The East Carolinian, February 24, 1983






Bitt lEaat (ftarflliniatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Voi.57No.44
Thursda, February 24, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
ECU Administrators React To Proposed Cuts
Bv PATRICK O'NEII I
UniversiK leaders have expressed
strong opposition to the
Legislature's proposal Tuesdav that
could, if enacted, mean the loss ol
42"? facultv positions and $18
million in 1983-S4 for the I niversity
of North Carolina System
The proposal, prepared bv social
analysts ol a budget subcommittee,
would keep the ECl School o
Medicine from operating ai pro-
jected levels.
I NC system president illiam C.
Frida) told the subcommittee the
proposed cuts would be a
�"devastating blow" to North
Carolina's uruversitv system.
ECU Chancellor John M. Howell
said he agreed with Friday, adding
thai the INC system has already-
been forced to accept heavy cuts.
"We lost staff positions and suf-
fered a si percent budget cut this
year Howell said "That was a
heavier cut than some other state
agencies suffered
Or William E. I aupus, dean of
the School ol Medicine, said the
cuts, if enacted, would be "verv
harmful" to the development of the
medical school.
Howell and 1 aupus both pointed
out that the legislative analysts'
report was simplv a "staff report"
and was not a final decision bv the
legislature.
Howell said the final decision on
the proposed cuts will not be known
until July. L aupus said the state did
have a problem and was looking for
answers. He said the cuts are "all
speculation at this time. It doesn't
necessarily mean that this is the final
conclusion
The subcommittee report is part
oi an effort by lawmakers to have
all state agencies reduce their
budgets by three percent. To achieve
the reduction, the UNC system
would have to cut $18 million from
next fiscal year's 16-campus budget
of $606.3 million.Some leaders are
hoping to remove the current pay
freeze on teachers' and state
employees' salaries.
State Sen. Vernon E. White.
D-Pitt, said it would be unfair to
remove the pay freeze and cause
people to lose their jobs.
Among the suggested recommen-
dations for reducing the UNC
budget was a reduction in the
student-faculty ratio within the
system by increasing class sizes and
la vine off workers. Some
lawmakers have also suggested trim-
ming support of N.C. Memorial
Hospital in Chapel Hill
According to Friday, the sug-
gested reductions would also set
back development of N.C. State's
School of Veterinary Medicine and
endanger some of the desegregation
committments made to federal of-
ficials. I ridav added that under
these proposals there was
"absolutely no way" he could pre-
vent faculty layoffs.
The current student-faculty ratio
is 13.4 students to every teacher in
the UNC system Increasing this
ratio by .3 percent would produce a
$4.8 million savings for the state
and a loss of 143 faculty positions.
An increase of .6 percent would save
$9.7 million and cost 2X5 jobs. An
.9 percent increase, the maximum
suggested by the analysts, would
make the ratio 14.7 students per
teacher, saving $14.5 million and
causing 427 job losses.
Laupus and Howell both said that
any med school needs at least 10
years before it is fully developed.
They said early support of the ECU
school of medicine is critical to its
See CUTS, Page 6
Phcte Bv NEWS BUBEAU
Chancellor John M. Unwell
says cuts would be harmful


.
�i
H�MT
I'ftR
Seldom-Used Procedure Employed
Committee Cans Drinking Rule
Heart Fund Donations
PHOto Bv CINDV Will
The Student Residence Association ran a collection drive for the Heart Fund in front of the Student Supply Store
yesterday. Free balloons were given away by the volunteer workers to all those who donated to the chanty.
Supply Side Theory Doesn 't Trickle
Down Into Many College Curricula
By (,RF(, HIDEOUT
College economics departments
have apparently given up on supply
side economics, according to a Col-
lege Press Service report. The theory
that had some economics depart-
ments looking for ways to include it
in their curriculum has now been
reduced to just another discussion
topic.
The academic community, accor-
ding to Tim Roth of the University
of Texas at El Paso, tended to be
skeptical and tended not to favor
the supply side theory. Carson
Baves, director of the ECU
economics curriculum, said he
would be surprised if any school in
the nation devoted signifigant
amounts of classroom time to Presi-
dent Reagan's theory.
Bayes said the idea is discussed in
survey courses in economics, but
only because of the publicity sur-
rounding it. "There never was a
supplv side school of thought he
said. "Now, it will be discussed for
historical reasons
President Reagan himself has
seemed to abandon the theory.
Supplv-side calls for dramatic cuts
in taxes in order to stimulate the
supply, or business side ot the
economy. Reagan did this in his first
two federal budgets, but in the
third, unveiled in February, he ask-
ed for some tax increases to help
minimize the federal deficit.
Bayes said ECU didn't rush two
vears ago to include supply side
theorv in its economics courses. He
said the classes have always men-
tioned it, but just not under the
political term of supply side.
Most courses at ECU revolve
around the theories of John
Maynard Keyes, as do most schools.
One university that does have a
separate class on supply-side theory
is the Univesity of Southern Califor-
nia, the home of supply side-star
economist Arthur Laffer. His
classes on the theory, according to
USC officials, are always full.
As one economist, Cambell Mc-
Connell of the Univesity of
Nebraska, describes the demise of
supplv side in academic circles,
"The track record of Reaganomics
so far has been so poor, you're not
sure whether it's just a failure, or a
dismal failure
Some professors have written
economic textbooks while the
theory was in vogue and are now un-
sure what to do with sections on
supplv-side theory. American
I niversity's Brad Schiller does not
know what he'll do with a special
portion he wrote on the theory in his
forthcoming revision of The
Economy Today.
John Sumansky of the Joint
Council on Economic Education in
Washington, D.C said that
Reaganomics will still be discussed
and debated in college economic
courses as part of coverage of cur-
rent issues and events.
An amendment to Gov. James B.
Hunt's drunken driving bill was
defeated in committee Tuesday.
I he amendment introduced b
Rep. Daniel I . Blue, D-Wake,
would have allowed 18-year-olds to
buy beer and wine for on-premises
consumption, but kept intact the
resl ol the bill that prohibits
is year-olds from buying alchohol
in an uncontrolled area.
I he move bv Blue to modify
Hunt's package was defeated with a
seldomn-used procedure bv Rep.
Charles 1) Evans, I) Dare, the
Judiciaryommittee's acting chair-
ma
Initalh the committee voted 8-7
in favoi of Blue's amendment, but
I r-ans opted to vote against the mo-
tion causing a tie. which meant
defeat tor ihe amendment.
Lvans was acting within the
assembly's rules when he opted to
vote, but as a normal matter of
practice and tradition, chairman
usually only vote in the event of a
tie.
�'We're making a statement that
we're not going to be hypocritical,
hiding our heads in the sand and
saying that 18-year-olds are not go-
ing to drink Blue told the commit-
tee. "They've been doing it for
thousands of years, since the
discovers of what a grape will do if
you put it in a little bit of water
Rep. H. Martin Lancaster,
D-Wayne, the committee chairman
and a co-sponsor o Hunt's drunken
driving hill, defended Evans ac-
tions. He said Blue's amendment
would send "mixed signals" and
create more confusing and com-
plicated situations with regard to
when and where alcohol may be
consumed.
Blue made the point that 18-year-
olds, rather than drink in bars where
ihey have some supervisors, would
instead drink in their cars, therebv
undercutting the impact o the
legislation.
1 om Haines. the vice president of
the Greenville Night Club Associa-
tion who has critized Hunt's
drunken driving bill, said it was a
shame that Blue's amendment was
defeated. "This would have been a
perfect compromise Hames said.
"Now drinking will be taken out of
a controlled situation and placed in
an uncontrolled situation
Haines also agreed with Blue that
the new law will not stop 18-year-
olds from drinking and that it would
probably cause an increase rather
than decrease in the numbers of
drunken drivers. "We're defeating
our purpose by this legislation
Haines said.
Haines said another benefit of
Blue's proposal would be the mcres-
ed difficulty for high school
Photo Bv CINDY WALL
Jim Ensor of W7.MB accepts a grant from Tom Haines of The Attic.
students under 18 to get bee-
wine.
Lancaster, apparently reals -
that Blue's amendment wo lid p
rehnguished his chair to I vai
order to speak against the am
ment. He defended his tac' .
ting that it was seldom u-ed
not a common practice, but it
been done repeatedly in the
legislature Lancaster said Blue
has claims that his proposal i not
dead yet. and he vowed to get it re
introduced.
The Attic Gives
Cash Grant To
WZMB Station
By MILLIE WHITE
Starr W nw�
The Attic, a local nightclub, has
recently given WZMB a grant of
more than $1,300. According to
Bob Neese, promotion and enter
tainment coordinator for the Attic.
the grant is in coordination with
WZMB's first anniversary which
took place earlier this month
As a public service, WZMB pro
moted a December concert featuring
The Backdoors, which took place at
the nightclub. The birthdav gran;
given the station was based on a
percentage of beer and gate receipts
of the concert.
The Attic and WZMB, who i
both avid supporters ol the Rock
Album sound, are looking -orward
to working together in the future
"Since rock'n'roll is our
livelihood Neese says, "we like to
promote rock oriented radio sta
tions. We plan to do a lot more w
WZMB in the future.
Jim Ensor, assistant manager and
program director of W7MB, ex-
pressed the station's appreciation
for the grant. "They've really
helped us a lot with the money
Ensor says, "it's allowed us to do a
lot of things that aren't within our
own budget, like buying T-shirts
and extra albums. Ensor added that
the station is extremely grateful to
the Attic for the grant and is looking
forward to working with the
nighclub again.
Slim Look Becomes Harmful Compulsion In Diet Disorders
Bv MILLIE WHITE
suff Wrilff
I aura was a sophomore in college when she decid-
ed to go on a diet. Sure, she could have stood to lose
a few pounds but she wasn't fat by any means. As she
loses weight, her family and friends compliment and
encourage her. Laura's parents are especially proud
of her, she's always been such a good girl.
Although she wants to lose weight, Laura also
.utti to improve her social life; being pretty and
popular are so .mportant these days. But her social
life doesn't improve. Laura becomes thdrawn and
obsessed with her diet. She can't stop M�a
time, Laura stops eat.ng altogether. Ins ead of losing
the orig.nal 10 pounds, she loses thirty. Laura is pale,
weak and gaunt. She has anorexia nerv�sa.
Anorexia nervosa is an eat.ng disorder which IS oc-
curring more and more in young women Ihe
disorder is characterized by dramatic weight loss
caused by continuous self-starvation and by severe
self-imposed dieting. mn
Another eat.ng disorder that is bK�ningmore
common among women is bulim.ahctnzeo
binging and purging accompanied by frequent weight
fluctuations rather than profound weight loss.
Each year, more and more cases of anorexia ner-
vosa and bulimia are reported, especially among col-
lege age women. About 90 percent of all cases
reported involve women. Roughly 10 percent of the
cases prove to be fatal.
According to Dr. Jim Mathis. a psychiatrist at the
ECU School of Medicine who has been working for
23 years with people troubled by eating disorders,
people with anorexia nervosa (anorexics) and bulimia
(bulimics) have an irrational fear of being fat and an
unnatural preoccupation with food. They are avid
calorie counters and are often marvelous cooks.
Anorexics are generally described by family and
friends as being "good girls They are intelligent,
make good grades and always strive to please their
parents. .
According to Mathis, this desire to please their
parents could be part of their problem. By refusing to
eat, these girls are rebelling.
"This is one way these kids can rebel and no one
can stop them Mathis says. "It is if they are saying,
'look how strong I am; I'm in total control ' Most
of the girls are trying so hard to please their parents
that thev neglect pleasing themselves. Often the girls
feel insecure and isolated, in order to be cured they
must become more self-accepting.
Mathis is struck by the child-like qualities of the
girls. They are less mature than most girls their age.
According to Mathis, anorexics have a good mind
but they lack emotional maturity. He believes that
the girls don't want to act as women, that they want
to remain mamma or daddy's little girl.
Anorexia nervosa often begins at the onset of
puberty, as if it is an attempt by the girl to deny
becoming a woman.
Mathis savs anorexics tend to be exercise freaks,
noting "The enormous amount of energy they ex-
pend is what amazes me He adds that they "can do
enormous amounts of exercise even if they're so skin-
ny they look as though they couldn't lift a fly
According to Mathis, an anorexic's fear of fat
leads to a distorted body image.Mathis once stood a
girl with anorexia in front of a mirror and told her to
look at herself. When asked what she saw, the girl
replied that her thighs were too big and she needed to
lose more weight. The girl was SVS feet tall and
weighed 68 pounds. She died a few days later
Bulimics are characterized by their self-starvation
and binge eating. They starve themselves for a tew
days and then go on eating binges. They eat enor-
mous amounts of food and, afterwards, vomit.
When bulimics eat, they eat junk food and car-
bohydrates. "They wouldn't eat a piece of protein on
a bet Mathis savs.
A severe bulimic can eat 10-1500 calories a day. ac-
cording to Mathis. The world's record for binging is
held by a girl who ate 55,00 calories in a single day.
Although bulimia is fatal less often than anorexia
nervosa, on rare occasions bulimics have been known
to eat so much that their stomach ruptures, causing
death.
According to Mathis, bulimics, or bingers, vomit
so much that they can will themselves to vomit by
simply patting their stomach with their hand. Mat'us
also says that bulimics are ashamed of vomiting
See DIET, Page 6






