The East Carolinian, March 22, 1983







(&z Ea0t (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.4�r
Tuesday, March 22, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
UNC Chancellor Fordham Denounces Funding
Medical School 'Not Needed'
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
"We built a new medical school
we didn't need said Dr.
Christopher C. Fordham III,
chancellor of the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in
a reference he made Thursday to
the ECU School of Medecine.
Fordham, who made his com-
ments at a meeting of the Greater
Raleigh Chamber of Commerce,
said he believed that the UNC
system is "overextended" and
that he opposes any attempts by
the N.C. Association of Indepen-
dent Colleges and Universities to
garner state support to supple-
ment their incomes.
When Fordham remarked that
the UNC system contains
"overbuilt colleges" he was refer-
ring directly in one case to the
ECU School of Medicine, which
was largely built as a result of the
strong lobbying efforts of former
Chancellor Leo Jenkins.
In the summer of 194, when
the plans for the ECU Medical
School were being developed,
UNC President W7illiam Friday
placed Fordham in complete
charge of the ECU medical school
program. Before becoming
chancellor at Chapel Hill, For-
dham was dean of the UNC
medical school.
On numerous occassions during
the development of ECU's
medical school, Fordham came
into conflict with Jenkins and
others who were developing the
project. At one point Fordham
prevented ECU officials from us-
ing any of the15 million set aside
by the General Assembly for
development of the school.
Despite his recent suggestion
that the ECU medical school was
not needed, Fordham's own
medical school dean, Dr. Stuart
Bondurant, and Dr. William
Anlyan, vice-president of health
affairs at Duke University, appear
to disagree with him. Both Bon-
durant and Anlyan believe that an
adequate number of medical doc-
tors are being educated in state
colleges. Neither felt there was a
surplus of medical doctors.
"I regret that he (Fordham)
said that said ECU Chancellor
John Howell, claiming that he did
not wish to make a public debate
out of the issue. "I think there are
a great many people in Eastern
North Carolina who are glad that
the medical school is there, and I
doubt that they think it's one too
many
Dr. William Laupus, dean of
the ECU School of Medicine, was
unavailable for comment, but ac-
cording to a spokeswoman in his
office, Laupus left word that he
had "no comment" regarding
Fordham's remarks.
On the issue of state funding to
private colleges, Howell agreed
with Fordham. "My position is
the same as President Friday and
all the chancellors in the entire
UNC system Howell said "I
think there should not be in-
creases in the amounts that the
state provides to private institu-
tions
Howell noted the UNC system
has already been forced to accept
a six-percent cut in its budget,
making it impossible for
employees of the 16 school UNC
system to receive cost of living
salary increases.
"We don't have as much
money to operate this year as we
thought we were going to have
Howell said, adding that the
budget office could only send 94
percent of the original fiscal year
amount promised to the system.
"We're also working in a year in
which nobody who works for the
state got a raise
Howell said the state's 38
private colleges received an
average of $850 per student in
state aid, including an increase of
S50 per student in the last year.
"We are not in favor of a raise
in state aid to private colleges
Howell said. "We don't think
that that's equitable at a time
when we're (UNC schools) talking
to the legislature about a raise
next vear
Reconstruction Begins On TKE House
By PAT RICK O'NEILL
Staff �ril�r
Preliminary repairs began last
week on the Tau Kappa Epsilon
fraternity house that was damag-
ed in an early-morning fire Jan. 8.
The fraternity has secured a loan
of $15,000 from a local bank to
repair damage to the attic area of
the three-story dwelling. The fire
was limited to the attic area, but
water and smoke damage occured
in several other rooms.
According to Assistant to the
Chancellor Charles R. Blake.
faculty advisor to the TKE frater-
nity a second mortgage was ar-
ranged with a local bank so
renovation could begin. All
repairs could be complete in less
than a month, Blake said.
Blake said the TKE organiza-
tion was in good financial condi-
tion.
The $15,000 loan will be used
for basic structural renovation,
including total rewiring of the
house, restoration of the roof,
complete shingling and a new ceil-
ing in four or five rooms damaged
bv water.
" Blake said rewiring, which will
cost $18,000, is a safety measure
to update the original wiring,
which was not fully equipped to
handle the load of the 14
residents, as well as replace
damaged areas.
Blake also said another $7,000
or $8,000 would be needed for ad-
ditional interior work to be done
by the fraternity brothers
themselves. He said painting,
clean-up and general re-
decorating would be handled by
members.
Blake said the recent TKE box-
ing tournament, which raised
about $2000 for the fraternity,
and other revenues including dues
from fraternity members, house
rent and alumni donations have
placed the TKE's on a "solid
foundation" financially. He
estimated the TKE organization
generates between $22,000 and
$23,(XX) a year in total revenues.
"We underestimated our in-
come Blake added. "We're in
pretty good shape
Blake praised the TKE alumni
members for their help and con-
cern during the last two months.
"They've been constantly helping
in many ways Blake said.
"Thev'e been helping us keep the
mortgage payments going he
added.
"We're very pleased said
Blake. "We've gone into this
thing with a great deal of planning
with the contractors, the city, the
boys and alumni members
Blake said that the contractors
began repair work on Monday
following a delay in having partial
electricty restored to the dwelling
to run elective tools, lights and a
large pump which was used to
remove water from the dwelling's
basement during the weekend.
The renovation calls for the at-
tic area to be converted into a
storage facility, while other rooms
on the first floor will be converted
to bedrooms to re-allocate space
for the four attic residents who
were displaced by the fire.
Blake thanked ECU director of
See TKE, Page 6
Memorial Held
r��Kto Bv SCOTT I 48SO-
The mood was somber Monday at the memorial service for EC I vtti
dent David Martin, who was killed in the March 2 explosion at atafc
Green.
Legislators Set Aside
SGA Money Limit Bill
Graduation Audience Limited
By DARRYL BROWN
uteuni NM Eaitor
Attendance at the ECU com-
mencement ceremony this year
will be cut by approximately one-
half over previous years, and
graduates will have to obtain
tickets for all guests, said Chair-
man of the Commencement Com-
mittee C.C. Rowe.
A new attendance-limiting pro-
cedure is being employed for the
first time because the graduation
ceremony must be held in Minges
Coliseum instead of Ficklen
Stadium. The football field in
Ficklen is set to begin renovation
before May 1 and will not be
available for the ceremony.
Graduates participating in the
commencement ceremony must
request tickets for family and
friends who want to attend the
ceremony. Each graduate will be
guaranteed two tickets for guests
upon request. Additional tickets
may be available if seats are not
filled.
Fourteen hundred graduates
usually attend the ceremony,
which normally has an attendance
of over 13,000. This year the at-
tendance must be cut to the
Minges capacity of about 6,900.
Ficklen Stadium can seat 35,000
people.
All graduating students should
have received an announcement
of the new procedure and a guest
invitation request card. Students
may submit the ticket request star-
ting next Monday, March 28,
through April 15. During this time
students can receive their initial
two tickets for guests. The pro-
cedure is not conducted on a first-
come first-served basis.
Between April 19 and April 29
the Commencement Committee
will fill requests for additional
tickets as room allows, according
to Rowe. Only about 5000 guest
tickets can be issued due to the
limited seating in Minges because
of fire and safety codes.
"It's a matter of taking care of
people who really want to came to
commencement Rowe said. He
said the coliseum had been used in
the past because of bad weather
"Whenever we went into Minges,
we've always had the problem of
overcrowding
Rowe said most students want
three to five tickets, and he ex-
pects most will be able to get that
many. "Two is not a lot of
tickets, but we'll try to take care
of more if we can
Audio speakers will be set up
outside the coliseum to so that an
overflow crowd can at least hear
the proceedings. Rowe said no
plans for outdoor seating have
been made.
Students can request their
tickets at the student organization
booth in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Commencment will be held on
May 6 and the band concert will
begin at 9 a.m. Former
Chancellor Leo Jenkins and
former U.S. Sen. Robert Morgan
will be given the First honorary
degrees awarded by ECU.
Morgan will give the commence-
ment address.
Cries of "cut of order
"motion to adjourn" and
"previous question" were heard
throughout debate Monday night
as the SGA Legislature received a
lesson in parliamentary pro-
cedure.
The thorough workout of
Robert's Rules of Order was a
result of a motion by the Student
Welfare Committee that would
put a 10-percent ceiling on the
amount of funds a group could
receive from the legislature during
its annual budgeting process. The
bill's sponsor. David Brown, said
the limit would ensure all student
groups a chance of getting money.
The problem is that the SGA
usually has around $100,000 to
appropriate during the annual
budgeting process. This year
groups have requested a total of
over $225,000, with some groups
asking for as much as $43,000.
These problems, according to
the speaker of the house and op-
ponent of the bill Gary Williams,
should be worked out by the
legislature via hardwork. not by
what he termed "passing the
buck" by enacting a limit.
The whole text of the bill in-
cluded a measure to go past the
limit in emergencies with a two-
thirds vote, arid exempted I -
ecutive council budget from the
limit.
With Williams speech, a small
group of legislators became
adamantly opposed to the bill.
Though they didn't hae the
numbers to defeat the measure.
they did have the skill to
manuever around a vote �ith
parliamentary tools.
The first try by the Williams'
faction was a move to send th
to the appropriations committee
so a complete study could be cone
on the bill. This measure was
defeated 16-10.
Williams then aked tor
motions that would hac
the bill, and each time he v-a
defeated. Yet. his strateg)
wearing down the �arengi1
other side was working. As the
meeting dragged on a n u
legislators began to leae. the vote
margin on motions to table and
kill the measure decreased
Then came quorum calls and
challenges to the chair, bu: a
all the determined debate an I fer-
vent finangling. the bill, after a -
cond motion, was sent to the ap-
propriations committee b a vote
of 16-14. The bill will come up or.
the floor again within the next few
weeks.
Education School Denied Accreditation
SRA PmMeiit Tory
dent of the Stndeat
tioas.
"KoH By CINDY WALL
Rosso is oae of the candidates running for presi-
Government Association in the March 30 elec-
The School of Education has
been denied accreditation renewal
by the National Council for Ac-
creditation in Teacher Education,
an organization that oversees
teacher training programs in the
United States.
According to Angelo Volpe, ac-
ting vice chancellor for academic
affairs, the school was turned
down because of problems in the
governing of its programs. Volpe
said the quality of the ECU pro-
gram was never questioned, but
that the administration,
maintenance and supervision was
not up to the standards of the
NCATE.
Both Volpe and Charles R. Co-
ble, the acting dean of the School
of Education, said they want to
assure students in the program
that the NCATE denial of ac-
creditation is only temporary and
that teacher certification is not
jeopardized. .
"It hinges on technical matters
unrelated to the cpyof tie
programs Coble told The East
Carolinian. The school has a year
to correct the problems, he said.
According to Coble, who of.
ficially succeeds Dr. Richard
Warner as dean on May 6, the
School of Education is required to
apply to NCATE every five years
for renewal of its accreditation.
The school is eligible to reapply at
any time during the next academic
year. Volpe and Coble were "very
confidant" that the organization
would accept the school's re-
accreditation application some
time next year.
"Our program has emphasized
diversity of teacher education pro-
grams Volpe said. Authority in
such a program is not centralized.
Volpe said the format of diversity
is one of the key area addressw
by the NCATE.
The School of Education was
informed of its denial March 1"
and is allowed a 15-day period in
which to appeal the decision. The
school has decided not to appeal
and will reapply in the fall
World News At A Glance
(UPI) WASHINGTON � President Reagan
said Monday he will nominate veteran government
executive William Ruckelshaus to be director of the
embattled Environmental Protection Agency.
Reagan praised Ruckelshaus' previous government
service � which included three years as chief of the
EPA when it was formed � and said he gave him a
"broad, flexible mandate
WASHINGTON � Rita Lavelle, former chiet
of the Environmental Protection Agency's toxic
waste enforcement, disobeyed a House subcommit-
tee subpoena to testify today. The panel voted to
charge her with contempt of Congress.
BRUSSELS, Belgium � European finance
ministers today agreed on an unprecedented
realignment of all currenciei in the European
Monetary System. That includes a further 2.5 per-
cent devaluation of the weak French franc.
NET ANY A, Israel � Lebanese and Israeli
negotiators made "more progress" today in
U.Ssponsored troop withdrawal talks. But they
left aside the crucial issue of security arrangements
for Israel, officials said.
SEATTLE � Protesters vowed to continue
monitoring progress of a train believed to be carry-
ing 100 nuclear warheads to a Trident submarine
base. They alleged the train violated speed limits in
an effort to thwart their vigils.
WASHINGTON - Through sharp words, secret
briefings and personal lobbying. President Reagan
will wage "an uphill battle" to dissuade Congress
from slowing the pace of his defense buildup.
Chief spokesman Larry Speakes said today, "It's
probably the toughest yet, as far as budget pro-
posals, for us.
WASHINGTON � The Labor Department says
the fund that helps pay for unemployment benefits
in 27 states will run out today. House and Senate
negotiators are working on a compromise version
of a jobs bill that contains $5 billion

