The East Carolinian, March 24, 1983






She Saat (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.Sfr 5
Thursday, March 24,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Nader Scolds Consumer Record Of Senators
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Sialt Wruci
Consumer activist Ralph Nader, speaking as the
featured guest speaker at ECU's Spring Lecture-
Seminar series, scolded North Carolina's congres-
sional delegation for having "about the lowest"
ranking in the nation on consumer affairs.
In his speech titled "Consumerism Update:
Where Has It Been and Where Is It Going?" he
specifically cited former ECU professor John East,
R-N.C, as having the worst voting record of any
senator.
Nader, a Harvard Law School graduate, has
been at the forefront of consumer battles for more
than two decades. He has championed such causes
as ea pipeline safety, American Indian rights and
motor vehicle safety.
The author of I'nsafe at Any Speed, which was
responsible for bringing about safety regulations in
the auto industry, said the state's other senator,
Jesse Helms, was more consistent on consumer
issues but still ranked near the bottom.
Two million people have been killed and more
than 100 million people have been injured on U.S.
highways since 1899, Nader said. $50 billion is
spent each year as the result of auto accidents.
Nader said this could be avoided if automobiles
and highways were made safer.
Consumers could lower the number of traffic
deaths, save energy, reduce foreign imports, im-
prove the air quality and use their time more wisely
only if they organize, according to Nader.
Nader said consumers are victims of advertising.
He said that consumers must work at achieving a
degree of "independent consumer knowledge" to
to be able to understand the advertising process.
Consumers should work together for health
clinics that emphasize preventive medicine, Nader
said. This, he said, would reduce the cost of health
care which is estimated at 10 percent of the gross
national product.
Nader chastized the american public for not get-
ting involved. "The average person watches televi-
sion 25 hours a week he said. "That doesn't in-
dicate that people are pressed for time If
economic justice is not worked for, Nader said, the
public will suffer the consequences.
Helms and East, claimed Nader, were law-and-
order politicians who typically complain that
there's too much government regulation on the
backs of industry. Yet, Helms and East don't want
to apply law and order to corporate negligence and
fraud, Nader added.
Nader mentioned the production of the hot dog.
He said that manufacturers were allowed to label
crushed bone as calcium.
"Maybe there's a lot of things we look at but
don't see Nader said. He added that to many
people trust big business, in spite of such examples.
Nader did not just pick on North Carolina politi-
cians. He claimed President Reagan has two ideas
of freedom: the freedom to die on the highway and
the freedom not to live on the highway.
He criticized the auto industry for not installing
airbags as standard on automobiles, an action that
Nader said could save thousands of lives a year.
"Corporate crime takes more lives (and)
damages more people than street crime Nader
said. He said that all the money stolen from banks
in a year totaled $22 million, while corporate waste
and white-collar crime cost the American people
billions of dollars.
"The whole future of the consumer movement is
going to increasingly revolve around organized
consumers Nader said. "The risks of consumer
inaction are getting bigger and bigger. It's impor-
tant that consumers, not corporations, shape the
economy
Nader placed the responsibility of social change
en the backs of the American people. He told the
audience to get their "moral juices" stirred up and
begin to develop a responsible citizenry.
"If your're not an actively involved citizen
Nader said, "you're going to be more unhappy
(and) frustrated
PHoto By CINI
Consumer Advocate Ralph Nader
urges citizen organization
SGA Candidates Campaign To Greeks
The SGA election season of-
ficially opened Tuesday night at
the Lambda Chi Alpha house.
Candidates used the opportunity
to air their views on campus mat-
ters.
One vice-presidential can-
didate, David Futrell pledged sup-
port to minority groups on cam-
pus. Futrell said that "a lot of
people in the (SGA) legislature
were racist" and that he would try
'one step at a time" to correct
some of the problems.
Lindsey Williams was the first
speaker to address the group of
student leaders. The vice-
presidential candidate promised
to work to keep the lines of com-
munication open between the
Greek system and the SGA by
holding regular meetings between
the two groups. She pledged
assistance to Greek organizations,
including a promise to print a
booklet on the Greek life that
would be sent to incoming
freshman.
Williams also pledged to work
for a transit system that would
serve students going to the
downtown area.
Timothy Mertz, also a can-
didate for vice president, said he
favored giving the vice president
more power. He pledged to sup-
port student referendums.
Paul Naso and Tory Russo, the
two candidates for president, were
the last to speak.
Russo, who is the current presi-
dent of the Student Residence
Association, said he would at-
tempt to increase the amount of
office space available to student
organizations, including that of
the Inter Fraternity and
Panhellenic councils.
Russo said that he would work
to keep student loans available
throughout the school year by
recommending that records show
which students are delinquent on
their loans.
Naso, an SGA legislator, said
he supported the creation of a
centralized information center
that would connect all the major
organizations on campus. He add-
ed that this information center
would serve several purposes in-
cluding helping new students to
become more familiar with the
campus.
Naso said he would work to ex-
pand Pirate Walk, the new cam-
pus escort service.
Both Nasso and Russo were
cautious regarding how SGA
funds should be distributed, but
both supported that funds be
given to all recognized campus
groups. Russo supported a ceiling
on the amount of funds a single
organization would receive. Naso
said he would make his decisions
based on specific requests.
Becky Talley, current SGA
secretary, is running unopposed
for SGA secretary, and Sarah
Coburn is the unopposed can-
didate for SGA treasurer. The
election is slated for Wednesday,
March 30.
Lambda Chi Alpha President
John Greer, who hosted the one-
hour program at the fraternity's
Elizabeth Street residence, said
the candidates forum was put
together to enable various Greek
leaders to meet with candidates
and hear their platforms.
The elections are to be held
Wednesday, March 30. Polls will
be open in most areas from 9a.m.
to 6 p.m.
The executive officers
(president, vice president,
secretary and treasurer) will
assume office at the end of the
spring semester. They will act as
the full body of the SGA during
both summer sessions.
There are no rule changes for
these elections. There had been
rumors that changes would occur
after last year's troubles, but the
election rules committee of the
SGA decided there were to be
none.
Explosion Victims Use
Aid Offered By School
SGA Copier
Photo By CINDY WALL
McDonalds Careful Of
Ads For Thorn Birds'
A student uses the new copying machine purchased by the Student
Government Association. The machine is placed in the lobby outside
the Student Supply Store, near the snack bar.
Civil Libertarian Questions
Laws On Drunken Driving
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
The executive director of the
N.C. Civil Liberties Union,
George Gardner, believes that
several sections of Gov. James B.
Hunt's drunken driving legisla-
tion are unconstitutional because
they deny due process of law, ac-
cording to a Tuesday newspaper
story.
Gardner said his organization
opposes the provisions of Hunt's
legislation that would allow
drivers who refuse a Breathalyer
test to be jeld in jail for up to 24
hours, require immediate 10-day
license suspension for those refus-
ing the test or record a blood
alcohol level of .10 or more and
revoke the license of 16- and
17-year-old people found with any
alcohol in their blood.
"Everybody's entitled to due
process, otherwise you're making
the cop the judge Gardner said
in an interview.
Specifically, Gardner said de-
taining an accused drunken driver
for up to 24 hours following his
arrest is a denial of due process.
Concerning the 10-day license
suspension for refusing the
Breathalyzer test, Gardner said
the CLU opposes the taking of a
license without a hearing.
Garner said it was also un-
constitutional for the state to take
away the licenses of 16- and
17-year-olds if they were found to
have any amount of alcohol and
drugs in their systems. "You can't
have two classes of driving-under-
the-influence Gardner said.
ECU attorney David B. Stevens
is in agreement with several of the
CLU's positions. In an interview
with The East Carolinian, Stevens
said the law on whether a driver's
license is a right or a privilege
varies from state to state. In
North Carolina it's a privilege.
Stevens said the state should
not be permitted to withdraw a
person's license as a punishment
before a hearing in a court of law
to establish guilt. He said it would
deny due process stated in the
Fifth and 14th amendments of the
Constitution.
Stevens did say the only excep-
tion to this would be if law en-
forcement officials perceived that
the intoxicated person was a
danger to himself or to the public
because of his condition. Stevens
added that he had "serious
doubts"about a law that would
permit the state to hold a person
in custody before a hearing.
"The failure to take the
(Breathlyzer) test alone would not
be a basis for putting him in
prison for 24 hours Stevens
Sec LAWYERS, Page 7
(UPI) � McDonald's, the fast-
food chain, has advised its fran-
chise holders not to advertise in
connection with the ABC mini-
series "The Thorn Birds" unless
their spots are placed early in the
program before the Catholic
priest portrayed by Richard
Chamberlain breaks his vow of
chasity.
The McDonald's management
memo, dated March 15, cited
pressures brought by "television
activitist groups" in its decision
not to sponsor the 10-hour mini-
series which premieres Sunday.
A company spokesman said
Tuesday that the decision was
made on grounds that "The
Thorn Birds" is not a "family
special and that a protest last
week from the U.S. Catholic Con-
ference had nothing to do with it.
The conference chastized the
network for starting the series,
based on the novel by Colleen Mc-
Cullough, on Palm Sunday and
running it through Holy Week
when the central protagonist, a
priest, winds up having a love af-
fair with the girl to whom he was
father confessor throughout her
childhood and adolescence.
"Our position is that we only
advertise on what we call all-
family specials and this is not a
family special said Steve Leroy,
manager of media relations for
McDonald's.
The memo revelaed some ner-
vousness over the public's percep-
tion of the story.
"We have already received
numerous letters from television
activist groups indicating their
position with regard to this pro-
gram's content the memo said.
"OP-NAD (McDonald's natio-al
network time-buyer) will not be
associated with this program.
"You are cautioned that if you
are involved at a local level, it
should only be during the earliest
phase of the program
Cal Thomas, a spokesman for
Moral Majority in Lynchburg,
Va said his group had not
pressured advertisers to boycott
the series, but that he was not sur-
prised at the content, or the
Catholic council's reaction to it.
"It is curious that network
television seems incapable of por-
traying a religious character in a
positive way he said. "Priests
and pastors � they never seem to
do it to rabbis � are always hav-
ing illicit affairs, embezzling,
fraudIt's most unfortunate
A New York network time
buyer who asked not to be iden-
tified said the Holy Week schedul-
ing was governed soley by a lust
for rating points.
He said "The Thorn Birds" in-
itially was slated for the May
sweeps period, but that in the
wake of the highly successful
"Winds of War network ex-
ecutives saw an opportunity to
win the season from CBS before
the summer hiatus and rushed it
into the schedule.
He said the Catholic council
was not the only group likely to be
offended and that McDonald's
was not the only sponsor likely to
back away because of the story's
content.
"The execution is marvelous
he said of the series. "As a televi-
sion vehicle, it's going to work,
but you can't walk away from the
fact that when a father becomes a
father, you've got problems on
your hands.
By GREG RIDEOLT
Students affected by the March
2 Village Green explosion are star-
ting to use relief funds made
available to them by administra-
tion officials. Robert Boudreaux
said that, so far, 16 students have
received assistance.
Although an ECU Village
Green Emergency Fund has been
started and contains more than
$2,300, Boudreaux said the
money given out so far is from the
N.C. Tuition Scholarship fund.
The $2,300, he said, is being saved
until other money available runs
out.
Boudreaux said the purpose of
saving the money given to the
Village Green Emergency Fund is
to have funds available during
summer school for the victims. He
believes the financial burdens on
the people affected by the explo-
sion will be hardest felt after the
spring semester.
Money in the fund, which is
handled by the financial aid of-
fice, has come primarily from stu-
dent organizations but was started
by concerned citizens in the com-
munity. The SGA and SRA are
two of the contributors.
Boudreaux said each of the 16
students was given $186, and the
money would not have to be paid
back. Two student athletes.
because of NCAA regulations,
had to be turned down.
Vice Chancellor for Student
Life Elmer Meyer said a total of
52 students were displaced by the
explosion.
Boudreaux urged any student
who lived in Village Green and
was affected by the blast to come
by the financial aid office if they
needed money.
�y STANLEY LEAKY
PaaJ Naso, pictured above, b raaaiag agaiaat Tory Rasao for SGA
presMeat ia the March 30 eteeuoa.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
if you or your organization
woula like to have an item
panted in the announcement
column please type ,t on an an
ncvncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian m care of
�� production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Buildmq Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd wed paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge tor an
tments but space is often
iited Therefore we cannot
IT an tee flint your announce
�� will run as long as you
v anl ana suggest that you do not
. solely on fh,s column tor
PI Wicity
The deadi me �or an
nouncemenfs is 3 p m Monday
rOl tho Tuesday paper and 3
P Itl Wednesday y for the Thurs
"iv paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
w ill Be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
'oartments
BIOLOGY CLUB
There win be an ECU Biology
CLUb Meeting Monday March
n i8i in bn itea at30 p m
Spring Elections and the upcom
ng CANCAS trip will be on the
Menaa Members please attend
BACK TOTHE BIBLE
e' s get bacK to the Bible1 in
� ormal Bible discussions Mens
1 30 Tuesday night 110 Belli
Dorm Womens 7 30 Thursday
night, 21? Mendenhall
Everyone is welcome1
ZETA BETATAU
The Little Sisters of Zeta Beta
Ta. are ready to party with the
f-other s this Saturday night
S (V3 until 1 00 at the Moose
oage Be tnere and be ready
to rock and roll Luau Style
There will be a little sister
meting at 8 00 Thursday night in
'he basement of Umstead
1 rm! Be There! Aloha'
EASTER CARNATION
SALE
Coth.ng ana Textiles
SOciaion will have an Easter
la'ia'ion sale on March Nth
ana 30th in front ot the Student
Suopv Store Come buy one for
a 'riena
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
A three part worshop offered
a' no cost by the University
Counseling Center Thursday
March 31, April 7 and U All
"M ee sessions will be conducted
from 3 pm 4 pm 305 Wr.ght An
"ex 75"6661i The workshop
ft ' focus on help in numbers
I s'ingo'sh between their asser
tive aggressive and non
assertive behaviors Par
�lopants can learn how to ex
press themselves directly ano
openiv ano respond to interper
sonai Situations m a manner
Ahich neither compromises in
dividual beliefs nor offends
others Please call counseling
center for registration
CADP
"There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro
gram 4 15 Thursday at
Menoenhai; Student Center
Room 247
RECALL DRUG
The pam reliever Zomax, is
being temporarily withdrawn by
McNeill Laboratories for
relabeling purposes concerning
the possibility of allergic reac
tions Any containers ot the drug
obtained from the Student
Health Center should be return
ed to the Pharmacy at the
Center Please do not take
anymore ot the drug If you Ob
tamed the drug from a drug
store please return to the place
of purchase You will be reim
bursed the purchase price of the
tablets by the place ot purchase
KYF
The Kings Youth Fellowship
will have its next meeting on
Monday, March 28 at 8 00 PM in
MSC room 233 There will be a
time of Bible study and
fellowship followed by
refreshments
WZMB
Heavy metal music can be
heard on WZMB during Keith
Mitchells Electric Ramvbw
Show The Electric Rainbow
Radio Show can be heard from 3
to 6 pm on Friday and from 12 to
6 am on Saturday night This
album special on Friday at 4 00
will be the brand new Pink
Floyd aalbum The Final Cut"
Saturday Keith Mitchells
album special will be The
Tygers ot Pan Tang at 2 am. and
it's entitled Spellbound For
maximum pleasure don't miss
it
PLANT SALE
The ECU Biiogy Club is hav
mq a plant sale at the Biology
Jept Greenhouse Thursday
March 31 from 7 30 am 1 00
p m and Fnoay April 1 trom
9 00 1' 00 a m Everybody
Welcome1 I
MARSHALL
APPLICATIONS
Persons interested in applying
tor Marchall may do so m 228
Mendenhall Student Center A
3 09 grade average is required
and awouid like tor you to be a
lunior at the end of spr.ng 83
semester
HOW DO YOU
SPENDYOUR TIME
l know you waste at ieast one
hour and a half during the week
Why not instead use 'har time to
Benefit yourself by attending in
fer varsity on Aeonesday nites
a' 6 30 m Biology 102 it is a time
oi teaching ana fellowship
ATTORNEY
GENERAL
Appi,cations are now be.ng ac
cepted tor the position of
Attorney General of the Student
Government Association In
terested students should apply
at the Student Government
Association office. Room 228
Menaenhaii by March 29
SCEC
Student Council for Excep
t.onal Children is having Special
Educators from Fort Bragg
School System New Hanover
County School System and other
school systems They will be
discussing iob opportunities,
their own system, and interview
tips Come 10m us Monday.
March 26 m 129 Speight at 4 00
It will be very beneficial
SPRING ZING WING
DING FLING THING
The ATTIC presents the 5tf
annual SPRING ZING WING
DING FLING THING on Thurs
day March 24fh with States
GIRLS you get in FREE till
10 30 GUYS 99 all night
There will be HAPPY HOUR
PRICES an best of all a KAP
PA SlG CHUG OFF For more
details caM 752 5543
PHOTOS
For your sake and others,
have your picture taken for the
ECU Yearbook! You may order
pictures it you want but at least
have it made so you can always
be remembered as having been
here
FRISBEE
The ECU frisbee club invites
everyone to come out and see
some of the best ultimat frisbee
to be played on the east coast
this year The Natural Light
Ultimax flying disc tournament
is this weekend, March 26 and
27, behind the Allied Health
Bldg The first games will begin
at 11 00 come out and support
the IRATESI The team plays on
Tues and Thurs at the bottom of
College Hill at 400 Club
meetings are Monday nights,
8 00, rm 248 Mendenhall
Anyone interested is more than
welcome to check it out
BEST BODY CONTEST
Are you a KNOCK OUT? If so.
why not enter the Best Body
Contest sponsored by NAACP to
be held on April 22 at 8 00 in
Memorial Gym First and Se
cond place prizes will be award
ed For more information, call
757 3340 or 752 8568 Deadline for
entries is April 1
COCAINE AND
MARIJUANA
INTERVIEW
Will pay $10 tor 30 minute in
ferview with ECU student who
uses cocaine at least once a
week Contents of the iterview
will be used in a forthcoming
text ANONYMITY
GUARANTEED NO NAMES
PLEASE If interested call Dr
Chenoweth at 757 6431 between
3 5 pm on Tuesday or Thursday
Will pay $10 for 30 minute in
terview with ECU student who
uses marijuana 3 4 times a
week Contents of the interview
will be used m a forthcoming
text ANONYMITY
GUARANTEED NO NAMES
PLEASE If interested, call Dr
Chenoweth at 757 6431 between
1 3 pm on Tuesday or Thursday
CAREER CHOICE
The Strong Campbell Interest
Inventory is offered every Tues
day at 4 PM in 305 Wright An
nex when school is in session
with the exceptions ot examma
tion period and registration
day This is available to ail
stuoents at no cost No formal
registration is required
TAXES
Volunteers from the ECU Ac
counting Society and the Na
tional Association of Accoun
tants will be m the mam lobby of
Mendenhall Student Center to
help individuals prepare fax
returns from 4 to 7 pm each
Tuesday in March, and
Tuesdays and Thursdays in
April through April 15
AMBASSADOR
SCHOLARSHIP
The Past Presidents club of
the ECU Alumni Association is
offering a scholarship to an Am
bassador in order to express
their deep appreciation for the
vast amount of volunteer ser
vice that the ECU Ambassadors
contribute to the progress and
welfare of East Carolina Univer
sity. The recipient must be an
ECU student who is a member in
good standing of the ECU Am
bassadors and must be of such
classification as to be a senior in
the fall semester of 1983 Ap
plications may be picked up in
the TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center Applications should be
completed and turned m by
April 1, 1983
BAHAI MEETING
The ECU Banal Association
will meat m Mendenhall
snackbar Tuesday, from 11:00
until noon. Bahai's believe In the
onanass of mankind, the oneness
of God, and the essential
oneness of all the world's major
religions You are cordially in
vited to attend For more infor
mation call 752 4483 or 752 1018
WHEELCHAIR
ATHLETICS
The 1983 Southern States
Regional Wheelchair Games
will be held on April 29 and 30 at
the University of North Carolina
at Charlotte Events include ar
chery, track and field, swimm
ing, pentathlon, weightlifting,
slalom and table tennis
Students wishing to participate
will need to meet qualifying
standards for events Par
ticipants are classified accor
ding to levels of ability For
details contact Dr Dave Porret
ta at 757 6441
SAM
The Society for the Advance
ment of Management will meet
on Thursday March 24 in Rawl
104 at 4 00 Guest speaker Mr
Don Barham, Vice President of
Personnel with National Spmn
mg m Washington, DC, will
speak on Quality Circles m
Management Everyone is in
vited to attend
IRS ADVISORY
COUNCIL
APPICATIONS
Now s your chance to recom
mend policies, suggest new ac
tivities programs and bee me
involved with the operation ot
your intramural recreational
services program! Applications
are being accepted through
April 8 for the positions of coun
cil president and council
representatives The Advisory
Council includes a represen
tative from each ot the par
ticipation divisions fraternity,
sorority, residence hall ta
representative is included tor
each of the three campuses
total of 3 residence hall
representatives), club-depart
ment and independent off
campus Principal duties of the
Advisory Council include recom
mendaf i on of
policies procedures for iRSpro
grams services, reviewing
disciplinary matters and ad
visding the IRS staff of student
concerns
Application forms are
available m 204 Memorial Gym
All interested students are en
couraged to apply not later than
the Apni e deadline
1� 1Nimr
CLASSIFIED ADS VAii �� kxW Aa, AatlalfanPfaS
us a saparate thtwt of patw if � . Z4- 1
rw irwv mwt nissn. i nara or m t �r � �� units par lina. Each tBtttr, punc- f. . t bat J mmm kern ti�a.
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nyphenato words properly. Loavo space at and of lino if word doesn't tit. No ads w�M be ac- cepted over the phono W j reserve the right to reiect any ad. All ads must bo prepaid. Eadote j 75� per line or fractioa of a ttac. Please print IcfiWyt Use capital and f lower case In ten �etnralo THE EAST CABOUNIAN f office by J.Pt Taesday befate 1 Woaaaoaay paMiaiina. 1 1 1 1