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 24, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your Organization
would like to have an item printed
m the announcement column,
please rype it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office tn the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge tor an
nouocemenrs, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednesdayy tor
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations ana depart
ments
NEW PSYC COURSES
The Psychology
Department has added
two courses in fall, 1983:
1 Developmental
Psychology, PSYC 3204,
Section 005, 1:00 pm,
MWF, SP 305; 2)
Psychology of Adjust-
ment, PSYC 3275, Section
005, 2:00 pm, MWF, SP
211.
ASMR 2000
Looking for a unique
and exciting way to
satisfy your General Col-
lege humanities re-
quirements Preregister
for ASMR 2000, a new in-
terdisciplinary course in
Medieval and
Renaissance Studies,
scheduled for fall 1983,
Mondays, 6:30-9:30 pm.
The course will survey
the basic concepts of
Medieval and
Renaissance art, history,
literature, music, and
philosophy. For more in-
formation call 757 651.
MASH
Delta Sigma Ph. MAS'H Rush
Par'y ana Little Sister Rush
Party Monday Fee 28 a'8 00 un
Hill The Delta Sig House '5 located
a' 510 Ea' 10th Street on the cor
ner ot 10'h and Lawrence Come
dressed as'avorte character' For
more information ana noes call
752 908 Get SM'A'S'H on
Hairybut'aio'
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MAJORS CLUB
The P E Ma ors Club 'S
available 'o donate time and ser
vces to any organizations or tune
tions on campus or m Greenville
who need help wtn 'good cause '
ettorts �ha' benefit people and the
commmty n general Chariatable
organizations, human service
groups and other benevloents or
philanthropic groups are en-
courage to contact the club for any
assistance they may be able to
provide
NSDL AND NURSING
LOAN BORROWERS
CONFERENCE
There �re two borrower con
ferences scheduled for National
Direct Student Loan (NSDL) or
Nursing Student Loan recipients
You are required to attend one of
the conferences it you h� ereceiv
ed either the NDSL andor Nurs
ing Loan The conference will pro
vide you with information on
terms of your loan and the repay
ment porvisions Conference
schedule 1 5 30 p m 15 p m
Feb 28, 1W3 "m "3 Biology
Bldg 2 5 30pm 15 p m Mar 2.
1983 Rm 103 Biology Bldg Please
bring a pen with you to the con
terence
PRC
Carwash Saturday. February 27
at piaza Shell and a Happy Hour
at Paulina Bob s Sunday.
February 28, 183 from 5 00 10 00
SIGMA THETATAU
S,gma Theta Tau's spring
business meeting w.H be held
March 3 at 7 30 in room 203 at the
nursing building
HISTORY MAJORS
The Richard C Todd Phi Alpha
Theta Lectures will present Or
John Riddle of NCSU with an in
formative program "Dioscorides
and Early Medicine" This will be
a discussion of the use of herbs for
medicinal purposes during the
Middle Ages The program will be
held Thursday. March 3, at 7:30
p m in BB 104 Light
refreshments will be served
following this informative presen
tation The public is invited
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Attention1' The meeting that
was previously slated tor Satur
day February the 2th, has now
been rescheduled to Sunday Feb
27th at 6 00 p m The meeting will
be held at the INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE on E 9th Street Please
excuse any inconvenience that this
change may have caused you
Thank you for your cooperation
Members are urged to attend!
SKYDIVING
EXHIBITION
interesed in skydiving! Be sure
to attend the skydiving exhibition
tonight m the lobby of Um stead
dorm at 7.00. Expert skydlvers
will be on hand to show you all of
the newest equipment and answer
any questions you may have about
this fascinating sport The pro
gram will include an exhibition ot
parachutes, parachute packing,
instruments, safety devices, and
related gear the program will
also include talks on free fail.
relative work, parachuting ac
cidents, student first jump train
ing. sky diving facts and myths If
you have been thinking about
making that big jump, or even if
you are iust an avid spectator, this
show is tor you Come out and talk
with the East Carolina sport
parachute club and meet the
Greenville sky dives Sky diving
isn't what you think it is Recent
sky diving movies will be shown
and anyone attending will have the
opportunity to take the first lump
course The program is free to
anyone
ECU BAHAICLUB
The ECU Bahai Association will
meet m 241 Mendenhall each Tues
day from II 00 till noon Bahai's
believe in the elimination of all
forms of preiudice, whether it be
racial, social, economic or
religious preiudice You are cor
dially invited to share your
thoughts with us anyone in
terested is welcome to attend For
more information call 752 4483 or
752 1018
FRISBEECLUB
On March 26 and 27 the ECU
irates will host their first ultimate
fnsbee tournament ULTIMAX
Make plans to come out and see
some of the best ultimate to be
played on the east coast this year
The irates are traveling to
Gamsville. Fia over spring break
to play in the Florida State
Ultimate Tournament (and maybe
catch some rays too1) club
meetings are Mon nights 8 00
Rm 248 MSC Anyone interested is
welcome to attend
PHI SIGMA TAU
The Philosophy club will meet
Monday. 2'28. at 6 00 in
Mendenhall Rm 248 Hugh
Fulcher will present a paper en
titled The Term God A
Lingu'Stical Analysis " All in
terested persons are urged to at
tend
MEDIA BOARD
The Media Board is now accep
ting applications tor 1983 84 Media
Heads for the following mediums
the East Carolinian, The tbony
Herald Rebel. Photo Lab and
WZMB radio station Pick up ap
plications 'n the Media Board of
f ice between the hrs of 8 am 12 pm
and 1 pm 5 pm Deadline tor ac
ceptmg applications s March 18 at
5 00 pm
HILLEL
The ECU Jewish Community the
ECU Hiiiei will be having a Pur.m
Party on Feb 27. 1983 at 1 30 pm
Students of ECU Jewish commun.
ty are invited to attend For more
information and it a ride it needed
ease call 752 9643 or 756 5640
KYF
The Kings Youth Fellowship will
have its next meeting on Monday.
February 28 at 8.00 pm in MSC
Room 244 There will be a time of
Bible study and fellowship, follow
eo by refreshments
MARKETING FILM
SERIES
The American Marketing
Association and ECU Department
of Marketing will present a
Marketing Film Series on March 2
and 3 in Rawl 130 at 3 00 All in
terested East Carolina students
are invited to attend The films
will provide information about
marketing opportunities and show
relevance of marketing m cor
porate obiectives and methods of
operations The topics will include
Marketing An integral Part of
Business Operations and
Marketing careers"
ECGC
The ECGC will meet Monday
February 28th at 7 30 pm at the
Newman House. 953 E 10th St
Plans tor future meetings and ac
tivities tor spring semester will be
discussed All interested persons
art cordia'iy invited to attend ana
participate
BEST LEGS
CONTEST
Excuse me. excuse me. yes I am
writing this to you I have seen you
around and you have the best look
mg legs ever, so I iust wanted to
let you know ttvai The Best Look
ing Legs Contest is coming up and
you are a sure winner so keep
looking for more
details handsome
SLC
Each week, the Sign Language
Dept offers a silent dinner so the
sign language students and the
deaf community can socialize and
practice sign language skills This
week the silent dinner is Thurs.
Feb 24 at Plain Jane's Dinner
will be at 30 pm
NCSL
Did you ever want the chance to
tell your legislators how you feel
what new laws should be made,
what topics concern you, and so
on? Let NCSL help you out! NCSL
the North Carolina Student
Legislature discusses the issues
of today that can affect tomorrow
for us all! Our "forum" meets at 7
p m Monday nights m room 212,
Mendenhall come on by and we'll
help you enforce your public right
to know iust what's what in
government!
CO�OP IN NAGS HEAD
Retail sales positions are
available at Nags Head in addi
tion positions for life guards and
individuals that are interested in
hotelmotel management exist
For details come by the Co op of
fice, Rawl 313 (phone 757 6979)
Due to the shortage of afforddabie
housing at Nags Head, students in
terested in work there this sum
mer should begm their iob house
hunt now )
S.O.U.L.S.
Any youn lady interested in par
ticipating in the annual Miss Souls
Pageant is asked to see any com
mittee member or Prsident
Ladies interested should also be
present at Thursdays meeting for
further instructions The pageant
will be held on Mar 20 at 6 00 in
Hendrix Theater Tickets are on
sale
Souls meeting will be held
Thursday. Feb 24 at 7 00 p m A
committee meeting will be held at
6 pm This is a mandatory meeting
and everyone should be present
Souls will hold a Leadership
Workshop on Feb 26 from 12 in
B102. B103 B104 All souls
members, campus leaders facul
ty. and students are urged to at
tend Featured speakers will be
present
SCEC
Student Council For Exception
Children presents Being A Part
Of It All. A Retarded Couple En
joys Married Life. a film by
Richard Burman The film will be
given Monday. Feo 28 at 4 00
p m in Speight 12V Everyone is
welcome to attend!
PI KAPPA PHI
Congratulations are in order for
the Pi Kappa Ph. A basketball
team The A team remained
undefea'ed as they defeated
previously unbeaten Alpha Phi
Alpha fraternity by a score of
44 37 Also the Brothers would like
to thank all of the alumni that at
tended Founoers day Feb 12 This
was our chapter Beta Phi 20th bir
thday Also the Beta Ph. chapter
of Ph. Kappa Ph. will have the
privilege of host.ng an the Pi Kap
pa Phi chap'ers in our area Feb 26
and 27 19 chapters win attend th.s
area conclave All business
meetings will be held In
Mendenhall Student Center
CARWASH
The pledges of Sigma Phi Ep
siion fraternity will hold it s pre
spring kick oft carwash Sunday.
27 Feb 183 between 9 00 and S 00
at the Shell Gas Station corner of
Arlington Dr and 264 bypass
across from Kroger Save on ano
Some Burger Restaurant
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PIRATE WALK
The Pirate Walk is an escort ser
vice which provides the women of
ECU a walking companion after
dark to campus locations and the
immediate vicinity If you have a
night class, place your call ahead
of time and arrangements will be
made to escort you home The
Pirate Walk operates Sundays
through Thursdays from 6 00 to
12 00 Call 757 6616 to arrange for
an escort
PREMEDICAL
SYMPOSIUM
The North Carolina Premedical
Symposium will be held at the
Brody Building at the East
Carolina School of Medicine on
Saturday Februuary 26, 1983 from
9 00 to 4 00 p m Dr William
Laupas. Dean of the East Carolina
School of Medicine will speak on
"Medone in the Year 2000" and
Mrs Susan Darrow from the
Kaplm Center will discuss, "How
to prepare tor the MCAT" There
will also be a Question Answer
Forum concerning what happens
to an application after it is receiv
ed by the medical school Or Dean
Havek from the ECU School of
Medicne nd Dr Suydam
Osterhout, from the School of
Medicine Duke University
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ
presents Prime Time Every
Thursday nite at 7 9pm m B'Ology
Bu'ldmg Room 103 A time of fun.
fellowship and training in now to
live a victorious Christian life
NEED ANEWMAJOR?
interested in a health career but
don't know which one Want a ma
lOr with good employment oppor
tunities Learn more about the
various health professional pro
grams offered at ECU by Signing
up tor HPRO 2000 Survey of
Allied Health Professions A dif
ferent health career will be
featured each week and this
course will give you an opportuni
ty to learn something about each
profession as well as meet some of
the faculty from each department
SIGMA PHI EPILON
Sig Ep and Papa Katz present a
Sunday Happy Hour which will
start at 8 30 until 1 00 am For a
low cover charge you can drink all
the coid beverage you can hold at
no extra charge we ain't scared.
are you
PPHA
The Preprotessional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday, February
24, 1983 at the Afro American
Cultural Center All old and new
members should make plans to at
tend this meeting Any other in
terested parties are urged to come
and see how (PPHA) can help you
The meeting will start at S 30 p m
BENEFIT BALL
A benefit bail will be held at the
American Legion Hall (BYOB Set
ups sold) on Saturday night
February 26 from 9 1 TicketsSJOO
m advance (at Apple Records)
and 2 50 at the door Proceeds go
to Oxfam America and Pitt Co
Emergency aid For more mfor
mation call 752 4216
TAXES
Volunteers from the ECU Ac
counting Society and the National
Association of Accountants will be
n the main lobby of Mendenhall
Student Center to help Individuals
prepare tax returns from 4 to 7 pm
each Tuesday and Thursday in
February each Tuesday in
March, and Tuesdays and
Thursdays m April through April
15
BAKE SALE
The Alpha XI Delta's will be
having a bake sale in front of the
student store Thursday February
24, 1983 from Bam until 3pm
YARD SALE
Alpha Xi Delta sorority will
nave a yard sale Saturday Feb 26.
starting at 8 00 a m Clothes, odds
and ends, anything and
everything! 508 E 11th Street
Watch tor the signs!
PHI ALPHATHETA
The Phi Alpha Theta Initiation
Dinner will be held Thursday,
Feb 24 at 5 15 p m The Western
Smlin on Tenth St is the location
Tickets are available in the
History Office (BA 311
Members S2 00 Faculty S3 00
All members are urged to attend
Guests and spouses are welcome
TKE BOXING
TKE Boxer Registration is go
mg on now at Memorial Gym from
5 X to 7 00 pm Monday through
Thursday until February 24th All
amateur boxers welcome tth An
nual Tournament takes place on
March IS. 16 17 at MInges Co'
seym. This boxing event is sane
tioned by the American Boxing
Federation
SLC MEMBERS
Yes, it is time tor another club
meeting. Sun Feb 27 at 30 pm
This will be a covered dish dinner
with a very Important business
meeting afterward Wt will
discuss our spring activities
Everyone is invited to attend You
do not need to know sign language
The meeting is held in the
Multipurpose room at
Mendenhall
PAGEANT
Miss N C Southern Beauty
Pageant! The search is on for con
testants. Ages 1 24 years old
Each age division is limited and
the deadline date April 1. 1983 The
pageant is scheduled to be held
April 2� 30. 1�83 in High Point,
NC All young ladies are invited to
participate Age divisions art 1 3.
4 6. 7 9. 10 12. 13 16. 17 24. State
winner in each age Division will
receive a cash scholarship, crown
trophy, banner and flowers, also
other awards will be presented
For information send a stamped
self addressed Long envelope to
Miss N C Southern Beaury
pageant. P O Box 5432
Greensboro. N C 2743S 0432 The
phone is 919 294 0295
ATTENTION
Nominations will be made tor
Vice President and Secretary at
the meeting on February 24 at
4 15 The meeting will be held m
Room 221 in Mendenhall Student
Center All members please at
tend! For more information call
75773
FREE
The Central Campus Area
Residence Council will be hosting
a Talent Show on February 24.1
983 it will be held m Wright
Auditorium at 7 00 p m The ad
mission is FREE and the public is
invited Come out and see all your
friends perform
INTENDED SLAP
MAJORS
AH students in General College J
who intend to mator In Speech j
Language a. Auditory Pathology J
will pre register tor Summer A ?
Fall terms on Monday. Februar
Mat? 00pm in Brewster D 103
CAREER CHOICE
The Strong Campbell interest
inventory is offered every T jes
day at 4 PM n 305 Wright Annex.
when school is m session with me
exceptions of examination period
and registration day This is
available to an students at no cost
No formal registration isreoured
CO�OP
Summer positions are available
at North Carolina state parks For
example, a park attendent will be
hired m Gatesviie Duties consist
of general maintenance of the
park (mow grass keep area clean
etc) Also a naturai'Sf w) be
hired The naturalist mus nave
compoeted at leas' three years of
college and maiored In a natural
science Jobs are also avaiaoie a'
other state parks such as Ci'Ms of
the Neuse Mammocks Beach
Fort Macon ana others Life
guards, naturalists, cierk typists
and general laborers will be hired
Come by Rawl 313
HORSEBACK RIDING
The outdoor recreation center is
sponsoring horseback riding tr ps
to Jarmans Stables Reservations
and payment for the Thursday
afternoon trips are due by 3 00
p m each Thursday Rates are
5 00 per hour Transportation s
provided wth the shuttle leaving
Memorial Gym at 3 30 pm snarp
For more information or reserve
tions can or stop by the
� ntramurai recreafionai servces
outdoor recreaton center 113,
Memorial Gym Phone 757 �9i i
The Last C arolinian
Sr�f ivtamafat caamaaam
SMCT
PuOisheo every t jesoa. �- :
Tnyrsday during he acaoe
year ano every Weanescar - . -
ng tne summer
Tie Eas' Cmnmian s "�e �
t.c a' newspaper ot E
C' -a u)m "i � � �
ooera'ea ana puO sneo tor a-
c. Me. tmuajni ot Eas Ca' -
Uersi�y
Subscription Rate 170 yea- �
The East Carolinian ott-c
are located m the Old Sees
Building on the campus of EC U
Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Send ai
;iangeo T,e Eas-Ca'
Old Sou'h Bunding ECU Gree-
�.ne NC :?834
Telephone S" 41a tit C
PRE�MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGY MAJORS
P'ereg strat ontor a �-
MEDT ma'Ors w be he - :
Tjesday March 1:983 a' 1 t "
Brewster D 102Soe�s ��
nave oeen notified c me r a�:
tance into the Depa'�e- �
also complete change al - �
tor�s a h s � ma rm ��
unatie �o a'eno ms sess "
piease :a 8Mr Raoey w w�
McGram a' 757 6961 �0 served. � r
a �ea'e appon'men'
CARPET SALE
4
i OK
average roll is12,
all colors sizes at
Alpha Phi parking lot
�Tues. the 22nd-25th �

f

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e

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The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
Thurs.
D.J.
Happy Hour 7:00- 10:00pm
So Admission til 8:00-Doors open at 7:00

I
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OILCHNttE
LUBE AND
FILTER
Maor Brand Muingrade OH Up To 5 Qts
Expire 31583
� ���p COUPON
Fri.
JANICE 9:00-J:00am
HappyHour 7:00-10:00 Heavy, hot hors'duerves
A11 ECU Students A dmitted Free till 9:00 with ID
! Wheel Alignment$ 388
I Inspect all four tires Steering Systems
Inspect suspension and
� Most U.S.con and Imports
I Expire 3,1583
L a. aa m m m m COUPON
I
Sat. JANICE 9:00-l:00am
Happy Hour 7:00-9:00
Vo Admission till8:00pm
MensorWEH
Closed Sundays txctpl for special events
NHM.
Across from Greenville Airport
Phone 757-aSOS for additloeal inlorwallon
tt
r1fitchefi s Hair Styling
3
J
� WGOODYEAM
OFFICIAL N .C. INSPECTION ST ATION
DOWNTOWN WEST EN D J
m DICKINSON AVE SHOPPING CENTER I
752-4417
756-9371!
FORGET
ON'T
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'If Noil" C 0' -a
sic
756-3050
Lustre Curl
50 Reg. 39.50
$32
Haircut�style inc.
(with Coupon)
Good Thru March 5,1983
Our Everyday
Inflation Fighters
$A00
Shampoo & Set
Hair Cut
S100
Mitchell's
Hairstyling Academy
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center 756-3050











