The East Carolinian, March 29, 1983






1
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1
�he Safit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.S7 Nol 3
Tuesday, March 29,1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Drinking Age
SGA Voices Opinion
By GREG RIDEOUT
NewtEdtUH
The SGA joined the ranks of
student governments across the
nation Monday night when they
passed a resolution against raising
the drinking age. The current bill
before the North Carolina
General Assembly proposes to
raise the age to buy beer from 18
to 19.
At least one dozen states are
considering bills that would raise
the drinking age. ECU now joins
schools from Georgia to Arizona
that have voiced their opposition
to hikes in the drinking age.
The bill, which was brought to
the floor by the Student Welfare
Committee, received only token
opposition. Kyle Schick, the spon-
sor of the bill, told the legislature
that the bill would put a restric-
tion on students for the faults of
all drunken drivers. Statistics
show that driving under the in-
fluence was high in the 20-35 age
group, therefore telling an
18-year-old he couldn't drink was
selective prohibition.
Other legislators called the hike
in age a "sham" and a "quick
fix
The major clause in the bill
reminded the General Assembly
that 18-year-olds are required by
law to defend their country, James B. Hunt Jr Speaker of the
possibly risking their life for House Liston B. Ramsey and the
freedom. Therefore, the bill Governor's Crime Commission.
Slay, Clement Lead In
SRA's Energy Contest
stated, they should be granted the
opportunity to enjoy all the
privileges and rights of a legal
adult.
Student legislators across the
land have used different
arguments in their opposition to
drinking-age-raising laws. The
University of Georgia told their
state senate that blame for
drunken driving was being unfair-
ly placed on students.
Student groups across the coun-
try say the real problems are not
being addressed by legislatures.
Marshall McQueen, a student
government official "at Marshall
University in West Virginia, said
state governments are punishing
the innocent instead of the few
students who do abuse alcohol.
The ECU bill does support
stricter enforcement of laws for
driving under the influence, but
not at the expense of 18-year-old
students.
SGA President Eric Henderson
said he is against raising the drink-
ing age, but, like the legislature,
believes harsher penalties should
be enacted for drunken driving
Copies of the resolution will be
sent to representitives of Pitt
County in the General Assembly,
Lt. Gov. Jimmy Green, Gov.
&
ry c,

Before And After
Phofo By CINDY WALL
1
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�2?
Ph�to By STANLEY LEARY
College Hill was transformed almost overnight from a tropic resort to
an arctic disaster last week as spring was issued in with a freak
snowstorm. The blizzard dumped four to six inches of snow Down
East in less than a day, but the university went cautiously on. Many
students spent more time in the snow than in classrooms last Frida,
however. Most people made the transition from sunbathing to
snowball fights rather easih, while others had their weekend plans
spoiled when they were unable to drive cars out of the parking lot. A
i rare and short-lived art form made a brief appearance on the ECU
campus, however � snow sculpture: a medium with all the durabilitv
of a sandcastle.
Education School Tries For Re-Approval
B PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff Writer
With only two weeks left in the
Student Residence Association
Energy Contest, Slay Residence
Hall held more than a two-
percentage-point lead over second
place Clement, according to the
ECU Office of Housing Opera-
tions.
Slay, with an average energy
saving of 17.45 percent at the end
of eight weeks, led Clement,
which had 15.39 percent. The win-
ning hall at the end of 10 weeks
receives $250 in prize money. Se-
cond place receives $200. Also,
any residence hall that has a
average energy savings of five per-
cent or more at the end of 10
weeks will receive $100 in prize
money.
The race for other places is
close with four halls in contention
for third place. Scott hall with a
12.09 percent savings leads Flet-
cher (11.10), Tyler (10.35) and
Garret (9.64). Both White dorm
(5.44) and Aycock (5.74) are in
contention for the five percent
prize money. Fleming (4.95) and
Greene (4.48) also have a chance
for a $100 award.
According to SRA Energy con-
test coordinator Mark Niwald, the
contest has picked up steam in re-
cent weeks with the possibility of
as many as eight halls saving
beyond the five percent level.
"A lot more dorms than ex-
pected are going to win the prize
for the five percent savings
Niwald said. "As the contest pro-
gressed, there's been more savings
than we first anticipated. It (the
contest) started out a little slow
Slay, which has been among the
leaders for the last six weeks, also
won a $50 bonus for having the
highest percentage saved for over
a two-week period in February.
"I'm really excited and pleased
that we're doing so well said
Slay hall energy officer Denise
Gibson.
Jarvis Residence Hall, with a
saving of 44.76 percent for the
eighth week of the contest, had
one of the highest single week sav-
ings. Jarvis' second week two
total of 45.57 percent was also
among the highest figures. The
contest ends officially on April 5.
Winning halls must request a pur-
chase order from the housing of-
fice to claim their prize money.
According to Ni wald, the prize
money cannot be used to purchase
alcoholic beverages.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
An effort is underway to make
the necessary adjustments to get
the ECU School of Education
back into the good graces of the
National Council for Accredita-
tion of Teachers Education
(NCATE). The organization
denied teacher accreditation to
ECU's program two weeks ago.
At first, several ECU officials
appeared to de-emphasize the im-
portance of the NCATE certifica-
tion, even suggesting that ECU
may not make ali the changes
necessary for re-establishing
NCATE approval. In an earlier
newspaper report Chancellor
John Howell was quoted as say-
ing, "If they (NCATE) just push
for to much, we might just say go
fly a kite
But according to Dr. Lyn
Gubser, executive director of
NCATE, a resolution recently
recommended by the Board of
Directors of the National School
Board Association to its members
would make NCATE certification
a prerequisite to teacher appoint-
ment. NSBA Membership in-
cludes all 16,000 U.S. school
boards, Gubser said. He added
that NSBA members would be ac-
ting on the resolution during its
upcoming national convention.
Gubser also reported that the
National Education Association
has targeted ten states to develop
legislation requiring NCATE ac-
creditation as a prerequisite for
teacher certification.
Dr. Richard Warner, dean of
the ECU School of Education,
said recommendations by the
NSBA were non-binding but that
under some circumstances
NCATE certification could make
a difference in an applicants
changes of being hired for a
teaching position.
Warner said that "given
everything else being equal" an
interviewer might take into con-
sideration whether the applicant
had graduated from an NCATE
approved school of education in
his or her evaluation.
"I think it is serious said
Warner, refering to ECU's loss of
accreditation. "And we do need
to respond "
According to Dr. Angelo A.
Volpe, acting vice chancellor for
academic affairs, the quality of
ECU's education program was
never in question. "NCATE
perceived that administration and
supervision of the teacher educa-
tion programs was different from
the standards which they pro-
mulgate and which they are ac-
customed to Volpe said in a
statement.
Volpe also said that ECU's pro-
gram has not changed substantial-
ly from the program that was fully
accredited by NCATE five years
ago.
Reagan Plans Honduran Training Posts
BOSTON (UPI) � The Reagan
administration hopes to establish
a training center in Honduras for
U.S. military specialists to help
retrain soldiers from El Salvador
in new anti-insurgency tactics, it
was reported Sunday.
The Boston Globe, in a
dispatch from Washington,
quoted well-placed officials as
saying the training program could
be started within a month for up
to 50 small "hunter" battalions,
if the government of Honduras
agrees and Congress provides the
necessary funds.
The report could not im-
mediately be confirmed through
Pentagon or State Department
sources.
"I don't know about Hon-
duras. I know it's been named as a
possible site Anita Stockman, a
State Department spokeswoman,
said. "I can't confirm that
because I think the decisions have
not yet been made
Administration officials said
Honduras has been among the
countries mentioned as possible
training sites outside of El
Salvador.
Reagan, in a March 10 speech,
proposed $110 million in increas-
ed military assistance for El
Salvador and an additional $20
million for Honduras and to sup-
port training programs in
Panama.
At the time, administration of-
ficials stressed the training of
Salvadoran troops would be done
outside of the country if Congress
approved the full aid request.
The officials quoted in the
newspaper said they would prefer
to do the training in El Salvador,
but Congress is clearly unwilling
to see the United States send more
than 55 military advisers.
SGA Candidates Take Advantage
Of Opportunity To Voice Platforms
The SGA Legislature tod a busy
drinking age in North Carolina to
Pfwto By CINDY WALL
night Monday. After passing a resolntion opposing the raising of the
19, it sponsored a candidates forum.
By GREG RIDEOUT
News t dilor
Candidates for SGA executive
offices once again had a chance to
express their views Monday night
at a forum sponsored by the SGA.
Although most candidates
reinterated their platforms, there
was some debate over the
feasibility of vice presidential can-
didate Lindsey Williams' proposal
for a downtown shuttle service.
Williams representitive (She
was unable to attend because of
"academic reasons) spoke at
length for the student's need for
such a service, but she did not
know the cost to the students for
the shuttle. Vice presidential can-
didate David Futrell called the
idea "ridiculous
Tim Mertz, also a candidate for
vice president, liked the idea but
added that the cost could be pro-
hibitive without outside funding.
Both candidates for SGA presi-
dent, Tory Russo and Paul Naso,
endorsed the plan cautiously.
They said the idea was good but
should be studied more closely.
All the candidates except Russo
were against the present bill
before the SGA legislature that
would put a 10 percent funding
limit on groups. Russo said he
believed groups should not be
allowed to get more than 10 per-
cent of the annual SGA ap-
propriations (a figure estimated
around $10,000).
Presidential candidate Russo
stressed his experience to the small
audience, while Naso told the
crowd he .didn't have all the
answers, but he had a system to
get them. He said that as president
he would set up an information
system network that would coor-
dinate and act as a liason between
students, groups and the SGA.
Becky Talley, candidate for
secretary, and Sarah Coburn, can-
didate for treasurer, are both run-
ning unopposed. They told the au-
dience of their plans for next year.
Sarah Coburn proposed that a
newsletter be sent out by the SGA
to inform groups of different
rules and regulations governing
them.
The election is slated for
Wednesday. March 30. Polls will
be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
New Buccaneer Yearbooks
Now Available To Students
The 1981-82 ECU yearbook,
the Buccaneer, has finally arrived
on campus The 400-page, hard-
back volume is a special edition
commemorating the 75th anniver-
sary of the university and is com-
plete with color photographs and
pictures of the student body.
The yearbook, published by the
ECU Media Board and produced
by a student staff, arrived last
Thursday. Copies can be picked
up by students this week through
Thursday between 2 and 5 p.m.
at the Buccaneer offices, located
on the second floor of the
Publications building, across
from Joyner Library.
In addition, anyone having
their portrait made for the
1982-83 yearbook may pick up
their Buccaneer in the offices at
sitting time.
Lisa Coleman, the new year-
book editor, praised the new
purple-bound volume and last
year's staff, headed by Editor
Amy Pickett. "I think it is the
best Buccaneer yet. Ms. Pickett
and her staff did a Fine job
The Buccaneer is paid for by
student fees and can be picked up
without charge by ECU students
with ID and activity cards. The
university has printed 5,500
copies.
Students wishing to have their
portrait made for next year's year-
book or for private use must sign
up as soon as possible outside the
Buccaneer offices.
� - 4.vim . .
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2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 29, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
if you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
. nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building. Flyers and handwrit-
ten cooy on odd sited paper can
not be accepted.
There s no charge tor an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
merit will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rei solely on this column tor
puDlicity
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p.m Monday
toi the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesdayy tor the Thurs
dav paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
Trus space is available to all
campus organizations and
cepartments
PITT COUNTY
HEALTH FAIR
The East Carolina University
School of Medicine is sponsoring
the Pitt County Health Fair on
April 22 and 23 at the Carolina
East Mall. There will be over 20
community organizations in-
volved in providing screening
anj education during the two
day period Any student
volunteers willing to help with
heai'h screenings and education
will be appreciated For more
information or to volunteer,
please can the Health Education
Office at 757 6510 We need your
participation in making this
Health Fair a success!
AOn BEST LEGS
'his is your last week to have
pictures taken for the Best Legs
Contest. Don't miss your chance
to show oft those terrific thighs.
Call today and make your ap
po ntment at the AOn House
BEST PLAYBOY
BUNNY CONTEST
Okay all you bunnies pull out
vour fish net hose and your
black leotard and hurry on down
the the Elbo TONIGHT1 (Ears
v. ii be provided).
FRISBEECLUB
ne snow has melted and
warm weather is hopefully upon
us Come to the bottom of col
lege hill on Tues and Thurs. at
4 00 ana enjoy the wonderful
game of ultimate frisbee Club
meetings are Monday nights
Rm 248 MSCatB 00 Anyone in
'erested is welcome to attend
INTER VARSITY
Spring time brings out the best
'm people and so does I V Come
a"d ioin us this Wed night, as
we study the Word of God, to
I no out what our best should be
e will be meeting in the
B.oiogy Bidg N105. at 6 30 See
vou then�
WALT DISNEY
WORLD
Representative from Walt
Disney World in Orlando, FL
will be at UNC Chapel Hill April
7 at 7:00 p.m. to interview col-
lege students majoring in retail
management, hotelrestaurant
management, recreation and
park administration or business
for summer or fall employment
The Magic Kingdom College
Program includes a minimum of
30 hours of work per week and
students will be eligible for
special Disney arranged nous
mg near the Walt Disney World
resort area Students will
receive firsthand experience
while studying the practices and
philosophies employed by the
Disney management team.
There will be a presentation
about the program given and in
terviews will follow afterwards
Students must be earning
academic credit while working.
Interested students need to con
tact Nancy Filinow
COOPERATIVE ED.
The East Carolina
Cooperative Education Office
will be hosting the Eastern
Regional Conference on
Cooperative Education March
30, Mendenhaii 244 Registration
is at 9 30 the program con
dudes at 3:00 pm The con
ference will provide a forum in
which employers and educators
can discuss ways in which"
Cooperative Education can help
during the hectic aO's Panel
members include Dr Clyde Er-
win (President of Wayne Com
munity College), Dr. Trent
Davis (Chairman of the ECU
Environmental Health Dept.),
Dr Bruce Petteway (President
of NC Wesieyan College), and
Mr Jack Parker (Burroughs
Wellcome) Any faculty
member or student that is in
terested in Cooperative Educa-
tion is urged to attend any por
tion of the conference they can.
For additonal information, call
7 576979
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general
meeting of the ECU Am
bassadors on March 30th in the
Mendenhaii Mutti Purpose
room The meeting will begin at
5 00 p.m Ambassadors of the
month for Jan and Feb. will be
announced. Nominations for of
ficers for the 193 14 school year
will be received and voting will
t�ke place at the April 13th
meeting Plans for the March
31st Open House will be discuss
ed also Please make plans to at
tend this very important
meeting
WOULD YOU LIKE TO
BE AN AMBASSADOR
What exactly is an ECU Am
bassador The East Carolina
University Ambassador's will
be hosting an open house March
31st from 7:30 until 9:00 p m. at
the Taylor Slaughter Alumni
Center across from Spilman. All �
interested people are urged to
attend! Drop by and see what
the ECU Ambassadors are real
ly like!
NATURAL LIGHT
ULTIMAX
March 2 27 is but a week
away and the I rates are getting
their first ultimate tournament
together! Come out and see the
best east coast teams compete
in ultimate. The I rates practice
every Tues. ' Thurs. at the bot
torn of the hill at 4.00. Club
meetings are Mon. nights 1:00
Rm 24a MSC Anyone interested
may attend.
PUT A LITTLE HEART
IN YOUR SOUL
The twelfth annual Walk tor
Humanity is coming up soon.
The walk will take place on April
16 beginning at Green Springs
park at 1:30 a.m. Anyone in-
terested in helping come to the
Hunger Coalition meetings on
Thursday nights at 7:00 p.m. at
the Newman Center, 953 East
Tenth Street, or call 752 4216.
GREENVILLE
PEACE COMMITTEE
Love-brutally humiliated and
destroyed: a world of stagnant
possibilities created by the false
fathers who built and tolerated
the Auschweitz's and Vietnams
of history, those who have par-
ticipated in the torture
chanbers of the ecclesiastical
inquisitions and then forgotten
without remorse. This is the
state of affairs that cries out to
us; that plagues our consciences
and demands to be challenged.
If you are ready to make a com-
mitment to justiceif you are
ready to begin building a new
kind of society free of violence,
poverty, and alienation we need
you. Come to the meeting of the
Greenville Peace Committee at
610 S. Elm St. at 7:00 Friday
night, or phone 741 4906 for more
information.
SPRING
CARNATION SALE
The Clothing and Textiles
Association Spring Carnation
Sale has been postponed until
March 31st. Come and purchase
a flower for a friend from 1000
am to 3:00 pm in front of the Stu
dent Supply Store.
SUMMER SCHOOL
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits
for Summer School 193 will be
accepted jin the Cashier's Of-
fice, Room 105, Spilman
Building, beginning April S.
Room assignments will be made
in me respective residence nail
otjices on April 7 and April .
Thereafter, they will be made in
the Office of Housing Opera
tions, Room 201, Whichard
Building. The rent for a term of
summer school is $120 for a
semi private room and SIM for a
private room Additional rent in
the amount of $20 Is required for
Jarvis Hall.
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy,
provided such rooms are to be in
use this summer, are to make
reservations on Thursday, April
7. All other students may
reserve rooms on � first-come,
first serve basis on Friday,
April t.
Residence halls to be used for
women are Greene, Slay (first
floor for mobility impaired
students) and Jarvis. Men will
be housed in Fletcher, Slay
(first floor for mobility impaired
students) and Jarvis Halls.
DELTAZETA
Thanks for your support and
help with the March of Dimes
and sign Language Club. You
did a great job!
GRADUATION
in an effort to expand the
limited seating for this year's
commencement proceedings,
two classrooms will be set up in
the Mingest Building with a
Closed-circuit coverage of the
ceremony. Each classroom will
accommodate about 100 people
and will have a six-foot T.V.
screen No ticket is required.
TAXES
Volunteers from the ECU Ac
counting Society and the Na-
tional Association of Accoun-
tants will be in the main lobby of
Mendenhaii Student Center to
help individuals prepare tax
returns from 4 to 7 pm each
Tuesday in March, and
Tuesdays and Thursdays In
April through April 15.
CANOE TRIP
The Outdoor recreation center
for the Department of
intramural Recreational ser
vices is sponsoring a canoe trip
on Wednesday, April 13, 1983.
The trip is suitable for beginning
or experienced canoers. Trip
participants will meet behind
Memorial gym at 300p.m. on
Wednesday for a liesurely pad
die down the Tar River lasting
approximately 2 hours. Par
ticipants should arrive back at
Memorial gym at 6:00 p.m Ad
vance registration and payment
(S3 00 per person is due by 4.00
p.m. on Tuesday, April 12, 1983.
Groups are welcome. For
registration or more informa
tion call or stop by rm. 113
Memorial Gym, 757 6911 or
7 57 638 7)
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed for Art Depart
ment self-help positions art
available for nude modeling at
15.02 per hour PLease see the
following teachers: Ray
Elmore, Tran Gordley, Davy
Davenport, Wes Crawley, Betsy
Ross, Michael Voors.
RECALL DRUG
The pain reliever. Zomax, is
being temporarily withdrawn by
McNeill Laboratories for
relabeling purposes concerning
the possibility of allergic reac
tions Any containers of the drug
obtained from the Student
Health Center should be return
ed to the Pharmacy at the
Center. Please do not take
anymore of the drug.
This year,
some of our graduates
will be remembered
under the following
yearbook heading�
Those Not Pictured.
"Don't be a blank spot Your college
yearbook is a lasting memory of a
great part of your life.
For your sake, and others,
get your picture taken.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may vm ittt farm at rtajit �r
uw a aaaarata a a pipir If
you fM� mara ham. Tfcaca ara M
units par Hit. Eacti tofttr, punc-
tuation mark and word apaca
count m ana unit. Capitalist and
nypnanata woraa property. Laava
tpaca at and of Una if
doaan't fit. No ads win ba
captad ovar tna pnona.
m9r9 tna rtpnt to rofoct any ad.
75f per tow or fraction of a int.
Please print tefintyi Use capital and
tower case letter.
toTNEEASTCAMMJNUN I
AMBASSADOR
SCHOLARSHIP
The Past President's club of
the ECU Alumni Association is
offering a scholarship to an Am-
bassador in order to express
their deep appreciation for the
vast amount of volunteer ser-
vice that the ECU Ambassdors
contribute to the progfress and
welfare of East Carolina Univer-
sity. The recipient must be an
ECU student who is a member in
good standig of the ECU Am
basadors and must be of such
classification as to be a senior In
the fall semester of 1983. Any
Ambassador who is interested
should pick up an application
after March 2). 1983 In the
TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center. Applications should be
completed and turned in by
April 1, 1983
LECTURE
The East Carolina University
Department of Foreign
Languages and Literatures is
pleased to announce the lecture
"Strategic interaction" by
Robert J. Di Pletro, Chairman.
Department of Languages and
Literatures. The University of
Delaware. Professor di Pietro.
and internationally known ex-
pert on language teaching and
methodology, will speak on 1
April at 11 a.m. in Room BO 4 of
the Media Center, located in the
basement of Joyner Library
(new annex).
ATTORNEY
GENERAL
Applications are now being ec
cepfed for the position of
Attorney General of the Student
Government Association. In-
terested students should apply
at the Student Government
Association office. Room 228
Mendenhaii, by March 29.
IFCPAGENT
The Miss IFC Pegenf is to be
held on April 25th at 7:00 p.m.
Applications need to be turned in
by 5 00 p.m.on Wed. April 6th.
So all you Greeks need to pick
your BEST BABES NOWI!
MARSHALL
APPLICATIONS
Persons interested in applying
for Marchall may do so in 228
Mendenhaii Student Center. A
3.09 grade average is required
and awould like for you to be a
junior at the end of spring 83
semester.
EASTER CARNATION
SALE
The Clothing and Textiles
Associaion will have an Easter
carnation sale on March 29th
and 30th in front of the Student
Supply Store. Come buy one for
a friend.
PLANT SALE
The ECU Bilogy Club is hav
ing a plant sale at the Biology
Dept Greenhouse. Thursday
March 31 from 7:30 am - 1:00
p.m. and Friday April 1 from
9:00 - 11:00 am Everybody
Welcome 11
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi's Tau Chapter
will hold Its monthly business
meeting Wednesday, March 30.
1983 in Rawl 130 immediately
following the 5:00 pledge
meeting. All brothers make
plans to attend this meeting.
CAREER CHOICE
The Strong-Campbell interest
inventory is offered every Tues
day at 4 PM in 305 Wright An
nex, when school Is in session
with the exceptions of examina
tion period and registration
dav. This is available to all
students at no cost. No formal
registration is required
ALAMO
There will be a happy hour
this Tues March 29 at the
ALAMO from 7 10 featuring
SI.25 Hiballs and .75 beers.
There will be a Disc Jockey and
drawings for prizes. Bring your
memberships or Greek Iden
ttflcetion. Open to whole Cam-
pus.
BEST BODY CONTEST
Are you a KNOCK OUT? If so.
why not enter the Best Body
Contest sponsored by NAACP to
be held on April 22 at 8 00 in
Memorial Gym. First and Se
cond place prizes will be award
ed. For more information, call
757 3340 or 753 8568 Deadline tor
entries is April 1.
SCHOOL OF ART
The School of Art is offering
the initial Wellington B. Gray
Memorial Scholarship for
undergraduate students of
junior and senior rank who are
currently enrolled full time in
the School of Art and majoring
in Art Education. The Well
ington B. Gray Memorial
Scholarship is the amount of
500.00. To qualify, a student
must have a grade point
average of 3.5 in hisher major,
and an overall average of 3.0.
Slides of five works (name, title,
media, date) must accompany
the scholarship application
form. Application forms may be
obtained from the School of Art
Office. The deadline for all com
pleted application material is
April 14, 1983. The scholarship
will be awarded before the end
of this acadmic year.
PHI SIGMA PI
ELECTIONS
Phi Sigma Pi's Tau Chapter
will hold 198384 elctions on
Tuesday. April 5. 1983 at 500
p.m. in Rawl 130. All brothers
please attend this important
meeting.
S. R.A.
Escorts are needed for the
Escort Service. Anyone in
terested in being an escort
please contact your dorm direc
tor. If you are a dorm resident of
if you live off campus contact
the SGA office.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Students to be initiated into
Phi Eta Sigma are remind to be
at the multi-purpose room. Men
danhall Student center, no later
than 715 p.m. on Thurs Mar
31.1983
BACK TO THE BIBLE
Lef s get back to the Bible! In
formal Bible discussions Mens
7 30 Tuesday night, 110 Beik
Dorm, Womens 7 30 Thursday
night, 212 Mendenhaii
Everyone is welcome!
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN
COMMUNITY
The Catholic Newman Com
munity invites all interested
students to participate in their
activities and workship ser
vices. Mass is celebrated on
Wednsday evenings at 500 p.m
at the Newman Center (953 E
10th street) followed by a pro-
gram and meal Sunday Mas is
celebrated at 12.30 p.m. on Sun
days in room B 103 of the
Biology Building For more in
formation call 752 4216
SUMMER SCHOOL ift3
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits
for Summer School 1983 will be
accepted in the Cashier's Office,
Room 105, Spilman Building,
beginning April 5 Room
assignments will be made in the
respective residence hail offices
on April 7 and April 8
Thereafter, they will be made in
the Office of Housing Opera
tions. Room 201, Whichard
Building The rent for a term of
summer school is $120 for a
semi private room and 8180 for a
private room. Additional rent in
the amount of $20 is required for
Jarvis Hall
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy,
provided such rooms are to be m
use this summer, are to make
reservations on Thursday. April
7 All other students may
reserve rooms on a first come,
first serve basis on Friday,
April 8.
Residence halls to be used for
women are Greene, Slay (first
floor for mobility impaired
students) and Jarvis. Men will
be housed in Fletcher. Slav
(first floor for mobility impaired
students) and Jarvis Haiis.
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
A three part workshop :?�����.
r no cost by the un ,�ri�,
Counseling Center Tnurva�,
March 31. April 7 anc u aj
three sessions will be conouc�c
from 3 pm 4 pm 305 Wr.gn- �-
nex (757 6661) The wcrnvx
will focus on help in -
distinguish between lher ass
five, aggressive, ana n,r
assertive behaviors p�-
ticipants can learn now to �
press thamsefves direc'� �ne
openly, and respond To
sonai situations to t miniv
which neither compron- ses a
dividual beliefs nor ;�?
others Please can courv,
center for registration
The East Carolinian
Servutf it onpu comm
'I92S
Published every Tuesatr
and Thursday during �
academic year ana every
Wednesday during me surr
The East Carolinian mt
official newspaper of Es
Carolina university, ownec
operated, and published tor
and by me students of East
Carolina university
SabecrtpMen Kate: ����r-T
The last Carefintafi office
ara localea in lk� Otd vout
Building aa the campus of
ECU. Greenville NC
POSTMASTER Sena tz
dress changes to The Eaf
Carolinian. Ola S
Building ECU Green t
NC 27834
7$7
�!��
6389
MERTZ
Time is running out.
Make appointments now to have
your yearbook portraits made.

