The East Carolinian, March 17, 1983






(Bhe lEaat (Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.4- 5
Thursday, March 17, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Morgan, Jenkins Get First Honorary Degrees
By MILLIE WHITE
M�ff W filer
The first honorary degrees
awarded by ECU, the doctorate
of letters, will be given to
Chancellor Emeritus Leo W.
Jenkins and former U.S. Senator
Robert B. Morgan on Mav 6.
Chancellor John M. Howeil in-
vited Morgan to be the speaker at
the 74th annual ECU commence-
ment. Many institutions ask an
honoree to gie the commence-
ment address.
Howeil, announcing approval
by the Board of Trustees of the
honorary degree awards, said, "It
is indeed heartening to me that we
have initiated this practice with
two persons so well qualified and
deserving
Jenkins, as president and
chancellor, and Morgan, as chair-
man o the trustees, fought
political battles in the 1960s and
I9"0s which shaped ECU's role as
a uniersity. ECU changed from a
college to a u liversity during
Jenkin's tenure in 1967.
An honorary degree committee,
established by the board of
trustees last year, recommended
conferring the degrees upon
Jenkins and Morgan. Both men
were nominated by ECU graduate
C. Ralph Kinsey, Jr. current
chairman of the ECU trustees.
In formal letters of nomination,
Kinsey commented on Jenkins'
31-year service to the university.
"Unprecedented growth occurred
during more than three decades of
leadership by Leo Jenkins. In this
period, approximately 85 percent
of the alumni graduated
Kinsey said "enrollment was
1.600 students when Jenkins ar-
rived in 1947. This number had
grown to more than 12,(XX) when
he retired in 1978
Since his retirement as
chancellor, Jenkins has served as
special assistant to Gov. James B.
Hunt, Jr. for economic develop-
ment and other projects.
"Dr. Leo Jenkins had great vi-
sions of increasing the service of
East Carolina to the people of this
region and state Kinsey said.
"His goal was to transform a
small teachers college into a maior
multi-purpose university
Anouncing Morgan's nomina-
tion, Kinsey said he "is totally
devoted to the advancement of
higher education He added that
Morgan "is among East Carolina
University's most distinguished
graduates. He has maintained a
close relationship with this institu-
tion for almost 30 years and has
given vital support and leadership
during an era of unprecedented
growth
Morgan received a BS degree
from ECU in 1947. As a state
senator for five terms in the 1950s
and 1960, Morgan spearheaded
the lengthy legislative fight that
won university status for ECU
In 1968 Morgan was elected At-
torney General of North Carolina
and served as the state's highest
legal officer until his successful
campaign for the U.S. Senate in
1974.
When contacted at his Harnett
County law office, Morgan said
he is grateful to have been chosen,
along with Dr. Jenkins, to receive
the honor.
"I'm very much appreciative
and the fact that I feel like I don't
deserve it makes the honor even
greater he said. Morgan said he
is proud to receive the honor from
such a great institution and that
he "couldn't covet a greater
honor
Former L.SSen. Robert Morgan and former EClhancellor Leo Jenkins, seen here at a university func-
tion, were selected a the first people to receive honorary degrees from ECU. The ceremony will take place
at the end of this semester,and Morgan will give the university's commencement address.
N.C. Senate Passes Hunt's Drunken Driving Bill
Gov. James B. Hunt
Minority Aid
Down; Funds
Up To Whites
By PATRICK O'NEILL
A slightly amended version o
Gov. James B. Hunt's drunken
driving bill sailed through the
State Senate Tuesday. The new
bill, which calls for raising the
minimum drinking age for beer
and wine products from 18 to 19.
is also expected to be passed by
the House ;n similar form possibly
by next week.
"The people of North Carolina
have cause to be proud of their
state Senate for its overwhelming
vote Tuesday the Governor said
in a prepared statement late Tues-
day. Hunt added that the drunken
driving bill, if passed in the
House, would give North
Carolina the "toughest and most
comprehensive drunk driving law
in the nation
The Senate version of the bill
also contains an amendment that
would ban any open beer or wine
containers in most cars and small
trucks. Some Senate members are
concerned that the amendment
could delay passage of the
measure in the House.
Besides raising the minimum
drinking age, the legislation will
abolish plea bargaining in
drunken driving cases, impose
mandatory seven to 14 day jail
sentences for serious violations
and toughen the sentences and
fines for less serious cases. It also
creates a two-stage trial where the
sentence would follow the convic-
tion after other factors were con-
sidered by the judge.
An amendment to exclude a
rule imposing a automatic 10-day
driver's license suspension for
anyone registering above .10 per-
cent blood alcohol content or
refusing to take the Breathalyzer
test was defeated by a lopsided
40-8 vote.
Hunt said he was "particularly
gratified" that the amendment
was voted down.
The defeated amendment was
introduced by Sen. Dennis J.
Winner, D-Buncombe, because he
believed the 10-day suspension
would violate the principle that a
person is presumed innocent until
convicted in a court of law. "This
absolutely flies in the face of our
most basic liberty-saving princi-
ple Winner said.
The section of the Hunt legisla-
tion which calls for raising the
minimum drinking age to 19 has
met some resistance from ECU
administrators, security officers
and students.
Director of Campus Public
Safety Joe Calder claimed that the
new minimum-age law will be
hard to enforce and create addi-
tional work for police officers.
Dr. Jerry Lotterhos, director
of ECU's alcohol training pro-
gram, has also criticized the Hunt
bill as being unenforceable. Lot-
terhos said the bill fails to deal
with some of the basic questions
concerning the reasons alcohol is
not used responsibly by
Americans.
Tom Haines, owner of Green-
ville's Attic Nightclub and a
spokesman for the Greenville
Nightclub Association, has also
been highly critical of the Hunt
measure. Haines claims that the
new legislation will actually in-
crease drunken driving because it
will force more 18-year-olds to
consume alcohol in uncontrolled
environments.
State Sen. Vernon White,
D-Pitt, who voted for the Hunt
bill, said he believes the new age
requirement will help to remove
drinking from the high schools by
limiting the access to beer and
wine for many 18-year-old
students. T was very pleased with
the bill White said. "1 think it's
a very good bin
Perhaps the most controversial
proposal is the dramshop provi-
sion which would have held places
that serve alcohol responsible for
their customers' actions after
leaving an establishment. It was
amended after heavy lobbying by
opponents. The amended pro-
posal would hold retail outlets
liable for civil damage suits if they
sold alcoholic beverages to minors
later involved in accidents.
It
(CPS) � Middle-income white
students got more financial aid
last year than did eight years ago,
while low-income minority-
students got less, according to a
study just released by the National
Commission on Student Financial
Assistance.
Students whose parents earned
more than $12,000 a year were
more likely to get a grant than
they were in 1974 � when a
similar study was done � and the
amount of that award was larger,
according to the study.
At the same time, low-income
students had about the same
chance of getting aid as they did
eight years ago, the study found,
but the amount of that award has
shrunk since 1974.
Black students, while still more
likely to get an award than white
students, were also likely to
receive a much smaller amount
than white students.
Inflation, apparently, is the
culprit.
"The federal government just
has not increased the maximum
award sizes to keep up with infla-
tion explains John Lee, director
of the Human Resources Division
of the Applied Systems Institute,
the Washington, D.C consulting
firm which prepared the study.
For example, he says, a 1974
award of $1000 would have had to
increase to $1800 by 1981 in order
to keep pace with inflation.
Middle class students have
come out ahead, he notes, because
of a series of new programs in-
troduced in 1978 to increase aid to
those students.
And blacks and other
minorities, he adds, have seen the
value of their Financial aid erode
the most "because those kids, due
to the maldistribution of wealth
by race, are more likely to be in
the lower income category than
white students
"Also Lee says, "low-income
kids are more likely to go to a
lower-cost of going to college �
that kind of limits the size of the
awards low-income students
receive
Computers On Campus
Prove To Be Hot Items
To Enterprising Thieves
Photo By CINDY WALL
Now Let's See
That'll be four hamburgers, two hotdogs (hold the chili), three large fries, chocolate shake and a coke. Is
that for here or to go?
UNC Girls Line Up For 'Playboy'
Despite Protest By Some Feminists
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUtt W hl�
More than 100 University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
students showed up for a photo
session conducted by Playboy
photographer David Chan. The
preliminary photos were being
shot in preparation for the
magazine's feature on "Girls of
the Atlantic Coast Conference"
next fall.
Despite efforts by several
women's groups to stop the pro-
posed feature, the First stop on
Chan's eight-school schedule was
full of willing girls.
The controvers y began last
month when Playboy began to
purchase ads in several ACC stu-
dent newspapers. The ads were
called sexist by some because of
what Duke University's school
paper's advertising manager term-
ed "meat marketing
At UNC, the Daily Tar Heel,
despite strong objection from a
feminist group on campus, ran the
ads.
Tuesday's turnout included
women in two categories. Many
were interested in possible model-
ing careers; while others hoped to
make some money. Playboy is
paying $75 for clothed models,
$150 for semi-nude and $300 for
nude to the women who are
choosen for the spread. The
magazine will select six women
from each ACC school toi the
final photo sessions.
The initial photo sessions con-
ducted by Chan, who spent
Wednesday snaping the women of
N.C. State, are basically facial
shots. The more provocative,
seductive poses will come later.
Since 1977, Playboy has been
doing features for its September
issue featuring women attending
schools in various athletic con-
ferences, and every year the
magazine causes a great deal of
controversy from the feature.
(CPS) � Despite the heralded
advances that microcomputers are
bringing to the college campus
these days, the proliferation of the
compact, lightweight and easily-
transported mechanical marvels is
causing a growing problem with
campus law enforcement agen-
cies: they're too easy to steal.
"We're getting a lot more
microcumputers on campuses
these days in engineering depart-
ments; computer programming
departments, for administrative
use; in faculty offices and in com-
puter centers and dormitories
explains Dan Keller, director of
Campus Crime Prevention Pro-
grams and security chief at the
University of Louisville.
"And as they became more and
more popular on campus he
said, "micorcomputers are also
becoming popular consumer items
for the public. Now there's a
reason to steal them
Consequently,
"microcomputers are becoming
the CBs of the eighties" as
popular items to steal.
At Louisville. Keller says, "we
didn't have any problems with
computer thefts three years ago.
Now it's a monthly occurrence
Campus law enforcement direc-
tors across the country echo his
concerns.
Microcomputers, they say,
along with hardware such as
phone modems and disk drives,
are slowly becoming hot items for
thieves.
Most ofFicials agree the pro-
blem can only get worse.
"We have a large number of
personal computers on campus
and, at this point, have already
lost two or three over the last
year reports Iowa State Security
Officer David Stormer.
Iowa State has recently had "a
number of component parts
stolen too.
There's a developing market for
used microcomputers. They're
readily resalable, and very dif-
ficult to trace when they are
stolen Stormer says.
"They're easier to steal than a
typewriter concurs Illinois
State's Lt. Don Knappl. Theft of
micorcomputers, he says, will
"undoubtably" become a major
crime problem for colleges.
Drexel hasn't had any serious
computer theft problems yet,
Smith says, but when all entering
freshmen will be required to have
a microcomputer this fall, his
department will "make every
available effort to see that they're
secure
Among other things, he plans
to register the serial number of
each micro with the FBI's Na-
tional Crime Information Center,
and have a special logo etched on
every machine.
Campus security directors
across the country are frantically
working to register, label and bolt
down thousands of microcom-
puters.
Carnegie Mellon, which will re-
quire all entering freshmen to
have their own micros within the
next two years, is already plann-
ing a massive "Operation LD
program to register and identify
the machines.
At Iowa State, "everyone who
has access to a computer is briefed
on recommended security pro-
cedures Stormer says. "We
recommend every computer be
secured behind locked doors, and
physically attached to a wall or
table
T

