The East Carolinian, March 1, 1983






A

t
5hE iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.45-
Tuesday, March 1, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
SGA Finances
Reserve Fund Set Up
The SGA Monday night tangled
over, and finally passed, the
Financial Management Act that
will guide the spending of funds
for the '8384 school year. The
final version of the bill passed by
a voice vote.
The bill's key clause stipulates
that 17.5 percent of SGA expected
revenue is to be kept in resere
and not appropriated during the
SGA annual budgeting process
The figure was reached upon after
the two oppossing sides, one
headed by president Eric Hender-
son advocating a 15 percent
resere and one headed by
legislator Charles Blake ad-
vocating 20 percent, compromis-
ed.
The bill came to the floor with a
15-percent reserve clause and was
immediateh amended by Blake to
20 percent. Henderson and
Speaker of the House Gary
Williams spoke against the pro-
posed amendment, saying that a
15 percent reserve was more than
adequate. They also said a large
reserve portion would defeat the
purpose o' annual budgeting.
Blake and other legislators, as
in other SGA meetings, said the
15 percent reserve would take
authority from one legislator and
give it to the next.
A majority of the legislators
agreed with Blake and passed the
amendment 20-17. But the
20-percent reserve didn't hold out
for long. Speaker Williams, after
another amendment to the bill
failed, immediately re-introduced,
through parliamentary procedure.
the already-passed 20-percent
reserve clause.
W illiams this time launched in-
to a all-out defensive speech to
defeat the amendment. He said
the legislature, by holding such a
large portion of the money in
reserve (as much as $25,000),
would destroy all semblance of
planning and continuity in the
budgeting process.
Williams speech seemed to pro-
mpt the legislators; they decided
to debate the amendment again
with a vote of 18-14.
Members began to tire, and
some even left. The discussion on
the reserve clause began again.
This time, before debate could get
hnted, legislator David Brown in-
troduced a friendly amendment to
compromise and make the clause
17.5 percent. It was readily ac-
cepted by all members of the
SGA.
The act passed, with the reserve
clause at 17.5 percent. It now has
to be signed by Henderson.
Photo By CiNOY WALL
The Student Government Association in its weekly meeting last night passed a new Financial Management
Act with a reserve fund of 17.5 percent. The figure was agreed upon after much debate and compromise.
I
i
Postmen Should Get Sore Feet From East's Mail
Only months after being prais-
ed for his thriftiness, N.C.
Republican Sen. John P. East is
taking the heat for spending
almost a million dollars of tax-
payers' money for his office's
mailing cost.
East, a former ECU political
science professor, spent $961,000
to mail out 8.5 million newsletters
in 1982. According to a congres-
sional report. East's total was the
seventh highest among the na-
tion's 100 senators.
East received praise last year
when he announced that he had
returned $140,000 to the U.S.
Treasury that he saved from staff
expenses.
With last week's release regar-
ding East's newsletter expenses,
the praise turned sour. State
democratic leaders responded
with strong criticism of East for
his high mailing cost. Some have
charged that East has been using
his frequent mailings for political
purposes. In the six weeks prior
to last fall's elections. East sent
out 6.2 million copies of tax-paid
newsletters that attacked liberals,
national Democratic leaders and
the news media.
"It is obvious that the newslet-
ters that were sent out during that
time, just prior to the election,
were blatantly political said
June E. Milby, communications
director for the state Democratic
party.
The congressional report also
said East's mailings averaged 3.89
letters for every mail box in North
Carolina.
"The purpose of the mailings in
a representative democracy is to
allow us to communicate with our
constituents East said in -1 re-
cent Associated Press interview.
"Often the local press is unable to
cover the range of activities we are
involved in
East denied that the letters were
political or connected with last
fall's elections. He pointed out
that since he does not face election
until 1986, it would require a large
leap of faith to say his mailings
were tied to the elections.
"All citizens find it unfortunate
when tax funds are used for pur-
poses for which they were not in-
tended said Betty Speir, the first
vice chairman of the N.C.
Democratic Party I feel certain
that the franking privilege was in-
tended for basic informational
purposes for a senator's consti-
tuents and not for political pur-
poses Speir told The East
Carolinian.
Nationally Sen. John Heinz
(R-Penn) was the highest free mail
spender. Heinz outpaced his
senate colleagues by sending out
15 million pieces of mail at an
estimated cost to tapaers of
S2.25 million, according to a
senator Rules Committee.
Overall, the 100 senators spent
$48 million to send out a record
234 million pieces of mail. 90 per-
cent of which were newsletters
MSU Director m
To Take ECU
A dmission Job
Charles F. Seeley, director of
admissions and scholarships at
Michigan State University, has
been named the new director of
admissions at ECU and is set to
take office in two weeks.
Seeley will replace Dr. Susan J.
McDaniel. who has been serving
as acting director since the
resignation of Walter ML Bortz
from the post in January of 1982.
McDaniel will continue to serve in
her position as associate vice
chancellor for academic affairs.
Seeley, a MSU graduate, has
served in recruitment and admis-
sions at his alma mater for more
than 20 years and has been pro-
gram director since 1972. MSU
has a student body approximately
three times as large as ECU.
"I am delighted that Mr. Seeley
will be joining us said Vice
Chancellor of Academic Affairs
Angelo A. Volpe, under whose of-
fice the director of admissions
serves. "Mr. Seeley brings a solid
record of success and extensive ex-
perience to this position
Volpe said the director of ad-
missions is a key figure in ECU's
recruitment and retention pro-
gram. Seeley, 55, will take office
on March 14, a fairly good time of
year, according to a
spokeswoman for the admisions
office, since the most hectic
recruiting efforts by the university
are over and the majority of in-
coming students have made com-
mitments to colleges for the fall.
Seeley is a Michagan native and
has never worked outside the
state. He was selected for the
ECU post after a nationwide
search to fill the position.
ECU Business Student
Gone Since Wednesday
bv DAVE WILLIAMS
Pedestrian Pest
Recent heavy rains causing mud puddles and wet spots have probably caused more than one pedestrian to
be splashed by a passing car such as the one above.
Tuition Hikes Suggested For
UNC System Non-Residents
Announcements
Editorial
Entertainment
Sports
Classifieds
The weather for today will be
partly cloudy with a chance of
rain later in the day. The forecast
for Korea will be no more war,
with an outside chance of a mon-
soon heading for Vietnam.
Hawkeye and the all guys and
gab of the 4077 have finally gone
home. We're going to miss them.
By JEFF CLONINGER
Suff Writer
Two bills have been proposed
recently in the N.C. General
Assembly to increase tuition for
out-of-state students, suggesting
that students pay a larger portion
of the actual cost of their college
education and thus cutting state
subsidies.
The first bill, sponsored by
Rep. Howard Coble of
Greensboro, would raise tuition in
increments of 10 to 18 percent
each year for a six-year period,
resulting in an increase to about
90 percent of the actual cost of a
college education. The second
bill, proposed by Rep. John Jor-
dan of Alamance County, would
call for an immediate increase to
100 percent of the actual cost and
would be put into effect as of Ju-
ly, 1983.
The tuition students currently
pay is only a small part of the ac-
tual cost to educate a student in a
college or university. State funds
pay the majority of the expense.
William C. Friday, president of
the UNC schools, said if either bill
is passed in it's present form, it
would deal a "devastating blow to
our state's educational institu-
tions Friday believes such a hike
in tuition would not only "cut off
many good students from our
campuses" but also "hurt athletic
and scholarship programs as
well
Because of the large number of
N.C. students who go to school
out of state, Friday fears that
other states may follow the pro-
posed actions of the General
Assembly and raise their out-of-
state tuition fees.
ECU Chancellor John M.
Howell stated the position of the
university will be always to at-
tempt to keep tuition low since the
Constitution states that education
should be free if possible. North
Carolina has always tried to keep
tuition low because the state
generally believes that colleges
and universities are a good invest-
ment of money.
"As technology advances more
educated people are required than
are laborers Howell said. "An
increase of tuition would surely
UNC President William Friday
result in a decrease of students be-
ing able to afford higher educa-
tion
Out-of-state students com-
promise 15 percent of the students
at North Carolina's 16 state-
supported colleges and univer-
sities.
The Raleigh Police Department
and the Belmont Police Depart-
ment in Mecklenburg County
have joined ECU campus police
and the Greenville Police Depart-
ment in the investigation of an
ECU student who has been miss-
ing since Wednesday.
Anne Marie Fredenberg, a
sophomore business student, was
reported missing Thursday morn-
ing by her boyfriend Eric Knight.
Knight was the last one reported
to see her. Fredenberg, 19, from
Charlotte, dropped out of school
on Wednesday Feb. 19. She had
told her roommate in Clement
dorm that she would return for
her belongings, but never did.
"She hasn't taken anything,
said Fredenberg's roomate Shan-
non Peak. "I'm real concerned
Both Peak and Fredenberg's
parents thought it unusual for the
young woman not to inform them
or Knight of her whereabouts.
ECU police detective Gene
mcAbee, who is in charge of the
Fredenburg case, said Freden-
burg's disappearence was clouded
bv some "suspicious cir-
cumstances" that he could not
elaborate on at this time.
"The information 1 have would
cause you to worry a little
McAbee told The East Caroli-
nian. "I'm concerned for her
safety
McAbee said that most of the
leads he has received as a result of
over a dozen interviews were very
sensitive and could not be releas-
ed. He added that most of his in-
formation was unconfirmed. "It's
a strange situation McAbee
noted.
Fredenburg is 5'8" and weight
120 pounds. She has brown
shoulder-length hair and brown
eyes. She was last seen wearing a
striped shirt, blue jeans and
cowboy boots, McAbee said.
According to McAbee, Freden-
burg' s 1980 Chevrolet Chevette is
also missing. He described the car
color as beige with stripes on both
sides. The license plate is RZZ85.
Reasons for Fredenburg's
withdrawal from ECU are not cer-
tain, but Peak believed that she
may have quit because she needed
some time to be by herself. "She
might have just wanted to take a
break he said.
Peak is not convinced that any
foul play is involved in Freden-
burg's disappearance. "I don't
think she's in danger Peak said.
"She just might have run off or
something
"I won't form an opinion
now McAbee said in reference
to Fredenburg's safetv. "Were
not far enough along on the in-
vestigation
McAbee has kept in close con-
tact with Fredenburg's parents
throughout the ordeal. "Thev
came up from Charlotte last
week McAbee said. He added
that he has been maintaining
telephone contact with the familv
since that visit. McAbee has also
remained in contact with both
Peak and Knight.
McAbee said he had no solid
leads about Fredenburg's
whereabouts, but that he had
received some informaion in-
dicating she may have applied for
jobs in the Raleigh area since her
disappearance. McAbee added
that because of the other
suspicious circumstances he
couldn't be sure if she a-
definately safe.
"Nobody has seen her at all,
that 1 know of. since last W ednes-
day morning at nine McAbee
added.
World News
At A Glance
Bv United Press International
DAKAR, Senegal � Presi-
dent Abdou Diouf and his
Socialist Party today swept to a
commanding lead in Senegal's
first national elections since the
constitution was liberalized.
Early returns from Sunday's
presidential and parliamentary
elections showed Diouf far
ahead of his four challengers.
LAS VEGAS, Nev. � Bombs
were found at the Stardust and
Desert Inn Hotels on the Las
Vegas Strip, forcing thousands
of tourists to flee today. Both
bombs were removed safely
The extortion outbreak netted a
payoff from a movie theater
that received a telephoned
bomb threat Sunday night.
WASHINGTON � Another
leak has been found in the space
shuttle Challenger's main
engines, forcing an additional
delay of up to a week in the
See WORLD, Page 3