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Available Here


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ft
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HAVING PROBLEMS
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DRUGS?- ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
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DAILY SPECIALS AT
SUBiMP

MASH:MASH:MASH:MASH:MASH:MASH:M.SH:MASH:MASH
Final Salute to MASH!
Monday-Feb. 28-9:00
We Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL & DRUG PBOGS AM
501 305 Etwin Bldg
757-6799
208 E. 5th St. 758-7979
MON.
SNAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI. GENOA, BOLOGNA)
& CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2.09
TUES
SNAK ROAST BEEF, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
SODA FOR $2.09
WED.
SNAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $159
THURS.
SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.89
FRI.
SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND
A SMALL SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
The Best Pizza in town.Honest
FREE BEER - PIZZA
FREE PITCHER
every Comertri-I Break!
10th�Couoch st.
ImASH:MASH:MASH:MASH:MASH:MASH:MASH:MASH:Mv
SATSc
B BOB MORt.AN among the
urmersitiel
1
ECL has the second svstem.
west average SAT With
score for freshman score of 9
Group Su
A group ' ECL
lents facult) and
' hae annou:
plans to take part in a
demonstration Fr
tc oppose the interven-
tionist polu v � the
Soviet L'nion in
Afghanistan.
According to a
? eman with the
Greenville peace com-
mittee, which i pon-
sonng the one hour
event, the demonstra-
tor
front t
Office on 1

M e rr. I
peace
they are der
in response
que-
Afghan
mor.
mee' i e
Women V
Sev en
the Greenville-1
Countv � the
League of '��
Voters are pla:
join League n
from throughout the
slate for u
lobbying ��-son in
Raleigh todav
The local
will be tak -
the Leaf ual
1 ektislative Dav visit to
the c
their lej
the iss .o the .
l re "� ing j-
quaint cursed ve-
our legislator- i
thinf
and wha" we're
terested d
K a
-

I
a n a! j

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L e
JAZZ
in the loft
by "Paul Tan
Quartet
'eaturmg:
Ray Codnngior Tru mpt
Paul Tardit; Piano
� Clarence Seay. Bass
David I lk Dm rns
at tin
Beef Ban
Fri Jan. 14. Sat Jan
400 t Andrews Dmf 75S-1
9 p.m. until . .
JilZZ originals and.
performed with such slat
tunes as 'Cretan Dolf
��S'e'ila by larl;
Fridav. Feb. 25th. sat Feb
9PM until
bring this ad for
FREE WA
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A SECOND H 4SH1
MACHINE Al Si
OFFER tPlRhS
MARCH 2nd
Iwas
HOUS
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-Zip1Phone
pnrm-lnwl
1�I�?�
iJ
IHOICE
Iht1 a�t Carolinian
� -ii
� wjt �no
� - jaem.c
1 � a � � �av Our
I i 1 n s e of
. �- - �� Eas'
jAned
fcheti tor ana
I Ml Carolina
ription Rile i?0 yearly
' t asCarolinian offices
ca'e�n the Old South
Bd3 Or�he campus ot ECU
Iee"viileN C EH Sena aoaress "�v Eas' Carolin,an. - � Green
e'tphon-TS1 eJca 6347. 630
I PRE�MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGY MAJORS
P'ereg a' on for atl pre
najjors De hela on
�-� � - 983 a' 7 P M
� . SuOentS yyho
�- � . � .�, r accep
�ne Department wl!
- - ' I -oge ot maor
m ajt 1 ' e you are
� : rhij session
v- Rapey or Ms
�' W61 'o schedule an
. i ,h . ' � en
PET SALE
tge roll is12,
iors sizes at
Phi parking lot
I. the 22nd-25th -
M

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Nexus Products
Available Here �


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M.H:MANH:MASH:MASH
L150
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ityle inc.
(upon)
torch 5,1983
with
Break!
:he st.
:MASH:MASH:MASH:MASHi
IHOASTCAROUNUNFHttUAftYai 1983
SAT Scores At ECU Low For N.C. Colleges
By BOB MORGAN among the nine major higher than Western has th, hioh, � .� .
By BOB MORGAN
Slat) Wrila
ECU has the second
lowest average SAT
score for freshman
among the nine major higher than w�t.m k� .w u- ,
universities in the C r in Unc fhighest average schools in the system,
sixteen-school UNC which has a 1. ,n h�VNC SyStem w,th with the exception of
system. � oVf a O55- N.C. State is the N.C. School of the
With an average Universitv nf ivw?k S?T? W,th a SCOrc Arts- � traditionally
score of 856, ECU I cS i cip3 h2 T �7h ' min�rity SchooI� and
The other seven range from just over
Group Supports Afghans' Stance
A n-r� f r� ,
A group of ECU
students, faculty and
staff have announced
plans to take part in a
demonstration Fridav
to oppose the interven-
tionist policies of the
Soviet Union in
Afghanistan.
According to a
spokesman with the
Greenville peace com-
mittee, which is spon-
soring the one hour
event, the demonstra-
tion will be held in
front of the U. S. Post
Office on 10th Street at
4 p.m Friday.
Members of the
peace committee said
they are demonstrating
in response to the re-
quests made by three
Afghan freedom
fighters who visited
ECU earlier this
month.
During a public
meeting one of the
rebels responded to a
question from a person
who asked what they
could do to help the
cause of the Afghan
people. He advised him
to demonstrate as a
means of raising the
consciousness of the
American people.
The peace commit-
tee, according to
members, supports
peace both at home and
abroad. They said that
includes
Union.
the Soviet
During their visit, the
Afghan freedom
fighters gave accounts
of the Soviet occupa-
tion of their country.
The men claimed that
1.000,000 Afghan peo-
ple have been killed,
many as a result of
cruel and violent acts
carried out by the
Soviet troops.
Some members of
the Peace Committee
have reported being
displeased with the
"pro-communist"
label that many people
attribute to them
because of the stands
they take.
The Peace Commit-
tee is opposed to any
type of U. S. military
aid going to the Afghan
rebels.
800 at Pembroke State
to 580 at Elizabeth City
State.
ECU Assistant
Director of Admissions
Gene Owens believes
the SAT score is given
too much importance
by many people and
should not be used to
judge the quality of
students at a school.
"We should be con-
cerned with what
students leave an in-
stitution with rather
than what they have
before they get there
he says.
ECU admits students
on a predicted-GPA
formula, which
forecasts what a stu-
dent's grade point
average will be at the
end of their first year.
Women Voters League Lobbies In Capital
This takes into account
the SAT score but it
places a larger em-
phasis on the high
school record.
Owens points out
that ECU does not use
a minimum SAT score
for admission like some
other universities that
are much more selec-
tive. He classifies ECU
as "moderately selec-
tive" in its choice of
students.
"Whether or not
Chape! Hill uses a
minimum score or not
the public perception is
that it does savs
Owens. "Many times
this prevents marginal
scorers, who are at the
tops of their high
school class, from even
applying there. These
are kids who will per-
form well at any college
they attend
A major criticism of
the test has been that it
is culturally and racial-
ly biased. It has been
proven nationwide that
minorities score signi-
fiantly less than white
and that certain
cultures score lower
than others.
Sixty percent of
students n ECU live
within a 100-mile
radius of Greenville.
Western Carolina,
like ECU. gets many of
its students from rural
areas North Carolina.
The average SAT score
there. 816, compared to
Appalachain State
University, also located
in western North
Carolina and drawing
on large amounts of
Uudents from the ur-
ban cities of the pied-
mont, has an average
SAT score of 900.
Nationwide. SAT
scores have been declin-
ing over the past severe
years At ECL. there
has been almost a
20-point drop in the
average score since
Among North
Carolina's private col-
leges. Duke Universitv
and Davidson Lnive-
t are at the top with
average of 1261 and
1-25. Livingston and
Johnson C. Smith,
both predominate
minority, are two of the
Qwest at 585 and 596
Seven members of
the Greenville-Pitt
County chapter of the
League of Women
Voters are planning to
join League members
from throughout the
state for a legislative
lobbying session in
Raleigh today.
The local delegation
will be taking part in
the Leagues annual
Legislative Day visit to
the capital to acquaint
their legislators with
!he issues they support.
"We're trying to ac-
quaint ourselves and
our legislators with the
things that are going on
and what we're m-
League member Elaine
Warshauer who is coor-
dinating today's trip.
Warshauer said that
the goals of the League
of Women Voters is to
try to create a more
responsible and in-
formed voting consti-
tuency.
The League will nor-
mally study a given
issue for a length of
time and then decide
what actions they
should take in regards
to that issue. "We take
stands on issues that
we've studied War-
shauer added.
Warshauer mention-
ed several issues that
be lobbying for in the
General Assembly to-
day. They include:
� A proposal to sup-
port joint marital pro-
perty settlements bet-
ween seperating
couples.
� Support for the
Coastal Area Manage-
ment Act which would
in part limit develop-
ment of certain en-
vironmentally pro-
tected coastal areas.
� Support for the
residents of the District
of Columbia getting the
right to vote.
from enacting any
legislation more str-
ingent than the En-
vironmental Protection
Agency's limits regar-
ding the maintenance
and disposal of hazar-
dous waste.
� Support better day
care facilities
Warshauer said that
the League is currentlv
studying subjects regar-
ding nuclear arms con-
trol and defense spen-
ding, but no action is
yet planned.
Homecoming Staff Open
Repeal of the Har-
dison Amendment
tertsted in. said I eague members would which limits the state
John Curtis, assis-
tant programming
director and advisor to
the homecoming com-
mittee, has announced
he is now taking ap-
plications for commit-
tee positions, including
chairman. The early
start on planning next
year's festivities is to
avoid some of the pro-
blems encountered last
year, Curtis said.
The '82 Homecom-
ing chairman, Regina
Hardee, said last year's
program was new to all
involved. She said most
of the people who will
work on Homecoming
'83 will be experienced.
The positions, she
said, are open to all
students, regardless of
experience. She said a
head chairman would
be named and several
committee chairman
would be appointed.
The different commit-
tees are parade,
halftime, entertain-
ment, homecoming
queeen elections,
publicity, and decora-
tions.
Curtis said the
deadline for committee
chairman is March 4.
The Student Union is
also sponsoring a
homecoming theme
contest. Any student
can submit an idea for
the theme. The
deadline for themes is
March 4. There is a S25
prize.
Curtis said the plann-
ing and work will begin
after spring break. He
urged students with
suggestions to come
and sec him in his of-
fice at Mcndcnhall Stu-
dent Center.
Curtis and Hardee
said the funding for
homecoming comes
from the SGA.
February 28-Morch 49am-5pm
Buccaneer Office
JAZZ
in the loft
by"PaulTardJf"
Quartet
featuring:
Ray Codrington; Trumpet, Jlugal horn
� Paul Tardif; Piano
Clarence Seay; Bass -L
David Via; Drums
at the
Beef Barn
Fri Jan. 14, Sat Jan. 15
400 St. Andrews Drive 756-1161
9 p.m. until
Jazz originals and classics
performed with such standard
tunes as "Green Dolphin St. "
"Stella by Starlight"
Friday Feb. 25th, Sat Feb.26th
9PM until
Selected Art Supplies
Tote Bogs Sweat Suits Tennis Shirts
bring this ad for a
FREE WASH
OFFER GOOD WHEN USING
A SECOND WASHING
MACHINE ALSO
OFFER EXPIRES .
MARCH 2nd
WAS
HOUSE
10th St. Across from
Krispy Kreme (752-6117)
14th St l Block from
the "Hill" (752 9636)
SPRING
EANIMG
T-Shirts
Gift Items
Shorts Sweaters
Our Sale has
been extended
thru Friday,March 4th.
4 Ox

AlEKf Come on in and mop up
' ' " on the great bargains!
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Owned and operated by East Carolina University Wright Building
�. - �� �
'�"