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CAR WASH
When was the last time you
aw the original color of your
ar? By letting the Spring
Pledge class of Gamma Sigma
Sigma Sorority wash your car
for a donation of $2.00. you can
help a paralyzed foster child
(and increase your gas mileage
by removing the lag of all that
extra weight!) it will be open
March 26 trom 10 am to 4 pm at
the Bypass Shell station on 101
W Greenville Rd
SOULS
Souls meeting will be held on
Thursday. March 24 at 7 00 p.m.
in 221 Mendenhall Committee
meeting will be at 6 00 p.m.
Everyone should attend All
organizations should have so
meone present
Miss Souls Pageant will be
held on Sunday, March 27 at 6 00
p m in 244 at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Ticket are on sale
for $1 50 in Room 255 Fleming or
can be purchased at door
SILENT DINNER
Hi friends, we will have Silent
Dinner this Thursday night.
March 24, 1982 at Marathon,
6 00 p m It is sponsored the Sign
Language CLub If you come,
you'll have a great time
STOP THE KILLING
Today i Thursat noon the
ECU Committee on Central
America will be holding a one
hour vigil for peace m Central
America We ask that the U S
stop sending arms to El
Salvador and Guatemala At
6:50 P.M we will be holding a 30
minute candlelight vigil on the
steps of the Pitt County Cour
thouse in memory of El
Salvador s Archbishop Oscar
Romero who was assismated
three years ago today He spoke
for peace he died through
violence For more information
call 752 4216 or 758 4906
INTERVIEWING
WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and
Placement Service in the Blox
ton House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you in
developing better interviewing
skills for use m your iob search
March 22, 1983 Tuesday at 4 00
p m and March 24, )9�3 Thurs
day 2 00 p m A film and
discussion of interviewing
through the Career Planning
and Placement Service will be
shared
PRC CLUB MEETING
Tuesday night at 7.00 - 244
Mendenhall Elections for fall
semester officers will be
discussed and also a guest
speaker will be present Please
come to support your club
AOM BEST LEGS
AOfl is presenting a best legs
contest to be held in front of the
Student Store. Photographs are
being taken NOW call the AOI l
house TODAY and make your
appointment
STAN LANDERS
ECU'S own Stan Landers will be
signing autographs Wednesday
m the second floor bathroom at
Mendenhall from 2 to 4 pm Br
ing a pen. paper will be prove
ed
PRIESTTOSPEAK
Former Campus Chaplain Fr
Charles Muihoilaid will be
speaking about his recent trip to
Central America at the Baptist
Student Center at 7 30 pm
tonight (Thursday) The public
is invited
JUMP ROPE FOR THE
HEART EQUIPMENT
The Equipment has arrived
Jump ropes. T shirts and Warm
up suits are here Wind breakers
and prizes are on the way The
date is April 23 The place is
Mmges Coliseum
ASPA
American Society for Persor
nel Administrators will hold its
83 (4 elections on April 6 at 3 pm
in Room 207, Rawls All in
terested individuals wanting to
hold an office or become part of
ASPA. contact Brad Edwards or
Dr Tomklewicz Needed are
new and old members to help
shape ASPA s progresive
future To do your part get in
voivad and become an officer
andor member ASPA is ready
for you! Are you ready to be part
of ASPA?
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed for Art Depart
ment self help positions are
available for nude modeling at
$5 03 per hour PLeese see the
following teachers Ray
Elmore, Tren Gordley. Davy
Davenport, Was Crawiev, Betsy
Ross, Michael Voors.
S. R A
Escorts are needed for the
Escort Service Anyone in
terested in being an escort
please contact your dorm direc
tor If you are a dorm resident of
if you live off campus contact
the SGA office
IFCPAGENT
The Miss ifc Pagent is to be
held on Apni 25th at 7 00 p m
Applications need to be turned m
by 5 00 p m on Wed Apni 6fh
So all you Greeks need to pick
your BEST BABES NOW
PSICHI
Psi Chi presents topics to help
the listener to open her his mmd
to many different areas in the
field of Psychology On April 5.
Tuesday, in Room 129. Speight,
at 3 pm it will be no different
Psi Chi proudly presents Dr T
Durham His topic will be about
Masturbation Come and clear
up any questions you may have
on this topic This lecture is open
to ail
PRIME TIME
New location w.tti fun
fellowship and training, spon
sored by Campus Crusade tor
Christ, m the Nursing Building
Room 101 Thursday 79 p.m
Everyone is invited
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers of Pi Kappa Ph.
recently had elections of officers
tor fall semester Those electyed
to iiold office were David Bran
non Archon Brian McGinn
Vice Archon Exec. Ken Sigmon
Vice Archon Fundraismg Bm
Bullock Treasurer, Scott
Smith, Secretary. Mike
Sfrother Warden, Craig King.
Historian and Bill Austin
Chaplain Congratulations to the
Pi Kappa Phi A soffbaii tourna
ment this past weekend Also the
Beta Lambda pledge class of P.
Kappa Phi would like to an
nounce that this Saturday
March 26 there will be a car
wash at McDonaids's on loth
Street from 9 00 a m until The
Charge is only $2 00 Supper
Beach 83 ,s coming up
LECTURE
The East Caro'na J .�-i �,
Department of Fc(
Languages and L 'ea'jrt t
pleased to announce he adanj
Strategic m'e'ac'c-
Robert j Di Pietrc Ci
Department of Languages �
Literatures the U v�'5 �, g
Delaware Professc d P rs
and .nternat,onaiy ioow- m
pert on anguage a - a
methodology spea� -y
April at 11 am in Roc BC � y
the Media Center ioca - �
basement of Joyner rr,
mew annex
NA
There will be a "ee " ot
Narcotics nnanymom
night at 7 00 at Me"3e-r�
dent Center Room :4
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus commumn
since 1925
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday during the sum
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for
and by the students of East
Carolina university
Subscription Rate: $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU. Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The East
Carolinian, Old South
Building, ECU Greenville,
NC 27834
3�f
Telephone 757-464, 6347,
b


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ATTIC
752-7303
C
'L
THURSDAY. MARCH 24th
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Featuring the STATES an ;
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 24, 19�3

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LECTURE
MUK versify
tmenl o� Foreign
�e'a'ures s
( "v lecture
ntwoction by
P ffTC Cnirrn�n
� - aviagei �oa
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. �xswn ex
,g� "eacrdrvg ana
speak on 1
l m n Room BO 4 of
. rntef 'Of a'ed In 'he
-� ver L'brary
NA
re a meet.og of
. �ort Tsoui Sunaav
� 1 V3fitijll Stb
- ion
, . . . - � � � ���v4v��.�v.a
2-7303
tOAY MASCH 24th
ual 5 ' ' �
MATES an i
Plus
TE s UTAH I
lowed By
HA VS BOSTON
OLLEGE
ISAT
SUN
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ER BROWN
ms Don't Forget
NslON IN MARCH
� .����
IN A HOBIE
DVENTURE TRIP
'OUR SUMMER
tress-challenge-
j the Outer
It Carolina.
25 Complete,
Register Now
- to son
� � tooi Krliwlriw
Camp Ooo l��
?