i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 22, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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mere is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is otten
i.m.teo Therefore we cannot
guarantee ma' your announce
� A run as long as vou
want ano suggest mat you do not
rely solely on m,s column tor
pub
The oeaoine tor an
nents s 3 p m Monday
rrtt fwa. pap' ana 3
. � Aednesdaw tor the Thurs
�i. paper No announcements
�v weci after these deadlines
a oe printed
� space is available to a"
arnpus organizations and
� re. tments
PLEASE READ
BUSINESS
ADMISSIONS
For tnose st. den's who do not
�ee' School ol Business aom.s
s,on criteria dur.ng the
Feoruary 21 Var.n 4 1983
C-aigeof Viaior there wm be a
one aa. change of maior per.od
;w . kw 'nose students
A. meet me School of
s,ness dm ss on criteria
Those stude's who waritl be on
smpus on . � ' a. refluesl
ldmiSS tc tne school of
Dusmess bv following the stan
-�ocec re
�e students who will not be
,mpus Or July 1. "83 bu'
me, a ee' the School
Bv s ness admissions re
. �� it tne eno 01 the cur
� e semester may appi to
� mge theif maior t. tonowng
�� v procedure
Prior to leaving; campus this
ester p,ck op your tile from
� KjV sor
3Ke your f.ie to the depart
�. secretary "� Accounting,
Dec son Science Finance
Management or Marketing as
app'Opr ate
- . n e departmental
out me torm to reques'
�lange of maior evaluation
� t you meet School ot Business
e.e's ,ou will be Bdm
- , ' '983 and an aa
� be ass.gnea 11 you do
� ,ee' 'he reau rements. your
� . A oe returned to ihe
General College
" you return tc school in
� . me appropriate
lta r. ��� " board tor
� . so' assignment
The pam reliever Zomax is
being temporarily withdrawn by
McNeill Laboratories for
relabeling purposes concerning
the possibility ol allergic reac
tions Any containers of the drug
Obtained from the Student
Health Center should be return
ed to the Pharmacy at the
Center Please do not take
anymore ot the drug H you ob
tamed the drug from a drug
store please return to the place
ot purchase You will be reim
bursed the purchase price of the
tablets by the place of purchase
CHEERLEADER
TRY OUTS
The East Carolina university
varsity Cheerleader tryoutswill
te held at 7 30 p m on Tuesday
Mari h 29 1983 on the main floor
of Memorial Gym
The first practice session will
be held at 5 00 on Wednesday
March 16 at the east end of
Minges Coliseum An guys ano
girls interested in tryng out for
the 1983 84 squad should be pre
sent at this first practice ses
sion
NATURAL LIGHT
ULTIMAX
ASPA
March 26 27 is but a week
away and the irates are getting
their first ultimate tournament
together' Come out and see the
pest east coast teams compete
in ultimate The irates practice
every Toes � Thurs at me bot
torn of the hill at 4 00 Oub
meetings are Moo n.ghts 8 00
Rm28MSC Anyone nterested
may attertv
IM BASKETBALL
CHAMPIONSHIPS ON
TV
The resident e nail intramural
championship basketball
games teatur.no the Fie' ' � �
Sharpshooters versus me ���
Drivers and the Beik Banc's
versus the Jones Enforcers will
te replayed via video tape on
Wednesday. March 23 The
games will be shown on the big
screen TV in me Galley Uones
Residence Main beginning at
7 00 p m Come early for a
courts.de sea'1
INTERVIEWING
WORKSHOP
The Career Plannng and
Placemen! Service m the B'ox
House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you in
developing be"er interview.ng
- s tor use n your ob searr-
March 22 1983 Tuesday at 4 00
p m ano March 24 1983 Thurs
a 2 00 D A tilm and
o.scuss.or ot interviewing
through the Career Planning
ana Placement Servce will be
shared
SUMMER SCHOOL 19M
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits
for Summer School 1983 will be
accepted in the Cashier's Office.
Room 105. Spilman Building,
beginning April 5 Room
assignments will be made m the
respective residence hall offices
on April 7 and April 8
Thereafter, they will be made in
the Office of Housing Opera
tions. Room 201. Whichard
Building The rent for a term of
summer school is SIM tor a
semi private room and JlSOfor a
private room Additional rent In
the amount of 20 is required tor
Jarvis Hail
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy
provided such rooms are to be in
use this summer, are to make
reservations on Thursday. April
7 All other students may
reserve rooms on a first come
first serve basis on Friday.
April 8
Residence halls to be used for
women are Greene Slay (first
floor tor mobility impaired
students' and Jarvis Men will
oe housed n Fletcher. Slay
(t,rst floor tor mobility impaired
students' and Jarvis Hails
SOULS
Souls meeting will be held on
Thursday, March 24 at 7 00 p m
M 221 Mendenhall Committee
meeting will be at 00 p m
Everyone should attend All
organizations should have so
meone present
NCSL
MISSSOULS
PAGEANT
Miss Souls Pageant will be
heid on Sunday. March 27 at 6 00
p m in 244 at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Ticket are on sale
lor Jl SO in Room 255 Fleming or
can be purchased at door
All right folks can we be
serious tor a moment? We at
NCSL have run bulletins
sometimes rather strange ones
� n the East Carolinian but tor a
very good reason I NCSL the
North Carolina Student
Legislature is your student
forum to the world and to the
lawmakers on what concerns
you state, local, or national!
This is where students have
their say and now is the time to
get involved To those to NCSL
heading this week to the
Legislative Session in Raleigh
good luck guys, and have fun'
But tor those ot you still stuck at
ECU relax' Monday night we II
get back to business and speak
,ng of which these folks win take
over the business at the next
meeting In short, here are the
East Carolina Delegations
NCSL Front Four for 1983 84
Delegation Chairperson Kirk
Shelley. Vice Chairperson Lisa
Maness. Delegation Secretary
Doreen Henry Delegation
Treasurer Theresa Leamy
There they are folks please
give them your support Also
why not let them and NCSL
know how you teeP Getting your
opinion heard about topics from
hquor laws to Greenville to a
bilateral nuclear freeze is what
NCSL is all about Your voice
makes a difference, so why not
have a chance to use It? Jom us
Monday n.ght at 7 p m in Room
212. Mendenhall and to all out
current members and to even
our former members hey. come
on back. guys, we still want you
around Please attend this
meeting We'll review session
preview the April IC and next
year as well as other fun items
And to those of you who want to
join come on by and get mvolv
ed1 Yes. you can let the
lawmakers know how you feel
with NCSL
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may us the torm at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit Capitalize and
nyphenate words properly Leave
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doesn't tit No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad
All ads most be prepaid. Enclose
1st pet line ot fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lowet case letters.
Return lo THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office b 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday publications.
Name
Address
CityState
No lines
BAB
ter
D�
ne
Sh
i-er.car Sooet, for Person
B n gtrators will noia ts
8j eiec'ions on Apr I 6 at 3 C
Room 207 Raw s A
� . loais � ns ,0
� � eat become cart ol
PA contad Brad Eowarosor
- �k ewici Needed are
old memDers to he p
spe ASPA s prcgresive
To do your part get in
ana become an officer
member ASPA is ready
Are you ready to be part
SILENT DINNER
M e-ds e II -ave S em
- nnef ft! s Thursday n g"t
Vlai � U l� �' Marathon
- � s sponsored me S.gn
.ang.age Cub if ybu come
ha-e a great I me
tore
v.ec
EPILEPSY ALPHA
EPSILON DELTA
Dr jerome Ha'ier from the
Department of Pediatr.es at the
ECU School of Medicine Will
speak on the topic o Epnepsy
Tuesday n.ght March 22 at 7 30
p m .n Flanagan Rm 307 The
executive meeting of AED will
oe at 6 30
SAM
The Society tor the Advance
ment ot Management w,n mee
on Thursday March 24 to Pawl
104 at 4 00 Guest speaker Mr
DcnBa'ham V ce President of
Personnel wiW Naona' SprtW
,nQ ,n Aashngton DC �
r r � IOC
sneak o- Qua '� C rents
Management E.er.one s il
� tea o a'tenc
FRISBEE
The ECU frisbee club invites
everyone to come out and see
some of the best ultimat fnsbee
to be played on the east coast
tnis year The Natural Light
Ultima flymg disc tournament
,s this weekend March 26 and
77. behind the Allied Health
Bidg The first games will beg
at 11 00 come out and suppor'
the IRATES! The team plays on
Tues and Thurs at the bottom ot
College H.n at 4 00 Club
meetings are Monday nights
8 00 rm 248 Mendenhall
Anyone interested il more than
welcome to check it out
MARKETING
FILM SERIES
The Amer .an Markeng
Association and the Department
of Marketing will present a I Irn
se, cs on Marc" se.es on marc n
:3ana24,nRawll30at3 00 The
films will provide .ntormation
about marketing opportunities
� me areas of Advertising and
Promotion and Sales Manage
ment All interested ECU
students are urged to attend
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Ph. Beta Lambda will hold its
next meeting Wednesday
March 23. at 4 00 P m ,n Rawi
341 Nominations for officers
will be open
PHOTOS
For- your sake and others.
have your picture taken for the
ECU Yearbook' You may order
p.ctures if you want out at least
nave It made so you can always
be remembered as having Deen
here
IVCF
You ve been searching a"
semester tor a good Christian
teliowship that is perfect tor
you. right' Well, we ve Oeen
here an the time1 Come ana iom
us this Wednesday night at 6 30
,n the Biology Building N102 See
you there
AOH BEST LEGS
AOH is presenting a best legs
ontest to be held in front of the
Student Store Photographs are
oemg taken NOW can the AOn
house TODAY ana make your
appointment
SPECIAL
OLYMPICS
The Specal Olympics pro
gram ot Greenvi'le and Pitt
County is making preparations
tor their spr.ng games to be held
April 14. Iv83 at the East
Carolina Track I Bunting Field!
There will be a meet.no tor in
d.v.duais or groups .nterested in
volunteering wittl the Special
Olympics Wednesday March
23rd at 8 00 at M.nges Coliseum
Room 136 individuals or groups
interested in volunteering
should contact Bill Twine at
752 4137 ext 201 Dr Dave
Poretta at 752 6441 or attend the
meeting
FELLOWSHIP
The Fountain ot L.te Christian
Fellowship meets every
Wednesday Night at 7 00 P m at
the Ledon.a Wr.gnt Cultural
Center tor a t.me of fun
fellowship and Bible study
IRS ADVISORY
COUNCIL
APPICATIONS
Now's your chance to recom
mend policies suggest new ac
tivities programs and become
mvolved with the operation of
your intramural recreational
services program! Applications
are being accepted through
April 8 for the positions of coun
cil president and council
representatives The Advisory
Council includes a represen
tative trom each of the par
ticipation divisions fraternity,
sorority, residence hall (a
representative is included for
each of the three campuses
total ot 3 residence hall
representatives), clubdepart
ment and independent off
campus Pnnopal duties of the
Advisory Counc .1 include recom
mendation
policies procedures tor IRS pro
grams services, reviewing
disciplinary matters and ad
visdmg the IRS staff of student
concerns
Application forms are
available in 204 Memorial Gym
All interested students are en
couraged to apply not later than
the April 8 deadline
WHEELCHAIR
ATHLETICS
1983 CANOE TRIP
The Outdoor Recreation
Center for the Department of
intramural Recreational Ser
vices is sponsoring a Canoe Trip
on Wednesday. March 23. 1983
The trip is suitable for beginning
or experienced canoers
Trip participants will meet
behind Memorial Gym at 3 00
Dm on Wednesday tor a leisure
iv paddle down the Tar R.ver
lasting approximately 2 hours
Participants should anve back
at memorial Gym by 6 00 P m
Advance registration and pay
ment 13 00 per person, is due by
4 00 p m on Tuesday. March 22
1983 Groups are welcome For
registration or more mforma
lion call or stop by room 113
Vemonal Gym .757 6911 or
757 63871
SCEC
Student Council for Excep
t.onai Children ,s having Special
Educators from Fort Bragg
School System New Hanover
County School System and other
school systems They w.n be
d.scussmg iob opportunities
tneir own system, and .nterv.ew
tips Come iom us Monday
March 28 to 129 Speight at 4.00
it will be very benelioai
FIRST AID CLASS
CAR WASH
When was the last time you
aw the ong.nai color of your
ar? By letting the Spring
Pledge class of Gamma Sigma
S.gma Soror.ty wash your car
for a donation of S2 00, you can
help a paralyied foster child
land increase your gas mileage
by removing the lag of an that
extra weight') It will be open
March 26 Irom 10 am to 4 pm at
the Bypass Shell station on 101
W Greenville Rd
PRIMETIME
New location with tun
fellowship and training, spon
sored by Campus Crusade for
Chnst. m the Nursing Bunding
Room 101 Thursday 79 pm
E ueryone is invited
JUMP ROPE FOR THE
HEART EQUIPMENT
The Equipment has arr.ved
jump ropes. T shirts and Warm
up suits are here W.nd breakers
and prues are on the way The
date .s Apr.I 23 The place .s
Mmges Coliseum
COLORGUARD
TRYOUTS
Anyone who w.shes to try out
lor the ECU March.ng P.rates
Coiorguard are urged to come to
Help Sessions wh.cn w,n be
given every Wednesday n.ght 7 v
pm to the lobby of the muse
bunding Tryouts are April 23
Wiay 7 14 Males and females ac
cepted
PSICHI
Ps Cn. will hole IS � �
for -i-a crttcers tor 83 84
year ana n liation
membe-sor Sa"r 23
t.on a"a r '�t on
Wes'ern steer on Me"
Dr .rj'dOoir E a � ' '
win pay lor their own �
for a 'ouch of class c �
in sen" forma' cr
ciotn.ng For an aoed bo
severa � � ' ' � "�� "
become w.nners "� ps
fie draw.ng nea ma-
Ps, en as� new
members to ne'e M �
be a success now �
future You car fl
ting PS Cn Ma' I 1
AN
come out and iom us
The 1983 Southern States
Reg.ona' wneeicna.r Games
will be held on Apr.I 29 and 30 at
the University ot North Carolina
at Charlotte Events include ar
Chery track and f.eld sw.mm
,ng pentathlon weightl.ftmg.
slalom and table tennis
Students wishing to participate
Wi need to meet quaMng
standards tor events Par
t.c,pants are classified accor
o.ng t0 levels of ability For
oe'a is contactor Dave Porret
ta at 757 6441
PE MAJORS CLUB
Physical Education Ma,or s
Ciub members wm rave a
meeting Wednesday March 23 at
7 00 p m The topic ot discussion
will be the coordination of
Greenv.ne Special Olympics
with the Maiors Club Tom
H.neswitbDr Paretta wm con
duct the meeting at M.nges
Room 136
PRCCLUBMEETING
Tuesday n,grv at t 00 244
Mendennaii Elections tor fan
semester oft cers will be
discussed and also a gues'
speaker w.ll be present Please
come to support your club
A tree 8 hour Red Cross First
Aid Clas will be offered on Satur
day March 26 For more .ntor
mation call 756 4974
OFF ANY
COMPLETE PAIR OF
EYE GLASSES
l -UP IT" �� " Not pood
wMk �ekea �a�rtl�a apectai
The East Carolinian
Vi she campus mwmx
pmc 1923
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday dur.ng tne
acaoem.c year and every
Wednesday aur.ng the sum
mer
The East Caronn.an is the
of.c.ai newspaper of East
Carolina university, owned
operated and pubished tor
and by the students of East
Carol.na university
Subscription Rate HO yearly
The East Carolinian off-ces
are located to the Old South
Building on the campus ol
ECU. Greenville. NX.
POSTMASTER Send ad
aress changes 'o The East
Caroiinien, Old South
Bund.ng ECU Greenv.ne
NC 27834
The
SAL-jCIIIi LOMS
SOFT QQ,y
, CONTACTS
n�cj.i;Des30D.t aimttna
AND CARE KIT
aj? OPTICALII PALACE
703.�elUe3lvn Ac ,o� F,o�n Pltl Plata Ne.l To I H A Reallv
atv M Hams I it enved if. i�n
Ope" 9 10 am lo 6 p m Hon rt
4J0f
Telephone 757 4344. 4147.
� out and iom us .� �" �-�-
756-9430
ci
:
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center - Greenville
? "We have a large assortment of party goods,
cards, stuffed animals, gifts, and baskets for
your Easter weekend' Come in and get your
shopping done t f early!
iwilTopenakK
of doors�
PLAN A HOBIE
SAILING ADVENTURE TRIP
INTO YOUR SUMMER
Week long stress-challenge-
adventures along tne Outer
Banks ot North Carolina.
$125 Complete.
Register Now
Pot ntoirnatior- mntea
jr. vierrvoarst :x,taco v
Camp Don L�
Aiaparoe NC 285C
919 2&3 "06
� �
V
(ZB,M6i
&M s&Z&
m

'���
S
.?.
Q
Beginning May 22. June 19. Jul 9 or Jul 24
? ???�?
?)�?�?�???�?????
And
this will
'open a lot
onkarts.
Whptnet its � yoot yearbook
parents homi . ui best
mend's wane! your senior portrail
i a lasting nemonj
L�jULaj-fl-8.a.o.
State Farm .
Insurance Companies
Recognizes
Attention:
Male Summer School
Students
It sets j
have t(
Dynai
work
colleg)
youct
today
the fn
to do
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
e
FREE room for both
summer school sessions:
Air conditioning
Within walking distance of campus
Part time work also available.
See if you can qualify.
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
Bill McDonald
Bill on�J his stotf finished 37th out of
15 000 ogents in the U.S. in Auto Production.
Bill wrote over 1,000 new auto accounts
Bill is the leading agent in the District
in new Homeowner and Fire Insurance.
Production far the year 1982-writing over
250 new fire accounts.
Contact Don Wilkerson
S.G. Wilkerson & Sons, Inc.
752-2101
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tr ,sed Salad may be substituted
-C:Sl mV35& extra
NAHl
Vd t
v
Vicky Jones - Secretary
Amber McDonald - Receptionist
Vickie Taylor - Office Manager
Devwanda Williams - Secretary
Call Bill McDonald
at 752-6680
State Farm - E. 10th St Greenville
Two Locations
Location No 1
Owv.lW totoo Clue
BO lo Si
o, Intecsecrwn � �" A
ot E C U Co��e��� a �0'
��Location No.2
Tfc, Romodo lf�
901 Green�ilte B�d
. Jw� WSouteellCUC.
1 one -���- iwa
�, ,cKee�l� heto- �� '
looms end hrees
mmm ��
A





y�llii�icf
15
ih m
�"MLMJiSEh
J
ijg
PLAN A HOBIE "
ADVENTURE TRIP '
INTO YOUR SUMMER

m
EIGHT CHAPTERS
BABYLONIAN HISTORY
TOMORROW'S EXAM
AND CATHY'S WAITIN
�,o
arm
Companies
YOU
BiH McDonald
faff finished 37th out of
in the U.S. in Auto Production.
1,000 new auto accounts
ng agent in the District
owner and Fire Insurance.
r the year 1982-writing over
iccounts.
� � . Jones - Secretary
Amber McDonald Receptionist
Vickie Taylor - Office Manager
Dewanda Williams - Secretary
Call Bill McDonald
at 752-6680
� ��� � � - E 10th St . Greenville
It gets down to what you want to do and what you
have to do Take the free Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics lesson and you can do it � handle all the
work college demands and still have time to enjoy
college life
You can dramatically increase your reading speed
today and that s just the start Think of the time,
the freedom you d have to do the things you want
to do For twenty years the ones who get ahead
DOIT!
have used Reading Dynamics It's the way to read
for today's active world �fast, smooth, efficient
Don't get left behind because there was too much
to read. Take the free Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics lesson today You can dramatically
increase your reading speed and learn about
advanced study techniques in that one free
lesson. Make the college life the good life With
Reading Dynamics you can do it
Two Lo "ions
'Location No 1
Gr��n�itU Rotory Club
809 Johnston St
at Intersection of Rotory A�e
and Johnston St Just 1 .blocks North
dKCU Compus on Rotary
'�Location No 2
The Romodo Inn
301 GreenII Bd
)u�t i mile South ot I C U Compus
r.a, Intersection o.Oeenlie US 2o4 By Pos,
and Arlington Bl-d
,� schedule oelow ond at r.ght tor
rooms ond times
Schedule Of FREE LESSONS
TODAY MAR.22 Noon and 3pm Rotory-
-7pm Ramada
WEDNESDAY MAR.23 2pm,4:30pm,7pm Rotary
THURSDAY MAR.24 1:30pm Rotary-5pm,7:30pm Ramada
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
Seating is limited, so
please plan on
attending the
earliest
possible
lesson!