Stie Saat Olarnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller. amnfMnw
Mike Hughes, mow! b�r
Waverly Merritt. o of C,NDY Pleasants. 5portJ m,
SCOTT L.NDLEY. ��, � GREG RlDEOUT. . S
AL1 AFRASHTEH. am M STEVE BaCHNER' "
c-nuiKucr-Dmu - .� Juliana Fahrbach, sr�d�or
Stephanie uroon, oniMM mm
. .v T.im,k,taki ,r TODD EVANS, Produciion Manoiw
Clay Thornton, Tre! sure� �"
&wiiBpvfyA�
ITHINK WE'VE QOTffiH
THEM WHERE WE If
WNffTWM
February 24, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Computer Age
Colleges Slow To Catch Up
Proponents for restructuring col-
lege curricula to include sign
language as an option in fulfilling
foreign language requirements have
long argued their case to no ap-
parent avail.
But now, the University ot
Washington has become the first
school in the country to adopt such
a change. After initially refusing to
consider Ameslan (the .jmmon
nickname for American Sign
Language) because it was not a
"natural language university of-
ficials changed their collective
minds and determined that Ameslan
evolved out of a culture of its own.
The addition at UW marks socie-
ty's first step at realizing the
changes that lay ahead in the not-so-
distant futire. Indeed, it sets a
precedent. But while Washington
officials did come to an apparent
agreement on the benefits and
necessities of sign language for the
1980s, in the same breath, they
refused to approve another up-and-
coming "foreign language" as a op-
tional substitute � computer
language. "It is not a natural
language they contested.
Unfortunately, this seems to be
the consensus among the nation's
institutions of higher learning.
Computer language isn't
"natural doesn't have distinct
origins, so it can't fall under the
foreign language department. Then
again, it isn't really a humanity or
fine art. And to say that it is an in-
dependent science seems, somehow,
to fall short of its true nature
And so it goes. Administrators,
leery of change in all forms, neglect
to realize the ever-increasing impor-
tance of computers in today's
world; thus, the subject is not dealt
with in the same important light as
it should be.
Sure, there are schools of com-
puter science and computer pro-
grams � good and bad � all over
the country. But these aim at a
relative few, those whose interests
or prospective fields dictate such.
It's high time we realize that com-
puter talk is the language of the
future � the near future. Our in-
stitutions need to reassess their cur-
ricula. Computer language,
especially for a college or university,
should not be a mere option for
fulfilling some specific requirement.
It should be as basic a part of a stu-
dent's curriculum as English,
mathematics or the natural sciences.
The addition of sign language at
the University of Washington
signifies that a more serious attitude
toward communication of the
future is slowly becoming a reality.
But administrators and college of-
ficials around the nation must not
let this precedent slip by with simple
token recognition.
The increasingly central role of
computers, which will become ap-
parent during most of our lifetimes,
cannot be disputed. Recent ad-
vances in computer technology-
lover the past 10 years) prove this
statement to be fact, not mere con-
jecture.
Computer language is no longer
the extracurricular luxury it once
was; on the contrary, it is fast
becoming a veritable prerequisite to
intelligence. Therefore, our colleges
and universities � our institutions
of higher learning � need to keep
up with the "trends" of the times,
lest we find ourselves, for all prac-
tical purposes, illiterate in the near
future.
Capital's Little Feds Riding Hoods
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � Justice Department
officials are going to have their hands full
investigating the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency. Not only have they been ask-
ed to look into why the embattled agency
has been shredding documents, but they
have also been advising EPA director
Anne (Gorsuch) Burford on her criminal
contempt charges.
She has been cited for contempt by Con-
gress for refusing to produce internal
documents. Among the papers that Con-
gress wants are memos relating to
Chemical Waste Management, Inc.
The company has had problems with the
Environmental Protection Agency. It was
represented by Denver attorney James
Sanderson, who went to work for Burford.
The Justice Department is now in-
vestigating charges that Sanderson used his
government position to help his client.
Sanderson was never officially confirm-
ed for his EPA job because of the con-
troversy over his alleged conflicts. But our
sources say he was seen hanging around
the agency for two weeks last month. The
sources claim he was secretly advising Bur-
ford on the contempt charges.
Sanderson told our reporter that he is
just a friend of Burford and that his visit
was social.
Another high official of the En-
vironmental Protection Agency is also
under investigation. He is John Horton,
who is in charge of the agency's ad-
ministrative affairs.
Justice Department officials are looking
into charges that Horton used a govern-
ment employee to handle his private
business matters on government time.
Horton flatly denies the charge.
The Justice Department investigation
arose from an anonymous letter that was
supposedly written by agency employees.
It's signed, "Disgusted Citizens
The letter accuses Horton of using his
$29,000-a-year administrative assistant,
PatKruger, as a secretary in his private
business ventures while the taxpayers were
paving her salary. Horton is a
multimillionaire and a partner in four cor-
porations.
We don't know whether Sanderson and
Horton are guilty of criminal misconduct.
But they clearly aren't helped by the agen-
cy's practice of withholding and shredding
documents.
RENT-A-CROOKS?: The fear of crime
has spawned a major industry: Property
owners across the country have turned to
private security forces for protection. Even
the government is now using private
guards � or rent-a-cops, as they're called
in securitv circles.
We have some depressing news for those
who rely on rent-a-cops. These private
security forces have been infiltrated by
criminals.
Our reporters have found private securi-
ty guards with criminal records. Some ot
them are guarding government building
including the Justice Department itself.
That's not the worst of it. Two of the
unions which represent 10,000 rent-a-cops
are controlled by organized crime, accor-
ding to the Justice Department's
specialists.
These unions are the Allied Interna
tional Union of Security Guards and the
Federation of Special Police. They repre-
sent securitv guards in New York. New
Jersey, Connecticut. Puerto Rico and
Washington. D.C.
States one Justice Department report:
"Allied Union and the Federation have
been wholly owned subsidiaries of organiz-
ed crime since their formation
They're sister unions, headed b one
man. His name is Daniel Cunningham,
and he was recently convicted and sentenc-
ed for racketeering and embezzlement
The Justice Department report allege-
that Cunningham has been under the
"tutelage" of the Joseph Colombo crime
family. The document also charges that
Cunningham has used his crime connec-
tions with the Colombo, Bo nan no and
Gambino mobs "to consolidate his control
over labor-organizing efforts in the securi-
ty guard, casino and nuclear power in-
dustries
Thus, it appears that the mob is unioniz-
ing securitv guards at nuclear plants and
gambling casinos. The unions, in turn, pay
a monthlv tribute to the mob.
Campus Forum
Things To Do Before Keeling Over:
Memo To Self
Timeclock, Not Keeper, To Blame
Did you ever get worried that life's going
to pass you by, and you won't have enough
time to do the things you've always wanted
to do? Well, I have. I guess 1 shouldn't
watch so many soap operas. You know
how everybody's always dying on The
Hung and the Breastlessl It's so depressing
� so many wonderful people never get the
chance to live out their dreams. They reach
their prime, thinking they have plenty of
time for experiencing life's finer things �
like adultery, divorce, embezzlement, ter-
minal illness, more adultery � and then
they're just plain written out of the
script ZAP!
MIKE HUGHES
So then, for your reading enjoyment �
or lack thereof � and also to help me
remember myself, here is a list of some of
the things I've never yet done but plan to
do at some point in my life, hopefully
before I bite the big one:
You know what I've always wanted to
do? I've always wanted to strut into a
crowded redneck bar oh a Saturday night
and scream to the bartender, "Midol for
everybody; it's on me
I've always wanted to chase some
paranoid five year old down a street and
bark at him, then relieve myself on a fire
hydrant.
I've always wanted to check into a sleezy
motel, maybe one with hourly rates, and
sign in as "Mr. John Smith and Guest
I've always wanted to leave a witty
message on a bathroom wall that would set
the standard for toilet literature. One like:
"Flush twice; it's a long way to the
Mendenhall Snack Bar or maybe
something a little more farfetched.
I've always wanted to check out a book
from the library and photocopy it from
cover to cover, so I could pull a fast one on
the over-priced publishers.
I've always wanted to drive to the lux-
urious, plush potato fields of Idaho for a
weekend, or if I don't have so much time
to spare, maybe just a picnic lunch in
Ayden.
I've always wanted to jump out of a
plane again But this time, I'd rather use
a parachute.
I've always wanted to class-up my car
with some worn-out air shocks, three dif-
ferent styles of mag wheels, a shag carpet
with pom-poms for the dashboard, a
florescent nude bullfighter window scene,
some Carlos Santana 8-track tapes, a
chain-link steering wheel and a gigantic
purple and orange bumper sticker that
says, "Viva Puerto Rico
Being a devoted fan of Bill Murray, I've
always wanted to drop an unwrapped Baby
Ruth bar into a crowded swimming pool,
then amid all the confusion, dive in and eat
it.
I've always wanted to star in a major
motion picture with Lawrence Olivier,
Lauren Hutton and Slim Whitman. Maybe
a remake of an Annette and Frankie
beach-party film, or maybe something not
so serious and dramatic.
I've always wanted to camp out under
the stars for three days and nights in front
of a ticket office and fight the angry, sex-
and drug-crazed hordes of heavy metal
rock 'n' rollers, so 1 could get front-row
seats for a Barry Manilow concert.
I've always wanted to straddle a dead
roadside armadillo and then spin my tires
on someone's clean white pants.
And finally, I've always wanted to meet
that unparalleled writer, renowned confi-
dant, world-class bowler and all-around
nice guy, Stan Landers Maybe some-
day.
Editor's Note: Mike "ughes, whose real
name is Sing "Ed" Wang. Jr. (see photo
above), emigrated from Smyrna to the
big city in 1980.
I am writing in response to an article in
Thursday's edition of The East Carolinian
concerning the clockkeepers at Wednesday
night's (Feb. 16) basketball game. I feel it
wasn't the writer's place to question the
competency of the clockkeepers. She came
across to the reader (as saying) that it was
the clockkecper's fault for not paying at-
tention. 1 just wanted to point out that the
clock machine has malfunctioned on
several other occasions during the basket-
ball season, and Wednesday night was
another time. I sat behind the score table,
and I also fussed about the score when it
skipped from 61 to 71. When I looked
down to see what number it was set on, it
was marked 61. So, it was the machine and
NOT the clockkeeper.
The question is still in the air as to
whether the Spiders of Richmond really
won the game because of a supposed point
missed by scorekeeper Woody Peele. With
all the confusion that had arisen from fans
and coaches, it could be possible � if it
was, it was an innocent mistake. But, it
was stupidity on Richmond's part not to
question the score when all the confusion
began in the first place; not when they
realized the game was in jeopardy. Second-
ly, the stat person for Richmond forgot his
stat book and did not sit at the score table;
therefore, he couldn't keep up with the
score. It was he who brought the matter
before the Richmond coaches that the
score was wrong. How did he know? I feel
the situation should be carefully reviewed
and the facts straight in order to prevent
unnecessary hassle and embarrassment.
Rhonda Rice
Editor's Note: All questions of com-
petency and integrity aside, the
"supposed" point (to which you refer) was
deducted from Richmond's score at the
time in question. It seems to follow that a
dozen separate statisticians, all of whom
spotted the error independently, cannot be
wrong in that assessment.
Same OF Song & Dance
I am writing in reference to an article in
the Feb. 22 issue titled "Legislature To
Vote On Weapons Freeze This "news
story is little more than an opinion article
by Greenville's local spokesman for Marx-
ist ideology, Patrick O'Neill. The writer,
as usual, did not bother to include a com-
ment from the opposing viewpoint.
The nuclear freeze and peace movements
are. without a doubt, controlled by the
Soviet Union through the KGB. This is a
documented fact, not mere conjecture. In
a recent newsletter, U.S. Senator John
East verified this fact.
"Many of the persons involved in the
movements are well-intentioned in-
dividuals. We have intelligence reports,
though, that the nuclear freeze and peace
movements are controlled by the Soviet
KGB
East also stated that the nuclear freeze
movement involved a very small part of the
populace in North Carolina. The poll con-
ducted by the UNC School of Journalism
was, to say the least, overly optimistic, to
say the most, a flagrant lie.
A nuclear freeze would lock the U.S. in-
to a position of inferiority in nuclear
weapons. From 1974 through 1982, Russia
deployed 2,035 ICBMs, compared to 346
for the U.S. By 1982, the Soviets had
deployed 636 intermediate-range missiles,
versus zero for the U.S. It should not be
surprising that the U.S.S.R. wants to
freeze at this level. With this freeze, it feels
that the U.S. could be reduced to a heap of
radioaci.ve rubble (along with western
Europe).
The MX missile is important if the U.S.
is to continue taking national security
seriously. According to Secretary of
Defense Weinberger, the Soviets "have the
capability to destroy most of our land-
based missile force on a first strike
Members of the House of Represen-
tatives have proven their indifference
towards U.S. defense by trying to delete
funds for the weapon. A feable attempt
was made to disgrace this indifference by
claiming that the busing system was not
adequate.
It is important that America install the
MX now, regardless of whether or not the
system is 100-percent accurate. It is equally
important that the KGB-controlled nuclear
freeze neve- materialize.
In 1979, the Soviet Union decided to
spend millions of dollars to organize a
peace and nuclear freeze movement to br-
ing about American disarmament. Many
well-intentioned individuals get caught up
in the peace flurry, not realizing they are
merelv puppets of Moscow. These "peace
groups such as the Greenville Peace
Committee, never discuss the massive
Soviet buildup in the past 20 years; in-
stead, they blame the U.S. military tor the
arms race. Russia spends about 14 percent
of its Gross National Product for defense,
compared to five percent for the U.S.
Russia has out-produced America in tanks
by nearly three-to-one � P.350 vs. 6.400
The neutron bomb was developed to
destroy Soviet tanks in a communist inva-
sion of western Europe. The bomb was, of
course, a major target of the "peace
groups
One should expect a communist sym-
pathizer like Mr. O'Neill to pursue a
unilateral American nuclear freeze, not
Soviet. He becomes very agitated and jit-
tery anytime Soviet Communism is
"attacked
The N.C. Legislature (and U.S. Con-
gress) should not be expected to be naive
enough to actively pursue a nuclear freeze.
N.C. State Senators H. Park Helms and
Gerry Hancock are not serving their con-
stituents by introducing a measure that
could totally annihilate the U.S. and
western Europe.
Like it or not. North Carolina is a
strongly conservative state. The people do
not want a nuclear freeze, and the
legislature should serve the people, not
follow pro-Soviet rhetoric blindly. The
peace and nuclear freeze movements are
part of an overall Soviet plan for world
domination. The U.S. Peace Council and
World Peace Council are not headed by
known communists by mere coincidence.
President Reagan described nuclear
freeze activists accurately when he stated,
"They are sleep-walking into the future
Keith Brittam
Senior, Finance
Editor's Note: Realizing full well that
both yourself and Mr. O'Neill have a right
to your opinions, I feel, without a shadow
of a doubt, that this issue (peace
movements vs. college Republicans) has
been heralding the same cries from both
sides for months now. Perhaps I don't
speak for a majority of readers � certain-
ly, at least, a large minority � but I think
the arguments coming from both sides of
Greenville's iron curtain are getting stale.
!
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THEEASJCAROIINIAS
Hoods
i
Interna-
1 the
�ime
.�hatge
rime conncc-
T"nV, Hmianno and
constidate his control
�ecuri-
er in-
Blame

le Peace
� h , ;
: the
'� s
-
oped to
eze, not
I and jit-
i n i sm is
�- . ' S Con-
be naive
� �. � " eeze
I Pa-K Helms and
g 'heir con-
v I mcas ire that
the ! S and
.t
I he people do
�-e. and the
the p ; � not
blii I . The
U foi M
incil and
'ldence
nbed nuclear
Ahen he stated.
alking into the future "
Keith Bnttain
Senior, Finance
N v Pealizmn full well that
f etti have a riaht
inions, fet without a shadow
that this issue i peace
college Republicans has
dine the same cries from both
nonths now Perhaps f don't
a majority of readers � certain-
it. a large minority � but think
mts comma from both sides of
I von curtain are setting state.
Legislators Pull Out Of Freeze Vote
RALEIGH ilipu ,u � iu:
H BKt ARV 24 IvM
Fou. s'all� sJ r L Cd ,UP md resolution's principal 50-member chamber.
another resolution urg- Senate sponsor said the The resolution urges
mg the United States to proposal still has 32 the United States
maintain "peace other senators lined up government to halt the
through strength. behind it � far more nuclear arms race.
Despite the highly than are needed for the negotiate a freeze with
unusual reneging, the resolution to pass in the the Soviet Union on
withdrew Wednesday
from co-sponsorship of
a resolution seeking a
freeze on nuclear
weapons, some ot
weapons testing anu
production and try to
reduce the number of
nuclear weapons and
delivery systems now in
operation.
Withdrawing from
Chinese Language Course Offered
B BARBARA
rYNDELL
Nin Wdo ma?
That's the Chineses
a to ask "How are
you?"
Again, during fall
semester, 19 S 3. the
ECU Chinese Study
Program will otter two
classes one in Chinese
culture and one in
Chinese language
The Chinese culture
class vsiii deal with the
history, culture and
e of China, giv-
ing the student a first-
hand view of China's
. ustoms and practices
The language course
provides the student
with a basic-
background in the
i h i nese language.
Chinese characters are
also taught, and the
class usualK visits a
Chinese restaurant dur-
ing the semester.
Or Veronica Wang,
who teaches the
Chinese language class,
said, "Presently, we
need to internationalize
our campus Students
need to know more
about the Chinese peo-
ple I here is more to
ithe culture) than laun-
dry m a t s and
restaurants.
"The language is im-
portant she says.
"You get to know the
people through the
language
There is no pre-
requisite for either
class. Dr. Alfred
Wang, coordinator of
the program, said that
so far there has been a
good response. "Many
students in the present
classes want a second
class "
He said that ECU
might have a Chinese II
language course
available in 1984.
ATTIC
PANIC
Till R
SUBWAY
FRI.�SAT.
j IN CONCERT
� FOR ONE NIGHT ONLY
IKIP CJJTP(D
: iJ
: Sun.Feb.27th 99C Adm. ATT NIGHT
:1FC4-PANHELLET1C
; Mon-The Final Episode of MASH on a 7 ft
TV in the PHOENIX ROOM
COMING IN CONCERT Fri.
MARCH 4th
Advance Tickets Avail,
at Record Bar-Apple Rec,
( The A d in Tues paper
was a misprint
SSORR � The East Carolinian)
A
T
SIGEP
HAPPY HOUR
8:30 to 1:00
EVERYSUNDAY
COVER CHARGE:
Members $3.00
Member Gentlemen $3.50
Guest Ladies $4.00
Guest Gentlemen $4.50
Memberships Will Be Available
At The Door
FREE
BEVERAGE
ALLNIGHT
LONG
"First we have to
have enough people
coming from Chinese I
classes said Dr. V.
Wang.
Both courses are
listed in the schedule
under Asian Studies
(ASAS) for three credit
hours each.
Chinese language I is
offered on Tuesday and
Thursday from 9:0
a.m. to 10:45 a.m. In-
troduction to Chinese
Culture is also offered
on Tuesday and Thurs-
day from 11:00 am to
12:15 p.m.
Right Bros.
Bike Shop
207 B East Fifth St.
phone 752-6181
"Quality Repair Work At
reasonable Prices
Good For $10.00 Discount
On Any New Bicycle Or
10 Discount
On
Accessories & Parts
� Coupon�
co-sponsorship ot that
idea Wednesday were
Sens. Dallas L. Alford
Jr D-Nash; George
W . Marion Jr
D-Surry; Conrad R.
Duncan Jr
D-Rockingham; and
William W. Staton,
D-Lee.
Sen. Harold W. Har
dison, D-Lenoir,
already had pulled back
his co-sponsorship to
promote his own
resolution "urging the
Congress of the United
States to adopt a na-
tional strategy of peace
through strength
"I'm in favor of a
nuclear freeze, but not
at any cost Hardison
said. "Russia has pro-
ven they're not going to
live up to any agree-
ment unless it's to their
advantage
Alford said he
misunderstood the
nuclear freeze resolu-
tion when he signed it.
"It was explained to
me that it only deals
with the (arms reduc-
tion) negotiations now
in progress, but it ac-
tually goes further than
that said Alford.
who added that he had
not read the resolution
before joining as co-
sponsor.
Sen. Wilham Han-
cock Jr D-Durham
and resolution sponsor,
said he didn't mind the
defections.
News
Writers
Needed
Apply In Person
At
The East Carolinian
Second Floor. Old South Building
Across from Joner Iihrar frit ranee
"look for mnrt details
ECU
studentfaculty �
DAY "ttht
apnl 16. -983 r VJEW? I.VI R
und the
h lT4KOI iu v;
��.
Copyright 1983
Kroger Sav-on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to DeaJers
Items and Prices
EHective Wed. Feb 24
thru Sat Feb. 26 1983
ADVERTISED ITEM POUCT
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readily available for
sate in each Kroger Sav-on. except
as spacjticairv noted in thts ad it we
do run out of an item we will offer
you your crtotca of a comparable
item when available, reflecting the
same savings or a raknetteck which
will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item et the advertised
price witnm 30 days
cyV.t
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville

usarr
� i
av
SKIM MILK BUTTERMILK.
2 LOWFAT MILK
CHOCOLATE MILK OR
M
FRESH FRIED
SOUR CREAM
&
v?-Gal
Ctn.
REGULAR O?
ScMitt U�W
�4 0-TI7 �
KROGER
SANDWICH
12-Oz
Cans
White Breai
Loaves 1 . -
Cake Donuts i
$479
SAVE
I
0MMJJ.
COKE. TAB OR
WELCH'S
Welch
09 wm
Grape Jelly
$439
KROGER
Peanut
Butter
$499
24-Oz. I
Jar "
10C
32-Oz. �
Jar
Btl.
ORANGE
DRINK MIX
1
i
Whit
Grapes
$429
BLEACH
Clorox
CHEF BOY-AR-DEE
SPAGHETTI WITH
MEATBALLS OR
Ravioli
$1.75
4fOz-
Can
27-Oz
Jar
Vi-Gal.
Jug
HEAVY-DUTY
DETERGENT
Rinso
$429
44-02. I
Box
gear
t