11





'
THE EAST C AROL INI AN
MARCH 1. 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
Tne East Carolinian m care ot
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office m the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
�en copy on odd sued paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements but spa. e s often
I 'ted Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column tor
Publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements s 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
C m Wednesdayy tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
w.H Be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and
Pacement Service m the Btox
ton House ts offering the follow
ing one hour sessions to help you
prepare your own resume
March 17. 1983 Thursday 3 00
p m. March 2! 1983 Mon
day I 00pm Those
seniors or graduate students
fn.shtng th's year and planning
'c register with us are urged to
a"end You may come tc 'he
B'oxton House at any of the
above t mes
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and
Placement Serv.ce n the B'ox
ton House is offering these one
hour sessions to aid you m
developing better nterviewing
ss is tor use in your job search
March 22 1983 Tuesday
4 00pm March 24, 1983
Thursday 2 00 p m Afilm
and discussion of nter ew
through the Career Planning
and Placement Service w
�area
MARKETING FILM
SERIES
T - e 4er as" Vare'ng
Assoc-af'On and ECU Depart
nentoi Ma-kef ng will present a
Market ng Film Series on
March 2 ana 3 n Rawi 130 at
3 00 Ail interested East
Carolina students are invited to
attend The films wn provide
ntormation about marketing
opportunities and show
�eevance of market ng ,n cor
porate obiecves and methods
of operaons The topics will m
ce Marketing An integral
rd" ot Bus ness Operations
and Marketing Careers
AMBASSADORS
There will not be a general
meeting of the ECU Am
oassadors on March 2. 1983
They wni. however, meet on
yveo March 16.1983 The
meeting will be held in the multi
Purpose room of Mendenhall at
5 00 p rr cive entertainment
wM be provided tfhe skit you ve
an neara about1' and signup
sneets will be available Pries
� � y.gh point totals will also be
liS ssed This is a meeting you
-s' .an no' a'fora to nvss'
PHI ETASIGMA
'�-? on E'a S gma Na'iona;
Freshman Honor Society will
-ee' on Tuesday March 1 at 5
pm r Room 221 a' the
Mendenhall Student Center All
embers are urged 'o a"end
NEW PSYC COURSES
The Psychology Department
has added two courses m fall
1983 1) Developmental
Psychology PSYC 3304. Section
005. 1 00 pm MWF, SP 305 2)
Psychology of Adiustment
PSYC 3275 Section 005 2 00 pm
MWF, SP 211
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
The international Language
Organization will be meeting on
Wednesday March 2 at 3 00 The
meeting will be held in BC 301
The maior topic of the meeting
will be finalizing the plans for
the Soiree Francaise All
members are encouraged to at
tend ana interested persons are
welcome to attend
ECUCIRCLE K
Circle K will not be meeting on
Tuesday March 2 1983 It you
are interested in finding out
about Circle k our next meeting
is March IS. 1983 Tuesday at 7 00
m room 221 of the Mendenhall
Student Center Circle k wishes
all students a pleasant spring
break
COOP
ACM ECU Chapter invites
ev' 'one to learn more about
the opportunity co oping Ex
perience is something we all
need before graduating I The
meeting is March 17 at 3 30 m
room 132 Austm Please come
learn more about this from Ms
Caroi Collins
ACM
Everyone is invited to hear
Dr Wirth speak on the Ad
language An interesting new
language and one not taught at
ECU The meeting will be
March 3 at 3 30 in Rm 132
Austin
ADVENTIST FORUM
Studies in Dan el a Pro
phecy Seminar will be held
Thursday at 7 00 p m in the Cot
tee House Mendenhall Student
Center Th.s Nationally Popular
Semmar s held acrosss
A-npa n leading . t.es The
�i � week series beflins
Thursday MarcH 3 7 oo p m
There will be a lecture and intc
ma � Prophecy No
registration fee s required
NOTICE OF MEETING
Our ifI D weekly nneeT ng
willbeiflon Thursday March
3 a? 7 DC 0 m -n MSC rm 244
Recentiv �nviTea rusfiee. shou'd
bring 'her aues f They haven t
paa them already MandaTor,
Ticket saies will te collected ana
by no means be turned �n laTer
Than The next meeting Mew
members are v.ceo to continue
The GBP spr.t by getting mvolv
eo ana help ng our newly elected
ott'cers
ECU BAHAI CLUB
The ECU Bahai Association
will meet in 241 Mendenhall
each Tuesday from 11 00 till
noon Bahai s believe n the
elimination of a" forms of pre
iudice whether it oe racial,
social, economic or religious
preiudice You are cordially n
vited to share your thoughts
with us anyone interested s
welcome 'o attend. For more in
formation call 752 ii- or
752 1018
MEDIA BOARD
The Media Boa'd is now at
ceptmg applications lor I98j 84
Media Heads for the tonow ng
mediums he East Caroin a-i
The Ebon, Her a Rebel Pho'o
ab anc AZMB 'aoo station
Pick up app'iat.ons in 'he
Meda Board off ce oetwee' MM
hrs of 8 am 12 pm ana I pf 5
pm Deadline tor accept"g ap
plications is Marcr 18 at 5 00
ASMR 2000
Looking for a unique and ex
;itmg way to satisfy your
General College humanities re
quirements Preregister for
ASMR 2000. a new inter
disciplinary course in Medieval
and Renaissance Studies,
scheduled tor tall 1983. Mon
days, 6 30 9 30 pm The course
will survey the basn concepts of
Medieval and Renaissance art.
history, literature music, and
philosophy For more informa
tion call or visit Dr McMillan.
E nghsh 757 6516 or Dr
Nischan History. 757 6956
SLC
Come on down! Each week
the sign language dept otters a
s.lent dinner so sign language
students and members of the
deal community can socialize
and practice their skills This
week the silent dinner is Aed .
March 2 at 6 00 p m The dinner
is at the New Deli
FILMSERIES
The Department of Marketing
in the School of Business will
present an introductory Film
Series on Marketing m March
and April The first two films
will be shown this week On
Wednesday March 2. the film
shown will be an Overall View of
Marketing on Thursday. March
3. the film shown will deal with
lOb opportunities m Marketing
both films will be shown in Rawi
130 at 3 00 Pv any interested
student may attend
JEWELRY MAKING
The Department ot University
Unions is sponsoring a Jewelry
Making course for members of
the Mendenhall Student Center
Crafts Center The course will
be ofterd on Wednesdays March
16 23 30. April 6 13 at 6 00
PM 9 00 PM The cost for the
membership is $10 00 and all
ECU students tacuity staff
and their dependents who are
Mendenhall Student Center
Members may register m the
Crafts Center on the bottom
floor ot MSC between the hours
ot 3 00 PM 10 00 PM Monday
through Fi day and 12 00 noon
5 00 PM on Saturday
For more information call
.noa Baraano a" 15'661' exl
60 a'tet 5 00 PM caii the Craft
entei a I � � 171
HISTORY MAJORS
The Richard C Todd Phi
Alpha Theta Lectures will pre
sent Dr John R.ddle ot NCSu
with an informative program
Dioscorides a"d Early
Medicine' This will be a discus
sion of the use of herbs for
medicinal purposes during the
Middle Ages The program will
be held Thursday March 3, at
7 30 p m in BB 104 Light
refreshments wilt be served
following this informative
presentation The public s n
vi ted
CO�OP
Summer positions are
available at North Carolina
state parks For example a
park attenaent will be hired in
Gatesviiie Duties consist of
general maintenance ot the park
imow grass. eec area clean,
etc) Also a naturalist will be
hired The naturalist must have
(Ofnpor'fd at least three years
of college and majored n a
natural science Jobs are also
available at other state parks
such as Cliffs of the Neuse,
Hammocks Beach Fort Macon
and othe-s 5V e guards
� �� -rPsts and
genera aborers will be h.reo
Come by Rawi 313
SIGMATHETATAU
Sigma Thea "aus spr ng
business meetng will be held
March 3 at 7 30 in room 203 at
�he nyrS'hg rxi'iding
NEW COURSE
ADVANCED SCUBA
DIVING
A new course will be ottered
next tall by the P E Dept called
Advanced Scuba Diving
Students can pre register now
tor the course under PHYE 5278
Prequisite is Basic Scuba Div
ing (2278) or permission from in
structor Will be oflered fall
MWF 1 30 3 30 for 3 s h
CHEERLEADER
TRYOUTS
The East Carolina University
Varsity cheerleader tryouts will
be held at 7 30 p m on Tuesday,
March 29, 1983. on the mam floor
of Memorial Gym
The first practice session will
be held at 5 00 on Wednesday.
March 16 at the east end of
Mmges Coliseum All guys and
girls interested in trying out for
the 1983 84 squad should be pre
sent at this first practice ses
sion
BUSINESS
ADMISSIONS
For those students who do not
meet School ot Business admis
sion criteria during the
February 21 March 4 1983
Change of Mator, there will be a
one day change ot maior period
on July 1, 1983 tor those students
who then meet the School of
Business admission criteria
Those students whe will be on
campus on July 1 may request
admission to the school of
business by following the stan
dard procedure
Those students who will not be
on campus on July 1, 1983, but
think they will meet the School
of Business admissions re
quirements at the end of the cur
rent semester may apply to
change their maior by following
this procedure
1 Prior to leaving campus this
semester, pick up your tile from
your advisor
2 Take your file to the depart
mental secretary in Accounting
Decision Science. Finance.
Managempnt or Marketing as
appropriate
3 While in the departmental
office fill out the form to request
a change of maior evaluation
� .on ireet Schoci of Business
requirements you wii be admit
'ed on July 1. 1983. and an ad
visor will be assigned it you do
not meet the requirements your
tile will be returned to the
General College
When you return to school in
August check the appropriate
departmental bulletin board for
your advsor assignment
NEED A NEW
MAJOR?
interested in a health career
but don t know which one Want
a maior with good employment
opportunities Learn more about
'he various health professional
programs offered at ECU by
s gn.ng up tor HPRO 2000
Survey of Allied Health Profes
sions A different health career
will be featured each week and
th-s course will give you an op
portunity to learn something
about each profession as wei' as
meet some of the faculty from
each department
CAREER CHOICE
The Strong Campbell Interest
Inventory is ottered every Tues
day at 4 PM In 305 Wr.ght An
nex when school is In session
with the exceptions of examina
tion penod and registration
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines There are 33
units per line Each letter, punc
tjation mark and word space
counts as one unit Capitalize and
nyphenate words properly Leave
space at end ot line it word
doesn't tit No ads will be ac
cepted over the phone We
reserve the right to reiect any ad
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75 per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly' L'se capnal and
lowei case letters
Return loIHr I ASTAROI.IMAN
office bj 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday publications.
Name
Address.
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No lines
.t.
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at 75C per line $.
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.enclosed
1I-��i'
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SPECIAL OLYMPICS
VOLUNTEERS
The Special Olympics pro
gram of Greenville and Pitt
County is making preparations
for their spring games to be held
April 14. 1983 at the East
Carolina Track (Bunting Field)
Individuals or groups interested
in volunteering to help with the
Special Olympics should contact
Bill Twine at 752 4137 ext 201.
Dr Dave Poretta at 752 6441. or
plan to attend a committee plan
mng meeting Wednesday,
March 2 19P3 at the Greenville
Park and Recreation Depart
ment, Jaycee Park on Cedar
Lane at 7 00 p m
PAGEANT
Miss N C Southern Beauty
Pageant' The search is on for
contestants. Ages 1 24 years
old Each age division is limited
and the deadline date April 1.
1983 The pageant is scheduled
to be held April 29 30. 1983 m
High Pomt, N C All young
ladies are invited to participate
Age divisions are 13 4 6 7 9
10 12. 13 16 17 24 State winner
m each age Division will receive
a cash scholarship crown,
trophy oanner ano tlowers also
other awa� a be presented
F or ntorma'ion send a stamped
self addressed iong envelope
to Miss N C Southern Beaury
pageant PO Box 5432
Greensboro N C 27435 0432
The phone is 919 294 0295
GOODBYE MASH
Oh fellow students' The war is
over' I What will we do now' We
could watch reruns on channel
five Or maybe move to Korea
and help Sune Lee find ner
parents Or maybe go to Marin
County and let B J take out our
tonsils No. this is ECU let's go
to Crab Apple Cove ano get
drunk with good oi Hawkeye
BEST LEGS
CONTEST
Excuse me, excuse me. es i
am writing this to you I have
seen you around and you nave
the best looking legs ever so i
iust wanted to let you know that
The Best Looking Legs Contest
is coming up and you are a sure
winner so keep looking tor more
details handsome
INTER VARSITY
We at IVCF would like to e�
tend a warm invitation to all of
,ou' Come iOin us mil wee. Km
a good time of pra.se ano
fellowship Our speaker a
our staff worker Paul Lear,
We will meet Wednesday at 6 X
,n Biology Bidg N102 An those
who nave iv shirts don I forget
to wear them Wednesday I
PHI SIGMA PI
Ph, Sigma P s T a . C- -
a hold ts �� " .
mee' � . fVedi � �� I �. �.����
1983 at 5 X p a' P�j.
Barpecue C'n � �
� " � -wes' speaur I
meeting ah oro'hers a
I iThed
' ng la ow " �
pledge meel - �
The Kast C arolinian
St' ;tv ihe t ompta niyinurri:i
nnr W
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday du'ing the sum
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned
operated, and published tor
and by the students ot Eas'
Carolina university
Subscription Rate $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus ot
ECU. Greenv.He N C.
POSTMASTER Send ad
aress chanoes to The East
Carolinian Old South
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Telephone 757 t34 637
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Free Parties w cold beverages
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For details call �
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day
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Prophecy Seminar
THURSDAY NIGHTS
sfg,�k,g MARCH 3, 7:00 p.m.
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Questions pmwt�!���� to thm �v�t� of wodd hictory:
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present
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Prophecy Seaaina � No Registration Fee.
1
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Tue. Mar. 1,1983 5
9:00-1:00 Adm.$1.75j
10 Draft for All,
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DRAFT
NITE
Come Early
f
wjrjirjrjrj srjrjtr.
The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
Weds. Membership Party Free hor'duerves
with The Fabulous kas-X-12:IK)am
Reduced Memberships Prizes pn.Mded b Record Bar
All ladies Free all night Happ Hour 5:30-8:00
Thurs Membership Party with The Castaways 9-1:00am
All Students $2.00 Adm. Happ- Hour 7-10:0Opm
Admission til 8:00
FH Direct from Nashville, Tenn. "Hee Haw"
One Night Only The Charlie McCoy Show
Starring Charlie McCoy and I.aney Hicks
with the Hee Haw Band. Two complete floor shows
9:00 and 11:00pm. Starring Comedian Uncle I gly.
Happy Hour 7:00-10:00
free hor'duerves
Sat Central Park 9:00-1:00am Happ Hour 7-9pm
No Admission till 8:00pm After 8: pm
$1.00 off with college l.D.
I MM N Mrmurial l�r
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Closed Sundays except lor special eenls ymm T574MIS i�r additional MwiHii
Pizza Ixm
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�bllRlClNUB
Cliffs Specials
past
on
.ion
J rJ J Located 1 mile past
Hastmg's Ford
10th St. extensi
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$2�s
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
Hunt
Supporters of the
N C. Nuclear Freeze
resolution ere d
a serious biow THur-
da when Gov James
b Hum joinec:
� '�� those : to
measure During
his weeUj news on-
ference, Hunt went on
for the first
time opposing the
proposed bi-iatera
verifiable freeze w
the Soviet Union
"I do not supj
the nuclear !reee
Hunt said in response
to a question. He said
the United Sta
should negotiate arms
reduction with the
Soviets from a pi
tion of strength. Hunt
did say he was in
favor of nuclear an
reduction.
Hunt's stater
adds to the burden-
the freeze resolution
supporters, wh
eight senate co-
sponsors to the
measure last wei �
State Sen G.
Hancock. D-Durh
and State Rep J
Par,
DM -
chiet spur
nuclear tr
tions in
and j
mained o
of
ment anc
st
the
rovi
saic
mea
In tl
the
tati �
spor.

one
Thur
New Bust
Gets EC
B BOB MORGAN
�suff nitr
The ECU chapter
of the fnn
Society for Personnel
Administration
presented its national
charter las: w� �
c e r e m �
Mendenhall Student
Center.
Bob Enckson. vice-
president of the North
Carolina region of
ASPA. made the
presentation to the
n e w 1 y � f o r m e d
organization
Rer-esenting the na-
tional club, he told
the ECU members
that "this is the
largest organization in
the field oi pci
in the country
According
organization' presi-
dent, senior manage-
ment major B
wards, it -
honor society
interest
students in
min.
j
fam;
with
err.p'i-
for wher
get a lobj
wards.
The El
-iitiall,
Mil M
:ianaj
-
t

ferer
add'
Trash Can
To Give E
A contest is being
sponsored bv the
Psychology Depart-
ment to improve the
appearance oi the
ECU campus
The contest, which
will involve
decorating trash bar-
rels which vmII be
placed around the
campus. begins
Thursday. X registra
tion table will be set
up outside the student
suppK store. All
campus organizations
and individual
students are eligible to
participate
The decorated
receptacles will be
judged on March 22
by a panel of ECl
facultv members who
�v
cond
- - '�
looking rj
The
Beau
test
by a si
ECl
sev eral
d e p a r t n
eluding
allied
nes'
Green,
graduate
serving
coordina
facultv
John C
the
Jepartml
Caldwelj
ground-l
dent, h
World Ne-
Continued From Page 1
ship's maidJ
launch next month. Two earlil
leaks had forced a launch delj
from Jan. 20 to March 19 or 2C
WASHINGTON - Tl
Supreme Court voted 6-3 today.
uphold the court-ordered break
of American Telephone
Telegraph Co. The justices
firmed the landmark scttleme
calling for a widespread changel
how telephone services are provf
ed.
MANILA, Philippines � Pr
dent Ferdinand Marcos toJ
vowed to crush a "reign of 'j

�-
A





PHI SIGMA P
� nner
�� Marcli �
��� ' soMkM in.
�- 4 Are
� rtw �
� to low ��, : ,
- .A
eakat!
BEACHi
on the n i ri p
its-
roni
old beverages
band