Sign up sheets located outside
the Buccaneer Office.
Portraits will be taken till
April 8th
Monday-Fri.
9-12; 1-5
at the Buccaneer Office.
Also, all campus organizations
wishing to be represented in the 1983
Buccaneer please contact the Buccaneer
at 757-6501 as soon as possible.
Ask for Tammy Edwards.
Campus Mi
Views On
A former ECU
campus minister
claimed Thursday
night that the Central
American nation of
Nicaragua will not
become "another
Cuba" if ti e United
States changes it's
policy toward that
country.
Father Charles
Mulholland, ECL's
catholic campus
minister until 1978,
spoke at the Baptist
Student Center as part
of the activities of
Central America
Week. He recently
returned from a fact-
finding trip to Central
America.
Mulholland claims
that under the San-
dinista government
there has been con-
siderable improve-
ment in the areas of
housing, nutrition,
education and helath
care. "The
Nicaraguan govern-
ment has considerablv
improved the m
lot of the
Mulholland saidj
He added thai
ing his trip he nj
many new h(
projects in Nicaj
captial city, Ma
since his last tril
years ago.
(improvement
domestic condl
is ihe main tar
this administn
said Mulhollanc
Mulholland.
travels annual
Central Amencj
that the pi
Nicarguan g
ment follow!
"non-alignev
tion" of stro
position to
foreign polu
being less cnt
the Soviet L m
Mulhol
believes that I
this anti-U.S.
is a result of l
tion. 'lt wa
stated that the
States govei
Political Si
By PATRICK CVNF.ll I
Staff Vknlrr
An ECU faculty
member has received
two awards for his
recently published
non-fiction book.
ECU political
science professor and
departmental chair-
man Dr. Tinsley Yar-
brough wa
winner of
Alabama
Award
Alabama
Association.
Yarbrougl
received th
Gavel Awarl
the Amend
Association'
Awards Coi
Do You Fre
WATC
WI
A
D
1)ALB
2) 2 DI!
3)GIF1
4) 2 SD
5)1M(
6) BAN
COV
ME
REMEU
GETB
� � if � �� 9 -� � n Miii iii iw �wilw iW m
j f �. �� � �� ?.
-��:��





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 29, 1983




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1.