U.il y OfJaH 24
MO
Nightclub
hispot & eatery.
on Vickers&WRQR's
1:00am
8:00
� Vickers & WRQR's
No Admission till 8:00
ur 4:30-7:00pm
iueres
9:00-1:00am
r0-9:00
ibers & Guests only
hinge and gameroom.
anting (Cafe) m
1104 N Mtmonil Dr.
cross from rrattte Airport
ti "5-000? for ddmo�sl t�ifor��rto-
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Evelyn Wood's new RD2 reading system makes it
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Evelyn Wood works � over 1 million people,
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Locotio Ho I
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Q
Introductory
�197S EVELYN
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l�lil Ti t� �r �" ������� � ���





aUl? Eaat (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller. ��. w0,
Mike Hughes, wo�ait :�r
Waveri y Merritt. xworo Cindy Pleasants. sporuedao,
Scott Lindley. ����, Mo��r Greg Rideout. ,�,a
At i Afrashteh. cmi vamvtr Steve Bachner. �������,�( ���
Stephanie Groon. cw-toiioii.wa���r Juliana Fahrbach. s,w, �
Ci ay Thornton, mrf-i�� Todd Evans, ����
March 24. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
SGA Elections
Tory Russo Our Top Choice
It's SGA election time again.
Ah, that sure brings back
memories none of which are par-
ticularly fond.
Last year's month-long circus
was enough to turn any stomach,
what with its randomly-thrown
allegations and charges, its in-
herent mud-slinging and muckrak-
ing. One might have thought the
presidency of the United States �
let alone East Carolina University
� was on the line. In a word, last
year's SGA elections (namely, that
of president) were an embarrass-
ment.
But embarassing as they were,
they also exemplified the tradition
for ECU politics. Unfortunately,
last year's fiasco wasn't unique to
last year. And maybe, just maybe,
we have the same election crapola
to look forward to this year.
Most of us hope otherwise,
though. Most of us realize that
Greenville, North Carolina, is a
world away from Washington,
D.C. And most of us also realize
that the annual escapade the SGA
elections have become in recent
years only serves to illustrate that
students may not be capable of
governing themselves.
Perhaps this year will be dif-
ferent. Perhaps this will be the year
when student politics at ECU
reverts back to its original � and
intended � form. But that remains
to be seen.
� � �
This year, The East Carolinian
breaks its own recent tradition of
lending no verbal support to any
one candidate. In short, we en-
dorse SGA presidential candidate
Tory Russo, a junior computer
science major from Greensboro.
Russo's political involvement at
ECU illustrates, but by no means
exhausts, the contribution he has
made to his fellow students in re-
cent years. He has also involved
himself in most of the other facets
of student life.
He is currently serving as SRA
president and chairman of the Stu-
dent Union Board of Directors. In
the past, he has served as House
Council vice president and presi-
dent, SRA representative and has
sat on a university ADHOC com-
mittee.
He was a founding member of
"Pirate Walk the campus escort
service which went into effect
earlier this year and was involved
in the Pirate Club's "Seige of
'83 a special Pitt County fund-
raising drive.
Russo is a proponent of pro-
gress, something ECU desperately
needs. But while he advocates wor-
thwhile change, Russo also
recognizes the need to maintain
other worthwhile campus pro-
grams.
As far as making specific cam-
paign promises, however, Russo
adheres more to a peripheral view
of the position of SGA chief ex-
ecutive. He doesn't conveniently
claim to support any particular in-
terest group but rather promises to
maintain a responsible attitude in
that capacity by increasing student
input and re-opening studentSGA
communication channels.
His past and current contribu-
tions to ECU speak for themselves.
And unlike many of his
predecessors, Russo's SGA slate is
clean. He is, in fact, the breath of
fresh air ECU has been been chok-
ing for.
� � �
In the SGA vice presidential
race, we support Lindsey
Williams, whose campaign
"platform" and general attitudes
toward that office correspond
favorably with those of Russo.
Simply stated, she encourages an
increase in interaction and com-
munication between all university
groups and organizations. Unlike
some others who have sought (or
are seeking) that position, she
views herself as representative
not maverick. Her efforts, com-
bined with those of Tory Russo,
would work to ECU's benefit �
not to maintain the all too familiar
SGA nonchalance but to provide
ECU with the leadership and
representation it needs and
deserves.
� � �
We encourage all students to
vote in the SGA elections on
Wednesday, March 30. Realistical-
ly, your vote is incredibly impor-
tant.
We also encourage the can-
didates running for SGA office to
remember that the positions they
seek are intended as seats of
representation, not thrones of per-
sonal glory. Keep your intentions
in good faith, and the respect and
cooperation you seek will be easily
won.
STOP COMPLAINING ,0'TO��. HAVE YOUNOTICEP HOW BUSINESS
HAS PICKEP UP LATELY 2,
� � �
Perhaps More People Ought To Listen
When R. Nader Speaks
By PAT O'NEILL
During one of his many appearances
on campus this week, consumer activist
Ralph Nader was referred to as "a true
inspiration Similar comments of
praise came from most of those who
heard this modern day prophet give his
audiences deep insights into everything
from safety air bags in automobiles to
the need to reverse the nuclear arms
race.
Nader is a true warrior for justice, a
David working to tumble the Goliath of
corporate violence at the root of
American society.
"It is important Nader emphasized
Monday evening, "that consumers not
allow corporations to shape the
economy. The risks of consumer inac-
tion are getting bigger and bigger.
Nader recognizes that most
Americans are, in fact, consumers, but
his real message is one of social justice
and human protection. A brilliant man,
Nader might well have used his Harvard
law degree to the ends of fame and for-
tune. Instead, he opted for "success on-
ly dedicating his life to working for
the people.
In a softspoken, yet firm, way, Nader
informs people of what they're up
against in a world where profits come
first and the health and safety of citizens
nearly last. "Corporate crime takes
more lives, damages more people than
street crime he said, inviting anyone
interested to join him in his justice work.
Get your moral juices stirred up, he said.
Nader had a special message for
students. He called on them to take a
lead in the effort for justice. He criticiz-
ed the efforts of big corporations that
recruit thousands of students into
government and defense-related jobs
that offer litle benefit for the masses.
He called on school administrators
and students to organize alternative
career days that welcome non-
government businesses and organiza-
tions on campus. Students are program-
ed to think that they have to go into
business administration to succeed,
Nader said. "Our country was not
founded by business majors
Nader said that many curricula
generally offer a narrow choice of
courses. "You'll see plenty of courses
offered on crime in the streets,1 h
noted. "How many courses (arc (ant
on crime in the corporate suites0'
Nader's suggestions were, indeed i
sightful � right on the money But hi
visit is over now, and my big question is
�'Where's the leadership?"
Who's going to take the lead
ECU's campus so that students en
begin to follow through on Nader - -
portant suggestions? Students can do
alone, and they're not supposed to. Ob
teachers and administrators are . ft
sumers, too. It's up to all of us to work
together for justice, but facn
members and administrators have a
special duty to guide students a.oru
road to increased knowledge and
awareness.
Let's begin by adding more creH
to courses, with a greater emphasis on
citizen action and social justice � wrj
academic discipline can be taut vh
these issues in mind. Our deaoenq
needs citizen input to flourish; college
students need faculty input to fUMrttfc,
and all of us need to pool our talon
our world is going to survive.
Announcing My Candidacy
One More For The Road
Campus Forum
Mike Hughes
Running From SGA Presidency
Being that the next page is already full
(I'm sure we all agree page 5 is pretty
much "full"), and being that I didn't
decide to run for sure until about an
hour ago, I would like to take this space
to jot down a few of my own campaign
promises and platform theories. Thus,
the following are the things I see as
ECU's direst needs in the upcoming
year:
First of all, I just want everyone to
know that I support the arts. I don't
really know what that means, but judg-
ing from the platforms of each of my
humble competitors, it seems like the
right thing to say. Anyway, I'm all for
art. In fact, if elected, 1 would personal-
ly see to it that nude sculptures of
Chancellor John Howell and Coach Ed
Emory � ECU living legends � were
placed on the Mall, where they could be
enjoyed by students of all shapes, sizes
and ethnic backgrounds.
Secondly, I'm all for SGA funding of
the campus bus shelters. But unlike my
"worthy" opponents, I don't think we
need more shelters. I think we need to
invest our time and money into those
we've got. Maybe the addition of a video
game or two, so that while students are
sitting and waiting for the buses, they
could be pumping more money into the
SGA. After all, pumping money is what
student government's all about, right?
Right.
Thirdly, and most importantly, I
would work closely with the Student
Union Major Attractions Committee in
booking big-name acts for Minges Col-
iseum. All it would take is a little fast
talk, hard work and cold cash, and 1
could have Slim Whitman and the
Ernest Angley Singers begging for a date
in Greenville.
Fourthly (what a word "fourthly"),
I think the ECU escort service, as wor-
thwhile as it may be, should be reassess-
ed. The fact is, it's just not being used to
its capacity. But you can't really blame
the girls. If they call the hotline, not
knowing who the hell's coming over,
they're taking a big chance. And per-
sonally, I know I wouldn't want to be
seen walking around campus late at
night with some fat, ugly slob named
Burt who doesn't brush his teeth "for
religious reasons even if he were a nice
guy.
Fifthly (a hard word to pronounce.
but consistent), I endorse a campuswsde
boycott of classes on Mondays and
Fridays. Most of us are pretty much
hung-over on these days anyway, and
it's time the administration realizes ��
can't be expected to learn if we can't see
or hear correctly. Furthermore, curren:
statistics prove that 1 already have the
support of nearly half the student body
Sixthly, and finally, if elected. I pn
mise to maintain the fine tradition of
ECU politics which has been in existence
ever since I can remember. As your SGA
president, I vow to pick up my mail once
a week, my check once a month and the
SGA secretary once in a while.
Editor's Note: Unortunatefy, M9
Hughes cannot run for the office of
SGA president fa job he 'd ' 'really love
to have) because he is a figment of he
own warped imagination and as suck
doesn 7 have an activitv card.
East Carolina's Best Voters Stay Informed
I want to take this opportunity to
thank you for the service you provide
to our campus. Apathy has been
pointed out as a problem among the
students here at ECU. I believe the
main reason students are apathetic is
because they lack information on the
issues that affect them. As a direct
result of your coverage of the SGA fall
elections, the turnout at the polls in-
creased more than 70.7 percent. As
elections chairperson, I wanted to
make sure credit was given where it is
due. I appreciate your article on my be-
ing chosen to fill the position again,
and I look forward to your coverage of
the elections as we move toward the
30th.
Joy Wilkins
Elections Chairperson
Sophomore, Business
Their Man, Mertz
Over the years that I have known
Tim Mertz, I have gotten to know him
very well. I know that he is for the
students. Believe me, Mertz is not run-
ning for vice president just to put it on
his resume like many of the candidates
who do run. So vote Mertz; he will do
his job.
Jane Braunlich
Senior, Home Ec.
It's SGA election time once again,
and I want to get my say in for the can-
didate who I feel is the best qualified
for SGA vice president. Tim Mertz has
the experience and the knowhow to do
the job. He is a former legislator and
SGA election chairman, and to me,
that's one of many good reasons to
vote for Mertz.
Vincent N. DiRenzo
Graduate, Geology
ECU Gives Him The Blues
To whom it may concern:
Well, in the first place you might call
it a question of priorities. A putting of
first things first, of establishing the
pecking order of what is important and
what is not important at a university.
And Lord knows that for the
undergraduate who has spent four
years or more in docile lockstep up the
educational ladder of success to where
he or she has finally earned the
privilege of being graduated from the
university, that is a day of remem-
brance and celebration.
The student's father and mother will
get to attend this most auspicious occa-
sion, but not the boyfriend or
girlfriend; not the brothers and sisters,
who were denied so that you could
persevere in your studies; not grandpa
or grandma, seeing the first generation
of their family progress beyond secon-
dary school. And when you question
why, you are told, "Because the grass
grows all around, all around. The
green grass grows all around
So, there are your priorities. It is
more important that the grass on the
football field be undisturbed than that
adequate space be allocated for the
graduation ceremony.
Maybe it is just as well. Just imagine
if you were a graduate student receiv-
ing a master of arts degree in educa-
tion, fully knowing that the school of
education certifying the degree is unap-
proved by the National Council for Ac-
creditation in Teacher Education, an
organization that oversees teacher
training programs in the United States.
Thank goodness it only applies to the
United States and does not apply to
Bangladesh and Costa Rica, where
your interests lie.
Once again, it is only a matter of
priorities. It is much more important to
keep all vehicles neatly divided into
sheep and goats, lions and lambs, and
if the lion should presume to lie down
with the lamb, off with his head. I
mean, if a registered student should
park in a visitor space, even though he
or she pay the required meter fee, off
with his head! Maybe it is a higher
priority to keep the different categories
of vehicles suitably segregated than it is
to keep a School of Education ac-
credited.
Fiddle dee dee. I'll worry about that
tomorrow.
DelbertJ. Cross
Graduate, Education
Editorial Right On The
Money (Or Lack Thereof)
On behalf of the faculty and staff of
the School of Education and the
students of this campus who are
preparing for careers in public educa-
tion, I want to thank you for your fine
editorial which appeared in your
March 15th issue. Your comments in
relation to the needs of public educa-
tion are right on target. Thank you for
caring about those who care.
?
- mmt m �� mmmt
��- 'mum
Ton Ru?
Candidate For SG
My name is Tory Ri
Greensboro. N.C anj
puter science major 1
the office of president
Government Associate
active participant in al
dent life. 1 am cum
president of the Sti
Association; r.asrmarl
Union Board ol Direc
recentlv plaved an inst
the creation of "1 I
1 am running I
ing about greatly net
change in areas which!
overlooked in the I
ing and eer-changin
progressive attitude
deal with thee ;
pa
I fee! we must mi
issues 1 have I
paign. They are
� To pro
within the office of
maintainii -
with the student -
� To provide
interaction, comn I
ing rclai i
dent organ
� T w i �
provide the I
F
i
Linde
Candidate For
My name
junior in marc
for vice pr
1 am no
for the Studer -
am an active men
Board and am
with the Seige I '
the co-ordinal
If 1 am ele.
seat. I will prorm
between SGA
tions. 1 feel it is ex1
keep cloe corami
the organizat:
be represented j
the funding
enefits he I
SGA is for the stuj
that is for the gq
SGA will l �
1 will work c
Government T:a
mode of trar
evening from th
various sororiti
apartment are
lageous to both
nmunitv.
1 will promote
certs � - '
dance recitals.
and other type
meaningful
students.
Thevicepresidl
and assisting th
fOf the student
and will be an
athle:u boa
SGA