�IB �aHt (Earnlttuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, 0,1 Maw
MlKE HUGHES, Managmt Eduor
WAVERLY MERRITT, D,rrc,or of Advrr,UU,t ClNDY PLEASANTS. Sports Edxor
Scott Lindley, bus,� � Greg Rideout, mm tw
ALl AFRASHTEH. CM Mamjttr STEVE BACHNER, Emtrtammtm Editor
Stephanie Groon. rnm ��� Juliana Fahrbach, sivi,Ed�0r
Clay Thornton, r�a&��� Todd Evans, production Manage
March 22, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
ECU Med School
Playing An All-Important Role
Speaking last week before the
Greater Raleigh Chamber of Com-
merce, UNC-Chapel Hill
Chancellor Christopher Fordham
expressed his disapproval of North
Carolina's system of educational
funding.
Fordham blamed the state's fun-
ding crisis on unnecessary
overbuilding" of its colleges and
universities. "It represents a
serious problem he emphasized.
"We're overextended Right
now, we can't pay our bills, and
they're asking for more
Among the chancellor's il-
lustrious list of unnecessary expen-
ditures was the development and
organization of the ECU School of
Medicine, which began nine years
ago. "We built a new medical
school we didn't need he said.
It seems incredibly ironic that a
"medical school we didn't need"
has taken on the role of medical
center for eastern North Carolina.
Perhaps Fordham forgets that life
does exist east of the Piedmont.
The constituents of eastern North
Carolina � who number in the
millions � have the same medical
and educational needs as those to
the west. And to maintain that the
building of the ECU medical
school was a mere spendthrift tac-
tic only emphasizes the same
Triangle-based ignorance that has
become all too familiar in Green-
ville for years.
Of all people to question the
need for a medical school in this
region of the state, Fordham
would seem an unlikely candidate.
In July 1974, he was placed in
complete charge of the ECU med
school program by UNC President
William Friday. But even then,
Fordham seemed more interested
in supreme jurisdiction than in ex-
ecuting a worthwhile venture, tabl-
ing the $15 million set aside by the
state legislature for the school's
construction and bickering
endlessly with then Chancellor Leo
Jenkins. In the end, in fact, the
ECU School of Medicine was com-
pleted in spite of Fordham.
Furthermore, Fordham would
have done well to take counsel with
the dean of his own school of
medicine, Dr. Stuart Bondurant,
who contends, "It seems that
North Carolina medical schools
are now educating approximately
the correct number of physicians
for the state, while access of North
Carolinians to medical education is
below the national average.
"If these observations and con-
clusions are correct Bondurant
continued, "there appears to be no
reasonable basis for reducing the
size of the medical schools or
otherwise reducing access of North
Carolinians to careers in
medicine
With this in mind, it becomes
readily apparent that Fordham's
contentions have no basis what-
soever.
The fact is, Fordham is sweating
out a minor shift in prestige. As
more state funds are invested in
ECU's School of Medicine, his
own medical school receives less
money, something administrators
at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill simply
aren't used to.
Without a doubt, each of the
state's constituent universities is
feeling the pinch as North
Carolina's legislators trim the
educational budget more and more
each year. But taking random jabs
at one of the state's most wor-
thwhile investments in recent
years, the ECU School of
Medicine, with little or no factual
basis, illustrates little more than
childish envy on Fordham's part.
State Senators Can Freeze Resolution,
Signaling A Gray Day For Green's Future
B PAT O'NEILL
"Trickery, trickery declared the
Rev. S. Collins Kilburn, executive direc-
tor of the North Carolina Council of
Churches, referring to the tactics last
Thursday of Lt. Gov. James C. Green
and other state senators who used
parliamentary manipulation to defeat
the nuclear freeze resolution in the
Senate.
The resolution, which won approval
in the state House last week, calls for the
United States and Soviet Union to work
toward a bilateral and verifiable freeze
on the development, testing and produc-
tion of nuclear weapons.
For more than a year, nationwide
public pressure in support of a nuclear
freeze has expanded to the point that
almost three-fourths of the American
people support the idea. This, despite
strong lobbying by ultra-conservatives,
who are attempting to discredit the
freeze by claiming it is largely supported
bv the Soviet KGB.
It is important to note that an1
others, conservative syndicated colum-
nist James Kilpatrick has publicly.
declared his support of the freeze. I asl
vear, he warned Republicans that there
was nothing in the nuclear freeze pro-
posal that an good conservative cot
not agree with. He also cautioned hi-
fellow Republicans not to allow the
Democrats and liberals to claim owner-
ship of what was perhaps one ot the
most important issues the world faces
In North Carolina, led b the
"running scared tactics of Gov James
B. Hunt, who claimed he was against the
freeze resolution, the anti-freeze war-
riors have claimed a hollow victorv tor
militarism. Their efforts to deteat the
resolution are among the greatest
mistakes the N.C. Senate has ever made.
Throughout history, there has never
been an issue of greater urgency than
this one. To borrow a term I've seen on
several bumper stickers: "Nuclear
War Final Insanity
John Caldwell, chancellor emeritus of
N.C. State University, during his com-
ments before the N.C. General Assem-
ble last month, called on the legislature
to support the freeze as a victor for
"reason and conscience saying that
passage of the freeze in North Carolina
would gain some time and hope for
humanity. "Call a halt to the growing
madness and make room for sanitv he
concluded.
Unfortunately. Jimmy Green el al
have not heeded this call to halt the
menace of the nuclear arms race; the
have opted to make no room for sanity.
The people of North Carolina will not
forget this one quickly. Green, who ha-
greater political ambitions, ma have
made the greatest political � and moral
� error of his career.
Etiquette Shmetiquette; Have A Good Time
Editor's Note: Stan Landers is vaca-
tioning in sunny Smyrna this week, so as
his second fiddle, I'll be filling in as best
I can.
Dear Stan Landers: My roommate,
Edna, and I have been arguing for weeks
about a matter of table etiquette, and I
write to you as a last hope.
MIKL HLGHLS
�r
It all started when I cooked a delicious
dinner of chitterlings and hog jowls for
St. Patrick's Day. You see, Edna's Irish.
Anyway, we were sitting at our table, en-
joying the extravagent eats, when all of a
sudden, Edna coughs up a chunk of grey
meat onto her plate. She said it was too
tough to swallow. I picked it up, chewed
it a while and agreed. But when I told
her she should at least cover it up in the
tablecloth, she stood up and belched out
her disagreement. She said she'd read in
one of your lesser competitor's columns
(Dear Abby, I think) that what she did
was proper. I think not. So tell me, Stan,
who's right?
GRISTLED IN GRIFTON
Dear Gristled: In the first place, there
is no single right or wrong in a matter
like this one. A few etiquette sugges-
tions, however, may be of some use to
you and Edna: Some "experts" do say
that it is proper to place the unsightly
glop on one's plate. However, some
others contend that the chunk should be
delicately placed in one's napkin on
one's lap. I tend to disagree with both
sides, to some extent.
What 1 always try to do when I find
myself in that situation is turn what
would otherwise be a social embarass-
ment into a fun time for all! You'd be
surprised at how many things you can do
with a stubborn piece of meat. You can
mold it into a cuddly animal shape, play
hockey with it on your plate, toss it to an
unexpecting friend and the best part
is, you can save it in the refrigerator for
later use! With this in mind, not only
will you avoid the constant embarrass-
ment of chewy pork � you'll be the hit
of every party and social gathering
you'll ever be invited to. Good luck
and good eating.
Dear Stan Landers: I don't live
around Greenville but am aware of your
column through mutual friends. I've got
this problem. I coach collegiate basket-
ball at a school that I won't mention
because the administrators at Maryland
(fictional school) probably wouldn 7 like
it too much. I can't reveal my true iden-
tity either, because that would give me
away. So, for the purposes of this letter,
let's just say my name is "Righty
You may think you know who I am, but
I'm not him Honest.
Anyway, about my problem: I have
recently been blindly accused of the
worst kind of illegal pick imaginable �
blackmail. But it's simply not true. I'm
not a dirty player; I've always played by
the rules. Just ask the NCAA. In all my
years here, they've never been able to
catch me at anything.
Oh well, let me explain the situation as
I see it. It all started last fall, when one
of my players, a big, tall, black fellow �
a helluva nice guy � was walking back
to his dorm room one night and stumbl-
ed (figuratively, of course) across this
poor little coed with her blouse caught
on a tree limb (a common problem on
many campuses, like for instance at
oh say the University of Maryland).
Well, to make a long story short, he bent
over to help the girl out and accidentally
ripped her blouse off. Naturally, the rest
of her clothes fell off as well, so being
the chivalric man he is, the player took
off his own clothes and offered to cover
her. But by gosh, he got her out of that
tree!
Then, the next thing you know, she's
filing rape charges against him. I just
couldn't believe it! I know that little
hussie had it all planned out from the
start.
Anyway, my star center (not his real
position) gets put on probation, and the
team starts dropping important games
left and right. So, I call this girl, merely
to suggest she get some psychiatric help,
and the next thing I know, I'm being ac-
cused of blackmail!
The season's over for us, having lost
our second-round game to a highly-
touted university from somewhere in
Texas. But now, I face the prospect of
losing my job. Injustice, it seems, is
everywhere, Stan. What, if anything,
can I do to fight back?
TENSE IN TUR TLETO WTV
Dear Tense: You sound like my kinda
guy, a real honest Abe, a real patriot.
But let me give you a little advice: Tr
calling the girl's friends. Maybe thev car.
bring her to her senses. If not. then
throw your weight around a little; use
your "pull After all, you must have
some "pull But remember, if all else
fails, Righty, then just do what you've
done so well for so long now denv.
deny, deny. Good luck both on and in
the court!
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a world -
renowned delinquent and hell-raiser
from Yonder. N.C, once checked out
an anatomy book from Joyner Library
and returned it three davs late!
-Campus Forum
Rape Ain't That Simple, Ann
To Ann Shirley, Alumnus CSC1
Like you, most of the females on this
campus are disturbed by the recent
reports of rapes on and off campus.
Your proposed solution to avoid
deserted areas day or night is unfeasi-
ble, unrealistic and all too often im-
possible. Your simplistic solution only
serves to imply that women are respon-
sible for their rapes. Rapes do not oc-
cur only in dark, deserted areas. I sup-
pose that the woman in Clement dorm
should have had someone with her
when she went to the lobby. Your
preaching doesn't do very much for
her. (Last) summer, another college
student was attacked while walking
with a friend in a well-lit, non-deserted
area of Greenville. Rapes can occur
where we're least likely to expect them.
Women should not be made to feel
that they are bad or doing something
wrong when they decide to go
somewhere alone. A woman should be
able to go anywhere she wants to alone
� even at night. I am not such an
idealistic person that 1 do not see the
risks involved, but having this need for
protection pushed on women destroys
what little independence they have
gained over the last 100 years and
relegates them to an inferior position in
society.
I do not intend to have someone
around at all times to protect me from
things that might happen. As a mature
adult, I would like to be able to take
care of myself, and I resent the fact
that 1 am made to feel like a small child
who must be guarded and watched
over.
If a solution to this problem exists,
I'm sure it is much more reasonable
than constant escorting and protection.
The problem must stem from the wav
that men and women view one another.
Perhaps if we stopped seeing women as
the property of males and males as the
protectors of womankind, things
would change. Trying to see one
another as human beings with in-
dividual strengths and weaknesses
might help. Don't make the woman
who has already been humiliated feel
any more at fault. Ann Shirley, I really
don't have a solution to offer, but 1
hope you see that neither do you.
Deborah Green
Junior, CSCI
Campus
B PA IRK K
ON Fill
-
President of the
ECl Co. .
Republicans Den-
Kilcovne called
Thursday 's state
Senate defeal
nuclear freeze resolu-
tion a "
cause of national
defense
nuclear freeze
byisi and F '
English Ins
i dith Wcbl
the defeat
resolution, � I
omphshed
unusual p
t a r y rr, a
"under: .
neakv "
iu
left in the ha i
Jame- C
an opponent
re He
� ecej
tie I

ment to th.
able W:
nted
Gn
- '
� �� tent 11
.
rh
The � �.
FCC Gives
To WZMl
Warren Baker.
general manger
WZMB radio station.
proudly held out a
Mngle -heet of what he
termed "an unassumi-
ng white piece
paper The paper
j- from the Federal
C o m m u n i c a
Commission which
stated that WZMB.
until December i.
1988 was a fully
licensed. FM-
broadcasting station.
For Baker, who has
been involved �
WZMB in sev
capace- since 198
receipt of the licei

-
� �
:� � '
culminai
-
The c
� i
Ba�
-
he was si I
I
Jeter, w
t a :
B spec a an i
MARCH IS
FOR SAVIN
At the
BICYU0
90S
1
IRCRl
SPRING TUNE
ONLY $121
includes Adjustmej
Gears,Cones.True Wne�
Check out the V 1983
fc�ooo�c�oc�o�cccoc�occc
Greenville's B
Now Being
Most delivery pizzas .a
true quality and have
delivery costs in the prl
PIZZA INN has chang
all that'
We sell our dell
pizzas at Menuj
No Surcharge,
give FREE Dr
our large and
pizzas. TRY U!
CALL 7S8-6266Greerv
A
I m





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 22, 1983
oinri
mri"7
M� itn
ff�rr
Resolution,
jreen's Future
( thai among
ated colum-
cl has publicly
freeze I asf
- thai there
ze pro-
e could
cautioned his
to allow the
. laim owner-
ne ol the
d � ices.
by the
' (io James
- was against the
freeze war-
w victor) for
lefeal the
- the greatest
Si. Senate has ever made.
history, there has neer
�e of greater urgency than
this one To borrow a term I've seen on
several bumper stickers "Nuclear
inoi (a y
1 � chancellor emeritus of
1 niversity, during his com-
' - N. General ssem-
I iture
as a ry for
cience that
n Non � arolina
� �pe for
lit I the growing
� -anit he
� Green et al
til to halt the
H arms race; they
make no room for sanity.
u lina will not
�ne quickl) (ireen, who has
ambitions, ma) have
political � and moral
areer
d Time
idvice: Try
iends Maybe the) can
her senses It not, then
hi around a little; use
ftei all, you must have
B 11 remember, it all else
i iust do what you've
� o long now deny,
den. Good luck both on and in
Sote Hike Huuhes, a world'
delinquent and hell-raiser
,r V.C once checked out
� boot '� loyner I ibrary
i it three days late!
le, Ann
'lution to this problem exists,
I'm sure it is much more reasonable
than constant escorting and protection.
� problem must stem from the way
that men and women view one another.
;aps it we stopped seeing women as
ne propert) of males and males as the
protectors ol womankind, things
would change. Trying to see one
another as human beings with in-
dividual strengths and weaknesses
might help. Don't make the woman
W bo has ahead) been humiliated feel
la i more at fault. Ann Shirley, I reallv
Icon't have a solution to offer, but I
hope von see that neither do you.
Deborah Green
Junior, CSC I
9f?,pus Con�niunity Reacts To Freeze Defeat
O'NEILL Senate resolution was the house last week the rni� u -ks-i. �w. c
Suit Write
President of the
ECU College
Republicans Dennis
Kilcoyne called last
Thursday's state
Senate defeat of the
nuclear freeze resolu-
tion a "victory for the
cause of national
defense Local
nuclear freeze lob-
byist and ECU
English Instructor
Edith Webber called
the defeat of the
resolution, which was
accomplished largely
through the use of
unusual parliamen-
tary maneuvers,
"underhanded" and
"sneaky
The fate of the
Senate resolution was
left in the hands of Lt.
Gov. James C. Green,
an opponent of the
freeze. He opted to
cast an unprecedented
tie-breaking vote sup-
porting an amende-
ment to the resolution
that removed the con-
dition that the freeze
be bilateral and
verifiable. When the
votes on the amend-
ment counted up to a
24-24 tie. Green cast
the 25th voe suppor-
ting the amendment.
A subsequent vote to
table the resolution
passed by a 25-23
margin.
The freeze pro-
posal, debated in the
Senate for about a
month, was passed in
the house last week.
The House resolution
calls on President
Reagan and Congress
to seek a bilateral and
verifiable freeze on
the production,
testing and deploy-
ment of the nuclear
arsenals of the United
States and the Soviet
Union.
The amendment to
remove the require-
ment making the
freeze bilateral and
verifiable was in-
troduced by Sen.
Harold W. Hardison,
D-Lenoir, a leader of
the freeze opponents.
Supporters of the
measure claimed that
the Hardison amend-
ment was introduced
as an attempt to kill
the resolution. Har
dison denied the
claims saying that his
amendment was
designed as a com-
promise. "If anyone
thinks Sen. Har-
dison's amendment
was not (intended) to
kill it, then I have
some underwater real
estate I want to sell
you said Sen.
William G. Hacock,
D-Durham, a prime
sponsor of the freeze
proposal, in the
newspaper interview.
Webber, who has
led the freeze lobby-
ing effort in Green-
ville on both the state
and national levels,
said she was disap-
pointed by the "very
underhanded way" in
FM
which the Senate
resolution was
defeated. "It's logical
and sensible to stop
building (nuclear
weapons) Webber
said. "The freeze is an
excellent way to begin
this process of reduc-
ing nuclear arsenals
"A lot of the
(Senate) members
who really did not
vote for this resolu-
tion, who thought it
was morally wrong or
something, wanted to
find some way out
Kilcoyne said. "With
a little parliamentary
manuvering they
found a way to water
down the resolution
to make it not worth
voting on Natural-
ly I'm pleased
Webber claimed the
Senate defeat of the
resolution was a case
of politicans not pay-
ing attention to their
constituents. "If they
have to do sneaky
things to kill it, it
must have been well
supported you feel
as if your represen-
tatives are trying to
steal a vote from
you Webber said.
"Elected represen-
tatives have to take
postions on con-
troversial issues
continued Webber. "I
would think they
would try to do their
best to listen to all
their constituents.
Webber said by
defeating the freeze
resolution, legislators
might push people to
"give up" on the
political process or
towards supporting
third party can-
didates. "They'd have
to turn themselves in-
side out to convince
me that the common
good was served by
defeating the freeze
Webber said.
Opposition to the
freeze proposal was
heavy from several
conservative
organizations in-
cluding the National
Congressional Club,
the political organiza-
tion of Republican
Sen. Jesse A. Helms.
The Congressional
Club financed radio
and television ads
against the resolution.
The freeze move-
ment was also dealt a
serious blow earlier
this month when Gov.
James B. Hunt joined
the ranks of the op-
position.
At the national
level, a similar nuclear
freeze resolutuion
seems certain to pass
in the House of
Representatives, while
it appears less likely in
the Republican con-
trolled Senate.
Republican Sen. John
P. East has said the
nuclear freeze effort is
a plot orchestrated by
the Soviet Union.
President Reagan
claims a freeze on
nuclear weapons
would lock the nation
into a position of in-
feriority with the
Soviet Union. Freeze
supporters see ihe
treeze as an important
step in stopping an
nuclear arms race,
which they say is br-
inging the world to
the brink of nuclear
annilation.
To WZMB Radio Through 1988
Warren Baker, marked the end of a license iPiPrh,Hi,M� a ,h,n�. :5 � .
Warren Baker
general manger of
WZMB radio station,
proudly held out a
single sheet of what he
termed "an unassum-
ing white piece of
paper The paper
was from the Federal
Communications
Commission which
stated that WZMB,
until December 1,
1988 was a fully-
licensed. F M -
broadcasting station.
For Baker, who has
been involved with
WZMB in several
capacities since 1980,
receipt of the license
marked the end of a
long road of hard
work. "I feel great
Baker told The East
Carolinian. "This is a
culmination of efforts
dating back to 1978.
The culmination of a
lot of work by a lot of
people
Baker was busy all
morning Monday call-
ing people to share the
good news. At the
time of this interview,
he was still trying to
reach ECU medical
school student John
Jeter, who Baker call-
ed a "key-figure" in
obtaining the new
license. Jeter had been
involved with ECU
campus radio since
1978 when he worked
with the previous AM
radio station, WECU.
He was instrumental
in coordinating the
switch to FM, accor-
ding to Baker, and in
the opening of
WZMB, which began
broadcasting in
February of 1982.
Baker said he was
surprised that WZMB
had received its
license, which could
have taken up to two
years to process. The
license does not mean
- TWO DAYS ONLY
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Thurs - Fri
March 24 - 25
10a.m. until 7p.m.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
1st Floor newspaper lounge
By speciaTarrangement with GALLERY LAINZBERG,
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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Most delivery pizzas lack in
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a change in any par-
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station's work, but it
is the official recogni-
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the .ation bv the
FCC.
WZMB had receiv-
ed its license from the
FCC Friday, but the
station's call letters
were incorrectly listed
as WZBM. Baker
received the corrected
license Monday.
Baker, who's term
as general manager
ends on April 15,
plans to re-apply for
the position that he
won last year from
Sam Barwick, the
previous general
manger.
Baker said he and
his staff had no im-
mediate celebration
plans. "We're too
busy to party he ad-
ded. "Don't tell the
man lies quipped
another employee
who had different
ideas. "Well, 1 guess
we'll have a little time
for a partysaid Baker.
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Copyright '983
Kroge' Sav on
ua-it'ty RioMs Reserved
Mcne s
oc2 to Oeatrs
Items and Prices
Effective Wed M�r .
thru Set Mar 26. 1963
Sty
V.