lOTHE BIBLE
ITHOLIC
WMAN
IMUNITY
�S3 E
t n
SCHOOL '�83
SERVATION
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
a - � pa orushop ottered
- c. re university
g Center Thursday
Apr i 7 ami u All
tttree v- an will ce conducted
4 prn J05 Wright An
�' Tie workshop
a �cl. on help m numbers
it ?e'ween their asser
� . aggro! ve and non
� . t Dehaviors Par
s .an -earn how to ex
�'?� Itumwtvn directly and
� espono to interper
I a' ors .n a manner
attic �' "v- compromises in
� � � a t�e'ets nor offends
P'ease can counseling
� " 'eg s�ration
- .e
,erve
The East Carolinian
. i. .Jii�i-�miiiiiiiiv
tmct If23
PuBiiSh-d every Tuesday
a"c Thursday during the
� Ktefflk year and every
Aen�sctav ckirmg the sum
"p East Carolinian is The
I newspaper of East
-a un.versity, owned,
wa'fd and published for
ana t� re students of East
�a university.
Subscription Rate: 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
art located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER Send ad
Jress changes 'o The East
'an Old South
. ECU Greenville,
nc rex
Telephone 7J7 414, 4J47.
�30�
MERTZ
t.
to have
s made.
outside
ice.
en till
ffice.
zations
in The 1983
Buccaneer
'ssible.
rds.
Campus Minister Presents
Views On Central America
A former ECU
campus minister
claimed Thursday
night that the Central
American nation of
Nicaragua will not
become "another
Cuba" if the United
States changes it's
policy toward that
country.
Father Charles
Mulholland, ECU's
catholic campus
minister until 1978,
spoke at the Baptist
Student Center as part
of the activities of
Central America
Week. He recently
returned from a fact-
finding trip to Central
America.
Mulholland claims
that under the San-
dinista government
there has been con-
siderable improve-
ment in the areas of
housing, nutrition,
education and helath
care. "The
Nicaraguan govern-
ment has considerably
improved the material
lot of the people
Mulholland said.
He added that dur-
ing his trip he noticed
many new housing
projects in Nicargua's
captial city, Managu,
since his last trip two
years ago. "This
(improvement of
domestic conditions)
is the main target of
this administration
said Mulholland.
Mulholland, who
travels annually to
Central America, said
that the present
Nicarguan govern-
ment follows the
"non-aligned posi-
tion" of strong op-
position to U.S.
foreign policy, while
being less critical of
the Soviet Union.
Mulholland
believes that much of
this anti-U.S. feeling
is a result of U.S. ac-
tion. "It was publicly
stated that the United
States government
had appropriated $19
million to assist covert
activity to overthrow
the Nicaraguan
government
Mulholland said. He
said the U.S. is also
"keeping up the Hon-
duran military" in
defense against
Nicaragua.
Mulholland said he
saw no possibility of a
Nicaraguan attack of
Honduras.
Sunday news
reports said the
Reagan administra-
tion is hoping to
establish a training
center in Honduras
for U.S. military
specialists to help
train El Salvadoran
soliders in new
"anti-insurgency tac-
tics Critics of the
plan feel that the
United States is wrong
in its El Salvadoran
policy and that U.S.
troops in the area to
the north of
Nicaragua could be
used to destablize the
Nicaraguan govern-
ment.
Mulholland said the
present leadership of
the Nicarguran
government is com-
prised of younger
people inexperienced
in administration.
Five of the govern-
ment leaders are
Catholic priests. The
present government
came to power in 1979
after the overthrow of
the dictatorship of
Anastasio Somoza.
Mulholland claims
that because of their
inexperience,
Nicaraguan leaders
would be open to
assistance from the
United States. "I feel
that the American
government should
give Nicaragua
whatever help they
can in pursuing their
aims (of improved
conditions for the
people) Mulholland
added.
ECU Committee Holds
Vigil to Mark Murder
Of El Slavador Bishop
In observance of
"Central America
Week the ECU
committee on Central
America held two
vigils Thursday, the
anniversary of the
assasination of ar-
chbishop
Romero
Salvador.
About
Father Charles Mulholland
urges U.S. policy change
Mulholland
believes the
Nicaraguan leader-
ship is looking for a
"third way" to
govern that would not
follow the example of
either the United
States or the Soviet
Union. He said the
U.S. could be viewed
favorably the
Nicaraguans if they
supported thier
development needs.
Central America
Week, which ended
Sunday, was a
statewide activity
designed to promote
study, reflection and
action on Central
American issues. The
Carolina Inter Faith
Task Force on Central
America and the Ex-
ecutive Council of the
N.C. Council of
Churches were the co-
sponsors of the week
of study.
Political Science Scholar Wins Awards
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff Writer
An ECU faculty
member has received
two awards for his
recently published
non-fiction book.
ECU political
science professor and
departmental chair-
man Dr. Tinsley Yar-
brough was chosen
winner of the 1983
Alabama Authors
Award by the
Alabama Library
Association.
Yarbrough also
received the Silver
Gavel Award from
the American Bar
Association's 1982
Awards Competition
for his non-fiction
work, "Judge Frank
Johnson and Human
Rights in Alabama
The book was
published in 1981 by
the University of
Alabama Press.
"He was very thrill-
ed to win the award
said Mary Alice Yar-
brough, the author's
wife. Yarbrough was
out of town on
recruiting duties for
the university and
unavailable for com-
ment. He will travel to
Montgomery, Ala
for the Library
Association's awards
banquet on April 7 to
receive his award.
Yarbrough is cur-
rently researching
Supreme Court
Justices William H.
Rehnquist and Hugo
L. Black, president
Carter's relations with
Congress and the
Supreme Court's
position regarding a
variety of civil liberty
cases.
Yarbrough has
been at ECU since
1967. He holds
membership in several
professional and
honorary organiza-
tions. He received all
of his degrees from
the Universtiy of
Alabama and is a
native of the state.
Oscar
in El
a dozen
students and faculty
members gathered
outside the Student
Supply Store at noon
Thursday during a
chilled rain holding
placards and handing
out leaflets to
students.
The leaflets titled,
"Peace with Justice in
Central America in-
cluded a picture of
Romero and four con-
ditions that the com-
mittee supports for
Central America.
The conditions call-
ed for a stop to U.S.
military aid to the
region, support for a
negotiated political
solution to the strife,
the halt of all U.S.
covert operations in
Nicaragua and a gran-
ting of temporary
asylum to Central
American refugees.
Student reaction to
the vigil varied, with
most students appear-
ing uninterested.
"I wanted to sup-
port something I real-
ly believe in said
ECU history student
Rick Brown, who par-
ticipated in the one-
hour vigil. "I really
believe that United
States military
volvement in
Salvador on
level
deplorable
Brown said
in-
El
any
is
he
studied
before
decision
against
policy
America
the situation
making his
to speak out
U.S. foreign
in Central
. "It took me
some time to research
all the facts Brown
said, adding that he
believes the American
people are not being
given an accurate ac-
count of the facts con-
cerning the Central
American issue.
"I am adament in
the right of the people
(in Central America)
to control their own
self-determination
Brown said. He claim-
ed it was the duty of
U.S. citizens to
educate themsele on
major issues such as
Central America. "It
comes along with our
citizenship
Only nine people
arrived at the Pitt
County Courthouse
Thursday evening
during a raging snow
storm to participate in
the candelight vigil in
honor of Romero,
who was shot in 1980
while celebrating mass
in El Salvador.
According to a
spokesperson with the
ECU Committee on
Central America, the
small turnout was a
result of the poor
weather conditions
Last year's vigil on
the same day attracted
more than 50 ECU
students, faculty and
staff as well as several
other Greenville
citizens.
Similar activities, as
part of the Central
America Week obser-
vance, were con-
ducted on several
other N.C. college
campuses last week.
Central America
Week w as also
observed in numerous
churches and
synogogues across the
state which held wor-
ship services.
o � . .��
a -
����.
.��
Do You Frequent The Joyner Library
I � ' �� o �
o �� . o�- � o
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Presents It's
PRE GREEK WEEK
TIP OFF
NCAA STYLE
COME OUT TO PAPA KATZ
AT 7:30 APRIL 4th AND
WATCH THE NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP
GAME WITH US ON OUR
WIDE SCREEN TELEVISION
AND DRINK FREE BEVERAGES
ALL NIGHT LONG
ABORTIONS
1-24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALLTOLL FREE
1-800-321-0575
MERTZ
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts. Sleeping Bags
Backpacks Camping Equip
men' Steel Toed Shoes Dishes
and Over 700 D'Herent Mew and
Used Items Cowboy Boots
'army-navy
STORE
I Ml 5 E"i
Street
TORY RUSSO
IS PRESIDENT OF THE STUDENT
RESIDENCE ASSOCIATION
CHAIRMAN OF THE STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE
MEDIA BOARD
CURRENTLY HELPING THE PIRATE
CLUB'S "SIEGE OF 83"
AN INNITIATOR OF "PIRATE WALK"
THE EXPERIENCE NEEDED FOR SG A PRESIDENT
DOOR PRIZES AWARDED
AT HALF TIME!
1) ALBUMS FROM RECORD BAR
2) 2 DINNERS FOR 2 AT PHARO'S
3) GIFT CERTIFICATE FROM QUICKSILVER RECORDS
4) 2 SIX FOOT PARTY SUDS FROM SUB STATION II
5) 1 MONTH MEMBERSHIP FROM AEROBICS WORKSHOP
6) BANANA SPLIT FROM HEART'S DELIGHT
COVER CHARGE:
MEMBERS: S3.00GUESTS: $4.00
REMEMBER: FREE BEVERAGES. DOOR PRIZES
GET BACK EARLY AND PARTY WITH US
SPONSORS INCLUDE:
BONDS, VARSITY BARBER SHOP, CHICOS, PHARO'S,
QUICKSILVER RECORDS,RECORD BAR, OVERTONS,
SUB STATION II, HEART'S DELIGHT,
AEROBICS WORKSHOP, ROCKET MUSIC.
��� �� � ywfcii m �fcw' ��
A