'
A






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would tike to have an item
prnted in the anftbuncemen
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
oMice m the Publications
Budding Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd aieO paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
mem will run as long as you
want ana suggest that you do not
rely solely on th.s column for
publicity
T he deadline tor an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
tor the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesdayy tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
receded after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
SRA ELECTIONS
SRA will have elections on
April 6. 1983 Filing dates are
March 18 through the 28 Can
didates meet'ng ,s March 29
Please ydur residence director
tor more information
CAR WASH
When was the last time you
saw the original color of your
car? By letting the Spring
Pledge ciass of Gamma Sigma
Sigma Sorority wash your car
'or a donation of $2 00 you can
help a paralyzed foster child
and increase your gas mileage
by removing the lag of all that
extra weight" it will be open
March 26 from 10 am to 4 pm at
the Bypass Shell station on 101
W Greenville Rd
DATING
Are you 'nterested in the
Christian view of DATING'
Come iom the Faith, Hope, and
Love fellowship this Friday
n.ght at 7 30 r m in Jenkins Art
Bu idmg Auditorium Know that
vou are ioved' Come iOin the
GREENVILLE
PEACE COMMITTEE
Low brutally humiliated and
destroyed a world of stagnant
possibilities created by the false
la'he'S who built and tolerated
'he Auschweitz s and Vietnams
rjl n oory those who have par
ca'ed in the torture
chambers of the ecclesiastical
"Ol'S tions and then forgotten
a 'houT remorse 'his is the
i'e of affairs that cries out to
us 'hat piagues our consciences
aid demands to be challenged
it you are ready to make a com
m rnent to iustice it you are
'eady to begin building a new
k nd of socety free of violence
DOverfy and alienation we need
vou Come to the meeting of the
Greenville Peace Committee at
610 S Elm St at 7 00 Fnoay
n.ght or phone 748 4906 for more
nformation
SUMMER
CAMP JOBS
Tf�ow8'�r safety ���trjc tors
a N and Arts and Crafts Direc
tor For information write Ed
Mara M Hooges Jr 215 E 1lfh
S1 .ashington NC 27889
SAM
The Society for the Advance
menf of Management will meet
on Thursday. March 17, in Rawi
10 at 4 00 Guest speaker will be
Mr Don Barham ytce president
ot personnel wth National Spin
ning in Washington. D C Mr
Barham will speak on quality
Circles in management
WZMB
The Electric Rainbow radio
Show hosted by Keith Mitchell is
on WZMB on Fridays and Satur
days from 3 pm to 6 pm and 12
midnight to 6 am respectively
A'bum specials this week are to
be F riday 4 pm
Vandenberg Saturday 2am
Riot's Fire Down Under
Please tune n to WZMB at these
times and adiust the volume ac
cordingly
DORM RESIDENTS
The Student Housing Depart
ment will be conduction a
survey concerning a proposed
quiet study dorm The SGA Stu
dent Welfare Committee made
this proposal but its success
hinges on adequate student sup
port if you would liKe to live in a
quiet or study residence hall
than make this indication on the
survey form, which will be
available dur.ng room reserva
tions March 21 25 Note A study
dorm is one m which the
residents formulate a set of
quiet hours and agree to enforce
them If mere are any student
suggestions or recommenda
tions contact the Student
Welfare Committee
INTER VARSITY
So your planning next weeks
schedule. Just remember to put
inter varsity down tor Wednes
day night at 6 30 m Biology 102
What better way tos pend a
Wednesday n.ght than in Chris
tian Fellowship and teaching
AMBASSADOR
SCHOLARSHIP
The Past President s dub ot
the ECU Alumni Association is
offering a scholarship to an Am
bassador m order to express
their deep appreciation for the
vast amount of volunteer ser
vice that the ECU Ambassadors
contribute to the progress and
welfare ot East Carolina Univer
Sity The recipient must be an
ECU student who is a member in
good standing of the ECU Am
bassadors and must be of such
classification as to be a senior in
the tali semester of 1983 m the
Taylor Slaughter Aiumm
Center Applications should �
completed and turned in by
Apr,I 1 1983
FREE
HEARING SCREEN
Free hearing screen for r
people who were in close prox
imify to the explosion aT v'Mage
Gren Apartments on Martri 2
1983 Contact Speech Pathology
and AudiOiogy Department
Regional Rehabilitation Centet
Pitt County Memorial Hosp-tai
tor appointment '�" 4448
COFFEEHOUSE
COMMITTEE
NEEDSMEMBERS
1 you like vaff't entertain
ment and ant a challenge
become a member on me Stu
dent Un.on Coffee house Com
mittee For more information.
contact the Student unon
Room 234) at 757 6611. ext 210
CADP
There will be a meeting in
Mendenhall Student Center
Thursday at 4 15. Room 221 It is
importan that an memrjers at
tend
TOKILL A
MOCKINGBIRD
� To Kill A Mockingbird" will
be shown on Thursday Marcn 17,
at the Methodist Student Center
at 8 00 p m as part of the conti
numg Thursday Night Fucks
program A discussion will
follow the movie and
refreshments will be served
FINANCIAL
AIDCONFERENCES
March 22 and 23 are the two
days scheduled for make uo
NDSL and Nursing Loan Bor
rower Conferences The March
22, 1983 makekp up conferences
will start at I 2 3 and (pm in
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 242 If you borrowed
either NDSL or Nursding Loan
and nave not attended a bor
rowers conference, you are re
quired to attend one ot the make
up conferences
ATTENTION
Welcome back, hope that
everyone had a great spring
break The Brothers and Little
Sisters of Pi Kappa Phi would
like to thank the students and
the university ot ECU Your sup
port and help after the Village
Green explosion that took the
lite of one of our brothers and
put tour others in the hospital
has been very heart warming A
memorial service for our
brother David B Martin. Jr will
be held on Monday larcrt 21 at
4 30 p m at Mendenhall student
Center on the patio Also the
Bro'hers really appreciate all
the work and support that our
little Sisters have given to us
MASSAGE CLINIC
Need a muscle relaxer to help
you get back into the swing ot
things? It you do then come to
the massage clinic that the
Physical Therapy club s having
on Wednesday. March 23 The
clinic will begin at 6 30 pm ano
last until 9 30 pm it will ue held
at the Belk Bilding in the
Physical Therapy Lab room on
thefirstfioor The cost s Jl 00 so
come on over and relax and en
Oy '
BAHA'I CLUB
The ECU Baha i Club will
meet in 241 Mendenhall TuesoaT
March 22 from 11 until noon The
Baha ' Fath teaches the con
cept of Progressive Revelation
This means that .n earn per.oc
of history Goo sends a
Messenger 'o guide Mankind
Baha. s believe that
Bahai u'Hah The Gior, of God '
v Go " � v � :� � �
vou are cordially mvited to
fl� and sn,r e .01 � Hi
HISTORY
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Department ot History
would like to call attention to
scholarships which are offered
in the Department of History for
1983 84
The Richard Cecil Todd
Scholarship Awards tor
members of Lambda Eta
Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta are
awarded annually to members
enrolled full time at East
Carolina University and who
demonstrated outstanding ser
vice to Lambda Eta Chapter of
Phi Alpha Theta, the History
Department and the University
The award is open to both
undergraduates ano graduates
who are members of Phi Alpha
Theta A maximum of two S5O0
awards may be granted each
academic year
Qualified members may apply
at the History Department office
in Brewster A 316
Applications must be submit
ted by April 15, 1983
The Joseph E and Catherine
E Hirsch Memorial Award in
History is awarded annoaiy to a
maior in the Department ot
History who is considered the
most promising iunior based
upon the following criteria
Scholarship to be
measured in terms ot the overall
quality of their work .n the study
ot history
Promise to be measured in
terms ot their positive atitudes
towards themselves and their
academic discipline,
Motivation to learn and im
prove and their general future
potential both as an individual
and as a student of history
The purpose of this award is to
provide the recipients with a
sum of money with which to buy
textbooks and any other books
related to h.s academic courses
of sdtudy it is hoped that said
books will become a part ot a
permanent collection, either n
the recipient's personal library
or in some other established
library
Qualified students may apply
tor the Hirsch Memorial Awara
at the Office of the History
SUMMER SCHOOL 1983
ROOM RESERVATION
Residence hall room deposits
tor Summe- Schoni 1983 will be
accepted in the Cash.or s Offe
Room 105 Sp.lman Building
beginn.ng Apr ; 5 Room
ass.gnmen's will be made ,n the
respective residence nan offices
on Apr,I 7 and Apr,l 8
Thereafter they n be ma
the O'tice ot Housing Opera
Room 201 A h , c h a r d
Building ' I. rent for a term of
Hmmei � s 1120 tor a
private room and SI60 for a
private room Add,t.onai ren' n
the amount ot S20 ,s required for
Jarvis Han
Students who wish to reserve
rooms they presently occupy
provided such rooms are to be in
use this summer, are to make
reservations on Thursday April
7 AH other studen's may
reserve rooms on a first come,
t.rst serve basis on Friday
April 8
Residence halls to be used for
women are Greene Slav I rst
floor for mob-lity impa.rec
students) and Jarvis Men w II
be housed m Fletcher Slav
i first floor tor mobility ,mr i re
students and Jarvis Halls
YDHL
Young Home Designer s
League meets March 22nd at
5 00 m the VanLand,ngham
room
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts, Sleeping Bags
Backpacks Camping Equip
ment Steel Toed Shoes, Dishes
and Over 700 Different New and
Used Items Cowboy Boots
111 9 5
ARMY-NAVY
1501 S Evans
Street
STORE
ABORTIONS
1 24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-321 0575
NOBS ,
I Jewlery Repair
custom crofting
tutvmttted work
Briai This Ad for
20OFF
14K Caaia Repairs
1
I
I
I
I
I
I by Les. Jewlery J
� 1291 5th Street. 7S-2U7
10-5 Tues.Set. I
! imam4
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion a difficult dec.
DEPEND ON. s at s made easier fcv
?hewomer rhe ?errlQ Center Counselors are
avaiiaoie day and n.gnt to support and under
stana vou vour safety cnnfort and privacy are
assured py trie caring staff of the Hemmg Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturday Aportion Ap-
pointments � 1st & 2nd Trimester ADortions up to
16 WeeKS � f-ree Pregnancy Tests � very Early
Pregnancy Tests � An inclusive Pees � insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OB NIGHT �
Heaitncare counseling THE FLEMING
CENTER
and education for wo-
men of a" ages
Pre Easter Special
20OFF
All new Spring and Summer Shoes
Styles by: Nine-West,Naturalizer,
Bees by Beacon Buskens and More.
IPitt Plaza
(Shopping;
Center
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
nyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75f per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters
Return to THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office b) 3:00 Tuesday before
wedaesday awMicattoM.
Name
Address.
CityState.
No lines
.ZiP.
Phone.
at 7S per line S.
.No. insertions.
�.
.enclosed
1 1 1 1���
1 1 1 1 14���j ��
1 1 1 1 1 1 1.��i��1 r1 �1�-11 � i � 4��1 ,�
Department
Deadline 'c
April 1 ,�b -
Brester A 316
applications is
' .� - � i ec Toad
� � . (or
� . . � ��� i scholar s m
History ai c? grantee tor me
academic year 83 84 ah ap
Dcants must De students enroll
eo tuii lime at East Carolina
University ana De declared
nistory majors who are in their
iunior or senior year Recipients
will be considered on trie basis ot
scholarship citijensfiip ana
nerd
Eden award will be tor the
amount o SSCO 00 per year In
teresteQ students ma apply tor
trie scholarship at the H,story
Department Brewster A 316
Deadl ne is Apr.i IS 1983
TONIGHT
The public is inyited to near a
lecture on Alternatives to un
carceration ton.ghi at the A,Ins
Building 7 30 p mN C Judge
Willis Whichard. chairman ot
the citizens commission on Ater
natives to incarceration will be
the teaturea speaker
IFC
The day Of t��e Mrs iFCBeau
�y Pageant is approaching
quicniy and all Greeks should be
considering which gorgeous girl
will represent them in this
auspicous event More ntorma
tion will be given at a later date
EVER DREAMEDOF
FLYING?
Make theat dream come true
The Department ot intramural
Recreational Services with the
cooperation ot Kitty Hawk Kites
will be offering a hang gliding
trip to Nags Head, NC on March
26 A beginning instruction class
will be offered as well as an ad
vanced class
Registration for the trip will
taken at the Outdoor Recreation
Center (113) Memorial Gym
Through March 17 Payment
must accompany registration
All equiptment and transporta
tion will be provided
The beginning course will cost
HI 40 with an additional S2v 00
charge tor the advanced course
if you elect to take it For more
information concerning the trip
call or stop by the center or
phone 757 6911 Hours 1 00 5 00
Monday and Friday ana 2 00
4 00 Tuesday Wednesday and
Thursday
1983 CANOE TRIP
The Outdoor Recreation
Center tor the Department of
intramural Recreational Ser
vices is sponsoring a Canoe Trip
on Wednesday Varcn 23 1983
The trip is suitab.e tor beginning
or eipenenceo canoers
Tnp participants will meet
behind Memorial Gym at 3 00
p m on Wednesday tor a leisure
ly paddle down the Tar River
lasting approx mately 2 hourS
Participants should arive back
at memorial Gym by 6 00 p m
Advance registration and pay
ment i3 00 per person! is due by
4 00 p m on Tuesday March 22,
1983 Groups are welcome For
registration or more informa
tion can or stop by room 113
Memorial Gym (757 6911 or
757 6387)
AKA CAR WASH
The members of Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority will nate a car
wash Saturday March 19 from
10 30 2 30 p m at Shell Service
Station at me corner of Evans
and Greenville Blvd
ILO
The international Language
Organization will be showing the
foihowing two films are
ugetsu ana Mr HulotsHoli
day The first film will be
shown at 7 30 Admission to the
films is stuoent id and activity
card or Menaenhall Faculty and
Staff ID
NSSLNA
Presenting the 13th Annual
Speech Language and Hearing
Symposium entitled
Phonology' A contemporary
view of Art.culation The pur
pose of this meeting is to aid pro
fessionals m learning methoas
tor helping children with com
munication problems Speakers
will be Or John Locke, Dr
Richard Shine and Or Salvatore
DeMarco It will be held March
24 and 25 For more information
contact the ECU Speech and
hearing clinic
COMPUTERS
The East Carolina Microcom
purer users Group (ECMUG)
will meet Thursday, March 17,
at 7 30pm, Mendenhall student
Center. Multipurpose Room On
the agenda are a magazine ex
change (bring your old com
purer mags to exchange or give
away) demonstration of the
Lobo Max R, and question and
answer time You do not need to
nave a micro to attend
NORTH CAROLINA
STUDENT
LEGISLATURE
Attention all NCSL
members1' The election nave
been heia wth one still waiting
?or official confirmation and the
results are coming m! if
cur.ousify is killing you iust
figuring out who Our new
Delegation Chairperson, Vice
Chairperson, Secretary, ana
Treasure are members of the
North Carolina Student
Legislature aon 1 wait until
after session We �ill announce
the results Monaay night at 7
p m at Menoenhaii, room 212 so
please attend1 And for those go
� ng to Raleigh next week for Ses
s-on please attena this meeting
to prepare yourselves for the
craz'ness ahead at Session (the
bills stupid)' Do not forget ney.
is that nr F again �!
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
The Internation Language
Organization will be showing the
following two films in Hendrix
theater on Tuesday March 22.
1983 The f.ims are UGETSU
and Mr HULOT'S HOLIDAY
The first film will be shown at
7 30 Admission to the films is
student id ana activity card or
Menoenhaii Faculty and Staff
ID
ECU IRATES
ECU iRates will host their
first ultimate tournament
Natural Light uitimax March
26 ana 27 Come out ana see
some of the best ultimate frisbee
to be played on the east coast
this year The dub participated
m a tournament at Florida State
University over spring break
We had some discouraging
moments on the field, but are
better ultimate players tor it
Scoring a bg 3 points against
Duke was a highlight of the
weekena Keep it up I rates
INTERNAL AUDITING
LECTURE SERIES
Guest speakers from the
Raleigh Durham Chapter of the
Institute of internal AuO'tors
will be on our campus as n
dicated below An faculty ana
students are welcome to atteno
The lecture series is scheduled
to be held m Ha 339 at 6 30
p m on the aates naicated
March 17 Foundations tor in
ternal Auditing instructor Roe
Barry CPA MCM Corporation
Occidental Lite of NC
CHEERLEADER
TRY OUTS
The East Caronna universe.
Varsity Cheerleader tryouts
be "e'a at 7 30 p m on Tuesaar
March 29, 193 on the mam floor
of Memor.ai Gym
The first practice sessor
be heia at 5 00 on wednesdai
March 16 at the east end of
M-nges Coliseum An guys and
girls interested n trvng out tor
the !9�3 84 squad should be pre
sent at th.s first pract.ee ses
Sion
MOVE ATHON
Gamma Befa Ph. presents the
secona annual Move A Thon on
Saturday March 26 from 9 am 5
pm All proceeds go to the 'he
North Caronna Burn Center n
Chapel Hill You can noe a bike
roller skate, walk, or iog To oo
tain a sponsor sheet or informa
tion call Lisa or Amy 752 7338
HOMECOMING
COMMITTEE
Applications art now being ac
cepted tor the 1983 Stuoent
Homecoming Committee
Chairperson Applications can
be picked up at either the
Menoenhaii information Center
or the Aiumm Center The
deadline tor applying for Ms
position n Friday March 18
1983
ABORT IONS UP
lO 12th W�rK
OF- PREGNANCY
S185 00 Pregnancy Test Birthlj
Control and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
832 0535 (Toll Free Number
800 221 2568) between 1 AM
and 5PM Weekdays
RALEIGHS WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West M-rgan St
Raleigl
FAMOUS
PIZZA
321 E.TenthSt.
One Week Special
Lasagna $2.99
Small Pepperoni Pizza
$1.99
not for delivery j
Happy Hour 2pm-closing
Pitchers Beer $2.25
Mugs 58C
CALL FOR FAST,FREE!
DELIVERY
758-5982 758-5616
Custom Designed
Perms
that only look expensivel
Our professional stylists know that to custom perm your hair the way you want, they must
listen to what you want That's why at Great Expectations you'll leave with the style you had
m mind at a pnee you can afford
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
i SAVE S10.00
on any
1 Great "X" Perm
(guaranteed 30 days)
t with coupon
J Offer expires 33113
GAMMA BETA PHI
This biweekly meetirvg nas
Qen set aside entirely for the
purpose of inducting new
members anc nstan.ng rvew of
ticers it win be held on Thurs
day March 17 Ml room !u MSC
As was noticed at the asf
meeting seat ng .s t,gn and cmi�
members are invited Fam.hes
taking pictures should do so
after tne meeting at hictt time
there w'H ne a reception r
cake and drinks provided
SGA POSITIONS STILL
AVAILABLE
The SGA currently nas me
following openings for Dor m
representative (J; Wh.te
Jones tl) Fletcher and 1
Tyler If interested in a ot tne
positions call tfrk Shelley a'
756 402s1 or app;� n tr sga of
f.ce
REVIVAL
Open
10 AM-6 PM
MoriSat.
10 AM-9 PM
Fri Only
Greenville
756-6088
ADDRESS
Oflly WeOfe- T WleJ � � meafB'jfJBiajaVttjW
UMCJlTliW
cwccnimns
NO
APPOINTMENT
NECESSARY
PRECISION HARCUTTERS
Featuring our exclusive line of premium twir care products
Great Expectations is an international franchise � inquiries vveicome
The Fountain of Lite Cnsa-
Feiiowsn.p here at ECU will be
having the-r annual Spr rig
Revival tnis wee beginning on
Tonight all 00 pm This revival
will be he'd in jenn "s
Auditor,um nightly unt.i Sa'ur
day l�th! The puoi'C s nvited
to come out each n.ght to nave a
gior.ous time Hi the name of me
iord
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Attention rnere w oe a
gene'a! mee' ng �h s Sa'j'aa�
the 19'n a' 6 DO p m -e
meetng w ii oe ne'd ae -er
nat ona Mouse on E ���� St
Mempe's are urged o a"enc
PUT A LITTLE HEART
IN YOUR SOUL
The twelfth annuai Aaik tor
Mumah'ty is coming up soon
The waik will take place on Apru
16 begnn.ng at Green Spr rvgs
park ' I X j Anyone n
terestec in helping come to the
Hunotr Coalition meetings on
Thursday nights at 7 00 p m at
the Newman Center �S3 E�t
Tenth Street, or call 7S2 421-
STUOENTS FOR
CHRIST
Lefs get back to the B'Die' in
formal group Bide discussoos
Mens HO Belk Tuesday 7 30
pm 'Women 2 tj Mence I
Thursday t 30 p m Everyone s
welcome
The East Carolinian
Servitf V campus cor- -
ji�t 1925
Published every "rmca,
�nd Thursday Our ng ��
academ.c year ana eve'i
Wednesday dur ng 'he s �
met
The East Carolinian is �
ofticai newspaper of Eas'
Carolina un.vers-ty o�ie:
operated ana pubiisnec 'v
and by me students of Eas-
Carolina U" ver$ity
Subscription Rate IHiti' .
The East Carolinian st'ices
are located m the Old Soutti
Building on the campus o'
ECU. Greenville. H C
POSTMASTER Sena a;
dress changes tc The Eas"
Caro' ,n.ar- Od Soutr
Bu'ding, ECU Green, r
NC 27834
��
Telephone 757-4J4 4J�?
BEST LEGS
if s here th.s s rou' ance "c
show off 'hose �h ghs scc
yOur organia'ion a"K3 w - �
ritic pr zes Pno'og'ac" � re-
taken Marcf '5 31 For mci -
formation ca'i the AOi h,�
Today'
MARKETING
FILM SERIES
The An-e- a- Vjit'
Assoc a'on anc 'ne Deear'�
of Mare' ng prese Pa" r ?� j
Vj'lf ng p. m Se' es
� s prov oe �Orma Br
about mjrKeting oppor'uni es
and w snow -e'evance &�
m �e' "�g tc corpora'e oc ec
� ves ano memoes of ope'a' tr
"ne se' es w te scw - Raja
130 a 3 X Ml Ma'c- D a-c
Top'Cswii noude �a.f' s �;
anj promote on he 23'J a"d
Sales Management or �r
24th All n'eres'ec s'udes a'e
� nvited to a"eno
NATURAL LIGHT
ULTIMAX
Marcn M 27 is but a week
�way ana me Irate are settino
mew first ultimate Kmrwawnn
togemer' Come Out �ne see ��
best eas' coast teams compete
in ultimate The irafes practice
every Tues � Thurs a' me bot
torn of tne n.li at 4 OB Club
mee' ngs are Mon nights � X
Ri 248 MSC Anyone e'es'ed
ce
North (Mm Cpwc
T�� RfVIIItND JOH
Advert:sir. :�pr '
TTe aa?t rc;rr Student � S"
t. C.
Gr�nv:l:e. NC ?76 -
jrtetvs
T�- -�?�
c s�s -� ve latotwrnti By �c- :� r. tad �t �� tottoa m
rletsr acat Utful�tiol mt - �C "�"� '�� -� "?"r -r P
preper t
�e vcus Ilk M r-j t� : teem,v. - U ran v �. y.�r:r
j-4irtr- 2ft. :r tttla nc� pc�!ll�. er. U z.osr :c ttMaa tmXmm
pcasi-le. If ttotrt :r� ,?n?. .? :� Doliect
p.n� bill -� fcr tt.u nice, ��� � - "�v dona tf :r.
,jvwU ' ajkakts.
n n
Students
K PSi � "Pm no!
reall worried about
finding a summer
shrugv Steve Thoma
a L m ersit
Florida freshm
"Pm pre -are I'll
get something
'I'm
something �-
up �. Marl
Greener
IHF freshra
are higher
than summer
right nov like :rvmg
to get throu.
W i t h L S.
unemplc.men' ate
.A around 10 p
cent, a ;ng
number ot
remain unw I
il be ar i
� � �
The noncha
rropnai
howe. er
Sumn
ment � � I
idcni
prt �
pla.
"Tb
one
Ca:riic K

SRA To Dona
To Village Gn
In a late Wedr-
afternoon ote. the
Student Residence
ssodation app'oved
:00 donation to the
ECU Village Green
Emergency Fund
aid the victims
explosion that ocx
red a: the apa
omplex Mar 1
In a 20 to one
the SRA. act .
suggestion made
SRA public
chairperson Lindse
Williams, aprro.e
the gift to the fund,
which now tola
to $2,500.
"We felt that it wa
a tragic event tor our
fellow student
SRA Vice President
wherevet -

