. Close to campus with
1 and 17 bath, pool, air condi
tioning. $240 month. 750-404.
FORSALET
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff
Welcome to our flea market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd. Open every Saturday and
Sunday � til S. Crafts, tools, fur-
niture, books, etc. Displays of
ofd postcards, burtons, antique
pistols and collectors' items.
Weal bargains 11
TWIN BED WITH FRAME, box
spring, mattress, table chest.
Good condition, call 752 3522.
70 YAMAHA ENDURO 250 good
condition 550 w helmet
752-437. TODD.
SCHWINN VARSITY 10 speed
Good condition. 075.00. Phone �
750404.
K2-7S0 KAWASAKI, 101, 01,400.
Priced to sell. Great bargain.
Good condition. This is a real
motorcycle. Make an offer. Call
752-435.
?50 SPECIAL II Yamaha $1,200.
Good condition. An excellent
bike. Need to sell. Make an of
far. Call 752 435.
102 CHEVY Custom Deluxe 10,
4x4. cspeed, sliding rear win-
dows, AMFM, cassette. PS
P.B. Lock-in hubs. Rally wheels.
Priced to soil, $10,300. Call
7H-4?JS.
By CINDY WALL
Competition was stiff in Tuesday night's cheerieading tryouts, as ECU students show off
their gymnastic skills.
ATTIC
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED TO
WASHINGTON. DC area
Leave on Ft day Call Steve at
752 0704. Will help with oas
MISC.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, experience, quality
work. IBM Selectric typewriter.
Call Lanie Shive 750 5301 or
GAIL JOYNER 754 1042
TYPING: Term papers, thesis,
etc Call Kempie Dunn. 752-4733
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE: Complete audic repair
call after 4 p.m. Mark 757 174.
MOVING? No .Ob too large or
small! Reasonable rates, call
750533
IS LEARNING SPANISH A
BITCH? Causing your hair to
fall out? Call me � I can help.
Tutoring available, flexible
hours KERRI. 757 325
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALL
Reasonable rates Call 750 S33
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
WANTED to sub lease one-room
apartment at Tar River Estates
this summer Apt. is beside
large swimming pool, has patio
and is located 5 minutes from
campus Call 750-4424 tor more
information.
PERSON(S) WANTEO to sub-
lease 2 bedroom townhouse at
Cherry Court. May-Aug. For
more info calf 752-373
NEED SOMEONE TO
SUBLEASE TWO bedroom apt.
at Cannon Ct. for the summer.
Call 757 1420 if interested.
SUBLETTING APARTMENT
tor summer One-bedroom apt.
on 10th St Very near campus.
EVERYONE
IS PICKING UP
ON PILOT PENS
WATCH OUT FOR
THE STUDY HALL SNATCHERS
They know that the 89c
e��'o fne Pi 0 Razor
po rr-a'ke' pen writes
as smooth as stU Ana
"�e custom-fil meta'
cr a' ne ps keep that
pom' ent'c tine page
ate' page Thats why
�Ken tl coes to 0
Pare Pomt its ove
.r � r$l wte
C2
C v��- .?i&td?f.ci4�uu?�

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752-7303
THUR
LADIES FREE TILL 10:30
50CBEV. TILL 11:00
FOR LADIES
FRI
ARMED ANGEL
FORMER MEMBERS
OF JESSE BOLT-
sat-sun
STREET ANGELj
- SUN -
1st ANNUAL PLAYBOY
BUNNY HIIMT
N.C.A.A. FINALS ON T T-v.
: FREE ADM.FREE POPCORN
�01
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STEAK HOUSE
WEEKEND SPECIAL
April 1st,2nd,3rd
Buy I3oz. Sirloin Reg. Price S6.39
Pay only J. price S3.20 Second I3oz Sirloin
All steaks served with king Idaho Pot.
or Fries �- Texas Toast
Salad Bar only $1.00 with this special.
Featuring Prime Rib
Every Fri.� Sat. Night
Now Serving 14ozT-Bone
April Lunch Specials Mon-Sat 11-2
Jr. Sirloin $2.19 w salad bar $3.19
Chopped Sirloin $2.49
v salad bar $3.49
lb. Hamburger w Baked Pot. $1.89
wsalad bar $2.89
Baked Potato wsalad bar $2.50
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
500 h. Greenville Blvd. 756-0040
Weekend Special
NiuOia Sponge o MOA j�
�s IctvtHc
A SUDS. SAND & SUN SYMPOSIUM
� S SzYtSirY' OF?yDN.V&53
iljgiiu7
a
EASTER WEEKEND EXTENSION COURSES
April 1 & 2,1983
North Myrtle Beach
South Carolina Campus
Courso
Description
Prerequisite
BUD 101 Can Redemption - Valuable Free Gifts
BUD 102 Natural Light "Beauty - Body"
BUD 103 "6 - Pack in the Sky" Aerial Jump Show
BUD 104 Tug-of War & Relay Races
Ecology
Basic Anatomy
None, unless jumping
Phys. Ed.
LOOK FOR US MATRICULATING ON THE BEACH
gkFTEKbE&lt
IF IT'S FUN YOU'RE LOOKING FOR,
COME GET YOU SOME!
CAROLINA'S RNEST OUTDOOR ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.
HOME OF THE '10,000" LADIES'SHORT SHORTS CONTEST
JUNE 1, 1983 � AUGUST 10. 1983
SPECIAL COLLEGE NIGHTS AND HAPPY HOURS
during SPRING BREAK '83
THE AFTERDECK ANNOUNCES
THE BEACH'S BEST LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
EASTER WEEKEND '83
SEE OR BE
ONE OF THE CAROLINA GIRLS
DOWN AT THE BEACH CLUB WITH

GENERAL NORMAN JOHNSON and
THE CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD
GRAB YOUR BUNNY AND HOP ON IT!
COUPON:
fT�RD��?�
BE MY GUEST
DURING SPRING BREAK '83. PRESENT THIS COUPON
AND A VALID '83 COLLEGE I D FOR
APRIL 4 31. 83 OR $2.00 OFF ON
NAPPY HUNTING! Mfotc ft T&
HWY. 17 N. ON THE IHTCRCOASTAL
wi -d .
� ii �� "�'� imm0mmcmmBmmMin
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 31, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 31, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.260
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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