OJ
00
0
:
lls call
76
Special Discounts
ul arta bars
M& Mghtclub
kwesl mahrspot & eatprv
lPar"u Free hor'duerves
PuousKas-�2:IH)a1
71,PS pnz� pr uki h Record Bar
kihi HappvHMuf 5:30-8:00
rHi,h7hrr7s,aHa,s9.l:00.m
Happ Mr7-0:00pm
Jit mission til -(hi
Nk;w�- HeeH.w
rhe harlie McCoy ShMV
f Mc os and I ane Hicks
r,rrUi�mpU,t' ����r shows
rrudeigi,
-Jianpi HUr jMt-l () � W
"T�r7-9pm
lege ID.
ms
d I mile past
tasting's Fordon
' extension
t vednesda
hursda
CORN
RIMP
2
95
s or Baked Potato,
may be substituted
35& extra
IV
By
T
irat
ben
tron
oi
ires!
vine
mitt
that
Sat!
M
hail:
N.C
and
the
a fi
of I
Cor
:he
has
mer
mee
V
bega
in t!
plaj
mm
i S
higl
to 1
(
I
II
T
trac
in
mee
this
in t
Tri-
VA.
T
the
the
witl
finis
and
f
Tl
trad
pete
nual
Ass
A ma
Ami
Tra.
Cha
Prin
ty's
nasii
and i
0
best
and
from
pectc
Tr
undi
Marc
the
petiti
then
day,
a.m.
event
35-p
throv
jump
duct
afteri
Hunt
lytEASJAROLIMAS
MARCH I. 1983
Supporters of the
N.C. Nuclear Freeze
resolution were dealt
a serious blow Thurs-
day when Gov. James
B. Hunt joined forces
with those opposed to
the measure. During
nis weekly news con-
ference. Hunt went on
record for the first
time opposing the
proposed bilateral,
verifiable freeze with
the Soviet Union.
"I do not support
the nuclear freeze
Hunt sa:d in response
to a question. He said
the United States
should negotiate arms
reduction with the
Soviets from a posi-
tion of strength. Hunt
did say he was in
favor of nuclear arms
reduction.
Hunt's statement
adds to the burdens of
the freeze resolution
supporters, who lost
eight senate co-
sponsors to the
measure last week.
State Sen. W. G.
Hancock, D-Durham.
and State Rep. J.
Parks Helms,
D-Meckenburg, the
chief sponsors of the
nuclear freeze resolu-
tions in the Senate
and House both re-
mained optimistic in
light of Hunt's state-
ment and said they
were still optimistic
the freeze would win
approval. Hancock
said 29 of the senators
still were backing the
measure.
In the House, 63 of
the 120 represen-
tatives have co-
sponsored the freeze
resolution while only
one has defected,
Helms said.
During debate on
Thursday, both sup-
porters and op-
ponents of the freeze
resolution delivered
emotion-charged
speeches before two
legislative commit-
tees.
The House Rules
Committee and the
Senate State Govern-
ment Committee are
the groups consider-
ing the resolutions. If
passed, the resolution
would be sent to
President Reagan,
Gov. Hunt and
members of the N.C.
congressional delega-
tion urging them to
work for a nuclear
weapons freeze with
the Soviets.
Hunt said he had
conferred with several
leading national
defense experts before
making his decision.
Hunt named Sen.
Sam Nunn, D-Ga a
strong proponent of
national defense, as
one of those he spoke
with. "People who I
respect at the national
level don't think it's
(the freeze) a good
idea Hunt said.
Local nuclear
freeze coordinator
and ECU English in-
structor Edith Web-
ber said the nuclear
freeze was
"reasonable and sen-
sible, there's no
reason to be against
it.
"They (politicians)
don't realize that our
New Business Club
Gets ECU Charter
By BOB MORGAN
SUff U rtlrr
The ECU chapter
of the American
Society for Personnel
Administration was
presented its national
charter last week in a
ceremony at
Mendenhall Student
Center.
Bob Erickson, vice-
president of the North
Carolina region of
ASPA. made the
presentation to the
n e w 1 y - f o r m e d
organization.
Representing the na-
tional club, he told
the ECU members
that "this is the
largest organization in
the field of personnel
in the country
According to the
organization's presi-
dent, senior manage-
ment major Brad Ed-
wards, it is not an
honor society but an
interest club for
students in the
management depart-
ment. It emphasizes
such areas as human
resources and person-
nel training in the
field of business.
Edwards said that
not all of the 44
members are from the
School of Business or
plan to pursue careers
as personnel ad-
ministrators. "Some
participate to help
familiarize themselves
with the things that
employees will look
for when they try to
get a job says Ed-
wards.
The ECU society
was initially organized
last fall by marketing
and management pro-
fessor Joseph
Tomkiewicz. The
basic function of
ASPA is to invite
speakers from dif-
ferent companies to
address club meetings
about topics relevant
to the field. Lectures
have been given bv
employees from such
companies as Proctor
and Gamble and the
National Labor Rela-
tions Board.
Edwards says a cur-
rent aim of the club is
to interest more
freshmen and
sophomores in
management through
the organization.
"Even if you aren't
going into personnel it
is a good way to make
contacts with com-
panies by meeting
employees from their
personnel depart-
ment he said. "It
never hurts if you
happen to know the
person who is giving
you an interview when
trying to get a job
For more informa-
tion about ASPA,
students should con-
tact faculty advisor
Tomkiewicz in room
215 B of the Raw
building.
Trash Can Decoration
To Give ECU Facelift
A contest is being
sponsored by the
Psychology Depart-
ment to improve the
appearance of the
ECU campus.
The contest, which
will involve
decorating trash bar-
rels which will be
placed around the
campus, begins
Thursday. A registra-
tion table will be set
up outside the student
supply store. All
campus organizations
and individual
students are eligible to
participate.
The decorated
receptacles will be
judged on March 22
by a panel of ECU
faculty members who
will award first, se-
cond and third place
prizes for the best
looking barrels.
The Campus
Beautification Con-
test is being directed
by a committee of
ECU students from
several different
departments, in-
cluding psychology,
allied health and
business. Margo
Green, a psychology
graduate student, is
serving as project
coordinator, and the
faculty advisor is Dr.
John Cope, also of
the psychology
department. Doug
Caldwell, the ECU
grounds superinten-
dent, has agreed to
cooperate with the
project committee to
ensure placement of
the decorated barrels
in highly visable areas
around campus.
Barrels will be pro-
vided to all interested
contestants. To
register for the contest
sign up at the registra-
tion table outside the
book store or contact
Margo Green or Dr.
Cope at 757-6214.
Registration will con-
tinue until the supply
of barrels runs out.
All campus
organizations are urg-
ed to participate in the
service project to
ECU and possibly win
valuable prizes.
World News In Brief
Continued From Page 1
ship's maiden
launch next month. Two earlier
leaks had forced a launch delay
from Jan. 20 to March 19 or 20.
WASHINGTON � The
Supreme Court voted 6-3 today to
uphold the court-ordered breakup
of American Telephone '
Telegraph Co. The justices af-
firmed the landmark settlement
calling for a widespread change in
how telephone services are provid-
ed.
MANILA, Philippines � Presi-
dent Ferdinand Marcos today
vowed to crush a "reign of ter-
ror" by Maoist guerrillas that has
killed more than 90 people this
year in the southern Philippines.
Marcos cited an escalation of acts
of terrorism by the Maoist New
People's Army in recent months
in the south.
PITTSBURGH � The top
negotiator for the United
Steelworkers told the union's ex-
ecutive board today that no con-
tract agreement was reached in
all-night negotiations. But
negotiator Joseph Odorcich said
there still was hope to beat an
unofficial Tuesday deadline in
reaching an agreement.
defensive weapons are
much more dangerous
to us than some ac-
commodations with
the Soviet Union
Webber believes
that Hunt's statement
will be damaging to
the freeze proposal.
"Gov. Hunt is a very
influential person in
North Carolina
Webber said. "The
fact that he even
becomes luke warm
(on an issue) is cer-
tainly going to hurt
the freeze move-
ment
Among the
speakers at Thurs-
day's public hearings
was Eugene B. "Red"
McDaniel, the former
Vietnam POW who
lost a bid for a con-
gressional seat last
fall. McDaniel in-
dicated that he did not
doubt the sincerity of
the freeze supporters
but that unfortunately
"the people who
march in Washington
or Raleigh do not
have the same impact
on the Kremlin
Another speaker,
John Caldwell,
chancellor emeritus of
N.C. State University,
spoke in favor of the
freeze proposal. "If
we win this victory for
reason and cons-
cience, we gain time
and hope for humani-
ty. Call a halt to the
growing madness and
make room for sani-
ty, Caldwell said.
$
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A
A
t
3Uj� 3Eaat (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, ow�uanagrr
Mike Hughes, ttmmum &
Waverly Merritt, d,c,o, wiiimh Cindy Pleasants. or� m.
Scott Lindley. m. m Greg rideout. �� &�
Ali Afrashteh. cmh w,�r Steve Bachner, omim saw
Stephanie Groon, o. m�� Juliana Fahrbach. g�
Clay Thornton, mm sw��w Todd Evans ���� ��w
March 1. 1983
Opinion
Sen. John East
Main Miser Mails By The Millions
For a man who rants and raves
about unnecessary government
spending as often and as intensely
as he does in public, Sen. John
East can certainly exhibit his own
spendthrift tendencies with the
best of the eccentrics in private.
According to a confidential
Senate Rules Committee survey
conducted last year, East ranked
seventh among the 100 senators in
what boils down to extravagent
misuse of taxpayers' funds.
Last fall, in a period of little
more than a month, East sent out
$961,000 worth � 6.2 million
copies � of "free" newsletters to
North Carolinians, letters which
were merely aimed at attacking
liberals, national Democratic
leaders and the news media. For
1982, East's outgoing bin tallied
8.5 million pieces of mail � 3.89
newsletters for every mailbox in
North Carolina.
In fact, the Chairman of the
Senate Rules Committee Sen.
Charles Mathias of Maryland told
the Senate last year that he'd
received several complaints from
East's constituents � one woman
from Whiteville, North Carolina,
had written him complaining that
she'd received nine copies of a
single newsletter from East.
East has defended himself
against arguments that the mail-
ings were part of a preliminary
election campaign, saying such ac-
cusations would require "a large
leap of faith since he doesn't
face re-election until 1986.
But Democrats interpreted the
mailings differently, calling East's
newsletters "blatantly political
The truth is, East's well-
published attacks on liberals were
little more than a series of pro-
pagandized philosophical
criticisms, a not-so-well-hidden at-
tack against "the liberals in Con-
gress .
The Senate franking privilege,
unlike that of the House of
Representatives, does not place a
limit on the number of pieces of
mail a senator can send out. But
Mathias and some other members
of the Senate are disturbed at the
apparent misuse of the privilege by
several of their fellow senators.
"The purpose East contends,
"of the mailings, in a represen-
tative democracy, is to allow us to
communicate with our consti-
tuents. Often, the local press is
unable to cover the range of ac-
tivities we are involved in But
despite East's contentions, the
survey also indicated that only
about four percent of the 234
million pieces of mail sent out by-
senators in 1982 contained any
form of response to their consti-
tuents' questions. All the rest was
used for pure one-sided political
combat and to satisfy the senators'
personal whims.
Sen. East is, indeed, correct in
his assertion of the underlying
theory of a democratic, represen-
tative society. Our "leaders" must
stay in contact with their in-
dividual constituents if our
aforesaid democracy is to
persevere.
Constituents, however, should
not be forced to fork out the big
bucks for the costly actions of East
and his spendthrift buddies on
Capitol Hill. After all, it seems
ridiculous to continue the current
extravagent mailing practice when
nine of 10 North Carolinians pro-
bably threw away the newsletters
with the rest of their junk-mail
anyway.
Pointing Out ECU'S 'Real' Funding Problems
Budging The Budget
Editor's Retraction: Before I start my
own column, I would like to publicly
apologize to the ECU football team for
Stan Landers' outrageous, flagrant
criticism of their collective intellect last
week. Please be assured, however, that
Mr. Landers received 30 lashes for what
he thought was merely an innocuous, sen-
sible piece of advice to a young female (I
hope) from FloridaAnd for the foot-
ball player who came to The East Caroli-
nian office last week asking for Mr
Landers I am especially sorry.
� � �
Every year, a group of ex-farmboy
North Carolina bigwigs get together and
determine what, in their minds, con-
stitutes a "fair" budget for our school. In
MIKE HUGHES
-&&
it, they include money for all the universi-
ty's expenditures they deem "worthy
You know, stuff like a few thousand
dollars for color-coded encyclopedias for
the Phys. Ed. library, new cashing
machines and ironing boards for the
Home Ec. department that kind of
stuff.
But in their infinite wisdom, they con-
sistently neglect several of the more im-
portant issues at hand. Thus being the
case, many of the university's most basic
needs go unnoticed, hence, unfunded,
each year.
It is in answer to this recurrent problem
that 1 now present a list of proposals for
what 1 feel are East Carolina Universitv �
direst needs for the near future:
First of all, I want to know when the
UNC Board of Governors is going to start
attacking our serious funding problems.
While thev pitter-patter and bicker over i
few million dollars for a stupid classroom
building, we're stuck here trying to deal
with the real problems, problems like il-
literate toilet literature.
We don't need a multi-million-dollar
classroom to take up more space than its
worth; what we really need is a central
campus bathroom reference librarv, com-
plete with dictionaries, thesauri, lymrk
anthologies and the like. After all, how
good does it look when a visiting dignitary
(mavbe even a member of the BOG) stops
by the Mendenhall rest room after an im-
portant meeting and sees flagrant
misspellings, poor word choices and clich-
ed themes scratched on the walls? It
makes for a poor reflection on ECU. and
it comes back to haunt us when budget-
come up again.
Another pretty big problem on campus
is drugs; therefore, my second proposal
calls for an upgrade in the university's
drug counseling program, possibly the ad-
dition of another staff member � a
specialist, one who know the ins and out-
of drug problems, one who's been there
before, one to whom confused students
can turn with their questions, and most
importantly, one who keeps up with cur-
rent drug news and knows where student
can get the best deal. We work too hard
for our money to keep blowing it on bad
shipments and cheap facsimiles
My third suggestion concerns an issue
that seems, unfortunately, to have died
down in recent years. Nevertheless, it is
just as important, in my estimation, as my
other proposals. And de-r
troversv and debate that have - in
the issue from its inception. I fe hai the
addition of an ECU V-
Erotic Dance mav be just wru
needs to gain the national
deserves
I'd also like to see some tta
vested in the Mendenhaii bow
suggest the construction oi - im
w here lane 1 is now . The lar
right anvwav. and per-or
bowl strikes unless 1 know i pit-
cher of beer waiting back ftl tie scon
table. Now, 1 realie that - g a �
supported school, it wouij
sell beer on campus; that's m sqggesi
thev give it away. but. of col- . -
those bowlers who have respecubis ui
dicaps
We also need a restaurant oi �
where students can go to get an inexp
sive. edible meal � a meal the -
digest tor good. And space w,
pose anv problems here, since we - �
build it where the Mendenhall Sna.K Bai
now stands.
And finally, I suggest an increase i:
funding tor administrative office tup
plies It's utteriv ridiculous how ol
technologv is leaving ECU behind. Wb
last week. I had to sit 20 minutes in the
chancellor's waiting room and look al t
same four coloring books he had K
ear And it wasn't a prettv sight
Editor's ote: Mike Huahes. wh
not a member of the ISC Biw
Governors, runs a feed lot and low
dromat on the edge of town. He recen
turned down several multi-million-a
offers from the Bethel Barons i
L'SEL to stay in school tor anothc -
With
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � On Feb. 8, the
Soviet Union launched a new missile for
the second time in four months. The test
launch violated three specific provisions
of the SALT II treaty.
It is a fact that SALT II has never been
ratified. But both the United States and
the Soviet Union have informally promis-
ed to abide by it. For example, the United
States is putting identifying devices on
B-52 bombers that carry nuclear cruise
missiles. That is on- of SALT IPs re-
quirements.
But the Russians' missile test blows
SALT II sky-high. We can tell you the ex-
clusive details of that missile launch. They
are in a CIA report that's so tightly
classified it makes top-secret look like a
letter from Aunt Harriet.
The new Soviet missile has been dubbed
"PL-5" by U.S. intelligence experts. This
is why its launching violated the SALT II
treaty:
� It is an improved version of the
Soviets' SS-16 missile. And the SS-16 was
specifically banned by SALT II.
� The new Soviet missile violates the
SALT 11 clause that allows each country
to have only one new land-based missile.
The United States is counting the MX
missile as its new one. But the Russians
already launched a new missile last Oct.
26. As it happened, the test was a failure.
But still, Soviet Ambassador Anatoly
Dobrynin told the State Department it
was their one new missile. The one that
was launched on Feb. 8, therefore, would
be a second missile under SALT II terms.
� The third violation involves encoding
VflAW �;
6EE.� A THREE BEPROOM HOUSE FOR ONLY
WriuNPREDBUCKSu,mUTHECrTCH?
the radio signals from the missile. This
means that U.S. trackers can't read the
missile's transmissions to tell if it is in
compliance with SALT II.
Putting all of a missile's radio signals in
code is forbidden by the treaty. In-
telligence sources told my associate Dale
Van Atta that this is the first time the
Soviets have pulled that little trick � at
least, it's the first time they've put 100
percent of their missile's transmissions in-
to code.
How the Kremlin's apparent violations
of SALT II will be viewed in the White
House is not yet clear. But it may mean
that President Reagan will no longer insist
that the Pentagon observe the provisions
of the unratified SALT II treaty.
ELDERLY VICTIMS: There is a whole
class of Americans who feel particularly
vulnerable to the criminal in our midst.
They are the elderly, our senior citizens.
Older people are tempting target for
criminals. They have money � their life
savings. Generally, they're physically
weak. Some of them are not as sharp
mentally as they used to be. And they suf-
fer from another disadvantage: They are
survivors of an age when life was simpler,
when Americans helped one another in-
stead of trying to rob and cheat their
neighbors.
Unfortunately, senior citizens' fears are
born out by the statistics. Investigators
for Sen. John Heinz, R-Pa asked law-
enforcement officials around the country
for facts about crimes against the elderly.
States and investigators report:
"Overall, consumer and economic
frauds directed at the elderly are
widespread and pervasive, touching near-
ly every aspect of senior citizens' lives
In fact, more than 80 percent of the
law-enforcement experts who responded
to the congressional questionnaire said
the elderly are more frequently defrauded
than the general population.
What are the top 10 frauds perpetrated
against the elderly? According to the
survey, it's appalling but true that
quackery and other medical frauds head
the list. Obviously, this is an area where
older Americans are most vulnerable.
HEADLINES AND FOOTNOTES:
� The public works system in America is
in deep trouble. Highways, bridges.
sewers, water-supply and mass-transit
Campus Forum
systems are suffering from severe
disrepair. An unpublished Congress
Budget Office report estimates that -
billion was spent last yuear to upgrade the
ailing framework but that billions more
will be needed to salvage it.
( rsn�hi. 19?
L nurd rcaiurr Svn&satr life.
Clock 'Error A Crock
I am writing in response to the Feb. 17
article by Cindy Pleasants,
"Clockkeeping Error Leads To Confu-
sion As the official clockkeeper, I
would like to clear up the misunderstan-
ding of the story.
First, the clockkeeper has nothing to
do with the scoreboard score. I only
operate the clock and the horn (buzzer).
Also in the article, there was a reference
to a clock malfunction. This reference is
totally wrong. There was never a ques-
tion about the clock, only about the
scoreboard.
I agree it was not Woody Peek's
(Daily Reflector Sports Editor) fault.
But neither was it the clockkeeper's
fault. The game was stopped at the time
of the confusion, and nothing was
changed. There was a mistake in the
scoring, and whom to blame is not clear.
But one thing is clear; it was not the
clockkeeper's error.
I think the competency of the writer
should be questioned, along with her
knowledge of the game of basketball.
Thomas Brame
Senior, PHYE
In Need Of Pen' Pal
Please allow me to introduce myself.
( I'm a man of wealth Wait a
minute: wrong letter.) My name is Ricar-
do Sanchez. I am an inmate at the Long
Island Correctional Facility here in V�est
Brentwood, NY. I am not in contact
with my family or friends, and at this
time, I have no one to correspond with.
It would do me good, both mentalh and
physically, to establish a pen-pal rela
tionship with any student or facultv
member who has a sincere desire to
write.
It makes no difference if the person is
black, white, male, female, voung or
old.
Thank you very much.
Ricardo Sanchez 81A4401 (4-A
P.O. Box 1012
West Brentwood, NY 1171"
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Jovner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Utters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted
��v M naUB
Proct
B P1KU k Mill
I
announced -
that
Daytoh
T I