1 HE 1 AST CARPI INIAN I EBMJARY 2A, 1983
Confere
By DARRVI BROWN
"A Poignant Pause
in the Sexual Revolu-
tion" will he the topic
of the 23rd annual
Family L ife Conference
held at ECU next week.
Speakers will be ad-
dressing subjects on
student and campus life
regarding sexuality as
well as examining the
effects of the sexual
revolution on society.
The keynote speaker
for the program, which
is set to take place in
Mendenhall on Tues-
day and Wednesday,
will be Dr. Carol
Cassell, whose presen-
tation gave the con-
ference its name.
Cassell, a noted ex-
pert in the field of
American sexuality and
sex education, is cur-
rently publishing a
book on the aftermath
Cuts Are Damaging, Leaders Say
a � ,wr�o ramnuses including aid would save $
Continued From Page 1
had received generous
appropriations, but
more money was need-
ed for it to fully
develop. He said he
could not speculate
now on ECU'S share of
the proposed
Sl8-million cut.
Howell said he and
other chancellors in the
svstem were contacted
by Friday yesterday
after the announcement
of the budget cut sug-
gestions. "1 agree with
President Friday's posi-
tion that higher educa-
tion has already been
cut heavily Howell
said.
Five other areas that
were targeted for cuts
in the legislative
analvsts report includ-
ed: '
� A reduction in the
number of physician
residencies funded for
Area Health Education
Centers and a decrease
in state support of the
systems health science
programs. A three per-
cent cut would mean a
savings of $615,000.
� A reduction in the
number of ad-
ministrative postions in
the UNC system. At
three percent, thses cuts
could mean the laying
off of 11 employees at a
savings of $279,000.
� A reduction in pro-
gram support to all
campuses including aid
to historically Black
campuses previously
promised funds in the
consent decree that set-
tled the desegration
dispute between the
UNC System and the
federal government.
This would mean $138
million in reductions.
� A reduction in
funds for agricultural
research and extension
programs. At three per-
cent, these reductions
would save $1.13
million and cause 18
cuts in positions in
agricultural research
and 25 positions in ex-
tension service.
of the "sexual revolu-
tion" with a perspec-
tive on male-female
relationships.
Cassell initiated and
directed the educa-
tional programs of
Planned Parenthood of
America. She is cur-
rently president-elect of
the American Associa-
tion of Sex Educators,
Counselors and
Therapists. Her
acknowledged expertise
in these fields has led to
appear on numerous
talk shows and serve as
a consultant for I adies
Home Journal and 60
Minutes, among
others.
Princeton instructor
Karen Gordon is the
other featured speaker
at the conference. Gor-
don is a specialist in the
field of adolescent and
campus sexuality and
will focus her presenta-
tions on these areas and
a program she heads at
Princeton, Sexual
Counseling Services, to
provide educational in-
formation for college
students.
Dr. Susan McCam
mon of the ECU
psychology department
ls a coordinator for the
conference. She said
this year's topic was
chosen after campus
committees on family
life and sexuality saw a
need among students
for information on
these topics.
Gordon will talk in
Mendenhall 244 on
adolescent and campus
sexuality on March 1 at
10 a.m. and again at 2
p.m. on her sex infor
mation program at
Princeton.
Cassell will speak
Tuesday in Hendnx
Theatre at 8 p.m on
"A Poigmant Pause in
the Sexual Revolu-
tion She will discuss
male-female relation
ships in Mendenhall
244 the following day
at 10 a.m.
� Cuts in related
educational programs
such as grants to Indian
students and state aid
to students in private
colleges. A total sav-
ings of $841,000 could
be realized from these
reductions.
Diet Troubles Can Be Fatal
Continued From Page 1
Tax Of Tuition Considered, Cursed
i. CLVTk "W"W mnrf� a
(CPS) � Groaning
under budget cuts and
croping for a way to
pay for delivering
municipal services to a
nearby campus,
Washinton, Penn is
considering taxing stu-
dent tuition payments.
The city's mayor
I eah Dnehorst will
hold public hearings in
April on adding a tax to
the tuition bills of the
approximately 1000
students at Washington
and Jefferson College
and the more than 800
students �
V avnesburg College.
In November, the
Evanston, 111 . city
council proposed tax-
ing the tuition
payments of Nor-
thwestern University
students. Alderman
Jack Korshak says the
proposal is included in
a city budget to be con-
sidered this month, but
isn't optimistic the tax
will be passed.
Mayor Dnehorst's
proposal would add
about SI25 a year to
local college tuition
rates.
"The thing was just
suggested contends
Washington and Jeffer-
son spokesman Paul
Shearn. "There was
never a formal pro
posal
Until there is a for-
mal proposal, "the col-
lege has no official
statement on it at all
he says.
Shearn suspects the
mayor mentioned the
tax at city council
meeting in late January
to "send up a flag and
see what would hap-
pen.
"There has not been
much of a reaction to
it. There's been some
comment from
students, who obvious-
ly are not favorable
toward it he said.
When Evanston's
Korshak proposed a
"student tuition tax in
November, Nor-
thwestern ad-
ministrators reacted
vehemently. In subse-
quent public hearings,
they warned other col-
lege officials to expect
that other college towns
would quickly adopt a
similar tax if Evanston
did.
Korshak argued
Evanston provides
about $600,000 more a
year in services like
sewage and fire protec-
tion than Northwestern
pays into the local
economy.
Mayor Driehorst
could not be reached
for comment, but
reportedly made similar
arguments.
"Students receive the
same services from the
city as other residents
she told The Observer
Reporter, the local city
paper. It was "grossly
unfair" that they don't
pav for those services
she said.
because of the negative
connotations involved.
When bulimics vomit
because of illness, and
not because the
vomiting was self-
induced, they are as
upset about it as a nor-
mal person would be.
For bulimics, hinging
is a relaxing experience.
Before bulimics binge,
thev starve themselves
and when they are not
eating they tend to
become anxious and
tense. After hinging,
thev are calm and
relieved. Then the cycle
of starving-binging
begins again
There is no known
medical reason for
anorexia nervosa or
bulimia. It is known
that family pressures,
changing location (ie:
moving, going to col-
lege) and personal
trauma such as the
death of a loved one
can trigger the
disorders
shapev These girls
with eating disorders
are just striving to fit
in.
Society is also
somewhat responsible.
In the late 1960s a
svelte model named
Twiggy came onto the
fashion scene and since
then reports of anorex-
ia nervosa and bulimia
have increased
dramatically. Young
girls want to be
beautiful and popular
like the women the.
in magazines and on
TV. Today's ideal
woman is slender and
CCOrding to l)r W
R Ball Of the ECU
Counseling Center, this
sear the center has seen
six girls in the initial
phases of anorexia ner-
vosa or bulimia. Girls
who are believed to
have one of the
disorders are sent to the
infirmary to be
medically examined. If
there is no medical
reason for their pro-
blems, the girls are sent
to see a psychiatrist,
who is better equipped
lo handle their pro-
blem.
With the help ol a
psychiatrist, these girls
can be cured, but
relapses are not uncom-
mon. Currently, Dr
Mathis oversees an
eating disorders clinic
which holds group ses-
sions once a week
There are approximate
lv seven people in the
group, but the number
is expanding and a se-
cond group will be for-
ming shortly
Mathis also works
with people who are
100 percent or more
overweight. As tar as
the cost is concerned.
Mathis savs that the
person pays as much as
he can afford to pa)
-�We charge what the
traffic will bear he
savs.
ECU DISCOUNT
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Park. View Commons
Across from Doctors Park
OP�rt? 5:30
Moo Fri
752 M44
pucians
wepayimmediate cash for
kCLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
k DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
olN � RING Ma a,
OPEN 9-30-5:30 MON SAT
401 S.EVANS ST. ������
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
"VQUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER

Break Out in One of These Beauties.
Swim and Fun Fashions
from our De Weese Designs
of California Collection.
(Left) "Shir Fit" detailed
for body shaping, grape.
44.00
Center) "Seabound
classic wrap suit, navy
piped in red. 37.00
(Right) "Shadow Stripe"
boldlv enchanting, black.
35.00
ft
J Ml J
V

CSN'T MATTER
WHO YOU ARE
DR WHAT YOU DO
H.L. HODGES CO.
HAS SHOES FOR YOU
(at a great savings,too)
THIS SATURDAY-FEDRUARY 26
ALL SHOES IN STOCK
ARE

20�
o
OFF
�4

�.
We stock shoes for whatever you do:
For the runner; shoes by New Balance, Etonic Tiger & Nike.
For the aerobic dancer; shoes by Lotto & New Balance
For the tennis player; shoes by Tretorn, K4M�, A� AgM.
For the basketball player; shoes by Converse, Adidas & Pony.
For the ball player; cleated shoe by Lotto, Pony & Converse.
And for casual wear; Topsiders by Sperry.
�tf
of Wilson
10 to 9, Monday thru Saturday
Parkwood Mali Wilson, N.C
m wehm MmUrCka V1 C"S gg?
H.L. HODGES CO.
210 E.HFTH St OREH1VIILE
Nuc
PSR .
H P I Kl� K �
PSB -
grou
Area
ea:
anc: I
med. j
ca-
ched
attack
resp
dir
f- ngland
�:
-
thei
30s
find
-
V

the 193
made it
home-
include arr
WW
W MtaM
�More M
person �.t
decree f rJ
are incliN
��
iiinnmni�w-MWiW
-
Ill