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Natural Light
v.oz mm
Cans
TAB. DIET COKE OB
Coca-Cola
v
'�3v
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Eacf of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available tor
sale m each Kroger Sav on except
as specifically noted m this ad It we
do run out of an item we in otter
you your choice of a compretie
'tern when available reflecting me
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will entitle you to purchase the
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Open Mon thru Sat 8am to Midnight
Sun 9 am to 9 pm
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KROGER
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FROM THE DELI
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24-Oz.
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SAVE
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save
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KROGER FROZEN
Orange Juice
S99
12-Oz
Cans
firwind Chuck
VAN GASP'S
Beenee Weenee
88
KROGER LOWFAT
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1 HI I AS! t AKOl INIAN
MARC H 22. 1983
N.C. Prison System Ineffective, Judge Says
A judge claimed
last week that North
Carolina has been
consistently ranked
first in the nation in
incarceration rates
and that the real vic-
tims of crime are the
taxpayers who are
forced to support a
system that is not
achieving its goals.
Judge Willis P
Whichard, a Ourham
ludge and chairman
of the Citizen's Com
mission Report on
Alternatives to In-
carceration, was in
Greenville Thursdav
night to discuss the
recommendations ot
the commission he
chaired for two years.
"The United
States, which we call
the land of the free,
incarcerates people at
a highei rate than any
country in the civiliz-
ed world Whichard
said. He called in-
carceration a
' ' p a r c u 1 u r a r 1 y
American
phenomenon" that
had been established
in the earlj 1800s by
Quakers who were
searching for a more
humanitarian method
of dealing with law
breakers.
The Quaker ideal
was that incarcerated
people would use their
time of isolation to
pray and repent.
Whichard painted a
glum picture of the
N.C. criminal justice
system. He called it
costly, ineffective and
overcrowded. "Either
we have the worst sort
of people in the world
in North Carolina or
there's something
wrong with the
system Whichard
said. "1 think it's the
latter
Whichard said that
incarceration for long
periods of time was
relatiel new in
North Carolina.
Whichard said the
high level of blacks in
the state's prisons was
due to poverty, lack
of education and the
background of the of-
fender White
prisoners were not put
in Central Prison until
1922.
"Incarceration is
an extremely expen-
sive and costly
remedy Whichard
said, noting the an-
nual cost of keeping a
person in jail in is
$9,600. Whichard
said that during the
time he was a judge
the annual state cor-
rections budget has
grown from $28
million to $168
million including $111
million used for new
prison construction.
Besides the high
cost of incarceration,
Whichard also
pointed out that 76
percent of the people
admitted to N.C.
prisons are admitted
for non-violent of-
fenses. Some
estimates also put the
state recidivism rates
(the number of ex-
offenders who return
to prison) at about 60
percent.
According to
Whichard, North
Carolina actually has
a low crime rate.
"North Carolina is
at a cross-roads
Whichard said,
"where it faces a
choice between conti-
nuing to build more
prisons or looking
toward alternatives
He added that
because of the
economy that the
facilities for 14,000.
Whichard said that
what he termed
"community based
alternatives" were the
kev recommendations
another deficency.
"Either we have the worst sort of people
in the world in North Carolina or there's
something wrong with the system. I
think it's the latter
of the commission number of people tur-
made up of lawyers, rung to crime would
TKE House Repaired
Continued From Page 1
housing Dan Wooten tor
assistance in relocating the 14
1 Kl residents left homeless b the
blae. 1 he dwelling was condem-
ned b city, building inspectors
the da) after the blae. "Dan
Wooten was really super in
assisting (Tkl- members) on a
month to month basis Blake
said. Ikl members who were left
homeless from the fire are now
living in dorm rooms, other
fraternity houses and sharing
apartments with friends, he add-
ed.
Ik-cause of their precarious
financial situation. Blake said it
had not been decided how much
of the revenue from this year's
tournament would be given to
charity. "St. Judes will be much
better off (over the long run) it
this fraternity survives Blake
said.
The Kast Carolinian will publish
SGA candidate platforms in next
Thursday's edition.
All candidates must have plat-
forms to The Fast Carolinian by
tomorrow, March 23 at 5 p.m.
Thcv must be typed and double-
spaced. NO EXCEPTIONS.
I he Fast Carolinian offices are located on
second floor of Old South building,
across from Jovner Library.
legislatures, ex-
offenders, clerics and
others.
He cited restitution
to the victims as
increase. North
Carolina's prisons
and jails at present
hold more than
17,500 inmates in
calling the victim a
"neglected and
forgotten person"
who, instead of get-
ting compensation for
their losses, is made to
pay still further
through taxes to keep
an offender in prison
Client-specific
planning was also
mentioned bv
Whichard as a viable
alternative to in
carceration. This pro-
gram provides a
tailor-made sentenc
ing plan for each of
tender If all condi
tions of the plan are
kept by the offender
he or she docs not ge"
sent to jail. Whichard
also supported an ev
pansion of the use ot
probation.
Whichard said that
the three goals of a
criminal justice
system are punish
ment. rehabilitation
and deterrance
"Prison does nc
rehabilitate he said
Treat the crew and we'll treat you,
Get your career off to a flying start
while youVe still in college.
Irive to fan I 11 � � ��'�
� i Marine on cani is h
schoo . � . �
. ireer with us of two way?
�. ire si t'Hen eai
nth in tin Marirn I ' irps Plah m
Leadi rs Class PLC in PLC aviation we can
s is a yreal . . rtui t ' i s
vai i' U'aoeis anl i i
I'd and self- '�
" � �
t starl
in two six-w el
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II V . '� � ��
. ISS 'S IH I
m t � done in �ne
.iph im res train
� ssii ins and uiiih irs
� . � m � �� idy on
mi.irantee flight school and civilian Hying your wa it the Marine Corps
essons during yon lor veai And in PLC law Platoon Leaders Class Make u appointment
wi can guarantee summei employment in the with y mi Marine (' irpsiffic i Selection
, field while vou re gaining youi advanced fficei thn ugh y ui college placement center.
� Y
�S
Every
Monday
&
Tuesday
Night
No Coupon Necessary
Ever; Vonda, ana Tuesday night, ter� wee
ot trie sear oraer any large - " re topping
pizza tor trie cr Family Night Special"
small P zza witti e sae
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service zone
FREE ana aei'verea ree n our
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Or � p t 2 p Z2 I " nuteS
Two pizzas for the price of one . now that s a treat you can t beat'
When it comes tc f pizza pta comes to vou
good a tn -r. '��
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STATION
r�?e FwrRowrz� our 9fdwso(?S
� -���-��
Minister Talk-
Central Amen
Fact Finding
Former t 'i
Catholu ' � 11 ainman
Father Charles
Mulholland will be.
ECU on Th .
speak on hi
fact finding :rI �
Central Ame-
Mulholland
served j � t
chapla.r
until 1978
to Greenville a
of CentM �
Week'
state
Cen-fd
Week is c
bv the Cam �
faith Td-
Central V-
the t��
of the N '
ofh
pose i
Ca:

studv. �
on beha f ol
tral An
anc -
cd

. .
i

the I

'
-

-
-

I
tin
.

-
gOv
. n

ECU Student
Spend Summ
Underwater S
Rv sll R1
MOR(,n
If vou've eve: beer, I

.recks or interested in
.I
i
I
-
-
working under
you could earn su
semester hours' a
b particir . n a
unique program th -
summer
A field schoc
Maritime Hist
Underrate: i
chaeolog) ill be h
in Swansboro, June
13 through Ju! 22
The program
co-sp msored bj I
and Swansboro s
200th �ersar
Cdcbrai i
tee
rsareeiK
attend
ricip
. eted -
t r o - -
m
historr,
re
m
Two �'C c I
cla
on campus
vide backj
f or mat i o n
America's
ternv
shipbuilding
agriculture
In add
so u N- ai the a
project - -
S�anvr
around unc.
a r c h a e - -
research methoo
techmquev
Students inter
in diving a.
must be cert � d
scuba b a nationalh
recognized instruc-
tional organization
NeNertheless. a
limited number of
students interested
onh in maritime
histon. research and
non-diving activities
supporting the proiect cred
at the site's location
will also be permitted
to attend
Why Swansboro!
Located on White
Oak River just inside Res
Bogue Inlet, the port men
of Swansboro "was a Cart
small and important Gre
port in the late eigh- Care
teenth and early nine- call
teenth century ac- to s
how v
I
I
seme
and
houti
non
will
five
S "4�
conu
in
and
1
"





udge Says
. lities tor 14,iKXV
W c-A-d said that
lg termed
litj based
s' were the
commendations
del icenc).
t sort of people
olina or there's
the system. I
.i v �; a
a n d
. ' pci son
� .��. � get-
i
ises � adc to
further
through taxes to keep
an offender in prison.
Client-specific
planning was also
mentioned by
Whtchard as a viable
alternative to in-
carceration This pro-
gram provides a
tailor-made sentenc-
ing plan for each of-
fender. If all condi-
tions of the plan are
kept by the offender,
he or she does not get
sent to jail. Whichard
also supported an ex-
pansion of the use of
probation.
Whichard said that
'he three goals of a
criminal justice
sstem are punish-
ment, rehabilitation
and deterrance.
'Prison does not
rehabilitate he said.
and we'll treat you
n
rr
&
Tuesday
Night
every week
3 rqe . i re "opping
Family Night Special
small c 2a with the same
FREE ind ae��verea ree r our
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r
vou
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ojR SPONSORS

Minister Talks On
Central American
Fact Finding Trip
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 22. IM1 7
Former ECU
Catholic Chaplain
Father Charles
Mulholland will be at
ECU on Thursday to
speak on his recent
fact-finding trip to
Central America.
Mulholland, who
served as ECU
chaplain for ten years
until 1978, is coming
to Greenville as part
of "Central America
Week" across the
state.
Central America
Week is co-sponsored
by the Carolina Inter-
faith Task Force on
Central America and
the Executive Board
of the N.C. Council
of Churches. Its pur-
pose is to invite North
Carolinians to
commemorate,
study, reflect and act
on behalf of our Cen-
tral American sisters
and brothers claim-
ed a promotional
booklet distributed by
organizers.
Thursday marks the
third anniversary of
the assasination of El
Salvador's Ar-
chbishop Oscar
Romero. Romero was
killed while
celebrating mass,
shortly after he had
made several
statements decrying
the violence and kill-
ings in his country.
Mulholland met
with several high
government officials
in the Central
American nation of
Nicaragua. He has
been making an an-
nual trip to the strife-
torn region for the
last four years.
Besides
Mulholland's visit,
the ECU Committee
on .Central America
will conduct two
public witnesses on
Thursday.
The committee,
which attempts to do
educational outreach
about Central
America in the univer-
sity community, will
hold a one-hour
demonstration in
front of the Student
Supply Store at noon.
Members of the com-
mittee and supporters
will be inviting
students who oppose
U.S. military aid to
Cenral America, and
those who would like
to see peace in the
region, to join them
for the gathering.
Educational leaflets
will be distributed to
students.
The committee is
sponsoring candle-
light memorial vigil
for Romero at 7 p.m.
in the Pitt County
Courthouse. Last
year's vigil drew more
than 50 participants
including ECU staff,
faculty, students and
campus ministers.
Mulholland's lec-
ture will begin at 7:30
following the vigil. It
will be held at the
Baptist Student!
Center on 10th Street.
ECU Students Can
Spend Summer In
Underwater School
By STl ART
MORGAN
Ult Wnlff
If you've ever been
:unous about ship-
wrecks or interested in
working underwater,
you could earn six
semester hours' credit
by participating in a
unique program this
summer.
A field school in
Maritime History and
Underwater Ar-
chaeology will be held
in Swansboro, June
13 through July 22.
The program will be
co-sponsored by ECU
and Swansboro's
200th Anniversary
Celebration Commit-
tee.
Students of all ma-
jors are encouraged to
attend, and all par-
ticipants will be pro-
vided with a basic in-
troduction to
American maritime
history, underwater
archaeology and
related subject
material.
Two weeks of
classroom instruction
on campus will pro-
vide background in-
formation on
America's trade pat-
terns, transportation,
shipbuilding and
agriculture.
In addition, in-
struction at the actual
project site in
Swansboro will center
around underwater
archaeological
research methods and
techniques.
Students interested
in diving activities
must be certified in
scuba by a nationally
recognized instruc-
tional organization.
Nevertheless, a
limited number of
students interested
only in maritime
history research and
non-diving activities
supporting the project
at the site's location
will also be permitted
to attend.
Why Swansboro?
Located on White
Oak River just inside
Bogue Inlet, the port
of Swansboro "was a
small and important
port in the late eigh-
teenth and early nine-
teenth century ac-
cording to Dr.I
William N. Still, pro-l
fessor in maritime!
history at ECU.
The naval storiesl
industry (consisting!
primarily of trade inl
tar, pitch and turpen-l
tine) and local ship-j
building were con-
tributing factors.
Following the war,
however, extensive
shipping of former
years narrowed down
to trade with the West
Indies and the late
19th-century lumber!
boom.
Swansboro even-
tually lost its status as I
a port. The Civil War
was its final blow.
"We want to find!
out what the early
waterfront at the port i
of Swansboro looked
like, for example, the
wharves, shipyards,
etc Dr. Still ex-
plained. "The field I
school will be a com-
bination of an
academic exercise and'
a project
Dr. Still said that
by using remote sens-
ing equipment and by
scuba diving,
paticipants in the pro-
gram will survey
Swansboro's harbor
and surounding
waterways for re-
mains of ships and
other objects ofl
historic cultural
value.
"It will be a great
learning experience on
how you do an under-
water project he ad-
ded.
For North Carolina
residents, cost of the
six-week course will
be about $450 for five
semester hours' credit
and $496 for six
hours' credit. For
non-residents, cost
will be about $570 for
five hours' credit and
$740 for six hours'
credit.
For further details,
contact the Program
in Maritime History
and Underwater
Research, Depart-
ment of History, East
Carolina University,
Greenville, North!
Carolina, 27834. Or!
call 757-6085 and ask
to speak to Dr. Still.
Win up to
With a Food Lion
Bumper Sticker
M00000
in FREE groceries!
Hundreds of winners
Details at Food Lion
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Saturday, March 26, 1983
USDA Choice Beef Round - Whole
10-12 Lb. Avg.
Sliced Free
Lb.
USM Ckaica Bitf Ckatk B.m !�
Chuck
Roast
USDA Ckeiet Btif R8a.4 SirUin
Ti Roastlk 22a
Lb.
USDA Out. Beef Cfc.ek Beaeieti
Chuck
Roast
S Lb. Deck Or Mm - Frith Daily
Ground Beef Lk 12S
Lb.
Seediest VMe
Thompson
Crapes
USDA Ckaica Beef Reaaa - Sirleia
Tip Steak i. 258
Pk�. of 12 12 Oi. Cms
Old
Milwaukee
2 Liter
Coca
m �
v:i
L.
1.S liter � Ckiaatl. B�raaa4y. Rklae. ekaklte I 5 Lit" - BaraaeeY Ckaklte Rete Rkiae
Flak etuklit fta Rete j e"ai� Bltat Frtatk el��here ZUfeeeel
Carlo iTaylor Calif J
Alt: it
� ID
11 Ounce
7.2S Oz. -fMifwN
Macaroni
& Cheese
10 Or - Frezee
i !�
119 Sheets 2 Ply
ti
Wky Pay 2 61
Why Pay -1 19
Wky Pey 59 Eiek
i iv ineets I fly
So-Dri SODRI
Towels DRI
Why Pay 59 SiJ jv
V
4 Roll Pack -1 Ply
Page Toilet Tissue
IS 0z. - Slew
Ken-l Ration
� f
Half Oellee SO Off
Liquid Wisk
99.
2 Cm - Thank You
Cherry Pie Filling Instant Potatoes
D Oz. - leektia
489
4.5 Oi. - U��r Kieeey Hearty Ste� - Cat Fete'
Purina 100
10 Or - Ure
Jeno's Pizza
49 Oz. - W Sefteeer
Fab Detergent
���
� T�
DID
lunce
Del Monte
Why Pay 1 19
f32.
6 S 0: Liqht Chunk T jni In Oil A
? Chicken Of I
gt The Sea
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Why Pa, 09
Duke's
f Mayonnaise
nvrtmut
CATSUP
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Why Pa, i js
� � HpMM
taMtaMM t m
mmm
-