� � e �
our -
-

Pre
-
P
'
N
an
rathe:

i SRA
I
m o
E.i
ONSOLlDATtD
HtATRtS

ADULTS SLOO
BUCCANEER
Starts Tomorrow
The Sequal to one of the most
: : : - " -
7iSSores
Jus: "
Wmm

. t�
,s-r-
,
k
-� �
BREAKFAST BAR
� FraMy Scra��bl8jd Egg � Homml
� mmWmtm �W� Of � Mom� FrHKJI
Homtfnidt MufHna � Link and
.jpn.y o�m S�ai�� Fn.lt Toppl
PLUS THa Ff�il Mr laatentvg � v�
SHONEYS
A
t





I HI UM( AlROI INIAN
MRCH 17, 183
.Phone.
.enclosed
! I I 1 I

t
� � -
.
4-t
4
ffl
i
GAMMA BETA PHI
SGA POSITIONS STILL
Av AlLABLE
REVIVAL
I he Fast Carolinian
if cvmpui � ommumti
i -t. � uesoay
-�d, dur ng the
�car ana every
la � Hiring rre sum
mer
�st Caro n a n i s r he
'Askdp�' 04 East
vers owned.
i W Dobshea tor
"X s?uaen's of East
ha n .ps �v
Subscription R�te 120 yearly
The East Carolinian otticei
are locateo in the Old South
Building, on the campu5 0f
ECU Greenville N C
" I R Send aa
� tn ' "ne East
' 0 a South
Greenv.iie
N ilt
Telephone 7 57 3� �37
BEST LEGS
� �
S EBSONAL
STUDENTS
ASSOr li'iniu
LE HEART
R SOUL
Eas'
STUDENTS FOR
CHRIST
"ante to
SDoor
- � - win ter
iphs wih te
� � more in
"� �'� noose
MARKETING
FILM SERIES
he a net a" Va-hetng
and ne Depar�men
� v. keting present Part 2 o a
� . � rig f nrt Ser es Tne
ns a provae "toi-mation
� � 'f hfl (X rtunitHM
A show relevance ot
� �- 'rpora'e oCiec
� " Bas 01 oorraon
series w Be sh n Raw!
v ?3 ana
Je Adverting
notion' on -he IJra az
� es Management on the
.��� i �� fec s'jaents are
?eno
NATURAL LIGHT
ULTIMAX
March 26-27 s But a w�k
away ana 'he irates are gen,n,
"e.r t.rst ultimate iournameniv
�ogeter come Ot aio see tne
Ses ias' oas' teams compete
� -nf � aes pract.ee
� � � ' es ' THrs a 'he bo'
� - a' 4 00 Club
neetingj �� v - - gnts 8 00
K � .4 v a -e '��e'es'ec
&
TheUmktkUA&Ckmd
I KM �o
es ;s
o- UJ
� � 5 a
� 5 ��
2 uj O
May
(CPS) - "I'm not
really worried" about
finding a summer job,
shrugs Steve Thomas
a University of
Florida freshman.
"I'm pretty sure I'll
get something
m sure
something will turn
up agrees Mark
Greenspan, another
UF freshman. "There
are higher priorities
than summer jobs
right now, like trving
to get through the
semester
With U.S.
unemployment rates
stuck around 10 per-
cent, a surprising
number of students
remain un worried
they'll be able to find
summer jobs this
year.
The nonchalance
may be inappropriate,
however.
Summer employ-
ment for college
students doesn't look
promising in most
parts of the country,
placement officials
report.
"This is probably
one of the worst
years observes
Camille Kozlowski of
Portland (Ore.) Com-
munity College's
placement office. "It
is an employer's
market
Summer job offers
are down 10 percent
at the University of
New Mexico. Florida
job counselor
Maurice Mayberry
asserts "the bulk of
plum jobs have
already been taken
If you don't have a
summer job lined up
already, he says, you
probably won't be
able to line up
anything that pays
better than the
minimum wage.
Others suggest
students will be lucky
to find minimum
wage jobs. "It's not
real, real encourag-
ing says Mary Jo
SRA To Donate $200
To Village Green Fund
In a late Wednsday
afternoon ote, the
Student Residence
Association approved
a S200 donation to the
ECU Village Green
Emergency Fund to
aid the victims of the
explosion that occur-
red at the apartment
complex March 2.
In a 20 to one ote
the SRA, acting on a
suggestion made by
SRA publicity
chairperson Lindsey
Williams, approved
the gift to the hind,
which now totals close
to $2,500.
"We felt that it was
a tragic event for our
fellow students said
SRA Vice President
Mark Niewaldand
wherever we can help,
we'd like to
"We're extending
our hand to help those
who suffered from
this tragic accident
said SRA President
Tory R u sso. ' We
wanted to provide
relief, to help them
out
Niewald pointed
out that the SRA does
not see itself purely as
an organization that
provides service to
dorm residents, but
rather as an organiza-
tion for all students.
The SRA raised
S3 40 earlier this
month for Hospice of
Fast Carolina, an in-
ternational volunteer
organization which
helps families of
cancer patients and
the terminally ill. The
SRA raised the money
by donating one day's
proceeds from their
gameroom arcade.
SRA has also agreed
to donate a day's pro-
ceeds from their
gameroom to Hospice
each month
throughout the school
year. "That is just a
wonderful thing
said Dr. Mary Ann
Rose, assistant pro-
fessor in the ECU
School of Nursing,
who volunteers with
the local Hospice
organization.
CONSOLIDATED
HEATRES
"�
ADULTS $Z00 TIL 5:30 �
BUCCANEER MOVIES
CHILDREN
ANT-riatr
IT3)
'y ntr � r
WWiUhi.iiiiu iii.yi
Starts Tomorrow! Exclusion!
The Sequal to one of the most popular A dult films ever!
Don 7 Miss it!
1:211.3:20,5:20. 7:20. 9:20

s.
A�
evu
'gWss'JormPzrtii SSSu,
A Romantic Comedy ADMITTED
Just for the Hell of it!
IvT:
f .
V
I BREAKFAST BAR OFFERINGS!
� Freshly Scrambled Egg � Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits � Bacon
� Country Milk Gravy � Horn Fried Potatoes � Southern Style Grits �
Homemade Muffins � Link and Patty Sausage � A Choice ot
Shoneys Own Special Fruit Toppings � Grated American Cheeae �
PLUS The Frutt Bar featuring a variety of freah fruit and tomatoes
SHONEYo
MONDAY-FRIDAY
6-00 A.M11:00 A.M.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY
A HOLIDAYS
6:00 A.M2:00 P.M.
Dohr of Manpower,
Inc the nationwide
temporary help firm.
Manpower's latest
survey of employers
found 15 percent plan
to decrease staff pos-
tions from last year's
levels.
Manpower placed
50,000 students in
summer jobs last
year, and Dohr hopes
the company will be
able to do as well this
summer.
Ohio State Finan-
cial Aid Director
Weldon Milbourne
also hopes to be able
to do as well as last
year, but isn't sure
he'll be able to equal
the number of work-
study jobs he found
then.
Full-time summer
jobs, he speculates,
will be even harder to
find. Even intern
jobs, which tend to be
unpaid, are expected
to hold at last year's
levels, at best.
The World Bank in
Washington, D.C is
currently sifting
through over 2000 ap-
plications from
economics, finance
and computer science
students who applied
for internships. But a
World Bank
spokeswoman says
there will probably be
only about 140 posi-
tions open, the same
as in 1982.
There are signs of
hope. The College
Placement Council's
November, 1982
survey of employers'
intentions indicated
businesses expected to
loosen hiring practices
around this May, but
a CPC spokeswoman
says relief doesn't
look like it'll come in
time to help summer
hiring.
Fort Hays (Kans.)
State University
placement chief
Robert Jenkins
"really thinks that, in
Fort Hays, any stu-
dent who wants sum-
mer employment and
is geographically flex-
ible can get it
Jenkins says he's
gotten job orders
from Yellowstone Na-
tional Park, far-flung
resorts, various
overseas firms and
summer camps
Florida's
pessimistic Mayberrv
thinks his students'
last, best hope may be
with Southwest
Publishing Co which
annually recruits UF
students, transports
them to faraway
Nashville, trains
them, and then sends
them around the
country to sell books
during the summers.
I I junior Hal Red-
dick, for example,
claims to have made
$9000 selling books in
Indiana last summer,
though after expenses
he banked a relativelv
modest S1600.
"The amazing
thing that happens is
that some of the
students come back
driving Mercedes
Mayberrv says.
Less spectacularly,
McDonalds says it'll
probably be hiring a
normal number of
student workers this
summer.
"Our business has
been extremely good,
and it looks like the
summer months of
1983 will remain
good reports Steve
Lerov ot the fast food
company. McDonalds
will hire during the
summer because
many of ns stores are
locally owned and
operated
But m Portland,
Kozlowski estimates
there are as many as
2000 applications out
for every local
restaurant job.
To land any sum-
mer job, she suggests
students be ready to
work "junk hours"
and be flexible.
Summer Jobs
for
Tryon Company Inc.
Interviews will be held at
Mendenhall Student Center
at the Coffee House
Monday March 21
at 10 am to 2:30 pm and
4pm-7pm
Job will involve approximately 14 weeks
work in Charlotte N.C. $800 monthly
plus bonuses
call 704-525-0572
if you can't make it.
Right Bros.
Bike Sho
207 B East Fifth St.
phone 752-6181
"Quality Repair Work At
reasonable Prices
Good For $10.00 Discount
On Any New Bicycle Or
10 Discount
On
Accessories & Parts
� � Coupon�
NOW OPEN
6 E - - '

- .
se. home - :� E
UUNCH a : ss? SPEC i
Zi VI C0B 2 98 - "4
HPP HoiHIUMHU�
am - 9pm DA v
i
- . � - (�-
- - � - fii - . .f

: ' � � � � -
items and Prices
Effective Wed March 16
thru Sat March 19 193
ITEM
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVEBT,SED
POliO
Eacfi ot ��sese advef
'�sea tems s re
quired to te reacj.iy
a�aiab'e tor sate m
eacfi Kroger Sa� on
eiceo as speo'icaii
"ote3 mi this ad II e
do 'u" out ot a" 'tem
e will ot'er ,0m ru.
co�c� of a com
parable item �h�n
available reflecting
tie same savmgs or a
ramchec which will
entitle you to pur
chase the advertised
� tern at the advertised
price within 30 days
ASSORTED TOPPINGS
Fox Deluxe
Pizza
10-O2.
Pkg.
SPRINGDALE
HOMOGENIZED
Whole Milk
ANHEUSER BUSCH
Natural Light
COST CUTTER FROZEN
12-Oz.
Can
HI-DRI
Jumbo
Roll
MT. DEW OR
12-Oz.
Cans
Pepsi Cola
8449
6-Oz. �
16-Oz.
Ret. �
Btls.
PLUS
DEPOSIT
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Brevet's
Ice Cream
$
Vz-Gal.
Ctn.
U.S. GOVT. INSPECTED
STORE GROUND OR
CHUB PAK
Ground
Beef
i
.f.
"U
Lb.
LIMIT 5-LBS.
FRESH CHEESE OR
Sausage Pizza
2 $5so
AMERICAN OR
MUSTARD
FRESH FRIED
DAILY
Potato Salad Glazed Donuts
$4 79
Lb m -qur 002. I
MKS
I
mm h � mW