?
(Sire iEaot (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, oenemi Manattr
Mike Hughes, Managing tduor
Waverly Merritt, r - fir mi, Cindy Pleasants. spans ��.�
Scott Lindley, m. Manager Greg Rideout, wmm
All AFRASHTEH, Creda Manager STEVE BACHNER, tnteria.nmtm tduor
Stephanie Groon. n i intm n i Juliana Fahrbach, stvietd,wr
Clay Thornton, rnhnn-aisupervisor Todd Evans, immm Manager
March 29, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Graduation '83
Seeding Vs. Seating
It is unfortunate that the
priorities of some members of our
administration � despite their
self-proclaimed "good" intentions
would work only to mar one of
the most important milestones in a
college student's life. It is unfor-
tunate that a ceremony com-
memorating the achievement of a
tew thousand "future leaders"
could be reduced to an issue of
seeding vs. seating.
Well, such has been the case
with ECU's 1983 commencement
exercises. They're being moved
from their customary, spacious
location at Ficklen Stadium inside
to a cramped Minges Coliseum.
Why? Because the football field in
Ficklen is scheduled to undergo
renovations around the first of
May.
God forbid our precious foot-
ball field should go unfertilized.
It's not like it's going to be torn to
hell after our first home game next
season anyway. It's not like
reseeding and whatever landscap-
ing they have in mind could be put
off one week to accommodate
something as insignificant as com-
mencement ceremonies. How can
we expect them to do that?
All sarcasm aside, however,
what the issue boils down to is sim-
ple mathematics. Ficklen Stadium
holds 35,000, which has always
guaranteed plenty of room for
anyone wishing to attend gradua-
tion. Minges Colisuem holds about
6.900 (presupposing, of course,
that about half of those 6,900 are
less than five feet tall and weigh
about 100 pounds). The average
number in attendance at com-
mencement is more than 13,000,
which means that under the cur-
rent plan for graduation, just over
half of those in attendance will ac-
tually see the ceremony.
Sure, the Commencement Com-
mittee has graciously planned to
furnish the overflow crowd with
loud speakers and closed-circuit
televisions so they can feel like
they're really there. Just imagine
the thrill of traveling a couple of
hundred miles to watch brother
Melvin or sister Gladys graduate
on TV!
Most of us don't buy the excuse
that "nothing can be done
Perhaps, we've all become too
hardened by that all too easy ex-
cuse in the past. Lord knows,
we've heard it enough. Unfor-
tunately, controversies like this
one only emphasize all too well
who's running ECU.
Perhaps in this matter, the com-
mittee's primary consideration is
money. After all, like it or not,
money rules an institution. But it
seems odd that the students, who
pump thousands of dollars into
East Carolina University each
year, invariably lose out to the
football program, which, unfor-
tunately but truly, loses thousands
of dollars every year. Without a
doubt, most of us enjoy ECU foot-
ball. But equally without a doubt,
most of us see the need for a
reassessment of ECU's priorities.
Furthermore, commencement
has been scheduled for the morn-
ing of Friday, May 6. Perhaps this
sounds like little more than
another petty gripe, but why was it
not slated for Saturday, when most
of our parents, relatives and
friends are off work anyway?
Trying to accommodate nearly
14,000 people for any one event is,
indeed, an impossible task. But
why is the Commencement Com-
mittee making ECU's 1983 gradua-
tion ceremony so much more dif-
ficult?
The Twits Behind The Mike
TV Sportscasters
As much as I hate the New York
Yankees, Sunday morning television and
day-old burritos, I'd have to say that TV
sports announcers take the cake.
I don't know what it is they speak, but
it sure as hell isn't English. It's more like
an Americanized dialect of Swahili, a
language of roundabout description.
And I don't know about you, but per-
sonally, I think it sucks.
MIKE HUGHES Sportsbeat
For some strange reason, Howard
Cosell just naturally comes to mind. Ah,
now there's a true "sports en-
cyclopedia" for you. Well, maybe
"dictionary" would be more ap-
propriate in Cosell's case, since Howard
has the unparalleled ability to relate in
50 words what any normal human being
could say in five.
In Howard's twisted (and, incidental-
ly, oversized) head, a well-liked Oriole
pitcher becomes a hefty, yet injury-
ridden, southpaw hurlsman, whose
record both on and off the mound in-
stills in these vocal, yet loyal, Baltimore
afficionados a sense of lasting tribute,
fidelity and reciprocated admiration
It's no wonder that Pepto Bismol con-
centrates half its advertising campaign
on ABC sports. Howard Cosell's
enough to make anyone want to vomit.
But then again, there's the other side
of the fence as well. Even worse than the
WANTTOCOMOVER
T0NI6HTANDTO
SOME OF MY
D��Vf701 JUA)�UOe�WfTOf&mj� Jflo.
Campus Forum
overly-unqualified announcers like
Cosell are those ex-coaches and players
who, with no previous training, try their
hand at the network microphone. Their
vocabularies consist simply of percen-
tages, ratios, averages, statistics and, of
course, grunts. They've become so used
to having a crusty wad of Big Red Chew
crammed in their right cheeks that sim-
ple, unmuted communication is next to
impossible. Their entire repertoire of in-
citeful sports comments consists of:
"Whew "Hot damn and "Jeezus
And what the hell kind of name is
Brent Musberger? (Sounds like
something you wouldn't want to order
from McDonald's.) Where did CBS dig
this guy up from? The biggest athletic
question in his life is deciding on which
hand to wave for emphasis while he's
gabbing about some effeminate figure
skater making his international debut in
Czechoslovakia.
Or how about Phyllis George. Sure,
she's grea' to look at, especially standing
next to a sweaty, mutilated offensive
tackle, but what in hell does a beauty
queen know about pro football? Maybe
I'm wrong, but I personally believe she's
just in the business for the locker-room
privileges.
So, you switch it over to NBC, hoping
� just hoping � for a change of pace,
and what do you get? Father Murphy
talking about the moral decay of profes-
sional football.
Spare us, Lord.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a 1982
graduate of the ECU School of Erotic
Drama who now drives for the Green-
ville Cab Company, is living proof that
higher education in North Carolina
works for all of us.
It's Election Time Again
It's spring again, and the race is on!
The SGA elections have raised two
more candidates into the campus
limelight. But who are they? For what
do they stand? Can they get the job
done? Your guess is as good as mine,
but there are some points about each
candidate which can help us decide:
Tory Russo has been involved in the
leadership of the Student Residence
Association and the Student Govern-
ment Association for three years.
Among other things, Tory Russo is
president of the SRA, a founder of the
campus rape-prevention program, the
Pirate Walk and an active member of
the Media Board. Tory Russo is runn-
ing with experience.
The second candidate, Paul Naso,
claims that he has the personality
capable of uniting the student body.
This is an important issue since Naso's
campaign centers around this objec-
tive. While Naso's experience doesn't
come close to Russo's, Mr. Naso has
served some time in the legislature.
Both candidates are extremely confi-
dent in their abilities; we, the voters,
must decide, however. Our decision
appears to come down to the simple
question: Should we vote for personali-
tv (Paul Naso) or experience (Tory
Russo)?
In The East Carolinian last Thurs-
day, the paper told us that they are
breaking their long tradition of
neutralitv by endorsing Tory Russo as
president and Lindsey Williams as vice
president. Their choice has been made.
Our turn comes tomorrow � make it
wisely.
Stephen Sherbin
Honor Board Chairman
Bigger Not Always Better
After reading last Thursday's edition
of The East Carolinian, a couple of
thoughts came to my mind.
Why, after a complete abstinence
from political participation (support
and endorsement) do you choose to
break the silence this year?
It is obvious that you feel compelled
to endorse Mr. Russo due to the fact
that he has what you call "an im-
pressive track record unlike Mr.
Naso.
It is also obvious that in your opi-
nion, bigger is better. Well, not always,
and especially not this time.
It has been my observation that peo-
ple in general are stimulated by gran-
diose achievements or superhuman ac-
complishments. Paul Naso clearly
states that he is not attempting to bite
off more than he can chew. Wouldn't
it be exciting and a surprise to see him
accomplish what he proposes to do and
(for him to do) even more than ex-
pected? Now, that's a real candidate
who should be endorsed and sup-
ported.
Mr. Russo, on the other side of the
presidential race, has proposed to ac-
complish seven (7) large tasks, con-
tinue his education and make himself
available to all public and ad-
ministrative meetings.
I would be very leery of someone like
Mr. Russo, who promised me the
world and, much to my surprise, could
only produce an island.
not true. David Futrell has been a
member of the SGA, a member of the
N.C. Student Legislature and
sophomore class vice president.
David is also a political science ma-
jor, one who is in the top 10 percent of
his class. 1 have known David for three
years, and he is a nice person, honest
and outgoing.
Exercise your right to vote tomor-
row, and vote David Futrell for SGA
vice president.
Mike Mills
Junior, Accounting
Peter Zegler
FutreU For Vice
Tomorrow is SGA elections, and I
want to say that David FutreU is the
best person for the office of SGA vice
president.
In last Thursday's East Carolinian,
Mr. Mertz, speaking of himself, stated
that he is the "only candidate with real
SGA experience However, David
Futrell's qualifications show that the
statement by Mr. Mertz just simply is
Encore
Year after year, elections come and
go. And if you pay close enough atten-
tion, you may notice that a few of
those "bright-eyed" campaign pro-
mises are never kept. And until about
two weeks ago, I felt that this year
would be no exception.
When I decided to get involved in
this year's elections, 1 didn't want to
support a candidate who just wanted to
win, formulating his or her own goals
on some sweet-smelling promises. I
wanted a candidate who I could really
believe in, one who would be depen-
dable, and one in whom I could place
my trust. I wanted not only a candidate
who would work well with the
students, but I also wanted to support
a candidate who could push for what
the students want and push for it in the
most logical way.
There is a candidate this year who
fills all these qualifications �
qualifications that a real student would
want, qualifications which could
assure a student that he cast his vote
correctly: that it has been made in such
a way that he can have full confidence
and assuredness of results through ac-
tion.
That candidate is David Futrell.
Vote for him if you want depen-
dability.
Chris Alford
Junior, Business
Russo-Williams
The students of East Carolina are
fortunate to have two competent,
trustworthy candidates running to
serve as your SGA president and vice
president. I am referring to Tory Russo
and Lindsey Williams, respectively.
Both have shown a desire to work for
the betterment of all students, not just
select interest groups. Their leadership
and knowledge of the inter-workings
of our university will prove to be a
benefit for the SGA in the coming
year, if elected. Tory and Lindsey have
proven themselves countless times to
be tireless workers on a wide variety of
organizations working to make student
life at ECU more enjoyable and
beneficial for all. Their ac-
complishments with the Student
Residence Association, Pirate Club
Seige of '83, Pirate Walk and
numerous other worthy efforts are to
be applauded and should serve as ex-
amples for other students to follow.
Most importantly, Tory Russo and
Lindsy Williams are above becoming
involved in petty political bickering,
which, for too many years, has
hindered the effectiveness of our SGA.
A vote for Tory and Lindsey will insure
leadership and integrity, as well as un-
wavering service to the students they
represent.
Charles Shavitz
Senior, Business
Play It Again
I would like to take this opportunity
to extend my support for to Tory
Russo for SGA president and Lindsey
Williams for SGA vice president. For
the past year, I have personally worked
with both Tory and Lindsey and have
found them to be very open-minded to
new ideas, yet always keeping the
students' best interests in mind when
making decisions.
In his capacity as SRA president.
Tory Russo has fulfilled all of the
SRA's objectives for the past vear He
has worked very closelv with other stu-
dent organizations to help achieve stu-
dent unity. For example. Firate Walk.
ECL's protective escort service, would
not have been possible had not SGA
and SRA pulled together resources and
directed their resources toward a ser-
vice for the students.
Tory Russo and Lindsey Williams
would like to continue this student uni-
ty, a unity which is essential if we the
students, would like to have im-
provements made in our favor. So. 1
encourage each of you to weigh each
candidate caretullv and choose the one
who stands for his her constituents.
Eric Henderson
SGA President
Lindsey, Their Lady
Lindsey Williams, our candidate for
vice president, has a responsible and
positive attitude concerning the
students' rights. We have known Lind-
sey for several years, and she i a verv
ambitious young lady who cares about
East Carolina University. She's never
satisfied until the job is done correctlv.
so, therefore, we know that she will do
an excellent job fulfilling the title "vice
president
Therese Barnhardt
Sharon Nelson
Computer Science
One More Time
The vice presidential office of the
Student Government Association is.
many times, overshadowed by that of
the president. However it is still an im-
portant position which deserves con-
sideration. There are three viable can-
didates running for this position. After
careful consideration, it is my opinion
that the best candidate for the job is
Lindsey Williams. Lindsey is excited
about being your SGA vice president.
She has served as publicity chairperson
for the SRA. She is also assisting the
Pirate Club in the "Seige of '83 She
cares about the of the entire student
body.
Above all, make sure you vote; vote
responsibly, and vote Lindsey Williams
for SGA vice president.
Bob Mills
SGA Vice President
More On Mertz
I'm for Tim Mertz for SGA vice
president because he wants to expand
the SGA bus system to the downtown
area late at night in order to give
students transportation back to their
dorms, apartments, houses, etc. This
service will help relieve ECU students
from the parking and driving problems
resulting from late-night downtown ac-
tivities.
Peter Grainer
Sophomore, Corrections
Ditto
As a senior and a former SGA elec-
tions chairman, I have seen many SGA
elections. This year, 1 have been
favorably impressed by the way Mertz
has run his campaign. Mertz has
brought up many important issues
while at the same time not feeding the
students a bunch of empty promises.
Because of this, I'm going to cast my
vote for Mertz.
Chuck Blake
Senior, Business
Altern
B STL VE DEARCalh
��"��- r
'new j
While hoping topenmen
provide its readersCarolim
with "the kind ofaims tc
news, feature and opi-essence
nion pieces that thepolitics
state's press can't orAccordi
won't publish" theKathen
staff of a new bi-will trv
weekly statewidedepth
newspaper plan totopics
begin publication nextconsul
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Student Opinia
Financi:
Scott Suess
I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 29. 1983
COME OVER
,T AND HEAR
OFMV
llEMNON
iPES ?
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tffl
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kcd
: have
J to
the
hen
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ould
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each
one
srson
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ote
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� Mills
resident
n Mert
-vice
ipand
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give
- their
This
idents
problems
.vn ac-
C.rainer
rrections
Htto
SGA elec-
en many SGA
ir, I hae been
su Mertz
Men has
tani issues
me not feeding the
empt) promises.
. tng to cast my
Chuck Blake
Senior, Business
Alternative Newspaper To Hit State In April
By STEVE DEAR
Staff Hrtur
While hoping to
provide its readers
with "the kind of
news, feature and opi-
nion pieces that the
state's press can't or
won't publish" the
staff of a new bi-
weekly statewide
newspaper plan to
begin publication next
month.
Calling itself a
"new journalistic ex-
periment the North
Carolina Independent
aims to capture the
essence of the state's
politics and culture.
According to Editor
Katherine Fulton, "It
will try to provide in-
depth coverage of
topics such as jobs,
consumer issues,
utilities and the deci-
sion making processes
of major institu-
tions
The tabloid was in-
ititated by three peo-
ple � Stephen M.
Schewel, former
director of the N.C.
Public Interest
Research Group;
David K. Birkhead,
owner of the In-
dividual Types
typesetting company
in Durham; and
Katherine N. Fulton,
former city editor of
the Greensboro Daily
News.
According to
Schewel, more than
$100,00 was first re-
quired to start pro-
duction of the
newspaper. Currently
it is being wholly sup-
ported by 25
stockholders who
Fulton described as
"people who feel
there's a need to sup-
plement what the
(daily newspapers)
do Each
stockholder has con-
tributed about $5,000,
according to Fulton.
Although the
stockholders are the
only current financial
backers of the paper,
advertising revenue
will eventually help
supplement costs once
publication begins.
According to Fulton,
the stockholders' in-
vestments can support
the paper into its se-
cond or third year.
Also, production
costs will be reduced
because the paper will
be operated out of
Birkhead's typesetting
company.
In addition to state
news items, which will
comprise most of the
tabloid-size
newspaper's 20 pages,
there will be sports,
editorial and opinion
pages in additon to
classified and display
advertisment pages.
Also, front and
centerforld pages will
primarily be devoted
to photographic
Student Opinion:
Financial
Or Registration?
Beth Hudson
ECU Students were
asked for their opi-
nion on the new
federal law requiring
students to show pro-
of of registration for
the draft before being
allowed to receive
financial aid.
Jeff Hargelt � Junior.
Drama: "I don't sec that
financial aid has anything
to do with the draft. I think
that registration for the
draft and financial aid aie
two separate things
Scott Suess � Freshman,
Geology "I don't agree
with the draft, but 1 feel
people should register.
Since we're getting financial
aid from the government
and draft registration is one
of the government's re-
quirements, then we should
comply
Beth Hudson �
Freshman, Psychology "1
don't really think it's fair.
Some people do need
money for their educations,
but they can't get it because
they haven't registered. I
don't think that's right
Marcus Jeannette �
Sophomore, Environmental
Health "1 agree (with the
new requirement). 1 just
feel that if people live in this
country and use the govern-
ment's money, the least
they can do is follow the
rules
Photos By CINDY WALL
Staff Phol�nphrr
Federal Papers Denied
To Registration Resister
Marcus Jeanette
Draft registration
resister Russell Ford,
who visited ECU early
last month, has had
his request denied that
the government
disclose documents
proving that he was
selectively prosecuted.
Ford's trial has been
set for April 14. He is
charged with failing
to register for a
military draft, a
felony punishable by
up to five years in
prison and a $10,000
fine.
Ford, 19, who is the
first person to spend
time in prison for
draft resistance since
the Vietnam War,
said his discovery mo-
tion for the disclosure
of government
documents had been
ruled irrelevant.
Ford was hoping to
follow on the prece-
dent setting case of
Calif, registration
resister David Wayte,
whose case was
dismissed last
November. Wayte's
judge dismissed
charges on the
grounds that Wayte
was prosecuted
because his dissent
with the law was both
open and vocal.
In the Wayte case.
Federal Judge Terry
Hatter said "the court
finds it hard to believe
that the prosecutive
arm of the govern-
ment could not
locate any non-
registrants other than
those who were vocal
in their opposition
Ford and Wayte are
among a group of 13
men indicted for draft
registration refusal.
All of the 13 have
been vocal regarding
their dissent.
Since his visit to
ECU Ford, has been
arrested two more
times for civil disobe-
dience and has served
another week in jail.
He was charged
with disorderly con-
duct and trespassing
during a sit-in act a
Trident submarine
shipyard in Groton,
Conn. The Trident is
used to carry nuclear
weapons. Ford's
other charge was
related to his attempt
to steal three military
recruitment signs
from the front yard of
a recruitment office in
his hometown of Mid-
dleton, Conn.
Ford said his deci-
sion to take the signs
was made on the
"spur of the mo-
ment" and that he did
it because he was op-
posed to the amount
of money the military-
was spending on
advertising while
there are cut backs in
education and student
benefits. He also said
he wanted to "remove
the signs from the
public eye" because
"they were untrue
One sign stated
"The Air Force, a
great way of life
Ford said, "The Air
Force, a great way of
death" was a more ac-
curate title for the
sign.
During his ECU
visit Ford said he
believed draft
registration was only
the first step in the
U.S. governments
plan to impose full
i scale conscription.
essays.
According to
Fulton, the editorial
opinions will general-
ly be more "liberal or
populist oriented
However, she stresses
that the paper's
editorial opinion will
not effect the objec-
tive news accounts of
state events and that
the goal of both news
and editorial items is
to "broaden the
political discussion in
the state
The paper eventual-
ly hopes to attain a
circulation of 50,000
readers. The paper's
attempts to increase
its circulation will
consist of door to
door soliciting in
selected urban
neighborhoods in
Chapel Hill and other
major cities and free
distribution to
targeted areas of the
state. Cost per single
issue will be 75 cents
and per year $16, ac-
cording to Fulton.
The paper is in the
process of increasing
its staff of about 10 or
15 full or part-time
editors and writers.
Fulton said that the
paper hopes to empl
a "substantial
number of freelance
writers over time
The first issue of
the paper is set to
come out on April 14.
MERTZ
sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
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I
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Greenville, N.C.);
Jeff Hargett
VOTE
LINDSEY
WILLIAMS
FOR S.G.A.
ICE PRESIDENT
The Spring Pledge Class of
Sigma Phi Epsilon
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 29, 1983
?
Nader Encourages Action
A capacity crowd
of interested students
and faculty members
gathered in the main
lounge of Mendenhall
Student Center to join
in a question and
answer session with
consumer advocate
Ralph Nader last
Wednesday.
During the session,
which lasted for over
one hour, Nader ad-
dressed questions on
seseral dozen issues
on campus, national
and world affairs.
Nader challenged
students to get involv-
ed in social justice
issues. He noted that
60 percent out of 12
million college
students don't vote.
Nader advised
students to find a
group "congenial to
their value systems"
and join it. He men-
tioned nuclear arms
control groups, toxic
waste management
groups and consumer
groups as possibilities
tor ECU students. He
also suggested that
students start their
own groups.
Nader mentioned
Public Interest
Research Groups,
(P1RG) which his
organization spon-
sors, as a possible
group for ECU.
PIRG groups are staf-
fed by college
students. New York's
PIRG group has a
S2.5 million budget
and employs 150 full-
time staff members
including lawyers,
scientists, and lob-
byists.
According to
Nader, the NY-PIRG
group has gained con-
siderable influence in
their State
Legislature.
Nader also sug-
gested that students
form their own
political parties. He
said that if the student
party could show that
it controlled five per-
cent of the electorate,
it would have the
other two party can-
didates crawling to get
their endorsements.
Nader also said that
students should learn
to manage their time
better so they could
put more effort into
social-action work.
He suggested that
students ask pro-
fessors to give course
credits for clinical
work.
Nader believes that
cigarette smoking
would go the way of
snuff, and it would no
longer be considered
"socially smart" to
smoke. He also said
that non-smokers had
a right to not have to
inhale the noxious
fumes of cigarette
smoke in public
places.
On the subject of
nuclear power, Nader
said, "It's not need-
ed, it's too dangerous
and too expensive
Nader claims that on-
ly 11 percent of U.S.
electricity needs come
from nuclear power.
"Nuclear power
plants should be shut
down Nader said,
adding that we should
"drop the myth" that
we're going to be able
to rely on a nuclear
future.
When one ECU
Professor asked
Nader why he thought
Reagan was unable to
attract "polished peo-
ple" to work in his
administration, Nader
responded that "most
polished people have
trouble swallowing
marbles
Nader did not sup-
port the flat tax rate,
and said he preferred
a progressive tax scale
that makes people
who make higher
wages pay more taxes.
Nader called the
1984 Democratic
presidential can-
didates "a very dull
lot" who were all
pretty much alike,
unimaginative and
not up to the leader-
ship requirements of
the position. Nader
strongly supported
third party actions to
"shake up" the
"fossilized, compla-
cent" two party
system.
Nader criticized the
Reagan administra-
tion's lack of concern
for education.
"Reagan is basically
anti-intellectual
Nader said. "He's the
only President I know
who owns more
horses than books
Reporters who go to
his home look in vain
for a book
Nader said that
Reagan was warned
that his anti-
education position
would weaken the
United States educa-
tion system which
would in turn weaken
the technical training
system in national
defense. Beause of
this, Reagan restored
funds in some science
and math areas. "If
we could prove that
contaminated drink-
ing water in this coun-
try was the result of
an international com-
munist conspiracy,
Ronald Reagan would
rush to clean up our
drinking water
Nader said. "Now,
(we've) got to show
that humanities can
beat the Russians
Nader challenged
students to learn to be
effective citizens. He
said students must
begin to think and
take action.
Half the people in
the United States,
Nader said, live in the
category of people
who make under
$10,000 a year.
Nader also criticiz-
ed the billions of
dollars in corruption
he claims there is in
the military budget.
On the subject of
Latin America, Nader
claimed that the U.S.
backs "the most
atrocious, corrupt
regimes
He suggested that
more funds be used
for the development
of solar energy.
Nader praised the
citizens of Warren
County who have op-
posed the PCB-laced
hazardous waste land-
fill. "They (the War-
ren County citizens)
have already alerted
millions of people in
this country to this
problem Nader
said.
Nader said the
argument over raising
the drinking age was a
"classic confronta-
tion" between the
rights of individuals
and the protection of
their lives. He added
that 18-year-olds were
old enough to go to
war, work, vote and
drive, but that at the
same time many lives
could be saved if the
drinking age is raised.
Nader had strong
words of criticism for
Reagan's administra-
tion who's not abus-
ing the public trust.
Nader said the N.C.
Congressional delega-
tion's voting record
was "atrocious" in
the areas of important
consumer health and
safety.
MERTZ
News Writers Needed For
The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian offices are located on the second floor of the Old South
building, across from the entrance of Joyner Library. Best days to come by are
Monday and Wednesday.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
MARC H 29. 1983 Page 7
Duran Duran
Catch On In
United States
By JONATHAN GROSS
Rrrort
NEW YORK - "Seven mon-
ths later, can you believe it? I've
always loved the record, but after
awhile you have to start thinking,
you know?" The Capitol
Records publicist wouldn't go so
far as to say the company had
just about given up on Duran
Duran's Rio when it suddenly
arose late last year from a com-
atose position on the lower ex-
tremities of the charts to trample
its way into the top 20. This after
the Birmingham, England quintet
had trudged through two un-
profitable national tours last
summer; after achieving
superstar status all over Europe
and the Britist Commonwealth
and selling in excess of five
million albums worldwide; and
eight months after first releasing
"Hungry Like The Wolf the
hit single currently prodding the
album up the charts (actually, to
set the facts straight, this version
of "Hungry" is a new. beefier
mix of the original version found
on Rio, released as a single after
the title track bombed).
If this tale has a pronouncd in-
dustry slant, it's only because the
selling of Duran Duran in
America is equally as fascinating
as the band and its music.
Delayed reactions of this
magnitude just don't happen
every day: the last one that conies
to mind is Blondie's Parallel
Lines, which exploded long after
its release, thanks to a master
disco smash called "Heart of
Glass Duran's saga has a
thicker plot, one involving club
play, the MTV factor, the not-
coincidental facelift of album-
oriented rock radio, loval sup-
port from the top ranks on down
at Capitol, and the band's own
tenacious interfacing of rock.
disco and top 40 formats with the
soul of a bar band. Not to men-
tion a ton of resolve on all fronts.
"There was a lot of hard
work agrees a jaunty Nick
Rhodes, Duran Duran's
keyboard whiz and media rela-
tions expert who is now, at the
untender age of 21, becoming
wise in the ways of the reocrd
business. And staying busy, too.
This interview was conducted
between sessions for Rhodes' cur-
rent pet project, co-producing
with Colin Thurston (Duran's
producer) the debut album of a
pop-reggae band called Ka-
jaGooGoo, yet another U.K.
adlescent phenomenon with a hit
single on its hands in the form of
the Rhodes-Thurston-produced
"Too Shy
"Sure, MTV played our
video Rhodes continues, "but I
think the touring and the airplay
we got early from college stations
did build us a cult following in
the U.S. that eventually grew up
and out
In their native land, Duran
Duran was never really a cult
item. The press there, with its
savage appetite for new blood,
seldom lets anything go unnotic-
ed, especially when it comes with
a calling card that reads Duran
Duran, a moniker copped from a
character in director Roger
Vadim's 1968 sci-fi psychedelic
spoof, Barbarella, Jane Fonda's
final screen fling as an unwitting
sex object.
It was in 1978 that Rhodes,
then 16. dropped out of school
and fell into a deejay booth at
The Rum Runner club in Birm-
ingham, allegedly the only wor-
thwhile place in town. There he
met bassist John Taylor, who had
flunked his A-level exams (kind
of like senior finals) and was
building a name for himself in art
See LABEL'S, Page 9
N. C. 's Frank Holder Dance Company Coming To Campus Next Year
North Carolina's own dazzling dance troupe, the Frank Holder tory Ensemble (Nov. 7), Pat Carrol in Gertrude Stein, Ger-
Dance Company will be at ECU on March 15, 1984 as part of trude Stein (Jan. 19) and The Acting Company, returning with
the Department of University Unions' 1983-1984 Theatre Arts The Cradle Hill Rock (April 10). For further information, call
Series. Also included on the series are the Alvin Alley Reper- 757-6611, ext. 213.
Magical Evening With Serkin
By MIKE HAMER
si�ff Unlrr
While Greenville's first
snowstorm was raging outside,
Greenville's music fans were
given a magical transport to the
days of Beethoven (1770-1827)
via the extraordinary playing of
Peter Serkin. Despite the fact
that driving conditions were very
poor, the house was almost full
for the concert.
Peter Serkin has been praised
by the New York Magazine as be-
ing, "the finest pianist this coun-
try has yet produced He is the
son of the world famous pianist,
Rudolph Serkin. He has played
with most of the world's major
symphony orchestras, including
the Boston Symphony and the
Los Angeles Symphony. Serkin
records on the RCA Red Seal
label. Recent recordings of his
have included the third in a series
of Chopin discs and an acclaimed
performance of the Beethoven
"Diabelli Variations
Serkin did not come to ECU
with an easy program; the entire
second half of his performance
was devoted to Beethoven's
Sonata No 29 in B Major, Opus
106. This Sonata is commonly
known as the "Hammerclavier"
� it is to Beethoven's Sonatas as
his Ninth Symphony is to the rest
of his Symphonies. The Sonata is
considered to be one of the most
difficult pieces for a pianist to
play. Serkin was equal to the
"task indeed he had committed
the entire score to memory. He
displayed a great sensitivity on
this piece, and he elicited every
nuance of shading that it would
seem possible to get from the
piano. I could not help but think
that Beethoven was certainly way
ahead of his time when he com-
posed this piece; certain sections
had a very modern sound to
them.
Serkin started off the concert
American pianist Peter Serkin at Hendrix Theatre
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
with Sonata No. 27 in E minor,
Opus 90. This piece displayed a
restlessness in its First movement
and a contentment in the second
movement. Perhaps it was the
snowfall, but this second move-
ment was my favorite of the even-
ing.
The second piece of the even-
ing was the Sonata No. 28 in A
major. Opus 101. This Sonata
was originally entitled the
"Hammerclavier" by Beethoven
when he completed it in 1816,
although Opus 106 was the only
one to retain that name. I felt a
stiffness in this piece � 1 don't
know if it was due to Serkin's
playing or to Beethoven's com-
postion.
Serkin received a standing ova-
tion, and he delivered a change of
pace with one of Schubert's
"Moments Musicanx Like
everything else performed that
evening, this piece was first class.
Tickets are currently on sale at
the Central Ticket Office for next
season's 198384 Artists Series.
The series will feature the North
Carolina Symphony Orchestra,
with Gerhardt Zimmerman, Con-
ductor, and the Charles Tregcr,
violin soloist on Sept. 14. 1983.
On Nov. 17, 1983. Lynn Harrell,
cellist, will perform (see photo on
page 8 ). On Feb. 9, 1984, The
Romeros, guitar quartet, will be
at Hendrix, and Anton Kuerti
will perform there on March 13.
The final concert of the 198384
season will be the Chamber
Music Society of Lincoln Center
who will give their concert on
March 19, 1984.
Photo By STANLEY LIARY
Hot Pop Star Joe Jackson Gives His All In Raleigh
Pop's hot master-of-the-mood-change, Joe Jackson, performed to an eager auuience in Raleigh
Sunday night, giving one of his patented eclectic performances. (For a review of the concert, look
to the Style Section of this Thursday's edition of The East Carolinian.) The concert competed
with a twin-billing of REM and The English Beat in Chapel Hill.
Campy Machismo
'A Team' Is Meaty Satire
By TOM CARSON
VHaftVak
Liberal intellectuals always have one show on
network TV that they can embrace as particularly
their own (Hill Street Blues) and one show that's
their guilty camp pleasure (Entertainment Tonight).
They also always have one show that they can
despise as the embodiment of everything they can't
stand about TV � and, by unappetizing corollary,
about the mass audience. Because of what kind of
show The A Team is, though, people are getting
more worked up about it than usual. Never mind
that it's about soldiers of fortune. Did you see the
logo? The title-printed in that blocky, semistenciled
style that always signifies heavy-weight butch
militancy on the move � gets riddled with holes by
the same machine-gun bullets that punctuate the
theme song, and the holes turn out to be the faces of
the stars. I can name that tune in one burst. Bill.
But I think it's liberal intellectuals' limitations
that would stop them from seeing that logo for
what it is, hilarious; almost certainly it's what's
stopping them from seeing The A Team as not only
one of the most entertaining shows on the air, but
also one of the smartest, and quite possibly the
most subversive. The tip-off is that one of the
show's creators is Stephen J. Cannell. Chances are
that any action show of the last few years that's
struck you as slightly offbeat, or weirdly contrived,
or just somewhat perverse, is one he's been involved
Sec PIONEER, Page 9
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IH :