' j .
bible
all
-
eui
EVER v
ITALI
5 PV
ALL-YOJ
�SPAGH1
' .1 VSAGll
RAVIO I
Wltf
ri.oil
Dl'
m






? ��
t
incline Problems
e Budget
;







v d despite the coo-
al have surrounded
on, I feel that the
S hool of Modern
what this school
al recognition it
mc tate funds in-
itial! bowling lanes. I
s . of a small bar
anc rarely works
personally, I can't
1 know there's a pit-
. back at the score-
ilize that being a state-
it would be illegal to
that's wh I suggest
� away, but, oi course, only to
have 'expectable han-
. laurant on campus
to get an inexpen-
a meal they could
And space vsouldn't
iblems here, since we could
.re the Mendenhall Snack Bar
. i i ds.
univers v . Finally, 1 suggest an increase in
trative office sup-
itterly i diculous how office
leaving ECU behind. Wh,
sit 20 minutes in the
ting room and look at the
coloring hooks he had last
asn't a prett) sight.
Vfikt Hughes, who is
' thi UNC Hoard of
a feed lot and laun-
f town. He recently
i rm mulu-million-dollar
Ht Bethel Barons of the
for another year.
h SALT II

iffering from severe
�r. unpublished Congressional
rice report estimates that $20
h is spent last uear to upgrade the
rig framework but that billions more
salvage it.

Error' A Crock
nothing id
eterenc.
-er a ques-
mt 'he
Pet
;ult
Icxkkeeper's
at the time
lothing was
take in the
is not clear.
was not the
)' the writer
ig with her
)asketball.
loons Brame
nior, PHYE
Pal
luce myself.
. Wait a
lime is Ricar-
at the Long
ional Facilit) here in West
Nil 1 am not in contact
n famil) or friends, and at this
tt no one to correspond with.
ld do me good, both mentally and
ically, to establish a pen-pal rela-
lonship with am student or faculty
member who has a sincere desire to
write.
: makes no difference if the person is
' white, male, female, young or
old
Thank you very much.
Ricardo Sanchez 81A4401 (4-A)
P.O. Box 1012
West Hrentwood, NY 11717
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all poinls of view Qf
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library '
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted
IHt l-ASrc AROI IMAS
MARCH 1. 1981
Procter And Gamble Plant Rehires Workers
SuflVkrncr
By PATRICK O'NEILL recalling workers who
were laid off in
November when the
company cut back
production.
Earlier this month,
the company began a
new line of feminine
Procter and Gam-
ble's Greenville plant
announced last week
'hat it has begun
protection products
for a test market in
the Mnneapolis,
Minn area. The
Greenville plant will
be producing the new
product.
The first 16 workers
to be rehired began
work Monday. Four
more workers are
slated to be hired on
March 14.
According to Pro-
cter and Gamble's In-
dustrial Relations
manager Gene
Parker, the plant ex-
pects to have hired
back all 50 of its laid-
off workers by May
or June. He indicated
that no new hiring
would take place.
Parker said most
former employees
were gladly accepting
their jobs back.
At the time of the
layoff, Procter and
Gamble was unsure of
the employees chances
of being rehired. The
50 people represented
ten precent of the
company's
employees.
The rehirings were
not temporary. "We
don't expect to bring
Daytona Beach Is The Spring Break Hot Spot
n A v -r v, . ��
DAYTONA
BEACH, Fla (UPI)
� The spring hot spot
in Florida for vaca-
tioning college
students has shifted
from Fort Lauderdale
to Daytona Beach, ac-
cording to the student
"bible" on spring
break.
"The Rites of Spr-
ing an informative
but sometimes
tongue-in-cheek guide
for students on spring
break, rates Daytona
Beach a hands-down
No. 1 and Fort
Lauderdale a
lukewarm second.
Bruce Jacobsen and
Rollin Riggs, Yale
Class of '82, research-
ed the book by
visiting and ranking
Florida's beach cities
during spring.breaks.
The book even
devotes a section on
"How To Get
Lucky
Fort Lauderdale,
according to the
book, is "the town
for sexual escapades
and rip-em-up
wildness" and was
dubbed "Fort Liquor-
dale" by the authors.
Fort Lauderdale of-
ficials were not amus-
ed by the rating or the
nickname.
Davtona Beach
came out on top
because of its wide
beaches, its relatively
tolerant police and
because the city
"knows how to show
her visitors a good
time
wrote
Jacobsen and Riggs.
Daytona Beach of-
ficials loved it.
An estimated
300,000 college
students are expected
in Daytona Beach
during March and
early April and Terry
Kiel, the director of
conventions and
tourism, said that "a
lot of it can be at-
tributed to the book
Ms. Kiel said
several marketing
groups surveyed col-
lege campuses to learn
where the students are
going and the surveys
showed most are go-
ing to Daytona Beach
because of the book.
"We're thrilled by
the book said Ms.
Kiel. "It sounds like
somebody from the
chamber wrote it
Jacobsen says
that's not the case and
added he and Riggs
had no idea the book
would do so well.
Since the book
came out last fall,
Jacobsen and Riggs
have been praised.
criticized and inter-
viewed.
"One TV guy even
introduced my part-
ner as 'Mr. Spring
Break said
Jacobsen of Riggs, a
freelance
photographer in Con-
necticut.
Jacobsen and Riggs
plan to revise the
book this spring. And
after that?
anyone back unless
we have a long term
job for them Parker
told The East Caroli-
nian in a telephone in-
terview. The company
has an expectation
"beyond the test
market for the new
product, said plant
manager Robert Grif-
fin in a recent inter-
view.
Last year's lavoffs
resulted from a cur-
tailment of the com-
pany's local produc-
tion of Pampers
disposable diapers.
Pampers production
was transferred to in-
ternational markets.
"We're delighted to
have them back. We
didn't want to lay
them off in the first
place Parker said.
"We have been doing
everything we can to
find a way to get them
back to work
The November
layoffs were the first
by Procter and Gam
ble's Greenville plant
in its seven ears of
operation.
According to Grif-
fin and Parker,
emplovees were ac-
tually laid off No
19, but were kept on
the payroll until Dec.
3 to give them some
"free time" in which
to find a new job.
BON VOYAGE!
INC.
Teacher i or Student teacher's
OFFICE SUPPLIES SCHOOL S JPPUES
SOCIAL STATIONERY, GIFTS, GRE TING CARDS
422 Aiungton Blvd. (Oppc irte l�tt�" j
756-4224
GREENVILLE, N.C.
E ADVENTURE THAN
A BLIND DAI
Can vou picture yourself
swinging down a din"1 Or
shooting the rapids1 Or
crossing a river using only
a rope and your own two
hands'
Vou 11 have a chance
to do all this and more in
Armv ROTC
Adventure training like
this helps you develop
manv oi the qualities vou 11
need as an Armv officer
Qualities like self-
confidence Stamina. And
the ability to perform
under pressure
ARMY ROTC
BE ALL YOU CAN B�.
I r our free elective Ihis fall: MLSC 1001-
jintroducliontoROTC. There is no obligation
to take the courses and it's open to everyone.
For more information on Army ROTC
contact us in room 324 Erwin Hall
r or call 757-6967.
H.L. HODGES CO.
210 E. Fifth Street
How to have class between classes.
:oo
OFF ANY
COMPLETE PAIR OF
EYE GLASSES
v SOFT sQQ
j CONTACTS "
JJj BKJUOCSS DAY GUARANTEE
& ANDCAREKn
PALACE
703 oteenvllte Blvt Arro. Fio� Pttl PUaa. N��t To ERA Realty)
GaryM Ham, I ,c,ns.d OtcUn Qp 9S0 a m to6 p � Mo, F
WEDNESDAY
� SPECIAL
FOUR (4) Tacos
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Tf 15 draft with purchase of 4 tocos
Indulge yourself in a warm cu of Cafe Vienna. It's a light and rin-
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AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR






A

y

THE EAST CAROl INIAN
Entertainment
Attenborough
Calls Gandhi
Back To Life
B CHRISTIAN WILLIAMS
I A. Time � �vhin(loii P.�-i Nt�iVnKt
WASHINGTON � It has taken
20 years for Richard Aucn
borough, the actor and director.
to get his life of Mohandas K
Gandhi to the screen. Along the
way. Attenborough mortgaged a
house, rejected several scripts and
had to return periodical!) IO
movie roles in "terrible crap" to
fill the coffers. Finally Gandhi. 3
hours and 20 minutes long and
budgeted at 120 million, has
opened. (In Greenville, the film is
at the Buccaneer Theatre.)
For the money men, Atten-
borough says, "The problem was
always the same: Who would go
to see a movie about a half-naked
man sitting on a pillow with a
beanstalk in his hand?"
For devotees of Gandhi, the
saintlike leader o. India's fight
for independence from Great Bri-
tain, the problem was that it
simply couldn't be done. One In-
dian scholar seriously suggested
that Gandhi be represented on
screen "only as a constant!) mov-
ing sphere of light
This was a typical reaction to
Gandhi, a British-educated
lawer who. bj adopting a
loincloth and a polic) of non-
violent civil disobedience, became
the father of Indian nationalism
The subject of 400 biographies,
the author of 94 volumes, he
seemed to filmmakers an unap-
proachable subject. Jawaharlal
Nehru, writing an introduction to
one eight-volume biography,
said, "No man can write a real
life of Gandhi, unless he is as big
as Gandhi
Attenborough says, "1 had no
more than a schoolboy's
knowledge of the man when 1 first
read Louis Fischer's biography of
him in 1962, hut I was totally
bow led over
Attenborough already had star-
red in more than 20 British
movies and The Great Escape, an
American production, and was
disturbed about the silliness of
many of his roles. He wanted to
produce and direct, and Gandhi
seemed a worthy project.
"1 soon found that everyone
Gandhi met he bowled over At-
tenborough says. "Lord (Louis)
Mountbatten said that of all the
trillions of people he had met,
there was only one who struck as
truly great � right up there with
Buddha and Jesus � and that was
Gandhi
The problem was how to bring
the Mahatma to the screen as a
believable and dramatic
character. He was considered a
saint, and Attenborough had not
dealt with saints: His Ol What a
I ovely U ar of 1968 was a plea for
pacifism, and A Bridge Too Tar a
blood) antiwar film. His previous
film biography was Young
Winston, a portrait of the early
hurchill which was equal parts
blood and thunder and ambition.
Gandhi was to be nothing like
those. Earl) on. Attenborough
determined to let his story be
guided b) his subject's frequent
admonition that "m life is m
message
"1 didn't want to make a nnu ie
about Gandhi's sexual obses-
sions, or about the Party Con-
gress or about politics Atten-
borough savs. "1 was guided bv
Gandhi's example m mv selection
of incidents for the movie
Thus Gandhi focuses on the
passage of a British-educated
lawyer in esi and dark suit to
beatific heromonk in loincloth
and wire-rimmed spectacles.
See rWENTY-YEAR, Page 7
Pagt
! I
�Ik
V
-v
a