A


Sire East (Earoltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, awiimmr
Mike Hughes. mw�rmtm
WAVFRLY MERR1TT. bm tf �� ClNDY PLEASANTS. $�ra EM
Scott Lindley. m. ���� Greg Rideout. v� e�
At 1 AFRASHTEH. cm Mmm� STEVE BaCHNER, to.�m,�, ��
Stephanie Groon. a�� m Juliana Fahrbach. $, e
Ct ay Thornton, iktaw���� Todd Evans, ,���. ����
March 17, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Hunt's Plan A Winner
Senate Balances Drunken Driving Package
On Tuesday, the state Senate
passed Gov. Jim Hunt's drunken
driving bill and sent it to the
House with one amendment: a
proposed ban on possession of
open beer and wine containers in
most cars and light trucks in the
state.
Since drunk driving in North
Carolina constitutes one of, if not
neglect to amend that law. After
all, it seems obvious that one of the
best ways to keep drunk drivers off
the road is to keep alcohol out of
the cars. But perhaps that's too ob-
vious.
Fortunately, the state Senate
recognized this inconsistency and
amended the Hunt package ap-
propriately. As the bill stands now,
the, worst problem in the state, it is it would make it illegal for drivers
both refreshing and encouraging or passengers in vehicles traveling
that the legislature at least appears on North Carolina roads to have
to be taking a decisive stand. open alcoholic beverage containers
Under Hunt's original bill were of any sort in their possession,
several drastic changes, changes That seemingly logical amend-
which the governor said would give ment, however, is expected to
North Carolina "the toughest and cause problems in the House,
most comprehensive drunk driving which will be considering similar
law in the nation legislation over the next few days.
He proposed eliminating plea Members of the House rejected a
bargaining in drunken driving similar proposal in 1981, corn-
cases bv abolishing existing DUI plaining that the bill would prevent
laws and lesser offenses, replacing drinking on buses headed for
them with a single driving-while- athletic events,
impaired statute.
His bill also calls for mandatory It's certainly good to know that
seven- to 14-day jail sentences for our entrusted representatives have
serious violations and increased their priorities in order
ECU Students Exploited From All Sides
A in't Just Landlords
fines and sentences for less serious
cases, not to mention a raise in the
minimum drinking age for beer
and wine from 18 to 19.
But whereas these are, indeed, a
few steps in the right direction,
Hunt, nevertheless, overlooked
one of the most obvious flaws in
the state's current legislation. In
All petty gripes aside, though,
Hunt's drunken driving package
may well be the best piece of
legislation the state has seen in a
long time. It's a plan whose time
has come. But it's also a plan
which will require a tremendous
co-operative enforcement effort,
another fact that Hunt has pretty
effect what he proposed, although much overlooked in the past
self-dubbed as the "toughest
was a mere mockery of the word.
If Hunt's original bill had pass-
ed unamended, it would have re-
mained legal in North Carolina for
passengers to have open beer or
wine containers in a moving vehi-
cle.
It is somehow ironic that an all-
out "crackdown" on drunken
driving on the state's roads would
He concentrates totally on revis-
ing legislation, a good start but on-
ly half the problem. Sure, his plan
may well be aimed at improving
law-enforcement conditions
(making the law "easier" for
authorities to enforce). But the
success of his package depends not
only on its passage in the House
but on its eventual, meaningful ex-
ecution.
By JAY STONE
It was exhilirating to read the letter by
Richard A. Freund in "Campus
Forum" on Tuesday. This is because
while the Village Green tragedy was sad,
depressing and horrible, Mr. Freund was
finally able to articulate the frustration
and anger that many of us felt in relation
to the event and to analyze the underly-
ing causes.
Yes, it is all too clear that the student
population of ECU is the victim of ex-
ploitation. Negligent landlords, greedy
employers and a utilities commission
that gives the students no vote in deci-
sions that are made which affect us. To
top it all off, the registrars in Greenville
discourage students from even register-
ing to vote because, they say, we are a
transient population that will not have
to live with the consequences of the
legislation we vote on.
Nevertheless, there will always be a
constant student population of 13,000 or
more whose collective voice deserves 10
be heard. In effect, we are politically
disenfranchised. In addition, our
employers often pay us lousy wages and
practice an authoritarian form of
management which relegates employees
to the status of submissive serfs, who
despise their jobs while living in fear of
losing them and being unable to pay
their bills.
Female student-employees are fre-
quently sexually harrassed on the job,
and they are expected to behave as
though they're flattered by the
patronage.
Indeed, the grumble of discontent is
frequent and often loud, but seldom is it
organized. And not until the student
community is solidly organized can we
expect a change in our status and reform
on the part of those who profit from our
current state of disenfranchisement and
weakness.
There are many possibilities. First, to
deal with the landlord problem, the SGA
should form a grievance committee to
hear and investigate complaints against
negligent landlords. If a landlord is
found to be negligent, then the SGA
should intervene on behalf of the stu-
dent by threatening the landlord with
legal action, a student boycott, picketing
and bad press. In short, the SGA should
begin to protect the students from ex-
ploitation, and it should let landlords in
Greenville know that students have the
political clout to take action against
them if they are negligent.
Second. to deal with the
employer employee relationship in this
town, students must organize. This is a
difficult problem because of the limita-
tions of time, yet it is not an insurmoun-
table one. A student-employee off-
campus union should be formed. It
could be funded in pan by the SGA and
in part by membership dues. Businesses
that exploit emplovees would be boycot-
ted, picketed and given bad press. In ef-
fect, we would shut them down.
For businesses that have a monopoly
in town and who are particularly intran-
sigent in meeting our demands. Ntudent-
run cooperatives could be started to
compete with them and. with student
support, drive them out of business. The
monev for this venture could come from
Ins And Outs Of Spring
DEAR STAN LANDERS: Spring has
arrived, and once again, I have a big pro-
blem. Since the weather is nice outside,
most of my friends spend their free time
out on the lawn basking in the sun. They
always ask me to go with them, but I just
can't. You see, I have an outie belly but-
ton. .
Now, I realize a lot of other successful
people have outies. but mine isn't just
vour average outie. It's downright big.
Case in point: I remember swimming in a
pond with my cousin last summer, and a
little sunfish came up and started nibbling
on it. Stan, he thought it was a worm!
I've tried everything: one-piece bathing
suits, T-shirts, electrical tape, but nothing
seems to work. But Stan, the worst thing
is it simplv won 7 tan.
I realize that you probably get hundreds
of letters like this every week but would
appreciate any and all advice you may of-
fer. Until then. I remain
STAN LANDERS
On Love And Stuff
INDOOR OUTIE FROM GRIFTON
DEAR OUTIE: Wow! I'll bet you look
funny as hell! But seriously, OUTIE, the
First thing you should remember is that
God created your unsightly appendage for
a reason. Obviously, he has a purpose for
you and yours. So, let me ask you this,
have you ever thought of joining the cir-
cus and doing a couple of shows a day?
After all, since you've tried "everything"
else to no avail, you might as well make
the most of the situation, right?
But if show biz isn't for you, then you
might want to consider the advantages of
a strategically-placed ornament. A
tasteful piece of costume jewelry, for ex-
ample, to accent your natural beauty
while downplaying your ill-shaped
midsection. Certainly, when faced with a
crisis like this one, monetary cost is not a
factor. But it may be comforting to know
that most jewelry stores will fit you for a
ring at no charge.
DEAR STAN LANDERS: Boy, that
lady sure has problems, huh? Fortunate-
ly, mine is nothing compared to that!
Nevertheless, it runs along those same
lines.
I recently attended a Slim Whitman
song festival in Bethel, at which time, I
met the girl of my dreams. She had long,
stringy red hair, wonderful eyes (one
green, one brown) and beautiful orange
and black freckles all over her shapely
190-pound frame.
She was chowing down on a dripping
tuna burrito and sweating profusely when
she caught the corner of my eye. And
needless to say, it was love at first sight.
We ended up spending the rest of the
weekend together, yodelling, laughing,
sweating profusely and eating. It was
wonderful.
But like all good things, my weekend
with Eunice came to an end. We parted
after a long goodbye bearhug. making all
the usual promises to keep in touch. But
the problem. Stan, is that it's been two
weeks since the festival, and I haven't
heard a thing from her. I know she's
received my letters � I've written eight. I
guess I'm just not good enough for her
I don't know what to do.
LONEL Y IN LIZA RD LICK
DEAR LIZ: The girl of your dreams,
huh? Well, I'd certainly hate to catch
your version of a nightmare! But serious-
ly, Liz, I must admit, it sounds like you've
got yourself a real winner. Tell me this, is
she also a competition belcher? Does she
play rugby or ride in a rodeo? If so, you
may be right in your analysis: You're just
not good enough for her. My advice,
then, is for you to forget about your little
raisin in the sun and find yourself so-
meone with a little less to look forward to
in life. Don't aim so high next time.
UXMJOIJjm SOS WAITER MATTHAUS 5ARA6�
-Campus Forum
the federal co-op bank, which was giver
increased funding and power under t!
Carter administration, or perhaps ever
from the university's endowment fund,
since it would be, in essence, a loan A
student-run co-op could maintain a
many as 30 to 50 stockholders who run
the business with a minimum experv
diture of time and who sell or give their
share of stock to another student wher.
thev graduate.
Third, to deal with the problem ot a
Greenville Utilities Commission which
has decided to form a municipal utilities
corporation and buy part ownership ol
nuclear and coal-fired power facilities in
the state, we must demand student
representation. The GUC took an action
that was not in the interest of the citizens
of Greenville, much less the students of
ECU. An alternative proposal which en-
couraged a more solar and conservation-
oriented approach was submitted and
summarily rejected.
The student community never knew
about the public hearing on the matter
and never had the power to cast a vote
on the Utilities Commission itself.
Students should push for proportional
representation on the Utilities Commis-
sion. In other words, if students com-
prise one-third of the population of
Greenville, then one-third of the com-
missioners on the GUC board should be
elected by students. These represen-
tatives should have voting power and
not just a right to sit on the board;
otherwise, it would be a purely cosmetic
gesture. Only when we have our own
representatives can we expect our in-
terests to be represented.
Fourth, we should form alliances with
the rest of the exploited in the city � the
people in west Greenville. After all, they
have an interest in lower utiity rates too.
There are also organizations in the state
like PIRG and Carolina Action that can
give us valuable assistance and instruc-
tion. We should ask for their help in
learning how to organize against the
vested interests that perpetuate the pre-
sent intolerable state of affairs.
Finally, there is the question of who
will take these initiatives. Ideally, the
SGA should do so since they are the
political representatives of the universi-
ty. But often, initiatives begin outside
the svstem with activist-oriented in-
dividuals. In the end, to say that it
should be done is not to say that it will
be done. What is needed is the will to get
it done.
Campus Escort Service Is Still A vailable
Because of recent events, I would
like to take this opportunity to remind
the female students of ECU that Pirate
Walk operates from 6 p.m. until mid-
night on Sunday through Thursday
nights. If a female needs an escort, she
should dial the Pirate Walk number,
757-6616, and an escort will be sent to
her location. We have escorts on dif-
ferent parts of the campus so that it
will not take much time for the escort
to arrive. Also, if a girl has a night
class, she can call ahead of time, and
an escort will be waiting for her when
she gets out of her class. I would stress
again that all of these escorts have been
thoroughly screened.
As of March 3, Pirate Walk had log-
Again, Pirate Walk operates from 6
p.m. until midnight, Sunday through
Thursday. I urge all female students to
use this service and not take chances.
Paul Summrell
Director. Pirate Walk
ECAC's Top-Dog
John Edwards was clearly the best
newcomer and top rookie in the
ECAC-South this past winter. It's a
strange paradox that the ECAC-South,
a conference hungry for credibility as
ged more than '400 calls from girls well as respectability would not try to
gcu iiiuis "��" -Tw n,m cIiautcp 9 t!) pnt wch as Edwards.
we are vitally interested. There are a
handful of universities which also ac-
cept A.S.L. as an option in the foreign
language requirement. The University
of Texas, the University of California
system. Catholic University, American
University, Northeastern University.
New York University and Boston
University, among others.
We appreciate your support in
acknowledging American Sign
Language as more than a communica-
tion system but representing a language
and culture of its own.
Leonard M. Ernest, Director
Barbara Howlett, Ed. Specialist
Kathy Beetham, Interpreter
Patricia Wilson, Instructor
Editor's Note: Stan Landers, Green-
ville's best-known advice columnist, took
the Charles Atlas body-building cor-
respondence course last spring and got rid
of his unsightly outie belly button. He is
now 103 pounds of solid steel and no
longer has to worry about getting sand
kicked in his face.
needing escorts, and we have more
than 60 active male escorts in our ser-
vice. All these escorts are dedicated to
our service and cause. All of these
escorts are volunteers who give up their
spare time to help.
If there are any questions, or if there
have been any problems with Pirate
Walk, please let us know. Also, if there
is any group or organization that
would like for us to come and talk with
them, please contact us. jFOUjjB
during the day, ask for the SGA office
and leave a message, and we will return
your call.
showcase a talent such as Edwards.
Jerry O'Keeffe
Junior, Business
'Sign' Of The Times
We at the Program for Hearing Im-
paired Students were very pleased to
your editorial "The Computer Age
which mentioned the acceptance of
American Sign Language as a foreign
language at the University of
Washington. This is an area in which
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For put poses of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authoris). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed.
Landfi
Althou
sure. Debor.ir.
'hinks �
band hj - ar-
.
and twelve I
civil disot
' �
haardou -
I
� ra Wai
Ken i
M
Farr Tail
M ii
Cosi
�� t

-
A
1-arr
I
a 1
S C H
Hci ' p
"Fro m I
Mufi
I act
Path to W
Teaching
Educatio
Te reat
tectivene
tee of the "r
Ser
sene- -
wofl
imprc ' -
teaching
series run
next week
aiions or. the t
ampu and
orVhop
argc range i p�
related
arid t rencf her Frig
contact b e t w
teachers and stud
or assisting rj in
more effeel
I
15
ECU DIS
on all ore:
eyegia
315 Pjk - �
Acrovs fr- C
752 11
iciai
STur
FU
Student
are allo1
1983-84
spring
submitti
March
IN AL1
ACCOl
AND
Copies ol
are avail
When thef
available
Budgets
by the A
Leg�slat
No Fun
months
special el
executN
A
. s� . -





II Sides
Op
5fl
andlords
p uank. uhich was given
g and power under the
� perhaps even
frsity's endowment fund,
m essence, a loan. A
could maintain as
tockholders who run
nh a minimum expen-
: �' id or give their
ther student when
dea with the problem of a
tilitics Commission which
rm a municipal utilities
� part ownership of
:oal fired power facilities in
A musl demand student
I he Gl C took an action
merest of the citizens
less the students of
i' �� proposal which en-
��' and conservation-
was submitted and
l communit) never knew
he public hearing on the matter
i never had the power to cast a vote
an the Utilities Commission itself
Students should push for proportional
n rhe Utilities Commis-
words, if students com-
f rhe population of
one-third of the com-
Gl C board should be
These represen-
- e voting power and
811 so sit on the board;
lid be a purely cosmetic
A hen we have our own
.an we expect our in-
represented.
. we should form alliances with
� the exploited in the city � the
vest Greenville. After all, they
in interest in lower utiity rates too
wre are i � .anizations in the state
riKtj andarolirm Action that can
iance and instruc-
ask for their help in
� to organize against the
ts that perpetuate the pre-
mie state of affairs,
nere is the question of who
� these initiatives. Ideallv, the
�io so since thev are the
�caJ r tatives of the universi-
� ten, initiatives begin outside
with activist-oriented in-
end, to sav that it
not to say that it will
needed is the w,to get
till A vailable
are vitally interested. There are a
nandhilI of un.vers.ties which also ac-
A VL. as an option in the foreign
guage requirement. The University
� lexas the University of California
Catholic University, American
Northeastern University,
� University and Boston
among others.
:ec.ate vour support in
knowledging American Sign
Unguaf asmorethanacommunica-
em but representing a language
and culture of its own
Leonard M. trnest. Director
kharRHrletEd -Specialist
Kathy Beetham. Interpreter
Patricia Wilson, Instructor
Forum Rules
'JrfJ C�rolman comes letters
inn H? I PO,m �f �� Mail or
hTJ' our �ff'ce � Old
thran , from
Xtatlrn, de the name' maJ�r �d
IndsZT' a1dress- number
ouble-spaced or JLT��
I ' ,WI �r atly printed.

IHtJE AST CAROL I MAN
MARCH I ivsi
?��5 Sparks Recor Of Civil Disobedience
- Deborah fanK. h0 Z �. PCB �� ltat ,a�i�a,cd Pr , X
Although she's not
sure. Deborah Ferruc-
cio thinks her hus-
band has been ar-
rested between nine
and twelve times for
civil disobedience pro-
tests at the PCB
hazardous waste land-
fill near their home in
rural Warren County
Kenneth Ferruc-
cio's last arrest on
March 3 was probablv
nis most serious. For
�he last 13 days Fer-
ruccio has been held
in the Warren County
jail refusing to post
$4,000 bond for
felonious larceny and
trespassing. He has
also refused to eat anv
food or drink
anything other than
water since his arrest.
On Tuesday, Fer-
ruccio was brought to
Warren County
General Hospital for
tests and returned to
the jail.
At the root of Fer-
ruccio's resistance
was the decision by
state and EPA of-
ficials to locate a
landfill in Afton,
N.C to store hazar-
dous PCB waste that
was removed from
200 miles N.C. road-
side last fall.
Ferruccio, who is
head of a group called
Warren County
Citizens Concerned
About PCB's, has
been the leader in the
drive to close down
the landfill and
relocate the con-
taninated PCB-laced
soil elsewhere.
More than 500 peo-
ple � many of them
repeater offenders
like Ferruccio � have
been arrested for pro-
tests over the dump
site. Most protestors
have been local people
like Ferruccio, though
others such as District
of Columbia Congres
Fan Talks On Women 9s History
Maria T r-
Mane T. Farr,
assistant dean of the
College of Arts and
Sciences, will be the
featured speaker at
Thursday evening's
' Women As
Pathfinders" seminar
at the Willis building.
Farr will be speak-
ing as part of the
celebration of Na-
tional Women's
History Week and
N.C. History Month.
Her topic is titled
"From little Miss
Muffel toCagnev and
Lacey: The Changing
Path to Women's
Careers.
"I'm delighted to
know that there is a
group of very
dedicated women in
Greenville who are in-
terested in encourag-
ing women to learn
about their ac-
complishments in the
past and interested
also in encouraging
women to pursue
future ac-
complishments Farr
aid speaking of the
members of the
I cague of Women
Voters, the Pitt Coun-
ty Council on the
statue of Women and
the Women's Ad-
visory Council for
Pitt Community Col-
lege, the sponsors of
the seminar.
Farr's lecture will
focus on what she
calls "the change of
gender roles" for
women, a kind of
"how to" for women
who are trying to
adapt to their new
roles and set new
goals for living in to-
day's world.
In the past. Farr
has done other
presentations on
women in administra-
tion, career planning,
images of women in
the media and student
evaluation of teaching
to various campuses
and community
groups.
Besides Farr's lec-
ture, the seminar will
also include two
discusssions titled
"Assets: Take Stock
of Your Professional
Assets" with Terry
Shank facilitating and
"Goals: Planning
and Implementing
Your Goals" with
Dr. Karen
facilitator.
Kale as
Gov. James B.
Hunt signed a pro-
clamation the first of
the month for the
observance of Na-
tional Women's
History Week in
North Carolina. The
program will begin at
7 p.m. with a wine
and cheese social
prior to the program.
The seminar is open
to the public and cost
of $3 per person. The
deadline for register-
ing is March 20.
sional Delegate
Walter Fauntroy have
taken a stance against
the dump.
Ferruccio's recent
arrest was a result of
his decision to
"move" � not steal,
claims Mrs. Ferruccio
� a water pump
which is to be used to
pump thousands of
gallons of water in the
bottom of the landfill
into a nearby creek.
"Ken and two others
(Ruffin Harris and
Trish Hubbard) pick-
ed up the pump and
moved it over Mrs.
Ferruccio told The
East Carolinian. She
said those arrested
were not planning to
steal the pump and
they never removed
the pump from state
property.
Both Harris and
Hubbard have posted
bail in their cases. All
three are slated for
trial next Wednesday
at which time it is
assumed Ferroccio,
who has been study-
ing the life of Gandhi
since his involvement
in the landfill issues,
will end his fast.
Mrs. Ferruccio
predicts Warren
County PCB story
will become a much
bigger political and
health issue as more
facts concerning the
dangers of the dump-
ing are brought out.
On Monday a na-
tional news report
claimed the emerging
consensus of many ex-
perts is that the bury-
ing of hazardous
wastes in landfill
might be the least safe
method of disposal
for such wastes. A
three-year study
released Wednesdav
by
At the Warren
County site there have
been two major pro-
blems which are, ac-
cording to Ferruccio,
already are posing a
helath threat to local
residents. Water in
the lining of the War
ren landfill site is
causing an
enormous extra
weight" and could
burst through the lin-
ing causing seepage of
contaminated water
into the surrounding
area.
The other problem
has been the build-up
of PCB-laced gas
under the plastic
cover of the waste
site. Mrs. Ferruccio
claims officials
workers have been
popping holes in the
cover to release the
Teaching Effectiveness Committee Has
Educational Seminars For ECU Faculty
the Congressional
Office of Technology dangerous gas into the
Assessment is ex- atmosphere
pected to cast still fur- The Hunt ad-
ther doubt on the ministration had
safety of hazardous earlier refused to meet
x �StC dfiIiS With �PP�nents of the
landfill site until the
dumping was com-
pleted and since then
little office response
from Raleigh has been
made.
Ferruccio has
a!readv referred to the
Governor's Waste
Management Act as
an act "which
prempts all civil,
human and en-
� vironmental rights
In a statement
released from jail,
Ferruccio said, "what
have I to say to (those
who approved) the
Warren County site,
not because it was
safe, but because it
was legal?" He went
on to say that "what
Hitler did to the Jews
was legal and what is
happening in Warren
County is Hitlensm at
home
"It is a civil rights
issue and a human
nghts issue Mr
Ferruccio said
200WEST
The Teaching Ef
fectiveness Commit-
tee of the Faculty
Senate is sponsoring a
series of talks and
workshops aimed at
improving classroom
teaching skills. The
series runs through
next week a! various
locations on the ECU
campus and the
workshops cover a
large range of topics
related1 to establishing
arid strengthening
contact between
teachers and students
or assisting faculty in
more effective
organization and
presentation of class
material
No preregistration
is required, and the
sessions are open to
all faculty. Lectures
and workshop
moderators are facul-
ty volunteers who
responded to a com-
mittee questionnaire.
The current com-
mittee chairwoman.
Madge McGrath of
the School of Allied
Health Professions,
hopes that a large
number of interested
persons will turn out
for each of the
scheduled programs
and allow an ex-
change of informa-
tion relevant to all
teaching problems.
She added that the
talks and workshops
will be informal and
the audience will be
free to come and leave
as their schedules re-
quire.
The program of ses-
sions is as follows:
March 17: Lectur-
ing For Cognitive
Learning, at noon in
Brewster C303. Use of
Visuals In Large Lec-
ture Classes, 3 p.m. in
Brewster D202.
March 22: Interna-
tionalizing The Cur-
riculum, noon in
Mendenhall 221.
Stress Control And
Teaching Burnout, 1
p.m. in Brewster
D306. Improving
Didactic Skills, 3:30
p.m. (Place to be an-
nounced.) Videotape
In The Classroom, 4
p.m. in Joyner
Library 225.
March 23: Student
Advising, at noon in
Mendenhall 221.
Discussion, 3 p.m. in
Brewster B303. Lear-
ning And Teaching In
1983, 3 p.m. in
Speight 301. Short-
Answer Testing: Con-
struction And Validi-
ty, 3 p.m. in Brewster
D305.
March 24:
Videotape In the
Classroom, 11:00 in
Joyner Library 225.
Discussion. An Active
Way Of Learning, 3
p.m. in Brewster
B30 A.V. Material
For Classroom Use In
The Health Profes-
sions, 4 p.m. in Belk
Building 216.
Thm. Ladies Lock In
Doors open 8:30
Adm. 50C
Guys admitted at 10:00
Lambda Chi Happy Hour
Doors open 4:00-7:00
50CAdm.
bring this ad for a
FREE WASH
OFFER GOOD WHEN USING
SECOXD WASHING
MACHIEALSO
"fluff n' fold
service available-attendants
on duty 7 days a week
Fri. nite
Sorority Night
Doors Re-Open at 9:00
Adm.50c
coupon expires
� March 73
l
15
ECU DISCOUNT
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Park View Commons
Across from Doctors Park
Open? 5:30
Mon Fri.
752-144a
i
i
Announcing
KWIK-STITCH
?' ourKwik 1 Day Full Service A Iterations Shop'
I
I
We Do All Minor & Major Alterations
(Unconditional Guarantee)
Plus Dry Cleaning Service A Monograraming
'cei
plicians
I Located At
I j Colonial Height Shopping Center
opposite end of Villa Roma
2741 E.10th St.
NOW OPEN
I Phone: 758-68S8 MonFrl. 84, Sot. 8-21
-�-0-�-eM�-)-e�e-o-e�B)��.().eMe)B�-o�B�f
1
i
ATTENTION
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
REQUESTING
FUNDS FROM THE S.G.A.
Student groups desiring Funds from the SGA
are allowed to submit a budget request for the
1983-84 school year for consideration by this
spring's SGA Legislature.The deadline for
submitting budgets is 5:00p.m. Monday,
March 21,1983.
IN ALL CASES BUDGETS MUST BE SUBMITTED
ACCORDING TO STATE LINE-ITEM CODES
AND MUST MEET SGA APPROPRIATIONS
GUIDELINES.
Copies of line-item codes and SGA appropriations
guidelines
are available on request in the SGA Office.
When the budget is reviewed and approved,funds will be
available at the beginning of the fiscal year (July 1 1983)
Budgets not submitted by March 21 will not be reviewed
by the Appropriations Committee nor considered by the
Legislature until the Fall Semester
No Funds will be appropriated over the summer
months except for summer projects or cases with
special circumstances as determined by the summer
executive officers.
Sun?00 W-10th St"
John Moore's Beach Party
4:00-7:00pm
ECU�Greenville's Best 200 West?
����
HOUSE
lOth St Across from
Krispy K �me (s �t;)
1 h S Block t om
� he "HiM- (752 963�)
FROM
BOND'S
H.L.HODGES CO
TO YOU
I
A