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 29, 1983
?
Coppola Film 'Outsiders'
Suggested By A Librarian
By ALJEAN HARMETZ
New ork N�w� S�r�k�
published in 1967 when she was 17. It quickly
became a staple in junior high school libraries
FRESNO, Calif. � The dedication that across the country,
flashes on the screen at the end of Francis Cop- "The teenage point of view is usually inter-
pola's new movie reads: "The film The Out- preted by an adult said Swayzc, who plays
siders is dedicated to the people who first sug- the oldest brother of the boy on whom the Film
gested that it be made � librarian Jo Ellen focuses. "Hinton's insights were phenomenal
Misakian and the students of The Lone Star about the pain teenagers go through Of the
School in Fresno, California five actors on the Warner plane, Howell � a
Making a movie nowadays is a $10 million 16-year-old who enacts the sensitive hero,
gamble. Movies get made when tax-shelter Ponyboy, in The Outsiders � did not read the
financing "falls into place or some agent book in junior high school,
packages the "box-office insurance" of Burt The saga of how The Outsiders became a
Reynolds and Goldie Hawn or Robert Redford movie actually began in 1972 when Jo Ellen
and Jane Fonda, or a studio wants to take Misakian, a parent and newly hired librarian
another chance on a director whose last picture aide at the Lone Star School, passed the book
did naell enough at the box office. to her 13-year-old son. "I had been so
Movies get made because they are sequels to frustrated because the kids, the boys especial-
successful movies or because horror has been ly, didn't read she said. "Somehow, The
selling tickets, and one might as well jump in Outsiders caught on
before the slice-and-dice cycle is over. Movies Misakian is not quite sure when she decided
emphatically do not get made because a group that The Outsiders should become a movie.
of seenth and eighth graders from a country But she does remember how unsure she felt
school sends a letter to a director asking him to when she called a columnist on the local
please make a movie from their favorite book, newspaper, The Fresno Bee, and asked who
In this case, the students from the Lone Star would be most amenable to turning the novel
School sent their letter to the wrong address. into a movie. "I was so relieved because he
The letter, dated March 21, 1980, was sent didn't laugh Mrs. Misakian said,
to the corporate headquarters of Paramount The columnist suggested she write to Lloyd
Pictures, a studio for which Coppola made the Shearer, the movie editor of Parade magazine,
Godfather movies six years earlier. What hap- who in turn suggested she write to "the author
pened afterward is a fairy tale that might itself of the book She did, but Miss Hinton did
have made one of the heartwarming movies not answer.
Hollywood used to churn out in an innocent "When there was no answer from the
and iess expensive era 50 years ago. author, I wondered what to do with the peti-
The final scene in the fairy tale came this tion the kids had signed Mrs. Misakian said,
month when a Warner Bros, corporate jet "I picked up Newsweek magazine and read a
touched down in Fresno to bring the finished review of The Black Stallion I got Coppola's
movie and five of its stars to the school where address from the reference section of the
it all started Aboard the plane were Leif Gar- Fresno County Library. I told him about our
rett. Patrick Swayze, Ralph Macchio, Darren school with 324 children from kindergarten
Dalton and C. Thomas Howell. The film's through the eighth grade. I enclosed a copy of
best-known actor, Matt Dillon, would join the paperback because I knew he wouldn't go
them later at a preview for the 104 Lone Star out and buy it
students who wrote to Coppola in 1980. "It If Mrs. Misakian's letter had been sent to
was like writing to Santa Claus said Lucy the right address, it might never have reached
Fisher, a Warner Bros, production vice presi- Coppola,
dent.
This weekend. The Outsiders, a $10 million
movie, opened in 850 theaters across the coun-
try.
The Outsiders � which is about a group of
unwanted, switchblade-carrying, long-haired
kids from the wrong side of the tracks, perma-
nent outsiders � is a dramatic version of the
alienation many teenagers experience. S.E.
(Susan Eloise) Hinton of Tulsa, Okla wrote
the novel when she was 15 years old, and it was
A eclaimed Cellist Lynn Harrell On '83- '84 A rtists Series Slate
Master cellist, Lynn Harrell, greatly acclaimed the
world over for his superb musicianship, highlights the
Department of Univesity Unions' 1983-1984 Artists
Series on November 17. Also included on the series are
the North Carolina Symphony (Sept. 14 in Wright
Auditorium), The Romeros, a guitar quartet (Feb. 9),
Anton Kuerti, pianist (March 13), and the Chamber
Music Society of Lincoln Center (March 19). For fur-
ther information, or tickets, call 757-6611, ext. 266.
MERTZ
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Pionee
Continued From Page 1
in. Some of Cannell's
projects have not suc-
ceeded, i.e the
wonderful Ten Speed
and Brownshoe.
which only lasted 10
episodes � but a sur-
prising number were
or are hits, and he's
also amazingK pro-
lific; in fact, I cant
think of anyone else
in TV who's managed
to get so man shows bj
on the air that al! bear j
some stamp of his
personality
More intriguingh.
Label'
Pays
Continued From Page
school As Duran Duran.
and Tayloi started mes
local pogoheads with an
minimalist sound produo
bass, a clarinet and a
box. Drummer Roger Ta
then recruited from a loci
outfit called the Sex
Guitarist And Taylor
after, answering an ad t
placed in Melody
(amazingK. n
are related) V tha i
quartet convinced Rum
club owners Paul and
Verrow to manage ther
Duran was bu maintin;
club to earn their k:
Simon I e Bon w a :
mingham L and dating.
barmaid at :he Ram
From there, kismet d I
work too much overtime.
In late 1980. Duran
landed a support lot
O'Connor's (of Rreakin
fame, or infam IK.
picked up the scent, i
contract, and got lmj
return-on-inves:ment.
debut single, "Planet
spent two week :n t
Musical Exprevv Top JO,
as high as Number 12 beti
tapered off. It defined
that had Giorgio Mor(
fiuences. but recalled ni
others, including Japan's!
ATTIC
Sou'
AMES BON
Film Festival
�Free Admissions
Free Popcorn
Doctor No. 2
From Russia I rrj
1 Love. Starts :0iJ

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Flon-er Shop
Wt99mm9tmm
Send your thoughts





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
hts Series Slate
fv a guitar quartet tKeh. )),
h 13), diu thehamber
enter (March 19). For fur-
calf "56M 1. et. 266.
EM POLICY
� d Ivartsed tems ,s -e
-g -ead'y available for
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� otadm this ad 1 we
' a !�m e will of'er
,e c'a comparable
- iva abta 'e'lectmg the
e sa- 33 � a :nec hich
He yc to purchase the
"e advertised
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�ed Ham
S099
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Can"ed Ham
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Offb
MARCH 29. 1983
Continued From Page 7
in. Some of Cannell's
projects have not suc-
ceeded, i.e the
wonderful Ten Speed
and Brownshoe,
which only lasted 10
episodes � but a sur-
prising number were
or are hits, and he's
also amazingly pro-
lific; in fact, I can't
think of anyone else
in TV who's managed
to get so many shows
on the air that all bear
some stamp of his
personality.
More intriguingly,
that personality, as it
comes through on his
programs, isn't an ob-
vious guarantor of
success in a mass
medium. It's a pop
sensibility for sure,
but the kind that has
never actually been all
that popular. Cannell
is one of what I think
of as the tough-guy
intellectuals � the
men who rt'ute to
romantically hard-
boiled male fantasies
of stoic self-
sufficiency, rough
camaraderie, and
cynical wit as their in-
tellectual traditions,
which Raymond
Chandler as their
jump-off point and a
whole posse of pop
icons, from John
Ford to F. Scott Fit-
zgerld, film noir to
Marvel comics, as
their touchstones. It's
the intellectual ver-
sion of cool, and cool
is what they're look-
ing to get from it;
they don't relate to
any of this stuff
aesthetically, but
more as a set of
graph-points by
which to plot their
own self-image.
But even though
the style is locked in
permanent
adolescence, the
paradox is that the
same awarenes that
pushed these men
toward literary and
cultural models in the
first place also can't
help but make them
see the ideal of in-
tellectual macho as
funny. They've made
the parodic undercut-
ting of their sensibili-
ty part of the sen-
sibility itself. In fact,
that hard-boiled in-
tellectualism often
ends up man's version
of camp sensibility.
Forty years ago, so-
meone like Cannell
might wel have been a
pulp novelist grinding
out imitations of
Chandler, and going
about it with the same
ponderously unreflec-
tive solemnity that
Chandler himself did.
Because he's working
today, and especially
because he's working
in television, he can't
be anything else but a
fantasist who ex-
presses his sensibility
by making cartoons
of it.
Almost all of Can-
nell's shows, from
The Rockford Files to
The Greatest
American Hero, have
functioned as expres-
sions of his own tastes
to an astonishingly
forthright extent; but
up until now they've
done so primarily
through being
parodies or wry skew-
ings of popular taste.
The A Team is his
first successful at-
tempt to create a fan-
tasy full-blown out of
Label's Patience With Duran Duran
Pays Off In Impressive Record Sales
Continued From Page 7
school. As Duran Duran, Rhodes
and Taylor started messing up
local pogoheads with an obtuse,
minimalist sound produced by a
bass, a clarinet and a rhythm
box. Drummer Roger Taylor was
then recruited from a local punk
outfit called the Sex Organs.
Guitarist Andy Taylor joined
after, answering an ad the band
placed in Melody Maker
(amazingly, none of the Taylors
are related). At that time the
quartet convinced Rum Runner
club owners Paul and Michael
Verrow to manage them; while
Duran was busy maintinaing the
club to earn their keep, vocalist
Simon Le Bon was attending Bir-
mingham I and dating, aha, a
barmaid at the Rum Runner.
From there, kismet didn't have to
work too much overtime.
In late 1980, Duran Duran
landed a support slot on Hazel
O'Connor's (of Breaking Glass
fame, or infamy) U.K. tour. EMI
picked up the scent, offered a
contract, and got immediate
return-on-investment. Duran's
debut single, "Planet Earth
spent two weeks in the New
Musical Express Top 30, reaching
as high as Number 12 before sales
tapered off. It defined a sound
that had Giorgio Moroder in-
fluences, but recalled numerous
others, including Japan's seminal
rock disco single, "Life In
Tokyo Bowie, Chic, the Yellow
Magic Orchestra, George Benson
and more Bowie. But none were
so, or are so, prominent as to
obscure the band's infectious
filigree, distinctive for its menage
a trois of full contact guitar,
throbbing electro-beat and well-
structured dynamics. Lyrically,
Duran Duran are perfect dream
merchants, mixing media and
metaphysics for amusing, hook-
laden results.
"Within the band there are
really only two unanimous in-
fluences and those are Roxy
Music and The Beatles con-
tends Rhodes. "The former
because of their sophisticated ap-
proach and the latter because
they wrote great pop melodies
But whatever it sounded like,
"Planet Earth" 's "ba-ba-baba"
chorus ("Happy Together"
anyone?) earned Duran Duran a
number twelve spot on the tough
New Musical Express chart in
mid-1981, multi-platinum sales
for their self-titled debut album,
instant stardom (they've been
hailed as the "Fab Five" by
British papers, and have legions
of screaming young female fans
dogging their every move) and,
despite their protests, a drafting
into the front ranks of the New
Romantic army.
In retrospect, it was a small an-
noyance and a relatively insignifi-
cant bit of miscasting. Duran
Duran has long outshone and
outlived that party's caked
makeup and draped capes. "We
wear clothes that we like to
wear declares Rhodes. "I'm
fashionable, but Andy wears
denims and Simon doesn't care
for anything that doesn't feel
right. Back then, it was a label
that was naturaly applied to peo-
ple who made dance music and
dressed well The mistake made
by the press in that episode was
wrongly diagnosing Duran Duran
as victims of fashion rather than
doctors of style constantly check-
ing their aesthetic pusle against
that of the great unwashed.
On these shores, however,
Duran's breakthrough was con-
siderably more difficult.
"Without getting into specific
figures, let's say the first album
sold moderately well and more
than enough to convince us the
band had potential says
Capitol's vice-president of
marketing, Walter Lee. Enough
to keep "working the record"
when "Hungry Like the Wolf
barely dented the charts upon
release last June and Rio was
hunkered down in the 140-150
range on the album chart right
through Thanksgiving, when it
started to show signs of life.
The answer, though, was not
radio, not even a booster EP,
Carnival (containing remixed ver-
sions of "Hungry Like The
Wolf "Girts on Filmreleased
last fall in hopes of rekindling in-
terest in Rio. The answer was
television, particularly MTV,
with its link to an estimated eight
million homes in the United
States, and its unquenchable
thirst for video product from
anyone and everyone. "We never
looked at video purely as a pro-
motional device states Rhodes.
"To us it's a complex expression
and our videos are no less valid a
presentation of Duran Duran
than the accompanying music. Of
course they're good for exposure,
especially on MTV and British
TV shows which can't get the real
thing
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his own sensibility, at
its most blatantly
comic strip and fan-
ciful (and butch), and
without reference to
anything outside
itself. The show's
premise might have
been spun off from
Peckinpah's The
Killer Elite: four men
who once formed a
commando unit in
Vietnam, and were
"accused by their
government of a
crime which they did
not commit are still
(12 years later?) on
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and hire themselves
out as mercenaries to
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has his special exper-
tise: the leader's a
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one's a mast pilot,
one's an electronics
genius, and one's
good-looking. (Just
to remove any doubt
about that being his
talent, the name Can-
nell gives him is
"Face the cigar-
chewing, raffishly
cynical team leader is
named, almost as
amusingly,
"Hannibal Smith)
Even at the outset,
though, Cannell's
particular brand of
wry perversity is
already in evidence �
not only in his manag-
ing to put over a net-
work TV series in
which the main
characters are all
declared enemies of
the state, but in the
twists he gives his
stock prototypes: the
electronics expert, for
instance, turns out to
be played by Mr. T
still wearing his
Mohawk from Rocky
III, but now ac-
coutred in ridiculous
khaki jungle shorts
that give his menanc-
ing bulk an oddly
homel look.
The premise allows
a plot mobility that
gives Cannell access
to an enormous fund
of stock situations
and subjects that, in
TV's vast pop-culture
junkyard, are more
than ready to hand,
and that're all more
than ripe for his kind
of comic take. Even
on relatively
straightforward
police or detective
shows, the suspense-
story pretext has
often been used as an
exuse for sly parodies
of the business world
or politics or
whatever, The A
Team, as overt fan-
tasy, lets Cannell in-
dulge himself this way
right out in the open.
Not only the initial
situtaitons, but the
plotting itself, work
on this brazen level:
the comic riffs and
pop-cartoon action
sequences that are so
laboriously inserted
into more literal-
minded action shows
(and usually stick out
as contrivances all the
more because of it)
are the whole point
here � the stories are
designed as no more
than the flimsiest
pretexts to hang the
bits and visuals on,
with as little indepen-
dent function as the
"plot" of The Road
Warrior.
The show's tone
was originally a little
unsteady: an early
episode that ripped
off Jonestown
(cleverly disguised as
"Jamestown"), for
instance, fell apart
becasuse the memory
of the actual event
kept interfering with
its actual use as a
mere plot pretext. But
Cannell and his co-
workers have gotton
cleverer at finding
situations that adapt
more smoothly than
that to comic fantasy,
and over the last few
weeks the series has
been getting better
and better. One recent
episode began with
the wonderfully im-
probable premise of
two beautiful college
girls hiring the A team
to rescue one of their
professors � a
mathematics genius
who's invented the
perfect system for
roulette, taken off for
Las Vegas, and disap-
peared. Inevitably,
this allowed Hannibal
Smith to impersonate
a big-time gangster,
with Mr. T glower-
ing in a three-piece
suit, as his
bodyguard, while the
team's other members
did various other
routines. Just as in-
evitable, it climaxed
with a car chase
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X