umi
Hi
tf
W HOW BU5NB5
SGA Candidate Platforms
Listen
Speaks
ffercd on crime in the streets he
'How man courses (are there)
me in the corporate suites?"
Nader's suggestions were, indeed, in-
ful t on the money. But his
isil is over no. and m big question is:
ere's the leadership'1"
A - to take the lead on
campus so that students can
to follow through on Nader's im-
� s iggestions? Students can't doit
we, and they're not supposed to. Our
arc. jciirn;straiors are con-
. It's up to all of us to work
istice, but faculty
tnd administrators have a
it) to guide students along the
eased knowledge and
tegii b) adding more creativity
.r�e with a greater emphasis on
ion and social justice � every
iisciplinc can be taught with
lies in mind. Our democracy
n input to flourish; college
lents need faculty input to flourish,
ii! of us need to pool our talents if
vorld is going to survive.
Road
with some fat, ugly slob named
Burl uho doesn't brush his teeth "for
Ugious reasons e en if he were a nice
ithly (a hard word to pronounce,
consistent). I endorse a campuswide
of classes on Mondays and
idays Most of us are prettv much
Her on these days anyway, and
me the administration realizes we
be expected to learn if we can't see
or hear correctly. Furthermore, current
1 Prove that I already have the
support of nearly halt the student body.
Sixthly, and finally, if elected, I pro-
mise to maintain the fine tradition of
�olitics which has been in existence
since 1 can remember. As your SGA
esident, I vow to pick up my mail once
a week, my check once a month and the
SGA secretary once in a while
.Editor's Note: Unfortunately, Mike
Wughes cannot run for the office of
loC-4 president (a job he'd "really" love
V "ave, because he is a figment of his
town arped imagination and as such,
idoesn't have an activity card.
d
)i vehicles suitably segregated than it is
P keep a School of Education ac-
r edited.
Fiddle dee dee. I'll worry about that
morrow.
Delber J. Cross
Graduate, Education
Editorial Right On The
loney (Or Lack Thereof)
On behalf of the faculty and staff of
he School of Education and the
ludents of this campus who are
fepanng for careers in public educa-
Pn, I want to thank you for your fine
litonal which appred in your
larch 15th issue. Your comments in
Nation to the needs of public educa-
n are right on target. Thank you for
nng about those who care.
Richard Warner
Dean, School of Education
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
March 24. 1983 Page 5
Running For The Presidency.
Tory Russo
Candidate For SGA President
My name is Tory Russo; I am from
Greensboro, N.C and I am a com-
puter science major. I am running for
the office of president of the Student
Government Association. 1 am a very
active participant in all phases of stu-
dent life. I am currently serving as
president of the Student Residence
Association; chairman of the Student
Union Board of Directors, and 1 have
recently played an instrumental role in
the creation of "Pirate Walk
1 am running for this position to br-
ing about greatly needed constructive
change in areas which I feel have been
overlooked in the past. ECU is a grow-
ing and ever-changing community. A
progressive attitude must be taken to
deal with these changes and growing
pains as they occur.
1 feel we must move ahead on the
issues I have focused upon for my cam-
paign. They are as follows:
� To provide responsible leadership
within the office of president, while
maintaining an open communication
with the student body.
� To provide for better and or more
interaction, communication and work-
ing relations between the various stu-
dent organizations.
� To work with the Student Union to
provide the best possible entertain-
ment, special attractions and extra-
curricular activities possible.
� To sevice as many off-campus
housing areas as possible in hopes of
alleviating some of the campus parking
problems.
� To insure that "Pirate Walk the
rape-prevention program, will be pro-
vided for and remain active well into
the future. As it is the cornerstone of a
new progressive attitude taken by the
SGA to protect the well-being of its
students and create an atmosphere of
cooperation and unity within the
university community.
� To find ways to increase the
availability of "student loans" to those
in need.
� To increase security and safety via
improved lighting in certain areas of
campus to deter potential crimes, such
as theft and assault.
1 feel my past record of student in-
teraction and involvement shows my
interest and willingness to serve the
students. The most recent are: SRA
president, 1982-83; chairman of the
Student Union Board of Directors,
1983; active member of the Media
Board, 1982-83; a founder of "Pirate
Walk 1982-83; involved with Pirate
Club's Seige of '83; served on SGA
cabinet, 1982-83.
My services to the university are not
limited to just this past year. They
range from serving as House Council
vice president and president, to serving
on a university ADHOC committee, to
serving as SRA representative during
my earlier years here at ECU.
With no disrespect or malice toward
my opponent, let it suffice to say that I
feel I am comparatively much more
qualified for the presidential position,
as my record speaks for itself.
Paul Naso
Candidate For SGA President
When dealing with the goals of a
university, the image it portrays should
be emphasized. My ultimate goal is to
enhance the image of the university. At
the moment, we are very well known
for our partying ability, and 1 think
that is great. However, I would like to
be known for our various departments
as well. Then, we would, indeed, be a
unique university. This is a long-term
project, and my objective for next year
is to take that first step.
A university is made up of various
smaller groups. Those groups, such as
the art school, music school, business
school, nursing school, SOULS, IFC
and Panhellenic, for example, are the
ultimate representative bodies of the
students. My objective is to give these
groups greater input into SGA.
SGA is the most influential student
organization on campus, and it has the
power to turn this university around.
However, SGA alone does not know
what's best for you, and 1 will be the
first to admit that I don't either. I
don't come to you with the answers to
the numerous problems this campus
faces; I come to you with a plan to find
them. What better way to have the
students' views represented than to in-
crease the voice of the groups that
represent them? If you can unify, then
you can come to a collective decision
that benefits the students as a whole.
I am currently on the SGA Ap-
propriations Committee, and the only
time the SGA gets to talk to these
groups is at those meetings. I don't feel
that you can properly know what the
needs of these groups really are in 15
minutes. I plan on bringing these
groups into more frequent contact with
SGA.
My second objective is to create pro-
per communication channels between
the SGA and the students themselves.
When people arc uninformed, they
become apathetic. Apathy has been a
problem here at ECU. I plan on work-
ing closely with The East Carolinian
and WZMB to better inform the
students as to what is going on.
I also plan to enhance communica-
tion through an information center.
This center would be expanding and
complementing the already-established
information centers and would serve as
an intermediary between these centers
and the students themselves.
As far as taking stands on issues, 1
openly support the Pirate Walk.
However, I feel that it should be ex-
panded. Currently, the physics depart-
ment has its own escort service. I want
to unify or at least have the right hand
know what the left hand is doing.
I also plan on having a questionaire
for the students to find out the
strengths and weaknesses of the escort
service. Moreover, I plan on having the
director submit a periodic report to the
SGA, something he currently does not
do.
1 also support the bus shelters, and 1
believe that we should continue to use
our own resources. We should con-
tinue to have the industrial technology
denartment build them, rather than
contract with some private company.
Too many people promise things
they really can't do. It's not that they
are lying as much as it is they just don't
realize their limitations. My promises
to you are achievable because they are
within my limitations. They are
realistic and much-needed. They can be
accomplished, and if I am elected, and
these objectives are realized, 1 will hae
done what many nave tried to do �
create a bond between the students and
the SGA. That's my reason for runn-
ing. Thank you for your time.
For The Vice Presidency
Lindsey Williams
Candidate For SGA Vice Pres.
My name is Lindsey Williams; I'm a
junior in marketing, and I'm running
for vice president of SGA.
I am now the publicity chairperson
for the Student Residence Association,
am an active member of the Media
Board and am assisting the Pirate Club
with the Seige of '83. Also, 1 am one of
the co-ordinators of Pirate Walk.
If I am elected to the vice president's
seat, 1 will promote public relations
between SGA and all other organiza-
tions. I feel it is extremely important to
keep close communication ties between
the organizations, so that they may all
be represented equally. 1 am in favor of
the funding of organizations such that
it benefits he student body in general;
SGA is for the students' use. Anything
that is for the good of the students,
SGA will assist.
I will work closely with the Student
Government Transit to establish a
mode of transportation in the late
evening from the downtown area to
various sororities, fraternities and
apartment areas. This would be advan-
tageous to both the students and the
community.
I will promote various types of con-
certs for the student body, such as
dance recitals, musical performances
and other types of enjoyable and
meaningful acts on behalf of the
students.
The vice president will be influencing
and assisting the president, speaking
for the student body on city council
and will be an active member on the
athletic board.
I am qualified for these duties in the
sense that 1 am familiar with the ac-
tivities of the athletic department, as
well as being an active member of this
campus.
David Futrell
Candidate For SGA Vice. Pres.
My name is David Futrell, and I am
a candidate for the office of SGA vice
president. I am a sophomore, majoring
in political science and am currently
serving as sophomore class vice presi-
dent. In the past, 1 have been actively
involved in the North Carolina Student
Legislature. 1 am not one to make lots
of campaign promises that I am not
able to keep. Also, I am not a smooth-
talking politician, but I do have some
issues that I feel will strongly benefit
the students and faculty of East
Carolina.
If elected SGA vice president,I
would make a commitment to help
communications between the SGA ex-
ecutives and the various groups and
organizations on campus. As vice
president, I would try wholeheartedly
to maintain the excellent relationship
between the vice president and the East
Carolina administration. 1 would like
to better the communications and rela-
tions between the SGA executives and
class officials.
As vice president, I will work for an
extended bus transit system that would
allow ECU students access to the
medical library. I would also like to see
more apartment students served by the
bus system.
As vice president, I would like to see
minority organizations such as SOULS
and the NAACP better represented. I
will support more bills for funding of
these minority organizations.
I will support the funding of fine arts
and bills that would allow all students
at ECU to enjoy the arts.
I would like to urge all students at
East Carolina University to vote on
March 30; your vote can make a dif-
ference. Vote David Futrell, SGA vice
president.
Tim Mertz
Candidate For SGA Vice. Pres.
My name is Tim Mertz. I have five
good reasons why you can't go wrong
with Mertz for vice president:
� Experience � I have been an SGA
legislator, SGA elections chairperson
and have served on the Rules and
Judiciary committees. I am the only
vice president candidate with real SGA
experience.
� Arts � I am a member of the Mar-
ching Pirates, and I believe the arts,
music and drama schools should con-
tinue to receive the same amount of
funding from the SGA.
� Referendums � I believe in a
campus-wide vote supported by the
SGA to have students decide major
issues (i.e fee increases).
� I believe that the SGA salaries are
too high and should be cut, including
that of the office of vice president.
� I am not afraid to speak out for
what I believe in. Thank you for your
support on Wednesday, March 30th.
i
v
F I
Elections Chairperson Joy Wilkins
Photo bv CINDY WALL
Other SGA Candidates
tor Cinov
SGA executive candidates (left to right) Paul Naso, Tony Rosso, Lindsey Williams, Tint Merta tad David Fatal.
Sarah Coburn
Candidate For SGA Secretary
My name is Sarah Coburn, and I am
a junior majoring in English and
minoring in psychology. During the
past year, I have had the privilege of
serving as your SGA secretary. Since I
am running unopposed, I would like to
take this opportunity to tell the student
body some of my plans for the coming
year.
In my opinion, my office, unlike the
other SGA executive offices, is func-
tional rather than political. According
to the SGA Constitution, my duties in-
clude taking minutes of all the
legislature meetings and making copies
available to members of the legislature
and the other executive officers. I also
handle, under the direction of the
speaker of the house, all of the official
correspondence of the legislature. I
perform the other clerical duties deal-
ing with the legislature and have a seat
on the Executive Council. As you can
see from this list, most of my duties are
concerned with the legislature. This
year, I have come in contact with many
students from many different
organizations and have found that
there are several problems that need to
be resolved.
Many groups that are just being
formed on campus encounter a lot of
problems in gaining recognition simply
because they aren't sure about how to
go about it. For these people, I plan to
make up some packets that will include
the steps involved in being recognized
by the SGA as well as the vice
chancellor for student life.
I also plan to include copies of the
SGA's rules for funding, the rules
governing fund-raising events on cam-
pus and how to have those events ap-
proved. These, along with other useful
materials, should eliminate many of
the problems faced by new groups.
At the first meeting of the
legislature, each legislator receives a
packet of materials that will be used
throughout the year. Among those ar-
ticles I place in these packets are some
dealing with the use of parliamentary
procedure. I plan to make up some ad-
ditional materials that define and fur-
ther explain some of the motions and
procedures, since many of the new
legislators are not familiar with
parliamentary procedure.
1 also plan to begin notifying the
groups funded by the SGA of any
changes that may be made in our fun-
ding procedures and explain how those
changes may affect them.
Another idea I am working on is the
possibility of a newsletter designed to
increase student awareness about the
actions of the SGA, the reasons behind
those actions and how the student body
may be affected by them.
In closing, 1 would like to thank The
East Carolinian for allowing us this
space to communicate with you, the
student body. I also thank you, the stu-
dent body, for your support of our ser-
vices, activities and programs. If you
have any questions or suggestions,
please feel free to contact me. 1 can be
reached through the SGA office at
757-6611, ext. 214. Thank you.
Becky Talley
Candidate For SGA Treasurer
My name is Becky Talley, and I am
running for re-election for the office oi
treasurer. I am a junior, pursuing a
B.S.A. degree in accounting.
Having been involved with student
government since my freshman year,
and having served as Fletcher dorm
representative, sophomore class presi-
dent, and presently holding the office
of treasurer, 1 have the knowledge of
student government to represent the
students' best interest.
I have enjoyed working for you in
the past year and will continue to serve
your best interest at all times.
i
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 24, 1983
Ground
Steam
�W811 Democ
One year ago the
term "Ground Zero"
was very familiar to
most people on the
ECU campus. For
two months students,
faculty members,
campus ministers, ad-
ministrators, in-
cluding the
chancellor, and Gov.
James B. Hunt were
involved an effort "to
broaden the spectrum
of the American elec-
torate involved in the
debate about nuclear
war
"Ground Zero"
was the title of the na-
tional effort based in
Washinton, D.C
that sought to inspire
Americans to begin to
consider the reasons
why a nuclear war
might occur, what
would happen if it did
and how could it be
prevented.
"It's an issue
(nuclear proliferation)
the public needs to
think about said
then acting ECU
chancellor John
How ell, "that falls in
the general catagory
of issues that need to
be discussed
The Ground Zero
events on campus
were two months in
the planning and
came to a peak during
the week of April 18
through 25 which was
proclaimed by Gov.
Hunt as "Ground
Zero Week" in North
Carolina.
The events of that
week, which reached
thousands of ECU
students through
classroom lectures,
debates, films and
news coverage, are
now history.
Two people who in-
strumental in bringing
Ground Zero Week to
ECU were Kirk
Welch, of
Washington, N.C
and John Gardner,
assistant to the Vice
Chancellor for Stu-
dent Life. (Gardner
later took a tem-
porary leave of
absence from his job
to work with Welch
fulltime on the
prevention of nuclear
war. Their effort end-
ed because of a lack
of financial support.
One year later,
perhaps slightly more
discouraged, both
Welch and Gardner
are still quite active in
the same "anti-nuke"
activities. Gardner is
still actively involved
in his fight to prevent
nuclear war and is at
present leading a
study group which is
examining a docu-
ment on the nuclear
arms question that
was prepared by the
U.S. Conference of
Catholic Bishops.
Both Gardner and
Welch were part of a
six-person delegation
that spoke with Gov.
Hunt on nuclear
weapons. At the time,
Hunt listened, but re-
mained very non-
commital on several
of the group's sugges-
tions.
"Hunt was very
guarded when he talk-
ed to us Gardner
said. "He asked what
he could do added
Welch. "Like every
other American
citizen, we told him to
educate himself on the
issues. Apparently he
has not done a great
deal of educating
himself, because in
speaking out against
the freeze he showed
that he doesn't know
much about the issue.
I think he had an op-
portunity to show
leadership, but he
chose not to
Gardner said that
the nuclear freeze
shouldn't be a par-
tisan issue. "It's a
shame to see people
pointing fingers in-
stead of examining
their consciences
Gardner said, making
a direct reference to a
recent statement from
the National Congres-
sional Club that critiz-
ed Hunt for suppor-
ting Ground Zero
Week last year.
"If James
Kilpatrick can come
out for it (the Freeze),
why should it be a
liability to any politi-
cian, liberal or conser-
vative?" Gardner
said. "His (Hunt's)
confusion is that he
thinks that any sup-
port for the freeze
translates to a lack of
support for national
defense Gardner
continued. "I don't
see why you can't sup-
port the freeze and
still be for a strong
national defense
"The spring of
1982 was a time of a
lot of awakening in
this country
culminating with the
June 12 Rally (an
anti-nuclear rally held
at the United Nations
in New York City)
Welch said. "That
was unprecedented
public awareness
Welch claims public
awareness has been
increasing on the
nuclear weapon's
issue for the last 18
months.
Gardner agrees
with Welch that there
is a greater awareness
on the part of some
people regarding this
"critical issue but,
he adds, that "no
great turn about" has
occurred in the last
year.
"This does not
mean it (Ground Zero
Week) was in vain
added Gardner.
"People like Henry
Kissinger are
publishing innovative
alternatives to
strategic defense aim-
ed at making real
arms control possi-
ble
Gardner also claims
that the nuclear arms
issue has been a
decisive factor in the
outcomes of some
elections.
"We saw a lot of
things happen
Welch said.
Topics that we
weren't able to talk
about in this part of
the country a year ago
because they were
considered un-
patriotic or com-
munist are now being
discussed in local
newspapers and from
church pulpits. Peo-
ple are questioning
the arms race
"1 felt we touched a
few minds on campus
during that week
Gardner said. "I hope
they in turn affected
other's opinions
Welch cautioned
that citizen apathy is
keeping the world
drifting "closer and
closer" to a nuclear
holocaust. "There
will be no peace until
there is justice
Welch said.
Elections For SRA April 6th;
Candidates To File By Monday
The Student
Residence Association
will hold its annual
elections for area
residence councils,
house councils and ex-
ecutive officers on
Wednesday, April 6,
with ballot boxes
placed in dormitory
lobbies on campus.
New officers will be
sworn in and begin
work on April 13, and
other representatives
will take office next
semester.
The SRA, which
represents the more
than 5,000 ECU
students who live in
campus dorms, deals
with problems and
concerns of ECU
students and conducts
building room 214 by 29 and April 6.
5 p.m.
Candidates must at-
tend an orientation
meeting March 29 to
familiarize themselves
with election rules.
According to Ed
fundraising drives for Dougherty, elections
various charities and chairman, there have
good causes.
Candidates must
complete filing
notices for the elec-
tion by Monday,
March 28, and turn
them into Whichard
been changes in the
rules since last year,
and they will be strict-
ly enforced during
this election. Cam-
paigning can take
place between March
Offices for the elec-
tion include SRA
president, vice presi-
dent, treasurer and
secretary in addition
to area residence
council officers and
house council
members.
All dorm residents
may vote in the elec-
tion. Anyone with
questions can contact
Dougherty at
758-8310.
The Brothers and Pledges of
Pi Kappa Phi
(TTKCp)
would like to thank the following
individuals and organizations
for their support through a
time of crisis;
Our Little Sisters
IFC
A0TTS
KE's
Bobby Pierce
EEE's
KA's
AZA's
AATT's
BOTT's
AXA's
Golden Hearts of E0E
EjE's
EE little sisters
AZ's
J.C.Penny's
Scott's Cleaner's
Pitt Memorial Staff
Hospital Rehap.Center
0KT's
Belk Tyler's
Dr.Edwards
Mr.Whichard
Mrs.Garganus
Dean Mallory
Ricky Wilburn
Mike Shaefer
Dept.of I in tra murals
Dr. Elmer Meyer
Chancellor Howell
Brenda Vanderaum
Jeferson Florist's
Cox Florists
Nursing Station of ICU Ward III
Bond's Sporting Goods
Mrs. Messner
International Foreign Language Society
And to the many,many more
that have also helped
THANKS
r ?-
�$&
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n
"1
&&
I BREAKFAST BAR OFFERING!
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�HONEYS
205 Greenville Blvd.
MOMOAY-FRIOAV
COO AM 11 SO AM
SAUMDAV-SONOAY
A HOLIDAYS
� SO A M 2O0 P M
ATTENTION
ALL STUDENTS
Public Forum For
SGA Candidates
Monday, March 28.1983
7:00-8:00pm
Mendenhall 244
Question and Answer
Session- i
Your Chance to meet and!
talk with the candidates !
ALL STUDENTS INVITED
CHICAGO (LTD Harold
� Democrats hailing on grounj
from as far afield as didacy svi
Massachusetts and unity of t
Texas are coming to Sen.
the aid of Democratic Kenned
mayoral candidate and Derrx
Lawyer Quest
Drunk Drivin
continued from page 1
said. He added that it would n
hold a person in prison on the
refusal to take the test.
In January, N.C. Attorney Gej
Edminsten issued an opinion tl
provisions in question were const
Gardner said the CLL was ki
lobbying efforts against the
key because the cour could rul
constitutional at an earlv date.
Suspect In
Go Before
Probable cause has been founj
by a N.C. District Court judge ll
the case of a Greenille man wh
was arrested in connection wit
the March 4 rape of an ECU sti
dent.
The finding oi probabl caul
by Judge Robert Wheeler meat
the accused, Bill Ra Warren
Route 1. Box 14 Greeemil
will now go before a grand jur
The next meeting of a grand j
in Greenville is April 18.
The grand jur decidev wheth
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24. 1983
Democrats Back Washington
CHICAGO (UPl)
Democrats hailing
from as far afield as
Massachusetts and
1 i.as are coming to
the aid of Democratic
mayoral candidate
Harold Washington
on grounds his can-
didacy symbolizes the
unity of their party.
Sen. Edward M.
Kennedy, D-Mass
and Democratic Party
Lawyer Questions
Drunk Driving Law
vontinued from page I
said. He added that it would be wrong to
hold a person in prison on the basis of his
refusal to take the test.
In January. N.C. Attorney General Rufus
! dminsten issued an opinion that said the
oisions in question were constitutional.
Gardner said the CLU was keeping their
lobbying efforts against the provisions low
kej because the court could rule them un-
constitutional at an earlv date.
leaders from 13
Southern states
Wednesday endorsed
Washington for
mayor.
A delegation of 12
party officials, head-
ed by Georgia Chair-
man Bert Lance,
visited the city to cam-
paign for
Washington. A 13th,
Texas Chairman Jim-
my Slagel, sent a
message of support.
Washington is run-
ning against
Republican Bernard
Epton and Mayor
Jane M. Byrne, who
lost the Democratic
primary but then
began a write-in cam-
paign.
"This is something
Suspect In Rape Must
Go Before Grand Jury
that transcends just
the city of Chicago
Lance told a news
conference. "It has
national implica-
tions
Lance and several
other state chairmen
said the April 12 elec-
tion will be a test of
party unity and the
first step in cementing
the coalitions needed
to defeat President
Reagan in 1984.
If Washington
should lose because he
is black, Lance said,
"there obviously
would be national im-
plications And, he
said, the same would
be true if racial issues
destroy the local
Democratic Party
organization.
Kennedy also
described the contest
as a national one �
and urged unity
despite the
divisiveness of the
primary. He also at-
tempted to placate
Washington sup-
porters who
remember he endors-
ed Mrs. Byrne in the
primary campaign.
"I'm here doing a
little advance work
Kennedy said. "If
everything goes well
here today and
Harold forgives me,
then Fritz Mondale
will be out here on
Sunday
Former Vice Presi-
dent Walter Mondale
endorsed State's At-
torney Richard M.
Daley in the primary
and Washington has
been publicly bitter
about that endorse-
ment.
Kennedy said he
was "rather flat-
tered" to be invited to
speak on
Washington's behalf
� "especially since
my coattails don't
seem to be all that
long these days. Just
ask Jane Byrne
In his speech, Ken-
nedy praised
Washington's work in
Congress opposing
the social service cut-
backs of the Reagan
administration. He
said a Washington
victory in the general
election will be a sign
the Democratic Party
is continuing its fight
against Reaganomics.
Others who travel-
ed to Chicago with
Lance were Jimmy
Knight of Alabama,
Lil Carlisle of Arkan-
sas, Charles
Whitehead of Florida,
Paul Patton of Ken-
tucky and Danny
Cupit of MississioDi.
News Writers Needed
Apply In Person At
The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian offices are located on the second floor of
the Old South Building, across from Joyner Library.
ROOMATE WANTED
Responsible male or female wanted to snare 3
bedroom duplex witn two working students. Near
campus; rent cheap; plenty albums. Call Charles
at 752 4935 or 756 8865.
Probable cause has been found
b a N.C. District Court judge in
;he case of a Greenville man who
-a as arrested in connection with
the March 4 rape of an i . stu-
dent.
The finding of probable cause
by Judge Robert Wheeler means
the accused. Billy Ray Warren of
Route 1, Box 147, Greeenville,
will now go before a grand jury.
The next meeting of a grand jur
in Greenville is April 18.
The grand jury decides whether
Siimiiliii
1 C2jj�.
or not to return a trne bill of in-
dictment. If Warren is indicted,
he will stand trial for second
degree rape, which is punishable
with up to 40 years in jail.
The rape Warren is charged
with occurred in the bathroom of
Clement Residence Hall around
1:45 a.m. March 4.
Judge Wheeler set Warren's
bond at $10,000. According to
police, he has not paid the bond
and is still in jail.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiilt
Opn. Paii If 30 i
LIFEGUARDS
The City of Greenville Recreation and Parks
would like to interview qualified applicants for
swimming instructors and lifeguards,Full Time
and Part-Time summer Work.Please contact
Jim Parker at Greenville Recreation and
Parks. 752-4137 extension 205
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA&CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
& RING i
0r � ��s co ,�-�
401 S. EVANS ST. open�:W-$:jomon,sat
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
"vOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER

&r
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-
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your choice of
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for only $10.00
752-3861
FREE DELIVERY
We deliver to ECU 4-
the Hospital
12"4 item pizza
choice of 1 Soda
for only $6.00
Copyright 1983
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Righis Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Mar .3
thru Sat Mar 26. 1963
i
&L

Not valid with any other offer
We have a limited Delivery Area.
1403 Dickinson Ave.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
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Hr
i
I Mi I s c KOI INIAN
Style
MARCH 24. 1983 Page �
Carolina Action
Progressivism Is Not Dead
B JA STONE
SMI Wnlcr
Certainly the Reagan revolu-
tion has disillusioned pro-
gresses in this country. Never-
theless, progressivism is not
dead. In tact, if anything,
Reagan's reign o conservatism
has tended to spur the progressive
coalition into action.
An example of progressivism
at work; even in such a bastion of
conscratism as North Carolina,
is Carolina Action. Carolina Ac-
tion is essentiall) a grass roots
community organizing group that
is affiliated with ACORN �
Association of Community
Organizations for Reform Now.
One of its primary strategies is to
call public hearings on issues
which are of concern to the
public and to pack these hearings
with members of the community
w ho are to be affected by the pro-
posed action.
Carolina Action is presently
based in Durham with offices in
Raleigh and Charlotte. It also has
membership in Greensboro. Fun-
ding for the organization comes
from the community itself.
Carolina Action members pay
$1600 per year per family, money
is raised through bake sales and
rummages, as well as a variety of
other fund raising methods. The
organization is involved with a
wide range of issues such as
renters' rights, utility rate in-
creases, and getting lower income
individuals elected as delegates to
the democratic party.
One of the group's
achievements has been to change
the school board elections in
Greensboro from at-large elec-
tions to district elections. This
move benefited black and lower
income voters, according
Carolina Action's head organizer
John Hickey.
"At large elections tend
toward a kind of tyranny of the
voting majority" Hickey told
The East Carolinian since, under
this arrangement a simple majori-
ty city-wide vote would elect all
of the members of a legislative
body. Conversely, in a district
election each election district
within a city elects its own
representative to the school
board, the utilities commission or
whatever positions are up for
elections. Under the latter ar-
rangement minority interests are
better protected
Some of the other areas that
Carolina Action has gotten in-
volved with are work against
utility rate increases to pay for
construction work in progress on
nuclear power plants and more
equitable distribution of federal
grant money among the popula-
tion of a city. In the area of
federal grants, explained Hickey,
the government makes grants to
cities (for example Durham is get-
ting between 18 and 20 million).
The city administration then
allocates this money for different
projects within the citv.
. . large elec-
tions tend toward a
kind of tyranny of
the voting majori-
ty
� John Hickey
"Often these funds are turned
into boon-doggles for various
business interests in the com-
munity said Hickey. "Carolina
Action opposes this by packing
public hearings on the allocation
of funds with individuals from
lower income and minority com-
munities. We have also submitted
alternative budgets or proposals
for how federal money should be
spent m the community at these
hearings
In addition to community
organizing, Carolina Action
plans to run its own candidates
for office. Many of its efforts are
also directed into educational
outreach programs designed to
increase its base of support
among middle income people.
Carolina Action is presently
recruiting staff personnel to in-
crease its impact in the com-
munities it is engaged in. A
spokesperson for the group said
that it probably will not expand
into other communities for
another two years. In the mean-
time this organization is waging a
battle on behalf of the public in
the middle of Helms country.
School of Music Hosting Festival This Week
The New York Vocal Arts Ensemble (pictured above) performed yesterday as part of the week-
long ECU School of Music "Festival 8283 Closing out the festival is the annual spring
meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the College Music Society tomorrow evening and all
day on Saturday, March 26, at the School of Music. One of the scheduled events is a solo and
chamber music recital by faculty members of the School of Music. The performance is open to
the public. For further information about the festival, call Marilyn Lucht at 757-6916.
Archbishop Mourned During CITCA Week
By PATRICK O'NEILL
stuff Wnlrr
"For the reign of faith and just ce in my country I
urge you if you really want to defend human rights
to prohibit the giving of military assistance to the
Salvadoran government to guarantee that vour
government will not intervene directly or indirectly
with military, economic, diplomatic or other
pressure to determine the fate of the Salvadoran
people.
� Letter from Archbishop
Oscar Romero to Pres. Carter
Feb 17, 1980
Romero was murdered only five weeks after he
wrote that letter to Pres. Carter. He was assasinated
while celebrating Mass in front of a church full of
people. His killers were never brought to justice.
Today, March 24 marks the third anniversary of
Romero's death. People all over the world will be
memorializing this man who spoke for peace and
love, but instead was violently and senselessly gunn-
ed down.
In North Carolina individuals and groups have
already been taking part in the activities of "Central
America Week" which began last Fridav (March
18).
Central America Week is sponsored by the
Carolina Interfaith Task Force on Central America
(C ITCA) and the Executive Board of The North
Carolina Council of Churches. The week is designed
to promote study, reflection and action on Central
America in churches and synogogues across the state
in commemoration of Archbishop Romero's
assassination and of all those who have died for their
faith in recent months in Central America. CITCA is
a committee of religious people, lay and clergy,
women and men, Catholic, Jewish and Protestant
committed to working in solidarity with the poor of
Central America. "We are motivated by the increas-
ing role of the Church in Central America in the
struggles of the poor for freedom and justice
states an informational pamphlet distributed by
CITCA.
CITCA was started by a former Central American
missionary Gail Phares. She has since enlisted the
help of another former Central American mis-
sionary Joe Morasn as her co-director. Together
they have worked to educate, to respond, to assist.
CITCA educated people on the human rights
situation in Central America with special emphasis
on the roles of the church and of the U. S. govern-
ment in the region. Their educational work includes
train others to spread the work, sending out educa-
tional mailings, lobby political leaders and work
with the media.
They respond to crisis situations in Central
America via worship services, marches, vigils and
rallies and letter writing, they also sponsor fact Fin-
ding delegations to Central American nations.
CITCA assists the poor people of Central
America by providing food, clothing and medical
aid as well as seeking legal assistance for Central
American refugees living in our area.
Throughout N. C. groups have been taking part in
educational forums, public witnesses, religious ser-
vices and all kinds of activities at the local and
regional levels as part of their Central America
Week activities.
Most of the Central America Week activities being
conducted in Greenville are happening today. The
ECU Committee on Central America (formally
known as the ECU Committee on El Salvador) has
been conducting various campus activities dealing
with the Centrasl American issue for over a year.
Today they are sponsoring a one hour vigil at noon
in front of the Student Supply Store in honor of
Romero. They will also be distributing educational
leaflet to students.
At 7 p.m. the committee, which is made up of
students, faculty members and campus ministers,
will be holding a candle light vigil on the steps of the
Pitt County Courthouse, and at 7:30 p.m. former
ECU Catholic campus chaplain Father Charles
MulhoUand will be speaking about his recen. fact
finding trip to Central America. MulhoUand, who
will be speaking at the Baptist Student Center, has
traveled to Central America on several occassions.
According to a spokesperson with the ECU Com-
mittee on Central America, the committee's
members are opposed to United Mates military aid
that is being sent to the region.
The Reagan Administration has supported their
arms aid by claiming that it is necessary to keep the
region from being taken over by Cuban and Soviet
backed Communists insurgents.
Many religious missionaries who are working in
the region disagree with Reagan and are asking that
arms aid be stopped. They claim that it is not com-
munism that is responsible for the unrest, but rather
the plight of the poor, who are demanding help from
an unresponsive government, is causing the disunity.
Reagan has vowed to continue military aid and has
recently asked for additional military aid to the El
Salvadoran government.
Phares of CITCA has issued a listing of four
demands that her organization is making during
Central America Week:
1 .Stop all U. S. Military aid to and intervention in El
Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras;
2. Stop all U. S. covert operations and other
destabilizing activity's against the government of
Nicaragua;
3. Support initiatives for negotiated political solu-
tions among all parties in the conflict in El Salvador
and the Mexican-Venezuelan peace intiative which
calls for talks between the United States and
Nicaragua and Honduras;
4. Grant temporary asylum to Central American
refugees until they can safely return to their
homelands.
Central America Week ends Sundav with
numerous churches throughout the state conducting
services focused on the Central American issue.
. Peter Serkin, an established pianist "whose mufkal sympathies we
SerkitlSerkinSerkinSerkin broader than those of virtually say yo.af musician la recent
memory will appear In Headrix Theatre tonight nt 8 p.m. For Infor-
mation concerning the availability of tickets, call the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, at 757-6611, et. 266, between the
honrs of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m Monday through Friday.
Storaska L
Frederic Moraska's Mi
his third appearance oi
recent rapes and assauil
area during the paM thj
ta!
Pi
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I for IBM's, R�m�ngt
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Page 8
ft
il

( This H eek
vesterdaj as part of the neek-
i festhal is the annual spring
:H tomorrow evening and all
scheduled events is a solo and
b . The performance is open to
Inhn I Dcht at 757-6916.
Week
ted Males military aid
rgion.
ha supported their
hat it necessary to keep the
iken over b Cuban and Soviet
rats.
manes who are working in
i Reagan and are asking that
Fhe claim that it is not com-
:he unrest, but rather
or, who are demanding help from
causing the disunity.
nue military aid and has
ii addi militar) aid to the El
"ne
'�1( - sued a listing of four
an is making during
.a K .
itar aid to and interention in El
femala. anu Honduras;
ations and other
- againsl the government of
� for negotiated political solu-
II parties in the conflict in El Salvador
�anAenezuelan peace intiative which
�s between the United States and
Hondui
( rary asvlum to Central American
the an safel return to their
ca Week ends Sundav with
I hroughout the state conducting
on the Central American issue.
tickets, call the Central Ticket
ft 757-6611, ext. 266, between the
y� thtough Friday.
Rape Lecture
Justin Time
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24, 1983
Frederic Storaska,
Executive Director of
The National
Organization for The
prevention of Rape
and Assault, will
speak in Hendrix
Theatre, Mendenhall
Student Center on
Tuesday, March 29,
1983, at 8:00 p.m. His
appearance is under
the sponsorship of the
ECU Department of
University Unions
Lecture Series com-
mittee and the Stu-
dent Residence
Association. The sub-
ject of Storaska's lec-
ture will be "How To
an early evening
assault on a young
girl by a group of
teenage boys promp-
ted Storaska to
become involved with
rape prevention.
Storaska's years of
research on the sub-
ject of rape preven-
tion culminated in a
book published by
Random House titled
How To Say No To A
Rapist � And Sur-
vive.
Admission to the
lecture will by by ID
and Activity Card for
ECU students and
MSC Membership for
mm
Mm
w�;
Say No To A Rapist Faculty and Staff
Storaska Lecture Is A Timely One
Frederic Storaska's March 29 lecture on rape prevention will mark
his third appearance on the ECU campus. It conies in the wake of
recent rapes and assaults on the ECU campus and in the Greenville
area during the past three weeks.
� And Survive
Frederic Storaska
was born in
Bloomsburg, Penn-
sylvania. He attended
North Carolina State
University, where he
majored in
psychology. In 1964
Public tickets are on
sale at the Central
Ticket Office and are
priced at $1.00. For
additional informa-
tion call (919)
757-6611, ext. 266.
All fraternities
talk brotherhood
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 24. 1983 P ,0
Davidson Pitches Pirates Over Ohio
By KEN BOLTON
vmi��i Sports t ditor
The ECU Pirates took advan-
tage of three unearned runs and
two RBI base hits by John Hallow
to defeat Ohio University 5-3
Wednesday afternoon at Harr-
ington Field.
Sophomore pitcher Bob David-
son, the "ace" of the Pirate pit-
ching staff, pitched his first com-
plete game of the year to pick up
the victory.
Davidson, who is now 1-1, gave
up eight hits while striking out
seven and walking four.
ECU jumped out in front in the
2nd inning due to a well-executed
double steal.
After Winfred Johnson struck
out, David Wells followed with a
base hit to right field. David
Home then dropped a blooper in-
to left field to put men on first
and second.
Tony Salmond then hit into a
fielder's choice to force Home at
second. The stage was thus set for
the Pirates' double theft.
With Jabo Fulghum at the
plate, Salmond on first and Wells
on third, Salmond broke for se-
cond.
When Ohio catcher Rick
Korkate threw to second, Sal-
mond hesitated, enabling Wells to
scamper home with the game's
first run.
In the top of the 4rth, Ohio
bounced back to take the lead
thanks to two base hits and a
sacrifice fly.
Ohio added another run in the
5th innine to make the score 3-1.
Second baseman Mike Jaworski
opened the inning with his second
of four base hits for the day.
Leadoff hitter Jeff Zickafoose
followed with a bad-hop single
over the head of first baseman
Todd Evans into right field.
Korkate then grounded to short
to drive in Jaworski. With only
one out and a man on second,
Davidson got out of the jam by
striking out Gary McLaughlin and
popping up clean-up hitter Rob
Livchak.
The Pirate bats came alive in
the 6th inning, as ECU scored two
runs on three doubles.
Robert Wells opened the inning
with a double down the left Field
line. Hallow then followed with a
sharp hopper that bounced off the
first base bag and into right field
for a double.
After two consecutive ground
outs to second base, David Wells
hit a double deep into left field to
tie the score at 3-3.
The Pirates took the lead for
good with a two-run 7th inning.
Salmond reached on an error by
third baseman McLaughlin and
was sacrificed to second by cat-
cher Jack Curlings.
After Mark Shank and Robert
Wells drew walks to load the
bases. Doug Stackhouse was
brought in to relieve starting pit-
cher Pat Rose.
With Hallow at the plate, a
passed ball by Korkate allowed
Salmond to score from third with
the eventual winning run.
Hallow then delivered a base hit
to give the Pirates an insurance
run.
Hallow, who now has 19 RBIs
in this season, is the all-time ECU
runs-batted-in leader with 94.
The victory broke a two-game
losing streak for the Pirates which
included losses to N.C. State and
Campbell.
After the game, ECU coach Hal
Baird was happy to have gotten
the victory.
"We really needed that one a
relieved Baird stated. "I feel
much better about the way we
piayed today
The amount of left-handed hit-
ters in the Ohio lineup made it
hard for the right-handed throw-
ing Davidson to use his curve ball
effectively.
The free-swinging Ohio batters
had a tendency to try to pull
everything with power.
As a result, Davidson concen-
trated on hitting the outside part
of the plate against the
"southpaw" hitters.
"Bob smelled it and really went
after it said Baird, reflecting on
Davidson's first complete game.
"He was within one pitch of being
yanked three times. This should
help put him back on the up-
swing
With their five runs scored to-
day, the Pirates are in the midst of
an impressive scoring streak. ECU
has now gone 74 straight games
without being shut out.
The Pirates are now 12-5, while
Ohio drops to 2-5.
ECU hosts Ohio again this
afternoon in a 3:00 p.m. contest
at Harrington Field.