Director Richard Attenborough examines star Ben KingsUVs makeup in this scene from Gandhi, now in Greenville.
Having A Ball In Greenville
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
Sl.fl V�nlrt
Where else but in Greenville
can a person go to a Saturdav
night ball for onl S2 and see the
merrymakers dressed in styles
that ranged from early hippie to
formal gowns and tuxes.
It all happened this past
weekend at the American Legion
Hall where two of Greenvilles
legendary hard core entertainers
Bill "Shep" Shepard and English
grad student Mike Hamer called
out their forces to join in the fun
of Greenville's first ever "Benefit
Ball
The evening teatured perfor-
mances by three local bands that
kept the music humming almost
continuously till the wee hours ol
the morning. The crowd, which
kept dancing 'till the performers
were exhausted, was a good mix
of present and former ECU's with
all three bands bringing their
followers with them.
The evening featured the
premier performance of the
Amateurs, followed respectively
by the I lghtnin' Wells Blues Band
and The Rutabaga Brothers and
the lemon Sisters, two of Green-
ville's favorites.
The gala event was the
brainstorm of Mike Hamer (an
East Carolinian staff writer
himself) Hamer. a bass player
and vocalist with two of the
bands, was searching for a way to
connect his deep personal concern
for hungry people and his love for
musical entertainment. The
Benefit Ball was the answer.
Hamer got together with
several local and ECU hunger
groups to share his idea The
response was strong and the
volunteers went to work The
bands agreed and Hamer called
all over town for a hall. The
American Legion which usually
charges SI50 a night for their
facility decided to provide the hail
at half price for the worthy cause
Posters went up, tickets got
printed and the word was spread
Apple Records quickly sold-out
See NEEDY. Page 7
lit 111
S-liy' i UL
�iu. jam ?� ?
Vonnegut's Rudolph Waltz
His Latest Voice Of Doom
Travel-Adventure Film 'Poland9 Coming To Campus
Clockwise from top left: A young girl helps with the harvest on a family farm; near Warsaw's
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, a member of the Mountain Guards stands at attention; religious
pilgrims pray before the monastery in Czestochowa. The scenes are from Sherilyn and Matthew
Mentes' powerful Travel-Adventure film Poland � The Enduring Dream, which will be shown on
Tuesday, March 15, at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre. For ticket infor-
mation, call the Central Ticket Office at 757-6611, eat. 266.
B KHACH1GTOLOLYAN
V Wag V otn
Kl'RT VONNEGUT. By Jtrotm KimkomUi lhr� l K ftfm
DEADEYE DICK. n. Kw Voamgm Mhcw Stjmmr Uwwn : IB
Kurt Vonnegut began writing in the late '40s,
refined his craft in the popular magazines of the
'50s, and achieved the peak of his popularity in the
'60s, when both the paperback market and the
teenage population grew with extraordinary rapidi-
ty. The mass audience Vonnegut captured during
those years belonged largely to the first generation
whose tastes were shaped by television; it demanded
simple writing, rapid plot development, abundant
dialogue, and quick shifts of scene, and showed a
preference for wisdom delivered in conclusive but
cool tones (formal characteristics that generally pro-
duce TV scripts rather than novels aspiring to the
status of art). He owed another part of his success to
the content of his work, which overlapped the urgent
concerns of '60s studentry; Vonnegut expressed his
detestation of war and his distrust of corporate
technology in terms both convincingly serious and
acceptably hip.
In Kurt Vonnegut Jerome Klinkowitz gives a brief
but panoramic view of this complex career; it's the
best of the several academic works on Vonnegut
issued over the past decade. Klinkowitz shows how
Vonnegut's refusal to separate morality and inten-
tion from action parallels his insistence that ideas be
considered together with the forms they take in fic-
tion; this stance produced his best books � Cat's
Cradle, Mother Sight, Slaughterhouse-Five.
Klinkowitz has a tendency to see the whole of Von-
negut's work in terms of these, its best moments; I'm
not convinced that the total ouput deserves the
praise it gets here. But this is a quick, acute account
of Vonnegut's dual role as craftsman and socio-
literary phenomenon.
Like Klinkowitz, I'm tempted to discuss Von-
negut's work as pop event rather than literary ar-
tifact. This is somewhat unfair to Deadeye Dick, a
book that's carefully put together and eager to help
the reader along. The narrator is Rudolph Waltz,
who tells the story of his life vaguely chronological-
ly, in the short installments that are a hallmark of
Vonnegut's style; he may strain your tolerance of
credulity, but never your attention span. Rudy's
voice is mild and confiding, and rarely wavers from
the tone established in the opening pages, no matter
how grim the details he narrates.
And they are grim. The focal points of Rudy's
story are two disasters: at 12, he accidentally shoots
a pregnant woman. When he is nearly 50 and living
in Haiti, his hometown, Midland City, Ohio, is the
site of an allegedly accidental neutron bomb explo-
sion: Rudy and his brother Felix can actually walk
through an intact city of the dead, swept clean of
corpses by federal troops. It helps to know
something about Vonnegut's past as a survivor of
the bombing of Dresden and a publicist for General
Electric, where "progress is our most important pro-
duct Progress. Vonnegut intimates, is an ugly mid-
American city left standing and corpse-free, a
technological improvement over the charnelhouse
that was Dresden.
In it's orientation toward disaster. Deadeye Dick
See HE HAS, Page 7
Playhouse's 'Custer'
About Average Work
B ZACK PERKINSON
staff WrtMr
The ECU Playhouse production of Custer, which
finished its run last week at McGinnis Theatre, wasn't
the kind of play that knocked you out of your seat.
Nor was it a totally boring groaner often typical of
senior's college productions. It lay somewhere in bet-
ween, like a conversation with an old friend in which
the topics are familiar.
Doubtless, the original production had more socio-
emotional impacts. Around 1970, when old values
and beliefs were being questioned, a veritable
plethora of plays, books and movies appeared decry-
ing the old jingoism and Manifest Destiny. But it
would seem by now that everybody knows Custer was
a pompous ass (as I believe he is referred to in the
script), and that the white man's burden was an ex-
cuse for the subjugation of technologically disadvan-
taged people.
The subject that holds my interest is the possibility
(the Indians said "fact") that E troop of the 7th
Cavalry committed suicide en masse when surround-
ed by the Sioux and Chcyene immediately prior to the
battle on the Little Big Horn. When I was in the
cavalry we didn't have horses. We didn't have sabers
either, but the standing joke (?) was that when all else
fails, fall on your saber. Was that some legacy left to
us by the old troopers? The sad romanticism of death
and a Valhalla for slain warriors is still with us. Any
recruit in basic training knows it well.
Custer's outstanding performer was Gary
Weathersbee, who is as fine an actor as one is likely to
sec anywhere. In an electrifying speech in the second
act, he, as Major Benteen, defends himself against ac-
cusations of cowardi � by Mrs. Custer and sum-
marizes the points of the whole play. His elocution
and projection seem entirely natural, as if he was
born speaking across a valley. Weathersbee had the
best lines, best part, and best props; but, he brought
something of his own to make it all just a little bit bet-
ter. The other players were passing fair at best
reciting lines in strained classroom exercise fashion'
Sets and lighting were, as always, the best.
All in all, it was an enjoyable evening No
blockbuster, but I did get to see Gary Weathersbee
performance. The drama department needs to t
more of him, too.
Twenty
Continued r rum Pag? t,
When
wrong, he f�
protest; whei soldiers
attack his folio wei
he encourages them
submit to be I
gradually in his un.
shakable adhert
this Christlike po

India ralhel
him, ar.
ble Bn; I
has to admj
longei
I
I
of a

He Has Dea
( ontinued From Pae f
looks back � Slaughterhouse-Five a
Cradle Bu
made
the '60s at
ratives. n
to the terrair. I
is a dist
ding in a w
militarv me
permeaes evet
tion to Midland i
Whether
narrated in the :
to the p
whims. :
are glmost imn
depreca' g humor, pui
aphorisn
trademark ��
ABORTIONS
1 � �e� ��- - j' -
App'ts. MaaeDa.s
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ARMY-NAVY
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Potato ol
THE WORD IS OUT!
ROAD WARRIOR"
IS A HIT!
Apocalypse POW!
Exhilarating
entertainment:
"A sensational
slam-bano end-of-
the-world picture
-i , v XWSNEE
"A smashing good time
at the movies .A
sizzler. George Milier
and company have
pulled oft a winner
Starring NHL GIBSON
Written b TERRY HAES CLORE
Producer tM BYRON KENNEDY
HUSH
I THIS WEDNESDAY NIGHTS
M�' - 7 PM. SECOND HI
PM. Both Films In Mendenh
Theatre. Admission By ID &
MSC Membership For Focuf
The ECU Student Um





t
M Ki. H I. 1983 Page
� �f "�
I
�S�
now in dreenville.
7 Greenville
men
?cal and ECU hunger
are his idea. The
a :rong and the
ers went to v�ork. The
bam ed and Hamer called
for a hall. The
v - cai Legion which usually
har. S150 a night for their
decided to provide the hall
ail price for the worthy cause.
went up, tickets got
printed and the word was spread.
Apple Records quickly sold-out
Sec NEEDY, Page 7
Rudolph Waltz
oice Of Doom
- intimates, is an ugly mid-
Manding and corpse-free, a
over the charnclhouse
tster, Deadeye Dick
ee MY HAS, Page 7
Playhouse's 'Custer'
About Average Work
B ZA( KPERKINSON
Staff Wnlrt
roduction of Custer, which
k at McCiinnis Theatre, wasn't
:ked you out of your seat,
oring groaner often typical of
ions. It lay somewhere in bet-
n with an old friend in which
familiar
beii-
Miuld
.
y -
i

Rudy's
from
5 :he
� pio-
� walk
I
know
I of
(itneral
mi nt
ginal production had more socio-
Around 1970, when old values
being questioned, a veritable
ks and movies appeared decry-
mgoism and Manifest Destiny. But it
b now (hat everybody knows Custer was
fas believe he is referred to in the
'he white man's burden was an ex-
ubjugation of technologically disadvan-
ple
that holds my interest is the possibility
said �fact") that E troop of the 7th
mimed suicide en masse when surround-
ioux andhevene immediately prior to the
' Little Big Horn. When I was in the
didn't have horses We didn't have sabers
standing joke (?) was that when all else
fall on ur saber Was that some legacy left to
le old rr.�opers� The sad romanticism of death
d a alhalla for slain warriors is still with us. Any
recruit in bask training knows it well.
( Hirer's outstanding performer was Gary
W eathersbee, who is as fine an actor as one is likely to
see anywhere. In an electrifying speech m the second
he. as Major Benteen, defends himself against ac-
cusations ot coward by Mrs. Custer and sum-
inzes the points of the whole play. His elocution
and projection seem entirely natural, as if he was
born speaking across a valley. Weathersbee had the
best lines, best part, and best props; but, he brought
something of his own to make it all just a little bit bet-
ter The other players were passing fair at best
reciting lines in strained classroom exercise fashion'
Sets and lighting were, as always, the best.
All in all. it was an enjoyable evening No
blockbuster, but 1 did get to see Gary Weathersbee's
performance. The drama department needs ro see
more ot him, too.
( ontinued From Page 6
When things go
wrong, he fasts in
protest; when soldiers
attack his followers,
he encourages them to
submit to be beaten;
k:raduallv, jn his un-
shakable adherence to
this Christlike policy.
the fledgling nation of
India rallies around
him, and the inflexi-
ble British raj finally
has to admit Gandhi
is no longer a man but
an idea, and therefore
indestructible.
Within the confines
of a single film, and
guided by the messge
of Gandhi's public
life, has Atten-
borough "sanitized"
his subject?
"Oh no Atten-
borough says, "not at
all. Yes, it's pretty
clear that as a kid,
Gandhi was randy as
hell. He was married
very young, and when
he was 16 or 17 years
old, his father was dy-
ing. Gandhi was sit-
ting there, massaging
his father's head,
when he was over-
come with a normal
urge. So he called to
his uncle, and went to
his bedroom and
awakened his wife.
He Has Dead Eye For Readers
Continued From Page 6
looks back to Slaughterhouse-Five and Cat's
Cradle But the technical innovations that
-lade onnegut an "experimental" writer in
he 60s are gone: no Tralfamadorean nar-
atives, no intercutting from the land of fact
the terrain of science fiction. What remains
a distilled sense of the doom alwavs impen-
ng in a world dominated by technocrats and
tai men, it is palpable on everv page, and
neates even events that have no direct rela-
to Midland City's bomb factories
hether routine or catastrophic, events are
nated in the patented Vonnegut style: plain
the point of blandness, capable'of large
imsv and small expressions of outrage that
almost immmediately retracted with self-
deprecating humor, punctuated with the little
ap! risms that arc his most recognizable
tit�a:k. It's a style that Vonnegut seems to
think is both stoically moral and, with its
jinglelike refrains, appropriate for a mass
readership; he uses it to depict a world in
which large mistakes, like neutron bombs, are
the only thing apt to put an end to the small
mistakes that form the grain and pattern of
existence. His characters' lives are always
shaped bv what they neither expect not plan
tor. "It is too easy, when alive, to make
perfectly horrible mistakes Rudv says,
remembering that his father helped keep
young Hitler alive by buying a painting from
him when he was a starving artist in Vienna.
Variations of this sentiment are everywhere:
small decisions balloon into large disasters,
and Rudy responds by saying, "this was quite
a mistake then, because he is a cook, he
gives us a recipe. The book is full of them,
presumably on the theory that as formulas go!
a recipe is less likely to result in something
catastrophic than, sav, Dr. Hoenikker's lce-9
in Cat's Cradle.
Of
He was making love
to her for only a few
minutes when his un-
cle called to him, and
Gandhi came tearing
down the hall. But
before he got there,
his father had died.
"This incident had
a great effect on him,
as he says in his
autobiography. For
the rest of his life he
was always trying to
rid himself of passion
� not just physical
passion, but any pas-
sion which might lead
to anger
By Gandhi's own
account, he fought a
lifelong battle against
his own sexuality.
When he was in his
70s, and deeply
depressed over the im-
pending partition of
Pakistan, he con-
tinued to test himself
by having women lie
next to him in bed and
embrace him. After-
ward he would ex-
plore whether any
sensual feeling had
been aroused by the
experience.
IHl t XM t AKOl IS1XN
MXKC H 1. 1983
These and other of
Gandhi's attempts to
attain brahmacharya
� or spiritual oneness
with both sexes �
were controversial,
even in his own time.
Nirmal KumarBose, a
former Bengali inter-
preter of Gandhi's,
told the writer Ved
Mehta that "after
Gandhi's death
everyone wanted to
suppress all further
discusssion of the
brahmacharya ex-
periments Bosesaid
he published his
book. My Days with
Gandhi, at his own
expense after being
advised by the Nava-
Jivan Press.
"The whole idea
that Gandhi led a bor-
ing life is ridiculous
Attenborough says.
On the contrarv, there
was so much material
that it overwhelmed
the limitations "
Needy Aren't Only Ones Who Benefit
BORTIONS
Continued From Page 6
of their first batch of tickets and iocal
businesses gave ECU Hunger Coalition
member Theresa Dulski over a dozen door
prizes.
By 9 p.m. on Saturday, people began filing
in the ball with coolers on shoulder for the
BYOB evening. By 9:30, the parking spaces
were scarce. Hamer had hoped optimisticallv
for a turnout of 200 to 300 people. Those who
were unfamiliar with the organizing skills ot
Shep and friends were somewhat less hopeful.
Hamer was right, and the room was full. The
actual turnout? 300 easy.
Hamer, who is also a member of the
ECU Greenville Hunger Coalition called on
Jennifer Baughan, coordinator of the Hunger
Project and several others to get suggestions
as to where the benefit monev"should go.
It was decided to divide the monev in half
with 50 percent going to Oxfam-Amenca. a
international agency that funds self-help
development projects in poor countries and
the other 50 to Greenville's own Church
Ministries United, a relief organization sup-
ported by eleven local churches which pro-
vides tood for iocal poor families
"Church Ministries United is delighted to
have this help said Liz Wilkerson. chairman
of CML's Board of Directors "I; wa- really a
great idea Wilkerson added that there have
been manv needs among the poorer resident
of Greenville this winter We could realK use
the extra help
The evening's music kicked off nh a set b)
the Amateurs. Shep slapped his boneos and
bciteu out the tunes, most of which'he had
written himself.
lightnin' Wells followed with a ve' I
Chicago-style blues. Mike Wells did a fan-
tastic job on a couple of Howhn' Woll ongs
and a spellbinding job on his rendition
Screamin' Ja Hawkins "1 Put a Spell Or
1 ou
M ek terminations
App ts Made 7 Days
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Street
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m
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featuring USDA choice beef
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Every Tuesda in March 1983
Beef Tips
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Potato or F.F. and Texas Toast
featuring Prime Rib every
Fri. & Sat. Night
Now serving 14 oz. T-Bone
2 locations to better serve you
500 W. Greenville Blvd. 756-0040
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES
e are looking for girls intc rested in being
counselors - activils instructors in a private girb
camp located in Henersonsille. VC. Instuctors
needed especially in S�immingWSII, Horseback
riding. Tennis, Backpacking, Archers. Canoeing.
(Amnastics. C rafts, Also Basketball, Dancing, Soc-
cer, t heerleading. Drama, Art. Office work, C amp
craft. Nature studs. If sour school offers a Summer
Internship program v�e will be glad to help. Inquiries
- Morgan Hasnes P.O. Box 400c. Trson !S C
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uAppfe ofids
Greg Kihn Def Leppord Soft Cell
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Missing Persons H e Hu i dE Sell l tedLp's.
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THE WORD IS OUT!
ROAD WARRIOR
IS A HIT!
Apocalypse. POW!
Exhilarating
entertainment
A sensational
slam-banp end-of-
the-world picture
A smashing good time
at the moviesA
sizzler. .George Miller
and company have
pulled off a winner
THE ROAD WARRIOR
Starring MEL GIBSON Music by BRIAN MAY
Written by TERRY HAYES. GEORGE MILLER with BRIAN HANNANT
Produced by BYRON KENNEDY Directed by GEORGE MILLER
UIBijja
iiwixi
THIS WEDNESDAY NIGHT FIRST SMASH HIT: Mad
Max' - 7 PM. SECOND HIT: The Road Warrior' - 9
PM. Both Films In Mendonhall Student Center's Hendrix
Theatre. Admission By ID & Activity Card For Students,
MSC Membership For Faculty And Staff. Sponsored By
The ECU Student Union Films Committee.
200 West
AXA� A0's
Happy Hoar
Tuesday, March 1
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Happy Hoar Prices
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ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
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"PW�IM�)