A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
MARCH 22. 1983 Page 8
What Price
The Blues?
Billy Price
Dazz Band Joins King For April Slated Concert In Minges
Special guest The Dazz Band will open for Evelyn
"Champagne" King on Saturday April 23, at 8 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum when the ECU Student Union Major Attrac-
tions Committee presents its onl concert for spring semester.
Tickets are priced at $7.50 for EC I students and $9.50 for the
public. All tickets sold at the door will be $9.50. Tickets go on
sale March 30 at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
Nelliga
By ROGER EBERT
CMeafo Saa-Ttawt
NEW YORK � Kate Nelligan
is in the midst of one of this
season's great personal triumphs
on the Broadway stage, and she
plans to walk away from it. She'd
rather make movies.
She sits backstage in her dress-
ing room at the Plymouth
Theatre on 45th Street and talks
about how comfortable stage ac-
ting is, how reassuring, and
about how mean the people who
make movies can be. And then
she says that after 10 years on the
stage, her whole interest has
shifted to film.
She has a way of talking blunt-
ly. She is, in fact, a wonderful
talker: She can be poetic and fan-
ciful one moment and then shift
cheerfully to four-letter words.
Her voice in either case is clear,
precise, musical and compelling.
There are those who wonder if
she might not be the next great
actress in movies, the next atter
Mervl Streep, with great technical
skill at the ser ice of both passion
and intelligence.
She is well-known in Fngland,
where she starred on the stage for
seven years, a Canadian playing
British roles. She is becoming
better known to moie audiences,
after Eye of the eedle. Dracula
and the current Without a Trace.
Still, at 29, she probably has most
of her best work ahead of her.
She opened Jan. 6 on Broad-
way in Plenty, a Joseph Papp
production of a play by David
Hare. It follows a British woman
from her youth as a resistance
fighter in Nazi-occupied France
to her middle age as the bitter and
possibly mad wife of a career
diplomat. A virtuoso perfor-
mance in a brilliant and cruel
plav, it is possibly the best thing
on Broadway right now, and
Plenty is one of the hottest
tickets. But Miss Nelligan and
Hare plan to close the play after a
few more months and move on to
other things, including a movie
version of Plenty.
What they contemplate is
heresy. A hit on Broadway is so
rare that the conventional idea is
to hope it runs forever. But when
Miss Nelligan does decide to
leave the play. Hare is determin-
ed to see it close rather than
restaged with another actress.
Miss Nelligan, backstage,
laughs at that: "They'd recast
Lassie in my part here, if it would
keep the play going long enough
to win the Tony � which it
would definitely do � and then
run forever. But I think David
has proven his point, since the
plav is a hit. That's enough. He
doesn't believe in hanging onto
things forever
Kate Nelligan is so good in the
play that you can follow Hare's
reasoning: Why keep the play
alive at less than its original im-
pact? Plenty is one of the few
serious dramas of recent years
that centers on a woman, a strong
woman, and tracks her through
the lives of several men. She is
onstage almost every moment.
See NELLIGAN'S, Page 10
By GORDON 1POCK
The Belushi-Akroyd parody of
rhythm and blues in the movie
The Blues Brothers is the closest
most college students have ever
come to witnessing early 60s R&B
� unless they also saw Otis Day
and the Knights in Animal
House. Even though Belushi
wasn't much of a singer, the
character he portrayed, Joliet
Jake Blues, had his heart in the
right place, and putting the band
back together was for him a holy
mission. It didn't matter that
R&B was a thing of the past, and
the band was doomed to failure.
Like Jake Blues, Billy Price
became infected with R&B at an
early age. As a kid growing up in
northern New Jersey, Billy listen-
ed to the New York R&B station-
on his tiny transistor radio. He
idolized soul singers like Sam
Cooke, Jackie Wilson, Bobby
Bland and Otis Clay, even though
the Beatles and Stones were fast
taking over America.
"It's an obession. It's been
that way for me since 1 was a little
kid says Price. "When I heard
Otis Redding sing, 'I've Been
Loving You Too Long nothing
else seemed to mattter
In college at Penn State during
the late 60s, Price was fronting
horn bands for fraternity gigs
while everyone else was getting
their first taste of hard rock. And
as disco swept the nation in the
mid-70s. Price was touring as
lead singer for the Roy Buchanan
Blues Band, perfecting a vocal
style after the great soul singers
from the decade before.
Price left Buchanan, and in
1978 fulfilled his dream. He
formed the Keystone Rhythm
Band, modeling it after the rock-
solid touring bands of 60s soul
singers like James Brown, and
Sam and Dave. Though the
guitar, base, drums and
keyboards are tight, it's the pum-
ping horn section that makes the
Keystones a soul band in the true
sense.
The comparison between Jake
Blues and Billy Price is useful for
those who are otherwise un-
familiar with R&B and soul
music, useful for those who
otherwise can't imagine a white
singer dedicated, perhaps blindly,
to a black style of music from 20
Photo �� CMBISSEWARO
Bill Price
years ago. No doubt, there is a
kindred spirit between Jake and
Billv Price.
But there is a difference � that
between fiction and reality, bet-
ween a character and a real man.
Another big difference is vocal
slyie � Billy Price has it. He's
not just imitating the great blues
vocalists; he's the real thing.
Critics have called Billy one of
the best white R&B singers work-
ing today.
Operating out of Pittsburgh,
BP and the KRB have become
one of the most sought after club
bands touring the East Coast.
They are particularly popular in
DC where they recently broke
attendance records at the Wax
Museum. D.Cs largest rock
night club. It is their
unadulterated brand of R&B that
makes them distinctive on the
club circuit. Bands like BUI Blue
and the Nighthawks mix R&B
with rock to produce a sound
more easily digested by their
young, white audiences. But in a
club environment, especially in
larger cities that have a
knowledgeable blues audience.
Price's uniquelv faithful style is a
strong draw.
Billy stands on stage, an
enigmatic figure in dark
sunglasses, and the charisma
flows. With the band pumping
out a tight rhythm behind him,
he's set to sing about his woman,
how she done him wrong, down
on bent knee begging his baby to
come back. Or he's strutting the
stage, rapping to some other
See PRICE. Page 10
Enduring Lecture
'Poland' An Insightful Trip

i

By PATRICK O'NEILL
Suff Writer
"For over a thousand years, the history oj
Poland has been marked by a consuming struggle to
establish a viable and secure Polish nation in the
plains of eastern Europe. Over the centuries, this ej-
fort has suffered a series of near-fatal setbacks
which have severely drained the energies and
resources of the Polish people. Even today, with its
internationally recognized borders and increasingly
industrialized and modernizing society, the future
of Poland is far from settled. Internally, a number
of devisive pressures threaten the stability of the
state. Externally, Poland remains within the effec-
tive grasp of the massive and powerful Soviet Union
to its last Itnm
Dateline Data on World Affairs, 1979.
Although written in 1979, prior to the more re-
cent and more open "people's struggle" in this of
35 million people, the above words do a more than
fair job of summerizing the plight of the Poles. The
Dateline report goes on to say that "perhaps the
most obvious threat to Poland's existence has come
from her powerful, expansionistic neighbors
In recent years, Americans have come to identity
with the Polish people as they struggle for freedom
decent food and housing, effective labor unions and
independence from soviet domination. Words like
Solidarity and Gdansk are familiar to most of us
Solidarity's gentle yet firm leader Leek Walesa has
become something of an American hero. His brave
acts of resistance, to attempts by the government to
control his independent union, have been an in-
TuXpeople who attended the Depart-
meofTUitynions' Travel-Adventure Film
titled Poland: The Enduring Dreamy treated o
a different view of this nation which is rich m
customs and traditions.
REVIEW
Sherilyn Mentes invites the audience into "her
own" Polish world. She narrates flowlessly and in-
sightfully through two rolls of film that she and her
husband Matthew personally shot. Their travels
take viewers from the Baltic Sea to the Tatra Moun-
tains with many stops in between. The audience is
able to meet many people, to catch glimpses of their
beautiful art, simple living and colorful dances and
customs. Mentes carefully blends an occassional
touch of humor to her narrative.
The audience becomes aware of the deeply rooted
role that the Catholic Church plays in the lives of
the Polish people. Several minutes of the Mentes'
film is devoted to an exploration of that role played
by the Church. Sherilyn zooms in on a Catholic
priest who is delivering a sermon and remarks that
the Polish people will often turn to the priest for
guidence on how they should respond to the latest
govenment edict.
"When he (the priest) talks about the devil,
everyone knows which one he means Sherilyn
adds.
Their film also presents exciting coverage of the
1979 trip to Poland by Pope John Paul II as he
returns to his homeland for the first time since tak-
ing over the reigns of the entire Catholic Church.
Private cars are rare in Poland, notes Sherilyn,
because the price of gas is $3 a gallon, when
available. Her trip also brings us to a factory where
workers perform the delicate art of glass blowing
and crystal cutting. The film cuts to another more
unusual art form as the viewer watches an old man
make a set of bag pipes out of a goat skin. The
sound, which is produced by the player flapping his
See POLAND, Page 9
Pianist Serkin Performing At Hendrix On Thursday
i.imtd virtuoso piaaist Peter Serkin will perform a program of Bee thorn this Thursday
�h TJ Itl �. taMendetantf Stndent Centers Hendrix Theatre. Serkin has established
TliZl m "oianist whose ninsical sympathies are broader than those of virtually any young
mTskla-Ttareeentmemory Tickets can be purchmd at the Central Ticket Office, MSC.
St or as ka I
Fredtru Storaska
Organization for i
will speak in Hei
Center n I hun�da Mai
is under the spoe
I niveritv I mn i
Twelfth
BRl iN IB. Kl
Spi -
began lasl S
but 'he c
pa'
Twelfth Sigl
Fr;j
Sha
edv ol
playing in i
fictional land
merrv -m�ik i -
drawn out
point of weai
Poland
Continued In
arm up and dow:
to the s
blown pipe-
Despite th
economv. the �
rer.er
When f rts vt
force the fa
refu-cc �
farmer-
ming si
other 5 n p
revoiu:
Set lo I't'i n
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
MARCH 22. 1983
Page I
What Price
The Blues?
Billy Price
Dazz Band Joins King For April Slated Concert In Minges
Special guest The Da Band will open for Evelyn I ickets are priced at $7.50 for El I students and $9.50 for Ihe
"Champagne King on Saturday April 23. at 8 p.m. in public. All tickets sold at the door will be $9.50. Tickets go on
Minges Coliseum when the ECU Student I nion Major Attrac- sale March 30 at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhal! Stu-
tions Committee presents its onl concert for spring semester, dent (enter. t
Nelligan Eyes A Film Career
By ROGER EBERT
CMcafo Saa-TUMt
NEW YORK � Kate Nelligan
is in the midst of one of this
season's great personal triumphs
on the Broadway stage, and she
plans to walk away from it. She'd
rather make movies.
She sits backstage in her dress-
ing room at the Plymouth
Theatre on 45th Street and talks
about how comfortable stage ac-
ting is, how reassuring, and
about how mean the people who
make movies can be. And then
she says that after 10 years on the
stage, her whole interest has
shifted to film.
She has a way of talking blunt-
ly. She is, in fact, a wonderful
talker: She can be poetic and fan-
ciful one moment and then shift
cheerfully to four-letter words.
Her voice in either case is clear,
precise, musical and compelling.
There are those who wonder if
she might not be the next great
actress in movies, the next alter
Meryl Streep. with great technical
skill at the ser ice of both passion
and intelligence.
She is well-known in England,
where she starred on the stage for
seven years, a Canadian playing
British roles. She i- becoming
better known to movie audiences.
after Eye of the eedle, Dracula
and the current ithout a 1 race.
Still, at 29, she probably has most
of her best work ahead of her.
She opened Jan. 6 on Broad-
way in Plenty, a Joseph Papp
production of a pla by David
Hare. It follows a British woman
from her youth as a resistance
fighter in Nazi-occupied France
to her middle age as the bitter and
possibly mad wife of a career
diplomat. A virtuoso perfor-
mance in a brilliant and cruel
play, it is possibly the best thing
on Broadway right now, and
Plenty is one of the hottest
tickets. But Miss Nelligan and
Hare plan to close the play after a
few more months and move on to
other things, including a movie
version of Plenty.
What they contemplate is
heresy. A hit on Broadway is so
rare that the conventional idea is
to hope it runs forever. But when
Miss Nelligan does decide to
leave the play. Hare is determin-
ed to see it close rather than
restaged with another actress.
Miss Nelligan, backstage,
laughs at that: "They'd recast
Lassie in my part here, if it would
keep the play going long enough
to win the Tony � which it
would definitely do � and then
run forever. But I think David
has proven his point, since the
play is a hit. That's enough. He
doesn't believe in hanging onto
things forever
Kate Nelligan is so good in the
play that you can follow Hare's
reasoning: Why keep the play
alive at less than its original im-
pact? Plenty is one of the few
serious dramas of recent years
that centers on a woman, a strong
woman, and tracks her through
the lives of several men. She is
onstage almost every moment.
See NELLIGAVS, Page 10
By GORDON IPOCK
Suff �nlrt
The Belushi-Akroyd parody of
rhythm and blues in the movie
The Blues Brothers is the closest
most college students have ever
come to witnessing early 60s R&B
� unless they also saw Otis Day
and the Knights in Animal
House. Even though Belushi
wasn't much of a singer, the
character he portrayed, Joliet
Jake Blues, had his heart in the
right place, and putting the band
back together was for him a holy
mission. It didn't matter that
R&B was a thing of the past, and
the band was doomed to failure
Like Jake Blues, Billy Price
became infected with R&B at an
early age. As a kid growing up in
northern New Jersey, Billy listen-
ed to the New York R&B stations
on his tiny transistor radio He
idolized soul singers like Sam
Cooke. Jackie Wilson, Bobbv
Bland and Otis Clay, even though
the Beatles and Stones were fast
taking over America.
"It's an obession. It's been
that way for me since 1 was a little
kid says Price. "When 1 heard
Otis Redding sing, 'I've Been
Loving You Too Long nothing
else seemed to mattter
In college at Penn State during
the late 60s, Price was fronting
horn bands for fraternitv gig
while everyone else was getting
their first taste of hard rock And
as disco swept the nation in the
mid-70s. Price was touring as
lead singer for the Roy Buchanan
Blues Band, perfecting a vocal
style after the great soul singers
from the decade before.
Price left Buchanan, and in
1978 fulfilled his dream. He
formed the Keystone Rhythm
Band, modeling it after the rock-
solid touring bands of 60s soul
singers like James Brown, and
Sam and Dave. Though the
guitar, base, drums and
keyboards are tight, it's the pum-
ping horn section that makes the
Keystones a soul band in the true
sense.
The comparison between Jake
Blues and Billy Price is useful for
those who are otherwise un-
familiar with R&B and soul
music, useful for those who
otherwise can't imagine a white
singer dedicated, perhaps blindly,
to a black stvle of music from 20
PnotoB. CMRiS SEAHC
Billv Price
vears ago No doubt, there is
kindred spirit between Jake and
Bills Price
But there is a difference � that
between fiction and realitv. bet-
ween a character and a real man.
Another big difference is vocal
stvle � Billy Price has it. He's
not just imitating the great blues
vocalists; he's the real thing
Critics have called Biliv one of
the best white R&B singers work-
ing todav
Operating out of Pittsburgh,
BP and the kRB have become
one of the most sought after club
bands touring the East Coast
Thev are particularly popular in
DC. where the recently broke
attendance records at the Wax
Museum, D.C 's larges: rock
night club. It is their
unadulterated brand of R&B that
makes them distinctive on the
club circuit. Bands like Bill Blue
and the Nighthawks mix R&B
with rock to produce a sound
more easily digested by their
young, white audiences. But in a
club environment, especially in
larger cities that have a
knowledgeable blues audience.
Price's uniquely faithful style is a
strong draw.
Billy stands on stage, an
enigmatic figure in dark
sungiasse. and the charisma
Hows. With the band pumping
out a tight rhythm behind him.
he's set to sing about his woman.
how she done him wrong, down
on bent knee begging his babv to
come back. Or he's strutting the
stage, rapping to some other
See PRICK. Page 10
Enduring Lecture
'Poland' An Insightful Trip