?
lution
adolescent and campus
sexuality on March 1 at
10 a m and again at 2
p.m on her sex mfor-
l rnation program at
�nt Princeton.
. assell will speak
iv Tuesday in Hendrix
Theatre at 8 p.m. on
Potgmant Pause in
Sexual Revolu-
She will discuss
a female relation-
ships in Mendenhall
244 the following day
i Be Fatal
psychiatrist, these girls
be cured, but
ipses are not uncom-
Currently, Dr.
Mat his oversees an
tg disorders clinic
�i holds group ses-
once a week.
c are approximate-
even people in the
ip, but the number
.vpanding and a se-
id group will be for-
� � shortly.
Mathis also works
people who are
� percent or more
weight. As far as
:ne cost is concerned.
Ma: riis says that the
on pays as much as
.an afford to pay.
"We charge what the
will bear he
1ATTER
ARE
�U DO
CO.
YOU
too)
DRUARY 26
TOCK
OFF
you do:
tonic. Tiger & Nike.
jo & New Balance.
Swiss, Adidas & Asahi.
jerse, Adidas & Pony.
o. Pony & Converse.
by Sperry.
co.
:MVILLE
HI I SI CAROI INIAN
Style
FEBRUARY 24. 191
Page 1
Nuclear A Hack
PSR Zeros In On Threat Of War
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Suit Wruct
PSR was formed in 1961 by a
group of physicians in the Boston
Area who were troubled by the
health inphcations of nuclear
weapons testing in the atmosphere
and by the lack of data on the
medical consequences of nuclear
war.The founding members resear-
ched the effects of a thermonuclear
attack on Massachusetts and the
ability of the medical community, to
respond to such an attack. Their fin-
dings were published in the k-
England Journal of Medicine
(5-31-62).
This early work played a major
role in developing public understan-
ding of the awesome capabilities of
thermonuclear weapons and con-
tributed to the signing of the
Limited Test Band Treaty in 1963.
In 1979, because of the increasing
concerns some physicians were
beginning to have about the hazards
of nuclear power and weapons pro-
liferation, PSR was reactivated. On-
ly three days after PSR placed an
ad, outlining their concerns, in The
Sew England Journal of Medicine,
the nuclear accident at Three Mile
Island occured. PSR began to grow
at an amazing rate. They now claim
to have about 20,00 members and
110 chapters throughout the coun-
try. Currently, they claim to be
gaining an average of 1000 new
members every month.
Presently PSR's work primarily
focuses on the threat posed by
nuclear war. Through their sym-
posiums entitled "The Medical
Consequences of Nuclear Weapons
and Nuclear War" PSR has been
playing a leading role in alerting the
community and the general public
to this important issue. "One of the
major goals of PSR is to make peo-
ple more aware of the dangers and
unacceptability of nuclear war
commented John C. Moskop, assis-
tant professor in the medical
humanities program of the ECU
School of Medicine.
Moskop sees PSR as having
primarily an educatinal function
and he further sees it as the respon-
sibility of the medical community to
do the education. "They (medical
workers) are in effect charged by
society with the responsibility for
restoring and maintaining health in
the case of a nuclear war Moskop
said "The only way to preserve the
health of the society is to prevent it
(Nuclear War)
PSR invites physicians, dentists
and professional students to join.
Other interested people may join as
associate members or sponsors.
People interested in joining PSR can
write to them at 639 Massachusetts
Ave. Cambridge, Ma. 02139 or
John Moskop at 406 S. Harding St.
Greenville 27834.
Moskop said that the reason he
feels so strongly about the nuclear
weapons issue is because "It's got
the potentional to completely
destroy our way of life as we know it
and unless we take this issue by the
horns and do something to get the
arms race under control there's an
ever increasing chance that those
weapons might be used.
If that happens, Moskop said, it
would be the "ultimate
castastrophy
Poland's Enduring Dream Comes To Campus In March
The children of the mountaineers perform the traditional dances of the Tatra Mountains in this scene
from Matthew and Sherilyn Mentes's Travel-Adventure Film Poland � The Enduring Dream. The film
is coming to Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre on Tuesday, March 15. at 8 p.m. The pro-
gram is part of the '82-83 Travel-Adventure Film Series.
30s Deco Revived By Adventurous Decorators
I he Kcjitpr iiiJ :
Every collector wants a bargain, and the best way to
find one is to collect something that is not quite in
fashion. Recent auctions have suggested that bamboo
furniture from the 1930s is beginning to interest the
adventurous decorator.
Art deco designs were popular in America and most
European countries in the 1920s and 1930s. As the style
persisted, less expensive types of furniture copied the
"look Rattan Art and Decoration of Manila, the
Phillippine Islands, made bamboo porch furniture in
the 1930s. Comfortable stuffed pillows and simple lines
made it popular. These sets were sold to fashionable
homes in the United States. A full set of furniture could
include armchairs, side chairs, sofas, hassocks, coffee
$btes, side tables, even wastebaskets. One set of 11
pieces sold recently at the Skinner Auction Gallery for
thousands of dollars. Another sold a few months later
for much less. This type of furniture also is available at
house sales and small auctions, unrecognized and inex-
pensive because it has not been pictured in the recent
decorating and collecting magazines.
Q: What can you tell me about leather postcards
mailed with I-cent stamps between 1900 and 1911'
A: Picture postcards were first used in the United
States in 1893. The idea became popular, and soon the
plain picture card was not enough, more unusual cards
were wanted. The manufacturers began to make what
today's collectors call novelty cards. These were made
of leather, wood, bamboo, metal stimulated ivory, even
pressed peat moss.
Many items usually were attached to the cards as part
of the design. Feathers, buttons, hair, coins, cloth and
'More Media' Exhibit On Display In Mendenhall
Workable jewelry and mixed media paintings (above) by Roxanne Reep comprise an exhibit titled
"More Media " currentlv on display in Mendenhall Student Centers gallery and upper cases. The one-
person show runs through March 4. Reep is a School of Art faculty member who received her masters
degree from ECU. Small metal pieces (that may be manipulated by the wearer) from her masters thesis
are included in the show.
Peeks At Antiques
metal were used. About 1907 the post office ruled that
the novelty cards had to be sent in envelopes or boxes,
but they remained popular. Leather cards were made in
quantity, both as simple cards with the message written
on the leather and as cutouts shaped like bears or
bathtubs. One manufacturer suggested that the cards be
stitched together to make a pillow cover.
Q: I have a pewter plate marked "Roswell Gleason
When did he work'
A: Roswell Gleason worked in Dorchester, Mass
from 1822 to c. 1871. He was a well-known manufac
turer of Britannia and pewter.
Current listed prices are recorded from antique
shows, sales, flea markets and auctions throughout the
United States.
Milk bottle, sprigg's cream top, $15.
Child's mug silver-Dlate. Mickey Mouse and Donald
Duck, Wilken, $35.
Whirligig, windmill, wood, "Dancing Sam ' Dan,
The Banjo Man black musicians, boxed S75.
Buddy L. hydraulic lift dump truck, 1920s, 1350.
Shirley Temple doll, composition, with pin, 18 in-
ches, $475.
Westminister bracket clock, mahoganv case, silvered
dial, silver presentation plaque, signed Gustav Becker.
164 inches, $750.
Parlor safe, cast-iron. Herring Co New York. Egvp
tian Revival, $1,700.
Victor phonograph, school model, large pleated
horn. $2,200
New Paperback Views Options
On Deprogramming Valley Girls
By DICK WEST
WASHINGTON (UPI) � The wonderful folks who
brought you "The Official Preppy Handbook" are now
out with a paperback called How To Deprogram Your
Valley Girl.
If inclusion of both titles in the same catalog strikes
you as a publishing equivalent of schizophrenia, we are
on the same wave length. Fer shurr.
What we have here is a book company lighting
cultural fires with both hands while stamping them out
with both feet.
Will the firm's next instructional manual be How To
Deprogram A Preppy0 Certainly the demand is there.
I can foresee a whole new market for publishers who
claim to know the antidote for social trends thev abet-
ted.
In recent years, for example, several books containing
detailed guidelines on how to be Texan have been
published.
Such directions, I understand, were particularlv
welcomed in Texas, where there is a good bit of confu-
sion about behavioral patterns. Judging from the
western hats and high-heeled boots I have seen in this
area, however, the problem is national in scope.
Fresh evidence came the other day from Austin where
a member of the Legislature introduced a measure
authorizing the sale of "Texas Native" auto license
See TOTALLY. Page 8
Book Shows
Us Gandhi
As Villain
By EMILY CASEY
Staff Writer
Indira Gandhi,
by Nayantara Sahgal,
Ungar Publishing,
1982, call number:
n.p.(el83.8G9,145,1982)
This book is about the daughter
of Jawaharlal Nehru. Nehru, the
George Washington of freed India,
wrote his sister, Vijaya Lakshmi
Pandit, about Indira as she, his only
child, grew up � not guessing she
would become a political leader, let
alone prime minister after his suc-
cessor Shastri's sudden death.
Madame Pandit made these iciters
available to her daughter, whose
book about Mrs. Gandhi here show
us her cousin Indira as a villain.
Last week's election news from
Madhya Pradesh, Karnataka, and
Tripura suggests that the Indian
voters are once again turning
against their proud, authoritarian,
and perhaps ultimately tragic
leader.
Mrs. Sahgal, who represented the
Janata party (anti-India) govern-
ment in the United Nations, fur-
nishes us a wealth of details on per-
sonalities in post-Nehru India,
'Gandhi9 Playing In Greenville
Richard Attenborough's thorough rendering of the tale of In-
dia's famed "Mahatma Mohandas K. Gandhi, is currently
playing at Greenville's Buccaneer Theatre. Gandhi features one
of the year's great performances by England's Ben kingsiey in
the title role. Abo playing at the Buc is Pat Couroy's The Lords
of Discipline and comedy hit Tootsie (in its final week).

lii�� iitiipiii inn in ii �i.iininiiiigjBfiwii �
�30tmm� :
i





8 THE FAST CAROLINIANFEBRUARY 2J983
Like, Totally Tubular
Continued From Pajje 7
plates to us expatriates
fortunate enough to
have been born in the
state.
Does this mean con-
ditions now are ripe for
a counter-training
regimen embodied by
oh to Deprogram A
Texan? If so, 1 want to
be the first to reach
some opportunitic
publisher with a
manuscript
The alle cult, ac-
cording to Lillian
Glass. its chief
deprogrammer,
originated in Califor-
nia. 1 may help to
assume that the Texas
cult started in Califor-
nia, too.
"Toda writes
Miss Glass, "no com-
munity is safe from the
Valley cult, and no
matter where you live
in these United States
you may find yourself
harboring a Valley Girl
under your very own
roof
Yes, and much the
same might be said ot
the Texas cult.
Disciples of the two
movements even
develop along parallel
lines, eventually
reaching what Miss
Glass refers to as "The
Terminal Phase
Despite such
similarities, however, it
appears that
deprogramming Tex-
ans, particularly those
who hae never been
west of the Mississippi,
is more difficult than
changing the "Total
Image" of Valley Girls.
Very few Valley
Girls, I gather, feel
compelled to ride
mechanical bulls when
they go honky-tonking.
Mot only has
"Valspeak" replaced
�'Meaningful
dialogue she tells us,
the cult promotes a
monotone quality in
speaking, a rapid rate
of speaking, lack of
proper breath control,
excessive nasality, ab-
normal pitch and cons-
tant repetition of words
and phrases
That description ex-
actly applies to many
bureaucrats 1 have
known.
Band's Last Laugh
By ELIZABETH JENMNGS
The band Laughing Matter, con
sisting of three ECU students, gave
a farewell performance in the
Phoenix room of the Attic Tuesday
night.
The members of the band have
decided to take a break from perfor
ming and develop more original
music. ,
"We've plaved the same material
over and over and need to work on a
new repertoire said John Shan
non, lead guitarist. Shannon, a
junior majoring in English, also ex-
plained the band must devote more
time to academics.
Laughing Matter is a band in a
class by itself. The material is writ-
ten solely by the members in a pro-
gressive rock style
"It's better than plaving other
peoples' music said David Gaya.
bass player. "We want to present a
different type of music Gava. a
junior majoring in musk, portrayed
his excellence on stage as he com-
nhmented the sound of the lead
guitar The band's drummer. Jot
Shotweli. added chimes and
cowbells to give the band's sound
variety
Derek Collins, lead singer, e
pressed enthusiasm and viulnv
throughout the performance Col
hns a senior majoring in history
has' been with the band tor two
vears.
' you may recall I aughing Ma'
ter's fust place award at "The Bat
tk of the Bands" last spring It
band's extraordinary sound and ex
cellent musicianship has enabled
them lo perform at such places a-
the Attic and quickh establish a
local tollowing
Those of vou who missed the last
performance of laughing Matter
lost an opportunitv to see tour ex
cellent musicians execute their in-
strumental rock Hopetulh
1 aughinc Matter will make a com
eback with more of their unique
talent
Laughing Matter
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion : mt woe
DEPEND ON � jtsmodeeawerb
� omer rfttier-teming � '�" Counselors are
. . j � jr � � ipj '� r�. �oef
- . ;��. nfort and privacy are
assured I . �-� ring staff ot the Reming Cent�
SERVICES � Tue lav Sal i r. �'� Ai
pc rttment � 1st & 2 i h mester Abortions up f
�� Weeks � free regnancv Tests � iery fcartv
Preonarvcv Tests � a Inclusive ;s � Insurance
Accepted � CAU 781-5550 DAY OS NIGHT �
THE FLEMING
CENTER
� . � :��'��-
ABORHONS UP
icj I2th WbfcK
OF PREGNANCY
1'iS nc Pr?nanc Th' B1
Control and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
817 0S3S Toll Free Numbe'
�00 :s�� between � A M
and 5 P M Aiojn
B ALEIGMS woven s
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
91 West Vqan St
R igl
ARMY ROTC
FREE ELECTIVE
Register for new Free electives
available to you beginning this fall.
Army ROTC offers you an
exerting options for your schedule,
and remember-there is.
NO OBLIGATION
MLSC 1001 -Introduction
to ROTC and the Army
M-4:00 W-2:00
T-9:00 Arranged
TH-9:00
Advanced Course
COMING SOON.
Look for
iMOME
a
CoUWRY-CoklMj
Bring this ad for
Fried chicken dinner
with 2 veggies and
bread for only $1.99
plus tax and drink
SophomoresVeterons,and Transfer
Students-find out how you
can qualify for our advanced course:
MLSC 3001-Applied
MLSC 3001-Aplied
Military Leadership
Contact us at 757-6967 or
come by Room 324 Erwin Hall
for more information.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE
ARMY ROTC
in an
teaming
issue
of your
college
news-
paper.
it
NT Missm)
512 E. 14th St.
While vacationinq in the Greek l&ie&,
famous detective Mercule Poirot spotted
o beautiful woman on the beach. QeolLrinq
that she wa& deod, he did not ak her to dinner.
fwwncNm rTovjuti mxtm i tm nu"i rJisuwiwcn
A JOHN WWDOJKNE (ttJ RfCrVWDOOOoWtfl PRODUCTION �JOHN WUBIW ran
PETER U5TIN0V JANEWRKIN 1015011115 DCTTE MV15 HMMrWOW
JON FINCH OUMWrNiiET QEORCiE KENNEM
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DErlTrl ON THE NILE"
WITH MRRT ANMEV5 I 5 JON MM COHPOiEO PT NINO ROTfl
KREENPWT PTHfTiXXfl 5iWfTER
PRODUCED 51JOMN WWB0W�E AND RKLrWRD QOOBWI
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PG�in(ii'�itaOi�s,i�S'ltO ����� PTv:
torn mm �m. nt'w-�.�ii �cw�ij !� jz: !
Will be available
your favorite retailor
on March 10th
PQTQQ U6TINOV � JQNQ 5IQKIN � COLIN BLPKELY
NICUOLQ6CLQY � JQMQ6 MP60N � RODDY McDOWQLL
6YLVIQ MILE6 � DENI6 QUILLEY � DIQNQ RlGG
MOGGIQ 5MITU �S� EVIL UNDQR TUQ 6UN
Muic by COLE PO�TEQ Qrranqed by JOHN lQNCU&EQV
6crenploy by QNTUONV 5U0PPEQ CoMomei Dy CNTUONV POwElL
Produced by JOUN BPQBOUQNE one QiCUQQD GOODWIN
Directed by GUV UQMlJON
are looking forward
to serving you
Taylor Beverage Co.
PG'HKVTM.
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, SMASH H.TS MHg-Mi� PJJIJ�-SSSXSI
.scr
Student Union Films Committee
trtrk
103 E. North Carolina St.
Goldsboro






























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1
I a ugh
III) I M l k( )l INI
Sports
1 i hki -K 24 1VK�
f'agc i
Emotionless Pirates Beaten By JMU
ON
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Photo B D�VE Wll I lMS
F( ! (ihnn Edwards leaps up against a� lifford Maurer in
weekend jiimn. teammateharlie Green looks u.
Lady Pirates Surpass
.500 Mark With Victory
lU1ND IM F s m v
� -�
Denkler
(. v.
V

Hues maintained the lead
throughout i test.
"W a on on the i ad ieve
I with the wii
"I!

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' game
ever seen, them play tonight.
laed o ads
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Denkh Bu
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� w e