THF EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
MARCH 1, 1983
Page 8
Pirates Nail Down Winning Season
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Mitor
With 4,830 spectators looking
on, the ECU men's basketball
team secured c. winning season in
Minges Coliseum Saturday night
by gliding past the Wilmington
Seahawks, 70-60.
"I'm happy for the kids that we
got a winning season said Head
Coach Charlie Harrison after the
game. "Nobody, the magazines
or newspapers, thought we had a
chance to have a winning
season
After last week's loss against
conference foe James Madison,
Harrison described the Pirates'
play as "emotionless but that
wasn't the case against the
Seahawks. "These guys amaze
me he said. "I never know how
to predict them, but when you
look back over, only one or two
haven't been played with emo-
tion
Against Wilmington, the Bucs
built an eight-point lead by
halftime, and gradually pulled
ahead by as much as 15 points in
the first five minutes of the second
period.
ECU's Johnny Edwards
dominated offensively during the
first 10 minutes of the final half,
pumping in eight points in the
first four minutes. The Bucs made
mne-of-10 baskets in eight
minutes, while the Seahawks were
five-for-10 from the floor.
The Seahawks cut the Pirates'
lead to, 55-48, with 3:56 remain-
ing, but two freethrows each from
Bruce Peartree and Barry Wright
once again gave the Bucs a solid
advantage.
In ECU � UNC-W's first clash
on Jan. 24, the Pirates played
without center Charlie Green,
who was out with a separated
shoulder. But. as UNC-W coach
Mel Gibson predicted, the return-
ing of Green would prove to be a
major factor in the second con-
test. Harrison explained further.
"Green gives us more flexibility,
more board strength Harrison
said. "We're a lot quicker team
out there with him in the game
The Bucs went up, 47-30, with
14:11 remaining, and at this
point, Harrison said the Pirates
began to relax a little too much.
"We got sloppy he said. "We
started at the defensive end and it
generated to our offense he
said. "We weren't very good. We
needed to get some momentum
going
But the Bucs did have enough
momentum to pump in 15 of 20
shots for a 75-percent shooting
average from the floor. Edwards,
the leading candidate for the
ECAC-South's "Rookie of the
Year scored 14 of his 19 points
in the second half and led the
Pirates in rebounding with eight.
Green, who was seven for 12
from the floor, followed Edwards
with 17 points. Peartree, a
sophomore guard from Pantego,
added 14 points, making six of
eight baskets. Another
sophomore, Barry Wright, finish-
ed with 12 points to give the team
four players scoring in double
figures.
In field goal percentage, UNC-
W shot 41-percent from the game,
with Washington native Shawn
Williams leading the Seahawks
with 16 points. Junior Terry
Shiver racked up 12 points, Scott
Prudhoe had 11 and Tony Ander-
son contributed 10.
In the first half, the Pirates
jumped out to 7-2 lead, but a slam
dunk by junior Carlos Kelly reviv-
ed the Seahawks. The Bucs
retaliated. Now leading, 11-10,
ECU's Edwards sank a four-foot
jumpshot and a nailed a fastbreak
one-hand dunk to boost the Bucs
back up, 15-10.
With Wright on the bench with
three fouls, Thorn Brown, Green
and Edwards were relied on to
generate the offense. They did.
The threesome combined for 10
points during the final minutes,
giving the Bucs a 28-22 advantage
at the half.
The Pirates made 12-of-24
shots for a 50-percent shooting
average in the first period. The
Seahawks had more trouble at the
other end of the court, however,
making only 30 percent of their
field goals.
The Seahawks are now 11-14,
and were looking for their third
straight win in Minges Colieseum.
But the Bucs put an end to UNC-
W's streak, and will start gearing
up for their final game of the
regular season against Penn State-
Behrend Thursday night in
Minges Coliseum.
Now, 14-12, and, 3-7, in the
ECAC-South conference, the
Bucs will travel to Richmond,
Va on March 10-12 to compete
in the conference tournament.
Among six teams, the Pirates are
placed fifth.
At Thursday night's home con-
test, ECU's Charlie Green and
Thorn Brown will be making their
final appearance in Minges Col-
iseum. Both seniors will receive
special recognition following the
bout.
Gametime is 7:30 p.m.
r-�CU 10. UNC-WilmiB�ton 60
ECU
Vknghi
Brown
Edwirdl
Robuuon
Peartree
NicLcod
Vanderhorii
Green
Totak
UNC
Andtrson
Ketly
S Prudhoe
WUUanu
Shrivel
Dtckeai
M Prudhoe
Stegcr
MP FG FT
Zl
19
40
40
32
4
I
M
5-7
1-2
6-11
2-3
6-
0-1
0-0
712
2-2
0-0
7 9
2-3
2-2
0-0
0-0
3 3
27-44 16-19 25
Mf fc n i a r n
33
29
17
39
36
12
10
2
512
2-7
4-9
7-19
1-6
2-2
0-0
0-1
0-0
12
3-4 4
2-2 12
e-� 1
04
2 2
0-0
24 U-56 14-16 36 22 6 6
UNC-WI
Turnover! - ECX 14. UNC-W II
TecJuucml fouli - None
Of :iaii � Cite. Phipp.
Alt - 4.KB
21
22
42
n
PHote Br GABY PATTtftSON
ECU point guard Curt V anderhorst applies defensive pressure on
UNC-W's Shawn Williams. The Pirates won their 14th game of the
vear to secure a winning season.
Lady Bucs' Season Finale This Weekend
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Lady Pirate guard Caren Truske will join Man Denkler and Fran
Hooks as seniors who will play their last game in Minges Coliseum
Saturday night.
By KEN BOLTON
AaWui Sporti Milor
Senior center Mary Denkler
scored a career-high 34 points and
freshman Sylvia Bragg pulled
down a career-high 12 rebounds
on Saturday afternoon as the
ECU Lady Pirates defeated
George Mason, 69-65.
After Saturday's game, which
was played in Fairfax, Va the
Lady Pirates travelled to
Washington, D.C. to face George
Washington University on Sunday
afternoon.
This time, ECU came up on the
short end of a 79-75 score, due
mainly to a 40-point performance
by GWU guard Kelly Ballcntine.
The loss ended a three-game
winning streak which had been the
Lady Pirates longest of the
season.
The Saturday afternoon victory
over George Mason was a game of
career highs for four ECU
players.
Besides Denkler and Bragg's
performances, seniors Fran
Hooks and Caren Truske played
well in their next-to-last regular
season game for ECU.
Hooks grabbed a career-high 11
rebounds, while Truske scored a
personal-best 10 points.
Even with the victory, ECU
coach Cathy Andruzzi wasn't
satisfied. "We controlled the
boards and shot well, but we had
too many turnovers (20) she
stated. "We allowed them to do
what they wanted offensively
Andruzzi was especially critical
of the Lady Pirate defense in the
.loss to George Washington.
"We just had a lack of defense
throughout the entire game An-
druizi commented. "Our defense
lost the game for us by not
creating our offense
Ballentine got her 40 points on
17 for 32 shooting from the floor
and six of eight free throws at-
tempts.
Kathy Marshall added 18 points
and Anne Feeney contributed 11
as George Washington ended its
season with a 9-16 record.
For the Lady Pirates, Denkler
again led the way with 28 points
and nine rebounds. Bragg record-
ed 15 points and seven assists,
while Lisa Squirewell chipped in
12 points and eight rebounds.
The Lady Pirates were trailing
39-30 at halftime, with Ballentine
blistering the ECU defense with
25 points.
ECU rallied to tie the score at
45 in the second half but GWU
refused to buckle and pulled out
the four point victory.
The Lady Pirates will have a
chance for a winning season this
Saturday night when they host
UNC-Charlotte in Minges Col-
iseum.
Andruzzi is glad to be in the
position for a chance to finish
14-12. "We're very pleased with
our situation right now she
said. "We want them to do the
best they can and being 13-12 is a
credit to our kids.
"We are in a situation in which
not many teams have to deal
withAndruzzi added. "We've
been plagued by injuries and as a
result we don't have depth. I'd be
more disappointed if we had more
talent and depth and were losing.
Our kids have done a fine job
Saturday night's game will
mark the end of the career of
three ECU players � Denkler,
Hooks and Truske.
The three have combined for
31.7 points per game and 13.4 re-
bounds per game this season while
averaging nearly 37 minutes per
ballgame.
Denkler, the 6-0 all-America
from Alexandria, Va has scored
1,758 points during her iltustrous
four-year career, which pots her
at second place on the all time
career scoring list behind Rosie
Thompson.
Denkler has 555 points this
year, which puts her in fourth
place for the most points in a
single season.
She has been the mainstay of
the Lady Pirate offense this year,
scoring in double figures in all but
two games.
Hooks became a scoring .threar
out of necessity this season is she
averaged 6.1 points and 4.2 re-
bounds per game.
The 5-8 Goldsboro native
scored a career-high 17 points
earlier this year against UNC-
Charlotte and pulled down a
career-high 11 rebounds this
weekend against George Mason.
Truske, 5-6 native of Colum-
bus, Ohio, set a career-high 10
points on four occassions while
scoring twice as many points in
1982-83 than she did in her
previous two seasons.
Andruzzi hopes that ECU fans
will come out Saturday night and
send the seniors off with a fond
farewell.
"Our seniors have done an
outstanding job for us this year
she said. "After this one, Mary
Denkler will be gone. We hope
people will recognize that and
come out and support them.
Gametime for Saturday's
season finale is 7:30 p.m.
Young Bucs Bat Up For VCU
t
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Saom MKM
The ECU men's baseball team
open the 1983 season this Wednes-
day at Harrington Field against
Virginia Commonwealth Univer-
sity.
With 12 freshmen and
sophomores, six juniors and seven
seniors, Head Coach Hal Baird
will be debuting a young team.
"We've got a lot of new
players Baird said. "A lot of
them will be playing college ball
for the first time, so there's no
doubt this will be a year of
rebuilding for us
According to Baird, however,
lack of experience is not his
nrimary concern at this point.
"How well we do depends on how
� " our pitchers do he said.
Sophomore Bob Davidson,
who hails from Fort Bragg, will be
the starting pitcher against VCU,
Baird said. Last year, Davidson
compiled a 5-3 won-loss record
and posted a 2.65 ERA.
Tony Guzzo, a former assistant
coach at ECU, is now VCU's head
coach, and Baird knows Guzzo
will have his team ready. "We're
looking for them to be much im-
proved and competitive he said.
"We know he likes the running
game, and he'll especially have
them ready for us
VCU is only one of 43 ECU op-
ponents this season � a schedule
Baird described as the most dif-
ficult one the Pirates have yet to
face. "We play seven more dif-
ferent teams in post-season this
year he said. "It's gonna be the
toughest schedule we've ever
had
After last year's overwhelming
success, the Bucs certainly have a
reputation to live up to. The ECU
squad finished with a 34-14 record
in 1982, recorded the 30th winn-
ing season in 31 years, earned an
NCAA playoff berth by sweeping
three games in the ECAC-South
Conference Championship, and
defeated North Carolina for its
first NCAA playoff win in 10
years. Four players signed in to
the professional ranks after the
season.
Following Wednesday's game,
the Pirates will play Atlantic
Christian College on Thursday,
with senior Charlie Smith posi-
tioned on the pitcher's mound.
Smith, a 6-2, 195-pound Rober-
sonville native, finished with a 3-2
won-loss record and a 3.00 ERA.
In the title game of the ECAC-
South Conference tournament,
Smith pitched 2.7 innings of one-
hit baseball, saving the game for
Davidson.
On March 4, the Pirates will
play their first away game of the
season against ACC opponent,
N.C. State. Mount Olive junior
college transfer Robby Mc-
Clanahan, the only left-handed
player on the quad, will be pit-
ching for the Pirates. The Bucs
will again confront the Wolfpack
on March 7, with freshman Wln-
fred Johnson filling the pitching
spot. Johnson, who may possibly
be the best power hitter on the
squad, was a designated hitter for
the Pirates at the end of the fall
season. "He may be the only two-
way player I've had since I've
been here Baird said.
Both the Atlantic Christian and
N.C. State games will begin at 3
p.m.
Swimmers Set Out
For Championship
By ED MCKLAS
Sun Writer
The ECU men's and women's
swim teams will finish out their
1982-83 season when they travel
to Syracuse, N.Y. Saturday to
compete in the Eastern Inter-
collegiate Swimming and Diving
Championships.
The event, which includes such
powerhouses as Pittsburgh,
Maryland, West Virginia and
Penn State, will be hosted by
Syracuse and held at Nottingham
High School's elaborate swimm-
ing complex.
There will be 16 teams com-
peting in the event. ECU swim
coach Rick Kobe considers ECU
to be one of the top eight teams.
"It's hard to predict this
meet explained Kobe. "Teams
usually score most of their points
on depth so it depends on how
many swimmers we have who get
in the finals and score
According to Kobe, the event is
a good chance for the swimmers
to display their skills in their quest
to qualify for the Nationals.
"We'll probably have some
who will make the Nationalswith
their times he sara Also, we
should set some varsity records
After the Eastern meet, Pirate
diver Scott Eagle and diving coach
Jon Rose will travel to Columbia,
S.C where Eagle has qualified
for the NCAA regional diving
competition, to be held March
11-12. If he finishes among the
top nine, Eagle then goes to the
NCAA finals March 24-26 in In-
dianapolis, Ind.
The men's team is presently 4-5
while the women are 5-5.
ECU sealer Jon Riddle lies ap patt carefully Riddle �rlii. ,k.
Pirates place 14th among 21 teams at FSU's Seanteofc
past weekend.
tab
McCorkle 'Dai
By RANDl MEW
vuff Wnier
The ECU men's
track team has
benefited all vear
from the performance
of its outstanding
freshman class, and
one of the most p
mineni members of
that class is sprinter
Nathan McCorkle
McCorkle. who
hails from Newton,
N.C runs the 55. 2 �
and 400-meter
the Pirates. Althc .
a fine runner in eacl
of these event Mc
Corkle specializes in
the 55-meter dash and
has placed in
event at afcnosl �
meet
McCorkle said I
beiian running
in the ninth grade. i
plaved footbal! in
tumor high, and when
1 started playing in
high school. 1 -
to keep �n shape dur
�ng the off-seas-
i started runnil
While runni
Newton-ConoJ
High. McCorkle
high school ��
the 100. 200
400-rneter ra
sem j
the 100
200- mc-
also namec
con:
er
� tand

i
i
TTta
Golfers Pla
The ECU me:
golf team beg
spring season in Sun-
n v Florida 11
weekend, placing Itol
among 21 teams
Florida State
Seminole C lassie
During the ih
dav tournament. I
ECU golfer- I
Czaja. Roj
Newsom, Jon K j: .
David Doolej
Kellv Stimart comb
ed for 925 stroke
place the Pirate-
the 14th spot.
In team star
the University
Florida placed
with 85. FSL r-
second with 882
Mississippi St a
finished third with
886, Clemson shot
fc�G for fourth place
and Miami nabbed
fifth place with 902
strokes. UNC-Chapd
Hill placed ninth in
the tournament.
Czaia. a


