The East Carolinian, March 15, 1983






v
(Ufa l�uBt (Untalmmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.4rJ
Tuesday, March 15,1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Campus Rape
Suspect Indicted
By GREG HIDEOUT
Ne�� 14ilor
A Greenville man has been
charged in connection with the
March 4 rape of an ECU senior.
The assault occurred around 1:45
a.m. in the bathroom in the lobby
of Clement Residence Hall.
The 22-year-old women's name
is being withheld by police request
and because of East Carolinian
policy.
Billy Ray Warren, 26, of Route
1, Box 147, Greenville, will ap-
pear in District Court for a
preliminary hearing on March 19
He is charged with second degree
rape, which is punishable with up
to 40 years in jail. He is being held
without bail.
Warren, who had been banned
from campus earlier this year for
the attempted abduction of a
female student, had allegedly
gone to Clement dorm to sell
jeans (from a business he sup-
posedly operates) to the victim.
The women, who had met War-
ren previously, was called on the
phone. When she arrived in the
lobby, according to campus
police, she was grabbed by War-
ren and shoved into the women's
restroom across from the
elevators in Clement's lobby.
Detective Lt. Gene McAbee of
Campus Public Safety said the
women called his office after the
rape. He then went to the crime
scene and within four hours had a
warrant for Warren's arrest. War-
ren was arrested by Pitt County-
Sheriff officers early the next
morning at his home.
� � �
In an unrelated incident, an
ECU freshman was assaulted by
an unidentified man as she walked
from the west end of campus
towards Ninth Street. The
18-year-old women was grabbed
by the man on the median that
separates the library staff parking
lot from the day lot behind
Mendenhall Student Center.
The area was dimly lit because
of trees that blocked a streetlight.
The trees have since been cut
down.
1 t. McAbee said so far there
are no suspects in the case,
although they are investigating
Billy Ray Warren, the 26-year-old
Greenville man who was arrested
in connection with the Clement
lobby rape.
i
According to eyewitness and police reports, an unidentified Marine
in a car hit a campus security vehicle on College Hill and tried to elude
police by driving toward 10th Street late Monday afternoon. A three-
car accident occurred near the bottom of the hill when the suspect hit a
van, inflicting still more damage to the police car. All three cars were
towed from the scene, and the suspect was taken to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital. Details and formal charges were not available.
X'� r-v;?v ��� � Dut campus police speculated that the driver may be charged with dry-
ing under the influence and hit-and-run. A partially empty liquor bot-
tle was confiscated by police at the scene. (Photos by STAN LEAM I
- �i
3�5?i �cZ
Investigation Closed On Fatal Explosion
ECU Starts Fund
For Blast Victims
By PATRICK O'NEII 1
Sl�f( Wl r
An ECU Village Green
Emergency Fund has been started
to provide financial aid to
students who were displaced as a
result of the explosion that oc-
cured March 2.
According to Vice Chancellor
for Student Life Elmer Meyer, 52
ECU students, including one of
Meyer's children, were displaced
by the explosion. One hundred
three residents were left homeless.
The fund, which contains
$2,255, accumulated as a result of
donations from concerned people
in the community and an SGA ap-
propriation of $2,000. Meyer said
the seed for the emergency fund
was planted when a member of a
local servire club called Meyer
asking where donations could be
sent to aid the victims of the ex-
plosion which killed one ECU stu-
dent and injured a dozen others.
Meyer said all emergency ap-
peals for aid are being handled
through the ECU Financial Aid
Office. He said students who lived
in the Village Green apartments
who were displaced or injured by
the explosion are eligible to apply
for the money.
According to ECU'S Director
of Financial Aid Robert
Boudreaux, there is also other
emergency funds available to
students from institutional
scholarships that his office
oversees.
Boudreaux strongly emphasized
that only students with a
"reasonable need" for emergency
aid would be awarded the funds.
"As long as the student was
displaced by the explosion and has
a need, and it's a reasonable need,
I'm going to try to help them
Boudreaux said.
Five students have requested
aid so far. He said the money was
given to the students and would
not have to be paid back.
Boudreaux added that most of the
students were requesting funds to
replace books and supplies.
Boudreaux said that his office
would help students in areas
where their insurance companies
did not cover their loses.
Meyer said he has sent lists of
students displaced by the blast to
offices on campus.
Although many of the displaced
students were not living directly in
areas that received the most severe
damage, many were still
evacuated from the damaged
building because it was unsafe.
Both Meyer and Boudreaux
said the ECU Village Green
Emergency Fund was begun
because of public concern. Funds
were not solicited. "The con-
tributors started coming in
without anybody asking for
them Boudreaux said.
Boudreaux said that he had not
yet begun to use the money from
the Emergency Fund, but that he
would when the need arises.
Meyer said that anyone wishing to
make donations can do so by sen-
ding checks in care of the ECU
Financial Aid Office.
By DARRYL BROWN
Auulaai Nt� Idilor
The cause of the explosion at a
Village Green apartment complex
March 2 has been confirmed as a
gas leak from a dryer in the
building's laundry room, but
what actually ignited the blast
cannot be determined, according
to Greenulle Fire-Rescue Chief
Jenness Allen.
City police and fire in-
vestigators worked in conjunction
with the State Bureau of In-
vestigation and federal in-
vestigators to find the source of
the explosion, which killed one
ECU student and injured 12
others.
The inestigation is closed
because "nothing more can be
gotten from the site Allen said.
Only one ECU student, Richard
Seabolt, remains in Pitt County
Memorial Hospital after being in-
jured in the explosion. He is still
in the intensive care unit and is
listed in guarded condition. Of the
other ECU students injured in the
blast, the last two released from
the hospital. Michael Strother and
Hank Redecker, went home Mon-
day.
Property damage at the apart-
ment complex is estimated to be
over $500,000 and loss of personal
belongings to residents is exten-
sive. A spokesman for the Green-
ville Police Department said that
some personal property recovered
from the explosion site, which is
being stored by the police in a
nearby vacant apartment, had
been claimed, but many items
have not been picked up and peo-
ple are still turning in small ar-
ticles found in the area.
Some personal property was
destroyed in the blast, but
residents are free to look through
the the police department collec-
tion and claim remaining belong-
ings.
A special fund has been set up
by ECU with private and universi-
ty money and is available to
students in the explosion who re-
quire financial assistance for ach
expenses as books and pen
items.
Residents from the explosion
area have been relocated The ex
plosion completely destroyed
several apartments in the 60-unit
building and damaged others p-
proximately half of the units n
be inspewteu for structural
damage and possibly repaired
before being occupied again. The
apartments in the area are still
condemned and the area is closed
to traffic.
According to the Pitt County
Clerk of Court's office, no civil or
criminal lawsuits have been hied
regarding the explosion incident
Dean Resigns Post To Study Theology
The dean of the School of
Education, Richard W. Warner
Jr has been granted a leave of
absence from ECU to complete
theological studies leading to the
ministry in the Episcopal Church.
Having been a lay minister and
senior warden of the vestry of
parishes in Greenville and
Alabama for several years,
Warner, now 44, expects to be or-
dained into the priesthood within
the next two years.
Warner said that he has been
contemplating the priesthood for
some time. "I was heavily involv-
ed in church work here and in
Alabama before I came here I
knew that at some point in my life
I would seek ordination (into the
priesthood) Warner said. "I
was not certain when
"The more involved I became,
the more involved 1 wanted to be.
Finally, I decided that the church
is really where I am supposed to
be he added.
He was accepted as a postulant
while serving as associate dean for
academic affairs and professor of
counselor education at Auburn
University in Alabama in 1979,
the year before he was appointed
dean oi the ECU School of
Education.
Warner was accepted for a year
of theological studies in
December, when he decided to
become a priest.
He will begin his studies full
time in August at Virginia
Theological Seminary in Alexan-
dria, Va.
Acting Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs Angelo A.
Volpe. said he would appoint an
acting dean to assume ad-
ministrative responsibility after
Warner relinquishes his post and
that a search committee would be
formed to receive and screen ap-
plications for a new dean.
Warner will retain his tenured
professorship, and in the event he
should decide to return to ECU, it
would be as professor rather than
dean, Volpe said.
"I know that this is a decision
on Dr. Warner's part that has
been a long time in the making
and I wish him good fortune as he
pursues this new and laudable
goal Volpe said.
Warner said he is "immensely
proud" of many accomplishments
achieved during his deanship in
the School of Education, especial-
ly the establishing of the Rural
Education Institute.
Warner is married and the
father of three children. He is also
a licensed psychologist and cer-
tified mental health counselor.
Richard W. Warner
Financial Aid Office Not Requiring
Draft Registration Proof On Forms
SGA Gives Emergency Fund Grant
By GREG R1DEOLT
Npw� f dtir
The SGA Legislature voted
Monday night to give $2,000 to
the ECU Village Green Emergen-
cy Fund, which was set up by the
Financial Aid Office to help vic-
tims of the March 2 explosion that
!
The
Announcements
Editorial
Entertainment
Sports
Classifieds
Page 2
Page 4
Page 7
Page 10
Page 13
For a total recap of all the
ECAC-South Tournament ac-
tion see SPORTS page 10. The
Pirates won one game and
were defeated in the semi-
finals.
killed one student and injured 12.
The fund now has $2,255 dollars.
The bill, designed to help those
students who lost their homes and
possessions in the blast, was
originally introduced on the floor
as $2,4O0-lcfan fund. Money, up
to $150 per student, was to be
�iven to students based on need.
An amendment to the bill was
immediately proposed by Senior
Class President David Cook to
reduce the amount available to be
loaned to $1,200. He argued that
the need was not there to warrant
a $2,400 appropriation. The
amendment was defeated by a
near-unanimous voice vote.
After more debate concerning
the need of the money and the
length of time the loan fund
should operate, a friendly
(non-voted on proposal if the
bill's sponsor agrees to it) amend- issue. The proposal with be voted
ment was introduced to change on in the March 21 meeting.
By DARRYL BROWN
AmIiUsI Sew Editor
A federal judge in Minnesota
last week blocked execution of a
law requiring proof of draft
registration in order to receive
financial aid. The ECU Financial
Aid Office and similar college
departments around the country
are now uncertain of their respon-
sibilities, procedures and obliga-
tions regarding the law.
Robert Boudreaux, director of
financial aid at ECU, said his of-
fice is not requiring proof of
registration compliance on the ad-
vice of the National Association
of Financial Aid Administrators,
who said neither the federal
government nor institutions
should have the authority to col-
lect information regarding
registration compliance.
"We're not planning to enforce
lilt lu�.� wcue anything now " Boudreaux said,
that would state the legislature's The policy of the ECU office, ac-
opposition to raising the drinking cording to Boudreaux, is to accept
age in North Carolina. The move applications with proof of corn-
was made to further study the pKance if the student voluntarily
gives it, but to not require the
statement. The office will give
the appropriation from a loan to a
grant and to reduce it to $2,000.
The final version was then pass-
ed by consent, which means no
one objected to the bill. The
money will be given by the SGA to
the ECU Village Green Emergen-
cy Fund as a grant. The finacial
aid office will dispense the money
according to need.
Speaker of the House Gary
Williams said the legislature
should "feel good about" the bill.
He said the action was part of the
SGA's job of helping the campus
community.
The SGA also voted to
postpone debate on a proposal by
the Student Welfare Committee
students forms to request written
verification of registration from
the Selective Service System, but
the procedure is not mandatory at
this time.
Written verification should be
sent to males upon registration,
but for those who have lost it.
another copy can be obtained
from the Selective Service.
Boudreaux expects the uncer-
tainty of the law's legality to cause
delays in financial aid procedures
this year, as court action could
drag on for months before the
issue is settled. "It's going to be a
big delay predicted Boudreaux.
"We're really at a standstill
The injunction issued by the
Minnesota judge technically only
blocks the law in his district, but
the ruling sets a precedent that
could be followed around the
country and influence higher
courts' decisions.
Boudreaux said most people
were signing the statement of
registration compliance on their
request forms for financial aid,
and he speculated that most of
those who did not sign did so
unintentionally. He said the office
always receives some forms which
are not complete.
The federal regulation, propos-
ed by Secretary of Education Ter-
rel H. Bell and Director of the
Selective Service Thomas K Tur-
nage, would make all students fil-
ing for financial aid state that they
have registered with the Selective
Service or are exempt from
registration because they are
female, on active duty in the
military or are too young or old to
be required to register.
The rule linking registration to
student aid was proposed after
debate over how to enforce a
federal law insisting that any
students required to register for
the draft do so before receiving
any Title IV federal aid funds.
The rule was signed into law by
President Reagan in September as
part of the Defense Department
Authorization Act.
Controversy has arisen in recent
weeks regarding the moral as well
as legal aspects of the registration
requirement.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 15, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed m the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send if to
The East Carolinian m care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd s.zed paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment wil run as long as you
vani and suggest that you do not
rely solely on tn.s column for
publicity
The deadline tor an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
� or the Tuesday paper ano 3
p m Aednesdayy tor "he Thurs
day paper No announcements
received alter these deadlines
will be printed
Th.s space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
INTERNAL AUDITING
LECTURE SERIES
Guest speakers trom the
Raleigh Durham Chapter ot the
institute of Internal Auditors
w'H be on our campus as in
dicafed below All faculty and
students are welcome to attend
The lecture series is scheduled
to be heid m Rawl 339 at 4 30
p m on tne dates indicated
March 3 introduction to in
iernai Auditing Ai FusseM
General Auditor, Planters Na
�onai Bank and Trust Co
March U 17 Founaations tor
Internal Auditing, instructor
Sob Barry CPA MCM Corpora
tion. Occidental L.fe of SC
EVER DREAMEDOF
FLYING?
Make theat dream come true
The Department ot intramural
Recrea'ona. Services with the
cooperation of Kitty Hawk Kites
will be ottering a hang gliding
tr.p to Nags Head NC on March
26 A beginning instruction class
will be offered as wen as an ad
vanced class
Registration tor the trip will
taken at the Outdoor Recreat.on
Center .113 Memorial Gym
Through March 17 Payment
must accompany registration
All equtptrnent and transporta
t.on w.li be provided
The beginning course will cost
141 40 w th an additional J2v 00
charge for tne advanced course
it you elect to take it For more
intormation concern.ng tne trip
can or stop by the center or
phone '57 6911 Hours i 00 5 00
Monday and Friday and 2 00
4 00 Tuesday Wednesday and
Thursday
BINGOICE CREAM
The Department of university
Unions is sponsor,ng another
Bingo .ce Cream Party on Tues
day March 15. 1983 at 7 00 PM
in the Mendenhall Student
Cen'er Muiti Purpose Room All
students, tacui'y staff and
their dependents are welcome
The admission this time only
will be 50 cents Prizes will in
elude tickets o concerts artis'
series events 'he acting com
pany, and recreat on passes
The Grand Pr ze drill be a free
trip to Kings Dom.n.on
Come and eniov the delicious
ice cream and try your luck at
winning some of these prizes
Bring a friend'
NEED A JOB?
Freshmen and Sophomores it
you need a iOb and can type at
least 60 words a minute with tew
mistakes contact the Produc
tions Manager at the East
Carolinian between 3 00 and
6 00 757 6366. 6367 or 6309
CO-OP
A representative from the Na
tionai institute of Health (NIH'
will be on campus March 15 and
16 to recruit students for the
Normal Volunteer Program
NORMAL volunteers serve as
research subiects and also