THE EAST CAROL INIAN
Sports
MARCH 29, 1983
Page 10
Smith, Wells Power Bucs By Baptist
By KEN BOLTON
AataUBt sport t dllor
The ECU Pirates banged out 17
hits and Charlie Smith ran his
record to 3-1 with a 13-8 victory
over Baptist Monday afternoon.
The 17 hits was the most for the
Pirates this season, and that total
is even more impressive consider-
ing me record of Greg White,
Baptist's starting pitcher.
White was 3-0 with a 0.00 ERA
coming into yesterday's game, but
ECU scored eight runs in the first
innings to give White his first loss.
In the 1st inning, ECU scored
on a three-run homer bv David
Wells.
Wells' shot over the right field
fence came with Todd Evans and
Winfred Johnson aboard.
In the 2nd inning, catcher Jack
Curlings added a solo home run to
make the score 4-0.
In the 3rd, a walk by Johnson
and singles by Robert Wells and
Tony Salmond loaded the bases.
After Curlings walked to bring
home another run, Mark Shank
delivered a two-run single.
Kelly Robinette drove in
another run with a single to make
the score 8-0.
Baptist came back to score a
run in their half of the 3rd inning
with back-to-back singles by Jeff
Barnes and Robbie Bessinger.
Neither team scored during the
middle three innings (4rth, 5th,
and 6th), until ECU added
another run on singles by Sal-
mond and Curlings.
The ECU defense proved its
worth, also. With a runner at se-
cond base and one out in the 7th
inning, Barnes hit a grounder to
Smith, who whirled and threw to
second.
Robinette tagged the runner out
at second and threw to Evans at
first to catch Barnes in a run-
down.
In the course of the rundown,
Robinette ran all the way across
the field to cover first base, where
he made the tag for the second
out.
Robinette thus made both
putouts on the unique double
play.
"We played well defensively,
especially with four double plays '
tough double plays ECU coach
Hal Baird said after the game.
"Here we saw the advantage of
having Kelly back in the lineup
Robinette had been away from
the team for a little over a week
due to a death in his family.
His return added spark to an
ECU defense that played inspired
all afternoon.
The Pirates added three more
runs in the 8th inning on a triple
by John Hallow, an RBI single by
Johnson, a Baptist error, and a
sacrifice fly by Salmond.
Johnson and Hallow had three
hits to pace the Pirate attack, and
David Wells, Curlings, Salmond,
and Shank contributed two hits
each.
Wells and Curlings both had
three RBIs for the contest.
"We just went in and got the
job done stated Baird. "I hope
See PIRATES, Page 14
Pirate Golfers Solve Riddle
As a 23-year-old senior on a
team dominated by freshmen, Jon
Riddle might be described as the
"old man" of the East Carolina
golf team.
But he's not playing like an old
man. He's been the leading golfer
for the team so far this spring,
registering th low score for the
team in the past three tour-
naments.
"The last three tournaments
I've played all right said Riddle.
"1 could have played better, but
vou can alwavs sav that about
golf
One of Riddle's strengths as a
golfer has been very important
this year. "I'm good at keeping
my head level he said "1 like to
stav even-tempered he explain-
ed.
Hopefully, some of that at-
titude rubs off on the freshmen on
the team.
"The freshmen are just getting
used to this kind of competition.
They'll do really well one day and
not so well the next. Experience
helps
Riddle has been playing golf
since he was eight years old, and
said he always enjoyed the
challenge of tht individual sport.
"It's not like team sports. "It
feels good when you're playing
good and you're doing it yourself.
It's hard to put into words
As a golfer for Terry Sanford
High School in Fayetteville, Rid-
dle proved he could compete at a
high level.
"Our high school team won the
state championship in 1978 he
said "In 1977, I won the North
Carolina Junior Championships.
Then 1 got a golf scholarship to
East Tennessee State University
Things, however, didn't work
out at ETSl' and after his
sophomore year. Riddle transfer-
red.
"I had a little disagreement
there and decided to leave he
said. "My sister had gone to
ECU; it was close to home and 1
heard thev had a good program. 1
called Bob Helmick (then ECU
head golf coach) and said I was in-
terested.
"It was rough at first Riddle
admitted. "I left behind friends
and a place I knew. Plus I had to
sit out one year of intercollegiate
competition. I practiced and
played in some amateur tour-
naments during the summer, but
it's not the same. I think I lost
some of my competitiveness
But Riddle has regained
whatever he was lacking. "The
last couple of years have been
pretty good. 1 like ECU, have got-
ten to know a lot of people, and I
feel like I'm back into competi-
tion now
Right now the senior isn't sure
exactly what the future holds and
whether he'll be competing on an
even high level after his college
career.
I've found out you have to be
really good to make it as a profes-
sional. I'm debating trying the
mini-tour for a while
But if that doesn't work out
Riddle said he will be prepared.
"Pretty early in college I
figured I had to have something to
fall back on if golf didn't work. I
can graduate in management this
semsester and I'm one course
away from a double major in real
estate. I'd like to go back to
Fayetteville and go into real
estate. That's what my father
does
Riddle does expect to be playing
golf for a while � a habit he isn't
planning to break.
"I plan to play golf until I'm
really an old man. There are a lot
of amateur tournaments to com-
pete in. Even if 1 do go on the
mini-tour and it doesn't work out,
1 should get my amateur status
back
Pttoto By GARY PATTERSON
In The Glove
Powerhouse hitter Cvnthia Shepard relaxes during a light moment
at a recent Lady Pirate softball practice. The Bucs will pla a
doubleheader toda against I NC-Wilmington. C.ametime is 3 p.m.
Cage Awards Presented
Five players of the 1982-83
ECU men's basketball team have
been selected to receive various
awards presented by the basket-
ball program.
Senior co-captain Charles
Green was named most valuable
player. The 6-7 forward from
Washington, DC, averaged 11
points and 6.6 rebounds per
game. Green suffered a separated
shoulder during the season but
when he was in the lineup, the
Bucs won 10 of 15 games. Green
was chosen to the all-ECAC-
South Tournament team.
Freshman Johnny Edwards, the
Charlotte native who was named
to the ECAC-South all-league
team, was awarded ECU's top
newcomer and rebounder.
Edwards led the team in scoring
and rebounding with 18 points
and 8.4 rebounds, respectively. In
the ECAC-South Conference, Ed-
wards was named Rookie-of-the-
Week six out of 10 weeks and
made the honorable mention list
on Sporting Whs All-America
selections.
Sophomore forward Barrv
Wright was announced as the best
defensive player. Wright, a Nor-
folk native, drew the toughest
assignment defensively. The 6-5
guard-forward also won the top
defensive player award his
freshman season at ECU.
Senior co-captain Thorn Brown
received the most improved
award. Brown doubled his playing
time this year, upped both his
scoring and rebounding averages
and played a major role in the
Pirates lineup when Green was
out.
Sophomore Bruce Peartree won
the free throw shooting award.
The Pantego native led the team
by sinking 58 of 68 attempts for
an 85.6 percent average.
Under first-year coach Charlie
Harrison, the Bucs captured the
first winning season in three
years, finishing with a 16-13
mark.
Senior Charles Green (34) was named as ECU's MVP and freshman Johnny Edwards was awarded top newcomer and rebounder �
McGuigan Excited About New Season
White, Evans Pace
Men's Track Team
By RANDY MEWS
By HORACE McCORMICK
ECl Sforu Ufo
When ECU women's track
coach Pat McGuigan began to
prepare her 1982-83 squad for
their first indoor meet, she found
her roster lacking both depth and
experience with only two
sophomores leading 13 untested
freshmen.
As the season progressed,
McGuigan's squad began to ripen
as three of her Lady Thinclads
emerged despite a discouraging
start. Sprinters Kathy Leeper,
Regina Kent and Jamie Cathcart
rose to the occasion to bury six
schools records between them.
Leeper, who won the state high
school meet three consecutive
seasons, broke the ECU school
record in the indoor 400-meters,
turning out a time of 59.79, while
also establishing new school
records anchoring the 1600-meter
relay and providing a strong leg
on the 4x150 meter relay and the
sprint-medley team. In addition,
Leeper delivered stiff competition
in the long jump.
"I was disappointed in myself
as a long jumper and as a sprinter
even though I still broke the
school record said Leeper. "I
thought I would be doing muci.
better by now, but maybe I set my
goals a little too high for the first
season.
"There's a big difference bet-
ween high school and college
track she added. "I knew the
competition would be tough, but
it's even tougher than I expected.
But I think all the girls have
matured a great deal since making
the transition from high school to
college
Regina Kent, a state champion
sprinter for three years in high
school, placed first in the
55-meters in the Colgate Women's
Games, the Hershey Track and
Field Meet and the Summer Track
Festival. She also broke the ECU
indoor 60-yard dash record with a
time of 7.13.
Kent was also a member of the
record-breaking sprint medley, 4 x
1600 meters and the 4 x 150 meters
relay teams. She missed qualifying
for the Nationals by .08 seconds.
"1 was disappointed and hurt
because I didn't qualify Kent
explained. "Coach McGuigan
had planned to take me to another
meet to qualify. I felt that I was
beginning to reach a season peak,
but the meet that I was expecting
to qualify in was cancelled and so
were my hopes as a national con-
tender this season
Jamie Cathcart, who was a
member of the state champion
mile-relay team at East Forsyth
High School, broke the ECU 600
meter indoor record her first meet
of the 1982-83 season, while also
running with Leeper and Kent on
the record-breaking teams.
Cathcart's time of 128.4 in the
600 meters was good enough to
give her a second-place state rank-
ing, excited about the outdoor season,
"Although I only ran the last particularily the mile relay. We've
two meets of the indoor season, come a long way since the fall and
my times were increasing con- this outdoor season will go even
siderably stated Cathcart. "I'm farther
Staff nicr
Ray Dickerson was one member of the Pirate mite-relay team
which finished in third place in this weekend's meet.
The ECU's men's track team
captured one first-place and two
third-place finishes this wekend in
the highly competitive Florida
Relays in Gainesville, Fla.
In just the second outdoor meet
of his collegiate career, Craig
White won the 110-meter high
hurdles with a time of 13.93; and
was only .01 of a second away
from qualifying for the nationals
in Houston, Texas. This winter,
White represented ECU at the In-
door National Championships,
competing inthe 55-meter high
hurdles. v
In the 100-meter dash, Erskine
Evans had his highest finish as a
Pirate, placing third in 10.73
seconds. The winning time of the
event was 10.71.
The mile-relay team had their
best time of the year, taking third
place in 3:12.07. Each runner: Ed-
die Bradley, Willie Fuller, Reuben
Pierce and Ray Dickerson all ran
their legs of the race in under 49
seconds.
Coach Bill Carson was extreme-
ly pleased with the performance
of his relay team. "They ran a
qualifying time of 3:11.26, which
is quite good for a group of four
freshmen. They are really coming
along quite well
The 4 x 100 and 4 x 200 Pirate
relay teams also qualified for the
finals, but on the baton exchange
in the 4 x 100, Chris Brooks was
cleated by a teammate and cut his
leg badly. Brooks was unable to
finish the race and also could not
participate in the 4 x 200.
It was an unfortunate accident,
but the Pirates still made a good
showing for themselves. They will
be in action again next weekend at
the Duke Invitational in Durham.
Golfers At Par
The ECU men's golf team par-
ticipated in the Palmetto Classic
March 25-27, placing 14th among
18 teams at the Santee-Cooper
resort in Orangeburg, South
Carolina.
Bad weather plagued the tour-
nament, and only 36 holes were
completed during the three-dav
event.
Five ECU golfers: David
Dooley, Chris Czaja, Roger
Newsom, Kelly Stimart and Don
Sweeting combined for 774
strokes to place the Pirates in the
14th spot. In team standings;
Ohio State was first with 717
strokes, Clemson placed second
with 722, Wake Forest shot a 729,
and Virginia took fourth with 732
strokes.
Dooley, a freshman from
Charlotte, led the Pirates, with in-
dividual scores of 78 and 73.
Czaja finished one stroke
behind Dooley, shooting rounds
of 77 and 75 while Newsom shot
an 81 and a team low 72.
Bulldog
Hometol
ATHENS Ga
(UPD � The I niver
sitv of Georgia
basketball team.
hich plavs
Carolina State in the
finals of the V
tournament
weekend, couldn
practice Mond
because the r
in town.
The people a ho
handle schedulii .
the univer- I
lseum nc ei
sidered that tl
t would be needed
for one ol the final
four V -
ment tear:
tice in
'�Right n �-
got the fl ed
in din foi i
Coach Hugl ' jrham
said V
noon om his
iscum
should ed
with it s
have our floor I
down to practice
b tomorrow
Thui
ing
i
1
all vl
thi
G
a
3t m
ECl guard Bruce PearJ
earlier this ear. Pearti
award this �eek.
Wolfp
RALEIGH N (
lUPl) North
Carolina Sta c' s
coaches and r
tried to maintain a
semblance of routine
Monda in prep;
tion for the NCAA
basketball finals, but
it wasn't ea on a
campus electn! t
the "team
destin
Squad member at-
tended their � 51
classes since earlv
March, when
Wolf pack hecan the
streak of victories that
propelled it to Satur-
day's championship
semi-finals in lbu-
querque. N M �
against v eorg
Coach Jim Valvano
concentrated
paperwork, mean-
while, and assistant
coach Tom
Abatemarco prepared
his recruiting
schedule
But Wolf pack fans
weren't about to take
a break from the
delirium that has
swept the North
Carolina State cam-
pus since n on the
Atlantic Coast Con
ference tournament.
The student bodv
prepared a pep rally
for Mondav after-
noon, while at the
Wolfpack Club -
North Carolina
State's booster group
� five telephones