I
'

i
I HI lM( AKOl INIAN
Style
MARCH 17. 1983 p
Virtuoso Serkin
Piano Prodigy Coming Soon
Peter Serkin. "the finest pianist this countrv has et produced will he on campus in March.
Peter Serkin, an established
pianist whose musical sympathies
are broader than those of virtually
any young musician in recent
memory, will appear in Hendrix
Theatre, Thursday, March 24,
1983, at 8 p.m.
Serkin, "One of the supreme
musicians of our time studied
at the Curtis Institute of Music
with lee 1 uvisi, Miecyslaw
Horsowski. and his father.
Rudolf Serkin. He continues to
study piano and music in general
with Mr. Horszowski, Karl Ulnch
Schnabel, Marcel Moyse, and he
also worked with the late Ernest
Oster. Serkin made his first public-
appearance in 1959 at the age of
twelve in a preformance of the
Haydn Concerto in D major con-
ducted by Alexander Schneider at
the Marlboro Music Festival. This
concerto was repeated that fall tor
his New York debut. He has since
appeared with most of the world's
major symphony orchestras.
Serkin's thoughtful individuali-
ty, enabling him to bring
something new to all he plavs. is
perhaps what prompted New
York Magazine to call him "the
finest pianist this country ha yet
produced " He plays with an
enormous vitalitv that becomes
both creative and recreative and
there are no apparent limits to his
technique.
This is the last concert of the
1982-18? ECU Unions Artists
Series season, and it promises to
be certainly not the least but one
of the finest musical presentations
of the year. Tickets for the con-
cert are $2.50 for ECU students.
and $7.50 for ECU faculty, staff,
and the public. All tickets sold at
the door will be $7.50. Tickets arc-
on saL- at the Central Ticket Oi
fice. Mendenhall Student Center.
Telephone (919) 757-6611, ext
266. The Ticket Office is open
Monday-Friday, 10 a.m4 p.m.
Campus
Notes
An "Art in Europe" program
featuring three weeks oi travel in
Italy, Switzerland, Germany and
Holland is being offered bv the
East Carolina University School
of Art this summer.
The program, designed for in-
terested students, teachers, and
persons in the community, is be-
ing co-sponsored by the Division
of Continuing Education and
Eben Tilly Associates. Credit and
non-credit options are available.
Dr. Richard Faing and faculty
member Michael Voors along
with professional tour guides will
accompany the group.
Visits will be made to maior
hisdtoric sues, museums, and
galleries in Rome. Siena.
Florence, Venice, Milan. I ugano,
Basle. Heidelberg. Cologne, and
Amsterdam. The tour will depart
N.Y on July 27th.
Persons interested in the tour
may attend special meetings
scheduled every Thursday evening
at 7 P.M. in the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center Auditorium or contact the
School of Art.
Foi turther information contact
Michael Voors at 757-6785 or
Dear. 1 aing at 757-6665
Poel Marilyn Hacker will visit
Easl Carolina University later this
month, to read from her work
and conduct a discussion critique
session for local poets m the area
Her reading is set for this even-
ing at 8 p.m in the Nursing
Building Auditorium (Room 1011
On Friday, March IS, she will
lead a critique workshop from
noon to 1:30 in the Brewter
Building, room R-103.
Both events are open to the
public. Persons wishing to have
their poems critiqued at the
workshop should bring along at
least 20 copies of each poem
Hacker is the author of three
poetry collections, published bv
Viking and Knopf. Her collection
Presentation Piece was a I amonl
Poetry Selection of the Academv
of American Poets and received
the National Book Award tor
Poetry in 1975.
She is a native and current resi-
dent of New York City, having
spent several vears in San Fran-
cisco and London Her other
nors include a Creative rtists
1' tblic service Crant and a Gug-
genheim Fellowship
Epilepsy � identification.
therapy and treatment, social and
psychological implications � will
be discussed in detail at a March
25-26 symposium at ECU
The symposium, to be held at
ee EPILEPSY, Page 7
����������h������i�i�
Toiler's Latest Raises Some Key Questions
Bv EMU CASE
M�ft vVnlrl
1 have been reviewing books long enough for you
now to have sufficient credibility to share the follow-
ing with vou.
Reviewing Alvin Toner's The Third Have calls for
some reflections on the medium of book reviewing in
general. What, if any, is the purpose of reviews? Is it
to provide the reader with an outline so that he may
talk intelligently, or unintelligently, depending on the
review (about a book he hasn't read1 Or to persuade
him to read or not read, depending on the opinion
given) I believe the latter is the more desirable goal,
and that being the case, 1 will try to inspire you to
rush to the nearest library to check this book out.
Admittedly, this is a dangerous precedent for you
may open this paper to this page some dav to find on-
ly a cryptic command, as: "read this book or "do
everything in your power to avoid reading this
book But 1 promise I will not resort to such a solu-
tion unless 1 am pressed by conflicting deadlines.
What follows is a review that will tell vou little about
the book, which you will have to read for yourself if I
am sufficiently persuasive.
If you are a representative sample oi the public at
large, you are probably at this very moment sitting at
home trving to make sense out of a world which
seems increasingly devoid of it. And if all the confu-
sion and strife and uncertainty is depressing you, if
all the signs of dissolution of social institutions, the
statistics of crime, reports of civil disorder and
revolutionary uprisings, prophecies of economic
doom and gloomy predictions of impending Ar-
mageddon are getting you stuck in hopelessness, then
you are, as I was, ready for this book. The Third
Wave is optimistic.lt will renew your faith in the
future, make you laugh in the face of your evening
news report and cause you to cancel your subscrip-
tion to your daily newspaper in favor of the Tar-
rytown Newsletter. It may be nothing more than an
elegant intellectual exercise or it may be a manual for
the twentv-first century. You'll have to read it and
make up vour own mind.
Toiler makes an exhaustivelv supported argument
for the new paradigm. He. with a growing number of
creative-edge intellectuals in other fields, interpret all
the signs of disintegration as things getting worse
before they get better. This gives him and the others a
definite edge over the rest of us as it allows them to
follow their own interests in relative calm while chaos
and confusion surround them. This is an edge which
vou should not disregard an opportunity to acquire.
Religious rebirth might give you such an edge, but at
what cost?
Tofler's thesis is that we are in the midst of a 'third
wave" of human development. A jump from the In-
dustrial Age (the second wave) into an age whose title
has not yet been univesally agreed on becauseit has
not vet been universally perceived. But it is here. And
just as chaos accompanied the earlier transitions
from nomadic to sedentary agriculture and then to
industry sc does it now accompany this transition
resisted as it is by all who have a state in the status
quo that is to av. all of us. I he tamihar, the
habitual, the customary, the tried and true, the way
its always been, the don't mess with it if it works all
get in the wav when we are confronted with the un-
tried, the untested, the u nfamiliar, the alien. Change
is inherently painful. It is threatening; it is frighten-
ing; it might not work. We might not be able to ad-
just to it. V e mav not be as well fitted in the new
order.
A microcosm of the thesis of The Third Wave can
be seen to operate in the change from the avoirdupois
system of measure to the metric. Our children will
have no dificulty with it. But for us, used as we are
and comfortable with 2 4's and inch and 3 8th the
metric system is a monumental pain in the grits. The
metric system is part of the Third Wave, of the new
paradigm. We must embrace it without a backward
glance or else suffer much pain.
Read this book.
Gardening Student
Doesn 't Need Firm
Roots At School
By MIKE HAMER
Sia!i Writer
My garden will never make me
famous, I'm a horticultural ig-
noramus, I can 7 tell a stnngbean
from a soybean, or even a girl
bean from a boy bean. � Ogden
Nash
Whether one is a horticultural
ignoramus like Ogden Nash is
talking about, or a gardening ad-
dict, this is the time of the year
when we think about spinach
salads, watermelons, and tomato
sandwiches. In short, it's garden-
ing time again.
One unique problem that we are
dealing with is the fact that most
students will be leaving in seven or
eight weeks, which is when most
of the early vegetables would be
ready to eat.
According to Sam Uzell, the
Pitt County Argicultural Exten-
sion agent, some of the crops that
could be harvested before the end
of school are beet greens, salad
greens, kohlrabi, leaf lettuce,
spinach, early Alaska peas,
garden cress, onions, and, of
course, radishes. Any of these
should be planted as soon as
possible.
Those students and faculty who
will be around through the end of
first summer session, or
throughout the summer, don't
have to worry about reaping the
harvest. According to Norma
Everett at Van's Hardware, most
people are planting potatoes,
onions, beets, carrots, mustard,
kale, and spinach now. She also
added that this is a good time to
put in cauliflower, broccoli,
brussels sprouts, cabbage, lettuce,
and spinach plants. If you are
transplanting, be sure to water the
plants generously for two to five
days.
The Organic Hardening
magazine recommends planting
swiss chard and Jerusalem ar-
tichokes, besides the vegetables
already mentioned. Those garden-
ing to get a jump on the warm
weather crops could start
cucumbers, eggplant, melons,
okra, peppers, and tomatoes in-
doors at this time.
It's basically a bit early for
those persons who are flower
gardeners. Organic Gardening
recommended planting sweet peas
at this time. Plant and See
Nursery recommended trying can-
See GARDENING, Page 7
���� �� CINDY WALL
That's Right, It's Gardening Time Again In The Green City
ECU sophomore Karen Hildreth is one of many students who tries
her hand t Greenville gardening during the spring and summer
months. Gardening tips can be obtained by calling Extension
Teletip, a service of the N.C. Agricultural Extension Service, at
1-800-662-7301. They also have � booklet. Quick Reference Home
Vegetable Gardening Guide, available upon request.
i
-?,
Karen does the hot down in ih
Epilepsy Sy
Collaborat
Continued From Page h
the Brody M
building
chaptei
honor society ii
the Comprehen
gra"
oi Medic n
Medicine, the Beld
tion and the EC
Goverr.merv.
The Friday. M i
featuring a presentation
Ross Shuping. Greens
neurologist, b
sons wuh epilepsy
families sr.d fr
Dr. S " . p ' -
"Epilepsv D ii j
ment Hi presentai
followed bv a
First Aid for Seizjurt
question-anwer session.
Friday afternoon and Sa I
sessions are designed I i
health professiona
V
The htr
in Tom n
LUNCH BUFFET Mon
�y EVENING BUFFET Mor
SPAGHETTI Wed ail vou cai
ft.
Spogtr Eer
Just like eating i
All vou can i
"i - C' - V
PI K A
The
Al
pr
DIA
Happy Hour
Prices
� FRIDAY
4:3





ItCl fi
lerkin
oming Soon
ther information contact
Voors at 757-6785 or
ai 757-6665.
M yn Hacker w ill visit
a University later this
read from her works
discussion critique
ocal poets in the area.
g is sel for this even-
8 p m in the Nursine
id torium (Room 101).
March IS, she will
workshop from
m the Breuster
� R 103
s are open to the
Persons wishing to have
jued at the
?uld brine along at
2 each poem.
5 the author of three
c llections, published bv
and Knopl Her collection
ration Piece was a I amont
v ection of the Academy
� Poets and received
Book Award for
itive and current resi-
� New " ork C it, having
� ears in San Fran-
1 ondon. Her other
i v reative Artiste
Grant and a Gug-
Fellowship.
dentification,
ment, social and
. cal implications � will
tail at a March
. n at I Cl
im, to be held at
See EPILEPSY, Pajje 7
I llllllllltl! IMlllllHlllllilllllKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
estions
i fie lamiliar, the
� e : and true, the way
with it if it works all
nted with the un-
ilien. Change
itening; it is fnghten-
� ' not he able to ad-
il fitted in the new
I he Third H ave can
- ' m the avoirdupois
metric ' )ur children will
. ued as we are
ri2x4 md nch and 3 8th the
tal pain in the grits. The
the Third Wave, of the new
it without a backward
-
to
2sl :
Pt�oto By CINDY WALL
rreen City
C. Agricultural Extension Service, at
lave a booklet. Quick Reference Home
available upon request.
? -�- i , �� vr �. jjT. �� jHAjL 71
aBBBHP1 - � � wJsj - . "aB " m
TJlPT?flai j�l i . t � a � �
mi- - bcii - . S'tV
V j � � � � i P��oto By CINDY WALL
Karen does the hoe down in the privacy of her back yard.
Epilepsy Symposium A
Collaborative Effort
Continued From Page 6
the Brody Medical Sciences
building, is sponsored by the ECU
chapter of Alpha Epsilon Delta
honor society in conjunction with
the Comprehension Epilepsy pro-
gram at the Bowman Gray School
of Medicine, the ECU School of
Medicine, the Beld-Tyler Founda-
tion and the ECU Student
Government Association.
The Friday, March 25, session,
featuring a presentation by Dr.
Ross Shuping, Greenville
neurologist, is designed for per-
sons with epilepsy and their
Tamili- and friends.
Dr. Shuping's topic is
"Epilepsy: Diagnosis and Treat-
ment His presentation will be
followed by a screening of a film.
First Aid for Seizures and a
question-answer session.
Friday afternoon and Saturday
sessions are designed for allied
health professionals and physi-
cians.
Speakers include five physi-
cians: Dr. Fritz Dreifuss of
University of Virginia, Drs.
Jerome Haller and Early
Trevathan of ECU, Dr. J. Scott
Luther of Duke University and
Dr. Kiffin Penry of Bowman
Gray.
Other presenters are counselors
Gay Anderson of Mocksville, Jeff
Campbell of the Epilepsy Associa-
tion of N.C. (Charlotte), Louise
Denmark of the N.C. Department
of Health Services, Pat Gibson of
Bowman Gray, Jim Keene of the
Department of Human Resources
and Scott Luce of the Pitt County
Mental Health Center; Carol
Rados of the Vocational
Rehabilitation Center, Greenville
nurse Laura Wall of Bowman
Gray; Mary Stephens of the High
Point Memorial Hospital EEG
Laboratory and Dr. Ken Kudley
of UNC-Chapel Hill.
Gardening 9s
New Lure
THhhASl CAKOl 1NIAN MARCH 17. 1983
Continued From Page 6
dy tuff and pansies,
while Kittrell's
Greenhouse recom-
mened pansies and
alyssum. They also
recommended that
this would be a good
time to plant such
herbs as parsley,
rosemary, and dill.
There are a number
of good gardening
books on the market,
but one that I would
endorse for gardeners
who are starting out
and who would be in-
terested in gardening
in a small space is
called How to Grow
More Vegetables
Than You Ever
Thought Possible on
Less Land Than You
Can Imagine by John
Jeanons. Jeavone
makes the claim that a
person can grow
enough vegetables for
himself year round in
a garden space total-
ing only 100 square
feet provided there
was a four to six
month growing
season which this area
does have.
Jeavon urges the
tender of a small
garden to begin with
raised beds. An area 2
feet wide by 5-6 feet
long is a good size to
begin with. Here are a
few steps that Jeavons
suggests for getting a
garden bed started:
1. Loosen the soil 12
inches deep with a
spading fork � a
straight spading
shovel will do.
2. Remove the weeds.
3. Let the soil rest for
one day.
4. Add a 3 inch layer
of compost.
5. Use a hoe or a fork
and loosen the soil.
6. Add wood ashes
and bone meal or
blood meal.
7. Prepare a lip
around the upper
edge of the bed so
that rainfall will not
wash off the bed but
will be contained in
the space.
8. Plant your seeds
and hope for the best.
If this is your first
garden 1 would
recommend that you
start with one bed and
plant onion sets,
spinach, lettuce, and
raddishes. A first-
time gardener should
always plant radishes!
Potatoes are usually a
sure bet, also. Accor-
ding to Uzell,
students using com-
mercial fertizer would
do well to use 8-8-8.
Students living in
the dorms will have a
much more difficult
time in getting a crop
of food growin, but
certain vegetable can
be grown in con-
tainers.
Containers should
have good sterile pot-
ting soil, good
drainage, besides a
location where they
can get maximum
sunlight while they
are growing to
maturity. Lettuce or
spinach would not
need direct sunlight,
but tomato or pepper
plants should get lots
of full sun.
More information
on gardening can be
obtained by calling
"Extension Teletip
a service of the North
Carolina Argicultural
Extension Service.
Happy gardening!
Pizza
Transit
Authority.
2 FOR
THE PRICE OF
ONE
WITH THIS COUPON
CaltUa Now! 757-1955
We Deliver'
FREE COKES TOO
Now Available � Diet Coke
BUV ANY LARGE 2-OR MORE
INGREDIENT PIZZA AND GET
ANOTHER SMALL 2 OR MORE
INGREDIENT PIZZA
ABSOLUTELY FREE
NOT VALID KV'AN OTHER COUPON
GOOO THROUGH 15 83
I GREENVILLE Ti: 1 �4S
Pizza Transit Authority
REAL DEAL!
FREE COKES TOO
Now Available � Diet Coke
757-1955
$1.00 OFF SMALL 2-OR-MORE INGREDIENT PIZZA or
$2.00 OFF LARGE 2-OR-MORE INGREDIENT PIZZA or
$2.00 OFF ANY PIZZA LITE - � mm
fcxPIRES 5-1-83
����������
Uptown Clothing Company
Register tor Our Free Drawing To Fie Held Each Monrh
Men's & Women's Designer Fashions
Hl�1iHj $BH'&& ZmMl 7tn Thru ,9th
� " - � .
V -i -$24- : aie
&44S20C : .
s �-$20� - �-�
j �$22
s �:S21C e. - : :
x � "$20Boy Pa
1 Z$21 . .
�$19
Live Remote On WRQR
11 a.m. To 2p.m. March 19th
Greenville Square Shop( r g Center
(In The Corner. At Greenville Square)
756-95C9
� G L ' "� V '
" TR0N' is f an-tastic. magical for
kids and grown-ups, extraordinary.
.may aone SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
-CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
r
sensational and brainy,
stylish and fun!
;l�jAnsen NEWSWEEK:
TR0N is about to take
you somewhere you ve
never been
Vemon Scott UPI:
Utterly new. vividly
exciting a trip and a half
R world inside
the computer
inhere man
has never been.
Never before noun.
Geneve CHICAGO TRIBUNE
TRON'isatrip. and a
terrifically entertaining
one at that.
FUcftaraScrucM TIME
TR0N a vision of the
movies future
jane-Mas NEW YORK TIMES
It is beautiful -
spectacularly so
a wonder to behold
-mepE1
'atmwt0
Oil i
TRON A LlSBERGcR KUSmNER PRODUCTION
JEFF BRIDGES BRUCE BOXLElTNER OAviO UJARNER CINDY MORGAN BARNARD HuGrES
RONMILCER - WENDY CARLOS STEVEN LISBERGER - BONNIE MACB'RO
STEVEN LISBERGER OONAlD KUSHNER STEVEN LISBERGER
JOURNEY -WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS �s . s pg .��,c.��-v �
COPYRIGHT 1982 SWANK MOTION PICTURES. INC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Date Morch 17.18,19 Jime 7 PM 5,7, 9 PM
Place Hendrix Theatre Admission IP & Activity Cord
. �
tm �,