�: ' �
1
�.�
.
.
�I
a
ayei on
-i mt i senior
ike 11 i'l 20 shots
pull down 1 1 rc-
Denl m ha- ! ,6s6
"its.
e ol her
best games ui the season, making
nine of 12 shots from the floor and
tour ol five freethrows to pump in
22 pomts. siic. along with freshman
B g, led in rebounding with
1 puard 1 ran Hooks, who has been
- ith a ed eight
ints ,i commended
utstan-
ich a good
she aid "She scored eight
Id hae had more
realh work-
I ha 'here"
i ad � Seahawks, Sharon
M Millan was Is- and
tour � ot to
� Pi kard and
I 16 points each, and
lowed with 12
I he Pirates n : I 68 shots
M � I rom the
; 2 ol 22 t; 'ethrows
i 54.5 pi mark. I he Hues
i ' the Seahaw ks'
I he 1 ad. li ates w ill be on the
this weekend, travelling to
ge Mason on Saturday and
George Washington on Sunday.
� lies va.ill be played at 2 p.m.
I . Pirates' final game ol the
ii will be on March 5 against
M ol-
im.
By KEN BOLTO.N
1 he lames Madison Dukes gained
a measure ot revenge on the ECU
Pirates last night with a "6-56 vic-
tory in an I CAC South game
played in Harrisonburg, Va.
Earlier this ear. the Pirates had
beaten James Madison 43-41 in
Minges Coliseum.
In last night's contest. Dukes
center Dan Ruland scored 18 points
and guard Charles Fisher added 12
more to give IMU its 15th victory of
the sear against 10 losses.
I he victory was an important one
tor lames Madison as thev have
solidified their second-place posi-
tion in the conference with a 5-3
league mark.
1 eauge standings are verj impor-
tant now as the top two teams will
receive a bye in next month's
EC t -South tournament.
I he William dd Mary Indians
have wrapped up first place and the
Dukes have all but wrapped up their
hold on second place
lei is now 13-12 overall and 3-7
in the conference.
1 ast night's game was close until
the 6:00 mark in the first half.
Behind the inside plav o Johnny
Edwards and Charles Green, the
Pirates hung tough with the Dukes
at the start ol the game.
A dunk bv Idwards and a
baseline jumper bv Bruce Peartree
biought ECU to within one, 20-19,
with 6:25 left.
But it was at that point thai IMU
started to pull away, and the Dukes
never looked back
Two free throws bv David Du-
pont and a jumper by Ruland sent
the Dukes on a 14-5 scoring tear that
put them up 36-24 at halftime.
The Dukes used balanced scoring
and an aggressive defense in the se-
cond half to widen the margin in the
second half. The Dukes' b .
lead was a 65-40 advantage with
6:43 left.
The Pirates were hurt bv the in-
side play of James Madison, as ap
parent by the 39-19 difference in re-
bounding.
ECU head coach Charlie Ha-
nson said after the game that the
Dukes were just too physical !�
Pirates.
"They just killed us on the b
and inside Harrison commented.
"Alter we got down, thev just com-
plete!) wore our butts down
I eadmg the way tor the Pirates
once again was Edwards, the
freshman sensation from Charl
Edwards scored 1" points, despite
the fact that he didn't start due I
unusual pre-game accident.
While hanging around at tl hotel
before the game. Idwards was at-
tacked by a dog, causing him to run
into a metal pole and bruise his
knee
The killer dog was not eno igl l
stop Edwards, as he scored 13 ol his
Photo By GABY PATTERSON
Senior Fran Hooks, along with Mary Denkler and Caren Truske. will play
the last home game of their lady Pirate career in Minges Coliseum on
March 5 against I'NC-Charlotte.
Buc Cagers Earn 'Comeback Kids' Label
�;
Ei Pii ati
il attack this season,
iK been
alls. : another n � le-the
� Kids "
in, j; dif 1 i ms this
i the Pira ped out
�J halt to pull
mfort wins lor in-
i weekend's bout with
. a leader in the conference
igue, EC1 had a W 28 lead at
halftime
Bu' : d spell from the flooi
' the 1'uates m 1 1 point lead, as
hipmen red the Bucs,
11-3, at art ol id I
Nevert hele I Pi rates, i
� � � I 1 lemselves
geth i I ga fa anothet
ting, hair pulling finish. W ith
seven seconds on the clock, 1 :( l
centei Tony Robinson connected
with Green underneath the basket,
who vas open for a lay-up. I he
ba ket gave the Birs a 68-67 lead
with tour seconds remaining in the
game
Except foi William & Mar . and
Richmond, everv conference g inn
fat this season has been won bv
no mort than fout points. And the
Pirates have clinched three o' those
si thrillers. 1 he Bucs' iirst con-
ference victory same on Jan. 8,
when thev edged out James
Madison, 4i 41
CINDY PLEASANTS
1 ook Inside
I he last two conference wins have
some just recently, with the Bucs
outlasting the University of Rich-
mond in double overtime to clutch a
"V 75 decision I he win against
Navv gave the Pirates their third
conference win
In comparison, last year's squad
won tour games bv no more than
three points, two ot w hich were con-
ference toes, and the remaining two
were instate teams. Against Cieorge
Mason, the Bucs won, 66-64, and
pulled out a 61 8 victory over
William & Mary. The Pirates lost to
Campbell last season, 62-60, but
came back to defeat UNC-
( harlotte. 71-68, and UNC-W,
68-66. 1 he 1981-82 squad never fac-
ed an overtime situation all season.
In a press conference following
one o the conference games. Head
Coach Charlie Harrison was asked
if he fell jin.xed after having lost to
Naw(66 64) by two points and then
suffering a 59-58 defeat against
Cieorge Mason University in double
overtime.
"Not at all he replied. "I've
told you before there aren't any bad
teams in this league. We expected
we might get in these situations
coming in.
"No, 1 don't feel jinxed. We're
doing a lot of good things out
there
After last year's difficulties, Har-
rison's last remark is somewhat of
an understatement. The Pirates are
doing more good things than people
had ever imagined they would do.
The first year coach has com-
pleted turned this year's squad
around. A team which seemed to be
lacking in motivation and hanging
in limbo, has been rejuvenated
under the guidance o Harrison.
Once skeptical fans began to take
a second look when the Pirates gave
ACC opponents, Duke and N.C.
State, a real scare on their home
turfs. After all. who would have
thought a team which set the lowest
scoring and rebounding averages in
ECU's history the previous vcar
could bounce back and have a 13-12
mark nearing the end oi the season?
More than anything. Harrison
has developed a team that shows
character � something the Pirates
have lacked in recent years
At present, the Pirates need to
win only one of two remaining
games to guarantee a winning
season. But whether or not thev do
wind up ahead in the win column
doesn't really matter The Pirates
have surpassed all expectations and
then some.
Yet having a winning season does
seem only fitting, for the Pirates
have certainly proved that they are
winners in everv sense of the word.
1" points in the first halt
In addition to Edwards, Charles
ireen and Peartree added 10 apieee.
and Barry Wright chipped in with
SIX.
Earlier this week. Idwards. who
is an apparent shoe-in for rookie-of-
the-year honors, was named EC AC
South Rookie ot the Week for the
tilth time this year.
Idwards is currently averaging 19
points and 8.6 rebounds per game,
with both figures being second-best
in the league.
Even though the Pirates were onlv
seven points under their season
averace ot 6' pomts per game, Har-
rison felt that ECU's plav resulted
in their own undoing.
'It was not so much what they
did but what we did not do he
stated Tarly in the game, we did
what we had to do and got some
great shots, bu! thev would not
fall
lame Madison is soached by I ou
Campanelli, who is in his ilth
reason at JMU with a 202-88 record.
In the last two seasons. C ampanelli
guided the Dukes to the
tournament.
( ampanelli felt atter the game
that his club's intensity had a I
do with the outcome.
"We asserted ourselves on
defense and executed on offense as
well the JMU coach said "When
we plav with intensity on defense
and execute on offense, we can plav
with anybody "
The Dukes won the E A &
title last vear and lost to eve:
champ North Carolina by jus-
points m a first-round game
James Madison took advantage
of their opportunities at the
throw line as thev hit 22 f 2
tempts.
I he Dukes weren't too sh.i-
from the field eitrv i .
cent compared with E I 44
cent
I ast night s game was
impressive performance foi Pira
forward Charles dreen In the
four games since returning
shoulder injury. Cireen ha- a
11 points and seven rebounds per
game
Harrison felt that an unerr
effort by the Pirates was the
reason tor the los
"Tonight we just didn't play
any emotion said the fit '
.oach. "It is very uncharacte
of this team to not plaj mtb
tion. i van tell you wh
ed. but we jus- can
again
ECU has or tw � �
ing on their schedule be-
ference tournament.
On Saturday night, the Pirates
play host to intrad:e
I NC Wilmington. Came' �
7:30 p rr.
Pirates Face Rival
B CINin PLEASANTS
ECU's instate rival, the UNC-
Wilmington seahawks. will definite-
ly have fire in their eyes when they
visit Mges Coliseum Saturday
night.
In the two teams' previous
meeting on Jan 24. the Bucs won in
overtime. o 4 I he Prates only
shot 14 h percent from the floor,
bu: j,idoach Charlie Ha-
praised the team for overcoming
their problems and slicking it out.
"The kids hung together he stated
after the game. "I'm very proud of
them Thev played their tails off and
came from behind in a hostile at-
mosphere.
I he major difference m the up-
coming contest will be the addition
Oi Charles C.reen to ECU's starting
lineup. The Pirates outrebounded
the Seahawks. 33-21, in the .ast
game and will be even stronger
under the boards with dreen now
inside I Nc -W Coach Mel Gibson
is well aware of the threat Cireen
poses to his team.
'last Carolina made a
remarkable comeback to beat us the
first time Gibson said, "and I
know with Cireen back in the lineup,
they arc a much better team
Revenge, however, won't be the
Seahawks' only motivation coming
in to Saturday's game. Now 10-13,
I Nc W needs to win their last four
games in order to finish with a winn-
ing season Along with 1-C I . UNC-
W will lake on Campbell University
this week, and according to Cubson,
both carries are detrimental "The
game tl week a
they are with instate teams,
said.
" Kerall, the V i it
ECU-l Nc. w series, 12-4
Seahawks have �-
two trips ��. Minges In
Pirates lost 58-4"7 a
Bucs sutfered a c ;
the Seahawks
Pacing I NC W will be 6-4 gua
Shawn Williams, now avera
15.9 points and 5.1 rebounds per
contest. The Washington native is
UNC-W's second all-time scorer
with 1,369 career points
6-0 junior Tony Anderson l
the team with an 11.2 sc
average. Carlos Kelly, a 6-5 junior.
is pumping in 10.5 points pet
test, and has committed just 7 tur-
novers in the past eight gan-cs
In rebounding. 6-4 junior wa -
on Terry Shiver leads the Seahavi
with a 6.3 average. Shiver has gi
bed 4" rebounds in his last I
games
For the P:r a: es.
phenomena Johnny Edwards �'
leads in scoring with a 19-poinl sc t
ing average He also ieads n re-
bounding with An S.6 ov .
average
Sophomore Barry Wright is now
pumping in 12.3 points per gan
while Cireen now has a 10.3 sc rinj
average
After Saturday's bout, the Bucs
play their last game of the regular
season on Thursdav. Marsh J,
against Penn State-Behrend. The
game will be plaved in Minges (
iseum at 7:30 p.m.
Women '5 Softball Team
Set For Season Opener
B RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
The ECU women's softball team
will open the 1983 season in two
weekends when it travels to Florida
to take on the University of
Jacksonville.
Second-year head coach Sue
Manahan is extremely optimistic
about the season. "We're all very
exsited. and we hope to improve on
last years record That task won't
be an easv one since the Pirates
finished last season with a 42-13
mark
Manahan said she will be coun-
ting on the seniors to make a large
contribution this year. "I'm expec-
ting a great amount of leadership
from Cynthia Shepard, Yvonne
Williams, Mitzi Davis, Ginger
Rothermel and Fran Hooks
The Pirates are led by All-
Americas Davis and Shepard.
Three All-Region players:
Williams, Rothermel. and Jol anda
Clayton also return for the Pirates.
Overall there are eight starters
from last years club. The outfield is
already set with Shepard in
rightfield. Davis in centerfield.
Hooks in leftfield and Williams
playing short field.
In the infield. Sherrv Stout plays
first base. Rothermel is at second
and Clayton plavs shortstop "We
have a very strong double-plav com-
bination in Rothermel and
Clayton stated Manahan
Strong candidates for third base
are Tamara Franks and Freshman
Sandy Kee Vying for the vacant
catcher spot are I 17 Con and James
Madison transfer student Suzanne
Martin.
On the mound, ECU returns one
of the best pitchers in the region in
Jeannette Roth. Roth comes off two
consecutive 30- win seasons and
shold be invaluable to the Pirates
this season. Backing up Roth will be
Freshman Stacey Boyette who is
making the transition from fast
pitch to slow pitch sofball
Other Freshmen on this year's
squad who will be expected to con-
tribute include Wendy Ozmet, Don-
na Panoss, Carla Alphin and Robin
Graves.
With a lot of talent returning and
an excellent freshmen class coming
in, Manahan has high hopes for the
'83 squad. "If God will stay with us
and we can stay healthy, we should
be very very good





10
I Ml I AM l K l !M
1 I Bkl K 24, IVS
Photo by GAUY P4TTFBJON
sidelined I orraine Foster looks on �ith Delphine Hedges during Fad Pirate action.
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X
Old Dawg Learns New
Tricks, Signs With N.J.
ATHENE, Ga.(UPI)
- Heisman Trophy win-
ner Herschel Walker
signed a three-year con-
tract with the New
Jersey Generals that
will make him the
highest paid player in
the history of profes-
sional football, his at-
torney said Wednes-
day.
The spectacular
University of Georgia
star signed with
Generals of the fledgl-
ing U.S. Football
League after discover-
ing he had unwittingly
lost his amateur status
by earlier signing a ten-
tative contract with the
club.
Walker's, agent Jack
Manton, said Walker
received his first year's
salary in cash and in
advance and that the
entire package is
"totally guaranteed
Terms of the con-
tract were not disclos-
ed, but earlier reports
had the Generals offer-
ing Walker as much as
$16.5 million. Accor-
ding to the report,
Walker has to receive
$2.5 million a year.
The Atlanta attorney
spoke at a new con-
ference in front of an
apartment building
where Walker's
girlfriend, Cindy
Deangelis, lives.
As the news con-
ference started, Walker
slipped out of the back
of the building and ap-
parently left the area in
a white truck. Manton
said Walker would join
his new team at their
training camp in Orlan-
do, Fla over the
weekend and, at the
team's request, would
not meet with the
media until he reaches
Orlando.
Manton issued a
brief statement from
Walker in which the
three-time All-America
running back said he
made a mistake in de-
nying earlier he had
signed a contract with
the Generals.
"No one realizes
more than 1 that 1 am a
human being Man-
ton quoted Walker as
saying. "I wish to
apologize to (Georgia)
Coach (Vince) Dooley,
the University of
Georgia and all the
people who have been
my loyal friends. I ask
for your forgiveness
and ask God for his
forgiveness
"This is indeed a sad
day for Georgia said
Dooley. "Herschel
Walker has meant so
much to our program
the past three years.
He made a mistake and
he admits it. He's had
an early education in
the hard reality of the
business profession.
"Now it is time to
look ahead Dooley
said. "He can make
the best of what I'm
sure will be an enor-
mous opportunity as a
pro football plaver and
I know he will do well
in that endeavor. We
look forward to follow-
ing his career
Manton said he and
Walker's mother tried
to talk Walker out of
the idea of sounding
out the USFL when
Walker first brought it
up about three weeks
ago.
"We tried to talk
him out of sending me
to New York said
Manton. "But he said
'if the money is what
I'm led to believe, I
owe it to myself to find
out
Manton said the
Chicago franchise of
the USFL submitted a
written contract to
Walker in December
but Walker did not sign
it. He said when he
went to New York
about three weeks ago.
he submitted legal
briefs to the USFI of-
ficials "that their rule
(not drafting n o -
seniors) was not legally
sustainable
He said the league
checked with two law
firms in New York and
reported back thev
agreed that the position
could not be sustained
in court.
Manton said
Generals owner J.
Walker Duncan met
with Walker last Thurs-
day and askd Manton
to leave while he con-
ferred with Duncan
alone for about three
hours. He said it was
during that time that
Walker signed the con-
tract and that he did
not witness the signing.
"I take Mr. Duncan
at face value that he did
not realize he was
violating an NCAA
rule said Manton.
Asked about
Walker's present frame
of mind, Manton said,
"I think he is totally
happv "
Commissioner Chet
Simmons aid Walker
approached the USI I
in earlv January, in-
dicating a desire to play
the new league.
Simmons said beca i
Walker w a - an
undergraduate and not
�ived in the draft,
he decided to allow him
negotiate with the
i a e.
"Sure, we could ha �
said no said Sir
mons. "We had
make a tough decis.
and I made it mtl
good conscience
Asked whj he all)
ed the Generals to h
the rights to Wall
Simmons said:
"One of the nd
lions wa he wanted I
plav in the New "i
Metropolitan area 1'
was a special
cumstance
Simmons
Generalsoach Cl
Fairbanks both del
there was anv :
of league or '
monev in the conti
negotiations
Walker.
Simmons
Walker had ar:
ed tiie NIT la ' yeai
well as the anad
Football League
past, and
was never a h I �
b W alker i
Simmon
Walker did.
sign an eai
"There wa
ment signer ist �
Thursday
"There was a pi �
for Hei ' i .
his mind
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I
I Ml I SIAROl IMAN
H Bkl AK1 24 1983
11
; New
h N.J.
av e
v.iu: Sim
wto
ka toigh decision,
.le it withall
.
s�.JVC
v1 a -
�,i .
N t
a
(�
�den
-
fno�0 6v SCOTT LARSON
Ra Dickerson nill be one of ECl 's tracksters traveling to George Mason
University's tri-meet this weekend.
i, , i, v
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w a -
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College
raduates
They're going to have fun, fun, fun
on the night shift.
And get rich doing it.
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Friaay and Saturday Night at 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre, MSC
Sneaker Sam Sez
Wrestling Deadline
Today is the final
day to register for the
wrestling meet. Entries
will be taken in
Memorial Gym, room
204, until 5:00 p.m.
Matches begin
February 28 at 5:00
p.m. in room 102,
Memorial Gym. Mat-
ches are scheduled for
Monday through
Thursday with a single
elimination tourna-
ment. Sign up today.
Basketball Playoffs
The regular season of
intramural basketball
ends today. Playoffs
begin Sunday, Feb. 27
for all teams with a 50
percent or better won-
loss record. Play-off
matches will be posted
Friday, Feb. 25 outside
of 204 Memorial Gym.
Don't forget to check
the time and court for
your playoff game.
Good luck in the tour-
nament.
Defending Champs
Denied Victory
Monday night prov-
ed to be the night of
upsets in the fast-paced
sport of co-rec roller
hockey. The defending
champs, The Night
Cruisers, fell to the
unseeded team of Rolla
Doobie 2-1. Other
teams to advance in the
quest for the co-rec
championship were
H.Rs Magic Carpet
Ride, and El Loco
Flyers. Semi-final ac-
tion gets underway
Monday, Feb. 28, with
the final match
scheduled for 4:00
Tuesday, March 3, at
Sportsworld.
Co-Rec Lane Action
The fun-filled activi-
ty of co-rec bowling got
underway this week in
Mendenhall Lanes.
Schedules are posted in
the Student Center and
in Memorial Gym
Come watch as the fun
rolls on.
elimination tournament
within each division.
The tournament
brackets will be posted
today by 5:00 p.m
Please come by to
check when ou play.
Swim Meet
Registration for the
intramural swim meet
will begin Tuesday,
March 1 and continue
through March 14 The
meet will be held
Wednesdav, March 16.
Racquetball Doubles Get In Shape For Spr-
All teams who have ing
played at least three Registration for the
matches and reported second session of
these results will ad- aerobic fitness classes
vance to the single will begin Feb. 2h and
run through March 4
Second session classes
begin March 14 and
end April 21. The cost
is four dollars for one
class per week and eight
dollars for two classes
per ueek.
Sport Club Results
In sport club action
last weekend, the
women's soccer club
lost to NX SL 5-0. The
women's rugby club
also taced defeat by a
score of 26-0 to the
Reedy Creek Club. The
men's team handball
club split a pair of
games against the Ger-
man Air Force team
from Washington,
DC. The German men
won Saturday's game
21-20, but on Sundas
the ECL men retaliated
with a 28-2? victor)
The women's team
handball club defeated
the Washington. DC
club on Saturday by a
score of 13-10, but
Sunday, the women-
team finished in an - -
deadlock
This weekend, tl �
men's rugb club
travels to Greer.sr
while the wo me:
rugby club has
matches in Raleigh
Chapel Hill
women's soccer
goes to Rockv M
to play in an ind
tournament
Smith's Tarheels Drop Out Of NCAA Top 10,
But Three-Game Losing Streak 'Not A Slump1
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
(UPI)
A three-game losing
streak is not a slump,
says North Carolina
Coach Dean Smith,
when a team has a
schedule like the 11th-
ranked Tar Heels face.
"I'm not concerned
about a losing streak
said Smith, whose
hasn't lost three in a
row since 1970. "That
all goes back to
scheduling. A lot of
very good teams would
have lost three of the
last four games we've
played
The once top-ranked
far Heels have lost to
North Carolina
State(70-63), Maryland
and 7th-
Y illanova
their last
(106-94),
ranked
(56-53) in
three games.
It doesn't get any
easier Thursday night
when they take on a
17-6 Wake Forest team
the Tar Heels barely
edged 80-78 in the first
meeting this season. In
the last game. Matt
Doherty his a pair of
free throws with three
seconds left to give
North Carolina a come-
from-behind victory.
"We've got to work
on our execution
Smith said. "We've
played a lot of great
teams this year and
Wake is one of them.
We've got to be
ready
The Deacons are still
in the running for the
ACC regular season
championship with a
7-3 record, while North
Carolina is 21-6 overall
and 8-2 in the ACC.
Wake Forest also has
its sights set on an
NCAA bid, and a vie
lory over the Tar Heels
would impress the
NCAA's selection com-
mittee.
"Wake is certainly in
a contending position
for the regular-season
championship Smith
said. "We were for-
tunate to win over there
so we know we'll have
our hands full here
The Deacons have
won two straight, and
will also have history
on their side. They've
won in the last two trips
NOW OPEN
ana i
118 E FIFTH ST
I 3�'EE Pi.N-ui - �
-s: � BOOH B
SERVING HOME - STYLE
FOOD AT REASONABLE
PRICES
LUNCH a DINNER SPECIALS
QAILY FOR 2 88 TAX
IIam-9 pm DAILY
411r ntrees are tfome Made
thur. Hamburger Steak or Breaded eai i ulletl
fr, Haked Himnder or Hoi Hoau fork Sand�uh
Sal hiiien Patr or 1eal I oaf
Sun 13.37 Stuffedornnh Hen or (�lazed Ham
SfonHeef Slrofanoff or fried i fttcken
WMATA
FREE COKES TOO
Now Available � Diet Coke
!A or
!A or
r
i

I!
200WEST
200W.10thSt
Inur. Ladies Lock In
with the Condo Kid
Doors open 8:30
Adm. 50C
Guys admitted at 10:00
-ElL-AXA-i-EEE Happy Hourij
Doors open 4:00-7:00
50CAdm.
Happy Hour Prices AH Afternoon
Fri. nite Sorority Night
Doors Re-Open at 9:00
Adm.50C
Happy Hour Prices All Afternoon
vr
I BREAKFAST BAR OFFERINGS
. 200 W. 10th St. �
Sun.
John Moore's Beach Party
4:00-7:00pm
ECU�Greenville's Best 200 West
� Freshly Scrambled Eggs � Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits � Bacon
� Country Milk Gravy � Home Fried Potatoes � Southern Style Grits �
Homemade Muffins � Link and Patty Sausage � A Choice of
Shoneys" Own Special Fruit Toppings � Grated American Cheese �
PLUS The Fruit Bar featuring a variety of fresh fruit and tomatoes
SHONEYS
MONDAY-FRIDAY
6 00 A M 11 00 AM
SATURDAY-SUNDAY
A HOLIDAYS
600 AM 200 PM
to Chapel Hill. Last
season. North Carolina
vas undefeated and
ranked No. 1 when the
fell to the Deacons.
Injured power for-
ward AJvis Rogers is
questionable for Thurs-
day night's game, but
freshman kenn Green
has picked up the slack
in the front court.
Against Duke Saturda
Green scored 18 points.
In an 87-82 win oer
Clemson in the
previous game, he had
26 points and 10 re-
bounds. He was named
the ACC rookie of the
week for those perfor-
Deacoi) center.
thon reache) I
been nursing a rial
ing injur in re.
weeks. He
h spot dut in prac
but in games since
Feb. 9 injur he I
managed to
10 poini
average �vei 12
hounds
STUDENT OPPORTl NTTIES
Wr arr looking for girls interested in being
counselors - activil instructors in a private girts
camp located in Henersonville. St . Instuclors
needed epciall in Swimming)Wsi. Horseback
riding. lennis. Backpacking. Archer.anoeing.
(.vmnaslics. (rafts. Also Basketball. Dancing, soc-
cer.heerleading. Drama. Art. Office work,amp
craft, Nature stud. If our school offers a Summer
Internship program �e will be glad to help Inquiries
Morgan Hasnes P.O. Box 400c. Irson. V
18782.
758-9538 SKY DIVE 758-2428
DISCOVER THE I I TIMATl
FIRST JUMP $50 group o) 5 US each
ECU SPORT PARACHUTE CLUB
tc offer
"i SPA Rated Instructor and Jumpmasltr
tSkydi ing h ery 14 eekend and on H ednesdat
� Rental Equipment to Qualified Sky dners
fst Jump Instruction �
'(Omplete Instructions to (Juality tor
lass A Parachutist I icense.
Bill's Fast Food, Inc.
Comtf 4tti A Grerv�
7S7-1SM
Opn Mon -Sl 7 AM to 3 PM
Closed Sunday
Mosey On
In And
Try Our
Biscuits
2pcF. Chicken" f "Hot" Dogs
Dinner
with stew, trench fries.
& biscuits
" With choice of mid cnW or
my famous hot chili
$199
SI 00
Good thru March 5.1983Good thru March 5.1983
All You Can Eat
Specials
Shrimp all you can eat
Special for only $5.99
Thurs.Night Only
105 Airport Roao Greenville, N
��
:
C �
SPRING BREAK AT
iDAYTONA BEACH
7 Nights-
Beach Front
Free Parties w cold beverages
and live band
10.00
For details call
756-7076





�M
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 24, 1983
Recent Contests
Making ACC A
3-Horse Race
(UPl) The Atlantic
Coast Conference
regular-season basket-
ball race has suddenly
taken on new meaning.
By losing three
straight, two of them
conference games, 11th
ranked North Carolina
has set up a three-horse
race for the regular
season title down the
stretch. Two weeks
ago, the Tar Heels
looked like they had
wrapped up the cham-
pionship after
defeating Virginia for
the second time this
season.
Now the Tar Heels,
after losing 70-63
Saturday to North
Carolina State, are tied
with the No. 3-ranked
Cavaliers at 8-2 in
league play, followed
closelv bv Wake Forest
at 7-3.
On Wednesday, the
scramble continues
with the Cavaliers
travelling to Clemson,
where the Tigers are
1-10 in league play and
looking to erase some
of the frustration of
what is shaping up to
be the worst season
ever for a Bill Foster-
coached team.
In other games, N.C.
State travels to Duke,
and Maryland will be
trying to keep alive
hopes of a post-season
bid at Georgia Tech.
The Tar Heels see ac-
tion again Thursday
night Thursday night
when they host Wake
Forest.
Virginia defeated
12th-ranked Missouri
68-53 Sunday, while
Clemson lost 92-88
over the weekend to
Maryland to set the
stage for Wednesday's
game.
"We're always the
bridesmaids and never
the bride said Foster,
whose team hasn't
beaten Virginia in the
last five times and not
since 7-4 Cavalier
center Ralph Sampson
was a freshman. The
Tigers took a 105-87
beating at Virginia
earlier this year, and
the only bright note
was that they poured in
an ACC record 12
straight three-point
plays.
The win over North
Carolin was Valvano's
first in nearly three
seasons as Wolfpack
Head Coach. But the
cheering has stopped,
and the team is looking
at a 15-8 record it hopes
to parlay into a post-
season bid.
"It's back to the
business at hand
Valvano said. "We
have all conference
games left and it's very
important for us both
in the conference and
the post-season
(tournament) situa-
tions
Duke, now 10-13,
fell to Wake Forest
110-104 over the
weekend and to
Maryland 101-90 Mon-
day night, but Valvano
is concerned about get-
ting caught flat-footed.
"Duke has been
resilient. They've been
able to bounce back all
year he said.
The Wolfpack also
announced this week
that shooting ace
Dereck Whittenburg
has returned to practice
on a limited schdule.
He won't p 1 a y
Wednesday, but is ex-
pected to be back in the
lineup for the
Wolfpack's final two
games and the tourna-
ment.
Maryland has a hot
hand headed to
Georgia Tech after
defeating North
Carolina, Clemson and
Duke.
"Maryland may be
playing the best basket-
ball in the conference
right now said
Valvano.
Georgia Tech comes
into the game off an
83-
T)
win over Ap-
palachian State
day night.
Mon-
Classifieds
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Roanofce. Va ,
or surrounding are for Spring
Break Will share expenses. Call
Julia, after S:J0 p.m. at 752 1132.
Julie is an equal opportunity rider.
MISC.
WE BUY USED MUSICAL IN
STRUMENTS. CALL 7ie-07.
SPRING BREAK PARTY: In
eludes 7 nights and I days on "The
Strip" in sunny Ft. Lauderdale,
Fla Various activities within
walking distance including a free
keg daily at the Burton Occupan
cy available at three hotels with
range in prices from $125 00. For
further info contact Beth or Lisa
at 7S4-�S73 or 757-M2.
ECU STUDENTS. FACULTY
STAFF: Welcome to our Flea
Market at the Pitt County
Fairgrounds located on N. Green
ville Blvd Open every Saturday
and Sunday I till 5. Crafts, tools,
lurniture. books, etc Displays of
old postcards, burtons, antique
pistols and collectors' items. Real
bargains
BREAK THE MIOSEMESTER
blues Head to sunny Florida for
break Join the BIGGEST PARTY
of the year in Daytona Beach. 7
nights accommodations at King's
Inn-Beach Front Free outdoor
parties with live I ands and
unlimited brew Pric� is only
110 00 for everything. We can ar
range transportation!) Join the
fun in the sun I Oil 7M-7074.
SURFING. SUNNING. SWIMM
ING and serious partying All at
a price you can afford! Join up for
the party of the year in tunny
Daytona Beach. Call 7SO-7074 for
details.
PORTRAITS. MODEL 0T
FOLIOS, group and club pictures
� all very reasonably priced. Ask
for Jim, 7S7-121I.
FOR SALE
COTTAGE FOR RENT al N. Myr-
tle Beach Spring Break U2S;
Easter JJOO Summer ssoe par
month Sleeps six. call 77� �ae
(Raleigh)
BOB SEGER TICKETS: Fri
March ! I in Greensboro Best of-
fer. 7S� '44
CHEAP PAD 1 or J persons SUS.
all utilities, near ECU 7SM415
days.
VIVITAR JS COLOR
ENLARGER for tale: Ask for
Jim. 7S7-3JU.
PERSONAL
MIDGETS. FAT PEOPLE AND
HEATHENS ARE TAKING
OVER THE WORLD
AHHHHHHHHHHHhhhhhhtth
WHY ARE YOU READING
THIS? BECAUSE EVERYONE
ELSE DOES. You saa, it pays to
advertise m THE EAST carol I
NIAN
ROOMMATE
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: Kings
Row Apartments. : bedroom.
split utilities and rent. Contact
J an. 7S2-02Bo.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE, experience, quality work.
IBM Selectric typewriter Call
Lanie Shive 7 so SJ01 or GAIL
. � �
TYPING: Term papers, thesis,
ate. Call K ample Dunn. 7S2-47U
EXCELLENT TYPIST
Reasonable rates. All papers. Call
77 1171 after 4 p.m.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE: Complete audio repair call
after 4 p.m. Mark 752 124
HABLA ESPANOL7 If not, tutor
iitg available in Spanish literature,
grammar and conversation. No
etpere hatta el ultima minutoi
Call 7S7-MM before 7 00 p.m.
FOR PROFESSIONAL FLIGHT
INSTRUCTION, call JOE,
7Jef42.
CAPEHART STEREO for tale:
SOB; bat four speakers. AMFM
radio. J speed BSR turntable and
�-track tape Back � rrnor repairs
needed. Call (�lt) 7Se-t4 bet-
ween to and ll p.m. and 8-t a.m.
Ask tor VINCE, M Umstoad.
LOST AND
FOUND
FOUND GOLD CHARM OKP
engraved on one side i2 75 01 TAJ
Engraved on appetite side In
quk-o lei Cashier's OfWco.
FOUND: TONDA THERINO'S ID
CARD Call 752 5203
LOST: 2 YEAR-OLD small Mack
female dog. White markings an
chin and paws. no tail. Answers to
CLO. Please call 7$0 220 after
4:00 p.m. if seen or found
Win up to
With a Food Lion
Bumper Sticker
$AA00inFREE9r0Cefies!
VWW Hundreds of �inners
These prices good thru
h
Saturday, February 26. 1983
$178
m Lb.
USDA Cbelee Bi.f CM BeMUtt
Chuck
Roast
Onto A Fretb 10 14 lb. toft.
Turkeys u 58
Details at Food Lion
USDA Choice Beef Chuck - Bone-In
Lb.
10-12 lb. Ati � USDA eb.iet- tftol.
99
SttfJItti
Rib
Eye
6?it. A Fretb ft-4 lb. A� �
Turkey Breests u M28
Thompson
Grapes
4 4 lb. Ate.
Fresh Picnics . 88
nitr
Coca
Cola
$119 $99
�Vaf6 l2 0rCae.vlia.bt
Old
Milwaukee
$499
3 liter - BirgeeeY Cbablit, Rbiae. Rate
7S0 Ml. � laaibratee, Rotate. Biaaee
w-w
c
22 Ounce
miri
Why Pay M 09
389
1 lb. - Morforiee
VJfrtK'
99
32 Oeaee
y y
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119 Sbeeti 2 Ply
So-Dri
Towels
Mb Pey 59
w
15 Or St
Ken-L Ration
Kent
'�Uon'7?i
99
299
Feet Tana Relit
Brown & Serve
89
4 Paeh - Aeeertea' VaMerf
Toilet Tissue
J49
4ft Ouee
Cold Power
12 Oi. - lire
Jeno's Pizza
2 Caa � Cherry Pie Fllliai
Thank You
489
4.S Or � IhrerKlaeef Heerty Ste. Co. F��
Pjirtna 100
41
4 Oi. Uabeaa
Instant Potatoes
H�lf G�llo� 50' Off
Liquid
Wh� Pe� '3 n

A






Title
The East Carolinian, February 24, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 24, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.253
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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