By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff Whirr
"For over a thousand years, the history of
Poland has been marked by a consuming struggle to
establish a viable and secure Polish nation in the
plains of eastern Europe. Over the centuries, this ef-
fort has suffered a series of near-fatal setbacks
which have severely drained the energies and
resources of the Polish people. Even today, with its
internationally recognized borders and increasingly
industrialized and modernizing society, the future
of Poland is far from settled. Internally, a nu fiber
of devisive pressures threaten the stability of the
state. Externally, Poland remains within the effec-
tive grasp of the massive and powerful Soviet Union
to its last
Dateline Data on World Affairs, 1979.
Although written in 1979, prior to the more re-
cent and more open "people's struggle" in this of
35 million people, the above words do a more than
fair job of summcrizing the plight of the Poles. The
Dateline report goes on to say that "perhaps the
most obvious threat to Poland's existence has come
from her powerful, expansionists neighbors
In recent years, Americans have come to identify
with the Polish people as they struggle for freedom,
decent food and housing, effective labor unions and
independence from soviet domination. Words like
Solidarity and Gdansk are familiar to most of us.
Solidarity's gentle yet firm leader Leek Walesa has
become something of an American hero. His brave
acts of resistance, to attempts by 'he government to
control his independent union, nave been an in
spiration to us all-
Last Tuesday, people who attended the Depart-
ment of University Unions' Travel-Adventure Film
titled Poland: The Enduring Dream were treated to
a different view of this nation which is rich in
customs and traditions.
REVIEW
Sherilyn Mentes invites the audience into "her
own" Polish world. She narrates flowlessly and in-
sightfully through two rolls of film that she and her
husband Matthew personally shot. Their travels
take viewers from the Baltic Sea to the Tatra Moun-
tains with many stops in between. The audience is
able to meet many people, to catch glimpses of their
beautiful art, simple living and colorful dances and
customs. Mentes carefully blends an occassional
touch of humor to her narrative.
The audience becomes aware of the deeply rooted
role that the Catholic Church plays in the lives of
the Polish people. Several minutes of the Mentes'
film is devoted to an exploration of that role played
by the Church. Sherilyn zooms in on a Catholic
priest who is delivering a sermon and remarks that
the Polish people will often turn to the -priest for
guidence on how they should respond to the latest
govenment edict.
"When he (the priest) talks about the devil,
everyone knows which one he means Sherilyn
adds.
Their film also presents exciting coverage of the
1979 trip to Poland by Pope John Paul II as he
returns to his homeland for the first time since tak-
ing over the reigns of the entire Catholic Church.
Private cars are rare in Poland, notes Sherilyn,
because the price of gas is $3 a gallon, when
available. Her trip also brings us to a factory where
workers perform the delicate art of glass blowing
and crystal cutting. The film cuts to another more
unusual art form as the viewer watches an old man
make a set of bag pipes out of a goat skin. The
sound, which is produced by the player flapping his
See POLAND, Page 9
;
Pianist Serkin Performing At Hendrix On Thursday
Acclaimed virtuoso pianist Peter Serkin will perform a program of Beethoven this Thursday,
March 24, at 8 p.m. la Mendenhal! Student Center's Hendrix Theatre. Serkin has established
himself as � pianist whose musical sympathies are broader than those of virtually any young
musician la recent memory Tickets can be purchased at the Central Ticket Office, MSC.
StOruskQ I I
Iredtru SI
Otganizal n for I
will vptaK
(enter on I ru,
is undt-r tin s
I niversii I nmn- I
Twelfth
Bv RHlHlk
Twelfth
I
-
merry -mat
Jrau. n
point of
Poland I
( onlinued fr
arm up and i
. �
blowi
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-
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She-
stl fO POI N





ICH 22, IW Pa�� s
rice
es?
ice
Photo B. CHRISSEA�D
Hill Prut-
n.ere is a
alee and
� ference � that
� ai d ' ealitj. bet-
and a real man.
. ce is ocal
He's
i i the great blues
the real thing.
ed Billy one of
RiB Mnger work-
� P ttsburgh,
i KRB have become
ight after club
the Fast Coast.
irl popular in
recently broke
records at the Wax
DCs largest rock
1 is their
rand of R&B that
m distinctive on the
club circuit. Bands like Bill Blue
and the Nighthawks mix R&.B
kUh rock to produce a sound
more easily digested by their
oung. white audiences. But in a
t ronment, especially in
tha: have a
sable blues audience,
a faithful style is a
on stage, an
I ; figure in dark
the charisma
Y � the band pumping
rhythm behind him,
"at his woman,
one him wrong, doun
. nee begging his baby to
back. Or he"s strutting the
g to some other
see PRICE, Page 10
i&maa&P'
Si
1
k
�ndrix On Thursday
logram of Beethoven this Thursday,
drix Theatre. Serkin has established
er than those of virtually any young
the Central Ticket Office, MSC.
THE IASTC AROl INIAN
Mk( it isis'
Storaska Lecture On Rape Prevention Comes To Hendrix Theatre
Frederic Sloraska, Executive Director of The National
Organization for The Prevention of Rape and Assault,
will speak in Hencirix Theatre. Mendenhall Student
Center on Thursday. March 29, at 8 p.m. His appearance
is under the sponsorship of the ECU Department of
University I'nions Lecture Series Committee and the Stu-
dent Residence Association. The subject of Storaska's
lecture will be "How To Say No To A Rapist � And Sur-
vive Admission is hy ID and activity card for students
and MSC membership for faculty and staff. Public
tickets are $1 and are on sale at the Central Ticket Office,
MSC.
Twelfth Night A Real Blow Out
By CARLVN FBFRT
Malt Unlrr
Spring officially
began last Sunday,
but the Acting Com-
pany celebrates
Twelfth Night this
Friday evening.
Shakespea s com-
edy of mistaken iden-
tity and sexual role-
playing in a lyrical,
fictional land, where
merry-making gets
drawn out to the
point of weariness,
makes a fitting cap to
the first week of
calendar-sanctioned
spring fever in Green-
ville.
The title refers to
the twelfth night of
Christmas. January
6th or the Epiphany,
a once solemn
religious feast grown
Bacchanalian over the
years. Celebration of
Twelfth Night tradi-
tionally included lots
of drinking.
Poland Lecture
Continued From Page 8
arm up and down on a set of bellows, is similar
to the sound of the more common mouth-
blown pipes.
Despite the socialist leaning of the Polish
economy, the viewer learns that in Poland, 85
percent of the farmland is privately owned.
When efforts were made by the government to
force the farmers to form collectives, most
refused to work and-the plan failed. Hence,
farmers own their own farms. Methods of far-
ming still include the horse drawn plough and
other simpler ways from the pre-industrial
revolution era.
Sherilyn brings her audience back through
See TO POLAND, Page 10
overeating, and
orgies; folklore called
it a "festival of
misrule Originally
an observance of the
Feast of the Three
Kings and the an-
nouncement of
Christ's birth.
Twelfth Night the ho-
ly day gave way to the
Twelfth Night of wild
sexual liasons, a spirit
of indulgence and
"anything goes
Twelfth Sight is
not about religion,
and it isn't even set
during Twelfth Night.
But everyone on stage
acts as if it was
Twelfth Night. "If
music be the food of
love, play on, give me
excess of it belches
the duke of Ulyria in
his opening speech,
and from this point
on, love and excess
take over. Like Friday
night in Greenville,
Twelfth Night meant
a night of parties; but
like many Friday
night parties, the
revelry seems to go on
a bit too long and too
loud for some of the
characters.
You know the old
saying, "you can't tell
the players without a
scorecard?" Well, in
Twelfth Night, you
can't tell 'em even
with a scorecard. And
neither can the
players themselves. A
pair of twins � iden-
tical, although
brother and sister �
shipwreck in a strange
land. Fearing her
brother dead but still
hoping to find him,
the sister disguises
herself as a boy and
gets a job as a
eunuch, or page, to
the hedonistic Duke
Orsino. The Duke is
in love with a lady
named Olivia, who
wants nothing to do
with him because
she's mourning her
dead brother, but she
falls head over dainty
heels for the disguised
page.
Meanwhile, her
stuffy, cross-gartered
servant Malvolio gets
the impression the
lady is in love with
him. When the lost
brother reappears,
Olivia mistakes him
for his sister (who she
thinks is a man,
anyhow) and whiskes
him off for a secret
wedding and
whatever else.
Confused? Of
course, but with
everyone on stage
wearing a mask of
some sort � either a
physical costume or
disguised intentions
� the characters will
appear more confused
than the audience.
The audience, at
least, will have pro-
grams; the characters
are never sure who's
who and what's what.
And some of them
are just doing what
comes naturally,
whether role-playing
or debauching or just
staying drunk for five
acts. Yes, it is a little
like a warm spring
night in Greenville.
The Central Ticket
Office has a handful
of tickets left for Fri-
day night's perfor-
mance, and a few
more for the com-
pany's Saturday night
presentation of
Moliere's Tartuffe.
WIN. PLACE.
SHOW.
nurVQA
Vm re a winner
when you come
into our annual
pen House
It's two days
filled with the world's most ex-
citing motorcycles Thf 1983
Hondas Discover the look and
feel of our radical new V twins.
high performance V fours and
spectacular new in line fours.
And that's only the beginning.
.Just for corning in well give you a
free deck of Honda playing cards'
And you'll get
a chance to
win a new 1982
Urban Express
Why even the
deal of a lifetime
can be yours during our Redline
Super Sale. It's a chance to get
selected Hondas at prices you
may find impossible- to pass up.
So come into our annual Open
House.With the new models,great
prices and free prizes you can get,
there's never been a better way to
thai feature all the great '83 Hondas, cover all your bets
HONDA-SUZUKI OF GREENVILLE
91S N. MEMORIAL DRHWY. 11 N.
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PHONE 75t-30�4
MARCH 25tfc, 2th
��- (� I pi I lawr � il"��u �"
i
ADvERTiSEO
'TEM POuC
Each of th.se advfti��d items is r.quir.d to b. r.adily available tor sal. at or
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in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED.Sat March 26 A&P IN Greenville, N C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
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FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND, WE WILL DOUBLE
3 MANUFACTURER'S COUPONS. EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 3 COUPONS
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Batwaan now and March 26. ft will radaam na-
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lor double thair valua Otfar good on national man-
ufacturars canta-otl coupons only (Food retailar
coupons not accaptad I Customar must purcrtasa
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Otter does not apply to A4 P or othar store coupons
whathar manufacturer is mentioned or not When
tha value ol the coupon eiceeds SO or the retail
ol the item, this otter is limited to the retail price
Savings are Great with A&Ps
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CALIFORNIA CRISP
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Dole
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m�i, iomi iaHsMsniiutaaMmift
MajMaM- "





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 22, 1983
To Poland And Back