t





1Mb fcASTC AROl 1NIAN
Sports
MARCH 17, 1983
Page 8
Pirates Capture Baird's 100th Win
By KEN BOLTON
Aniiuai Sporti Idiior
ECU head coach Hal Baird
celebrated his 100th career victory
Tuesday afternoon with a 8-4 vic-
tory over Fairfield University.
Freshman Daniel Boone and
senior Mike Williams drove in
three runs each in leading the
Pirates to their eighth victory in a
row.
ECU, now 10-2, opened the
scoring with a run in the first inn-
ing when first baseman Todd
Evans drove in shortstop Kelly
Robinette, who had doubled to
lead off the game.
Freshman Winfred Johnson,
who had a three-run homer deep
to center field in Monday after-
noon's victory, started on the
mound for the Pirates and pitched
the first five innings.
The muscular first-year player
from Elizabethtown, N.C. ran his
record to 4-0 on the year.
Sophomore reliever Chubby
Butler came on in the sixth inning
in relief of Johnson to pick up the
save.
After the game, Baird pointed
out the pitching staff for another
impressive performance.
"Winfred threw well and Chub-
by came in and had a real good
outing again Baird said. "1 was
glad to see it so we could rest some
arms
The Pirates' big inning came in
the fourth when they scored three
runs on two hits and an error.
Right fielder David Wells open-
ed the inning with a single to left
field. After Robert Wells sacrific-
ed him to second, left fielder
David Home reached on an error
by Fairfield second baseman John
Martin.
With men on first and third,
Boone lifted a fly ball into right
field that kept carrying until it
dropped on the other side of the
fence to give the Pirates a 4-0
lead.
Boone's home run was the first
collegiate base hit for the
freshman from Fuquay Varina.
Boone missed most of fall prac-
tice after he suffered a hairline
fracture on the first day of fall
practice. Good things are ex-
pected from Boone, who earned
13 letters at Fuquay Varina High
School.
Fairfield came back to score
three runs in the sixth inning after
an RBI single by Joe Charno and
two-run double by Steve Carlotto.
After Carlotto's double, Butler
came in with no outs and a runner
on third, and didn't allow the run
to score.
Mike DellaVecchia grounded to
Robinette at short and Ton Rear-
dan lofted a ball to center field
that Robert Wells relayed home to
keep Carlotto from scoring.
Well's throw was a perfect
strike to catcher Jack Curlings,
and was what Baird referred to as
"probably the key play of the
game
The Pirates added four more
runs in the seventh when Evans
and David Wells reached on er-
rors and Robert Wells loaded the
bases with a fielder's-choice
grounder.
Williams then greeted Fairfield
starter Dave Caseria with a slicing
triple to right field to drive in
three runs.
After Boone reached on an in-
field single, second baseman Tony
Salmond drove in Williams with a
fielder's-choice grounder.
Fairfield scored the game's
final run in the ninth inning when
Martin hit a two-out home run to
left field.
Baird has been impressed with
his first-year players so far,
especially Johnson, Boone and
Home.
"All of our freshman have
looked good so far Baird com-
mented. "We're trying to use
more players now
With their 10-2 record � the
earliest that Baird can remember
winning 10 games � the Pirates
have three key games in the re-
maining week.
Thursday afternoon at 3:00
p.m the Pirates host Clemson
University, a team that beat ECU
twice last season.
On Friday and Saturday, the
Pirates open defense of their
ECAC-South Championship with
a pair of conference games against
George Mason University.
Friday's game is scheduled for
3:00 p.m and Saturday's contest
is set for 2:00 p.m.
Long Causes 'Strong' Looks
BvEDNICKI.AS
Staff Wnlrr
When Terry Long walks into a
room, heads turn.
It's not his boyish smile, or his
friendly disposition, or the fact
that he made honorable mention
all-America offensive guard in
football last year.
Terry Long turns heads because
he is 290 pounds of solid, defined
muscle, with rock-like upper arms
the size of most people's thighs.
Long, however, was not always
the hulk that he is now. In fact,
when he first started lifting while
serving in the special forces of the
Army in 1978, he weighed a mere
160 pounds and could bench press
only 135 pounds � almost an
unbelievable thought when one
looks at Long today.
Five years after lifting three-
and-one-half hours a day, he is
considered the third strongest in
the world in total lifting. Just
recently. Long captured first place
in the State Power Lifting Con-
test, benching 501 pounds,
squating 837, and deadlifting 865.
Long, who is 22 pounds away
from the world record in powerlif-
ting, uses weightlifting to better
his football playing ability as well
as to his enjoyment. "Being so
short, it has helped as far as my
speed goes he said. "When
you're playing against guys who
are 6-5 or taller, it helps to have
an edge. Also, when you're
strong, you're less likely to have
injuries.
"Hopefully Long continued,
"I can intimidate the people I
play against. If I at least in-
timidate them a little, it helps me a
lot
Long said that having the
reputation as an intimidator can
be beneficial in more ways than
one. "Like coach (Ed) Emory
said, I'm a marked man out on
the field; everybody will be look-
ing for me. It just makes me want
to play harder
Besides using weightlifting to
improve his football skills, Long
also gets aesthetic satisfaction
from pumping iron. "Coming ou:
o the weightlifting room he
said, pressing his chin against his
large fist, "is like coming out of
church � vou have a good feel-
ing. It's a good way to spend your
time. I relieve some of my hostili-
ty when 1 lift
Long is the leading enthusiast
of a dedicated weightlifting pro-
gram at ECU. Although other
schools might not admit it. Long
feels that the Pirates' football
squad is probably one of the 10
strongest in the nation. "We em-
phasize weightlifting a great deal
at ECU he said. "We have a
very strong team, oven though
other schools might not think so.
We challenged Wake Forest and
North Carolina State to a
weightlifting contest and they
backed out. I don't think they
want to admit we are stronger
With spring football starting
Friday, Long, a junior from Col-
umbia. S.C has other goals
besides those related to weightlif-
ting. "My primary goal, now that
the contest is over, is to make all-
America again. I would like to
make first or second team next
year
Long has the desire and ability
to play professional football, but
he realizes that he can fall back on
a sport that gives him a tremen-
dous amount of satisfaction
weightlifting. "If it ends up that
way, I'll play pro ball. If not, I'll
go into lifting. I'm only 150
pounds off the world record in
power lifting
World's record? That would be
quite an accomplishment for so-
meone who was benching less
than his body weight only five
years ago.
East Carolina Faces 'Outsider' Image
Without a doubt, the ECU
men's basketball team ex-
emplified "Pirate Pride" to the
fullest this past weekend at the
ECAC-South conference tourna-
ment in Richmond, Va.
But before finally dismissing
the tourney, two disturbing issues
need to be discussed.
Of the six teams making up the
conference, East Carolina, in the
eyes of some, has acquired a
tainted reputation. In Sunday's
edition of the Richmond Times-
Dispatch Sports Columnist
Jerry Lindquist stated: In
fact, there is a prevailing negative
opinion about the ECU athletic
program in the conference. The
Pirate have been cast as villains
Another title, however, seems
more appropriate for the Pirates
in the Virginia-dominated con-
ference: "Outsiders
Four teams: George Mason,
James Madison, Richmond and
William & Mary are all located
somewhere in Virginia, leaving
East Carolina and Navy as the on-
ly out-of-state teams.
No one really seemed to care
how many Virginia teams were in
the conference until tournament
time. That's when you started
hearing coaches from the Virginia
teams commenting that the
"ECAC-South conference is a
fine example of just how good
Virginia basketball is
CINDY PLEASANTS
A Look Inside
Every coach in the conference
will unquestionably agree that the
ECAC-South is indeed a good
league, but the "snobbiness" of
some of the Virginia teams sure
doesn't help a conference that is
already on shaky ground.
And though ECU and Navy do
not exist in 'Good Ole Virginny
they surely held their own in the
conference playoffs. The Pirates
ousted George Mason, and Navy
left Richmond behind, giving the
"Outsiders a chance to go up
against the conference's top-
ranked teams.
Hopefully, next year, if all six
teams do remain in the con-
ference, ECU won't be given
labels or the cold shoulder
because of shallow accusations
made by the press and the
coaches.
Fans Don V Show
It truly is a shame that only a
few dedicated fans were on hand
for the Pirates' season finale in
Richmond, Va.
Probably the most pathetic
sight in the tournament was when
the James Madison cheerleaders,
band and fan section had to lead
the cheering for ECU. The Duke
fans, however, weren't yelling out
of the goodness of their heart.
ECU was playing number one
seed William & Mary, and JMU
was to meet the winner of the
semifinal contest, obviously
thinking East Carolina would pro-
ve much easier to handle.
Spring break does come once a
year but so does the ECAC tour-
nament. And ECU wasn't the on-
ly unversity enjoying a week-long
study break, yet their section ap-
peared to be the least filled (except
Navy, of course).
ECU junior Offensive Guard Terry Long is considered the third strongest power lifter in the world. Long
bench presses 501 pounds and deadlifts 865 pounds.
PHO'0 tit GA�s PATTERSON
ECU Third Baseman John Hallow takes time out to talk to Pitcher
Brian Peterson. The Bucs pla Clemson todav at 3 p.m.
Swimmers Go West
B RANDY MEWS
staff Wnlft
Ten members of the EC1
women's swim team headed for
the west coast Monday morning
to compete in the NCAA
Women's Swimming and Diving
Championships.
The event will take place
March 16-19, in long Beach.
California. Head coach, Rick
Kobe, Jon Rose and Dannv
Michalove made the trip as the
Pirate coaches.
Kobe really doesn't know
w hat to expect from the meet. " I
don't have any idea of who will
be there. It's a mystery. When
we get there we'll find out who's
come and who are the
favorites
In 1982, ECU took rune swim-
mers to the Nationals, and
qualified for 20 events. This year
the Pirates have qualified 3" in-
dividual and relay events.
"I feel prettv good about t�e
meet said Kobe "We have the
same number of people going a
last year, but we're in almost
twice as many events. We ought
to get some All-Americans and
even one or two national cham-
pions out of it
Three ECU swimmers: Nancy
Ludwig, Kaky Wilson an Joanne
McCulIev qualified for four
events each. Ludwig will swim
the 50. 100, and 200-meter but-
terflv. while McCulIev will swim
the 50. 100, and 200-meter
breakstroke Wilson will com-
pete in the 50 and 100 fly as well
as the 200 breakstroke. They all
swim the individual medSev
event.
The other swimmers on the
team will all compete in three
events each. They include
freestylers Nancy Rogers and
Nan George, breakstroke:
Jessica Feinberg and butterflyer
Sharon Holt. Abbey Schultz will
compete in the breakstroke and
butterflv. while Nancy James
will swim the butterfly and
freestyle.
Rene Seech will dive for the
Pirates off the one and three
meter boards.
F �e relav teams qualified for
the meet and they will be made
up trom the nine swimmers com-
peting. Thev include the 200,
400 and 800-meter freestyle
team. as well as the 200 and
400-meter medley teams.
The Pirates return from Long
Beach Sunday night, and with
each swimmer competing in at
least three events. ECU should
finish up their season m grand
stvle.
Frosh In NCAA
You would never know that
East Carolina has the second
largest student population out of
the conference league, which is
even more of an embarrassment.
Not to mention that probably
75-percent of the fans present
were ECU alumnae.
True, the support has been
greater this season than in years
past, but once again, the Pirate
fans didn't come through when
the players needed them the most.
A tournament is the highlight
of a season and, if ever, the
greatest level of spirit and en-
thusiasm by the fans should be
demonstrated then.
For years, fans have complain-
ed because they didn't have a
team to watch. Well, this year you
did, and next year should be even
more promising.
But in able to truly succeed,
whether it be in Ficklen Stadium
or Minges Coliseum, ECU fans
are going to have to come through
or settle for a limited athletic pro-
gram.
After all, what you put into a
program determines what you get
out of it.
By RANDY MEWS
staff nxrr
Two members of the ECU track
team participated in the NCAA
Track and Field Indoor Cham-
pionships this weekend in Pon-
tiac, Mich.
The two tracksters are the
fabulous freshmen duo of long
jumper Chris Brooks and hurdler
Craig White. Both qualified for
the National Championships by
mid-season and have been perfor-
ming as if they were seasoned
veterans all year long.
Both turned in reputable per-
formances this weekend;
however, both suffered minor set-
backs. Brooks came with the
wrong pair of shoes, which
ultimately cost him a difference of
more than a foot on each of his
jumps.
Coach Bill Carson had not been
to the Nationals in several years,
and was unaware the take-off
board on the long jump was made
of plastic.
The tips of Brook's shoes are
also plastic, and this caused him
to slip whenever he hit the board.
As a result, Brooks was never able
to properly execute his jump.
Brooks qualified for the na-
tionals with a leap of 25' 6 3�, but
was never able to surpass the
24-foot mark the entire meet. "If
I had the right shoes, I'm pretty
sure I would've placed in the top
five Brooks stated.
"I was unaware he came with
the wrong shoes said Carson
but Chris still jumped very well
under the circumstances
White mishap occurred in the
semi-finals of the 55-meter high
hurdles. He finished sixth in his
heat, but had the opportunity to
finish in the top three. Going over
the last hurdle. White jumped too
high, and three people passed him
in the last five meters of the race.
"Craig was in good shape near
the end Carson explained, "but
he "sailed' the last hurdle and
three people slipped under him.
It's important to barely clear the
last hurdle so you can explode to
the finish line
Although White could have
done better, he was pleased with
his performance and enjoyed
competing in the most prestigious
collegiate track and field event. "I
felt pretty confident going in, and
I gained a lot of experience from
the meet
Although problems did arise,
Carson was pleased with the per-
formance of his freshmen.
Brooks and White even did well
enough for representatives from
Adidas to take notice. The com-
pany will sponsor the two athletes
for the rest of their collegiate
careers.
Soccer A wards
On March 1, the ECU soccer
team held its award banquet at
Four Seasons Restaurant and
presented various awards.
Brian Winchell received the
'Most Valuable Player' award,
while Steve Brody was presented
the 'Coach's Award
Senior plaques were given to
Tom Lawrence, Duane
Degaetano, Dennis Elwell, Stan
Gnff, Brian Winchell and Steve
Brody.
hmp
Sneaker
Old Veterans I)�, It
Again
Before the
tramural ba il
season
evervone wa tall
about the J .v I
and the
break a
six week sc
to a close oi �
these :w
champn
proved
was all al
Eight. -
Men
Divisior.
third
Camp .