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 29, 1983
11
Page 10
aptist
Pf�oc B, GA�v PATTERSON
flove
a relae during a light moment
practice. The Buo will play a
ilmington. dameiime i 3 p.m.
s Presented
5 Htrting Sews All-America
re forward Barry
renounced as the best
ayei Wright, a Nor-
!k native, dreu the toughest
lefensively. The 6-5
won the top
� e player award his
ason a: ECU.
r co-captain Thom Brown
the most improved
� doubled his playing
ipped both his
tnd rebounding averages
� � "� : role in the
neup when Green was
c Peartree won
Ming award.
ttive led the team
� i 58 � 68 attempts for
u coach Charlie
Bucs captured the
- season in three
g with a 16-13
ans Pace
ck Team
Brooks was unable to
'he race and also could not
in the 4 x 200.
an unfortunate accident,
� Pirates still made a good
or themselves. They will
on again next weekend at
c Duke Invitational in Durham.
jolfers At Par
The EC I men's golf team par-
ked in the Palmetto Classic
s 27, placing 14th among
�earns at the Santee-Cooper
in Orangeburg, South
arolina.
Bad weather plagued the tour-
nament, and only 36 holes were
�npleted during the three-day
levent.
Five ECU golfers: David
Pooley. Chris Czaja, Roger
r-ewsom. Kelly Stimart and Don
k meeting combined for 774
P rokes t0 Place the Pirates in the
! spot, in team standings
nio State was first with 717
�rokes. Clemson placed second
�J?2' wake Forest shot a 729,
nd Virginia took fourth with 732
strokes.
Doolev. a freshman from
harlotte. led the Pirates, with in-
'vidual scores of 78 and 73.
I Szaja f,msned one stroke
behind Dooley. shooting rounds
ot 77 and 75 whllc Ncw$om shot
� 8, and a team low 72.
Bulldogs Turned Away By
Hometown Georgia Rodeo
Classifieds
ATHENS, Ga
(I PI) � The Univer-
sity of Georgia
basketball team,
which plays North
Carolina State in the
finals of the NCAA
tournament this
weekend, couldn't
practice Monday
because the rodeo was
in town.
The people who
handle scheduling for
the university's col-
iseum never con-
sidered that the facili-
i would be needed
for one of the final
four NCAA tourna-
ment teams to prac-
tice in.
"Right now they've
cot the floor covered
in dirt for a rodeo
Coach Hugh Durham
said Monday after-
noon from his col-
iseum office. "They
should be finished
with it soon and we'll
have our floor back
down to practice on
b tomorrow
The team will prac
tice Tuesday,
Wednesday and
Thursday before fly-
ing out of Athens for
New Mexico to play
North Carolina State
Saturday.
Georgia, now 24-9,
beat defending
NCAA champion
University of North
Carolina 82-77 Sun-
day to enter the Final
Four.
"We won't be do-
ing anything different
than we've been doing
all year, Durham said.
"In practice we work
on fundamentals. We
have no changes in
strategy. Most teams
this late in the year try
to do the things
they've done well all
year. We're no dif-
ferent
That means
Georgia will start with
a lineup considered
short by most Divi-
sion 1 college teams.
No starter is over 6-7,
but the Bulldogs'
leaping ability, good
shooting percentage
and positioning has
lead them to tourna-
ment victories over
Virginia Com-
monwealth, St. Johns
and North Carolina.
Georgia has no
outstanding star on
which the team has
pinned its hopes this
season. Terry Fair,
6-7, starts at center
while James Banks,
6-6, and Lamar
Heard, 6-5, play the
forward positions.
Richard Corhen, 6-6,
subs at both forward
and center. Vern
Fleming, 6-5, who
was the leading re-
bounder among
guards in the SEC,
starts at one guard
position while Donald
Hartry, 6-2, and
Gerald Crosby, 6-1,
share playing time at
the other guard posi-
tion. Georgia plays a
multiple defense �
ECU guard Bruce Peartree drives on N.C. State's Sidney Lowe
earlier this year. Peartree received the best freethrow shooting
award this week.
Wolfpack Returns
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI) � North
Carolina State's
coaches and players
tried to maintain a
semblance of routine
Monday in prepara-
tion for the NCAA
basketball finals, but
it wasn't easy on a
campus electrified by
the "team of
destiny
Squad members at-
tended their first
classes since early
March, when the
Wolfpack began the
streak of victories that
propelled it to Satur-
day's championship
semi-finals in Albu-
querque, N.M
against Georgia.
Coach Jim Valvano
concentrated on
paperwork, mean-
while, and assistant
coach Tom
Abatemarco prepared
his recruiting
schedule.
But Wolfpack fans
weren't about to take
a break from the
delirium that has
swept the North
Carolina State cam-
pus since it won the
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference tournament.
The student body
prepared a pep rally
for Monday after-
noon, while at the
Wolfpack Club �
North Carolina
State's booster group
� five telephones
were ringing constant-
ly with calls from peo-
ple asking about
charter flights to New
Mexico.
This will be North
Carolina State's third
appearance in the
championship round.
The Wolfpack finish-
ed third in 1950 and
won the title in 1974.
Ironically, it was
during that 1973-74
season that North
Carolina State and
Georgia last met, with
the Wolfpack winning
94-60. The overall
rivalry shows seven
victories for each
squad.
Jim Pomeranz, the
Wolfpack's director
of publications and
sports editor of the
student newspaper in
1974, said the mood
on campus this year
exceeds that of even
the national cham-
pionship that David
Thompson, Tom
Burleson, Tim Stod-
dard and Monte Towe
brought to Raleigh.
"In 1974 it was
more of an expected
thing he said,
noting the team had
lost just one game in
two years. "The at-
mosphere is electric.
It's been a continuous
party since the ACC
tournament
Pomeranz said he
believes victories are
iwetttf this year
because "this is unex-
pected pleasure. A lot
of people are saying
'Aren't you going
overboard with your
partying0' But it's
something that
doesn't happen every
year for us
North Carolina
State also has known
how to put on a show.
It has come from
behind in all but one
of its past seven
games, and two of the
victories were in over-
time.
Many Wolfpack
fans had hoped their
squad would face
North Carolina again
on Saturday, but
Georgia quashed
those hopes with an
82-77 victory over the
Tar Heels in Sunday's
East Regional finals.
After the match,
North Carolina coach
Dean Smith predicted
the Wolfpack could
win "unless Georgia
shoots well from the
perimeter
"State will zone
Georgia some and
have the advantage of
a couple of 6-11
players inside he
told Monday's
Raleigh Times. "It
should be an in-
teresting game. Both
teams are in
momentum-gaining
roles at this time
man-to-man, full
court press, zone.
Durham said he
and his team are
handling the pressure
of being in the Final
Four pretty well.
"You start prepar-
ing for pressure the
first day of practice.
You work as hard as
you can work and you
practice for it. That's
all you can expect of
yourself and your
players. Then, when
you're in a critical
game, hopefully, you
can handle it
If you had ask
anyone in Georgia �
or the Southeastern
Conference � a
month ago if they
thought the Bulldogs
would have made it to
the Final Four, the
response might have
been a chuckle and a
thousand reasons why
Georgia wouldn't
make it.
PERSONAL
TO ALL THE PEOPLE WHO
READ THE PERSONALS
EVERY TUESDAY AND
THURSDAY kKi�u you think
�ft tli best rhino about The
East Carolinian. Sometimes I
think you're rifht. THE
EDITOR.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW.
3 bedroom apartment
fiivmonth plus 13 utilities.
Sauna, laundry rm tennis
courts, close. 751-Mlt.
3 ROOMMATES NEEDED tor
Georgetown Apts! Call gMgj,
ROOMMATE WANTED to
share two-bedroom apartment
next fall. 13 rent. Call 7S2-4S27
or come by )SS Aycock Dorm
alter 7 p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Private room, kit-
chen accessories, S�7.somonth
plus 13 utiities. One block from
campus. 311-B Summit. PH.
gBjBW.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, experience, quality
work, IBM Selectric typewriter.
Call Lanie Shive 7M-SM1 or
GAIL JOYNER 7S4-1M1.
TYPING: Term papers, thesis.
etc. Call Kompte Dunn. MMggL
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER-
VICE: Complete audio repair
call after t p.m. Mark 7SI-HH.
NEED TYPING? Lowest rates
on campus. I years experience
IBM type. Call Cindy, JSS-4741
after MB p.m.
MOVING? No To too lar�e or
small 1 Reasonable rates, call
7SA-S33.
II YEARS TYPING,
REASONABLE RATES. Spell
in, punctuation and trammer
corrections. Proofreading Call
CINDY at 3 1441, t a.m. � p.m.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: 1-YEAR-OLD small
Mack female dot. White mark
ints on chin and paws; no tail.
Answers to CLO. Please call
7SI-in� after 4M p.m. if seen or
found.
LOST: GERMAN SHEPHERD
puppy, mostly Mack. Answers to
"Dusty Lost near Harding
Street. U found, call 7SB-44B3.
WANTED
WANTED: Organist for dinner
music and lounge. See Janice
Davenport at Washington Yacht
and Country Club Thurs. thru
Sat. betweenand p.m. or call
Mo-uu.
WANTED: FEMALE
bartenders for part-time and
summer job. Apply between J
and 4 Thursday. March 34th. At
tk. iej e. 4th Street.
ATTRACTIVE MODELS
WANTED for figure -
"intimate apparel"
photography. Excellent pay
Send figure photo and personal
information to P O. Box 1413.
Rocky Mount, N.C. 7Ml 1413
ENERGETIC Part time
salesperson needed. AvaiiaMe
mornings and Saturdays. Ex
perience preferred but not
necessary. Apply in person.
Leather 'n' wood, Ltd. Carolina
East Mall. No phoncalls,
MATURE. RESPONSIBLE
PERSONS WANTED FOR sum
RBT tub-leasing in 2 bedroom
townhouse swimming pool, $240
plus Utilities. 757 3tOoot717 1715
SUMMER JOBS: Tow wafer
safety instructors, R.N. and arts
and crafts director. FOr mfor
motion, write Ed Hodges, Jr. 21S
E. 11th Street. Washington, N.C
MB.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
WANTEO to sub-lease one-room
apartment at Tar River Estates
this summer. Apt is beside
large swimming pool, has patio
and is located S minutes from
campus Call 7SI4424 for more
information.
FOR SALE
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff
Welcome to our flea market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd Open every Saturday and
Sunday I til s Crafts, tools, fur
niture. books, etc. Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' items
Real bargains
TWIN BED VITM FRAME, box
spring, mattress, taMe chest.
Good condition, call WMBM
71 YAMAHA ENDURO IS good
condition ssse m helmet
7J2 4J7?. TOOO
FOR SALE MYATTA
Americana 23 in bicycle Good
condition. tfS, nog. Call Til in
after S ask for Susan.
K2 7sa Kawasaki ttgi, 11.400
Priced to sell. Groat bargain.
Good condition. This is a real
motorcycle Make an offer Call
7S3 403S.
4M SPECIAL n Yamaha tU2te
Good condition An excellent
bike Need to sell Make an of
for Call 752 �t3S
toaj CHEVY Custom Deluxe It.
4x4. 4 speed, sliding r�r win
dows. AMFM, cassette. P.S
P.B. Lock in hubs. Rally wheels
Priced to sell, sio see Call
7S2-4f3S
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED TO
WASHINGTON. DC area
Leave on Friday. Call Steve at
7S7-�7M. Will help with gas.
MISC.
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALL
Reasonable rates. Call 7S-S33
VOTE
LINDSEY
WILLIAMS
IMTWARrtt
Your BSN means you're a professorial. In the Army, it also
means you're an officer. You start as a 4ullfledjecl member of our
medical team. Write: Army Nurse OppoTfAlhities,
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA�&1Q.
ARMYNURSECORP1
BEALLYOUCANK.
MERTZ L FOR S.G. A.
IVICE PRESIDEN
CAN DO
25 Offset Resumes for
Photocopies r $12.50
5t
CURRY
COPY
PCTM I ld v.ia��n. idia rap
utrMibH of Greenville 752-i233Expires43083
Includes typing,
second sheets & envelopes
8' 2 X 11 l side
Classic Laid Paper
412 EVANS AAALL-DQWNTOWN
Balloons Are Beautiful
Balloons Aren V Fattening
Balloons Won't Rot Your Teeth
Balloons Don 7 Sit There In A Nest, Then Fly:
Balloons A re Perfect For Easter,
Especially Our Bunny Balloons!
Bunny Mylar Balloons
picked up-$4.00
Easter Latex Balloons
picked up-$ 1.00 each
Beautiful Easter Bouquet
$20.00 delivered
Balloons
Over Greenvill?
Greenville's tint and inest
Balloon Service"
PHOSE 752-3H5
9:OOam-9:OOpm
i $15�� OFFANY j
! COMPLETE PAIR OF �
j JEYEGLiSSES j
�I ����! HUiiie RJ. I
Lj���j
V
lljN
SAcscii4io�s
SOFT
ill) JM sQQ
jjjj CONTACTS
7 �KjJJOCSJftMVGOARANTtf
AND CARE KIT
OPTICAL i PALACE eV
'�filial ii lb BlvH lArroM Fiom Pitt PUa N��. To rRA Realty)
Gary M Ham I ,cew�d Opinion Open 9 JO a m to 6 p m Moot -Ftl
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
is offering a cut and style
special Reg $16 50
Now $14.50
offer good thru March 31,1983
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
one 756-2950 or 756-4042
Bow Bow Wow
Unleashed
For Just
$6.49 IP
Plzzalxui
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas iack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
Pi ZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd
$6.99 Tape
WOW wow
WHEN THE GONG GETS TOUGH
THE TOUGH GET GOING
On Sale Throush April 7
Record Bar