PHoto By GARY PATTERSON
Down The Middle
ECU catcher Jabo Fulghum tries his batting skill in Wednesday's game against Ohio University
The Bucs won, 5-3.
Smith Content As A Pirate
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
A couple of years ago senior
pitcher Charlie Smith asked ECU
Head Baseball Coach Hal Baird
to watch him play a few games.
Baird did and he liked what he
saw.
So Smith picked up his belong-
ing at UNC-Chapel Hill and head-
ed for ECU.
Now two years later, Smith has
become one of the Pirates leading
pitchers. This year Smith has
given up only three earned runs in
22 innings and has struck out 10
batters. His wins include victories
over conference foe George
Mason and Virginia Com-
monwealth.
Smith comes from Roberson-
ville, where he posted a 7-0 pit-
ching record and batted .416 as a
senior in high school. He was also
starting quarterback for his state
championship football team.
Upon graduating, he was offered
a scholarship to play football for
UNC.
At UNC, Smith was plagued
with injuries and decided to make
baseball his collegiate sport. After
limited playing time as a
freshman, Smith became unhappy
and began looking elsewhere.
"They didn't give me much of a
chance to play Smith said, "and
I saw I wasn't going to get much
playing time if 1 stayed on
Smith was playing for the UNC
summer league team when he ask-
ed Baird to watch him play in a
few games. Baird was impressed
with Smith and offered him a
chance to play for ECU.
Smith was ineligible most of his
sophomore year, but he stepped
into a starting role during the spr-
ing. He was unable to make the
pitching rotation, which was
nationally-ranked at the time, but
he served as designated hitter, bat-
ting .300 in 1981.
Smith then played summer
league baseball for the Pirates. He
began pitching again and even-
tually worked his way into the
starting rotation last year. That
pitching staff was ranked sixth na-
tionally and included former
greats Bill Wilder and Bob Patter-
son, who both are playing profes-
sionally.
Smith had a good season, pit-
ching a no-hitter against Atlantic
Christian College, and saving the
ECAC-South Tournament title
game by giving up one hit in the
last three innings.
Although he has achieved many
accomplishments, Smith said his
biggest thrill of his career was get-
ting the chance to play for ECU.
"Coach Baird is one of the best
pitching coaches in college he
said. "He really helped me along
and gave me the chance to play
for the Pirates
Smith, a physical education ma-
jor, hopes to continue in baseball
as long as he can. "1 hope I can
continue playing after 1
graduate Smith said, "but if
that doesn't work out, there's a
possibility 1 could be a graduate
assistant next year
Smith still has time to think
about his future, and for right
now his concerns lie with the ECU
baseball team. "We have a young
pitching staff, and the lineup has
been juggled around a lot, but if
w? can keep playing the way we
are now, we have a good chance
of making it back to the NCAA
playoffs
Emory: The Time Has Come
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
ECU Head Coach Hal Baird looks on as the Pirates built their
record, 12-5, after a victory over Ohio. Baird secured his 100th
victory this season.
Lady Bucs Satisfied Over
Double Win Against Heels
Anytime a team beats UNC-
Chapel Hill, they've got to feel a
great deal of satisfaction.
But to beat them twice0. Now,
that's an accomplishment.
The Lady Pirate softball team
did exactly that Tuesday in
Chapel Hill, winning, 5-3 and 6-2,
in a doubleheader contest.
"It's always nice to go to
Carolina and come back with a
victory when it's both games of a
doubleheader said Head Coach
Sue Manahan.
In the first game, the Lady Bucs
scored two runs each in the first
two innings while Carolina col-
lected one in the second, giving
the Pirates a 4-1 lead going into
the third.
The next three innings went
scoreless, but the Pirates scored
once more in the final inning to
boost them up, 5-3.
The Pirates had 13 hits and four
errors, while UNC has seven hits
and five errors.
Leading hitters for the Bucs
were Sherry Stout, who went two-
for-four, including a triple.
Evonne Williams, who slammed a
double, also went two-for -four,
and Robin Graves followed,
finishing two-for-four.
UNC's Kay Holt went two-for-
three, and Dori Kovanan was one-
for-three with a triple.
In the second game, ECU went
up in the fourth inning, scoring
two runs for a 2-0 lead. They
came back again in the third with
three more runs, while UNC
scored two to put them on the
scoreboard. Now leading 5-2, the
Pirates' last run came in the final
inning to seal the victory, 6-2.
The Lady Bucs finished with
seven hits and three errors. UNC
had eight hits and three errors.
ECU's Jeanette Roth pitched
both doubleheader games for the
Pirates.
Leading hitters in the second
contest were ECU's Mitzi Davis,
who hit two homeruns and had
five runs batted in. She, along
with Melody Hamm, went two-
for-three to lead the Pirates.
UNC's Rose Brokoski went
two-for-four, while Sharon Tuttle
was two-for-three.
The Pirates are now 7-4 overall,
and Manahan was happy with her
team's play. "Defensively, we
played well fundamentally she
said.
See LADY, Page 11
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
"Good things come to those
who wait
For three years, ECU Head
Football Coach Ed Emory has
worked toward building a highly
competitive Division-1 team. An
experienced team. A team that
may prove to hold its own against
powerful teams like Florida State
and Missouri.
Well, now that time has finally
arrived.
"We've got the best athletes
that's ever been on this campus
Emory said. "If they stay eligible
and healthy, then we're gonna
have a good fooiball team. We're
gonna be better than we were last
year, but to be as good as last
year's won-loss record (7-4) is go-
ing to be a great challenge for
us
Emory readily admits that the
greatest challenge ever will be con-
tending with this season's
rigorous schedule � one describ-
ed as being unrealistic for ECU's
football program.
Does Emory think the
schedule's realistic? "It's not
realistic on paper when you look
at the pros and cons he said,
"but we play on turf, not paper.
We will have to be
overachievers
The schedule, however, won't
be a negative factor, according to
Emory. "It's there, and we're
gonna play it. It (the schedule)
won't be an excuse for why we did
good and why we didn't do good.
We've just got to have a better
spring practice and a better pre-
season practice than the schools
we play. We're looking forward
to it.
"We have the opportunity to
compete against the best, but it's
gonna be an uphill battle at least
through 1986
No coach could express more
enthusiasm than Emory does
about the futuristic possibilities of
the football program.
"I think it's gonna be a banner
year for the Pirates' Club and
ticket sales he said. "I think our
program's made great strides. We
have to be project-minded �
complete one project and then go
on.
"If you had told me 20 years
ago that ECU would be playing
Florida State, the Univ. Of
Florida, Missouri and Southern
Mississippi, it would have been an
earth-shattering thing.
"I just hope we can best some
of the teams we're not suppose to
beat
Getting off to a good start is
essential for the football program,
but with FSU and N.C. State as
ECU's first two opponents, that
task won't be an easy one.
"It's much better to win early
in the season than real late
Emory said, "but winning is gon-
na be a tough thing to do. Yet if
we do win early, the enthusiasm
and monies from outside can real-
ly be a positive factor in our pro-
gram "People have always
got to realize where we are and
who we are. We need the support
of every swinging soul and com-
mitment from everybody
Emory believes Pirate sup-
porters want to see the ECU foot-
ball team play the best schools
around. Just like the players.
"When 1 first came here, I ask-
ed the players what they wanted to
Head Coach Ed Emory said the Pirates
overachievers" in order to compete with the teams
have to he
this
see changed, and of the 10 things
they named, the first one was to
see the schedule upgraded
After a slight hesitation, Emory
said with a smile, "They certainly
got what they wanted
The players have also had to ad-
just to quite a few other changes,
including the replacement of eight
coaches. "That's drastic a change
is a serious, serious problem
Emory said. "We have to teach
them (the coaches) what we want
and get them back on the ECU ap-
proach
Both offensive and defensive
players have new coordinators,
and Emory has been pleased with
the team's attitude toward the
newcomers. "They (players) have
made a remarkable acceptance
toward the staff members and
their new ideas. Thev've adapted
well
The Pirate squad will have quite
a few more newcomers this fall.
Emory signed probably the best
recruiting class in ECU's history,
which, in his words, was just
another step up the ladder.
How was he able to get the most
sought after recruits in the state?
There were several reasons, in-
cluding having a coaching staff
that "outworked and out hustled a
few schools
"They see the commitment we
have to this football program
Emory said. "We're the
newcomer on the block in big-
time football. We're something
growing and they want to be part
of it
People, however, are ultimately
the ones who sell a program,
Emory said. "You can build
j facilities, but people have the
most influence. The recruits know
the people are sincere here. When
See EMORY, pate 11
Em
Cont'd From Page
Academics also
equal billing whj
talking with poteni
plae:v �'That I
first thing we d:
with a recruit
Emory s a i
"Academically, j
has so much flexibi
and versatility T
Lady
Loadi
( ont'd From Pat
"The oul
up with ome out
ches. We nit the
crisply throughout
lineup
Manahan ad
that this sc I
team has so-
last ear's
Nett
In a men s i
match w ,
afternoon.
defeated Mi
to run the
In single- I w
per det. Kern
6-1. 6-
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Creech del
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WOMEN'S H
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PafC 10
Ohio
� l
P�ote B. GARY PATTERSON
lame against Ohio University,
irate
ow his
pla for ECU.
rd is one of the best
iches in college he
- helped me along
he chance to play
cal education ma-
- intinuc in baseball
' . can "1 hope 1 can
� ing after I
ith said, "but if
� k out, there's a
� id be a graduate
time to think
ire and for right
lie with theECT
"We have a oung
and the lineup has
I a lot, but if
g the way ve
G od chance
k to the NCAA
Come
'the 10 things
first one was to
- lie upgraded
hesitation, Emory
mile, "They certainly
vanted
ive also had to ad-
s other changes,
placement of eight
Irastic a change
erious problem
e have to teach
es) what we want
nd get them back on the ECU ap-
proach "
e and defensive
hae new coordinators,
ind Emory has been pleased with
he team's attitude toward the
men 'The) (players) have
nade a remarkable acceptance
oward the staff members and
I their new ideas. They've adapted
well
The Pirate squad will have quite
a few more newcomers this fall.
Emory signed probably the best
recruiting class in ECU's history,
Iwhich, in his words, was just
another step up the ladder.
How was he able to get the most
ugh� arter recruits in the state?
There were several reasons, in-
cluding having a coaching staff
lat "outworked and outhustled a
TK schools
They see the commitment we
l-ae to this football program
lEmory said "We're the
Inewcomer on the block in big-
t:me football We're something
trowing and they want to be part
it
People, however, are ultimately
the ones who sell a program,
mory said. "You can build
facilities, but people have the
nost influence. The recruits know
the people are sincere here. When
See EMORY, page
Emory Ready
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 24, 1983
11
Cont'd From Page 10
Academics also get
equal billing when
talking with potential
players. "That's the
first thing we discuss
with a recruit
Emory said.
Academically, ECU
has so much flexibility
and versatility. Their
choice of different
curriculums is a
definite plus for our
recruiting
Emory will be
counting on recruits
to build depth to his
team since he has 19
starters and and 42
lettermen returning.
Now just four days
into spring practice,
the team has already
shown progress �
something Emory is
delighted about.
"Our defense has
been more physical
and aggressive, and
that's the way we're
gonna have to be he
said. "To win, we
must have a better
defense. You can't
win without great
defense
Lady Pirate Softball
Loaded With Talent
Cont'd From Page 10
'The outfield came
up with some out cat-
ches. We hit the ball
crisply throughout the
lineup
Manahan added
that this season's
team has something
last year's squad
didn't acquire.
'We're developing
something we didn't
have last year, which
is threats throughout
the lineup.
"The team as a
whole is showing a
good attitude. The
players are willing to
sacrifice their batting
averages to advance
their teammates on
the bases
The Lady Bucs will
play home Saturday
in a round-robin con-
test. At 1 p.m ECU
will play Pembroke
State. In the second
game scheduled for
2:15
Win. 9-0
In a men's tennis
match Wednesday
afternoon, ECU
defeated Mt. Olive 9-0
to run their record to
4-3.
In singles: Ted Lep-
per def. Kermit Nixon
6-1, 6-0; Don
Rutledge def. Mike
Bowen 6-3, 6-2; Paul
Owen def. Greg Cox
6-1, 6-1; David
Creech def. Barrv
Nethercutt 6-0, 6-0;
Cole King def. Tom
Coggin 6-2, 6-2; Tom
Battle def. Gary Caun
6-0, 6-0; Bill White
def. Benny Hood 6-0,
6-0.
In doubles: Lepper-
Rutledge def. Bowen-
Coggin6-3, 6-3; King-
Owen def. Nixon-
Nethercutt 6-4, 6-2;
Bon-Chase-Battle def.
Cox-Cain 6-1, 6-0.
ECU's next match
ABORT lONb UP
TO 1 2th WEEK
Oh PREGNANCY
$185 00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
S320S35 (Toll Free Number
800 "� 256 between � A.
and 5PM weekdays.
RALEIGHS WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�I7 West V-rgan St.
rtoieigi
is Friday at home
against Campbell at
3:00 p.m.
Sneaker Sam Sez
Pre-Season Softball
Tourney Champs
Crowned
The pre-season
softball tournament,
sponsered by the In-
tramural department
and Miller Brewing
Company, began
bright and early last