Continued From Page 9
the deadly years of World War II
when Poland saw 20 percent of
her population killed. Poland
became a land of "people
without a country Sherilyn said
"Poland lived only as a dream in
the hearts of the Polish people
At this point the film cuts to a
large gate with words above it
that translate to say "work will
make you free The gate was the
last one that 4,000,000 Poles
passed through on their way in to
the Dachau death camps. Poland
was reduced to "a pile of rubble"
because of the war, Sherilyn said.
The film takes viewers to an
old Polish shipyard where
workers first struck for better
conditions "the issue (for the
workers) was not money
Sherilyn notes "but a little
freedom and the right to form
trade unions
During the film which the
Mentes' call a "totally uncen-
sored view of Poland before Mar-
shall law" the audience is in-
troduced to the term "practical
co-existence" which is the used to
describe the goal of some of the
people regarding their relation-
ship with the government "The
Polish people have taught the
world a new meaning for the
word Solidarity said Sherilyn
The "enduring dream" pro-
gram was the final Travel-
Adventure Film of the year.
BLOOD DRIVE
FLETCHER
RESIDENCE HALL
LOBBY
THURSDAY, MARCH24
12-6p.m.
Year's Big Sleeper, 'Diner Weekend Free Flick A t Mendenhall
(Left to right) Kevin Bacon, Mickey Rourke, Daniel Stern and Tim
Daly star in Diner, a coined)-drama about five friends making the dif-
ficult transition into manhood. The surprise hit of '82. Diner will be
shown this Friday and Saturday at 5, 7 and 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Stu-
dent C enter's Hendrix Theatre. Admission is b ID and activity card
for students and MSC membership for faculty and staff.
Nelligan's Life In Theatre Nears End
C ontinued From Page 8
Plenty was not a hit
in England, Miss
Nelligan says,
although everyone in
America assumes it
was. "It set people's
teeth on edge she
says. "It got the worst
reviews you've ever
seen in your life. It
was produced by the
National Theatre, but
business was so bad
they only scheduled it
for two performances
a week. And yet we
developed a cult au-
dience, and on closing
night all the people
who'd seen it two,
three or four times
came, and stayed in
the theatre until 2
a.m. It was a com-
plete surprise that it
became a hit over
here
When she does
leave the cast of Plen-
ty, however, it will be
the last play she docs
for quite a time, she
says.
'Everybody's
always talking about
how well-trained the
British actors are
onstage, and how
when they grow old
they go into movies to
make lots or money
she says. "What a lot
of rubbish. Movies
are 10 times harder
than plays. There are
some movies where
it's a triumph if
you're still vertical
when they're over
She lights a
cigarette and settles
into a corner of the
dressing room, a
smart lady, very sure
of herself, unsen-
timental about the
1
Price Believes In
Sticking To Some
Pure R&B Basics
Continued From Page 8
man's woman, trying to be her backdoor man,
testifying about sweet love in the midnight
hour and meeting at the dark end of the street.
Price and the KRB have released two
albums, and neither fully captures the excite-
ment they generate on stage. Unlike hard-rock
bands that overwhelm club audiences by
bludgeoning them senseless with high decibel
noise, Price and company seduce a crow.
Fingers start snapping and knees begin jerking
soon after the band starts. With the first
ballad, Billy's crooning voice backed by the
wailing horns turns backbones to jelly. When
the band turns the tempo up again, feet start
moving, people start dancing and the
temperature rises while sweat pours.
Despite a large following of enthusiastic
fans, the band's arcane style has kept major
record companies away. The talent is there,
but mass appeal is missing. Yet, Billy refuses
to follow the successful example of the J. Geils
Band and do R&B in a contemporary style.
"I think what we're doing is already com-
merical explains Billy. "Look at Delbert
McCIinton or the Stray Cats; they've achieved
success without trying to go contemporary. If
we make it doing what we're doing now, peo-
ple will say 'they made it because they stuck to
their guns If we try to go contemporary and
still don't make it, people will say 'they sold
out "
But music, like fashion, is cyclical. New
wave and punk bands are rediscovering early
rock � even rock-a-billy is back. A soul music
revival cold be next, especially with groups like
Billy Price and the Keystone Rhythm Band
playing it so convincingly. And even if they
never sell a lot of records, they're still one of
the best club bands you're likely to ever hear.
Price and company will make their debut
appearance at the Attic tonight, March 22. If
you're an R&B fan, this band is a must. If the
music was before your time, then you owe it to
yourself to hear what Akroyd and Belushi
were so wild about.
stage: "All of us in
the theater are seeking
the approval o f
strangers. We do.
What a bizarre way to
make a living. The au-
dience is this extraor-
dinary dark mother
who enfolds you.
With a film, it's never
finished until you've
been gone from the
set for months. With
film, the baby is
always adopted.
"My gift is for
words. I've always
been good at words. I
can use them, I can
make people unders-
tand them, I'd spent
many years on the
London stage when
my whole interest
shifted to film � and
it did � and words,
you know, are not
what fim is about. In
film you use the feel-
ings you don't and
can't use in life.
"When I came over
here to New York, I
did a TV play because
1 needed the money. I
was broke. I won't do
another one unless
I'm broke again. It
took three weeks to
shoot and almost that
long to sit through. I
agreed to do this play,
because we had done
it in London, but it's
the only play I'll do
here.
"It's not a spec-
tator sport. When we
opened Plenty
downtown in a
smaller theater,
Robert De Niro came
one night with nine
friends. They took up
a whole row. Ten peo-
ple in that theater was
a crowd. Then they all
walked out, halfway
through, leaving that
whole bloody empty
row.
"It had a very
depressing effect. I
was ready to slit their
wrists. I have no more
interest in the theater.
I can't imagine myself
playing Desdemona,
dragging around in
those clothes. I did
spend seven years ac-
ting with Sco field,
Olivier, Gielgud,
Richardson in the Na-
tional Theater and
so I feel competent to
say that it's rubbish
that only stage actors
can act. Film acting is
infinitelv more dif-
ficult. You can't use
technique. You have
to use yourself
She sighs and
blows out smoke.
"But nobody agrees
with me she says.
"On the Today show,
Jane Pauley said,
'But, Kate, you're a
very serious and
gifted woman. Why
waste your life in
film?
Miss Nelligan
pauses to think about
that. "What an ex-
traordinary state-
ment she says,
finally. "Speaking for
myself, 1 haven't gone
to the theater to see a
play in seven years. I
go to movies.
Now she stars in a
sold-out Broadway
hit and plans her
movie career, not
without some pain.
"One of the directors
I worked for she
remembers, "did a
hideously cruel thing.
1 got into my costume
and came out for him
to look at me. He
said, and I quote,
"take the lady's hair
down, put her in
lingerie, and bring her
back and let me have
a look at her She
bites her lip, and says,
quite deliberately:
"You really can't do
that with me.
8
j Tapscott
A VERY SPECIAL GIFT SHOPPE
1
We Are Pleased to Announce
Our Largest Spring Sale Ever
? SALE EXTENDED THROUGH SATURDAY. MARCH 26
Entire Stock From 10 Up To 50 Off
Tot tUMcl,
Special Orders � Consignment hems � Scented Candies 10 H
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I ace Bedspread � Tahle Cloth � Stulfed Animals � Stoney Point Decoys 25 cm
All Prctures � Brass � Baskets � Glassware � Furnrture 30 cm
icker Chest � ECU Hamper 'Campus Frames 'Folk Art IS & 18' Tapers 40 o.
T - � Ceramic Accessories � Haitian Wooden Dishes � Silk Flowers &
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Out Regular Customer Know That We Cant Poaalbiy Hat tverythlna Here.
You'll Juat Have To Come Byl
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(Vise prt-M-nt the coupon hefonr onknng ()nc coupon per cuo
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i Jrrer pood during nomul hreakriv) hours onl at the
t itlowinK Harder t Rt-sUurams 9iOGotMdK
street & WOT F ItWi street (jitrnulle.
(tffergood through Mas si
present this coupon before ordennR One coupon per I
w�t please ' ustomer must pas an sale-ux Thecou
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pun not good In i omhtnatM i with arts other oScr
iloerisxxl after lost) AM daih . mis 21 the folk rss-mg Hardee s Restaurants 910
(xanche Street 290-F. hfth street (rfremille N (�rrodthniui Mas SI
198s
nacdeer
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fACoT
at)
264 By Pass,
Next Door to
Toyota East
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
FOUR (4) Tacos
for just M.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
a 8:00pm til closing
f 15C draft with purchase of 4 tocos C
YOUR B$N IS WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
THE ARMY.
Your BSN means you're a professional In the Army, it also
means you re an officer You start as a full-fledged member of our
medical team Write Armv Nurse Opportunmes.
P.O Box 7713. Burbank.CA 91510.
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(Across From Casablanca)
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OLr biscuits are made from scratch and
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j :
I Hi I A1-
Pirate
B KIlMCkl
Nl.ll � ntr
John Hallo hn a grand
home run and Charlie Smith
ched a five-hit shutout a
defeated George M i rtur-
day in the secon
ECAC-South double
Harrington Field.
In the first game. P
I es Wright, utilir .
speed pitches, gave ip ist I
hits and C ar McM
home runv to g - ;
and their torj
season.
Pirate ace Bh Da
went the
Baker
BIND PI V sAM-
Nportx r �lii'
two months as
coordinatoi
Ed Emory's
Bake- has truly
new home and
After only
ECU's offei
Head
associate, V"
adapted to
team.
With spring
� getting ur .
eagerly begun gearing up ' "
fall season. "I'm real
about all the offensive pla-
returning Baer sa d The
Pirates will only lose one offen-
sive starter this ye have 10
returning.
Baker will continue
formation that Larry Beck
troduced here last year Be
no coaching for the ISFI 's
Arizona Wranglers
Larry Beckish
each other, and 1
with his offense
When Coach Emory calk
he said he wanted to run the same
offense.
"1 have learned the term,
here, rather than having the
py(rfaTifc mine: BaVfeafv ft
will be the same offense � the
trap, or the option off the trap
�'The theory is a little different
from other options people are us-
and 1 k
was familiar
Bjkc:
- j
Veteran Quarterback hein Ingrai
ECU Get
�yBANDI MES
staff ntor
Two ECl swimmers. Nan
George and JoAnne McCully.
(returned to Greenville Sunda
night a All-Americas after com
peting in the NCAA Division!i
National Championships, in Longl
j Beach Calif during Muck
116-19. ,
Fridav afternoon. Nan George
ecame ECLs first NCAA All
imcrica bv placing seventh m the
,0-yard freestvle in 24.6 seconds
loanne McCuliev quickly follow
d suit later that afternoon byl
inishing ninth in the 100-yardj
reaststroke in 1:09.47.
Kobe was extremely pleased b
performance of his star swta-
rs. "They swam very well hd
"It was thrilling to get tw





11
nnf
And Back
workers firsJ struck tot better
conditions "the issue (foi the
workers) �.b not money,
Sherilyn notes "but a
freedom and the right to form
le unions
During the film which the
little
Mentes' call a "totally
uncen
sored view oi Poland bet ore Mat
shall law" the audience is in
troduced to the term "practical
co-existence" which is the used to
he the goal of some of the
c regarding theii relation-
� with the government "The
h people have taught the
d a new meaning tor the
Solidarity said Sherilyn
The "enduring dream" pro
av the final Travel
. re film of the vear
D DRIVE
TCHER
NCEHALL
)BBY
Y, MARCH 24
-6p.m.
EDNESDAY i
SPECIAL j
OUR (4) TacosJ
for just si.39
Gooa Wifh Any other Special
Ipm til closing
rh purchase of 4 tocos C
IS WORTH AN
COMMISSION
IE ARMY.
. e Army, :t also
' .edged member oi our
trs Opportunities
� A.9151C
IHURSE CORPS.
YOU CAN BE.
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t T MRU
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THE EASTCAROI INIAN
Sports
MARC H 22. I9JH
Pagt II
Pirates Split Crucial Doubleheader
B EDMCKI.AS
M��f Wrilrt
John Hallow hit a grand slam
home run and Charlie Smith pit-
ched a five-hit shutout as ECU
defeated George Mason 5-0 Satur-
day in the second game of a
ECAC-South doubleheader at
Harrington Field.
In the first game. Patriot hurler
1 es Va right, utilizing effective off-
speed pitches, gave up just four
hits and Cary McMichael hit two
home runs to give GMU a 6-2 win
and their first victory of the
season.
Pirate ace Bob Davidson (0-1)
went the distance in the first
game, allowing just six hits and
one earned run, but nevertheless
tost as the Pirates managed only
four singles off Wright.
After George Mason took a 1-0
lead on McMichael's homer in the
first, ECU tied the game in the se-
cond when Robert Wells raced
home from third on a double steal
play.
ECU then took a 2-1 lead in the
third on heads-up base running by
shortstop Kelly Robinette.
Reaching first on an error,
Robinette stole second and reach-
ed third on Todd Evans' groun-
dout. Then, with Winfred
Johnson at bat, Wright threw a
wild pitch, enabling Robinette to
reach home easily.
The Patriots, managing only
one hit through the first four inn-
ings, finally got to Davidson in
the fifth. Barry Durham singled,
Mark Oliver grounded a hit bet-
ween first and second base and
Jim Youngblood reached on an
error by Hallow to load the bases.
Dan Cosby then blooped a
single to left to drive in two runs
and McMichael followed with his
second home run of the game to
give Wright a 6-2 lead.
In the second game, it was
Smith's turn to gain attention on
the mound. The right-handed
senior gave up just five hits, while
walking two and striking out five.
With Smith providing the
defensive firepower, ECU decided
to add some offensive electricity
to a 1-0 lead in the fifth inning.
Jack Curlings doubled with one
out.
Then, after Mike Williams
reached on an error and a wild
pitch moved both runners up,
Robinette was inteniionaly walk-
ed to load the bases. Hallow then
took charge of the fireworks, sen-
ding a home run over the right
field fence to secure the victory.
Baker Puts Offense In Gear
B CINDY PLEASANTS
Sport t-ditor
After only two months as
ECU's offensive coordinator and
Head Coach Ed Emory's
associate. Art Baker has truly
adapted to his new home and
team.
With spring football practice
lust getting underway. Baker has
eagerly begun gearing up for the
fall season. "I'm real excited
about all the offensive players
returning Baker said. The
Pirates will only lose one offen-
sive starter this year and have 10
returning.
Baker will continue the option-I
formation that Larry Beekish in-
troduced here last year. Beekish is
now coaching for the USFL's
Arizona Wranglers.
"Larry Beekish and 1 know
each other, and 1 was tamiliar
with his offense Baker said.
"When Coach Emory called me,
he said he wanted to run the same
offense.
"I have learned the terminology
here, rather than having the
Ptevr1nehfti mine. MsfeaJIV. rt
will be the same offense � the
trap, or the option off the trap.
"The theory is a little different
from other options people are us-
ed to seeing, but 1 knew about the
offense before 1 got here
Before coming to ECU, Baker
had coached at The Citadel for
five years and became the winn-
mgest coach in the school's
history , accumulating a 30-24-1
mark, last year, the Citadel
finished 5-6, and Baker, much to
everyone's dismay, was fired.
Before coaching at The Citadel,
Baker was Furman's head coach.
In five years, he earned a 27-23-2
record, defeating North Carolina
and East Carolina in 1970. "1
think we played ECU every year I
was at Furman Baker said, "so
I've known about ECU and I've
known Ed Emory for a long time
too
As Coach Emory's associate.
Baker will share administrative
duties and assume the head
coaching capacity when Emory is
out of the office.
According to Baker, both
coaches are going to have all they
can handle with the upcoming
season. The Pirates have seven
away games scheduled, including
such powerhouses as " Florida
State, Missouri, the Univ. of
Miami and the Univ of Florida.
What is Baker's opinion of the
Pirates '83 agenda? "1 think it's
unrealistic for us he said, "but I
don't think people believe it is
realistic. If anybody plays a
toughter schedule, 1 don't know
who it will be.
"First of all, I don't mean it as
criticism, schedules like that br-
ing on big contracts, but anytime
you play seven away games, that's
unrealistic
Baker is well aware that the
football program hasn't been fill-
ing up Ficklen Stadium, but he
also believes the problem can be
rectified. "I think it's like the old
saying, 'which comes first, the
chicken or the egg At Furman,
everytime we played here there
was a big crowd, so 1 know it can
be done. I think you can have a
realistic home schedule
According to Baker, ECU
definitely has a problem because
of its Division-1 status. "I'm a
newcomer Baker said, "but in
my opinion, the mistake was
made two years ago. ECU should
be a Division-I school, but we're
so isolated.
"It is realistic for Duke, North
Carolina and N.C. State to play
us. I don't know why there's three
schools down the road from us
who won't play us
The Pirates are now getting
ready for team that will play
them, and one of Baker's top
priorities will be to find a No. 2
quarterback. "Kevin Ingram has
really come on to fill the No. 1
spot he said, "but with the
teams we play, you've got to have
a back-up quarterback
Senior John Williams, along
with freshman Brian Herndon,
will be competing for the second
.quarterback sport. Herdon,
however, has been recovering
from hip surgery, so he is not full
speed yet.
Another of Baker's main con-
cerns are those players missing
spring practice becuase of
academic ineligibility. "We can-
not afford to lose any players
Baker said. "We have to always
be concerned about the academic
status of the players
After looking at film, the new
offensive coach praised the team
for having speed and agility, and
described senior offensive guard
Terry Long as a "bonified all-
America candidate
When Baker arrived, most of
the recruits had been signed. Since
then, he has been able to become
acquainted with several of them.
"I think the recruits coming in fit
ECU's Brian Peterson shows his pitching style in an earlier
game. Against George Mason, Senior Charlie Smith pitched a
five-hit shut oat to give the Bucs a conference win.
our immediate needs. We're br-
inging in good linemen, two
quarterbacks, and we've have to
compete with the likes of Carolina
and N.C. State.
But Baker isn't really concerned
with recruits right now. He is
fcusing his attention on return-
ing veterans and spring practice.
"Hopefully, we'll use varia-
tions that will just add to the of-
fense. We'll open up for more
reverses and screens � things I
know that have been good to me
in past years, but there won't be
any drastic changes.
"We will add and blend with
what we have
Hitters Sailing Along
By KEN BOLTON
Anttaal Sporti Milor
As the ECU baseball team
begins its defense of the ECAC-
South crown, several members of
the squad have put together im-
pressive statistics.
Hitting has been the club's forte
so far, with seven Pirates above
the .300 mark.
Leading the balanced hitting at-
tack are junior Todd Evans (.360)
and senior Robert Wells (.351).
As a team, ECU is currently bat-
ting .286.
The Pirate pitching staff has
suffered from the loss of Bill
Wilder and Bob Patterson from
last year's nationally sixth-ranked
squad.
The pitching staff's ERA is a
hefty 3.07, compared to a 1.74
mark at the same point last year.
With their current 11-4 record,
ECU is sailing along at the exact
pace as last year. Last season's
squad was also 11-4 at this point
� en route to a 34-14 record.
One big reason for the Pirates'
success has been Winfred
Johnson, a 5-11, 210-pound
freshman from Elizabethtown,
N.C.
Johnson is the first two-way
(pitcher-hitter) player to play for
ECU coach Hal Baird.
The husky freshman has
registered a 4-0 record on the
mound while accumulating a 2.04
ERA.
When he's not on the mound,
Johnson serves as the club's clean-
up hitter. He is currently batting
.292, with three home runs and 11
runs batted in.
Besides Johnson, another
reliable hitter has been Evans. On-
ly a junior, he has a chance to set
the ECU record for hits in just his
third season.
Evans has 129 career hits, only
52 behind Billy Best (1977-80)
who had 181.
Last year, Evans set the ECU
single-season hit record with 64.
Although only a .261 career hit-
ter, centerfielder Robert Wells is
blistering opposing pitchers with a
.351 average. He collected only 26
hits in all of 1982 and already has
half of that total this season.
Senior shortstop Kelly
Robinette has combined with
freshman Tony Salmond to give
the Pirates a solid defense up the
middle.
After hitting only .247 in his
first three seasons, Robinette is
now hitting at a .303 pace. He is
tied for the team lead in both runs
and hits, and leads in at-bats.
Junior outfielder David Wells
and senior third baseman John
Hallow are both coming back
from early-season hitting slumps.
Wells is currently batting .275,
while Hallow is hitting .284.
Pleasant surprises have come
from the bullpen as relievers Kirk
Parsons and Chubby Butler have
been sharp, posting 1-0 and 2-0
records, respectively.
The Pirates will face the
toughest portion of their schedule
in the upcoming weeks in their
quest to defend their conference
title.
Upcoming opponents include
James Madison, N.C. State,
Campbell, North Carolina, Old
Dominion and Richmond.
Veteran Quarterback Kevin Ingram will be the Bucs' No. 1 offensive caller during spring practice drills.
ECU Gets Two All-Americas
Bv RANDY MEWS
SMR � nltt
Two ECU swimmers, Nan
George and JoAnne McCully,
returned to Greenville Sunday
night as All-Americas after com-
peting in the NCAA Division-II
National Championships, in Long
Beach. Calif during March
16-19.
Friday afternoon. Nan George
became ECU's first NCAA All-
America by placing seventh in the
50-yard freestyle in 24.6 seconds.
Joanne McCulley quickly follow-
ed suit later that afternoon by
finishing ninth in the 100-yard
breaststroke in 1:09.47.
Kobe was extremely pleased by
the performance of his star swim-
mers. "They swam very well he
said. "It was thrilling to get two
All-Americas in one day
On the final day of competi-
tion, George turned in the best
performance ever by an ECU
swimmer at the Nationals. She
finished sixth in the 100-freestyle
and set a new ECU varsity record
in 53.74.
The four-day event featured 54
teams, including such
powerhouses as Northern
Michigan, Air Force and Furman.
"This meet is three times bigger
and ten times faster than the
AIAW exclaimed head coach
Rick Kobe.
This is the first year the Lady
Pirates have participated in
NCAA swimming, having been a
member of the AIAW in past
years.
In the first day of competition,
ECU failed to place in any events.
"It is a brutal meet with the
NCAA and AIAW combined
Kobe said. "Today, a new NCAA
record was set in every event that
was swam
Other Pirates swimmers who
did well in the meet included Kaky
Wilson and McCulley in the
100-individual medley, and the
800-freestyle relay team of Nancy
James, Nancy Ludwig, Nancy
Rogers and George.
Coach Kobe enjoyed the meet
and was pleased with the perfor-
mance of his swimmers. "It was a
very competitive meet and we
swam well in the individual
events. A lot of freshmen made
the trip and they got some good
experience. I'm looking forward
to next year
ECU swimmers Nan George and Nu McCuHy returned home as ECU aU-Anaericw S��day.
George became ECU's Hist NCAA all-America ever.
i
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�"in i iiiminiiianiiiii in � ��
�'M1
A