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 29, 1983
Surf Club Triumphs
By CLAY
THORNTON
The East Carolina
surf club travelled to
Summer Haven,
Florida this Spring
Break to compete in
one of the largest col-
legiate surfing con-
tests ever held on the
east coast.
Members of the
ECU team had not
been in the winter
waters in the
preceeding four mon-
ths and so a long week
of practice was
scheduled.
The practice week,
however, was
characterized by small
waves and off-shore
winds, and there were
feelings of apprehen-
sion as the contest
date approached.
The day of the con-
test, Saturday, March
12th, was a beautiful
day with northeasterly
winds at 10-15 mph,
but once again the
waves were small and
there was even some
question as to whether
the contest would be
held at all.
The water was a
chilly 55 degrees and
there was also a
strong undertow
hampering surfing
maneuvers, but all the
teams zipped up their
wet suits and waxed
down their boards
and the contest began
on schedule.
The Pirates looked
strong in the initial
stages of the contest
with seven excellent
surfers: Wes
Tilghmart, Danny
Monahan, Bobby
Raines, Alan
Blankenship, Eric
Nichols, Jim Brown
and Scott Talcott ad-
vancing from the first
heat to the quarter-
finals. Scott Talcott
went on to represent
ECU in the
semifinals.
It was the first heat,
though, that was very
crucial, and the
Pirates came away
with the second place
team standing.
Six well-represented
schools participated
in the competition
with the University of
Florida taking first
place. Emily Riddle
Aeronautical Institute
followed ECU, taking
third place.
Another school
from North Carolina,
UNC-Wilmington,
claimed fourth place.
Flagler College from
St. Augustine came in
fifth while Sante Fe
Community College
brought up the rest of
the field.
It was an exciting
tournament and a ma-
jor accomplishment
for the Pirates,
especially considering
the size of the waves,
sparse practices and
the fact that this team
is in only its third
season of competi-
tion.
The surf club is
now looking forward
to the Easter break
and a contest at scenic
Cape Hatteras, but
this time the Pirates
plan to take first
place.
Matrices-
TWO BACON IE66 BISCUITS
HW-asc piTM-ni thisonfam he-ton- onk-ruiK tx- lotfmn xtius
uvnxT per vviji plcix-umktkt muv pj an sale u Ihis
OHfmn run good in lombuution vmh am other fcr
t Hfc-r px�J during normal biakfajl hour. onl ji ihc
following rUrdns Rt-Mjurants 910 o'jn�.tic
miw � 2907 r nnh Sncct Gwcmitk
V Ottrpxtd throtigh 1j i l'�U
A HOT HAM W CHEESE
SAHOWIOH.REaULW FRIES i
ft MEDIUM SftFT DRINK $1.79i
Itt-av prrx-ru this i .if hi fx-fi rv rUcri ng Oae a H4 m per
cilMlim l per visit pk-ast (. uMomrr muM pj an salt ux ThiMou
pon nx g.a.1 in . onibnuiion with jn other ictcr
l lfler good after 10 V) AM dail o�l al the following tUrure Rexaurano. 9M
(�Ainehe strevt A 290T loth xrrtt dtcnwlk V CfflrrJondthnAKh Mav M
1983 -
Hacdeer
ROOAAATE WANTED
Responsible male or female wanted to share 3
bedroom duplex with two working students. Near
campus; rent cheap; plenty albums. Call Charles
at 752 4935 or 756 8865.
Division of Student Life
Department of University Unions
Office of the Director of University Unions
& Associate Dean�Student Activities
207 Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
1983 HOMECOMING THEME
CONTEST
NAME
LOCAL ADDRESS
HOME ADDRESS
LOCAL PHONE
SOCIAL SECURITY NO.
THE BEST TIME TO REACH ME IS
YEAR
MAJOR
MY THEME SUGGESTION IS:
� All Homecoming Themes Suggestions become the propertv of the Homecoming Steering
Committee. b &
� The winner will receive a $25.00 prize.
� The Homecoming Steering Committee reserves the right to reject any or all entries
1!� HOmeCOming Steerin9 Committee is running a contest, if you name the theme of the
homecor
reserve the right to refect any or all entries. Entries must be"nJSiS'in to'thi'SSttoS UrT
100, hB� . � "��� ,a �uuiiiiiy d cumesT. it you
Lh�!�?: ff'J �"� To enter, fill out the form included above. All homecoming
theme suggestions become the property of the Homecoming Steering Committee
reserve the right to reject any or all entries. Entries must be turne
office, 234 Mendenhall, by 5 p.m Friday, April 8. Get involved and v.
ion

Vote Tory Russo
for SGA President

I
0KT Lil Sis
present
DRAFT
NITE
Wed.Mar.30,1983
9:00-1:00 Adm. $1
10 Draft for All,
All Night Long
Come Early s
1
I
I
" i

Due to Circumstances
beyond our control
An erroneous
Carolina Opry House Ad
was run Thurs. March 24.
We apologize for this mistake.
OVER t0O
ApSiiA
SHIRTS MUST BE SOLD
Pulsar Quartz
TAX BACK SPECIAL
$25 rrode-in on o large group of Pulsar Watches
men's and ladies styles available
V
Why pay more or settle for less?
Pulsar Quartz.
Always a beat beyond In technology. In value.
INDEPENDENT JEWELERS
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON JEWELERS
J
Htti
O. tk. M.II
��Mi
I Itcli. tmck to a
MERTZ
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
O
1 PAY ONLr: CfcH 0NIV- M0 CHECKS
'CSism(MmiiMnB(
o
! footm mucc-mmu) fnuua
CotFCriMftiS
�reenearre
��� XX 5"
WJwm nrltn
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OHIX
Nftnt bUMt
SWEATERS
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COLLEGELOGO
� MASCOT
SPORT SilRTSi
-t.
NOW ONLY
?7"
FACTORY BurOVT: aoSEOaiTS -KAWK&umTClK
3ktoMKrs
� � � �w
otunt tOvbonan
SWEATPANTS
WXFl3Cm.ar- itnu.1 �.ri���0��s
NOW,
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SWEATSHIRTS
WO fry
MM
;gV
COLLifitm
JERSIYS-MifiAU
Wb-JHIKT5
14 �?
ATHLETIC fOOfrtthR
OHlS arm UP
S 1 PAY ONLr? CASH ONW-NO CHECKS
fckK?ViRM-Uf5
�Ub�xMt
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TUK30CK5
WAiUBrftn
MM
T6MIW6
NOWOMLT
y
JUNIORS AND SENIORS
EARN OVER $1000.00 PER MONTH
If you are a math, physics, chemistry or engineering major with a
"H" average or better, earn over $1000.On per month through your
junior and senior yearssummers included! The Navy's NUPOC
(Nuclear Propulsion Officer) Collegiate Program is looking for
qualified individuals. Other benifits include:
$3000.00 cash bonus immediately upon acceptance into progran
$22,000 starting salary - $40,000 after just four years
FREE Medical Dental care and nany other TAX FREE benefits
30 days PAID annual vacation
1 yetr graduate level training
Immediate responsibility
Valuable engineering experience
Education benefits
Job security with fast promotions
HUtt NAH1 iND lfW�NTOR)T tWllX IF. Sol�
5H�IS
NOW
2sr
TO ��
odldas
MtffctfMtai
NOMOMtv r
RKgutllAU)
T.U49
am 3 :���
FRIDAY APRIL 1st
MG� HOUR SAUL
10 A.M. TILL 4 P.M.I
HOLIDAY INN
U.S.13
EMORIAL DR.
(fewfaf
lodidos 1
If you're interested in finding out more, see the Navy
Officer Programs Team, they'll be on campus 29-31 March at the
Student Center. If you can't make it, send
transcripts to:
your resume or
NELSON SKINNER
U.S. NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Or.
Raleigh, NC 27609
Or call 1-800-662-7231
8am-4pn, MonFri.
Bro
DENVER ,L PI,
Irv Brown, a retin
college basketball oi
ficial and forrnel
supervisor of thf
Western Athletil
Conference's of
ficials, is convince!
former Marquet
Uruversin c
McGuire �,dv
the nation
coaches when ii
to baiting the oi
ficiaJs.
And B .s
know. The rme
ficial, who �
April, uvorl
NCAA
gamev six I
championshipv
Ajdndor's nal
lege game.
Rupp's final
and hit Mc .
a technics.
Marque: te
officiates
"Official
be an art. - .
an official
of beaut.
!
5�
t;
Cougar
Clash h
IdealU. when
cornes down
championsh.p gi
it's a sp
delight wher.
the top iwc
competing.
And so il will b
natural - . n
Houston and N
Louisilie .
AJbiiqiierque, N M
Saturday .
NCAA Champ
ships.
Unfortunate �
though. th
show down conies
the sexnifina ame
rather thar. the nal.
The other semifinal
pairing wasn'1 as
predictable a Ga
and North Car
State, with 19 losses
between them, rode a
series oi upset vic-
tories to claim then
berths.
The Wolf pack
finished 14th in the
final I PI rankings
while Georgia was
No. 15.
'l guess the
'Destiny Kids' are go-
ing to collide
Georgia coach Hugh
Durham said. "We
(the coaches) already
had tickets. We told
the guys 4we"d really
like you to be going
with us
Houston. the
regular season na-
tional champion cur-
rently sporting a 30-2
record, expects to be
greeted with a full
court press from
Louisville, but this
doesn't concern the
Hh
i





lnc
r les,
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 29, MM 13
'Ou nan e tne theme of The
ced above All homecoming
ig Committee, and they
in to the Student Union
.v �
kSHIRTS MUST 8E SOLD
PSH0M.V NO CHECKS
SgMCEMSI
si
hi
SWEATERS
nr- r '
MOWONL
C0LL�G�l0GO
MASCOT
rf0RI5HlRrSj
HOW ONLY j
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'EAT PANTS
� oe SJXt
" '
�4�4.��V�fc,(i! WJfTOtP
SWEATSHIRTS y
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ATHtfTIC fOOTWUK
HMi
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GBH0NN- NO CHECKS
'UBf 50CK5
99
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thi)
T-5MIW6 T
NOW ONLY
j99
IWV�NWRf MUSI K jolO!
fLftJNKIMGv
tt)JU�W0
RKfllftlMUS
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RILlst
HOUR SALE1
TU.LO.M.
lidas -w I
U.S.13
EMORIAL DR.r-1
CE7BB
Brown Looks Back
DENVER (UPI) �
Irv Brown, a retired
college basketball of-
ficial and former
supervisor of the
Western Athletic
Conference's of-
ficials, is convinced
former Marquette
University coach Al
McGuire was one of
the nation's best
coaches when it came
to baiting the of-
ficials.
And Brown should
know. The former of-
ficial, who retired last
April, worked 22
NCAA tournament
games, six final four
championships, Lew
Alcindor's final col-
lege game, Adolph
Rupp's final game
and hit McGuire with
a technical in every
Marquette game he
officiated.
"Officiating may
be an art, but working
an official is a thing
of beauty Brown
said.
He said McGuire,
who led Marquette to
an NCAA title before
retiring, was, � "no
question about it" �
one of the best in get-
ting after the officials.
"He's street and
he's my favorite
Brown said. "He was
a damn good coach,
never looked at film,
used a little high
school zone and had a
designated shooter.
"If you wanted to
talk to him, the
manager would have
to go get him out of
the bar. He wanted to
get a 4T' right away. It
was part of his ploy to
work the crowd. The
maddest I ever saw
him was when I gave
Bobby Knight (of In-
diana) a T' before
him
Brown called
Knight "a sniper �
always calling you an
SOB, but the greatest
personal drive I've
ever seen. I've stuck
him every time, too
Brown said North
Carolina coach Dean
Smith was always
"very cool, aloof. His
total knowledge of the
game is the best. He
can do anything, run,
slow it down. He'd
say to me, 'Mr.
Brown, at the 10:12
mark, this and this
happened
He said Kansas
State basketball coach
Jack Hartman never
got the great talent
but always managed
to win anyway.
"One of the
meanest men I
know Brown quip-
ped of Hartman. "He
practices his team
three times a day dur-
ing Christmas
He said of former
veteran UCLA coach
Jack Wooden:
"Never used profani-
ty but he wanted to
fight. A sniper who
always reminded you
of those champion-
ship banners and that
UCLA didn't set il-
legal picks
Brown, who had a
good reputation
among the nation's
coaches as a good of-
ficial, said an official
working his way up in
the ranks actually ap-
preciates the volatile
coach.
"When you're
coming up, they
oughta' work you
Brown said. "Any
good official knows
that. When I was
young I used to blow
the whistle a hundred
times. I didn't know
what I was supposed
to do. Pretty soon you
get your style
MERTZ
nm �r GA�r pattchsom
Three members of the ECU softball team take a break to play with their new mascot. Missy.
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Cougars, Cardinals To I
Clash In Semifinal Game
Ideally, when it
comes down to a
championship game,
it's a spectator's
delight when you have
the top two teams
competing.
And so it will be a
natural when No. 1
Houston and No. 2
Louisville clash at
Albuquerque, N.M
Saturday, in the
NCAA Champion-
ships.
Unfortunately,
though, their
showdown comes in
the semifinal game
rather than the final.
The other semifinal
pairing wasn't as
predictable as Georgia
and North Carolina
State, with 19 losses
between them, rode a
series of upset vic-
tories to claim their
berths.
The Wolfpack
finished 14th in the
final UPI rankings
while Georgia was
No. 15.
"1 guess the
'Destiny Kids are go-
ing to collide
Georgia coach Hugh
Durham said. "We
(the coaches) already
had tickets. We told
Cougars. Villanova to be ashamed of. We
came out with a press just need to do well
to start the second the game we do
half last Sunday nd it Houston, although
promptly back tired as appearing in the Final
Houston quickly Four for the second
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1
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doubled its 10-point
half time lead.
"We haven't been
bothered by the press
all year said
Houston coach Guy
Lewis. "You press us
and we'll get it down
the court and stuff it
on you. I told the guys
that if they pressed us,
we were going to take
it to the basket
One big problem
for Louisville, 32-3,
will be to forget about
last Saturday's highly
emotional 80-68 over-
time victory over Ken-
tucky in the first
meeting between the
schools in 24 years.
But Cardinal coach
Denny Crum, saying
he has no plans to
change strategy,
pointed out that his
team will have almost
a week to calm down
and prepare for
Houston.
"The pressure's on
Houston he said.
"They were No. 1
year in a row, has on-
ly one senior in the
starting lineup, 6-9
Larry Micheaux. The
big man for the
Cougars, if they are to
succeed, is 7-footer
Akeem Abdul Ola-
juwon.
"This is my last
year and I try to pep
up the guys
Micheaux said. "I
always tell them
they'll be back next
year. I won't. This is
it for me. I want to go
out a winner. I guess
they took my speech
to heart against
Villanova
Micheaux scored a
career-high 30 points
against Villanova,
combining with Ola-
juwon and guard
Michael Young for 70
points � one less than
the entire Villanova
squad.

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This will be North
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regular season na- well. in 1974, and a
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14
THE EAST CAROLON1AN MARCH 29, 1983
Netters Win
The ECU men's ten-
nis team split six singles
matches and won two
doubles contests to
edge out Campbell,
5-4.
In singles, Bruce
Eikhoff (Camp.) def.
Ted Lepper, 6-2, 2-6,
7-5; Don Rutledge
(ECU) def. Arturo
Ibarguen, 6-0,6-2; Paul
Owen (ECU) def.
Frankie Delcarte, 6-0,
6-3; Don Gordon
(Camp.) def. Galen
Treble, 6-3, 6-1; David
Creech (ECU) def.
Steve Davis, 6-1, 6-2;
and David Holland
(Camp.) def. Cole
King, 6-3, 7-5.
In doubles, Lepper-
Rutledge (ECU) def.
Eikhoff-Holland,
6-4,6-3; Ibargucn-
Dclconte (Camp.) def.
Cole-Owen, 6-4, 5-7,
5-7; and Creech-Treble
(ECU) def. Gordon-
Ohorcasitas, 6-3, 0-6,
6-3.
The Pirates are now
5-3, while Campbell is
4-4.
The Bucs play UNC-W
Thursday at 3 p.m.
Pirates Beat Baptist
Cont'd From Page 10
it's a harbinger of
things to come
The Pirates raised
their record to 13-5,
while Baptist dropped
to 6-10.
ECU will once
again travel to Baptist
this afternoon and
then to UNC-
Wilmington on
Wednesday. The
Pirates return home
on Thursday to face
conference foe
William and Mary.
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fl7 Wtt Morgan St.
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MonFri.8-6.Sat.ai2
Western
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Every Tuesday in March 1983
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Served with King Idaho Baked I
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500 W. Greenville Blvd. 756-41040
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USOA Choice - Whole
For Easter Sunday only, the Food Lion Store in
your area will open at 12:00 Noon.
These prices good thru
Saturday, April 2, 1983
USOA Clitic Beef Rib
Rib-Eye Steak it 398
4 Lbs.
Sliced Fr.� - Sniff
Hostess
Hams
Amour - (Sliced FREE) .
Canned Hams iu. 698
Lb.
SnithfieM Wbolo � 19 23 Lb. Am. (Slieod FREE)
Or Swithfiela Shiak Portia
Smoked
Hams
tuart
Rid
Smithfield Bait Portioa
Smoked Hams i. 98
Strawberries
Aunt Hannah$
Shortcake Shells p 2 M09
Fresh 6reae A 10 14 Lbs. A�.
Frash 6rea A 4 7 Lbs Are.
Turkey Breasts u 1.28
Lb.
toed tiailiai � (Sliced FREE) 14 17 Lbs. Are,
IhM Ass Sheas Half
Semi-Boneless Hams ib. $1.48
4-8 Lbs. Avara�a
FreshSmoked
Picnics
Stetthfield Cceter Slice
Smoked Hams i, M.98
Lb.
USDA Choice Beef Rih Staedieej
Rib
Roast
Cross A 4 4 Lbs Are.
Fresh Hens i. 68
32 Ouaeo
22 Ounce
Liquid fj�
Why Pay 1 39
7.25 0z. - Food Tees
Macaroni
Monte �& Cheese i
Catsups
2 Liter
WbyPiy M.19
Pepsi .


Quart
JFG Mayonnaise
3-09
16 Oz. - Cut French
Del Monte Green Beans
Half Oallea - White House fetfe
Apple Juice
i u. - Fr.H. ee
Interstate Potatoes
4 Rill rack -1 PI,
Edon Toilet Tissue
25 Lb. Beef MOO Off
Alpo Dog od
15 Oi Liver Meat Fisb t Chicken
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49 Ounce
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Why Pay '2 39
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 29, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 29, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.259
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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