Saturday morning as
53 teams battled in the
two day event.
After a full day
Saturday and most of
Sunday, the 48 men's
teams swindled down
to two. The final
game featured the
Bombers against the
Gamblers. The
Bombers powerful
hitting and relentless
scoring proved to be
the deciding factor. A
last-inning scoring
surge by the Gamblers
fell just short of the
mark as the Bombers
beat the Gamblers
13-10. Chip Clifton
was named the tour-
naments MVP among
the men.
The ever-impressive
Heartbreakers played
the young Tyler
Tyrants in the final
game of the women's
action. Rallying
behind some strong
stick action, the
Heartbreakers stack-
ed up 12 runs before
the sixth inning.
Unable to match this
power, the Tyrants
fell 24-5. Stacy
Weitzel was voted
MVP from the Heart-
breakers.
The Intramural
Department would
like to extend a big
thanks to Miller
Brewing Company for
their assistance in
sponsering the tour-
nament.
Upcoming Events
Basketball is not
over yet! It's back
once again in the form
of a co-rec activity.
Last years champs,
The Enforcers, will be
back to regain their ti-
tle, but several new
teams are expected to
be reckoned with.
Three women and
two men make up a
team and special rules
are involved to
equalize competition.
Registration is held
March 28-30, with the
team captains'
meeting scheduled for
Thursday, March 31,
at 4:00 p.m. in
Memorial 102. Get a
team together and
join in on the fun.
Entries for the In-
tramural track meet
will be held next
Monday-Friday,
March 28-April 1.
The track meet will be
held the afternoon of
April 6.
Entry deadline for
tennis doubles and co-
rec doubles is today at
5:00 p.m. Grab a
partner and beat the
deadline!
Point System Up-
date
As the point system
sports near an end,
several teams are in a
close race for first. In
the fraternity division
Pi Kappa Phi leads
with 723 to Kappa
Sigma's 704. A tight
battle also exists
among the men's
residence halls with
Jones having 695 to
Scott's 653. The
Scuzzmen are
dominating the men's
independent division
as Sigma Sigma Sigma
dominates the sorori-
ty division.
5 Among the
women's in-
dependents IBAC
leads with 290 over
the Heartbreaker's
Advisory Council Ap-
plications Being Ac-
cepted
Now's your chance
to recommend
policies, suggest new
activities or pro-
grams, and become
involved with the
operation of your
Intramural-
Recreational Services
program! Applica-
tions are being ac-
cepted through April
8 for the positions of
council president and
council represen-
tatives. The Advisory
Council includes a
representative from
each of the participa-
tion divisions: frater-
nity, sorority,
residence hall (one
from each campus
Central, West and
College Hill),
clubdepartment, and
independentof f-
campass. Principal
duties of the Advisory
Council include
recommendation of
policies and pro-
cedures for the IRS
programsservices,
reviewing disciplinary
matters, and advising
the IRS staff of stu-
dent concerns.
Olympic Tryouts
Scheduled at ECU
The United States
Olympic Committee's
1983 National Sports
Festival is scheduled
for June 19 to July 3,
1983, in Colorado
Springs, Colorado.
Tryouts for the South
Region Men's Hand-
ball Squad will be
held at Memorial
Gymnasium, East
Carolina University,
Sunday, April 17,
from 9:00 a.m. till
1:00 p.m. and from
5-7 p.m.
Team Handball,
sometimes called
European or Olympic
Handball, is not the
popular American
four-walled handball.
Team handball has
been an Olympic
sport since 1972 and
the USA will field
both a men's and
women's team in the
1984 Olympic Games
in Los Angeles. Team
handball has been in-
cluded in the ECU in-
tramural and club
sports program since
1978.
Interested Can-
dida ?s should have a
background in one or
more of the following
sports: team hand-
ball, handball,
basketball, baseball,
volleyball, water
polo, and soccer
(goalees). If selected
for the South squad,
transportation to and
from Colorado Spr-
ings, housing, food,
and competitive attire
will be provided bv
the U.S. Olympic
Committee. Selected
players must be
available for prc-
festival practice (5
davs) and competition
in Colorado Spnng
from June 19 to Julv
3, 1983. The United
States Team Handball
Federation (USTHF)
is the national govern-
ing body for team
handball and respon-
sible for the selection
of players from the
four regions. Can-
didates should con-
tact: Mark Noble.
South Men's Coor-
dinator, 14020 Glen
v iew Dnv e. S .
Huntsville. Alabama
35803. (205) 453-0240
or (205) 882-9115.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion a dMlcutt deo
DEPEND ON. sicn that s maaeeasier bv
thewon en 3ftheHern�ng Center Counselors are
n j ice jc ana night to support and under-
" n 1 ,cv ur safety comfort and privacy are
assurea by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES � 'uesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
rmentsH 1st & 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
18 Afeeks � ee Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
-�� H . Tests MAJ 'ncusive T-eesB insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
Healthcare counseling TUC Cl CMIKJf"
CENTER
ana education for wo-
re " r oqes
15
o
ECU DISCOUNT
on all prescription
eyeglasses
3'5 Park View Commons
Across from Doctors Perk
Open S:30
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vfetic
Mon- Fri.
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12
THE EAST CAROL INI AN
MARCH 24, 1983
Wray Improves With Age
�-V
5- Jf
4
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
ECU shortstop Kell Rohinette leads off second base in an attempt to add another run
to the Pirates' productive offense.
The longer Gregor
Wray swims, the bet-
ter he gets. That's the
only way to describe
one of ECU's finest
swimmers.
Beginning at age
nine in a community
swimming league at
Granite Falls, NC,
Wray has continued
his winning ways as a
member of the Pirate
swim team, setting a
school record in the
400-yard individual
medley with a time of
4:11.78, and closing
in on several other
school records.
Following three
years of competitve
swimming on the
community league
level, Gregor joined
the Hickory Seahorse
Swim Club, where he
finished second in the
500 freestyle in the
1981 North Carolina
AAU Meet. Such
swimming success as
this caught the atten-
tion of a number of
college coaches, in-
cluding Old Domi-
nion, UNC-
Wilmington and Ap-
palachian State, but
Gregor selected East
Carolina, much to the
delight of swimming
coach Rick Kobe.
"I wanted to attend
a school with a small
swimming program,
where I could receive
individual attention
said Wray. "After
careful evaluation of
each of the schools
recruiting me, I decid-
ed to attend East
Carolina. "I am
happy with my selec-
tion, as we have a pro-
gram in which each of
us (swim team
members) are very
close, like brothers
and sisters
Gregor's success as
a freshman was
rewarded with his
selection as the reci-
pient of the Glen Dyer
Memorial Scholar-
ship. This award is
given annually to an
East Carolina swim-
mer that best con-
tributes to swimming
or diving excellence at
the University.
Despite setting a
freshman record and
qualifying for the
Eastern cuts, he
returned his
sophomore year will-
ing to work even
harder, determined to
further contribute to
the overall success of
the Pirate swim team.
His efforts paid off as
he led the Pirates into
the Easter Regionals.
Gregor, however,
does not plan to stop
there: "My primary
goals when I entered
East Carolina were to
break a freshman
record and qualify for
the Eastern cuts. Now
that these two goals
have been realized.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
TO THE GIRL I WALKED IN
ON in the bathroom at
Mendenhall Sorrv But don t
worry I didn t see a thing
The PHANTOM
MARE
Sue loves Lou like cows like to
moo And Gare loves Mare tor
her honesty, attection and
thoroughbred hair Wanna play t
Love you bunches THE PHOTO
FAIRY
ROOMMATE
WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
SHARE apartment during sum
mer school 1 3 rent and
utilities Call Greg at 752 �307
ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW
3 bedroom apartment
$11 month plus 1 3 utilities
Sauna, laundry rm tennis
courts, close 752 aoi9
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE experience quality
work IBM Selectric typewriter
Call Lame Shive 7SS S301 or
GAIL JOYNER 75 102
TYPING Term papers, thesis
e(c Call Kempie Dunn 752 6733
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE Complete audio repair
call after 6pm Mark 752 1296
NEED TYPING? Lowest rates
on campus 1 years experience
IBM type Call Cindy. 35i 474
after s 00pm
MOVING? No 10b too large or
small! Reasonable rates, call
75 9533
LEARN TO FLY Call Joe,
75 6942
10 YEAKS TYPING.
REASONABLE RATES Spell
mg punctuation and grammar
corrections Proofreading Call
CINDY at 355 2468. 9 a m 9pm
LOST AND
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LOST 2 YEAR OLD small
black female dog White mark
mgs on chm and paws no tail
Answers to CLO Please call
758 2206 after 00pm if seen or
found
LOST GERMAN SHEPHERD
puppy mostly black Answers to
Dusty Lost near Harding
Street If found call 758 4483
WANTED
WANTED Organist for dinner
music and lounge See Janice
Davenport at Washington Yacht
and Country Club Thurs thru
Sat between 5 and 9 p m or call
946 1514.
WANTED FEMALE
bartenders tor part time and
summer 10b Apply between 2
and 4 Thursday March 24th At
tic 103 E 4th Street
ATTRACTIVE MODELS
WANTED for figure �
intimate apparel
photography Excellent pay
Send figure photo and personal
information to P O Box 113,
Rocky Mount. N C 27801 113
ENERGETIC Part time
salesperson needed Available
mornings and Saturdays Ex
perience preferred but not
necessary Apply in person.
Leather n Wood. Ltd Carolina
East Mall No phone calls
LEAD SINGER NEEDED tor
est Rock band Male or female
752 8446 or758 780
WANTED Lead singer for rock
band Must be serious Call
Preston at 75 7374 or Mike at
- V CASE YOU HAVLN'T HEARD-
PL
in
n
is a neuj rcsiaurant
m ciocuni ocon
qreeni.nl Le thai :
S WITHM WAIMNG P1SJAMCE
m tHh ?. tUverr. rnr,ama ot ks .ind book (-v-irr,)
SERVES HOME-STYLE Eirxif?
HAS EKESP fAKf &PEAE
FEATURES nUI V SPECAS
nr- rrstci 2 PL tarn )
SAS HAPPY HOUU OM JtJfSPAy
HAS TAKE-nOTS �� � W7
&BNQ THIS COC4FON R"n? A FTCEE
I FfZUrr GCX&&L.ESZ when yra r itper
A rAi y SPEriAi R-rr-
Pltnr TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES
FLY NAVY
Thn n1v, .sently has several openings
for the most exciting and cha 1 lpni ny
job in the world - WAVY PILOT. If you
qualify, ne will guarantee vou a seat in
the most prestigious flight school
anywhere, it the Lonpletion of training
ynu will fly the Navy's high performance
aircraft.
Qualifications Are:
Rachelors degree
Less than ?8 12 years old
2020 uncorrected vision
Excel tent health
U.S. Citwen
If you think you can qualify and would
like to earn a starting salary of
$18,000 with $?8,000 in four years,
see the Navy BTFTcer Program Team,
they'll be on campus ?9-31 March at the
Student Center. If you can't make it ,
send your resune or transcripts to:
NELSON SKINNER
U.S. HAVY OfMCtR PROGRAAS
1001 Navaho Or.
Raleigh, NC 27609
Or call 1-800-662-7231
8an-4pn, MonFri.
752 297 Also needed Lead
guitar artist.
MATURE, RESPONSIBLE
PERSONS WANTED FOR sum
mer sub leasing in 2 bedroom
townhouse swimming pool, $240
plus utilities, 7 57 390 ot 7S7-171S.
MISC.
757 1512, ask for Jim
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff:
Welcome to our flea market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd. Open every Saturday and
Sunday � til s. Crafts, tools, fur-
niture, books, etc. Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' items.
Real bargains
SURFBOARDS. PRO SURFING
DESIGNS. M.T.B Rainbow,
twins and tns. Clean shapes,
some damage. 7S7 07t�.
TWIN BEDWITH FRAME, box
sprina, mattress, table chest
Good condition, call 752 3522
FURNISHED ROOM with
private bath, kitchen and laun
dry privilege, ins month
JSS-�70.
71 YAMAHA ENDURO 250 good
condition SSS0 w helmet
7S2-437. TOGO
WEIGHT BENCH w INCLINE
and leg lift. M0 402 G Holly
(WILCO APTS) evenings
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALL! !
Reasonable rates. Call 7S 9533
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
WANTED to sub lease one-room
apartment at Tar River Estates
this summer. Apt. is beside
large swimming pool, has patio
and is located 5 minutes from
campus. Call 7S-424 for more
information.
FREE Increase your reading
speed on the spot at a free
Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics Introductory lesson
We'll also show you how it's
possible to read and study three
to 10 times faster with better
comprehension! Get better
grades, have more free time.
Find out how See our large ad
elsewhere in this paper for loca
tion and times
FOR SALE
1974 TOYOTA CORONA 4 speed
ac, good mileage, clean SI,700,
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
is offering a cut and style
special Reg $16 50
Now $14.50
offer good thru March 31,1983
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
hone 756-2950 or 756-4042
Forget Hard Days!
We've Got a
Hard Days Night
Thursday, March 17th
at the
Carolina Opry House
Free A dmission
Free Draft-ALL NIGHT LONG
Free club memberships given away
We're Taking You
Back in Time
For the Time of Your Life!
gssft
KlfSfNtVf
CAMPU
my next goal is to
qualify for the NCAA
cuts. My times are
very close for
qualification in
several events, so with
more hard work I feel
I have a good chance
of qualifying in at
least one event
Kobe has nothing
but praise for his star
athlete. "Gregor is
the best overall swim-
mer that we have had
here at East Carolina
the past two years
said Kobe.
"A very hard
worker, he gives his
best at practice as well
as in the meets. He is
a good student, and
an outstanding young
man. He has really
been an asset to our
program.
Gregor is majoring
in industrial
technology, and
aspires to pursue a
career in the field of
plant design or
management. Like
many other young
students, however, he
is uncertain as to what
the future holds.
"Although it is not
in my present plans, 1
may pursue a
coaching career in
swimming said
Wray. "Whether 1 do
or not, 1 hope to
always be imolved
with swimming in
some manner,
because once you get
it in your blood, you
can never forget it
�rc-w-wwwwjwO DAYS ONLYM