Residence Ha
pion Belk
The Ba: dil
to the A �
elm
Fru'
P: PI I
won '
"B" Divis r.
kapr
The He
who
. I
worn.
�c
Chan
the top Vs
Reside-
the 1

Pi �
D
Fletchei
��
pi.
Congra . a
t h i
V re i
Daugherty
UNC Prep
For Tourr
chpe: h
N.C. .1 Pit
L'mve:s ol N
Carolina frcshn
center B'd Daugr
ty misses h -
straight da
tice Wee: . �
because of
splints.
Daughertv. a
startci �
Heels, is in the LSi.
mfirmarv but tc
ph- cian Joseph
DeWalt sac t - con-
fident Dauce �

S
-
SI
HA
8:31
EVE
COV
Mei
Member
Guest
Guest
Members!
F
BE
AL
L








1
the east Carolinian;
MARCH 17, 1983
V VR H 17 1983 Page 8
th Win
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
n John Hallow lakes time out to talk to Pitcher
Bucs plalemsnn toda at 3 p.m.
ners Go West
w

- �
ie meet. "I
t who vmII
Istery When
our who's
the
Aim-
s c ' Li � h i
and
ne
- each. Luduig swim
50, 100, and 200-meter but-
vhile McCulley will swim
100, and 200-meter
breakstroke. Wilson will com-
pe ie 50 and 100 fly as well
as the 200 breakstroke. They all
� n the individual medley
I other swimmers on the
will all compete in three
ts each. They include
rs Nanc Rogers and
Nan George, breakstroker
Jessica Feinberg and butterflyer
Sharon Holt. Abbey Schultz will
compete in the breakstroke and
hutterfU. while Nancy James
will swim the butterfly and
freestyle.
Rene Seech will dive for the
Pirates off the one and three
meter boards.
e rela teams qualified for
neet and they will be made
m the nine swimmers com-
ting They include the 200,
400 and 800-meter freestyle
uns, as well as the 200 and
400-meter medley teams.
The Pirates return from Long
Beach Sunday night, and with
-h swimmer competing in at
least three events, ECU should
finish up their season in grand
style.
In NCAA
IWs
V
� long
;rdler
J :ied for
ponships bv
?een perfor-
able per-
weekend;
minor set
ith the
�es. which
i' renceof
:h of his
ad not been
� eral years,
ie take
as made
shoes are
ed him
tne board
never able
jump.
the na-
16 ' . but
irpass the
meet. "If
I'm pretty
in the top
vdine with
Carson
very well
rred in the
heter high
Ixth in his
heat, but had the opportunity to
finish in the top three. Going over
the last hurdle. White jumped too
high, and three people passed him
in the last five meters of the race.
"Craig was in good shape near
the end Carson explained, "but
he -sailed' the last hurdle and
three people slipped under him.
l important to barely clear the
last hurdle so you can explode to
the finish line
Although White could have
done better, he was pleased with
his performance and enjoyed
competing in the most prestigious
collegiate track and field event. "I
felt pretty confident going in, and
I gained a lot of experience from
the meet
hough problems did arise,
on was pleased with the per-
formance of his freshmen.
Brooks and White even did well
enough for representatives from
Adidas to take notice. The com-
pany will sponsor the two athletes
for the rest of their collegiate
careers.
Soccer A wards
On March 1, the ECU soccer
team held its award banquet at
��our Seasons Restaurant and
presented various awards
Brian Winchell received the
Most Valuable Player' award,
while Steve Brody was presented
tne Coach's Award
Senior plaques were given to
jom Lawrence, Duane
Jgaetano. Dennis Elwell. Stan
Brod Winchell and Steve
I
Sneaker Sam Sez
Old Veterans Do It
Again
Before the in-
tramural basketball
season started,
everyone was talking
about the Joint Eight
and the Heart-
breakers, and as the
six week season came
to a close on March 3,
these two veteran
championship teams
proved what the talk
was all about. Joint
Eight, who won the
Men's Independent
Division, took their
third straight All-
Campus victory be
defeating the
Residence Hall Cham-
pion Belk Bandits.
The Bandits advance
to the A-C finals by
eliminating the top
Fraternity, Beta Theta
Pi. Phi Kappa Tau
won the Fraternity
"B" Division over Pi
Kappa Phi.
The Heartbreakers.
who are the
dominating force in
women's intramurals,
won the All Campus
Championship over
the top Women'
Residence Hall team,
the Fletcher Sharp-
shooters. Alpha Delta
the Sorority
but lost to
in their bid
AC Cham-
the Joint Eight, the
Heartbreakers and all
of the divisional
champions.
Champions of the
Rink
El Loco Flyers and
Rolla Doobie, the top
two slapshooting
teams, took to the
rink on March 3 to
decide the champion
of Co-Rec Roller
Hockey. Very few
goals were scored in
this final game as
both teams excelled
defensively. When the
final horn sounded,
El Loco had edged
out Rolla Doobie by a
2-1 margin, and earn-
ed the title as
"Champions of the
Rink
Pi won
Division
Fletcher
for the
pionship.
Congratulations
to
Championship
Wrestling
A packed crowd
watched as the ex-
citing finals of the in-
tramural wrestling
tournament got
underway on March
3. Congratulations to
the following cham-
pions in their
respected weight divi-
sions: 126, Kent
Smothers; 134, Mike
Morris; 142, Dave
Terry; 150, Dan
Keene; 158, Andy
Gross; 167, Lee Cox;
177, Tom Robinson;
190, Phil Hagen; and
unlimited, David
Twisdale.
Upcoming Events
With warm weather
here, it's time to get
the racket out of the
closet, brush the
leaves off the court
and play tennis. Entry
dates for tennis
doubles and co-rec
(mixed) doubles is
March 21-24 with
matches beginning
March 28. Round up
a partner and start
practicing that power-
ful serve today.
You have one more
chance to play basket-
ball but this time it's
co-rec style. Teams
are made up of three
women and two men
with specialized rules.
Entry dates are March
28-30 with games
beginning on April 5.
Mix-up a team and
sign up!
Entry dates for co-
rec inner-tube water
polo are March 21-24
with the splashing
event beginning
March 28. Join in on
the fun and make
some waves!
Advisory Council Ap-
plications Being Ac-
cepted
Now's your chance
to recommend
policies, suggest new
activities or pro-
grams, and become
involved with the
operation of your
Intramural-
Recreational Services
program! Applica-
tions are being ac-
cepted through April
8 for the positions of
council president and
council represen-
tatives. The Advisory
Council includes a
representative from
each of the participa-
tion divisions: frater-
nity, sorority,
residence hall (one
from each campus
Central, West and
College Hill), club-
department, and
indepenent-off-
campus. Principal
duties of the Advisory
Council include
recommendation of
policies and pro-
cedures for the IRS
programs-services,
reviewing disciplinary
matters, and advising
the IRS staff of stu-
dent concerns.
Application forms
are available in 204
Memorial Gym. All
interested students are
encouraged to apply,
no later than the April
8 deadline.
Lefty Refuses To Q
HOUSTON (UPI)
� There may be
demands for Lefty
DrieselPs resignation
and his team may be
in the midst of a swirl-
ing controversy, but
the veteran of 28
coaching seasons in-
sists he feels no
pressure.
"I'm too dumb to
feel any pressure
said the coach of the
Maryland Terrapins.
"I'm too dumb to get
out of coaching.
"This has been a
rewarding season for
me. It's been a great
season
Driesell has come
under fire from
several sources since a
Maryland coed con-
tended the Terps
coach tried to con-
vince her she should
drop a sexual harass-
ment complaint
against 6-6 forwaid
Herman Veal.
"I'm not going to
say anything about
that (the Veal inci-
dent) Driesell said
Wednesday on the eve
of his team's first
round NCAA tourna-
ment game against
Tennessee-
Chattanooga. "It has
had no effect on the
team. We don't make
excuses when we lose
at Maryland. Like I
said, I'm too dump to
be affected
The Terrapins are
one of four Atlantic
Coast Conference
teams to have made it
into the NCAA tour-
nament and Driesell
said he feels his team
is capable of advanc-
ing a lot farther into
the tourney than some
people think.
"We think we can
beat any team in the
country right now
said Driesell. "But no
we have to prove it.
"We may not beat
Tennessee-
Chattanooga, but if
they are going to beat
us they are going to
have to play hard
because we are going
to play awfuily
hard
Maryland's season
began with an
18-point loss to Penn
State and at that point
of the year Driesell
didn't think his team
was capable of
beating anybody.
"I was ready to
pack in it he said.
"I didn't think we
would win two games.
But we beat UCLA
and we beat North
Carolina. People
started out by saying
we were no good, then
ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss?.
they came back and
said maybe we were
sort of good. Now we
have to go out tomor-
row night and show
how good we are.
If Maryland does
beat the Moccasins
Thursday night, the
Terrapins will take on
the No. 1 ranked team
in the country � the
Houston Cougars.
"But my players
aren't looking for-
ward to Houston he
said. "If they are they
are foolish. They
might have been look-
ing forward to playing
Virginia in the ACC
"We are the under-
dog in this game as far
as I'm concerned. I
pick up the poll and
see that Tennessee-
Chattanooga is rank-
ed and we aren't.
That makes them the
favorite.
"But I like that. I
like it when we are
playing teams we
aren't supposed to
beat.
tournament and we
got beat by Georgia
Tech in the first
round.
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
if
�w,��xw�ww�www ;�ii i.
Daugherty Out;
UNC Prepares
For Tourney
&
We Are Now Open 11:00 a.m.
to9:00p.m.
aros
FINE
FOODS
CHAPEL HILL.
NX. (UPI)
University of North
Carolina freshman
center Brad Daugher-
ty missed his second
straight day of prac-
tice Wednesday
because of shin
splints.
Daugherty, a
starter for the Tar
Heels, is in the UNC
infirmary but team
physician Joseph
DeW'alt said he is con-
fident Daugherty will
be ready
Saturdav.
to play
North Carolina's
first game in the
NCAA Tournament is
Saturday against the
winner of Thursday-
night's West Virginia-
James Madison game.
North Carolina is the
defending national
champion.
Daugherty is
averaging 8.1 points
and 5.1 rebounds a
game.
Friday Super Happy Hour
4:00-6:00
35C draught
$1.00 Wine Coolers
75C Glass of Wine
Regular Happy Hour
from 6:00-8:00p.m.
Come on out � enjoy
our patio
Located in Georgetown Shoppes
Across From The Highrise Dorms.
For Take Out Call 752 4761
All You Con Eat
Spec
Shrimp all you can eat
Special for only $5.99
Thurs.Night Only
1105 Airport Roa Greenville, N.C.
Jazz Loft
' 'It 'sjust a step above
PAUL TARDIFF
QUARTET
Featuring
Ray Codrington on Trumpet
and Flugal Horn.
Robbie Link on Bass
David Via on Drums
Paul Tardiff on Piano
original and jazz standards
Plus music by
Charlie Parker
Sonny Rollins
Theoloninius Monk
Friday�Sat.
March 18th and 19th
9p B. until
Beef Barn
�400 St. Andrews Drive 756-1161
mmmmmmmmmmmmm
ECU STUDENTFACULTY DAY
APRIL 16,1983
'a
r
SIGEP
HAPPY HOUR
8:30 to 1:00
EVERY SUNDAY
COVER CHARGE:
m
mm
XJ,TdngsqXwninion
i2H3-
Jon � for fuarvcilrmcal ind make tkriw.r
TW MadcM I aioa Tra.d Coaajtlc a spoasoriat � �n� u kia � Doauaioa
Tfckets m�.oi�kiilW Central Ticket Offlre.Mearftafe.fl St��al Cealer
Foe sort taforaaOoa.co.tarl the Cealral Ticket Office � 7yi 1 eit 2M
Members $3.00
Member Gentlemen $3.50
Guest Ladies $4.00
Guest Gentlemen $4.50
Memberships Will Be Available
At The Door
FREE
BEVERAGE
ALLNIGHT
LONG
IMMMMMM5SSISS1
Wilber
OLD FASHIONED
HOT DOGS-BURGERS
5�AFOOD
FRIED CHICK�li
DRIVE THRU
fe3

BREAKFAST
GRAND OPENING
OF
WILBER'S
FAMILY FAVORITES
480 North Greene Street � 752-8611
(Across From Casablanca)
NOW OPEN
6 AM until 11PM
OLr biscuits are made from scratch and
branded with our name!
�SPECIALS�
�Two Scrambled Eggs ftft
Hash brown, biscuit. jl!y ft coffsoonly99
�Two Ham Biscuitsontyl .19
�Two Sausage Biscuitsomyl .19
�Econo-Pack Chicken A 0ft
Two ptocat chicken, biscuit, honsyonly 1.29
�Snack Pack Chicken . fi
Twopfc�cwctw:kfw,Wuitfr�f�ftlrw�,J�orwy only 1.59
�Old Fashion Hot Dogson�y59c
�Trout Dinnersomyl .99
�Featuring
Chicken Filet Sandwiches, Trout Sandwiches
Hamburgers, Shrimp Dinners, Buckets
ot Chicken, Drive-Thru Window
r.
r
.all you can
�PLAY Everyday
� to 6:00p.m. &
K $3M : Open
' 12 Noon
wiiimiini.ni.f.r,lrT

piB'inttpQDw

pnnmanmni
'4
.
Daily .J;
i - i � 11
10th St.Ext. by Papa Katz 758-1820
8 Tokens for $1.00 (2.00 LIMIT)
with this coupon
Expires 5-15-83
Your 1st scoop of Ice Cream4 price
with this coupon
Expires 5-15-83
Receive a FREE
2 Game ticket when you purchase
a 2 Game ticket at the regular
price ($3.00)with this
Coupon
Expires 5-15-83
A
4 '
wmwjin w ne �
A