-
. is n
need "
According I
Florida wa
sunnv either
wea:he- in Fl
was terrible I
� hen we
Last Meet O
Indoor Seasol
B Rands Mews
s��fT Wriwr
The ECU men's
track team competed
in their last indk
meet of the season
this weekend, run!
in the George Mason
Tri-Meet in Fairfax,
VA.
The Pirate- too
the top two spots in
the 55-meter hurdles.
ith Craig White
Finishing first in 7 M
and W alter
S .
second in " 0
In an
Dick
� �
son placed
event in 1:5
In " j
Ruebe:
ed third
while Edd
came in j
Mc
Pirate Tra
� �
In Prestigi
The ECU men s
track team will com-
pete in the 62nd An-
nual Intercollegiate
Association of
Amateur Athletes of
America Indoor
Track and Field
Championship at
Princeton Universi-
ty's Jadwin Gym-
nasium on March 4, 5
and 6.
Over 1,100 of the
hest collegiate track
and field athletes
from the east are ex-
I Pected to participate.
The meet gets
underway Friday,
March 4 at noon with
the pentathlon com-
Petition. The rest of
the meet begins Satur-
day. March 5 at 11:00
��� with trials in 14
vnts. Finals in the
5-pound weight
prow and the long
tnp will also be con-
lucted Saturday
Mternoon. Finals in
the remain
events will be
da. Mat j
p m
Defend
pion Fasrtein
son is amonf
schools ihat
represented
prestigious
Defending �
champions
to compete
McDermott
University ir
put. Rodne
of Villanova
meter hun
Yearwood ot
State in the �
and Leo Wil
Navy in tl
jump- w il
senior. isals(
time d
NCAA tndt
champion
of the NC
record, 7'5j
Other oi





M Ki H ! 198 ! Pace
g Season
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
fciuardurt anderhorst applies defensive pressure on
na�n Williams. 1 he Pirates won their 14th game of the
lure a winning sessoa.
'e This Weekend
Denkier has 555 points this
ear. hich puts her in fourth
place for the most points in a
Mngle season.
She has been the mainstay of
the Lady Pirate offense this year,
scoring in double figures in all but
two games.
Hooks became a scoring thread
out of necessity this season "is she
:
i Minges Col-
glad to bein the
achance tofinish
reery pleased with
nright now she
it tnem � the
� deal �
� . a
a
eraged 6.1 points and 4.2
re-
nbined
oe and 13.4 rc-
:ason a -
minutes per
a. a
red
'
the aii time
d Rosie
bounds per game.
The 5-8 Goldsboro native
scored a career-high 17 points
earlier this year against UNC-
Charlotte and pulled down a
career-high 11 rebounds this
weekend againsi George Mason.
Iruske. 5-6 native of Colum-
bus, Ohio, set a career-high 10
points on four occassions while
scoring twice as manv points in
1982-83 than she did in her
previous two seasons.
Andruzzi hopes that ECU fans
will come out Saturday night and
�end the seniors off with a fond
farewell.
"Our seniors have done an
outstanding job for us this vear "
he said. "After this oneMary
Denkier will be gone. We hope
people will recognize that and
come out and support them.
Gametime for Saturday's
season finale is 7:30 p.m
m
�'TsemmK
Mh
b (Jam V �
RMdl. Kn up pun cOTf.ll m �"
McCorkle Dashes' Into Track Success
THE EAST CARPI IN1AN
MARCH I, 1983
B RANDY MEWS
The ECU men's
track team has
benefited all year
from the performance
of its outstanding
freshman class, and
one of the most pro-
minent members of
that class is sprinter
a:han McCorkle.
McCorkle, who
haiN from Newton,
a. runs the 55, 200
and 400-meters for
the Pirates Although
a fine runner in each
of these eents, Mc-
Corkle specializes in
the 55-meter dash and
has placed in that
event at almost every
meei
McCorkk said he
began running track
in the ninth grade. "1
played football in
ank� high, and when
; sorted playing in
high school, 1 wanted
to keep in shape dur-
so
track -��ng
While running for
Newton-Conover
� McCorkle se
high school records ,n
Jhc 100. 200 anS
�W-meter races
came from
in track
ECU.
McCorkle who
stands 5'8 said he
chose track over foot-
ball because of his
size. "In high school
you can be small and
senior year, McCortu Stl be good' but in
ws state chamniJ COege the other 8"Vs
�he ioo Pnr) wo"ld be too big for
200-meters
McCorkle, who is a
physical education
major, said in his
spare time, he likes to
bowl or play
pong.
ping-
also
and
was
all-
per-
and
named an
conference
former.
As well as being a
'rack stand-out in
h'gh school, Mc-
Corkle was also star-
ting tailback for his
ate championship
football team. He was
named all-conference
n football and also
tne most valuable
P'ayer on his team.
Upon graduating
irom high school, Mc-
Corkle was offered
man football
scholarships, but his
only scholarship offer
big for
me. I also kept im-
proving my times in
track each year in
nigh school and felt I
could compete on the
college level
McCorkle said he
has enjoyed ECU a
great deal since com-
ing here. "I've met a
lot of people, and I'm
having fun running on
the track team
Besides track, Mc-
Corkle said he doesn't
have a lot of time for
anything else. "My
classes keep me really
busy, and I'm usually
studying when I'm
not at practice or a
meet
With the indoor
track season already
behind him, Mc-
Corkle is now prepar-
ing for the outdoor
season. According to
McCorkle, working
with head coach Bill
Carson has improved
his running ability
considerably.
several first-place
finishes under his belt
this year, McCorkle's
best performance of
the season was two
weeks ago when he
ran the 55-meter race
in 6.28 at the Carolina
Invitational in Chapel
Hill. Although he
finished third overall,
his time was just .28
seconds short of the
all-time ECU record
which was set back in
1976.
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S8 1033
"We've gone to a
lot of good meets this
year he said, "and
Coach Carson has
helped me improve by
showing me some new
techniques
Although he has
�� - -
ATTIC
McCorkle has been
satisfied with his first
year at ECU, but one
day he hopes to com-
pete in the NCAA Na-
tional Champion-
ships, and with three
more years left at
ECU, he has plenty of
time to accomplish his
goal.
Ha&ter
TWO BACON IEB6 BISCUITS $1.29
IVj" proem this 'i4 hi be m-tadrraqc nrou
iHK-r xr vimi phase tM.xmT m.rj pj Mn ah -
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t� r w . .1 during n. .tnuJ bmfcfaei i� Hirx, �,) j, lht
h li minjj tUnk-r s Kt-Mjurano v 11 m . j,x hi
Street 29CT I i mh��m i (mmdc
N OtergMxlchnxMjiMan 51 i-n
Golfers Place 14th
rhe ECU men's
: team began its
ring season in Sun-
) Florida this
� : placing 14th
nong 21 teams in
arida State's
lelassie.
During the three -
� ' urnament, five
golfers: Chris
Roger
Am, .hin Riddle,
d 11 Klcy and
Stimari combtn-
" 925 strokes to
th Pirates in
4tl pot.
In team -tandings,
the I n versity of
F hda placed first
� P5. FSU placed
- �ith 882.
Mississippi State
� third with
CJemson shot
��' '� Fowl, place
- Man nabbed
" place with 902
!r� L NC-Chapel
raced ninth in
: rnament.
jja, a
Sew
pidt
�-
sophomore from Old
Greenwich. Conn
shot a consistent
76-77-75 to lead the
Pirates individually.
Newsora, a
freshman from Port-
smouth. Va follow-
ed with scores of
76-80-73, for a total
of 229 points.
First-year coach
Jerry Lee said he
would hae liked for
the team to have done
better, but he wasn't
really disappointed.
'There were
schools there that plav
year round, and it's
hard to compete with
them he said. "Our
weather has been bad
here and we haven't
had a chance to prac-
tice as much as we
need
According to Lee,
Florida wasn't all that
sunny either. "The
weather in Florida
was terrible he said.
'When we teed off
Saturday, it was 37
degrees and 30 mile-
per-hour winds. Sun-
day, it was just as
bad; plus it rained
Other Pirate leaders
were Dooley, a
freshman who shot
78-77-79 for a score of
234.
Riddle, the only
senior on the team
shot 80-76-83 for a
total of 239 strokes,
while Stimart shot
84-79-79 for an
overall score of 242.
In individual stan-
dings, tournament
leaders were: Jim
Shuman (Florida),
216; Julian Taylor
(CTemson), 217; Steve
Keppler (FSU), 219
and John Morrow
(FSU), 219.
On March 4, 5 and
6, the Pirates will
travel to Fripp Island,
S.C for the Fripp
Island Invitational.
Last Meet Of 1982
Indoor Season Over
B Randy Mews
staff �mr
The ECU men's
ra team competed
: their last indoor
meet of the season
this weekend, running
In the George Mason
Tn-Meet in Fairfax,
VA.
The Pirates took
'he top two spots in
'he 55-meter hurdles,
with Craig White
finishing first in 7.36
and Walter
joutherland taking
second in 7.60.
In another first-
place finish, Ray
Dickerson won the
800 meters in 1:54.92,
while Wayne Richard-
son placed third in the
event in 1:56.70.
In the quarter mile,
Rueben Pierce finish-
ed third in 49.24,
while Eddie Bradly
came in fourth in
49.50.
Sprinters Nathan
McCorkle and Henry
Williams finished
third and fifth respec-
tively in the 55-meter
dash. McCorkle
finished the race in
6.39 while Williams
came in at 6.41.
The mile-relay team
of Bradly, Pierce,
Wayne Miller and
Keith Clarke came in
second overall with at
time of 3:19.4.
The Pirates swept
the long jump, taking
See BROOKS, Page 10
Pirate Tracksters
In Prestigious Meet
The ECU men's
track team will com-
pete in the 62nd An-
nual Intercollegiate
Association of
Amateur Athletes of
America Indoor
Track and Field
Championship at
Princeton Universi-
ty's Jadwin Gym-
nasium on March 4, 5
and 6.
Over 1,100 of the
hest collegiate track
and field athletes
from the east are ex-
pected to participate.
The meet gets
underway Friday,
March 4 at noon with
tr)e pentathlon com-
petition. The rest of
the meet begins Satur-
day, March 5 at 11:00
a m. with trials in 14
events. Finals in the
35-pound weight
throw and the long
jump will also be con-
ducted Saturday
afternoon. Finals in
the remaining 16
events will begin Sun-
day, March 6 at 1:30
p.m.
Defending cham-
pion Fairleigh Dickin-
son is among the 78
schools that will be
represented in this
prestigious meet.
Defending individual
champions expected
to compete are: Art
McDermott of Boston
University in the shot
put, Rodney Wilson
of Villanova in the 55
meter hurdles, Ed
Yearwood of Morgan
State in the 400 meters
and Leo Williams of
Navy in the high
jump. Williams, a
senior, is also the two-
time defending
NCAA indoor jump
champion and holder
of the NCAA meet
record, VS'A
Other outstanding
individuals expected
to highlight the
weekend's competi-
tion are Harvard's
Adam Dixon, the
1981 IC4A 1,500
meters champ, Dart-
mouth's Jim Sapien-
za, the 1982 Hep-
tagonal cross-country
champ, Maryland's
Alan Baginski, 1981
35-pound weight
throw champ,
Villanova's John
Marshall, Syracuse's
Jim O'Connell,
Rutgers' Elliott
Quow, Richmond's
Edwin Koech, Set on
Hall's quarter-milers
Linval Francis,
Washington Njiri and
Tommie Nnakwe, and
long distance runners
Steve Binns and Geoff
Smith of Providence,
Paul Souza of Penn
State, Fraser Hudgins
of William and Mary
and Bill Reifsnyder of
Bucknell.


















?






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Final Basketball Action
of '83 Season
Thursday: ECU vs. Penn State-Behrend
7:30-Minges Coliseum
"Senior Night"
Saturday: Lady Pirates vs. U.N.C.
�� M las n v Charlotte
7:30Minges Coliseum
"Senior Night"
$200 Money Scramble
Watch the Pirates attack,
i





10 THEEASTCAROHNIAN MARCH 1,1981
Classifieds
PERSONAL
RIDES
DRP I'VE BEEN 'he craiy fool
- not you I with I could turn back
time and make things right I hope
you'll accept my apology and let
me try to make things right I love
you. it's been my lots not yourj I
am so sorry I hope you will at
least forgive me and let me be
your friend Love, ALWAYS AND
FOREVER. Ml
TO THE GIRL WHO KEEPS
LEAVING love letters on my car
You misspelled STUPID and
"UGLY "
ROOMMATE
WANTED
RIDE NEEDED to Roanoke. Va
or surrounding area for Spring
Break Will share expenses Call
Julie, alter 5 30 p m at 753 1317
Julie is an equal opportunity rider.
RIDE NEEDED to Washington,
D C . area Friday March 4 after 1
p m Will split gas expenses Call
7SJ 543 and ask for Chip
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST 3 YEAR OLD small black
- female dog White markings on
ROOMMATE WANTED chin and paws no tail Answers to
3 bedroom apartment Village CLO Please call 7SI 330 alter
Green Apartments, sptit rent and 4 00 p m if seen oi found
utilities Male or female, call LOST GOLD SIGNET PINKY
753 t�3 RING with mtitals "MSA
engraved It found please call
Marion Slaughter 753 1307
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Despite the Pirates'
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I
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eMOVIE
M A G A Z 1 N
features
MONTY PYTHON'S
THE MEANING OF TIFF
British (. ii :ii (
3
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LANGUAGES
; Of) World Short) Mtiki -
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PSYCHO II
�ifhmr, l'i i.� - Ui � �
flu St � in nl flii 11 iin
PREVIEWS
S, m Perm in Bad Boys, k �
Doligltls Cf John Si Iiiu iili i in
1 i Idle l.ii i hi s Run is l'i ' �
C.ate in l'i ivatt S Ih.hI
DOCTOR DETROIT
Dim krod First S
Stdiini It" i
6
8
10
14
OUR COVER
Dun At,ri'ii woopeti around oi
hi;i n. ,i ith mil hi i iit'iI i hii 11 � � i
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At last! What we've all
been waiting for! Monty
Pythons The Meaning of Life,
in which are answered many
meaningful questions, in which
we see lots of blood, men in
women's clothing, women with very
large mammaries, and all the usual
tasteful Pythonesque weirdness.
IM 1 1 1 () H N S I () I
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left, Palin, (
andhapina � eft t
iht. in utnfoi m
nisjt,l c ier no
bit nf x i ml mal � i r
n bit h is luppnst ,7
main us t 11 wi i and
(fin asy as da n.
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it la' left, . i �
Joiii in di an 'his
tunt . in mil i,i his
)a: hi ili i ,
frumpy British
huus, if, l , i,
limks spookih liki an
i mi in an I, . isi
' t llillnii fie i.
Hi Int It It. this is not
a scent f � li �r!
� am � I hi U an
int" nationu ui
March 25
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i M I
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i
I
THE UNITED WAY
ISAGIFTWEGIVE
EACH OTHER
FOR BEING HUMAN.
Sometimes its not easy being human. Medical
libraries are filled with diseases of the body and mind.
.And, as if that weren't enough, we humans tend
to create many of our own problems.
Drugs. Child abuse. Family squabbles. The list
goes on and on. I
Things we don't
mean to do, but
end up doing
to each other and
ourselves.
It's all pail
of being human,
and all part of
why there's a
United Way.
The United
Way is an organi-
zation devoted to
making it easier
to deed with the
problems of being
human. An organization dedicated to making humanity
more humane.
.And since each of us is responsible for keeping
the United Way successful, it's like a gift we give to each
other for being human.
A gift in the best of human traditions:
sharing. Thanks to you.
m
�i
Thanks to you It works For all oF us United Way
'VV