-�.
mmi
Thurs - Fri.
March 24 - 25
10a.m. until 7pm
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
V 1st Floor newspaper lounge
:
By special arrangement with GALLERY LAINZBERG.
Cedar Rapids. Iowa
A SUDS, SAND & SUN SYMPOSIUM
u
ENROLL
NOW!
iy
EASTER WEEKEND EXTENSION COURSES
April 1 & 2. 1983
North Myrtle Beach
South Carolina Campus
Description Prarvquisita
Course �
H Can Redemption Valuable Free Gifts Ecology
BUD '02 Natural Lig Beautv Boo Basic Anatomy
Bl.0 103 6 Pacn f tie Sv Aer ai Jump Snow None uniesS .jmpmg
BUD 104 Tug ot War & Relay Races Phys Ed
LOOK FOR US MATRICULATING ON THE BEACH
Attention:
Male Summer School
Students
Natural Light
e. c. u.f ris be ec I u b
ULTIMAX
Flying disc tournament


a
a
a
a
a
a


a
a
a
a
a
a
am
FREE room for both
summer school sessions:
Air conditioning
Within walking distance of campus
Part time work also available.
See if you can qualifyv
� i
a
a
a
a
a

:
Contact Don Wilkerson
S.G. Wilkerson St Sons, Inc.
752-2101
326-27
BEHIND AWED
HEALTH BLDC.
Starts 11:00 a.m.
Z2Mm i
?





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Title
The East Carolinian, March 24, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 24, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.258
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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