assist NIH professionals m
various research subiects This
is an execeilent opportunity for
students .ntersted in human
pysioiogical research to gain
first hand experience All m
terested students must attend a
general meeting March 15. m
terviews are Varcfi 16 Please
call 757 6979 or come by the
Cooperative Education Office.
Rawl 313 tor additiorai details
MOVEATHON
Gamma Beta Phi presents the
second annual Move A Thon on
Saturday march 26 from 9 am a
pm All proceeds go to the the
North Carolina Burn Center m
Chapel Hill You can ride a bike
roller skate walk or iog Toob
tain a sponsor sheet or informa
tion an Lisa or Amy ?52 733S
ECU IRATES
ECU IRates wHI host their
first ultimate tournament
Natural Light uitimax March
26 and 27 Come out and see
some of the best ultimate trisbee
to be played on the east coast
�his year The dub participated
.n a tournament at Florida Stafe
University over spring break
We had some discouraging
moments on the field, but are
better ultimate players for It
Scoring a big 3 points against
Duke was a highlight of the
weexeno Keep 11 up irates
CAR WASH
The ECU Archery club Will be
having a car wash Saturday
March 19 at the Dodges Store
3210 South Memorial Dr.ve The
funds raised wm be used to Du�
new equ'Ptment tor the club So
come on out and get your car
washed tor only 3 dollars
TO KILL A
MOCKINGBIRD
To Kill A Mockingbird will
be shown on Thursday March 17
at the Method.st Student Center
at 8 00 p m as par ot the conti
nuing Thursday N'ght Flicks
program A d;scusson
follow the movie and
refreshments wii be served
GAMMA BETA PHI
This bwefkiy meeting has
Deen se aside entire. for the
purpose ot inducting new
TiemDers and tnsTan g new ot
'icers 11 �r-ill be held on Thurs
d�v, Mrcr 17 n room 744 MSC
As was nc tec a The last
meetng seating s tight and only
memws are ted Fa-i'es
taking pictures should do so
after The mee'ng at wh-ch tme
there wit1 be a receptor, with
cake and d"ns provided
HISTORY
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Department of History
would like to call attention to
scholarships which are offered
m the Department of History for
1983 84
The Richard Cecil Todd
Scholarship Awards for
members ot Lambda Eta
Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta are
awarded annually to members
enrolled full time at East
Carolina University and who
demonstrated outstanding ser
vice to Lambda Eta Chapter of
Phi Alpha Theta, the History
Department and the University
The award is open to both
undergraduates and graduates
who are members of Phi Alpha
Theta A maximum of two 1500
awards may be granted each
academic year
Qualified members may apply
at the History Department office
n Brewster A 316
Applications must be submit
ted by April 15, 1983
The Joseph E and Catherine
E Hirsch Memorial Award in
History is awarded annually to a
maior in the Department of
History who is considered the
most promising junior, based
upon the following criteria
Scholarship to be
measured in terms of the overall
quality of their work in the study
of history
Promise to be measured in
terms of their positive atitudes
towards themselves and their
academic discipline.
Motivation to learn and im
prove and their general future
potential both as an individual
and as a student of history
The purpose of this award is to
provide the recipients with a
sum of money with which to buy
textbooks and any other books
related to his academic courses
of sdtudy It is hoped that said
cooks will become a part of a
permanent collection, either in
the recipient's personal library
or in some other established
library
Qualified students may apply
for the Hirsch Memorial Award
at the Office of the History
Department in Brewster A 316
Deadline for applications is
Apr.l 15 1983
Five Richard Cecil Todd
Scholarships lor
undergraduates scholars in
History will be granted for the
academic year 83 84 All ap
plicants must be students enroll
eo full time at East Carolina
University and be declared
history maiors who are m their
lunior or senior year Recipients
will be considered on the oasis of
scholarship citizenship, and
need
Each award will be for tne
amount of S500 00 per year in
terested students may apply for
the scholarship at the History
Department, Brewster A 316
Deadline is April 15. 1983
CADP
There will be a meeting in
Mendenhall Student Center
Thursday at 4 15. Room 221 it is
mportant that an members at
tend
BEST LEGS
it's here this 'S your chance to
show off those thighs Support
your organization and win ter
r.fic pr zes Photographs will be
taken March 15 31 For more in
formation call the AOll House
Today '
POST SPRING BREAK
BASH
The brothers of Kappa Sigma
would like to invite you to their
Post Spring Break Basn on
Wednesday March 16 at tne
Elbo The party lasts from
9 until with reduced beer prices
See YOU There
HOMECOMING
COMMITTEE
Applications art now being ac
cepted for the 1983 Student
Homecoming Committee
Chairperson Applications can
be picked up at either the
Mendenhall Information Center
or the Alumni Center The
deadline for applying for this
position is Friday, March 18,
1983
BASKETRY
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a Basketry
Workshop to begin Wednesday,
March 16, 1983 The workshop is
free to members of the
Mendenhall Student Center
Crafts Center All ECU students
faculty, staff, and their
dependents who are 18 years of
age or older are eligible and
welcome to ioin the Crafts
Center at a cost of J10 00 per
semester
The Basketry Workshop will
be held on Wednesday evenings,
March 16, 23, 30, April 6 and 13,
1983 from 6:00 9 00 PM The in-
structor is Mary Ann Hutto
Sign up at the MSC Crafts
Center between the hours of 3 10
PM Monday through Friday and
12N 5 PM Saturdays
For further information call
Linda Barkano, MSC Crafts and
Recreation Director at 757 611
ext 260 After 5 PM call the
Crafts Center at ext 271
STUDENTS FOR
CHRIST
Lets get back to the Bible! In
forma' Group Bible discussions
Mens 110 Belk, Tuesday 7 30
p.m Women 212 Mendenhall.
Thursday 7 30 p.m Everybody
is welcome'
INTER VARSITY
CHR ISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
I know you've probably seen
those IVCF T shirts walking
around on campus and you re
probably wonoermg what rhey
are all about, wen here s your
chance! Come ioin us this
Wednesday at 6 30 m the
Boiogy Bldg N 102
SGA POSITIONS STILL
AVAILABLE
The SGA currently has the
following openings for Dorm
representative 2) White, (1)
Jones til Fletcher and il)
Tyler If interested In any of the
positions can Kirk Shelley at
756 6029 or apply in the SGA of
fice
CO-OP
ACM. ECU Chapter, invites
everyone to learn more about
the opportunity cooping Ex
perience is something we all
need before graduating 1 The
meeting is March 17 at 3 30 In
room 132 Austin Please come
learn more about this from Ms
Carol Collins
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RESIDENCE HALL
HOUSING
Students enrollen Spring
Semested 1983 who plan to
return to East Carolina Univer-
sity Fall Semester 1983 and who
wish to be guaranteed residence
hall housing will be required to
reserve rooms during the week
of March 21 25 Prior to reserv
ing a room, a student must make
an advance room payment of
IM 00 These payments, wttich
must be accompanied by hous
mg applications contracts will
be accepted in the Cashier's Of
fice, Room 105 Spilman Biulding
beginning March 17 Students
now living in redidence should
obtain housing applications
from their residence hall office
Students residing off campus
should obtain the applications
from the Office of Housing
Operations. Room 201.
Whichard Building These will
be available beginning March
15
Room reservations are to be
made In the respective
residence hall offices according
to the following schedule
(Exceptions Assignments tor
Fleming Hall will be made n
Jarvis Hall and those for
Unstead Hall will be made m
Slay Hall )
ASSIGNMENT SCHEDULE
Students who wish to return to
the same rooms they presently
occupy must reserve such
rooms on Monday. March
21 8 30 a m to 12 30 p m and
I 30pm to 4 00 p m and Tues
day. March 22 8 30 a m to 12 30
p m
Students who wish to return to
the same building .n which they
presently reside but different
rooms anc the students who are
being required to move trom
their current areas ano, or
Duildmgs bue to reconfiguration
of the residence halls will be per
mifted to reserve rooms on
Tuesday, March 22 1 30 p m to
4 00 p m
All other returning students
will be permitted to reserve
rooms on a first come , first
bas.s on Wednesday, March 23,
Thursday March 24 and Friday.
March 25 8 30 am to 12 30
p m and 1 30 p m to 4 00 p m
The number of unassigned
rooms in each Building will be
posted on the respectiveoffice
door by � 00 p m . Tuesday
While the residence hall room
rent is subiect to change for the
1983 84 School Year, if is an
ticipated at this time that if will
remain at S43S 00 per semester
MARKETING FILM
SERIES
The American Marketing
Association and the Department
of Marketing present Part 2 of a
Marketing Film Series. The
films will provide information
about marketing opportunities
and will show relevance of
marketing to corporate obiec
fives and mettiods of operation
The series will be shown in Rawl
130 at 3 00 on March 23 and
Topics will include Advertising
and Promotion" on the 23rd and
"Sales Management" on me
24th All interested students are
invited to attend
AMERICAN
MARKETI NG
ASSOCIATION
The American Marketing
Association will meet in
Mendenhall 221 at 5 00 on
Wednesday, March 16. 193 A
speaker from Naegele Advertis
ing Co will share information
concerning outdoor advertising
All members are urged to at
tend
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general
meeting on Wed , March 16,1983
The meeting will be held in tne
multi purpose room of
Mendenhall at 5 00 p m Live
entertainment wi! oe provided
.the skit you've ail heard
about and sign up shee's wit
be available Pr.zes for high
point totals win also be discuss
ed This is a meeting you iust
can not afford to this1
JEWELRY MAKING
The Department of university
Unions is sponsoring a Jeweiry
Making course for members of
the Menoennaii Student Center
Crafts Center The course will
be offerd or Wednesdays March
16, 23. 30. April 6. 13 at 6 OC
PM 9 00 PM The cost for me
membership is S10 00 and an
ECU stuaents, faculty, staff
and their dependents who are
Mendenhall Student Center
Members may register in the
Crafts Center on tne bottom
ttoor of MSC between me nours
Of 3 00 PM 10 00 PM Monday
through Friday anc 12 00 noon
5 00 PM on Saturday
For more information call
Linda Beroand.at 757 6611 ext
260 (after 5 00 PM call me Craft
Center at ext 271
STAN LANDERS
ECU'S own Stan Landers will be
signing autographs Wednesday
in the secono floor bathroom aT
Mendenhall from 2 to 4 p m Br
ing a pen paper win be provd
ed
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and
Placement Service m the Biox
ton House is offering the follow
ng one hour sessions to help you
prepare your own resume
March 17. 1983 Thursday 3 00
pm March 21. 1983 Won
day 1 00pm Those
seniors or graduate students
finishing this year and planning
to register with us are urged to
attend You may come to me
Bioxton House at any of the
above times
BUSINESS
ADMISSIONS
For those students who do not
meet School of Business adrrns
Sion cr.ter a during tne
February 21 March 4 1983
Change of Maior there will be a
one day change ot maior period
on july 1 1983 tor those students
who then meet he School of
Business admiss.on crifer a
Those students who �.u be or
campus on Juiy 1 may reques'
admission to the schoot of
business by follow ng the Stan
aard procedure
Those stuoents who arill no1 oe
on campus on Juiy 1 '983 but
think they will meet 'he School
ot Business admissions re
quirements at tne end of the cur
rent semester may apply to
change ther maior by follow.ng
th s procedure
1 Pnor to'eavmg campus'his
semester pick up your f te trom
your advisor
2 Take your fife to the depart
men'ai secretary in Accounting.
Decsion Science, Finance
Management or Market.ng as
aopropriate
3 While in the departmental
office fill out the form to request
a change of maior evaluation
If you meet School of Business
requirements, you will be admit
ted on July I. 1983 and an ad
v.sor will be assigned if you ao
not meet the requirements your
file will be returned to the
General Cotteoe
When you return to school in
August, check the appropriate
departmental bullet.n board tor
your advsor assignmen
PAGEANT
Miss N C Southern Beau'y
Pageant1 The search ks on fo'
contestants Ages I 24 years
oid Each age d.v.von iim.feo
and MM deadline date April 1
1983 The pagean' s scheduled
to oe held April 29 30 1983 H
High Pomt, N C AH young
ladies are inved to paropafe
Age divisions are 13. 4 6 7 9
10 12. 13 1. 17 24 State winner
in each age Division w,n rece-ve
a cash scholarship crown
tropn, oanner ano flowers, also
other awards win oe presented
For reformation send a stamped
self addressed Long enveooe
to Miss N C Sou'hem Beaur,
pageant P O Bo 5432
Greensboro N C 27435 0432
The pnone s 919 294 0295
CHEERLEADER
TRY OUTS
The East Caroi.na unive's �
Varsity cheerleader ryouts w '
be held at 7 30 p m on Tuesda.
March 29 1983. on he ma-n floor
of Memcr ai Gym
The first prac'ice sess.on
be held at 5 00 on Aednevoay
March 16 at 'he east fna o
Mmges Couseum An guys and
g.ris interested m try.ng ouT tor
'he 1983 �4 sq-ad shou's be pre
sent at this f.rst prac ce ses
s or
ECU BAHAI CLUB
The ECu B�"a asssoc a or
wm me�' or Tjesaay Mar I!
from 1100 re noo"
Menoenha'i 241 The o�na '
�eacnes 'hat he Founders o a
the ma or wor.a 'e g os we'e
progressively sent trom one
Creator o nstruc a aeve op ng
the human roce You a'e cor
dually "v tea o share
thoughts with js Anyone Hi
'eres'ed in weicome to attend
For more informa 0" Can
752 443 or 752-101
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
VOLUNTEERS
The Spacia' Olympics pro
gram of Greenville and P
Count, ,s making preparations
tor the-r spring games to be ne c
April 14 1983 at e Eas'
Caroi.na Track .Bunng c aM
individuals or groups erested
m volunteer,ng tc help eitt) tne
Special Olympics shouid cor'act
Bin Tw.ne at 752 4137 ext 201
D' Dave Pore'ta a 75: 64'
The East Carolinian
Published eve
and Thursday Jur - .
academe year ana
yVednescat 9ur '�
mer
The East Care, "a- .
offic a newspaper of Eav
Carolina Lin ve's � a
ooera'ed &rtc cc sr,
and bt ne s'uoe
Caroina utmwers
Subscription Rate tMyeai �
The East Carolian aft i
are located in the Old Sen
Building on the campus M
ECU Greenville. N C
POSTMASTER Sen
cress changes �
Car: r gr
Bu,id g EC J Sreer �
NC 27834
Telephone 7S7 �U 4ie
PSI CHI
The n.T af or o 'e. rn
ano eiectio" of 193 84 Ds :
ficers arill take place a' tot
Steer Tenfh Street
Wed Marc � f
Members arc - ' ?"�-�, da. �
their on a nne's " � 4
te' e rna-s- .
new t.ates are t
V IW "he aeac ry �
Ch. schoiarsh p aco
i-r i , mer-oers a-r -
� a'es nte-estec - -
a- o1 ce cw "93 64 a-e �: mei
- -ny. PS C r'i't Sc
202 or Mon Ma a' .
am oH.ces ava � �
Eres jff � :e ces ae'
�fjr, � � e a s � ' e' I
zra' ar Psi Cti S now se
�j" e :�es c Jts g) n
0' :es A �emrje-S3 -
� a'es are 'jec -c Support -
CH r;y com ng by �e Ps
a ano c ct "g aarr
� :�e's ho sen at S 50 ea
J! OC'
MEDIA BOARD
The PAea'a Boaro s now ac
cepfing applications for ifaj $4
Media -leads tor the follow ng
"�"ed ors t Eas Caroi.n.ar
The Eoony Heraic Reoe' fwoto
Lab and WZMB -ad.o sta' an
P,c� uo applications - "�
Med a Board off ce oetwee- "�
nrs ofH" '�: P"t ana or" 5
pm Dead ne t0r accec' ng
pi.caons s Marc" '9 a" I I
Forget Hard Days!
We've Got a
Hard Days Night
Thursday, March 17th
at the
Carolina Opry House
Free Admission
Free Draft-ALL NIGHT LONG
Free club memberships given away
The very best in Solid Gold
Rock-n-Roll with Greg Allinson
We're Taking You
Back in Time
For the Time of Your Life!
WIMTERVILLE
JKEES
BUSY
�UK MB
� run
I a
I II
! Wheel
.OiUpT.K
March 31
March 31
� WGOODfYEARi!
j �MLBHBT.H CIMTIMHBHB ,
I OfWCULWC. f Mr�, rrATlO I
I DOWNTOWN WWTENOj
I Tnmrm-tnV.uk�tmacn� i
7564371!
1752-4417
DONT
FORGET YOUR CAR!
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
t
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
��aaaaMBaaM
Pizza Ixui
Greenville's Best Pizzas
Now Being Delivered
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6246 Greenville Blvd.
Are
North Carolina and
Virginia
Breakfast of Champions
?????????????????????????a �������.�.�
ie Great North Carolina
State Wolf pack!
"Let me Run with the Pack"
Geep
World
B PATRICK O'M.I I I
Maft Mnio
Mi
I
While students rre Foreign A
polishing their tan
Florida of skiing in
Colorado, the nc-
ent on. The follow-
ing is a summu
national, state
local events of con-
cern to ECU students
rORI I)
March 3: h
sided vote oi 324-193
the Ho. of
Representative . a
ed a $4 9 billion
emergence anti-
recession bill designed
to create 400,00
manent - 5701
million in emerge-
housing, food
health care for i
of the recession
Mar 3 hxpelled
Soviet writer A
ander Solzhenit
was announced �
ner of the 198
Templeton prize
progress in re -
Solzhenitsyn. w -
received S rO.OOO
prize money, ha i
won a Nobel prize for
literature.
March 6: Re-elected
West German
Chancellor H
Kohl said his �
confirmed hi ck
mination to pern
the stationing of I v
nuclear missiles
West German
Also, it �a- ;
ed that the a:
nuclear envioi
talisi partv known .
the "Greens j
control Z
parliaments
March 8.
Department
Defence claims
military might of the
Soviet Union is in-
creasing. Defense
Secretary Casper
Weinberger quoted a
1CP page document
ihat he claims shows
recent gains in the
capability oi Soviet
defense.
March 8: Pope
John Paul II ended
his eight day Central
American trip todav
with stops in Belize
and Haiti. During his
trip the Pope pledged
the Catholic Church
will work for social
mstice and human
rights in the region
and urged Church
leaders to stay oul
government occupa-
tions

sent
year
.

A me:
bene:
for
bene'
67
- V.
thai

only
the p
Ma
ned
as
.
i �
me
taken I
the age oi
M .
CiOverruiK
ex r .
dip
0borne
was w
"red-r
Ma
the
celeb
days
t
M ,
summit
100
tions rJ
$'
Yo(
Caj
Comm
Ride
coi
r





THE EAST CAROL INIAS
MAR H 15. 1983
Phone.
.enclosed
1 . . �.�I�,
. - -f
. 1 �� -1�
t
r
1 L J i 1
I'v
I hi KunJ I arolinian
uesday
ng The
I ever
�� Eas'
East
.
SvO�'BOn Rat J30 yearly
The Eas Cardigan offices
e3 r 'he Old South
Budi"9 or he campus of
ECU Grenv,ile N C
' � -
jei I he E as
South
. .
IRlEAuER
Y OUTS
PSI CHI
"etiers
si Ch
Aeste
lLOLYMPICS
tUNTEERS
I
elp wih

� . . �' "os s
ers and ifi
g for
� � , � )314 j'e I -nee'
: �
v
. tot are
lent
and
- i.

- . ind new in
�� ts
- � � � SO1
it J 50 each or 3 to'
MEDIA BOARD
Tn� eea a Boara s r-ov. a,
ceptng aDpi'caVorvs tor 1983
AAec a Hea� or e tOiCArVng
� - - . - s ����? Easl Cro4irtf�n,
10
iTalOU
BUSY?
ent
$1388
Mm:
���� i
I ST ATOM
WESTEM0
icerrt
YOUR CAR!
�����������������


4.
Carolina and
ginia if
1st of Champions J



North Carolina
Wolf pack!


un with the Pack

Geep J

World News Summary
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Maff �rnrr
While students were
polishing their tans in
Florida of skiing in
Colorado, the news
went on. The follow-
ing is a summary of
national, state and
local events of con-
cern to ECU students.
WORLD
,
March 3: By a lop-
sided vote of 324-195
the House of
Representatives pass-
ed a $4.9 billion
emergency anti-
recession bill designed
to create 400.000 per-
manent jobs and $700
million in emergency
housing, food and
health care for victims
of the recession.
March 3: Expelled
Soviet writer Alex-
ander Solzhenitsyn
was announced win-
ner of the 1983
Templeton prize for
progress in religion.
Solzhenitsyn, who
received $170,000
prize money, has also
won a Nobel prize for
literature.
March 6: Re-elected
West German
Chancellor Helmut
Kohl said his victory
confirmed his deter-
mination to permit
the stationing of U.S.
nuclear missiles on
West German soil.
Also, it was confirm-
ed that the anti-
nuclear environmen-
talist party known as
the "Greens" gained
control of 27
parliamentary seats.
March 8: The
Department of
Defence claims the
military might of the
Soviet Union is in-
creasing. Defense
Secretary Casper
Weinberger quoted a
107 page document
that he claims shows
recent gains in the
capabilities of Soviet
defense.
March 8 Pope
John Paul 11 ended
his eight day Central
American trip today
with stops in Belize
and Haiti. During his
trip the Pope pledged
the Catholic Church
will work for social
justice and human
rights in the region
and urged Church
leaders to stay out of
government occupa-
tions.
March 8: By a vote
f 27 to 9 the House
Foreign Aid Commit-
tee endorsed a resolu-
tion supporting a
nuclear freeze. The
resolution will now be
sent to the House
floor where the vote is
expected to be close.
Last year a similar
nuclear freeze pro-
posal was defeated by
two votes.
March 9: A bill ap-
proved in the House
today provided $165.3
billion for social
security. The rescue
bill will mean higher
payroll taxes for
Americans, a curb in
social security
benefits and will raise
the age of eligibility
for retirement
benefits from 65 to
67.
March 9: After a
lengthy battle laced
with controversy and
rumor Anne Burford,
head of the En-
vironmental Protec-
tion Agencv, resign-
ed. President Reagan
said he accepted Bur-
ford's resignation
"with great regret
March 9: Two Los
Angeles medical doc-
tors were acquitted of
murder charges stem-
ming from their
removal of an in-
travenous fluid
feeding apparatus
that was keeping their
patient alive. The doc-
tors claimdd they were
only acting on instruc-
tions given them by
the patient and his
family.
March 9: Per-capita
cigarette smoking
declined by 2.4 per-
cent last year, to
slightly more than 187
packs per person. The
meabuiement is onl
taken for people over
the age of 18.
March 9: Soviet
Government, officials
expelled U.S.
diplomat Richard
Osborne because he
was allegedy seized
"red-handed" with
spy equipment.
March 10: Barney-
Clark, who received
the world's first ar-
tificial heart,
celebrated his first 100
days with the new
organ.
March 12: The
summit meeting of
100 non-aligned na-
tions wrapped up its
conference in India
with a series of at-
tacks on the U.S. The
55-page declaration
released by summit
leaders criticized the
U.S. for its support of
right-wing regimes in
Central America. The
same document gave a
much weaker state-
ment regrading Soviet
occupation in
Afghanistan.
March 12: Former
Green Beret James
"Bo" Gritz, who has
led a vigilante search
for missing American
prisioners of war in
Indochina, returned
to the U.S. today.
Gritz was quickly
whisked away by
waiting FBI agesnts
before he was able to
meet with the press.
March 12:
American Black
leaders meeting in
Atlanta say they are
trying to come up
with a platform to lay
before the Democratic
party to defeat
Ronald Reagan. Some
such as the Rev. Jesse
Jackson even sug-
gested the possibility
of supporting a black
presidential can-
didate.
STATE
March 3: U.S. Cen-
sus figures show the
number of people liv-
ing on farms in North
Caraolina has drop-
ped dramatically from
1970-1980. The new
figures show 188,437
people, or 3.2 percent
of the state's popula-
tion, lived on farms in
1980. compared to
about 10 percent or
530.316 people in
1970. National figures
showed a drop of a
third during the same
period. State leaders
claim the decline was
primarily caused by
larger farms buying
out smaller ones.
March 4: Despite
heavy lobbying by
conservative groups,
the N.C. House of
Representatives pass-
ed a resolution calling
for a nuclear arms
freeze. The measure,
which passed by a
vote of 65-48, urges
congress and the
president to seek a bi-
lateral, verifiable
freeze on the nuclear
arsenals of the United
States and the Soviet
Union. Gov. James B.
Hunt was opposed to
the measure.
March 4: Five more
people were arrested
on charges ranging
from tresspassing to
larceny as small pro-
tests continued at the
PCB hazardous waste
site in Afton, N.C.
Kenneth Ferruccio,
leader of a citizens
group, was held on
$4,000 bail for
charges stemming
from the theft of a
pump used to remove
excess water from the
lnadfill site which op-
ponents claim is con-
taninated.
March 5: The
makers of Coors beer
announced that the
popular Colorado
brew would be com-
ing to North Carolina
this week.
March 5: A group
of N.C. Southern
Baptists formed an
organization called
the N.C. Group of
Moderates. Their is to
counteract a conser-
vative swing in their
denomination.
March 7: University
of Tennessee
microbiologists claim
they have found
bacteria that can
decompose PCB's, a
long lasting chemical
compound believed to
cause cancer. Resear-
chers hope the
bacteria will remove
the need for landfill
storage of the
chemical.
March 11: UNC-
Chapel Hill scientists
reported that sup-
plements of vitamin
B-12 can bring
dramatic imporve-
ment to some people
suffering fom mental
illness.
March 11: Dr.
Leroy T. Walker, a
physical education
professor who built a
national reputation as
a track coach, was
named as interun
chancellor of N.C.
Central University.
March 11: Students
entering University of
North Carolina this
fall must pass parts of
the National Teacher
examinations by the
et 3 of their
sophomore year to be
accepted into a
teaching education
program.
LOCAL
March 3: Dr. John
R. Ball was appointed
associate dean of the
School of Allied
Health and Social
Professions and the
director of the Divi-
sion of Social Work at
ECU. Ball's duties
will include organiz-
ing and directing the
development of the
new master's degree
program in social
work scheduled to
begin this fall.
March 5: Former
democratic Sen.
Robert B. Morgan
and ECU Chancellor
Emeritus Dr. Leo
Jenkins have been
choosen to receive
ECU'S first honorary
degrees during the
university's 74th com-
mencement exercises
May 6.
March 5: The ECU
Board of Trustees
adopted a resolution
expressing "Deep
Sympathy" to the
family of ECU stu-
dent David B. Martin,
who was killed during
the explosion at
Village Green apart-
ments on March 2.
March 5: Assets of
the ECU Foundation
increased by more
than $340,000 last
year and now total
over $1.3. The ECU
Foundation provides
private sector funding
for university pro-
grams with emphasis
upon maintaining and
enhancing excellence.
March 8: Several
local citizens in-
cluding ECU instruc-
tor Edith Webber and
student Susan Menius
went to Washington
DC. to visit the office
of First District Con-
gressman Walter
Jones. They were part
of a national lobbying
day devoted to sup-
port of the nuclear
freeze resolution.
March 10: ECU En-
vironmental Health
Department Chair-
man Dr. Trenton G.
Davis was named a
member of the N.C.
Board of Sanitarian
Examiners.
March 10: Seven
Pitt County residents
were appointed to the
state's newly formed
Citizens concerned
for Higher Education
Committee.
YOGI
tfUSTS YOU
AT
tngs
dominion
Yogi wants you at King's Dominion for East
Carolina University Student-Faculty Day on
April 16,1983. The Student Union Travel
Committee is sponsoring a irip to King's Dominion.
Ride all day, eat all you like, for just a small fee.
For more information,
contact the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall
Student Center, at 757-6611, ext 266.
I
ADVERTISED
iTEM POUO
Each of thaaa advaetiMd rtams it raquirad to b readily available for aala
bakw the advertised price m each AAP Store, except as specifically noted
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED Sat. MARCH 19 GR E F N V I LLE,NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
at or
o
70UR fi&P COUNTBY STORE
DOUBLE COUPONS
FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND, WE WILL DOUBLE
3 MANUFACTURERS COUPONS. EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 3 COUPONS.
S20 PURCHASE 6 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 30 COUPONS.
Between no. and March 19 we will redeem national
manufacturer t cents-oft coupons up to SO lor
double their value Otter good on national manu-
facturers cents-off coupons only (Food retailer
coupons not accepted I Customer must purchase
coupon product In specified size Expired coupons
will not be honored One coupon per customer per
item No coupons accepted for tree merchandise
Otter does not apply to A&P or other store coupons
whether manufacturer is mentioned or not When
the value of the coupon exceeds SO or the retail
of the item, this ofter is limited to the retail price
Savings are Great with A&P's
DOUBLE SAVINGS COUPONS!
MFCS
COUPON
MFC
CENTS OFF
TOTAL
A&P ADDED COUPON
CENTS OFF AT A&P
COUPON A
25'
25'
COUPON B
COUPON C
COUPON 6
18'
U.S.D.A.
J
INSPECTED FRESH
Whole Fryers
'�!�&
Fre�n With Quality
CALIFORNIA SWEET & JUICY SEEDLESS
Navel
Oranges
15100
113 I
size �
IMPORTED DIRECTLY FROM CHILE
Seedless Grapes
WASHINGTON STATE RED
Delicious Apples
Jumbo
80
size
lb.
Bounty Towels
79c
DESIGNER
ASSORTED
big
roll
KRAFT QUARTERS V
Parkay Margarine
2 I00
mm pkgs I
DIET PEPSI � MTN. DEW � OR
8 Pepsi Cola
16 oz. Carton 1.49 Plus Deposit
Bottles
GOOD only in Greenville
ALL NATURAL
Ice
Breyer's cream
-L
V2 gal.
ctn.
SUPER SAVER COUPON
CICMT
0 CLOCK
COFFf�
REGULAR
y
SAVE 90 ON Bean
Eight O'clock -� �,
LB GOOD THRU SAT MARCH 19 AT AR LIMITONWTTHOUPON AND 50ORDER
Pay Only O
"29-
628
�f





Sty iEaat (Earnlfnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mil i er. c,enr,ul
Mike Hughes, wj
WAVERLY MERRITT, otmcm, ltf.n.i�m ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sport, �r
SCOTT LlNDLEY, tmmm Mmm GREG RlDEOUT, Ntm EOnr
Al i Afrashteh, o� Ha� Steve Bachner, tmwniu�
Stephanie Groon, onwa vfam,�. Juliana Fahrbach. sow
Ci ay Thornton, ri��f tumniiiw Todd Evans, production wanatrr
March 15, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Teacher Shortage
Dedication Doesn 't Pay The Bills
According to a report by the
American Association of Colleges
for Teachers Education (AACTE),
the teacher shortage that has crop-
ped up in isolated areas of the
country will become a nationwide
shortage by 1985. By that time, the
report predicts, schools around the
country will be able to fill only 96
percent of their vacancies. Worse
yet, their estimates also predict
that by 1990, only 80 percent of the
nation's education positions will
be filled.
These predictions reflect recent
trends in education, including the
exodus of women into other fields,
the increase in the birth rate and
the lure of higher-paying profes-
sions.
These trends do account for a
good portion of the shortage, but
the root of the problem, at least in
part, lies in the general attitude o
the public toward the teaching pro-
fession. Practically since the incep-
tion of formal schooling, teachers'
salaries have done well to break the
established "poverty income"
level. In fact, statistics show that
most metropolitan garbage collec-
tors earn a good deal more in a
year than their education counter-
parts.
They are charged with the duty
of teaching our children; in such a
capacity, they are, indeed, the
lifeblood of our society. But, un-
fortunately, our deranged
priorities dictate that they should
remain overworked and under-
paid. It's no wonder a lot of them
are out looking for more viable
means of making a living.
At some point in our educa-
tional "careers we've probably
all seen a teacher leave the position
for which he or she was trained
(and was dedicated to) for higher-
paying, if less "meaningful
work.
For too long, the importance of
teachers in American society has
been overlooked. And even when
they do receive their token raises
every third year, or whatever,
those increases are horribly in-
significant by comparison to the
rising rate of the cost of living. So,
with this in mind, who can
rightfully blame them?
The shortage is already beginn-
ing to tell in certain areas around
the country. Georgia, for example,
has 5,000 unfilled teaching jobs
this year, and the entire nation is
experiencing a shortage of math
and science instructors.
To combat the present and im-
pending shortages, President
Reagan has proposed special pro-
grams to train more math and
science teachers, but Congress has
not debated the proposal yet.
But increasing the number of
teachers is not the answer in and of
itself. After all, that only quells the
immediate problem, while main-
taining the undesirable status quo.
Instead of simply adding to the
educational work force, teachers
should be given more worthwhile,
tangible incentives. Sure, relatively
few, if anv, teachers are in that
profession for the money And
if they are, most are deeply disap-
pointed. But by the same token,
they cannot be expected to main-
tain a blind dedication to the pro-
fession when that dedication is
their onlv reward.
Hunt's Hunt For Senate
Marred By Conservativism
By PAT O'NEILL
During the 1980 election campaign, the
press often depicted North Carolina's
senatorial candidate John East as a Jesse
Helms clone. Although the 1984 senate
race is almost two years away, it has
already become apparent to North Caroli-
nians that another Helms clone has sur-
faced and is spewing his conservative
rhetoric in all directions in hopes that it
will gain him a senate victory.
Of course, I'm speaking of Gov. James
B. Hunt, who, in recent months, has
taken such hardline conservative stands
on several crucial issues that it's hard to
tell exactly where he differs with N.Cs
senior senator.
The expected race between Helms and
Hunt is already being billed as the "classic
match-up" and "the race of the century"
in North Carolina. But considering the
number of times that Hunt has been jum-
ping onboard the conservative band-
wagon, it's becoming more likely that the
great battle will instead be a not-so-classic
match-up of conservative v. ultra-
conservative � not real exciting.
In recent weeks, Hunt, a Democrat, has
come out against a state resolution calling
for a bi-lateral, verifiable freeze on
nuclear weapons between the U.S. and the
U.S.S.R. Nevertht'ess, the resolution
passed in the state with bipartisan sup-
port.
During the National Governors'
Association meeting held earlier this
month. Hunt voted against a resolution
(supported by three-quarters of his peers)
to put a five-percent ceiling on the growth
of the defense budget. Again, the resolu-
tion gained strong bipartisan support.
Hunt has also shown his true conser-
vative colors with his recent hardline posi-
tions on crime and prisons. Hunt's crime
package � especially his recommenda-
tions on the drunk driving problem � is
another example of his reckless response
to an emotional issue. Critics of the
package claim that it will only continue to
overcrowd N.Cs prisons while having
little or no impact on the problems of
crime.
Despite the fact that North Carolina's
prisons rank among the worst in the coun-
try in most categories � including rates of
Off&PW&V&iutlWZ-
Adversity Thick As Several Coaches' Heads
ECU: ECAC's 'Villains'
recidivism � Hunt has paid no heed to
the recommendations of the Citizens
Commission on Alternatives to Incarcera-
tion, which studied the problem for two
years.
Regarding his position on the freeze,
Hunt said the U.S. must negotiate arms
reduction from a position of strength. Of
course, his statement errantly implies that
the U.S. is "weak Based on the opi-
nions of thousands of experts in high
government positions, Hunt's conclusion
is far from true.
Hunt embarrased himself on the Gover-
nors' resolution by admitting that one of
his reasons for voting against the measure
was his own lack of knowledge regarding
defense appropriations. Surely a man
with national political aspirations should
have seen fit to educate himself on such
matters of overwhelming importance as
national defense.
No doubt, the memory of Robert
Morgan's 1980 senate defeat is still fresh
in the mind of Jim Hunt. Yes, the Con-
gressional Club is already moving full
speed ahead to discredit Hunt, and the
election will be a tough one. But what
Hunt doesn't seem to realize is that by
positioning himself on the right flank, he
is quickly losing votes from the center and
left.
Hunt is wrong to think that the left will
vote for him only as a vote against Helms.
He is undermining his own credibility as
well as discouraging thousands of
Democrats.
In his 1980 re-election victory, Hunt
carried 93 of the state's 100 counties, pro-
ving his overwhelming popularity. Why
now does Hunt decide to change his
political platform thus taking on the im-
age of a new Jesse Helms clone?
Hunt is making a grave mistake that
will probably produce two outcomes,
neither of which will benefit his expected
race: First, many North Carolinians, see-
ing a boring hot-air match between Hunt
and Helms, will simply not bother to vote.
And second, many who vote may opt to
support a third-party candidate.
If Gov. Hunt can't stand on his own
record as governor to win the 1984 senate
seat from Helms, then he shouldn't be
running at all.
By MIKE HUGHES
The editorial page may well be that
last place you expect (or want) to read
about a sports gripe. After all, in the
overall picture, taking into considera-
tion the diverse problems in our
universe, the world of athletics is
relatively menial.
Be that as it may, there are unfor-
tunate instances when we see that in-
justice and prejudice are not unique to
the realm of politics. And at times, we
see that same ignorance, those same pre-
judices, trickle down into the sports
world.
Such was the case last week, when the
six coaches of the ECAC-South cast
their votes for conference honors.
But to avoid a lengthy philosophical
treatise on injustice on the court, I'll get
right down to the point: When the
ballots were cast and the votes tallied,
ECU freshman center Johnny Edwards
was not chosen as the ECAC-South's
Rookie of the Year.
Granted, in being a loyal ECU fan,
my objectivity on this matter is ques-
tionable. I cannot remove myself totally
from the issue. Furthermore, in this type
of argument, opinions are a dime a
dozen. Realizing these inherent short-
comings, I'll let the facts speak for
themselves:
At season's end, Edwards ranked se-
cond in the conference in scoring with a
18.8 average, a respectable mark for a
freshman in any league.
But, the coaches maintain, scoring
doesn't win games in and of itself. Well,
although this is certainly a valid, pro-
found point, it seems somehow odd that
the coaches would use this in defense of
their Rookie-of-the-Year choice. Ed-
wards not only rivaled the league leaders
in points per game; he ranked second in
rebounding, with an 8.6 average; third
in steals, with 40 (a 1.4 avegage per
game); fifth in blocked shots, with 20;
and seventh in individual field-goal
percentage (53.6). He was named
ECAC-South Rookie of the Week six
times during the 10-week regular season.
These few statistics expound upon,
but by no means exhaust, the contribu-
tion Edwards made to the Pirates during
the regular season. With this in mind, it
may be beneficial to review the numbers
on Richmond's John Newman, who
somehow escaped with the honor:
By all means, Newman had a good
year, ranking eighth in the conference
with a 12-point average. He shot 53 per-
cent from the floor, placing him 10th.
and he ranked 14th in free-throw percen-
tage, with 71.7. He was a team leader,
indeed, but his team finished 2-7 in the
conference. Not once was he named as
ECAC-South Rookie of the Week dur-
ing the season. To say the least, Edwards
dwarfed him.
So, why then didn't Edwards receive
the honor? Perhaps a quote from a
sports column in Sunday's Richmond
Times-Dispatch will shed a little tinted
light on the question.
Jerry Lindquist, the Dispatch's self-
proclaimed sports analyst and
philosopher wrote of Coach Charlie
Harrison's dismay at the verdict:
Harrison must know this: Most of his
fellow coaches (who voted) didn't like
Edwards' conduct on the floor, and
they'd be darned if they'd single him out
for anything but concern In fact, there
is a prevailing negative opinion about
the ECU athletic program in the con-
ference. The Pirates have been cast as
villains
Obviously still disgruntled over the in-
famous "vanishing-point" incdent in
Greenville earlier in the season, Lind-
quist went on to accuse ECU of engag-
ing in elbow-throwing, taunting and
threatening opposing players and other
"cheap stuff
And Edwards isn't the only example
of the ECAC-South's "Virginia bloc'
Navy's David Brooks, third in the con-
ference in scoring and third on Na
all-time scoring list, was also overlooked
when the honors were awarded
All this exposition aside, though, the
point is this: If the conference coaches
cannot be responsible enough to p il
aside their pettv grievances and give
credit where credit is due, then the
voting should be taken out of their
hands.
Without a doubt. ECU is looked upon
b other teams in the league as nothing
more than a team of hatchetmen, out or.
the floor for blood Thev may not be the
classiest kids on the block. East Carolina
mav well not enjoy the same prestigious
aura as William & Mary, but the coaches
would do well to remember that when
the referee blows his whistle to start the
game, it's five-on five.
Perhaps Harrison summed up the
adverse attitude toward ECU in the con-
ference best when he reacted to the
award choice at a Richmond press con-
ference:
"You'd like for all your players to be
6-8 Harrison theorized, "from
middle-class backgrounds, who always
went to church and were aware of the
American flag. But I'll tell you this: This
is one of the most diversified groups I've
ever been around These kids have
never had any success in life. That's why
thev wanted it so bad. And that's why
thev sometimes act differently than
other kids
We take time now to honor the
1982-83 Pirates, whose 16-13 record
signifies that ECU basketball is. indeed,
on the upsurge. We honor Coach Har-
rison for his successful first year at the
helm, Charles Green for being named to
the ECAC-South All-Tournament Team
and Johnny Edwards, who was in fact,
if not on plaque, the ECAC-South's
Rookie of the Year.
Campus Forum
Good Landlords Alien To ECU
Thank you for the excellent editorial
which appeared in the March 3 issue. I
wanted to say much of the same but
could not have as effectively. There is
one point I would like to elaborate on,
though. The editor stated, it would
certainly be 'tragic' should we emerge
from the rubble and forget That is
too soft a statement.
It is terrible that such a tragedy
should occur before people open their
eyes and see just what many ECU
students must live in. As my father told
me over the phone when I called to say
I wasn't near the explosion, for once he
was glad I was too poor to live in
Village Green Apartments.
I have lived in at least six or eight
different apartments in Greenville, all
in worse condition than Village Green.
For years, I have griped because of the
apathetic attitude of landlords in this
town who will rent a slum to a student,
whether it is safe housing or not.
Should we ever have to witness such a
tragedy again, I would not want to be
in the owner's shoes. Constantly, 1
hear of friends and acquaintences who
complain to landlords about unsafe
conditions, only to receive promises
and no action. Someone is responsible
for the death of a young person; what
does it take to see some action?
Many landlords and merchants in
this town would cease to exist if
students were not here to fill their
pockets with money � and what do the
students get in return? A roof over our
heads, and that's about it.
Landlords: Have you ever worried
whether you would wake up? Or
dreaded to take a shower in 32-degree
cold? Or known that if the old wiring
in your house ever ignited, the house
would go up like a match? Try it
sometime.
Along with the landlord problem is
the price it costs to heat your house
or cook or wash dishes. 1 have lived
in Charlotte, Durham and Winston-
Salem, and in each of these places, I
needed less money to live than in
Greenville. How can this be? Several
times, I have tried to find out why the
Greenville Utilities Commission sells
electricity at a higher price than anyone
else this side of the Mississippi River.
Why are natural gas and water so much
higher?
When GUC switched over to CP&L,
shouldn't we have seen a drop in rates?
Why did GUC change over if it would
not affect our rates?
America is "sue crazy Everytime
you turn around, someone is getting
sued. I used to hate the thought of this,
but when people take lives in their own
hands, they can expect a lawsuit.
I have alot of fond memories of my
days in college at ECU, but there are
alot of ugly scars etched in my
memory, too. I just hope that someday
landlords will see what they are do-
ing before it is too late. I hope I
never see another life lost to
negligence.
Richard A. Freund
Senior, Ind. Tech.
A Word About Rape
To the female students of ECU:
I have been extremely disturbed by
recent reports of rapes on campus. I
have heard of at least two in the past
month. As anyone who has lived in
Greenville a while will tell you, it's that
time of year again. Every spring, it
seems the number of crimes in this
town increases, especially incidents of
rape.
It can be avoided, however. The
campus police can only do so much;
then, it is up to the women themselves
to take preventative measures.
It's very simple, ladies. Just avoid
deserted areas, on or off campus, day
or night. If you must traverse such
areas, at least take someone with you.
The ECU escort service was formed
specifically for that purpose. Don't
think that just because the library is
only a couple of blocks away that you
can probably get there safely. Other
women thought that and are very for-
tunate to be alive to regret their
mistake.
Also, report any suspicious
characters roaming around campus,
especially the dorms. Your life, or your
friend's, may depend on it.
Ann Shirley
Alumnus, CSC1
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all tet-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs).
Sympos
major
ium sponsor J
the ECU Scho
Medicine
begin on Thurs
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THfc fcASrc AROt IN1AN
MARC H 15. 1983
a
TuMNl
aches' Heads
s 'Villains9
: V N s "Virginia bloc
N; : Brooks, third in the con-
ring and third on Navy's
scoring list, was also overlooked
. honors were awarded.
exposition as de, though, the
II e nference coaches
be : enough to put
gi evances and give
where credit is due. then the
' be taken out of their
loubt, ECU is looked upon
the league as nothing
im oi hatchetmen, out on
for blood They may not be the
- : the block. East Carolina
. r.iov the -ame prestigious
i v am & Mary, but the coaches
'emember that when
his whistle to start the
's five-on-five.
naps Harrison summed up the
ad erse attitude toward ECU in the con-
ference best when he reacted to the
award choice at a Richmond press con-
's i'd like for ail your players to be
� S Harrison theorized, "from
iss backgrounds, who always
. ch and were aware of the
flag But I'll tell you this: This
t most diversified groups I've
These kids have
iccess in life. That's why
bad. And that's why
act differently than
Uchmtmd
ttie tinted
I
I
I
�. now to honor the
whose 16-13 record
skctbail is, indeed,
e honor Coach Har-
ul first year at the
.���� for being named to
Soutl ;i Tournament Team
hnn Edwards, who was in fact,
: plaque, the ECAC-South's
� the Year.
lien To ECU
ie house
� it
I is
. i e
ived
places, 1
than in
several
why the
jsion sells
Ian anvone
ppi Rser.
o much
ItoCP&I .
)p in rates?
I would
.time
is getting
ht of this,
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It there are
td i n m y
somedav
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l hope 1
lost to
A Freund
llnd. Tech
tape
ECU:
sturbed by
campus. I
nave heard of at least two in the past
month. As anyone who has lived in
Greenville a while will tell you, it's that
time of year again. Every spring, it
seems the number of crimes in this
tov n increases, especially incidents of
-ape.
It can be avoided, however. The
campus police can only do so much;
then, it is up to the women themselves
to take preventative measures.
It's �erv simple, ladies. Just avoid
deserted areas, on or off campus, day
or night. If you must traverse such
areas, at (east take someone with you.
The EC! escort service was formed
specifically tor that purpose. Don't
think that just because the library is
only, a couple of blocks away that you
can probablv get there safely. Other
women thought that and are very for-
tunate to be alive to regret their
mistake.
Also, report any suspicious
characters roaming around campus,
especially the dorms. Your life, or your
friend's, may depend on it.
Ann Shirley
Alumnus, CSCI
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s).
Symposium To Examine Morals
A major sym-
posium sponsored by
the ECU School of
Medicine is slated to
begin on Thursday in
t he Brody Medical
Sciences Building
Auditorium.
The three-day pro-
gram, sponsored by
the humanities pro-
gram, titled "Moral
Choice and Medical
Crisis" will feature
more than two dozen
distinguished speakers
from throughout the
nation.
According to Dr.
Loretta Kopelman.
director of the
humanities program,
the idea for the sym-
posium began when
concern surfaced
among the medical
profession and the
public regarding the
quality and ethics of
health care in the
United States.
Much of the in-
terest in these areas
has resulted trom the
recent changes in laws
regarding the care of
critically ill patients.
The N.C. Right to
Natural Death Act,
passed in 1981, deals
with two fundamental
life and death ques-
tions: The patient's
right to instruct their
doctor to discontinue
treatment if they
become unable to
make their own deci-
sion. The second
allows the family of
critically-ill patients
to decide, after con-
sulting with a physi-
cian, to withdraw
treatment.
According to
Kopelman, these cases
only involve situa-
tions that have been
diagnosed as
hopeless. "Given the
amount of social and
legal interest in these
issues, we decided it
would be important to
have a conference on
these topics
Kopelman said.
Kopelman noted
that the symposium
will be of particular
interest to physicians,
nurses, members of
the allied health
plrofessions,
philosophers and
others interested in
critical care. "From
the point of view of
physicians and nurses
these (questions of
critical care) are
among the most dif-
ficult and anguishing
decisions they will
have to make
Kopelman added.
Dr. John C.
Moskop, also on the
humanities program
staff, is co-directing
the symposium with
Kopelman.
Speakers from as
far away as Texas and
Connecticut will be
examining important
moral issues in the
provision of critical
care. Topics will in-
clude choosing treat-
ment for children and
incompetent patients,
resuscitation decisions
and principles for
distributing critical
care resources.
The symposium is
supported by ECU
School of Medicine
and by grants from
the N.C. Humanities
Committee, the
American Medical
Association Educa-
tion and Research
Foundation, and the
Arthur Vining Davis
Foundations.
The findings of the
symposium will be
published in 1984 and
will appear in the
Philosophy and
Medicine Series by D.
Reidell Publishing
Co.
The symposium will
begin at 9 a.m. Thurs-
day.
Programs will be
conducted in several
sessions. Each session
will have two
speakers. Panel
discussions and small
group discussions in
which the public can
address questions to
the speakers will be
held after the day's
proceedings.
The final sessions
will he held Saturday
morning-
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'Car-Kicking' Teacher Gets Jail
Term For Tough Traffic Tactics
(CPS) � A state
judge has sentenced
the "car-kicking
prof" of the Universi-
ty of Florida to 10
days in jail and an
$800 fine.
Before giving the
unusuallv -stiff
sentence. Circuit
court Judge Miller
Lang chastised
English professor
Julian Smith for kick-
ing a parked van last
fall as part of his
private war on cam-
pus traffic law
violators.
The incident occur-
red Oct. 30 when the
bearded smith hopped
inside an illegally-
parked van, and then
refused to budge until
police arrived to ticket
the owners of the van.
When the owners
drove away with
Smith in the van. the
45-year-old film
studies teacher
hollered out the win-
dows that he had been
"kidnapped After
police officers arrived
and failed to take him
seriously. Smith kick-
ed the van's rear panel
in frustration. He was
promptly arrested.
In the past. Smith
has walked over, laid
under and struck cars
illegally parked on the
campus. He says he
wasn't interested in
regulating traffic until
he arrived at L'F in
1977 and was appalled
by its "chaotic" park-
ing situation.
At his sentencing,
however. Smith, who
is now called "the car-
kicking prof" around
the school, said he
was sorry about his
"quixotic efforts" to
make the campus safe
for walking and driv-
ing.
The judge was
unimpressed. "No
matter how well-
founded your inten-
tions, you have in-
truded on the rights of
others Lang told
Smith. "You showed
complete disregard
for the laws you were
so quick to uphold
The shocked Smith
asked the judge to
defer the sentence un-
til the end of the
semester, but Lang
refused.
Other professors
will take over Smith's
classes while he in jail,
English Department
Chairman M e 1 v i n
New says.
UF president
Robert M a r s t o n
reserved comment,
except to say "the on-
ly part that is always
worrisome is that he
intentionally broke
the law
Hurrying from the
courtroom to the
county jail with his
wife Monica, Smith
was uncertain about
appealling the convic-
tion and about conti-
nuing his vigilante
crusade against traffic
violators.
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(Unconditional Guarantee)
Plus Dry Cleaning Service & Monogramming
Operated By Pauline Garris
Located At
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opposite end of Villa Roma
2741 E. 10th St.
NOW OPEN
Phone: 758-6858
MonFri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
ATTENTION
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
REQUESTING
FUNDS FROM THE S.G.A.
Student groups desiring Funds from the SGA
are allowed to submit a budget request for the
1983-84 school year for consideration by this
spring's SGA Legislature.The deadline for
submitting budgets is 5:00p.m. Monday,
March 21,1983.
IN ALL CASES BUDGETS MUST BE SUBMITTED
ACCORDING TO STATE LINE-ITEM CODES
AND MUST MEET SGA APPROPRIATIONS
GUIDELINES.
Copies of line-item codes and SGA appropriations
guidelines
are available on request in the SGA Office.
When the budget is reviewed and approved,funds will be
available at the beginning of the fiscal year (July 1,1983)
Budgets not submitted by March 21 will not be reviewed
by the Appropriations Committee nor considered by the
Legislature until the Fall Semester.
No Funds will be appropriated over the summer
months except for summer projects or cases nh
special circumstances as determined by the summer
executive officers.
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�$2.00 THURSDAY NIGHT FINALS
' 'Largest ABF Boxing Tournament in N. C.
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j-






1 HI AM I ARCH IMAN
MARCH 15. 1983
Soviet Symposium Stirs Cautious Community
-
(C PS) There
won't be a week-long
forum on Russian
culture at linn-
Benton Communit)
College in April And
if one does unfold at
the school at the time,
it'll be sponsored by
an entirelv different
college.
That's just the
latest contusion in a
series of confusions
that had some con-
cerned citizens taking
aim at a nuclear arms
�ace debate but hitting
the Russian culture
sniposium.
Linn-Benton's
governors, fearful of
stirring up "political
controversy" in the
weeks before the com-
munity votes on a tax
increase to help fund
the college, have
agreed to halt the
forum, although local
residents were really
protesting a nuclear
disarmament debate
scheduled to be held
on the campus at the
same time.
The citizens wrote
letters and lobbied
members of the Linn-
Benton Board of
Education, asking
them to cancel the
disarmament debate,
which they feared
would bring anti-
nukers and
"communist sym-
pathizers" to the cam-
pus.
Among the letter
writers were members
of the Committee for
Quality Textbooks,
which has been trying
to convince ad-
ministrators at
neighboring Oregon
State University to
drop certain
"anti-American
Wilkins Picked To Run
SGA Spring Elections
texts and courses.
The board "called
an emergency session
after one of the board
members heard from
people in the com-
munity recalls Peter
Boyse, assistant to
Linn-Benton's presi-
dent. "People who
opposed the sym-
posium called, but
people who favored it
didn't. Democracy
kind of works like
that, doesn't it?"
"1 think the com-
munity
misunderstood the
program says Dick
Lewis of the Oregon
Committee for the
Humanities, which
had promised to fund
the "What About The
Russians?" program.
"Citizens felt they
were being asked to
fund a program made
up primarily of
nuclear freeze sup-
porters he observes.
Lewis denies it, ad-
ding the OCH had
carefully screened the
Russian culture pro-
gram for balanced
viewpoints.
But at the meeting,
the board voted to
cancel the Russian
cultural program
anyway, citing timing,
political controversy
and an unwillingness
to spend money on it
during a period of
severe retrechment
and cutbacks.
Lewis says the
OCH was picking up
the entire tab for the
program, however.
"No one ever gave
back a grant before
Lewis reports with
some surprise.
Forum proponents
think the tax vote was
the real reason for the
board's action.
"The boaru was
afraid the cummunity
would misunderstand
this program because
of the (school tax)
levy coming up in the
next election asserts
Doug Clark, a Linn-
Ben ton t acuity
m ember and c 0
creator of the pro
gram.
" I hey were afraid
thev might alienate
the community b
allowing the pro-
gram adds Gret-
chen Shuette, Clark's
co-creator.
Among the 30 civic
groups endorsing the
program were two
local chambers oi
commerce, the Lions
Club, I he Rotar
Club, area churches
and the League oi
Women Voters.
College groups
were the most upset
b the cancellation.
"The f acu 11 y are
wondering it we are
going to have to keep
our mouths shui every
time an educational
issue is on the ballot
Clark savs
1 he factuh ha
kept it- mouth shut.
however. Over '
ihe faculty member-
have signed a protest
petition, while the stu-
dent government has
asl ed the board to
rescind its decision
and let the late-April
forum be staged.
"1 don't know how
realistic it would be to
expect the board to
retract 1 ewis says
Indeed, O r e j
state administrate
a-e considering sp
-uring the orphai
program, w hich Clarl
-avs w.as designed
encourage more ;
pie to learn aboul
. -tern
culture
rhe OCH w
probabiv shit! I -
grant to (hegon Sta
it OSl did adopl I
program, 1 ewis sa I
But Oregon v
Clark says, i . .
turn probabiv
the physical settinj
the forum right I
to Linn-Benton ui
a "shared fac
B ERNEST CONNER
With spring break
over, SGA elections
are about to begin.
Students who wish to
file should do so by
Friday.
So far onlv two
siudents have stated
their intention to run
for office. Tory Russo
and Paul Naso have
both announced their
candidacy for the of-
fice of SGA president.
Even with the
deadline foi filing on-
ly less then a week
awav, the SGA ex-
ecutive council
selected an election
chairperson Monday
night. Joy Wilkins
will fill the post.
A sub c o m m i 11 e e
chaired by student
legislator Chuck
Blake, is also working
on revisions to the
bvlaws covering
school elections and
Thev
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are doing this to pre-
vent re-occurences of
last year's controversy
between Eric Hender-
son and David Cook.
Henderson was ac-
cused by Cook of
campaign im-
proprieties including
overspending cam-
paign budget limits.
Because of conflicting
sections in the bylaws
Henderson was able
to be sworn in as
president despite
evidence that he ex-
ceeded the allowable
limit
Jo Wilkins
the bvlaws.
Blake said the com-
mittee hopes to pre-
sent recommendation
for bylaw revisions to
the SGA legislature b
Monday.
There are four of-
fices open in this elec-
tion. They include the
o('cc of SGA presi-
dent, vice president,
treasurer and
secretary.
Students interested
in running for office
should see the SGA
secretary, Millie Mur-
phey, in Mendenhal
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Summer Jobs
for
Tryon Company Inc.
Interviews will be held at
Mertderthall Student Center
at the Coffee House
Monday March 21
at 10 am to 2:30 pm and
4pm-7pm
Job will involve approximately 14 weeks.
work in Chorlotte N C $800 monthly
plus bonuses
coll 704-525-0572
if you can't make it.
campaigning. Thev campaign limit set in phey, in Menaennan
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ADMISSION Soi -AIL PROCEEDS GO To
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tx!xsxaxxxss
Parsons School of Design
otters intermediate to advanced courses
for coege students this summer
m New York City
Five weeks june 27 to July ?9 '983
:a�ng'PanlingEnv"onrTientai Design
iiiustraticmCommunicaiion Design
Photography. Fashion Design'Fashion
illustrationDa, Fiper Metai Design
Each 4-credit course n-ieets Monday
through Thursday 'rom 9 00 am to 4 OC
pm and includes intensive studm work
shops detd trips visits 'rom guest lectur
ers portfolio and career advisement
For additional information on the courses
housing and 'registration please return the
coupon or call 212 ?41 89'5
1983 College Summer Session
Brochure Request
Parsons School ot Design
Otiice ot Special Programs
66 Fifth Avenue New York MY 10011
Russia'
'Oblom
At Hen
H
-
n I