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E.T. Phones Home
Japanese, Portuguese, French, Italian. Spanish
(niawc eve)i Russian someday)
H PA l' 1 KOS I A
i i
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-
Anthony Perkins Is
Long-Awaited Sequel to
Hitchcock's 1960 Thriller
BY ZAN STEWART
n aaute craftsman who
possesses abundant re-
sources, actor Anthony
Perkins has displayed
' his talent in all manner
i of dramatic and com-
edic roles throughout
his distinguished and lengthy film and
stage career. On the screen, he's graced
�uch diverse works as William Wyler's
Friendly Persuasion (1956). where he was
Gary Cooper's Quaker son. and Alan
Rudolph's sadly neglected Remember My
Same (I978K where he performed with his
wife, photographer Berry Berenson.
Perkins is master of the self-conscious
twitch, the nervous, awkward stance of a
desperate, misunderstood boyman. He's
played a number of weirdos, from Pntty
Poisons helpless neurotic to the cold-
blooded husband of Sophia Loren in Five
Miles to Midnight, the hapless homosexual
photographer opposite Diana Ross in
Mahogany, and die anxious secretary in
Murder on the Orient Express. Throughout
these roles Perkins was always appealing �
though sometimes perversely so. Most
women who watched him believed (and
still do) that his characters (and, by exten-
sion, Perkins himself) would be just fine
and dandy with a little compassion and
mothering, some good food (he's so
thin ), some love.
Among those numerous roles, there's no
doubt that Perkins' most memorable, and
perhaps most effective, work was done in
Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho, the gruesome
thriller shot in I960. As Norman Bates, the
shy, stuttering and violently repressed
owner and sole caretaker of the Bates
Motel. Perkins deftly incorporated the
elements of sly humor and grisly terror
that Hitchcock loved into a performance
that kept viewers entranced.
Twenty-two years later, it seems few have
forgotten PerkinsBates or Psycho, so. by
popular demand, we have Psycho II. The
sequel is a co-production of Universal Pic-
tures and the Oak Media Development
Corporation, headed by Bernard
Schwartz. Schwartz is the project's execu-
tive producer and Hilton Green, who was
the first assistant director of the original
I mHxtn of the IH�origimmt, the rotmm-
tits gkmmity m, VnhxTsmTs
umtmumkk in the spring.





m I 3, . .
rVr� and worked wkh Hkchcock many
,7 times, it the producer. Australian
filmmaker Richard Franklin, in ha Ameri-
script by Tom Holland.
Though Perkins' drdiration 10 his craft
is unquestioned, he would be the first to
admit that his first priority is his family �
Berensun and their two children, fmnjod
�n. r� , ?'
cover of evergreens in the Hollywood
Hills. In his living room, where colorful
planks of a hardwood floor, the actor re-
laxes and talks about the sequel.
On the one hand, he mused, who would
have thought there was any more to idl,
what with Norman safely tucked away m
an institution; but, on the other, "Mayf
after a twenty-two-year wait he says,
makes the storyeasier to perpetuate, to get
' 's no good if
were quite open about changes. I've found
that the bigger the talent, the more that all'
concerned are secure with their materials
and their talents, then the more likely it is
dence in fib own work in the world
As does Perkins b FranUm, whose
I"1 �"ng Stacy Reach and Jamie Lee
Curus. "He seemed ideal for the job the
actor comments. "Here's a young guy
who's passionately interested in the thriller
flew, who's made a couple already, who
him very well, and knew all of Hitchcock's
films as well, plus he has that sense of
humor that Hkchcock had
The original Psycho was a (Hack, 30-day
�. L niversaTs Studio Cky lot, where the
Bates Motel, and Norman's home behind
classics of F.W.
Hitchcock's as The Loigrt. the 1926
about Jack the Ripper that in ways r
biesPswa
Transferring the Mack
says, this was achieved In-
deep dark Macks. So often, when
seeks to have a black and wain
colors will be muted, as wkh the
tensky. 1 like to call this process black and
color
The commercial viability of Put ho It
brought out Perkins' observations on die
ana some Wueprints. Sett were also ar-
ranged as dose to the original as possible.
paid oil and Perkins complimented them
when he mid that being on the set i
iU 8�ng home Abo making the
her role as LUa from the original film.
Working wkh Miles. Perkins says, "was
very good, better than the first time
To achieve the lone and fed of a psycho-
logical thriller, cinematographer Dean
ter on The Thing, Escape from Sew York and
others), and director Franklin studied films
of the German Expressionist movement
which employed exaggerated sets and
this Psycho II, and all that's required b di
k be good. This is sort of a throwback j
the Forties, when people went to sec pic
tures, just as long as they were good.
movies or they d id n't, there
thing else to spend their ent
dollar on.
spend inonev on, and Uus means tl
and good stories, don't get seen. That's
discouraging.
-So with Psycho II, the burden
made the film. We know there are no
cuses for Psycho II not to make k at the box
picture simply has to be good
as the original which, though gothic and
bizarre, was basically a small town story
that had its basis in the commonplace in-
gredients of our society, like people own-
ing motels and operating small hnikwii"
Psycho II begins wkh Norman Bates
being released from custody and judged fit
for society. He returns to Fan-vile and his
motd, the operation of which has been
casually overseen by a local bank. Norman
aho takes a part-time job in a diner, where
he meets Mary, played by Meg Tilly. Mary
is down on her luck and b suddenly with-
out a place to five, so Norman offers her a
room at the motd. free of charge.
But. and this is a whale of a but, while
Norman's been away, the bank has allowed
the Bates Motel to operate as an adult
moid, catering to one-hour rentals, and
Perkins, slipping humorously into charac-
ter, adds, "Norman doesn't care for that
Recapturing the persona of Bates. Per-
ins says, wasn't too hard. "I just got under
the skin or the guy Perkins aho had the
support of Franklin and Holland, two very
cooperative and confident talents.
"In a couple of instances Perkins
elaborates, "Richard and Tom and I would
lalk and I'd say. Well. Norman just
wouldn't do something like this and they





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UiHiurd�-
Shod, . can dim kirk Douglas
-�"� I lauman looking
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h a succi ssful manhunt. Ihtue
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Inflation is threatening the evolution
of higher education. -00,�
Naturalist
i 11 k"?0011 nipg everyone struggle harder for survival these days. So why
-should we be particularly concerned over what its doing to higher education?
�� I rfrl ilfl � I kl I� 1 �� �"�"�' TVliA'i
need? If laboratories don't have all the latest equipment? If courses on subjects
we've never even heard of have to be dropped?If, in fact, a number of colleges
actually have to go out of business?
Yes, it does matter what happens to
higher education. Because higher
education is essential to our survival.
Our colleges and universities
supply most of the basic research
upon which technological progress
is built. They also educate the
young men and women who will
guide the course and develop-
ment of this technology and give j
it humane ends and purposes.
Right now we need these
young people's ideas more than V
ever before. So that we can deal
more effectively with the problems
of inflation, energy and lagging
productivity. So mat we can move
a little closer to the establishment
of peace and the protection of our
environment.
So please give generously
to the college of your choice.
The money you mve could
decide a lot more than the future
of education.
It could help decide the future
of life as we know it.
Help!
Give to the college
of your choice.
and The Airman Gunol
Coundi �� financial Aid n EdwMM. k�c
MP fifth Avenue Nrw Yotk. NY hVI�





doctor Detroit Will SeeYou Now
& vice versa
BY GENE SIS K E L
( hicago hihum moim (iti
a xt ArLr unvn tes the firs' 'nkr
A rvl JrYrvWi LJ � himseii -what's
m m blue and sings alone?" he asks. "Dan tykrovd
m W 1 li.it Aykroyd can tell su h .1 joke indicah s lit- has been
.ililc iii deal with the death ol Ins best Friend and show
business partner, fohn Beiushi.
"Mint- than mivsmi; the work we might have done together, I miss
him � .1 friend whom I could call any time oi the day or night He was
.ilw.is happ to see mo. .md 1 was always happ) id sec him I here vv.is
ven lnilc Friction between us. I can't think ol am argument
that evei lasted more than 24 hours.
li was nnc nl iln- great Friendships ol the decade, it
iint the century Aykroyd s.is with ,i big grin, "and it
will i;n diiwn .is such, 1 ihmk
"John and 1 knew that n wouldn't last Forevei We
used in s.n, � 1 'he t.isi die young; leave a good-
looking corpse In the bat k ol his he.id he knew
thai one d.i he might heat that I had been killed on
m hike, .md 1 knew that nnc d.i I might heat that
he had gone out through his own physical clumsiness
ui the w.i he .u tualh went
"Look, we both wmked hard and played hard lioi
the Funeral m Fathei told me something He said he
had been prepared Foi years to get .1 call saying. Youi
si in is in .i box
"I itimk dhn and 1 are typical ol out generation
he s.is. tn w.i dt bringing the subjeel to .1
close "We live life to the Fullest (now). We
don't wail cautioush and plan out live
Mavbe it we weie Sons ol H.ii.m
wed Ik mine cautious, but that's
iini whd we are. I ride .i motor-
cycle, and it it weren't against the
law Id ride without m helmet
Win did Beiushi die and k-
himI survive? Aykroyd himsell
m.n inn have the answer, but to
thiiso whd knew Imlh men. the .in
swei is obvious. Aykroyd is more
dt .i thinkei and .i wrkei than .i
Free spit it. Mis humoi is more
restrained and cerebral than
physical. He h.is ,( machine-like
mind thai spits out Fat is. not
IihmI mi .i IimmI fight.
I vi had some wild times he
says "Inn I'm prett) cautious,
even though I take i isks I've
Ik-cii instructed in m doctoi to
stop drinking. He told me to cool
ii. because ol some blood indi-
(.Hois And I have (in down, but
it's awfulh h.ud not to throw back
.1 hoer nl iwn "
Aykroyd's him and IV careei has
not slowed down a hii. He can Ik- seen
on an occasional IV special hosted li
the hkes ol Steve Martin oi an) othei
(oiiiH ol the Saturday Night In, mold
And Aykroyd, 33, is receiving top billing
m his next movie. Doctor Detroit, a coin-
ed) due tin nationwide release M.n ti. it
which tykrovd plays a jekyll-and-Hyde
iole. a college English profcssoi who
masquerades as a ive-talking pimp m
an effort to protect a string "I prosti-
tutes from getting beaten up.
Vvkroyd's charactei is named Chi
skndlow. andClifTsspeciah) in Engiisl
ti
literature is the subjeel ol chivaln One da) while logging down the
street,hit bumps into a pimp named Smooth (Howard Hesseman).
whd has wiggled his wa) out ol an unpleasant confrontation with local
mobsters l blaming his problems on a nonexistent "big, had dude'
named Dot tot Detroit
Atteihit spends some time m a hot luh wnh Foui nt Smooth's
finest women, he agrees to become the fictitious Doctoi Detroit in an
effort in s.ne the damsels in distress Chivaln and all thai
Exterioi filming on Doctot Detroit took place last summei in Chicago
In Chicago Vykroyd is regarded as an honorar) nncn Ik-
cause nt Ins friendship wnh home-town lo Beiushi and
lecause t hicago was the location ol Vykrovd's greatest
film sin (ss. 1 Hlu, - Brothers, w 111 h be ame a snilii
am moneymakei despite an outrageous production
(iisi and mam negative reviews
wkroyd has had leading roles in the movies Ik-Ium-
Doctoi Detroit - , Blues Brothers and etghhors - hui
Doctoi Detroit represents the lust nine he is being asked tn
i ai i a movie without the chemistn and good will guaran
u-ed by Beiushi Hollywood executives will Ik- liNikmu to
the snss nt Doctot Detroit to see it vvkrovd can Ik liked
an audience � which can be crucial tm a movie siai �
as much as he is admired foi his abilities as a mimu
Aykroyd knows the issue well, the difference between
K-inu liked .md being admired It's the diffei
cine between playing the lead charactei oi
ns oddball inidiU It's a difference thai
can Ik- worth (500,000 a picture
I nlike iilm I don i pl.n i h.it ,k
his thai the audience (loves) I'm
flattered enough that the) jusi
want in see me I don'l mind Ik-
ing ilu- Frankenstein oi comedy, it
that's wh.it .im have It iends
v ho h.n e line m I hen heal Is
tin me. sn that I don't need In
gel thai kind nt response in
lei ins nt v, icen idles I'm .i uui
( enai � a lined, t onii .n ted
agent and I just do m oli.
sn. and that's n
ktod gives his "es. sn
response in a rapid-fire speet h
pattern thai sounds a lot like a
(loss between his l pm h-
inaii on Saturday Sight Live �
"Isn't thai amazing � and his
mimu i on the same show nl
i he nl Ik idiis-w hen i hailenged
hmi Snyder.
Regardless oi the success ol Doctot I,
timt. Aykroyd's movie careei is not going
to blow away. I his wintei he was bus)
working in New Yoik (in wnh the ted
mi Eddie Mm pin on Trading Places
(former!) tided Hl,i k and White), a corn-
ed) due tm summei release, due, ted b)
John Land is (The Blues Brothers)
Othet film and television projects writ-
ten b) Aykroyd are in the woiks. too. He
sas he hkes I V � and llus m.n come as
a surprise � lot financial reasons
His only previous starring roles
(The Blues Brother. Neighbors.
and 1941) also starred the late John
Beiushi. Will audiences embrace
Aykroyd alone as heartily as they
did the Aykroyd-Betushi duo?

ii in i t wntK





r ����'
IBS'
ttr
tour '
rid.
shit
sttr
i m the middle, taking
n instead of giumf it
iing around uith these
, . the food doctor de
torn shining, armor and
�� from a heasth gang
the name of chnalr.
of course
, i living foi me li
,om a salan potnl � �!
. ol ihi gnmt -
ducers In I l�'lh
I, and r� i uns), ihe
� ,nc� .ii fail con �
foi me now rs i"
I and rn extend
ihai it 1 wan! t" pack H
1 in
Vvkrovd realh p k
, . , v .i ditha ui' man
U , - IkII � .llif
? � �. Man ol .i I hou
� a�d the Man in
. , ,N, Born m Klaw i
: aised in Hu
Edward Vvkrovd
la ui. ni KI natured
(.ii i
,� Oll-l 111
v l.ltll. I I
. , ,1 i anadian govern-
;�,1 I.III. HI I 'III' ial
Bo, an .in In- voungei
�� M. look �he corned
, �h11iii. with Petei � �
. �. -i ihe Se� ond t it' in
� iroup in IbriMiti i w ben
111 in- big break
, who pul un. It�- M a
nli Vvkrovd once told
�. . magaine was mv
lave Benoii I love him
� ,� � i, - low, i Li� men hanl
In In- own ailiiu�I
Mild
Chf
romn
pimp
centi
with
Ifcrj
rmer
Jrfcy
fmti
dipt
nercd MHWTSafj professor
lion, a timid chluh o) a
left i. encounters the i
,oth (Houard Hesseman.
rid ends up in that hot tub
of Smooth's -emplosees"
Doctor Detroit Sir Hde
'rom Dr. Skridlou Dr.
dthough in several dis-
�ne of them a Southern
i right i.
He turned me on to m � '
smtike mv first jotnt. mirod
� had i litiU ihmg
wuhwhen 1 was H �' ' wakened
me '�� the hip - - � � � '� '
Ottawa. ih� whok rworld
ncvei knew existed I decided I
dropping ou. �� I vt nevei
looked bai k
Vvkrovd turned his back on the
setmnarv education his father
wanted as well as an nment ol
j� jobs His .nvolvemen. a.
S, i(,n led to taking up with
H! Belush. the origin. I
Mima mate, ol Mort Sahk M.k
Nuholn.iHn. Mav) Both.o
tourse.wer, selected astwo.
orlg,nal So. Readv f�� lu
rime Havers on S V
. where Vvkrovd developed his
nuked impersonations ol Ibm
Snvder. Jimmv I artet and Richard
KtM He abocreated �ih '1U1
Ion, Davis th- much loved t one-
heads and with Sieve Martm he
devekiped those wild and era
( �h Brothers
i atchmg Vvkrovd in a pensive
��� not easv I hat rapkl-hre
pace appears to be most constant.
� feast while he b at work on a
movie Bui he does reveal a.side of
himsell m response to that oW
chestnut ot an interviewers ques
uon. "What do vou know toi sure
about lit
What do 1 know toi surer, he
savs, hakmgh "Welk tw come a
this planet, voure bora alone and
vou die alone Us a solo journey
Sure, vou can give love and lake
love, but l.a-ualU life ba solo trip
Vou can Ik- a receiving dish foi all
sorts ot data, but ukimateh the
place to tm.l all vout answers i-
wkhin voursetf. Nou have to pro-
vide vout own solace 1 know thai
�- not vers original bui 1 do be-
lieve it 1 realh do

W-





Private School
f Kil I S I K I
o
.1
� I
H,i H . .
� � V: . Ill v,
.1. I .
.1 n lit Mi
. ilrii � � i


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Title
The East Carolinian, March 1, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 01, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.254
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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