12
itu
M i Ki 1 IM
1 ki H
ls"h�
Rutledge Combines Tennis With Academics
Foi t asi i arolina
tennis playei Pop.
Rutledge, there has
always been a conflict
between the couri and
the classroom
Rutledge places
more importance on
a rademics than man
athletes and
throughout his career
here at ECU
often had to
hi
. lie has
ik' sacrifice
ins tennis goals in an
effort to maintain
academic ones
��1 first two yeai-
e I came out in the
fall and made it up in-
to the top six
Rutledge said, "but
�hen school and tennis
?vould get to be too
much, so both times I
backed out halfwav
through fall season to
c oncentrat e on
grades
Hut last yeai things
seemed to fall into
place. Rutledge was
able to stick with ten-
5 I hrouj houi the en-
;easo and siill
satis tied with his
tee
a i ademic achiex e
ment I he persistence
paid ofl He con
sistentU played at tIk-
No 2 position behind
now graduated Pirate
ace Keith. Zengel
Rutledge's record was
9 -
"Yeah, things wen!
ptetn well for me last
year Rutledge said
"I was finally able to
maintain some kind
of happ) balance bet
m ecu tennis a rid
school I've averaged
4 the 1 ast five
semesters and made
the Dean's 1 ist twice,
w, tnle still making pi 0
gress with m game
So es. I'm prett
satisfied all around
with the wa things
went last yeai
I ho situation,
h owever, bec am e
strained again this
fall V hile taking 18
hours ol difficult
course work,
R u 11 e d g e also
developed a bad case
of bronchitis.
In what Rutledge
now sails a "stupid
mistake he
neglected to notif)
new coach Pat Shei
man about missing
practice Due to his
lack ol communica-
tion.
"Mv goal now is to
play the No. 1 posi-
tion, and I fed confi-
dent that I can do it.
I'm practicing real
hard Rutledge said.
"My class load is
it
Don Kutlt'dui
tion, he was dropped down some and this is
from the No 2 posi probabl) my last ear
tion down to No. 1 5.
V present, he has
worked his wav back
up to the No 4 posi
here, so I'm realK go-
ing all out
Rutledge sas this is
"probably" his last
vuar here because
there is a long-shot
that he may be eligible
for another season,
due to his minimal
play as a freshman
and sophomore.
Rutledge came to
ECU after playing
competitively at
several northern high
schools. He won four
letters at three
schools: Ottawa Hill
High in Toledo, Ohio,
where he won two let-
ters; South Kinstown
High in Wakefield,
Rhode Island - one
letter; and Mountain
lakes High in Moun-
tain lakes. New
Jersey one letter. He
was a semi-finalist in
the Ohio State
doubles tournament,
and a quarter-finalist
in the Rhode Island
State singles tourna-
ment. During his
tumor season, he was
undefeated. In the
summers of 8082,
Rutledge concen-
trated on tournament
play here in North
(arolina and was
ranked in the top 40 in
the state
"1 suppose m big
gest strength is m in-
tensity and ability to
respond to pressure
competition. I play
well when I get mad I
have a knack tor com
ing from behind, foi
ekeing out close
games at the end
"As tar a- my i
tual shots go, 1 have a
good serve and volley
game 1 know how I
work spins pretty
well 1 still have
predominantly a slice
game, though I'm
working on top spin
Actually , most people
who plav me com
ment on the strength
ol mv serve, but
presently I'm having
some trouble w ith it.
Rutledge conceded
that his bigg
weakness is
overhead smash I'
seems to be mv la I �
shot he said "1 K
don't concentrate like
I should, and it re
quires a lot ol concen
trtion and effort I he
little, dinky lobs, in
general, give me ti
ble And I can't n i
brag about m v
forehand c i �urt;
it's not ev e ii a
weapon I'm too ten
tative with it. I don'i
step into it and nail it
like 1 should 1 net ;t
quite otten, but
seems to be coming
along
t r US'
ime .
keep hi
�lie pi
r .
Ken
R u 11 ed j ' H
been sorn;
long H(
abil I i
sense ! I
ability
geni
- B rj
tcted t
&l C.rr- '� �?�� �"0
T s n. r' i Sleeping B a 9 s
D hes
and O
Used Item bo B
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BORl l()Ns
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I 800 321 OS75
STEAK HOUSE
featuring L SDA choice beef
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Every Tuesday in March 1983
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A connecting riht cross is an example of the heavy punching that took place in last
week's I k I Boxing tournament.
TKE Boxing Packs Wallop
Overton 's
Supermarket, Inc.
Attention Students
Super Specials
B MIKt HI (.Ills
Manuring I- dit'r
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thrill of athletic com-
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drama of head-to-
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lots ol blood, rhis
year was no excep
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custom Mnee the tour-
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the 1 Kf - put on quite
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Hut t h e r e � .15
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Perhaj
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p trance ol the N 1
bur Amateur Boxing
' ib ol Kinston In
this, their first ear ol
competing at Minges,
the) took tour ol the
nine title fights. In
fact, a tournament
that tor seven years
characteristically pit-
ted student against
student saw only three
ECU boxers win
trophies Never
theless, there was
plenty of action in
store.
In Thursday night's
123 H2 pound title
bout, lean, mean
Jesse Daniels posted a
second-round T K O
against luan Velas
quez, after daing his
opponent with a stun-
ning string of first-
round punches
And then came
Kinston. I e v o n
Rouse, the first
member ol the Stai
burtlut to appeal
I hursdav night. came
out ol his cornei
smoking and all but
destroyed his oppo
nem, lohn Kilpatrick,
scoring a first-round
FRO in the 133-142
pound weight class
But gi adually.
ted evening
out In the 143 152
pound title tight. Ed
die Braxton took an
obiousl close deci
n ovei K appa
tative
lohn N. �
I ' :
153-162
as Mark Saieed won
the post fight decision
K : 1 Ipha
cr I ouis Sot
ECU's lerry Parker
posted the best show
ing against the Star
burst lighters, taking
his opponent Jesse
Brown, to the wire
before losing the deci
sion in the 163-172
pound weight class.
But the Kinston
club wasn't the only
outside influence on
the '83 tournament
In the 173-182 title
match-up, Tommy
Pruitt, one ol three
boxers representing
the Greenville Police
Department. scored a
third round I K() over
I SC"s David Kaplon
after pelting Kaplon's
face with a burrage of
blood letting blows,
following Thursday,
night's competition,
Pruitt was named
Most Valuable Boxer.
The next two fights
went easily to Star-
burst boxers. In the
183-192 pound weight
class, Kinston's Mike
"Chiel Michael
M ic h a e 1 " Whit e
blasted E( I 's Man
I owe in one of the
e ening's shortest
fights, another first-
round TKO. Then
came the 91-202 title
tight, which definitely
took tlie award for
most lopsided, if not
medic, contest.
G PD representative
Da n Heinz, who
resembled little more
than a 2(K)-lb. pun-
ching bag against
Kmston's Ed Smith,
forfeited that title
bout halfway through
'he first round after
Smith's makeshift at
tempt at rearranging
Heinz's facial struc-
ture
And m Ihursdav
night's final contest,
the 203 unlimited
weight class, GPD's
B.M. Hamill and
Kappa Sigma's Keith
Parkhill exchanged
mostlv unimpressive
blows for three
straight lacklustre
rounds en route to a
post-fight decision in
Hamill's favor.
But all in all,
despite a few one-
sided bouts, the 1983
TKE Boxing Tourna-
ment provided much
of the same entertain
ment, excitement, ac-
tion and blood as
in past years, proving
once again that it is
one of ECU's finest,
best-planned and
most worthwhile
traditions
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4cademics
THE EAST CAROL INIAN
privacy; 1 like his con
Rma) gelce n t r a 11 o n and
o n t h eremai kable ability
�in whai is largely conceived b an in dual event, tennis - somewhat difficult ate as ,i team p but Rutledge praised the ECM squad foi being able istments
I here is constant ' tig of positions We're ail i u ted about the up
aning season, the u p g r a d e d v hed and toughei com n "
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V-r-�' IN
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�i
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MARCH 22, 1983
13
7 Classifieds
PERSONAL
TO THE WILD WOMEN MM,
SUSAN, JO: Let the bonal.de
organ, power of Nio roots. Talk-
ing Heads. �na the gun be with
you. Never forget the good
times; happy birmdaygeadua
tion. Love always, Bryte and
Becky
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��fl. punctuation and grammar
corrections. Proofreading. Call
OmWltMHIHta.m. f p.m.
LOST AND
FOUND
Davenport at Washington Tacht
� nd Country Club Thurs thru
Sat. between s and p.m. or call
4e 1SI4.
Baltimore or Washington. D C
Can leave March Ji. April I or 2
Katie. 751 t?3 Call enyt.m.
K� I firs. bem.� Todd Kvans is sho.n here atleraplin, lo keep . runner from
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, experience, quality
work, IBM Selectric typewriter.
Call Lanie Shive 7HSW1 or
OAIL JOYNER 7S�-IT
TYPING: Term papers, thesis.
etc. Call Kempie Dunn. 752 47J3
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE: Complete audio repair
call after t p.m. Mark 752 124
NEED TYPING? Lowest rate-
on campus. � years experience I
BM type Call Cindy. JSs7�i,
after 5:00 p.m.
MOVING? No Ob too large orl
small I Reasonable rates. call
75533
LOST: J YEAR OLD small
black female dog White mark
�ngs on chin and paws, no tail
Answers to CLO Please call
7S� 220 after 4 00 p m if seen or
found.
LOST: GERMaVsEPHERD
Puppy, mostly black Answers to
"Dusty Lost near Harding
Street. If found, call S4 44j
WANTED
WANTED. Organist for dinner
WANTED: FEMALE
Bartenders tor part time and
summer job. Apply between 2
end 4 Thursday, March 14th At
tic. 103 E 4th Street
ATTRACTIVE MODELS
WANTED for figure �
"intimate apparel'
photography Excellent pay
Send figure photo and personal
information to P O Box U13.
Rocky Mount. N.C 27001 113
ENERGETIC Partt.me
Mlesperson needed Available
mornings and Saturdays. Ex
perience preferred but not
necessary Apply ,n person,
Leather n' Wood, Ltd. Carolina
East Mall No phone calls
MISC.
elsewhere in this paper tor taxa-
tion and times
FOR SALE
RIDES
Grand Slam Carries
State Over Pirates
LEARN
75�.�42
10 YEARS
TO FLY Call
The ECU Pirates
lost only their fourth
baseball game of the
ear Monday after-
noon at the hands of
'be N.C. State
Wolf pack.
The Wolf pack used
a five-run 5th inning
to pull out the in-
trastate contest, 10-5.
The game was
scoreless after three
innings, until ECU
scored in the top half
of the 4rth inning on
an RBI double bv
Daid Wells.
The Wolfpack
came back in their
half of the inning to
score one run on three
ualks and two singles.
ECU took the lead
in the fifth on three
consecutive singles by
Jabo rulghum, Mike
Williams and Robert
Wells. Wilhams also
scored on a wild pitch
to make the score 3-1.
N.C. State did the
heavy damage in their
half of the 5th inning.
A grand slam home
run by Doug Barbour
put the game out of
reach for the
Wolfpack.
The Pirates left 12
men stranded on base
for the game, a fact
which ECU coach Hal
Baird claimed was the
fault of poor execu-
tion.
"Our executing is
where we have been
deficient Baird
said. "That cost us to-
day and we're going
to have to eliminate
those type of mistakes
in the future
For the Pirates,
who are now 11-4,
Winfred Johnson
picked up his first loss
of the year after four
consecutive wins.
ECU was led in hit-
ting by Robert and
David Wells (no rela-
tion), who had two
hits apiece.
The next Pirate
game is scheduled for
this afternoon at 3:00
p.m. at Campbell.
jijrior fxecs
A9E VOti NEW IN THl JOB MARKET?
SALAR
Starts $1?00 - 524,100 increasing
annually to $28.00 - $44,800 in four
years .
QUALIFICATIOHS
�In! Ii-ue gratis, all degrees ami degree
levels considered. Recent qrads looking
tor first job as well as those
contemplating a job change (under age
34) are encouraged to apply! Required
to pas rental and physical exams.
FNt l : i
Full medical, dental, unltaited sick
leave, 3" days annual paid vacation,
post grad education prograns and
retlrenent in 20 years!
JOB
'Portions are still available in the
following areas: Management (technical
and non-technical). Engineering,
Nuclear, Teaching, Intel 1 i gerce
Aviation Management, Diving, Pilots
Finance, Personnel Management. Worldwide
� ocations - we pay relocation expenses.
:f you're interested in finding out
wre, see the Navy Officer Programs
they'll be on campus 29-31 March
at the student (Wter. rjf ynil ,���,
id.e it, send your resume or transcripts
to:
NELSON SKINNER
U.S. NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Or.
Raleigh, NC 27609
Or call 1-800-662-7231
8am-4pm, MonFri.
Jounnk. I NEED A R,DE TO MO
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN BUFFET
5 P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
�LASAGNA m
K �SPAGHETTI $3.99
ji(Choice of 3 Sauces)
m�r� Wlth (jarlic Bread
f'lh a" you can eat soup and salad $4.99
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALL
Reasonable rales Call 7S4-SJ
RESPONSIBLE PERSON(S)
WANTED to sub lease one room
apartment at Tar River Estates
this summer Apt ,s beside
large swimming pool. Mas patio
and is located 5 minutes Irom
campus Can 7JI 4424 lor more
information
FREE Increase your reading
speed on the spot at a free
Evelvn wood Reading
Dynamics Introductory lesson
We'll also show you how it's
possible to read and study three
to l� times taster with better
comprehension! Get better
grades, have more free time
Find out how See our large ad

-
l�74 TOYOTA CORONA
ac good mileage, clean (I.
W iJU ask for Jim
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, Matt
Welcome to our tlea marfee at
the Pitt County r in ej e.aiii
located on North Greenville
Blvd Open every Saturday and
Sunday t M s Crafts, tee. h�r
mture. books, etc Di
old postcards buttons
pistols and collectors
Real bargains!)
SURFBOARDS PRO SU�J�G
DESIGNS. MTB. Diiele.
twins and tns Clean itiapi i
some damage U �7e�
TWIN BED WITH FRAME. 4�
spring, mattress, table cites'
Good condition, call 7S3 1S�.
'?
ATTIC







nr
PRESENTS
: 5th ANNUAL SPRING ZING
; WING DING FLING THING :
' " - ' STATES
THUR
kVrJIV �HII4. -j (if.
ALL-YOl-tAN-LAt J
FLOUNDER DINNER
Breakfast Bar open 6:00am"
SHONEYS
205 GrMnvilU Blvd.















CALL FORt
DETAILS t
- . - 752-5543 t
� .OTE: This annual event alwavs sells out
so please come early. I
WW�M,m�w.TTTTT()t
MARCH
24th
GIRLS FREE TILL 1030
GUYS 99 ALL NIGHT
HAPPY HOUR PRICES
ON THE BAR ALL NIGHT
RAFFLE SURPRISE???
AND AN ALL CAMPUS
iry CHUG
V� 0FF
GRADUATE TO GOLD
AND
DIAMONDS!
With a Diamond College Ring
from ArtCarved.
Your ArtCarved Representative
is here now with the beautifully
affordable Designer Diamond Collection.
An ArtCarved exclusive. Exquisitely crafted
designs, all set with genuine diamonds, in 10k
or 14k gold. Or, chose the elegant diamond-
substitute Cubic Zircinia.
Let your ArtCarved Representative show you this!
beautiful class ring collection today. Gold and
diamondsit's the only way to go.
IRT(7,RVED
COLLFGF RIMP,Q
COLLEGE RINGS
Tues. 22nd
Wed. 23rd
DATE � "
9-4
TIME
- Deposit Required MasterCard or Visa Accepted
Student Supply
SKLobby
PLACE
Nothing etee feete like real gold O
The Official
U Class Rings
v �
r
A
mm
" .





YOU CAN
gets down to what you want to do and what you
c to do. Take the free Evelyn Wood Re
nics lesson and you can do it handle all the
ollege demands and still have time to enjoy
ife
an dramatically increase your reading speed
and that s just the start. Thim the time
ou d have to do the things you �
Fc twenty years the ones who get ahea
d Reading Dynam
today s active world
.�N
Don t get left behind because there as too much
to read. Take the free Evelyn Wo
lamics lesson today ou can
se your reading spee
need study techniques in
n Make the college life
ung Dynamics you c
t h
TODAY MAR.22 Noon and 3pm Rotary-
-7pm Ramada
WEDNESDAY MAR.23 2pm4:30pm,7pm Rotary
THURSDAY MAR.24 1:30pm Rotary-5pm,7:30pm Ramada
Seating is limited, so
please plan on
attending the
curliest
possible
lesson!
3 EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS





Title
The East Carolinian, March 22, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 22, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.257
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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