puitirti ai the c
-
Anima
.
- �
I -
I -
� act a .
i '
-
ainzl
-
-
i
inima
Freleng B
A scene from the Acting C omJ





(immunity
.con
pon
a ed

Summer Jobs
for
Tryon Company Inc.
ews will be held at
ndenhall Student Center
at the CoHee House
Monday March 21
1 am to 2.30 pm and
�i week
ithjy
704-525-0572

Natural Light
1 L � J
'ED
Lb
. M " LBS
lazed Donuts
1 Ml ! s) ,XK( jNAN
Entertainment
MAR H
Russia's
'Oblomov'
At Hendrix
ecame a common epithet for the
' H ,��� of s lassitude th ti
'�� 1.possessed so main young lan-
downers ni the mid nineteenth
Bn d w id nr nrv, s 1 � M Bui )blomo ism is iversal 1 �� ei merican col
�eg( student, groaning and pull-
�- h ' u kei . ei his head.
; ough blomo ist
ises. mrw f them lastinj
i iwhole semestei lor all ol us.
hen sleep seems
� � ' nl : . - 1 reponst
It � as c n ncharox 's ge
- �Mikhalkov's) to see that
'� " no 's letharg goes deepet
I hev are
X - � ; ' i ?ro because
- .blomowsrn is pan of almost
Vs le e s one
1 he mo le opens w nh
Oblom i Nikiianet ha ns ti is
Mikhail , 1i ui i
li in that eetei
v i � ;K little 1
the moi ning ai 1
�i tse � � � a � ttin
" ?fore an ope ,� �
� s it the window ii
�"to the irtyard if a Russ
i tiful summer da
MSs, he hears one
if 1the : calling H
. . � iirned h, ne :
� �
Obloin a it h � mot hei
�-
pea ted �� � � ana i :
iinabili
. t to pa
1 i � thv apa ti" - in f h i
lOW W 'face ol real t
� � �i . � � pampering 11 h e t i � �.
�ragedv.
'mi � 11 �. cas
v � .tuty ol tine
Mo ho A Sla of
l.ovt mbei i ed
bright nes� �� 11
�� the coeiit M � i � gives
i �ht same ku
- ring sen-
novel v i
.Se Rl n . Page y
I he mam faces of Nikita Mikhalkov's screen adaptation of (.oncharov Oblomov, playing on campus tomorrow evening.
Animation 'Cels' Going On Sale This Month
1� . inusual to do,
n . and rabbits -
�. B ,
' 2 . - t n d ft ei
.f cartoon charact.
.� i exhibit and
� s1
la 24 2p m
' � lenha i first 1 iew papei
-
Veelpaintint i ?d eels, aie the
pan igs actua � - - mimated car-
f ach hat ictei paini 1 bv hand on a cleai
isually 11x14 inches or lai.
� id painting
: frame at a I me, to create the il
� T the ca ira n motion.
ire c artistic process �
nal image thai is photographed b the camera.
:a those eels are higl . prized by collectors.
I he current exh - �� i . henticated b Gallery
berg ' eda '�� �. a, an organization
pecializes ii u imation artwork. A
��� � ry 1 ainzberg will be on hand
:� s � ns.
! ' e exhibit sa . ghts the work of two
iperstars in the animation field: Chuck Jones and
Friz Freleng Both animators are veterans oi the
len era I cai '�'� im Br ithers - the
1940s Both have eonti ted n ich to American
p pulai culture
I re eng drean t � 1 Sylvester and the
irrepressible Yosen Sa I nes gave life to Wile
1 oyote, the R tnei and Pepe le Pew. Both
ts helped to shape Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck
and mam others N' a n their 70s, Freleng and
(ones hae contributed their considerable talents
tor over halt a cem in Both 'nave received
cademy Awards for theii achievements as
animators, but theii original artwork has rarely
been seen. The exhibit features signed and unsigned
eel paintings bv these two superb artists.
Also featured is a collection ol eels from some ot
Wall Disney's best known animated films including
The Jungle Hook. Robin Hood. Rescuers, and the
very recent The f" and the Hound A selection of
vintage Disney animation drawings from the 1930s
and '4K, including a tew choice drawings of Mickey
Mouse, will also be available.
Original Disnev. artwork has been treasured by
collectors ever since the late 1930s when San Fran-
cisco's Courvoisier Galleries first ottered eels to the
public.
In recent years, collectors' interest has broadened
to include many oilier studios According toC harles
Solomon, writing in the 4. Times, "Prices for
material from othei studios, especially Warner
Brothers and the Fleischers, are also rising rapidly.
However, it is still possible to obtain first rate ex
amples of animation art for less than $50 in some
cases for less than S25
The current exhibit sale provides an exceptional-
ly broad range of animation art More than 25 dif-
ferent productions will be represented including eels
from The Secret of Ninth, Gnomes, and Tom and
Jerry. Fleischer enthusiasts will be treated to
meticulously hand-inked eels of Bettv Boop. Krav
Kat and other popular 1930s stars. For the the Fan-
tasy buff, there is artwork from Heavy ft
With the growing interest in orig
art. many people are investing in eels We rd ng I
Gallery Lainzberg Director, Edith R
"People love the characters thev select M I
pie like the idea o owning the - fragment ol
American film history. And. ot course, pa f tht
attraction is the potential for apprec i
Bugs Bunny we were offering a: S tout years age
now sells for SI35 to $17?
In addition to the grow ng numbei
lectors, institutions have accumulated impressive
collections of animation art for public - and
study. Substantial collections can be found a: V �
fork's Metropolitan Museum ol An and the
Museum of Modern Art.
Special exhibits were recently held at the 1 ibrarv
of Congress and at important museums such as New
York's Whitney Museum of r: Ad the Montrea
Museum ot Art. In addition, manv universities and
colleges including Princeton, Vassar, Syracuse
Johns Hopkins, Rutgers and Oberhn have begun to
build eel collections
Acting Company Performing
Shakespeare And Moliere At
McGinnis Theatre In March
A scene from the cting Company production of Moliere's Tartuffe, coming to campus in March.
One of the finest touring repertorv companies in
the world, The Acting Company, under the ar
tistic direction of John Houseman, will be pert or
ming Friday and Saturday. March 25 and 26 at 8
p.m. in McGinnis Theatre.
The Acting Company will perform William
Shakespeare's Twelfth Night on Fridav. March
25. Under the direction of Michael I angham, this
is the hilarious yet touching comedy about the
befuddlement of lovers and the low jinks of
carousers.
The second production is Moliere's comedy
Tartuffe on Saturday, March 26. The play tells the
story of a mountebank and how he uses love,
greed and deception to his own end. Michael kahn
directs.
The touring arm of our nation's John F. Ken-
nedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Acting
Company remains the only theatre company in
America founded for and dedicated to the
development of American actors. The company
consists of seventeen highly trained actors and ac-
tresses selected from America's leading profes-
sional theatre training programs and regional
theatres The Xcting Company has a commitment
to tour professional repertorv productions of both
classical and contemporary piavs throughout the
I'nited States.
The companv's productions and actors have
been cited for manv prestigious awards and
nominations including two Tonv and six Drama
Desk Award nominations, an Obie Special Cita-
tion for Outstanding Achievement and the Los
Angeles Drama Critics Award
Former company members include Patti
I upone (Tvita). kevin Kline Pirates of Penznce
and Sophie's Choice) and manv others who have
moved on to careers in television, film and Broad-
way.
Tickets for each performance are $4 for ECL
students, S5 for youth (aged 13 and under) and S8
for Faculty, staff and the public. All tickets are S$
at the door. Tickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office. Mendenhall Student Center For
reservations, call 757.511 ext 266 The Central
Ticket Office is open Monday -Friday. 10 a.m4
p.m.
1





-Gene&stei CHICAGO TRlBUNt
A A A
TRON'isatrip.anda
terrifically entertaining
one at that
-ftchardSctwKei TIME
TTRONavisionotthe
movies' future.
-JanetMasi.r. NEW YORK TIMES
"Itisbeautiful-
spectacularly so
a wonder to behold:
3N o BARNARD HUGHE5
ER aw BONNIE MACBIRO
TEVEN LISBERGER
Uijfa.
RESERVED
15,7,9 PM
& Activity Card
Auditions For
Summer Stock
This Weekend
Local auditions for the 1983 season of the
Last Carolina Summer Theatre have been set
tor Saturday. March 19, in Room 206 of
I CU's Messick Theatre Arts Center, from 1
to 5 p.m.
More than 100 actors, singers, dancers
and technicians are being sought for the
season, which will include productions of
Pippin (July 4-9); A little Sight Music (July
II 16); So, So, Sanette (July 18-23) and
Ihe're Playing Our Song (July 25-30).
Other auditions have been held or are
planned for the N.C. School of the Arts in
Winston-Salem, the Institute of Outdoor
Drama, Chapel Hill, the Southeastern
Theatre Conference, Savannah, GA and
the Theatre in the Park, Raleigh.
Performers will be hired by the show, or
for the entire season, with rehearsals beginn-
ing June 19 in Greenville.
Auditioning singers should bring music
and prepare a song of their own choice
which shows the voice to best advantage. An
accompanist uill be provided; no "a
capeha" singing will be permitted.
Dance should bring rehearsal clothes and
shoes (including tap) and will be given
routines by the choreographer. Technicians
should bring a resume with letters of
reference for an interview.
There are also a number of apprentice
positions available.
Further information about the auditions is
available from Scott Parker. Summer
Theatre general manager, at 757-6390.
Interior design items bv Margaret Angell
Shields Volney II o Ne Bern, senior stu-
dent in the Last Carolina University School
Of Art. will be on display March 19-26 at
ECU's Kate I ewis Gallery in Whichard
Building.
The exhibition includes renderings done in
color pencils and pen and ink of Ms.
Volney's designs for interior spaces. The
show will open with a March lh reception,
set for 8 p.m. in the gallery.
Ms. Volney is a candidate for the Bachelor
t Fine Arts degree in interior design with a
minor concentration in drawing. She is a stu-
dent member o the American Society o In-
terior Designers and currently serves as a
representative for the ASID job oppor-
tunities program. She has also been engaged
in an internship program at Tapscott
Designs, a Greenville firm.
n
Russian Film
Here Tomorrow
Continued From Page 7
suousness, and this time he adds a sense of
peace and well-being.
The dreams of Oblomov's friend (Yuri
Bogatryev) are very different. An energetic,
back-slapping viking, Stolz is Oblomov's op-
posite in everv way, yet he loves his flaccid
friend (thev were childhood chums) and is
always trying to bring him to life. Stolz
plushes, Oblomov resists; one man is pure
will, the other pure reflection, and together
they send the movie through alternating
phases of movement and poetic contempla-
tion.
The source of Stolz's vitality, we are
meant to understand, was his father's put-
ting him on a horse and sending him on his
way when he was a young man. In this
episode, the colors are white and iron gray,
and the emphasis, at first, is on the sternness
of the German-born father and the fierce
pride of the young Stolz. But then, as Stolz
rides away in the snow, a woman (a
neighbor, perhaps) calls after him, and we
get one of those scenes of divine foolishness
so common in the great Russian novels �
the young man galloping back, falling off his
horse into the snow, breaking into tears as
friends cover his face with kisses, and then
riding away again.
The hearty sincerity of the Soviet cinema
can be awfully sentimental, but there's a ge-
nuine lyrical impulse in Oblomov. The open-
ly emotive acting is so fluid and expressive
that it makes one think twice about his
preference for tight, interior "cinematic"
acting. No doubt Mikhalkov is drawing on a
classical tradition of Soviet stage and film
performance that we know little about. The
actors' superb haining shows � they do
things that are very broad without ever los-
ing the precision of feeling that keeps you in-
terested in the characters. The vitality ex-
tends to the camera style, which is
refreshingly active and even rough for an
adaptation of a classic.
Mikhalkov uses natural lighting indoors,
so you get and idea of the murk and glare in
which our ancestors lived, and he keeps the
camera moving with the characters.
The super-prettiness of A Slave of Love
occasionally turned to slop; the beauty here
is quieter, and it's always expressive of the
picture's themes. There's one extraordinary
sequence in which Oblomov and Stolz ride
around a snow-covered St. Petersburg in a
sleigh, and every tree and branch along a
broad, empty boulevard is glistening-white.
The sleigii pulls up before a small palace col-
ored white and robin's-egg blue and sur-
rounded by a black iron fence with gold-
tipped spikes. This episode is an ethereal vi-
sion of czarist Russia, as powerfully
evocative as a passage from Boris Go-
dounov.
And much of the long, concluding section
in which Oblomov tentatively courts the
chattering jeauty, Olga (Elena solovei),
takes its tone of sweet melancholy from the
sense of luxury and waste and time passing
by.
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2 liter
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on 6-pack
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I





I HI I -M K �l i "si N
Sports
M Kt H
Bucs Defeated In Conference Semis
BIM PI I SANTS
-i-H-t.l
k clock
Sophomore Bi uce 1' ai
Whei he Pirates headed to lead to one with a 20-1
e' II
I he ' so excited W&M's Bruce Pa -
ie i ECA
� id that tl iwa I m tl
Han - � I pa talents they h i he a
"Coacl oi the '�
out
I I
I
K L- Va . foi the K V jumpshot, but W&M
v ference 1 ournament. side
knew � sadly what to expect
games had ihea �- n th�
. � t . demark ii ?nce ga
. he touri iment rh o nes a
;xce record -
B e B -
Aithi ' �
iince 19 Chat ;
opening
ent
t8-65 1- en 11
nt, Han
h one ol the "Th kid wanted to win so nothing but pra �
��( meewi it bad M em have never had "l'n r. all proud ol j �
anything a ttl P � �d "1:
mil. for us. V nnmg 20

A. �
1 Ol
itient,
I � lopp
. ' I h
ibundai
to H i �
'Regardle' ' a l
ed these kid fe Marx w
petit
la
wha out,
I'll 1
wronc business.
it Bucs lost,
�� I
'�
Ml � - I
nals
! espite acv
B
& Mar iggs
i
a iam v
� H i x-v
v a s n i
t
a
4V �
v .t - i v Star st
a r
6

Vengeful Pirates Turn
Back Pesky Patriots
BnIM�1 IM 1 XXM
-
W
Ma
iI. �

nt1 V
Souli

,���

fron 1i South'
Yatt- g i iayup with
t 4 .c; 'i !�' I 1 � t 8'J i . V. .
With ! 03
162-5
.
v � y
the Indi u
I . 70-54. Dui
tht ! I V
So ith all-1
I


II I .
-W ScM
- � aith i( itC'
� �ist V. & M
was a
I � � nd ParklYs s
-
� " �
.SeeIM)lNs 1'
Ladv Pirate Seniors
f? Bow Out Successfully
11
M i

I seniors I hum Brown (42) andharks Green (34) FiRhl t�r a
rebound against opening round opponent George Mason.
tt KlCVENGEFl 1 � I'utft 13
: � I won tl
� i r da
itelv plea
!� as ai - '�
I hey have filled roles this seas
� � " thai have been cha

TCI as all
See MitRs. l�ct 12


: he
"VAing.
"1t's about
� � �. .� them,
.talre like
M �� a turn
.
Han�theather m-
� this season But the Biks
ist 20 points, mark-
� i tl ec nd 'ime this season
ECl ha ' eld "i ates to his lowest

'We recognizedarlos Nates tor
alent he is Harrison
: . e got the ball he
a a performer He
gi eat pla W e just
didn't want gel C)
rhe Pirate lacked the reboun-
ding and shooting skills ol Cha
Green during the two teams'
Denkler Makes A-A
Va nai �
A :
E I 1
Pit �
diman pit,
. er 1 air tic
her Winfred Johnsi
Id.
�n belted a three-i un homei in
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
the seventh inning to lead the
It a banns
I82-S3 sea n by
a B : � News
Sei :e a
'�. �

�� . an t tea i .ear, bu
for t
team this yt
Denklei finished hei careei ai
I with 1,789 points, second
best on the 1 . I all time scoi
list
Denkler's othei careei n
include: first in field goal ac
curacy (50 9ro i. fourth in reboun-
ding (800), second in free thi
accuracy (73.4), and sixth in
scoi ing average 115 7)
Besides the post-season hoi
Denklei also made tuo
tournament teams during the
1982-83 season.
She was named on the South
Carolina Nike Classic team and
the Converse 1 ad Pirate Classic
all-tourne team
isketba
i
ireer w uh 3
I'Ni
1 Cl coacl v all � xnd
Denk .
"11 I ha
coach in terms ol
chai � v'
s the best ndru;
"U hen e ose Mai � t
� ast ai na trad
Denkler isn 1 ure
the future "
looking forward to the cha ei b
"I'm looking to the future
I'll remember all the goo.
I'll miss playing a
the team Denkler
"The team aspect ol lil
have to euitho
being under Coach Andi
wing to being on nn own
Harrison, Buccaneer Squad 'Fool Everybody'
1 -A illiam A. Mary
: i, in the semi-finals ol
the 1 i -V South Conference
Championship. Head Ba 1
Coachharhe Harrison was I �
ed at the press conference it he
would descibe his ; � � eas �n h
as being a "miracli yeai
"No, not really he replied
"It we won the M AA champion
ship, now that would be a
miracle Alter the laughter had
died down, Harrison reflected on
the uniqueness of his players.
"There are so many different per-
sonalities on this team '
Vet Harrison somehow manag-
ed to build a team that has com-
piled a 16-13 record and made the
semi-finals ol the ECA South
C onference tournament. A team
speculated to finish MX) this year,
and one that spectators had little
faith in A team Harrison describ-
ed as the most diversified group ot
athletes he's ever been around A
team expected to be mediocre at
best.
Heads began to turn and
mouths began to chatter.
however, when the Pirates went
n to Duke and N State,
and showed they could play
I asketball with the i
( teams In then first con
ference game, the Pirates suffered
,i i ne-poinl loss to �. ' g Mason,
69 68, bui bounced back t ideteat
two-time N( A qualifiei lames
Madison, 4i 41
CIND I'll ASAMS
I onk Inside
I he Pirates were in good shape
until tragedy k. ECl .enter
Charlie Gr� ei lowi tgainsl
W&M with a i parated shouldei
and would be unable to play foi
four weeks I he Bucs lost that
game and the following two
their longest losing streak ol the
vear.
Perhaps the Pirates major tur
1 iieen m the
in ed on Ian 19 I he
Bu . isted :he southarolina
Can - ks and won. 58 48 I he
('nates had become rejuvenated
� mce again
1 he Bucs on the nexl thiee
games, and have won 10 ol 14
games since the confrontation
with I S(
Many o! the wins didn't come
easy I he Pirates became the
"( omeback Kids Alter never
leading m regulation period, the
Bucs beat UN( Wilmington in
overtime, followed bv a two point
wm ovei I C harlotte, Bui
there were losses too. Navy made
a tap-in ai the buzzet win bv two
point, against the Pirates, and
George Mason sweated out a doa
ble overtime game, heating E I ,
o9-6X.
I he Pirates won five ol the last
six, sparked bv the return ol
( ireen nd with him back in the
lineup, the Bucs played the best
basketball they had all season
lust m time foi the conference
nameni
Harrison admitted thai he
didn't know what to expect at the
beginning oi the season. "1 had
hoped we would win 12. but 1
figured we would snuggle to do
thai he said "One ol mv
assistants fell that with a snuggle
we could be .500
Overall, Harrison said the team
plaved good and poor basketball
a nines, but they had one quality
which endured throughout the en-
tire season. "We let a couple
games slip away from us he
said "We were surprising at
points, and we played awfully.
awfully hard throughout. The
kids nist never gave up
What was Harrison's biggest
satisfaction? "1 was most satisfied
that the kids would not quit he
said "We may not have plaved
well al times, but we were always
OUl there fighting it all out
More than anything, Harrison
coaches bv the sanctity ol defense
"Defense wins baugames Har-
rison stated earlier this year And
because ol their defense, the
Pirates set a school record foi
fewest points allowed bv op-
ponents with a 63.5 average The
previous record, which was set in
1962-63, was M
In the Richmond Times-
Dispatch, sports Columnist Jerry
I mdquist wasn't very complimen-
tary 'owards ECU's detensive ef-
forts, citing them for "unrulv
play
"Every opposing coach can
recite instances of elbows thrown,
taunts, threats, and more Lind-
quist said.
That remark comes as surprise.
especially since most conference
coaches, like W&M's Bruce
Parkhill, praised the Pirates for
their strong detensive play nd
what kind ot taunts and threats is
he talking about anyway? Getting
beat up in the parking lot after the
game or egging a player to make a
move i you ?
�s tot elbowing, ask Johnny
Edwards, who has been double
and triple-teamed all season, now
main elbows he's gotte tl nsid
the lane from conference op-
ponents Sorry Mi 1 indqi
Harrison hasn't built a team
take cheap shots, which, on
other hand, is unlike v.
umn
i ne Pirates should take pi o.v I
their defense, especially ECl 's
senior members. Green and Thorn
Brown two players Ha
will definitely miss "I'm most
disappointed that 1 don't have
Charlie Green and Thorn Brown
back tor another year he sa d
"I like those two young men, a
the biggest down moment was
when Charlie Green went down
and we all felt he would never piav
again
But he did pla again �Xnd the
Pirates finished with a season that
Green, Harrison and the rest ot
the team can reflect back upon
with pride.
Congratulations Coach Har
nson and the 1982-83 men's
basketball team You fooled
evervbodv

Mad iso
Hs MD
R
-
-
-

� h





Semis
.v
LicePeartned the
�� 1 1oints, 'ohiin Ed
1 :ih
with! hom . and
sd IIon tor
: job he dme this
11 ai lithasnoa greal
"They :Maxa x ery
i 'basket
.e game
in exaJOWstrong
-G .
-aid her
W �� cgoi a
sj0 con
-i durinIeg ilai
d won1 their
William& lai is
asketbaII l
� � X 1hexgel an
b a cryingshame
,treak,
s: � j � v;tl
See INDIANS. Page 13
irate Seniors
lit Successfully
Minges
1 ' i rememberance
� � ' ' "get :�
Her fma formance w as
ad praise tor
isk 'l were also
' a gan for ECU.
ij h ol xx ha;
�� - done and meant to
gram. Andruzzi stated.
x hae tilled roles this reason
been challenging. Peo-
See �F MOKs. Pae 12
er Makes A-A
womei : ketball
finished
' A points and 13
: ��� � NC-( harlotte.
ac h t athy Andruzzi is
been able to coach
� - er the past four
pick one of the best
: avers i have had the opportunity
�� � in terms of attitude.
ter, and personaht, Marx
best Andruzzi stated.
When we lose Marx, we lose a
" I as. I arolina tradition
Denkler isn't exactly sure what
the I iture holds for her, but she is
I ng forward to the challenge.
'm looking to the future, but
mber all the ,od times
niss playing
im !)�
I � �� tean 1 i �
i with
ponded
one I'll
ithout, from
Andruzzi's
verybody'
tied all season, how
he's gotten inside
m conference op-
Mi I mdquist,
n't built a team to
mots, which, on the
unlit e vour
icn can
throw n.
lore Lind-
� uprise,
conference
Bruce
1 irates for
plax And
l threats is
x ' Getting
s ' after the
I to make a
sk Johnny
:n double
�uld take pride in
nse, especially EC! 's
membei 1 ireen and Thom
A piaxers Harrison
will definitely miss "I'm most
disappointed that 1 don't have
harhe (,reen and Thorn Brown
back tor another year he said.
"1 like those two young men. and
the biggest down moment was
when Charlie Green went down
and we all felt he would never plav
again '
But he did plav again. And the
Pirates finished with a season that
Green, Harrison and the rest of
the team can reflect back upon
with pride.
Congratulations Coach Har
nson and the 1982-83 men's
basketball team You fooled
every bod v
ECAC-South Tournament
rHt EASTCAROI INIAN
MARC H 15, I9M Plge 11
Madison Dukes The Tribe For EC A C Title
By MIKE HUGHES
Mauc,S( tHof
Although the conference tour-
nament in Richmond this past
weekend certainly had its
favorites, all six coaches knew
long beforehand that in the
ECAC-South almost anything
goes.
In fact, upsets were in the mak-
ing in every game:
Thursday Night
In the quarterfinals. ECU over-
came a tough George Mason club
68-65 behind excellent perfor-
mances by senior forward Charles
Green and freshman center
Johnny Edwards. Green pumped
in six field goals, went 8-for-9
from the line and grabbed a
tournament-high 14 rebounds,
and Edwards added a game-high
21 points. Sophomore forward
Barry Wright added 11 while
holding GMU's Carlos Yates (the
nation's fifth-leading scorer with
a 27-point average) to 20 points.
The Pirates watched a five-
point lead dwindle to one late in
the game. Then, with less than 10
seconds left, junior guard Tony
Robinson went to the line for two
shots. He missed both.
But as if to redeem himself �
and that he certainly did �
Robinson stole the ball from
Yates at the Pirate foul line, made
the lay-up, and ECU won 68-65.
�HI 0. orft Mason 6
NlM 74. Rtckmow) 49
N�.�
Bullti
kuma
Prise
Romajne
Brossks
XXhitaker
XV ells
Jones
Maum
Totals
Xr�man
Use
Pehl
Johnson
Bethca
Beckwtth
Dooles
Davis
Heher
lotaii
Richmond
Nar,
M,
rT R
- 9 1
Ol
ml 1
1 4
IV-O
O 1
Pi
II
in
4
11
2h
i w-n w 14
4 ft
IJ 25
12
0
4.1 69
to
34
33
40
44
74
n.
n
1-9.4
9 i J42.
: o-io
: tvoJ4
M 1 0-000
. Mz
13 22 3033t
4 44,
0 -r4
" 4 "V20
l" 4),1r
O 0-000
0 2 2;2
1 �
� u-n2�5
MUhi
3530 -65
U I
'ri�hl
Green
Edwanfa
R r bsi n
Pearvee
X anile'horst
Brown
Hajs
To lab
(rforf Masoa
XX son
Shannon
Rose
Nichofl
aies
Xohe
McQocca
Hanlin
a -
Totals
(.aslaroliaa
Ceorfe Masoa
Tjmosers - 1 asi i aiobna 13 George Mason 12
Asmms - East t a- rWnghi 4).GeorfcMaton 12
Oaic 'i Field foals East Carolina 23-52 i .eorgc
Mason 2 VI Pris mis 1 a' Carolina i .��
Mason 25 (fouln! out SirhK,
In Thursday night's second
match-up, third-ranked Navy held
off several Richmond threats en
route to a 74-69 victory.
The Midshipmen were led by
senior guard David Brooks with
26 points. Brooks, the ECAC-
South's third-leading scorer with
a 17-point average, pumped in 10
field goals (most from 20-plus
feet) and went six-for-six from the
free-throw line, while center Gary
Price grabbed 13 rebounds. With
his first-round performance,
Brooks became Navy's third-
leading scorer of all time.
Richmond's John Newman,
who somehow received Rookie-
of-the-Year honors over ECU's
Johnny Edwards, paced the
Spider attack with 19 points,
while center Bill Flye hauled in 10
rebounds. But UR shot only 27
for 70 from the floor for the
game, compared to Navy's 28 for
52, which proved the decisive fac-
tor.
Turnovers Richmond IV Sass 7 s RL
mond 10 (Flye 4), Saw IORomaune V Brook I) f irij
gais RKhmoad 27-70. N�v 21-52 Pasona. fou
Richmond 25 ifouled our Johnson, Sj g (fouled
oul Pruri Virndancc - 4.14"
Friday Night
After Thursday night's
endurance-test win over George
Mason, ECU came up against
number-one-seeded William &
Mary in the semi-finals. The In-
dians had posted a 9-0 conference
mark during the regular season
and appeared unawed bv the
upset-minded Pirates until the
game started.
In the first half. ECU held tight
on the Tribe's heels by forcing the
Indians outside. However, the
Bucs found the other end of the
court just as difficult to penetrate.
Nevertheless, the Pirates went in-
to the locker room at halftime
down by only two, 26-24.
ECU came out smoking in the
second half, building a small-but-
lengthy lead, a lead which lasted
until the game's waning minutes.
Bruce Peartree led the Pirates
with 12 points, and Johnny Ed-
wards pulled down nine rebounds.
But W&M sophomore guard
Keith Ciepiicki. who finished with
12, rallied the Indians from a
three-point deficit with 3:55 re-
maining by scoring six quick
points.
The Pirate light flickered once
more, however, when Johnny Ed-
wards stole the ball in the game's
final seconds. But he missed the
lay-up; William & Mary recovered
the ball and held on to win 48-45.
Behind ECAC-South Coach-of-
the-Year Bruce Parkhill. W&M
improved its record to 20-7, the
Tribe's best mark since the
1950-51 season.
In Friday night's second game,
the James Madison University
Dukes held Navy's outside
bombers to 34-percent shooting
from the floor en route to a 72-58
victory.
Madison's Dan Ruland paced
the Dukes with 23 points and 12
rebounds, while the JMU defense
held Navy's David Brooks to just
two points on the night.
The final score, however, was
not exactly indicative of the game.
JMU pulled to a 32-26 lead at
halftime, only to see Navy rally
back in the second half. For a
while, it looked as if the game �
like the three before it � would
go down to the wire. James
Madison needed a strong finish to
gain the victory And that's just
what they got.
Jaa
Simt(.�T�n
Bullrr44 �8
kuma10-022
Price44ft12
Romainei-t s08
Brook.1�11
Rsan1�U)02
XVh.takcr00-010
knaro: 212
J i ncs00-000
Maurrr142If
Maia10i.l
lotah2114-1414M
J�Ms Madison
M - -�10-0�.
EXmoJ&oc1�-4.
Ru.anj��II 1i
FisherlMi14
Dufsonr10-04h
lacksoa24
s-eiej12
Btadies41 1A
1 let0M);n
lolaLs222A-14172
lime Mid -n4�JJ
NaMn�J
I . - ,er.Madnoa siField ,
22-41Sa.s 21 r.Personal icaati Mad.I
22. Si ;t, viendarweb.Xfca
w Jtm- - -n
Saturday s Championship
So, despite a few gallant upset
efforts along the way. the top two
ECAC-South teams (W&M and
JMU) made it to the final game.
William & Mary wav perhaps,
the logical favorite, having com-
piled a perfect regular season con-
ference record, including two
previous wins over the Dukes But
Madison refused to pax heed to
the odds and came onto the court
amid a swarm of fans cheerme
"NCAA
The Dukes found the earlv-
going difficult, however, a-
William & Mary pulled to a 10-2
lead after six minutes. The Tribe
held the upper hand through the
first 10 minutes, building to an
18-8 lead with 10:02 remaining in
the first half. Across the floor,
W&M's fans answered the Duke's
pre-game cheers bx chanting
"N -I. Tat the JMl bench It
had all the makings of a blow-out
But it was not to be so The In-
dians' offense strident) fell apart,
while Madison wa- just Parting
to roll. The Dukes outscored the
Tribe 12-3 and went out at
halftime down bv but one point
21-20.
Wilham & Mary bounced back
in the second half, building a
nine-point lead. But much to the
chagrin of the Indians, the cham-
pionship game's flip-side was a
carbon copy of the first half.
Going to a tough man-to-man
defense, JML repeated its first-
half comeback one better The
Dukes' defense held W&M to just
three points m the games' I
12:26 The Tribe's Keith
Ciepiicki, averaging 16.3 points
per game, finished the game with
onlv six.
But the man who stole the show
was the Dukes" fireplug point-
guard Derek Steele Steele's
stylish steals and cool-handed
leadership on both ends of the
court helped JMU overcome the
nine-point deficit, breaking a
38-38 tie with a jumper at the 0:04
mark A controversial personal
toul was called on W&M's Tony
Traver as Steele's jumper fell
through the net Steele. who wa;
named the tournament MVP,
made good on the three-pom;
play, and James Madison won.
41-38.
Following the championship
game, Steele and Ruland were
named to the all-tournament team
from JML Also reiving that
honor were Keith Ciepiicki and
Kexin Richardson from William &
Mary and ECU's Charles Green,
who tallied 30 points and 20 re-
bounds in the Pirates' tw.
outings
� liar, MMwx41 ttftiaai4 Mars j
MP H. FI I4PT
�-s; .I
'

� 2oa
4
4. �
-fc
, -
Touts:a�I4-4B�-itLI 14 41
X4 �baa A MarsMPKFI � 4 Pi
� � -i-1 4�
-j B
.� -a
� i 1
�a�-

r .
� "Ufa:an-M4It 14 Xt
(aaaai Maakva�:i 4i
XV .11.am & Mars:ir� xt
Aisisi
canaani��
U ilium & Mart 4 (� . 45
E( IM. t'KPi
bright116
C�reen144h10
I J.a: Jv.1 :911
Robinson1CM)2j
Peartree: 1112
anderhorM0(W)00
Brown30-04
louh197-92445
Milium A Man
Strahorn;1 T46
Richardson6 2s14
eidner40038
Traver22-216
Ciepiicki51 j312
Coval10-012
Bland00-010
Brooks00-000
f�Mh20��20a
tJUH arolina2421-45
Wilham 4 Man2422-4
Turnoscrs � fcasi Carolina 12. XXilham & Mars 9
field goals - East Carolina 19-41. William & Mar
20-42 PersonaJ fouls - Fail Carolina 14. XV illiam &
Mary 8
ECU's Johnny Edwards (top) pumped in 21 points in the Pirates' first-round victor over high.v'niiitd
George Mason Thursday night. (Above left) Navy's long-distance bomber Dave Brooks, who scored 2 points
from the sidelines against Richmond in the other first-round game, engage in a bit of mid-court ballet with
the ECAC-South's Rookie of the Year John Newman. (Above right) Charles Green towers over William 4
Mary's Steve Ciepiicki (14) en route to a 10-point performance Fridav night and an All-Tournament team
honor. Nonetheless, the Pirates fell prey to the Tribe. 48-45. (Below left) James Madison's Coach Loa Cam-
panelli (center of photo, crying) rejoices with assisUnt coaches, bespectacled fans, male cheerleaders with
receding hairlines and other undesirables after his Dukes beat W4M in the championship. 41-3. (Below)
ECU Head Coach Charlie Harrison (center of photo, mouth agape), in a rare seated pose, veils out a bit of
encouragement to his team, while assisUnt coaches Dave Pendergraft (left) and Tom Barrise (right) taxe onto
the court. Photos by GARY PATTERSON.
!
-





f
THh t-ASTC AROl IMAN
MARCH 15, 1983 1
Johnson, Hallow Carry Pirates To Victory
By KD NICKI.AS
Winfred Johnson
and John Hallow each
belted three-run
homers and Kelly
Robinette collected
four hits to power
ECU to a 13-6 victory
over Fairfield yester-
day in a slugfest at
Harrington Field.
The victory, ECU's
seventh in a row, was
Head Coach Hal
BairdN 99th career
win. Baud will be
shooting for his 100th
victory today when
ECU plays Fairfield
at 3 p.m. at Harr-
ington Field.
"To be honest, 1
had no idea until so-
meone from the Daily
Reflector told me
Baird said. "It is cer-
tainly an accomplish-
ment, but 1 feel it is
more of a compliment
to the progress of our
baseball program
Down 3-1 in the
fourth, ECU scored
three runs to obtain
the lead for good.
After ECU flied out
twice to left field.
Jabo Fulghum reach-
ed first on a throwing
error by Fairfield
shortstop Dennis
Dokmbrowski.
Robinette followed
with a line-drive single
to left and Hallow
came up and smashed
his three-run homer to
right center.
After ECU added
three more runs in the
fifth and Fairfield
responded with three
in the bottom of the
seventh, the Pirates
began to pull away
with four runs in the
top half of the seventh
inning. Tony Sal-
mond walked, stole
second and scored on
Robinette's RBI
single. Then, after
Hallow walked and
Todd Evans was out
on a fielder's choice,
Johnson promptly
blasted a towering 400
to 425-foot homerun,
extending half way up
the trees located in
centerfield.
Robert Wells added
a solo blast in the
eighth to secure the
victory for starter
Brian Peterson, who
got relief help from
Kirk Parsons in the
seventh and Bob
Davidson in the
eighth and ninth.
Despite ECU get-
ting 15 hits and upp
ing their record to 9-2,
Baird is still looking
to improve. "We real-
ly have not played as
well as the scores in
dicate he said. "I'm
still looking for im-
provement in some
vital areas. We still
have holes, but as we
play we can correct
them
Baird was pleaded
with the character of
his ballclub. reflecting
on the come-from-
behind victories over
the weekend and also
over the past tow or
three years "The
scores indicate the
tvpe of character this
ballclub has he
said. "1 think it will
havse a positive im-
pact on us when we
play our conference
games Thev have
alreadv proved the
can come back "
Seniors Instrumental In Season
C ont'd From Page 10
pie will never forget
them for their all-out
hustle
For the season,
Denkler finished with
an average of 22.5
points and 7.8 re-
bounds per game.
Following Denkler
in season scoring were
1 oraine Foster (14.5),
Sylvia Bragg (9.8),
Darlenc Chaney (9.5),
Delphine Maby (7.3),
Hooks (6.0), and Lisa
Squirewell (5.6).
Chaney was just
barely ahead of
Denkler in the re-
bounding total.
Chaney averaged 7.9
and Denkler had a 7.8
per-game mark.
Hooks was the
team leader in assists
with 72. Bragg and
Truske each finished
with 49 assists.
Denkler led the
I ady Pirates in field
goal percentage (54.6
percent) and Bragg
was the leader in free
throws shooting (76.9
percent).
Andruzzi was pleas-
ed with this year's
squad, her fifth team
at ECU.
"At 14-12, I'm ex-
tremely pleased with
what this team has
done against a very
competitve and trying
schedule Andruzzi
commented. "With
all the obstacles we
faced, we ended the
season respectively
Andruzzi's overall
career record now
stands at 114-75.
The Lady Pirate
head coach, along
with assistant coach
Beth Burns, has
already begun
recruiting for next
year.
"We're pleased
with our recruiting
thus far Andruzzi
said. "We've had
several committments
from fine student-
athletes. We feel we
are getting en-
thusiastic, intense in-
dividuals to step in
and continue the pro-
gress of the pro-
gram
Lady Sluggers In Florida
The ECl 1 adv
Pirate softball team
was in Tallahassee.
Fla. this weekend to
complete in the Lady
Setninok Invitational.
IThe lady Pirav
won three games ana
lost two in the two
day round-robin tour-
nament.
In Friday's opening
round, the Lady
Pirate had to go up
against the host
Florida State
Seminalos and came
away a 14-8 loser.
Things turned
around quickly for
ECU, as the Lady
Pirates defeated
Campbell 17-2 in the
next contest.
ECU'S Wendy Oz-
ment set a team
record with 15 total
bases in the game,
breaking the old
Pirate mark ot 10.
The game was held
in cold windy
weather, a factor that
E C U coach S uc
Manahon said vsjs
helped bv the strength
of the I ady Pirate
bench.
"On a day like to-
day, depth really
helped us Manahan
said. "We made a few
changes and everyone
did a good job
In the next gime,
the Lady Pirates
defeated West Florida
8-2 behind two-for-
three hitting by
Tamara Franks and
Suzanne Martin.
Manahan pointed
out Stacey Weitzel as
a key ingredient to the
Pirates' success
"Stacey showed a lot
of spunk she stated.
"When the team
rallied behind Stacey,
it really gave us a
lift
On Saturday, the
I ady Pirates split a
pair of games,
defeating Miami Dade
North 13-0 and losing
to Western Carolina
8-6
Mitzi Davis went
three-for-three with a
triple and a pair of
runs batted in to lead
the Lady Pirates to
victory.
The loss to WCU
came about in extra
innings due to a three-
base error that allow-
ed a runner to score
from first base.
The Lady Pirates
had four players
nominated for the all-
tournament team:
Mitzi Davis, Sherry
Stout, Yzonne
Williams, Jeanette
Roth.
ECU's record is
now 3-4 with the next
game scheduled at
home on Wednesday
afternoon against
Louisburg. The dou-
ble header begins at
3:00 p.m.
ABORTIONS
1 24 �� t�rmi���iont
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 100 321 0575
WEEK OF MAR 14th-16th
At H.L.Hodges and Bonds Sporting Goods we are offering
physical fitness eauiptment at special prices in order to get ou
in shape for the spring and summer months ahead! let us helD
you trade in that old body for a new one that is phvsicallv fit!
�Etonic
mmmi ahum ttt !���
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i
RUNNING SHOES
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(were Vi.95 no 31.00)
MODE! 563 (were 34.95 now 31.00i
MODEL 522 (were 52.95 now 42.00i
RUSSELL SPORTSWEAR
( RKU NK Ks-8 95
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T Sl�rti Sltpi�9 ����
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ARMY-NAVY
STORE AST
INTRODUCING
Their national advertised aerobic weights b MK are now m Mock and are
a must for our phvsical conditioning program! Large & regular sues are aa�lable.
REG. & LG. 18.95
onl starter set. heavier weights
musl be purchased indmdualh
WEIGHTS
2 lo95 3 lb9.95
ATTIC
South'
Golf Team In Full Swing
With Two Crucial Matches
4 lb. -13-95 Sib16.95
YOUR WEIGHT EQUIPTMfcN I
l�23� rtoSof all V� ��� other everci aid ,o help ou gel re�d
for the summer lun!
By RANDY MEWS
staff � met
The ECU men's
golf team was in ac-
tion both weekends of
Spring Break, taking
part in the ECU and
Iron Duke Invita-
tional Golf Tour-
naments.
Hosting their own
tournament, ECU
golfers John Riddle,
Chris Czaja, Roger
�vlewsome, Kelly
Stimart and David
Dooley combined for
901 strokes to place
the Pirates 5th among
12 teams.
In team
NCSU won
standings,
the tour-
nament, Duke finish-
ed second, William
and Mary was third
and UNC placed
fourth.
Senior leader John
Riddle led the Pirates
individually, shooting
a consistent 75-74-74
for a three-day total
of 223.
Stimart finished the
tournament with 225
strokes, Czaja shot a
226, Newsome finish-
ed with 231 and
Dooley had 233.
The Pirates weren't
as successful in their
other tournament,
combining for a team
total of 920 strokes.
Riddle once again
led the Pirates,
shooting 227 for the
tournament. Czaja
shot a 228, Newsome
a 234, Dooley a 237
and Stimart finished
with 239.
The Pirates were
horrendous in the se-
cond round, and
finished the day with
a 320 stroke total.
"Our performance
was pitiful. This was
our worst showing of
the year exclaimed
first year coach Jerry
Lee. However, the
Pirates shot at 295 on
the last day and
finished 13th among
24 teams.
ECU will next com-
pete in the Furman In-
vitational, which will
include teams from
the ACC and SEC.
According to Lee,
"The competion will
be very, very tough
TUE
j MARCH 15
STING RAYSti
WED
MARCH 16
BJOHN Belushi
Film Festival
9:00
Animal Housefc
11:00
Blues Bros.
FREE ADM.
THUR
DIAMONDS
St. Patricks
? Special
ALLE.C.V.
GIRL '5 DORM
FREE IN MARCH
(with proper I.D.)
WELCOME BACKSTUDENTS
BONDS
218AriMlon
lOrcawttc.rtC
756-6001
KLHOOOeSCO
210 C. Piflh Street
Qrccnviic.MC
752-H56
l�
W7A
WE'LL RAY YOU
TO GET INTO
SHAPE THIS SUMMER
If you have at least
two years of college left,
you can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp this summer and earn
approximately $600.
And if you qualify, you
can enter the ROTC 2-
Year Program this fall and
receive up to1,000 a year.
But trie big payoff
happens on graduation day
That's when you receive
an officer's commission
So get your body in
shape (not to mention your
bank account). �
Enroll in Army ROTC
Yox more information,
contact your Professor of
Military Science.
ARMY ROTC
BEALLYOUCANBtJ
in Room 324 Erwin Hall, 757-4967
Drop by The Coffee House is tke
Basement of Meadenhall Student Center
on Mv. 23rd anytime between
3:00 and 6:00pm to find out
more about ROTC Bask Camp
Vengeful
Off The
Cont'd from Pan II
GMl
Harnngto:
ECL tor then
perfor
especially
and Green,
a-
to
"1
White, Brc
B RAM) MLW!

in tfa
terc
WOT.
etes ' '�
d
C h amp
Marc! 4 5
Pi
ship
Classifi
PERSONAL
TOS'O 3S ' - � � �"c
� � . MM �,��- ��
cas �. ne " mt-rr � se
csrre �: �r-M� �Os M
ft� r0�o �ei v 9r
UP Te p i45 -� �
91 "�!� - ���? i - �
you !���� f M
(our �ec' I rrZtc �� V '
C�t S ���� � ��" "
,OV 9K 0�S H i �� "
poo :as? .ch. �' i
m� c�ft�' ?v �� -2v js��
mt 'o ao �'t i J " "
bc W MKI - �
mn� Ci-EC
MOA80 Ml' S �.OM� Mt
i l�uc�n' S'�. ��� ,rom o�s'
pimimii s�-
DAD f p s a
.� .�: hj'comes ��� :�'
STEvE t' i �c �; s�� cc �r
ao�s e.�o�� i.� �� MM
.n Cl��S' i-Ov TB Si .
LEiGM PS -�' sc '
SERVICES -
PROFESSOR A- TYUHS
SERsiCE ��?�"�"� au ��
work i�m S��ric ��p��- N
Can L�n.e SKi 'Mi1 a'
GAIL JOTSER V. MJU

STEAK
featuring USDA
cut freh
Even Tuesda ii
Beef
$1.99 Rei
Served with king
Potato or F.F. ant
featuring Pm
Fri. & Sal
Now sen ing 14
2 locations to bet
00 W. Greenville
2903 E. 10th S
P
.�
Tar Laniin;

4-
I� Spe
Tues. Trou
Wc4.4
Shrimp f
1105 Airport Road
-





f
N N
MROs 15, NM
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 15, 1983
13
o Victory
I'm
me
u
the weekend and also
ovei the pasi tow or
three years 'The
scores indicate the
tpe of character thi-
ballclub has he
said "1 think it will
havse a positive im
pact on us when we
pla our conference
games rhe have
cad proved thev
�me Kkk
1th 16th
ft
db vi art offering
ii prices in order 10 get vou
months ahead! I et u helD
I that in phvsuallv fit!
Pi
� r
V
� s
m9
L
IG SHOES
RUSSELL SPORTSWEAR
( R � NK KS-S.95
HOODED IOPS-11 M
nv h At PANTS-8.95
lelastkait and drawNlnni
ODUCING
hand"
uht- b S are now in stock and are
-ram: I arge & regular sizes are available.
&LG-18 95
WEIGHTS
2ib1 9S J�5
4 lb13.95 5b16.V5
HT EQUIPTMENT
mbi Ih bars wdtihls JL benches to omDliment
to the ahovt- items. ve havejump ropes,
i iv other exercise aids to help ou get read
i ummn tun'
CK STUDENTS
KL. MOOQK CO.
2KEPttthS!r�1
Gr�rjn��.ftC
752-4156
� a.
CO �
a. a
-I UJ
Q-ljL
" O .
a. o u.
3M
pi?
U.UJU'
a. -
rsi h
NOIU
o o o
Vengeful Bucs Parade Patriots Indians Upset By JMU
Off The Court In First Round
Cont'd From Page 10
GMU coach Joe
Harrington credited
ECL' for their strong
performance,
especially Edwards
and Green, but he
wasn't as praising
toward the officials.
That last play
transpired the way it's
been for us all
season he said.
"Yates has been
beaten down the last
month. That last play
(Robinson's steal
from Yates) would
have taken a lot of
guts to call as a foul,
but 1 think it should
have been called
On the contrary,
however, none of the
three officials ap-
peared to have even
considered the play
anything but a clean
steal.
Harrington com-
plimented the talent in
the league and the
coaches. "Our league
has beaten some good
outside teams all
season he said. "I
think everyone's im-
proved a great deal
ECU'S Edwards
and GMU's Yates
were both named to
the ECAC-South's
all-Star team, along
with W&M's Keith
Cieplicki and Brant
Weidner and JMU's
Dan Ruland. Yates
shared the
"Co-Player of the
Year honors with
Ruland.
White, Brooks Pace Pirate Track Team
B RANDY MEWS
Nl.ff SSrilrr
The ECU men's
track team participated
in the 62nd Annual In-
tercollegiate Associa-
tion of Amateur
Athletes of America In-
door Track Field
Championships on
March 4, 5 and b in
Princeton, New Jersey.
National Champion-
ship participants Craig
White and Chris
Brooks faired extreme-
ly well in the meet.
White placed third
overall in the 55-meter
high hurdles, finishing
the event in 7.46.
Brooks won the long
jump event with an
stounding leap of 25'6
3 Brooks jump was
a quarter-inch of the
meet record set by
former Olympian Bill
Ryan.
The mile-relay team
of Eddie Bradley,
Willie Fuller, Keith
Clarke and Reuben
Pierce had their best
showing of the year,
finishing seventh in
3:17.39.
Other Pirates who
did well in the meet in-
cluded Nathan Mc-
Corkle in the 55-meter
dash and Chris
Mcl.awhorn in the long
jump.
Head coach Bill Car-
son was delighted with
some of the his
freshmen runners
qualifying for the
finals, but felt they still
could have done better.
"I think our freshmen
were overwhelmed by
the meet, and didn't
place as well as they
should have in the
finals
Carson also stated
that "this is one of the
best run track meets
I've ever seen. The
competition was
imbelievable
Cont'd From Page 10
James Madison pulled
out a narrow 41-38
win over the Tribe.
Unfortunately and
surprisingly, the
Dukes will be the only
team from the ECAC-
South competing in
the NCAA, as the In-
dians did not receive a
bid.
Against the Pirates,
W&M's Kevin
Richardson scored
eight points in the
first half, hitting six
of nine field goals to
lead the Tribe with 14
points. Cieplicki
followed with 12.
In the second
period, the Bucs were
up by five with 13:59
left, but Richardson's
four points, along
with senior Mike
Strayhorn and
Weidner's layups gave
the Indians the boost
they needed.
But ECU freshman
Johnny Edwards, a
member of the
ECAC-South's all-
conference team,
wasn't quite through
yet. Scoring four of
his 11 points with 5:12
remaining, the Bucs
went ahead by three.
Cieplicki's four
points, however, gave
the Indians a lead they
never again lost.
In the first half,
W&M jumped out,
6-0 . But Edwards'
slam dunk got the
Pirates moving. Lone
baskets from Ed-
wards, Peartree and
Wright cut the In-
dians' lead, 8-6, but
Cieplicki nailed three
baskets to help the
tribe glide away, 16-8.
With 7:22 left in the
first period, the Bucs
scored six straight
points to trail the
Tribe, 18-16. Green
then stole the ball and
made a lay-up to tie
the score, 18-18
But Richardson
came back for the In-
dians, scoring four
points to give W&M a
26-24 advantage over
the Pirates at
halftime.
The Bucs made 19
of 41 shots for a 46?
percent shooting
average, while W&M
shot 47.6 percen'
from the floor. The
Pirates outrebounded
the Tribe, 25-20, but
committed 12 tur-
novers while W&M
had nine.
Overall, Carson was
pleased with his team's
performance and en-
joyed the Pirates hav-
ing the opportunity to
compete in the meet.
"Being part of the
IC4A is the best thing
that could have hap-
pened to the ECU track
program
t�5tb
JlppGe tocoli(l
Alabama Frank Zappa
Hank Williams Jr. J.Geils Band
Molly Hatchet Sammy Hagor
Styx Night Ranger
Christopher Cross Musical Youth
Ric Ocasek
Red Rider
H e bu ontl eil ntd
ilhums Open rill 9.00
MnnSat.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
TONTO Yoti re really talented
with your sword I kept it ids' m
case you need it when the police
come tc arrest you lor steaung
the road ends Si9n and messing
up the pier lights We never did
get that palm tree did we' Do
you always go parachuting in
your sleep' I enioyed the Stray
Cat Strut down the beach until
you decided to strut me into the
pool' In case you haven't told
the other guys what you asked
me to do here s a hint ill nib
ble on yours it you II nibble on
mine' CLEO
HOWARD WHAT s worse than
a hurricane' Stay away from
priestesses!
DAVID Let's play 51 or better
ytt, bull what comes alter Jl?
STEVE Lets go to Me�ico or
does everyone lie there? See you
m class' Love TRINA and
LEIGH PS Let s do it again"
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE, experience, quality
work IBM Selectrc typewriter
Call Lame Sh.ve 7S4 S301 or
GAIL JOYNER tit i042
TYPING Term papers thesis,
etc Call Kempie Dunn, 7S3 .733
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE Complete audio repair
call alter I p m Mark 752 lilt
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST 2 YEAR OLD small
black lemaie dog White mark
ings on chin and paws no tail.
Answers to CLO Please call
7S4-320 alter 00 p m il seen or
found
LOST GERMAN SHEPHERD
puppy mostly black Answers to
Dusty Lost near Harding
Street II found, call 754 4443
MOVING? NO JOB TOO
LARGE OR SMALLII
Reasonable rates Call 7S� �S33
I AM WORKING ON MY
MASTER'S degree m public ad
ministration and need a tutor �
preferably a graduate person m
business administration or
public administration It
hours Please contact me as
soon as possible at 7525
Ask for ABOULLA
FOR SALE
174 TOYOTA CORONA speed
ac. good mileage, clean J200,
757 1512. ask for Jim
ECU STUDENTS, faculty, staff
Welcome to our flee market at
the Pitt County Fairgrounds
located on North Greenville
Blvd Open every Saturday and
Sunday � til 5. Crafts, fools fur-
niture, books, etc Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols anil collectors items
Real bargainsll
MISC.
COLLEGE STUDENTS Want
to earn entra money from your
room at your convenience?
Unlimited earnings potential!
Start your own business and
take it with you wherever you
go A unique way to save and
make money If interested call
752-0207 4 00 p m � 00 p m ,
Monday through Friday
15�� OFF ANY
COMPLETE PAIR OF j
EYE GLASSES i
Not goo I
ssssstsssssssssssl epwclaie
stern
vVifclf
OPTICAL
i isA
V
tLCJ4�fV'S
IOFT SQQ
JJj) CONTACTS
IMCJ UDCS 30 DAY GUARANTEE
- , AMD CAtt KIT
PALACE
703 L.tevnulle Blvri Ac ro� Ftom P�tt PU�� N��l To JRA Realty)
, � l, , A r�. Open? Mam lofcpm Mon -Fii
C�4rv M Hani I scet�e�J Optman v� �
ROAST BEEF
Tender, Tasteful, Tempting!
Lean roast beef piled high on
a fresh foot-long roll Mmm
Served hot or cold, the way you
like it Try one today!
�SUB3�
Famous Foot Long Sandwichos
We've got more taste.
208 5th St.
758-7979
STEAK HOUSE
featuring LSD A choice beef
cut fresh daily
Every Tuesday in March 1983
Beef Tips
$1.99 Reg. $3.49
Served with King Idaho Baked
Potato or F.F. and Texas Toast
featuring Prime Rib every
Fri. & Sat. Night
Now serving 14 oz. T-Bone
2 locations to better serve you
500 W. Greenville Blvd. 756-0040
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
.Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
O
jfi Anniversary Celebration
99
1PJjALsssss4 .efrisLssssssssssssssssssssssssW
TWO MOON A EB8 MR $1-�
HcWp�s�r�the.vU�4unhrsl�r���k-nis�! M"11
kstsscr ptTsss.p�sr ���.jnsrr mu-p jmwbuv rh.N
Kwn rM Mi �� �jn�tssnaoun � .hrr. Ar
lafcr Meal �li bnraktw n�ur uoh M thr
hi�u�sn� rsankr BcseivaTest. 4HHKaf�vhr
SMKta �0K lUtfiMrcct Urcrmilk
s O0rrrjuudltvuuMas M W
I
yv Roast Beef
I. I Sandwich!
a Tntf � NO COUPON NECESSARY
m March 12-20O
�fxassc pnr�c� the
tustumrr per vent pkasc
pun nut isuud m c msbmauixi wKti udsrr ofcr
AM
n.H��sheli�r��rnnH I esc oajpjn prr I
i�umrTiTsx�ipas am satou TWiiim
lOrrKWdaftcr U Vi A.M Oaih onh Jl ttsr fc)ik� rsankx � Bc��aTtiiv 90 j
ondJOW WO" t lifch �ntrt OnxmsUc M (sfrr,M�llhf�MisOs M j
' �' - � � �� �- I
11 ��IrMjVl
nsMdccr
L���.ex�m��i�ssiauae
gaC6?gt�aaBgs�apoa0ro
gggzssssr.sssiwwuswawiiirc
All You Can Eat
Specials
TocsTroat for $2.99
Wed. A Tkan. Bight
Shrimp for $5.99
105 Airport Road
ijiSSSSS�5�SJ-i�-
St. Patrick Day � The Day
TkaXEverybody is Irish!
Beautiful St. Patricks Day
Mylar Balloons
Hcked Up $4.00
St. Patricks Day Balloon Bouquet
$20.00 delivered with a song
PHOSE 752-3815 9:00am-9:00pm
Balloons Over Greenville
Greenville's tirst and Finest Balloon Service"
Thisyear,
some of our graduates
will be remembered
under the following
yearbook heading,
M
YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also
means you're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our
medical team. Write. Army Nurse Opportunities,
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank, CA 91510.
ARMY MURSE CORPS.
BEALLYOUCANBE.
Thos� Not Pictured.
i
!
Greenville, N.C
S
i
Don t be a blank spot Your coHege
yearbook is a lasting memory ot a
great part of your hfe
for your sake and others.
get your picture taken
isstt Vvsw S�uo� Hi
Ts NXVVNNVVV VV
Sitting Times 9:00-12:00 1:00-5:00
M-FMorch 14-April! Sign Up Now
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� NtfjiHeiy






Store Hours:
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Welcome Back E.C.U.
TuesSat.
SALE
H)lJ�l�IHHJtfHW�
K mart" ADVERTISED
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Om twr� �morttMXi � to haul every ���
t, smc ti�rr � stoc� on o' sheve ft �n
AOvKlit�(3 -l not vDe Of pur
ca�e du� lo �n� wntoeseen '���on
K m�l . 4Vo a Rr Ch�C Or 'eQuOSI
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0� ��? ,ni�t, K 0 ���: � "
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VISA'
master ctiatge
f

Our Reg. 88
B&
Dr. Pepper
Choose regular or
sugar free in 2 litre
bottles.
����������
Our Reg. 9.97 '
36 Position Lawn Chair
Multi-position lounger with
podded vinyl headrest, vinyl
1: support tubing, steel frame.
r"ii
69

Our Reg
8.96
6.96
Student Desk Lamp
Adjustable aim, hi-lo-off
switch, comes with
high intensity bulb.
Our Reg.
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156
4-PK. Light bulbs
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10.88
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3.47
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Angled bristles for hard-
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3.97 W
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2.00
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Rust proof metal
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24.88
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15.66
One Drawer Personal
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41.97
200-101 j x 8" i
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Notebook norrow
Paper ruW note p�p
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limit 2.
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3.77
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7.97
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2.69
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order ham.
jj
U
67
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Submarine Sandwiches
3 Sandwich meats, cheese,
pickles, onions, lettuce &
tomatoes on Vienna roll.
2.97
Select Savings In Sporting Goods
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Our Reg. 12.97
� MacGregor Athletic Bag9.97
Our Reg. 9.97
� MacGregor Back Pak7.97
Our Reg. 3.33
� Eveready Flashlight Battery197
Trash Can
Sturdy metal container has
ur Reg. 3.97 (No. 141G) World Class Frisbee 2.971 up to 20-gallon capacity.
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Parsons Table
For home or office. Use
singly or in multi-stack
combination.
19 97o" R�
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20 Steei cabinet
polypropylene Plaaes.
handie Shop now save

How 20-JO �o
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5.96
Our Reg.
7.96
k
2.99

Our Reg.
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Trash Can Liners
Pack of SO durable
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Our Reg 17.95
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10-gallon Aquarium Kit
All you need to get started. .10 gallon tank, pump, filter,
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CASSf�I T�5
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CEE
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1.97
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Metal File Cabinet
Features Open-hinge top,
Blank Cassettes
90 minutes of recording
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20 quart Potting Soil
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37.97
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Easy Assembly. j
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3.97
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6"Potted Plants
Choice of attractive fo-
liage plants for summer





'
t
1
8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 15, 1983
j�
Disney's Groundbreaking Film 'Tron'Here This Weekend
Light cycles streak across a game grid in this scene from Saturday at 5, 7 and 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Walt Disney Studios' futuristic animated feature Tron, Center's Hendrix Theatre. The film is sponsored by the
playing this Thursday at 7 p.m. and this Friday and ECU Student Union Films Committee.
Book Views 'Afrikaners'
How
to meet
aBigshoc
face to face,
silting limr- M-i 9:W-12:98 1:69-5:60
March 14- pril I sijjn t p Now
B EMILY
CASEY
sl�ff �nl�
Blood River, by Barbara
Villet. Everest, 1982, 255
pages, $16.95.
The author's hus-
band. Grey Villet,
was born in South
Africa. He furnished
her book with 32 full
pages of photographs
of his vast homeland,
its cities, its peoples.
Study those photos;
then refer to them
while reading her
��passionate saga" of
one of those peoples,
the white tribe of
Afrikaners.
Like W h i t es in
North Carolina, the
Afrikaners are
descendants of 17th
c e n t u r v colonists
from Europe. They
too now wield
political power after
having been crushed
by industrialized
military power of
alien whites, though
only after their homes
and crops were burn-
ed, their flocks
alaughtered, and their
population herded in-
to concentration
camps. When they
came back, a half cen-
tury later in the 1948
election, they created
the iron racial separa-
tion of apartheid
(most correctly rhym-
ed with "hate" not
"light"). And they
rose from poverty in a
Japan-like miracle.
Here at last is a
book that can help us
sympathize with his
embattled people, if
any can. Facts are not
blinked. In the
massacre at
Sharpeville (whose
22nd anniversary is at
hand), "all (186
wounded blacks) were
shot in the back by
the police. Bike,
brilliant young black
leader (was) beaten to
death by security
police. Soweto (was)
deliberately designed
as a soulless entity. It
is illegal for their
(workers') families to
accompany them to
the cities
Afrikans party-
goers consider the
Villets' defense of our
Declaration of In-
dependence demented
after their young
minister proclaims it
"one of the most cor-
rupt documents ever
written But these
facts become more
understandable (if
never acceptable) in
the historical and
psychological context
this book provides:
British imperialism,
Chaka Zulu's bloody
emptying of the veld
at the time of the
Great Trek, and
fanatical Calvinism,
streaming from
Huguenots as much
as from Dutch.
Individuals, center
of light, offer some
hope for the future.
Sam Brink, gharled
superfarmer: "unless
we take down within
the next few years the
whole ugly structure it
has taken thirty years
to build up, it will
destroy everything
(and) South africa
Game Of Travel Ends In Poland
From the Baltic Sea
to the Tatra Moun-
tains, from the birth
of the nation to eimp-
ses into its future,
Shenlyn and Matthew
Mentes move through
both space and time
to give an accurate
and colorful account
of contemporary
Poland in a travel
documentarv film to
be shown on tomor-
row night at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix
Theatre.
This is the last stop
in the Department of
University Unions'
"Game of Travel
Combining exten-
sive, in-depth
research with an in-
tuitive insight into the
human interest aspect
of their subject, the
husband and wife
team have produced a
fascinating account of
life in this eastern
european country to-
day.
Warsaw is shown as
it was after World
War II, when it was
reduced to rubble,
and as it is today � a
vigorous modern city
whose future lies in
the hands of the
young Poles such as
the proud young
soldiers participating
in the ceremony of the
changing of the guard
at the Tomb of the
Unknown Soldier.
The birthplaces of
Chopin and Coper-
nicus, the beaches and
shipyards of the
Baltic, a large
glassworks, a
religious pilgrimage,
the old city of
Cracow, and the
shepherds of the
Tatra Mountains are
a few of the people
and places shown in
the film.
Few countries of
the world have a
history as tragic as
Poland. It has been
completely wiped off
the map three times in
the past two centuries
but the Poles have
stubbornly clung to
their national identity
and each time their
country has been
reborn. A large
number of Poles have
relatives in America
and Shenlyn and
Matthew found these
people especially
cooperative and
helpful.
The resulting film is
comprehensive, can-
did and filled with the
vitality and humor
that characterize the
Polish people today.
Tickets are
available at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student
Center. Admission is
free to ECU students
with ID and activity
card, and free for
ECU faculty and staff
with MSC member-
ship. Public admis-
sion is $3.50, or $3 for
groups of 20 or more.
All tickets will be
$3.50 at the door.
TRON' is tan-tastic, magical for
kids and grown-ups, extraordinary.
jud,Sw� SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
200 West
AXA & EEE
Happy Hoar
Tuesday, March 15
90-1:00
Admission $1.00
Happy Hour Prices
Throughout The Night
EGIT B�t 200 West
200 W. 10th St.
,� try CHICAGO SUN-TIMES:
sensational and brainy,
stylish and fun'
j.h.j A:�n NEWSWEEK:
TRON is about to take
you somewhere you've
never been
VetnonScon UPI:
"Utterly new. vividly
exciting.a trip and ahalf!
R world inside
the computer
where man
has never been.
Never before now.
-GeoeSsxc CHICAGO TRiBUNt
A A A
"TRON'is a trip, and a
terrifically entertaining
one at that
-RicharOScnicuci TIME
"(TRON a vision of the
movies' future:
- Janet Mjsm. NEW YORK TIMES
"It is beautiful-
spectacularly so
a wonder to behold
LAI TARES JEWELERS
ESTABLISHED 1912
GREENVILLE N C
4 f -om Sf��
Ooi n. 2-Jl.ji
f Remounts
Custom Design
Repair
All Work Done On Premises
lAtfti
264 By Pass,
Next Door to
Toyota East
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL S
.
FOUR (4) Tacos
for just 51.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
2 8:00pm til closing .
I f 15 draff with purchase of 4 tacos -yi
TRON R LISBERGER-KUSHNER PRODUCTION
JEFF BRIDGES BRUCE B0XIEITNER DAVID IpRRNER CINDY MORGAN - BRRNRRD HUGHES
RONMILLER - - WENDY CRRL0S ��- � � STEVEN LISBERGER - BONNIE MRCBIRD
�� e STEVEN LI5BERGER DONALD KUSHNER STEVEN LISBERGER
-JOURNEY -WRIT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS J,N �V,u.p�� pGHtuowsuBr
COPYRIGHT 1982 SWANK MOTION PICTURES INC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Date March 17, 18, 19 Time 7 PM 5, 7, 9 PM
Place Hendrix Theotre Admission IP & Activity Cord
Auditions Fo
Summer Stoc
This Weeken
Local audi'
East Carolina Summe:
for Saturday. Mai
ECU'S Me- 1
to 5 pm
More than 10
and techniciai
season, whicl
Pippin (July. 4-9) A I ink Sight Wiu
ll-16i. Vo, Vanetti
They're Playing Our 5
Other audit
planne II
Wins-
Drama. (
Theatre
the Thea
Per'
for the t I
ing June �
. .
and prq
whisr
.�
cape, a
� -
rou'
d
pos '
1
Tht
Shield ' -
d
o: V �
fct '
B

sh .
se'
M- �
� -
rr. �
de-
ter
repi
tun -
in
De -
Russian Fil
Here Tomoi
l nntmued From Pagi
suou-ne a'
peace and wel
The dreams
Bogatrye) are very.
back - ape ng - g. St
positc in eer a
friend (thev w
alway- trying to
shes, Oblomov
will, the other pure
thev -end the movie thi
phase- ol movemei
tion.
The source ' x' s vita
meant to undei
ting him on a horse an -
av when be wa
episode, the colors are �
and the emphas
of the Germai b
pride of the you - x
rides awav '�"
neuhbor. pi
get one of those scenes
so common in the i
the young man -
horse into the s
friends cover his faa -
ndine awa aga
The heart
can be awfulrj senthtH
nume lyrical impu �
1 emotive aci
that u make- � l
preference
acting No doubt M ko is
classical tradition -
performance thai we k
actors' superb training � �
things that are ve
ing the pre. -
tereed in the chanw I
tends 10 the camera styi
refreshings active and t
adaptation of a classic.
Mikhalko uses natura
so vou get and idea ot the j
which our ancestors lived
camera moving with the i
The super-prettiness o A
occasionally turned to slop.
is quieter, and it's always a
picture's themes. There- on
sequence in w hich Oblomov I
around a snow-covered St
sleigh, and everv tree and
broad, empty boulevard B
The sleigh pulls up before a
ored white and robin"s-eggj
rounded by a black iron tr1
tipped spikes. This episode �
sion of czanst Russia,
evocative as a passage
dounov.
And much of the long, co
in which Oblomov tentatil
chattering beauty. Olga �
takes its tone of sweet metal
sense of luxury and waste
by

v. . - �
��� ��"imifi�imjg�

I





Title
The East Carolinian, March 15, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 15, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.255
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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