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 17, 1983
Page 8
)th Win
Pho'o 6v 04BV PATTERSON
i John Hallow takt time out to talk to Pitcher
I lt'm�on toda at 3 p.m.
ners Go West
W S
v m
I udwig will swim
50, : � i id 200-meter but-
hi � McCullej will swim
. K), and 200-meter
ke Wilson will com-
0 and 100 fly as well
� breakstroke. They all
the individual medlev
� I
ho will
' who's
swimmers on the
compete in three
i. The include
ers Nanc) Rogers and
Nan George, breakstroker
ica Feinberg and buiterflyer
Sharon Holt. Abbey Schultz will
compete in the breakstroke and
butterfly, while Nancy James
will suim the butterfly and
freestyle.
Rene Seech will dive for the
rates oft the one and three
ter boards.
a teams qualified for
: the will be made
he nine swimmers com-
peting They include the 200,
400 and 800-meter freestyle
as well as the 200 and
400-meter medley teams.
The Pirates return from Long
Beach Sunday night, and with
:h swimmer competing in at
ree events, ECU should
inish ip their season in grand
t v le.
In NCAA
IUv
II
II
;r set
-
I
:ra
� iki
are
i ised him
ird
able
ump.
the na-
6 , but
irpass the
meet "If
i m pretty
in the top
came with
arson
�er well
rred in the
teter high
Ixth in his
but had the opportunity to
sh in the top three. Going over
' hurdle. White jumped too
ind three people passed him
as; five meters of the race.
"Craig was in good shape near
Carson explained, "but
mailed the last hurdle and
three people slipped under him.
'tan: to barely clear the
hurdle so you can explode to
the finish line
Although White could have
done better, he was pleased with
performance and enjoyed
ng in the most prestigious
collegiate trak and field event. "1
felt pretty confident going in, and
lined a lot of experience from
a eel "
ough problems did arise,
was pleased with the per-
ince of his freshmen.
� and White even did well
igh for representatives from
Adidas to take notice. The com-
� will sponsor the two athletes
' ' the rest of their collegiate
.areers
Soccer A wards
On March 1, the ECU soccer
team held its award banquet at
�ur Seasons Restaurant and
Presented various awards
Brian Wmchell received the
Most Valuable Player' award,
white Steve Brody was presented
ine Coach's Award
Senior plaques were given to
r, Lawrence, Duane
Degaetano. Dennis Elwell, Stan
Brod " W,nchdl an Steve
1
Sneaker Sam Sez
Old Veterans Do It
Again
Before the in-
tramural basketball
season started,
everyone was talking
about the Joint Eight
and the Heart-
breakers, and as the
six week season came
to a close on March 3,
these two veteran
championship teams
proved what the talk
was all about. Joint
Fight, who won the
Men's Independent
Division, took their
third straight All-
Campus victory be
defeating the
Residence Hall Cham-
pion Belk Bandits.
The Bandits advance
to the A-C finals by
eliminating the top
Fraternity, Beta Theta
Pi. Phi Kappa Tau
won the Fraternity
"B" Division over Pi
Kappa Phi.
The Heartbreakers,
who are the
dominating force in
women's intramurals,
won the All Campus
Championship over
the top Women's
Residence Hall team,
the Fletcher Sharp-
shooters. Alpha Delta
Pi won the Sorority
Division but lost to
Fletcher in their bid
for the A-C Cham-
pionship.
Congratulations to
the Joint Eight, the
Heartbreakers and all
of the divisional
champions.
Champions of the
Rink
El Loco Flyers and
Rolla Doobie, the top
two slapshooting
teams, took to the
rink on March 3 to
decide the champion
of Co-Rec Roller
Hockey. Very few
goals were scored in
this final game as
both teams excelled
defensively. When the
final horn sounded.
El Loco had edged
out Rolla Doobie by a
2-1 margin, and earn-
ed the title as
"Champions of the
Rink
Championship
Wrestling
A packed crowd
watched as the ex-
citing finals of the in-
tramural wrestling
tournament got
underway on March
3. Congratulations to
the following cham-
pions in their
respected weight divi-
sions: 126, Kent
Smothers; 134, Mike
Morris; 142, Dave
Terry; 150, Dan
Keene; 158, Andv
Gross; 167, Lee Cox;
177, Tom Robinson;
190, Phil Hagen; and
unlimited, David
Twisdale.
Upcoming Events
With warm weather
here, it's time to get
the racket out of the
closet, brush the
leaves off the court
and play tennis. Entry
dates for tennis
doubles and co-rec
(mixed) doubles is
March 21-24 with
matches beginning
March 28. Round up
a partner and start
practicing that power-
ful serve today.
You have one more
chance to play basket-
ball but this time it's
co-rec style. Teams
are made up of three
women and two men
with specialized rules.
Entry dates are March
28-30 with games
beginning on April 5.
Mix-up a team and
sign up!
Entry dates for co-
rec inner-tube water
polo are March 21-24
with the splashing
event beginning
March 28. Join in on
the fun and make
some waves!
Advisory Council Ap-
plications Being Ac-
cepted
Now's your chance
to recommend
policies, suggest new
activities or pro-
grams, and become
involved with the
operation of your
Intramural-
Recreational Services
program! Applica-
tions are being ac-
cepted through April
8 for the positions of
council president and
council represen-
tatives. The Advisory
Council includes a
representative from
each of the participa-
tion divisions: frater-
nity, sorority,
residence hall (one
from each campus
Central, West and
College Hill), club-
department, and
indepenent-off-
campus. Principal
duties of the Advisory
Council include
recommendation of
policies and pro-
cedures for the IRS
programs-services,
reviewing disciplinary
matters, and advising
the IRS staff of stu-
dent concerns.
Application forms
are available in 204
Memorial Gym. All
interested students are
encouraged to apply,
no iater than the April
8 deadline.
ifty Refuses To Q
HOUSTON (UPI)
� There may be
demands for Lefty
Driesell's resignation
and his team may be
in the midst of a swirl-
ing controversy, but
the veteran of 28
coaching seasons in-
sists he feels no
pressure.
"I'm too dumb to
feel any pressure
said the coach of the
Maryland Terrapins.
"I'm too dumb to get
out of coaching.
"This has been a
rewarding season for
me. It's been a great
season
Driesell has come
under fire from
several sources since a
Maryland coed con-
tended the Terps
coach tried to con-
vince her she should
drop a sexual harass-
ment complaint
against 6-6 forwaid
Herman Veal.
"I'm not going to
say anything about
that (the Veal inci-
dent) Driesell said
Wednesday on the eve
of his team's First
round NCAA tourna-
ment game against
Tennessee-
Chattanooga. "It has
had no effect on the
team. We don't make
excuses when we lose
at Maryland. Like I
said, I'm too dump to
be affected
The Terrapins are
one of four Atlantic
Coast Conference
teams to have made it
into the NCAA tour-
nament and Driesell
said he feels his team
is capable of advanc-
ing a lot farther into
the tourney than some
people think.
"We think we can
beat any team in the
country right now
said Driesell. "But no
we have to prove it.
"We may not beat
Tennessee-
Chattanooga, but if
they are going to beat
us they are going to
have to play hard
because we are going
to play awfuily
hard
Maryland's season
began with an
18-point loss to Penn
State and at that point
of the year Driesell
didn't think his team
was capable of
beating anybody.
"I was ready to
pack in it he said.
"I didn't think we
would win two games.
But we beat UCLA
and we beat North
Carolina. People
started out by saying
we were no good, then
sssssssssssssssssssssssssss
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
0k
they came back and
said maybe we were
sort of good. Now we
have to go out tomor-
row night and show
how good we are.
If Maryland does
beat the Moccasins
Thursday night, the
Terrapins will take on
the No. 1 ranked team
in the country � the
Houston Cougars.
"But my players
aren't looking for-
ward to Houston he
said. "If they are they
are foolish. They
might have been look-
ing forward to playing
Virginia in the ACC
"We are the under-
dog in this game as far
as I'm concerned. I
pick up the poll and
see that Tennessee-
Chattanooga is rank-
ed and we aren't.
That makes them the
favorite.
"But I like that. I
like it when we are
playing teams we
aren't supposed to
beat.
tournament and we
got beat by Georgia
Tech in the first
round.
Daugherty Out;
UNC Prepares
For Tourney
�$
We Are Now Open 11:00 a.m.
to9:00 p.m.
aros
fine
FOODS
All You Con Eot
Specials
Shrimp all you can eat
Special for only $5.99
Thnrs.Night Only
105 Airport Roat Greenville, N.C
CHAPEL HILL,
N.C. (UPI) �
University of North
Carolina freshman
center Brad Daugher-
ty missed his second
straight day of prac-
tice Wednesdav
because of shin
splints.
Daugherty, a
starter for the Tar
Heels, is in the UNC
infirmary but team
physician Joseph
DeWalt said he is con-
fident Daugherty will
be ready
Saturdav.
to play
North Carolina's
first game in the
NCAA Tournament is
Saturday against the
winner of Thursday
night's West Virginia-
James Madison game.
North Carolina is the
defending national
champion.
Daugherty is
averaging 8.1 points
and 5.1 rebounds a
game.
Friday Super Happy Hour
4:00-6:00
35$ draught
$1.00 Wine Coolers
75c Glass of Wine
Regular Happy Hour
from 6:00-8:00p.m
Come on out � enjoy
our patio
Located in Georgetown Shoppes
Across From the Highrise Dorms.
For Take Out Call 752 4761
Jazz Loft
' 'It 'sjust a step a bo ve
PAUL TARDIFF
QUARTET
Featuring
Ray Codrington on Trumpet
and Flugal Horn.
Robbie Link on Bass
David Via on Drums
Paul Tardiff on Piano
original and jazz standards
Plus music by
Charlie Parker
Sonny Rollins
Theoloninius Monk
Friday�Sat.
March 18th and 19th
9p.m. until
Beef Barn
400 St. Andrews Drive 756-1161
�niiiiiiiliMil
ECU STUDENTFACULTY DAY
APRIL 16,1983
-���
SIGEP
HAPPY HOUR
8:30 to 1:00
EVERY SUNDAY
COVER CHARGE:
Joiaufnr ry.cicilrmrnt ml mkf briwr
TW Madtal I Moa Tr��d Coamiltet a ipoasoria, . tnp 10 Hal Doauaioa
Tkkrti u.Kmo.��H, Central TVkn Of ficr. MraaVaaaO Slmteairain
For atorr iaioraatioa.roatart the Ccalral Tickrl Officr ai 757U.�i 2�
:mmimmmmmmmmmmi
m
.
Members $3.00
Member Gentlemen $3.50
Guest Ladies $4.00
Guest Gentlemen $4.50
Memberships Will Be Available
At The Poor
FREE
BEVERAGE
ALLNIGHT
LONG
GRAND OPENING
OF
WILBER'S
FAMILY FAVORITES
480 North Greene Street � 752-8611
(Across From Casablanca)
NOW OPEN
6 AM until 11PM
Our biscuits are made from scratch and
branded with our name!
�SPECIALS�
�Two Scrambled Eggs ftft
Hash browns, biscuit. jeily 4 coffeeonjy99
�Two Ham Biscuitsomyl .19
�Two Sausage Biscuitsomyl .19
�Econo-Pack Chicken - on
Two pieces chicken, biscuit, honeyonly I .29
�Snack Pack Chicken fi
Two pieces chicken, biscuit, french fries, horwy ontyl.59
�Old Fashion Hot Dogsomy59c
�Trout Dinnersomyl .99
�Featuring�
Chicken Filet Sandwiches, Trout Sandwiches
Hamburgers, Shrimp Dinners, Buckets
of Chicken. Drive-Thru Window
Jall you can
?PLAY Everyday
� to 6:00p.m.
$3.00
.e
. e
�f
llUUIIIIalllMlr"iimnJH

ttttttiiihhUTTTfl
Open
12 Noon
, Daily
v- . y
'4
10th St.Ext. by Papa Katz 758-1820
8 Tokens for $1.00 (2.00 LIMIT)
with this coupon
Expires 5-15-83
Your 1st scoop of Ice Cream4 price
with this coupon
Expires 5-15-83
Receive a FREE
2 Game ticket when you purchase
a 2 Game ticket at the regular
price ($3.00)with this
Coupon
Expires 5-15-83
� ���
'�� ��i��
L
I





10
I Hi AM CAROl IMAN
MARCH 17, 1�83
Madison Ready For WV
Photo b GARY PATTERSON
David kaplon (left) and C.J. Harris exchange blos in a 173-182 lb. weight
class bout Wednesda nihl in the second qualiivinu. niht of the 1983 IKK
Boxing 1 ournament at Mingesoliseum. kaplnn won the contest b decision.
Final-round competition will bt-gin tonight at 7:30.
GREENSBORO,
N.C. (UPI) � James
Madison Coach Lou
C a m p a n e I 1 i
understands West
Virginia Coach Gale
Catlett is saying the
Dukes like to stall and
Campanelli is sore
about it.
"I resent people
speaking when they
have no knowledge of
what's going on, no
facts Campanelli
said this week.
James Madison
takes on West
Virginia and Virginia
Commonwealth plays
LaSalle as the NCAA
Basketball Tourna-
ment comes to the
Greensboro Coliseum
Thursday night. The
winner of the James
M a d i s o n - W e s t
Virginia game goes
against North
Carolina Saturday,
while the winner of
the other game will
play Georgia.
I ittle was known in
North Carolina about
James Madison this
time last year but the
Dukes quickly chang-
ed that when they
gave eventual NCAA
champion University
of North Carolina one
of its toughtest games
of the tournament.
James Madison,
19-10, got into the
NCAA Tournament
this year by winning
the ECAC South
Tournament.
Campanelli says the
stall is not part of the
Dukes' game strategy
despite what Catlett
thinks.
"We like a medium
tempo, no matter
what Coach Catlett
says Campanelli
said. "He says we
play stall-ball. I don't
think we do that. We
play good defense. 1
don't coach his group
and he doesn't coach
mine
James Madison is
led by Dan Ruland
who is averaging 15.2
points and 6.7 re-
bounds a game.
Charles Fisher is
averaging 10.3 points.
West Virginia is
23-7 and was ranked
in the top 20 during
the first few weeks of
the season. The
Mountaineers drop-
ped out of the rank-
ings never to return
after losing to North
Carolina State and
Stetson in December.
West Virginia won
the Atlantic 10 Con-
ference championship
Saturday by defeating
Temple in
Philadelphia.
It's also the second
straight year West
Virginia has been in
the NCAA Tourna-
ment. The Moun-
taineers beat North
Carolina A'T 102-72
in the opening round
last year but then lost
to Fresno State 50-46
in the second round.
West Virginia's at-
tack is led by senior
guard Greg Jones,
who has been averag-
ing 22.8 points per
game.
West Virginia had
some big wins this
year, including one
against then top-
ranked University of
Nevada I as Vegas,
but also has dropped
some games it was
supposed to win
Catlett has criticized
the team pubiclv for
lack of concentration.
"If we go play our
system efficiently, we
should be all right
he said of the James
Madison game. "I'm
more concerned about
how we perform than
how they plav
Virginia Com-
monwealth, 23-6. wa
on a 15-game winning
streak when it lost to
Alabama-
Birmingham in the
semifinals of the Sun
Belt Conference
Tournament. The
Rams are led b
Calvin Duncan,
averaging 17.4 points
a game; Fred Brown,
with a 12.9 point
average; and Michael
Brown with a 10 8
point average.
VCl Coach J.D
Barnett has expressed
satisfaction about get
ting into the East
Region
"I personal!) fell
we would get a I
with 23 wins having
plaved against the op-
position that we
plaved he said
"But 1 did not know
where we would go
Watch the
Pirates
ciXXclCxYw
o1
A
Classifieds
PERSONAL
- . B i I i m still rvad - 1 �
'Of �ou Love YOUR
SECRET ADMIRER
FIFl Mow s rout �ou �n m
gettlfl SIOShMl tttlS wt-t kt'HG
down jt the hoq show1 SK'PPY
ROOMMATE
WANTED
NEAT CLEAN FEMALE
ROOMMATE WANTED Cs
�;� at O j- Mills Studio Rent
15 0C monthly Apartment lur
nished
MATURE RESPONSIBLE
ROOMMATE WANTED in
3 bedroom duplex 2 blocks trom
campus 170 plus one third
utilities 75�47�5
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE e�per.ence quality
work IBM Selectric t�pt.iriter
Call Lame Shive 7S6 530 or
GAIL JOYNER 756 !0�J
TYPING Term papers, thesis
etc Call Kempie Dunn. 752 6733
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE Complete audio repair
call ater 6pm Mark 752 1796
NEED TYPING' Lowest rates
on campus I years experience
IBM type Call Cindy 35S 6748
atter s 00 p m
MOVING' No cot) too large or
small1 Reasonable rates call
ISI "533
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST . . t A H O L D '�
- - � . . ilVfiitff mark
inqs on ch.r nd paws no tan
Answers 'o CLO Please call
� �' . � � en or
found
LOST GERMAN SHEPHERD
puppv mostly black Answers to
Dusty Lost near Harding
St . � It (ound call T� 4483
0fi Anniversary Celebration
aj Roast Beef
I, I Sandwich!
II MIT N� COUPON NECESSARY
f March 12-20
FOR SALE iMmmmMmmmrwmmMMMMmmMMmmJm
CAN DO
25 Offset Resumes for
D. c $12.50
Photocopies 5C
CURRY 1)
COPY p
CENTER of Greenville
752 1233
includes typing,
second sneets & envelopes
8' : X 11 1 side
Classic Laid Paper
Expires J 30 83
412 EVANS MALL DOWNTOWN
qqooooooooooooooooogoooooooqoooqqoooooooooqogqBD&ag
MARCH IS
FOR SAVING MONEY
At the
BICYCte
90S
MISC.
COLLEGE STUDENTS Wan-
to earn entra money from your
room at your convenience?
Unlimited earnings potential'
Start your on business and
take it with you wherever you
go A unique wav to save and
make monev i interested call
752 0207 4 00 p m 9 00 p m
Monday through Friday
MOVING' NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALL"
Reasonable 'ates Call s 9533
RESPONSIBLE PERSON S
WANTED to sub lease one room
apartment a Tar Rv�t Estates
this summer Apt is beside
large swimming pool has patio
and is located 5 minutes trom
campus Call 7 58 6424 or more
information
9 TOYOTA CORONA 4 speed
a c good mileage ci-an t' 200
rSI 1513 -sk tor Jim
ECU STUDENTS Ucult �taf1
Welcome to our flea market i1
n. Pitt County Fairgrounds
located Ml Norfl
BUd Open . r , Saturday .nn
Sunday S til 5 Crafts tools fui
niture books c D piays of
old postcards buttons ami
pistols and collector items
Real bargains
CIGARETTES From 54 4, a
carton Will deliver no limit
Call '53 5812 nd leave name
number order time and place
ot deh ver y
WANTED
WANTED Organist for dinner
muiic and iounge See Janice
Davenport at Washington Tacht
and Country Club Thurs thru
Sat between 5 and 9 p m or call
946 ISM
UNFURNISHED ROOM NEED
ED 758 43S7
IMMEDIATE OPENING ECU
senior Become part ot a sue
cesstul team with a proven
record marketing the Colle9e
Defender Insurance Savings
plan to ECU students Set vour
own hours AM training and
license provided e�cellent ear
n,ng potential Call 752 0121.
Lawrence R Garrett CLU Pro
essionat Planning Services
!
Free Hearing Screening
For those people who were in close J
proximity to the explosion at Village $
Green Apartments on March 2,1983.
CONTACT:Speech Pathology
and Audiology Department,Regionah
Rehabilitation Center, Pitt County T
Memorial Hospital $$
for appointment (757-4448). i
. A.
B-E
March Specials
Tires
27x1 Gumwall
was 7.95 Now 3.99
IRC Roadlite Gumwall 27x1x1
was 8.95 Now 4.95
RIDES
RtDE NEEDED to Washington,
D C area leave anytime
tomorrow. March IB Will pay
tor gas Call Steve at 752 884
Lady Pirates Blow
Hurricanes Away
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
is offering a new look
in Spring hair Fashions
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
Phone 756-2950 or 756-4042
The lady Pirate
Softball team bleu the
I.ouisburg Hurricanes
avvav, 11-1, Wednes
day. and Fran Hooks
pitched her first
shutout with a 3-0 vic-
tory to sweep the
doubleheader.
In the first game,
the Lady Bucs scored
four runs each in the
first two innings, and
Louisburg had two in
the second inning,
giving the Pirates an
8-2 lead. Three more
runs in the third inn-
ing, however, sealed
the victory for the
Pirates.
The Bucs had nine
hits and made two er-
rors. Leading hitters
for ECU were Mitzi
Davi who went
2-for-2, slamming a
double and a triple.
Sandy Kee and
Melody Ham also
weni 2- for-3.
"We hit the ball
very well becuase we
got our hits
together said Head
Coach Sue Manahan.
"As in Florida, we
showed good depth.
The people on the
bench did a good job.
"It was a very good
way to start our home
season
ECU'S Jeannette
Roth pitched the first
two inning, while
Hooks came in to
pitch the final three.
In the second game,
the I ady Pirates
scored one run each in
the third, fourth and
fifth innings
Senior Cynthia
Shepard, who went
two-for-two, knocked
a homerun in the fifth
inning.
Wendy () m e n t
went three-for-three.
and Donna Panos was
two-for-three, with a
triple and a homerun.
"Fran Hooks
showed a lot of poise
in starting her in her
first game and pit-
ching a shutout
Manahan said.
"Donna Panos
(rightfield) had a lot
of power at the
played. She came
through with good
shots everytime at
bat.
"In spite of the
weather, the team
held together well
defensively.
Louisburg played well
in the second game,
which was difficult
after the first game
ECU upped its
record, 5-4. while
Louisburg fell, 2-4.
The Ladv Bucs play
next Tuesday at UNC-
Chapel Hill.
i
I
SPRING TUNE-UP SPECIAL
ONLY $12.00 Labor
includes Adjustments on Brakes,
Gears,Cones,iue Wheels,And Safety Check.
Check out the New 1983 line of Beach Cruisers
Studies in Daniel
Prophecy Seminar
THURSDAY NIGHTS
beginning MARCH 17 7:00p.m.
COFFEEHOUSE, Mendenhall Student Center
Questions pertaining to the
events of world history:
lo�o through the centuries.
prophecies found in the Book of
Daniel have death proven their
reliability.Their 100 accurate
portrayal of past events gives certain
confidence that perdictions reguarding
the near future will also come true.
Discover for yonrsetf what this biblical
prophet and author has to say about
our work) todav.
Questions that probe the
secrets of the future:
The studies in Daniel Seminar
consist of ten. weekly sessions, fcach
includes a lecture along with
stimulating, informal discussion
concerning prophecy and its
application to the final days of this
world's history.
I
Attend this Nationally Popular
Prophecy Seminar No Registration Fee
Forget Hard Days!
Wee Got a
Hard Days Night
Thursday, March 17th
at the
Carolina Opry House
Free Admission
Free Draft-ALL NIGHTLONG
Free club memberships given away
The very best in Solid Gold
Rock-n-Roll mth GregAllinson
We're Taking You
Back in Time
For the Time of Your Life!
i
We Cm Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL A DftUQ PBOOftAM
�0i SOSErwiiBidf
mmw






Title
The East Carolinian, March 17, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 17, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.256
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy