The East Carolinian, February 22, 1983






�lje iEaat (ftawltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.43
Tuesday, February 22, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Draft Listing Linked To Aid Forms
Photo By CINDY WALL
Financial Aid Director Robert Boudreaux
Radiation Therapy Center
By DARRYL BROWN
AstteUal Nm Milor
Proposed rules requiring all students to verify
registration for the selective service in order to receive
federal financial aid should take effect next month, put-
ting additional responsibilities on both students and
school administrators.
According to the Federal Register of Jan. 27,
Secretary of Education Terrel H. Bell and Director of
the Selective Service Thomas K. Turnage proposed the
rules making students responsible for providing written
proof of draft registration and forcing universities to
make students verify registration before awarding aid.
The action comes after debate on how to enforce a
federal law insisting that any student required to register
for the draft do so before receiving any Title IV federal
aid funds. The rule was signed into law by President
Reagan in September as part of the Defense Department
Authorization Act.
Under the new rules, all students will be required to
complete a "Statement of Registration Compliance as a
criterion for receipt of aid according to a letter from
the Department of Education. The registration rule
takes effect in the 1983-84 school year.
Even students not required to register must complete
the form, including females, students under 18, active
members in the armed services or those born before
1960. "Each student certifies the reason why he or she is
not required to be registered or that he is registered
the letter said.
The new compliance form will be added to the stan-
dard statement of educational purpose, in which all
students requesting aid certify that they will use the
funds for expenses at a specific school.
Students will have to show a registration
acknowledgement letter to prove their compliance with
federal requirements. The letter should be received by
the student after he has registered, but if he no longer
has it, he must request another copy from Selective Ser-
vice System in Chicago. Forms to request a copy of the
letter are available at the ECU Financial Aid Office,
said Robert Boudreaux, director of the office.
Boudreaux said that no aid checks would be awarded
until the written verification of registration is given to
his office. He added, however, that the office could
bably avoid delays caused by the new rule by proce
all forms and making awards of financial aid even it the
letter of acknowledgement isn't given to the office
When the letter is received, the check can be given lo
the student. No checks can be given to students who are
required to register if they do not provide
acknowledgement letter as proof of compliance, even il
they otherwise would receive an award.
Boudreaux said that one problem with 'he new
regulation would be with students who could not turn in
the written proof on time to receive aid The federal
government will allow a two or three month deferrmen;
of registration proof in special circumstance-
students can enter school even if they do not have their
acknowledgement letter yet.
However, Boudreaux said, his office staff pror
isn'f large enough to follow up students and get ven: ca
tion later, so the reprieve probably won't be available to
ECU students.
See BILL. Page 3
Medical School Facility Started
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff Wrllrr
Official ground-breaking
ceremonies were held Saturday as
construction started on the School
of Medicine's new Radiation
Therapv Center.
The $5.2 million project, which
was part of the original plan for
ECU's Science Medical Center, will
bring up-to-date cancer treatment
capabilities to eastern North
Carolina. The original funds for the
therapy center had been cut because
of money problems.
"We're just delighted said Dr.
William E. Laupus. dean of ECU's
medical school. "The architects
have come up with a very beautiful
and functional building The
building is ideal for providing both
m-patieni and out-patient caie.
Laupus joined Chancellor John
M. Howell, ECU Board of Trustees
Chairman C. Ralph Kinsey Jr Pitt
County Memorial Hospital Board
Chairman G. Henry Leslie, Pitt
Countv Commission Chairman
Charles P. Gaskins. UNC Board of
Governors member David J.
Whichard II and hospital president
Jack W. Richardson as speakers
during the ceremony.
"We have been developing a full
range of theraputic programs for
cancer treatment Laupus told The
East Carolinian. These include both
diagnostic studies and surgical and
chemotherapy treatments, he said.
I aupus said the addition of the
new therapy center would mean
citizens of eastern North Carolina
could now obtain "the full range of
cancer care close to home with the
latest, most modern up-to-date
equipment
Radiation therapy is an establish-
ed treatment against many forms of
cancer.
Laupus said that because of infla-
tion, more money was needed than
onginaly budgeted for the medical
complex. The funds for the radia-
tion therapy building were reap-
propnated by the N.C. General
Assembly last July.
Nearly half of the budget for the
24,000-square-foot building will be
spent for two linear accelerators
along with a computer, a radiation
therapy simulator and other equip-
ment.
"The 20-million-electron-volt
(accelerator) will enable us to func-
tion on the cutting edge of accom-
modate a larger accelerator unit.
Laupus said ECU's medical pro-
gram would be on-going and keep
up with the latest advances in
medical technology. An expansion
of the facility's services is planned
by Laupus and the medical school in
the future until it fully meets the
needs of the citizens of North
Carolina.
Laupus said a search for a direc-
tor of the new piogiaui will be con-
ducted during the next year.
Comprable therapy centers are
now located at Duke University, the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill and the Medical College
of Virginia.
Man 9s Best Friend
� T 0�I WILLIAMS
This ECU student may suffer the same fate as T.S. Carp did in his k.�ki�iktkM ��J1"
canine. Garp took revenge however - literally a tooth for a tooth. See if this student follows suit.
y i v m iu i v�a vj mx. - . - � � t
SGA Legislature Awards School Of Music Grant
. . -jj -t-u- iti unHrcnn't annrhpruion about Soeaker of the Hous
SGA Speaker Gary Williams
The SGA Legislature voted 28-10
with one abstention to override
president Eric Henderson's veto of a
bill to give $350 to the School of
Art. The two-thirds required vote
came after an explanation of the
veto by Henderson in which he said
the administration of the art school
was taking advantage of the
legislature.
Henderson said the money, which
will now be used to make the last
payment on an already-constructed
showcase in the Joyner Fine Arts
building, was demanded by the art
faculty after budget cuts had taken
the money originally planned to
fund the project. He said they
should have planned for the cuts
and not come to the SGA when their
money ran out.
The legislators in favor of the
vetoed bill stated the bill was for the
art students to display their pro-
jects, and was therefore a wor-
thwhile cause. The margin of vic-
tory was two votes.
Another veto by Henderson failed
to be overridden. The Financial
Management Act, passed by the
legislature three weeks ago, was sent
back to committee after a dispute
over how much money was to be left
in reserve after the SGA's annual
appropriations.
The management act vetoed by
Henderson required that 25 percent
of SGA money not be given out dur-
ing the budgeting process. It called
for the funds to be saved for the
next year's legislature to use as it
sees fit.
Henderson's apprehension about
the bill centered around the 25 per-
cent to be held back. He said that
such a large reserve would hamper
the SGA's budget process.
Speaker of the House Gary
Williams supported Henderson,
saving the whole purpose of having
a budget was to appropriate funds
in advance.
Those opposed to the veto, saying
this year's legislature had no right to
use next year's funds, were defeated
by a voice vote.
Speaker of the House W ilhams
also announced that the 'S3-84 elec-
tions of executive officers will be
held March 30. He said anvone
wishing to file to run for prev.dent.
vice president, secretarv and
treasurer can do so between Feb 28
and March 18. Deadline for elec-
tions chairman is March 4. W illiams
said the candidate's meeting will be
held March 21.
Williams said groups requesting
SGA funds for the next year hould
submit a budget by March 21.
Legislature To Vote On Weapons Freeze
- � , i .f�ntp ' ap further memoria
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Write
A proposal for a joint resolution
urging the U.S. government to seek
a bilateral, verifiable freeze and
reduction in nuclear weapons was
introduced into the N.C. General
Assembly Wednesday.
If passed, North Carolina would
become the 18th state to pass a
nuclear freeze resolution in at least
one chamber of the state legislature.
Freeze referendums passed in nine
of 10 state in last November's elec-
tions.
World News In Brief
By United Press International
TOKYO � A fire swept
through two hotel complexes in
the northern Japanese ski resort
of Zao Monday, killing at least
10 people and forcing guests to
leap from windows in a blizzard,
officials said. One person was be-
ing questioned in connection with
the fire.
KHARTOUM, Sudan �
Sudanese officials still insist
Libya's Moammar Khadafy is
preparing to invade their nation
but U.S. and Egyptian leaders
say the threat has waned. Sudan
accused Libya of trying to
destabilize its government by
planting agents in the
autonomous southern region.
SEATTLE � City leaders ap-
pealed to Chinatown leaders for
help in capturing a third suspect
in the gambling-club massacre of
13 Chinese-Americans. Benjamin
Ng, 20, and Kwan "Willie" Mak,
22, jailed on 13 counts of
homicide, were to appear in court
today for a bail hearing
TEL AVIV, Israel � Former
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon
regained some of his old power
by his reappointment to two key
Cabinet committees. Some op-
ponents called the reappoint-
ments "a mockery of
democracy Israeli Radio said
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
was the prime force behind the
Cabinet decisions.
NEW DELHI, India � Prime
Minister Indira Gandhi flew to
the state of Assam today to in-
spect smoldering villages where
tribesmen slaughtered at least 800
immigrants from Bangladesh.
Officials, who said nearly 80 per-
cent of dead were women and
children, feared the death toll
could soar to nearly 1,500.
WASHINGTON � President
Reagan's top aides hope to reach
agreement with House
Democratic leaders this week on
how to create several hundred
thousand temporary jobs for
America's more than 11 million
unemployed.
The N.C. freeze resolution was
introduced Wednesday by Rep. H.
Parks Helms, D-Mecklenburg, and
Sen. W. Gerry Hancock,
D-Durham. Thirty-three of the
state's 50 senators and 54 of 120
state representatives co-sponsored
the resolution.
"Last week, I joined other
legislators at the Governor's man-
sion, where we discussed North
Carolina in the year 2000 Helms
said in a news release. "During that
discussion, I couldn't help thinking
of the fragility of our assumption
that North Carolina, as we know it
today, will still be here in the year
2000
"In our hearts, we all fear that
one day these terrible machines of
destrution will be put to use, as all
of mankind's (machines) eventually
are, resulting in a final, universal
holocaust; sparing no one and no
nation Sen. Hancock said.
The 200 word-resolution says that
in 1949 the N.C. General Assembly
adopted a resolution expressing
North Carolina's desire for world
peace. Because of the nuclear arms
race, which has continued for the
past 37 years, that desire is still un-
fulfilled, the bill said.
"Whereas, the General Assembly
of North Carolina in adopting
Resolution 37, Session Laws of 1949
recognized that 'war is now a threat
to the very existence of our civiliza-
tion, because modern science has
produced weapons of war which are
overwhelmingly destructive and
against which there is no sure
defense we further memorialize
the president and the Congress of
the United States, proceeding from
the adoption of a nuclear weapons
freeze by the United States and the
Soviet Union the resolution
states.
If passed, the resolution would be
sent by N.C. Secretary of State
Thad Eurc to President Reagan,
members of the N.C. Congressional
delegation and Gov. James B.
Hunt, Jr.
"The state is being asked to pass a
resolution addressed to the United
States government said ECU
English instructor Edith Webber.
"The ultimate aim is to cut down
nuclear stockpiles, but the first
thing you have to do is quit building
up in order to reduce, you've got
to stop production Webber is one
of the 1st Congressional District
coordinators lobbying in support of
nuclear freeze proposals both local-
ly and nationally.
Webber called "ridiculous"
statements made by President
Reagan and some of his advisors
charging that the Soviet Union and
the KGB were behind the nucleai
freeze movement.
Several city and town councils ir
North Carolina have passed freeze
resolutions. A poll conducted
last October by the UNC School of
Journalism indicated 52 percent of
North Carolinians favor a bilateral
freeze, while only 16.5 percent op-
pose it.
nan Bv DAVE WILDAMS
Whatever Goes Up.
An adventurous biker looks like he's in for a big let down. This amazing
young man on his flying machine is going to have to reckon w.th grav.ty
momentarily - hopefully not on the pavement of Reade Circle.






THE EAST CAROL 1N1AN
FEBRUARY 22, 1983
Announcements
SGA ELECTIONS
AoDtications tor spring l�S3
elections chairperson being ac
cepted m SGA office 212
Mendenhall through March 4.
I9S3
EXECUTIVE OFFICES
Send applications tor SGA E
ecutive offices being accepted in
nt Mendenhall through March
lgtti )��3
BUSINESS ADMISSIONS
For those students who do not
mNt School of Business admission
criteria during the February 21
March 1�S3 Change of Maior
there will be a one day change of
maior period on July I "S3 for
those students who then meet the
School of Business admission
criteria Those students who will
be on campvs on July 1 may re
quest admission to the schoo. of
business by following the standard
procedure
Those students who will not be
on campus on July ! 1983 but
thmk they will meet the School of
Busness admissions re
quirements at the end of the cur
rent semester may apply to
change their maior by following
th.s procedure
1 Prior to leav ng campus this
semester, pick up your tile from
your advisor
2 Take your file to the oepart
men'ai secretary m Accounting
Decision Science Finance
Va-dgement or Marketing as ap
propriate
3 Jvhtie in the departmental of
free fill out the form to request a
change of maior evaluation
� ,ou meet School of Business
requirements you will be admit
'ec on July 1 lv83 and an advisor
�rill be assigned If you do not
mee the requ'remenfs your file
win be returned to the General
College
When you return to school in
August check the appropriate
departmental bulletin board for
your advisor assignment
INTER�VARSITY
Praise. Prayer, and Fellowship
these art iust some of the mgre
dients we combine every Wednes
day at 6 30 m the Biology Biog
102 Please come io.n us!
BIBLE DISCUSSIONS
e s get back to the B-he In
for-nai group Bible discussions
Mens no Belk dorm Tuesday at
730 pm A omens 712
MenJenhali Thursda a' 1 30 p m
Everyone s welcome1
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
"rnere sna oe a spec a I meeting
or Saturoay, February 26, at the
ir.rernatonai House on E vth
S,ree- One ot "he maior topes to
be discussed srai! be the consMu
SAemoers art urged to a
tend
ZBT HAPPY HOUR
csaai February 22 from
5 30 10 0C p m a' oantana Bob s
A d'awing drill be heio at 1 30
Tenets can be purchased at 'he
door or from a brother tor a 50 c ent
aonation Stop by tor a Drew'
INTENDED SLAP
MAJORS
AM sfuuenTs
who inteno fo
Language & Ai
a ' e 'eg sfe
c.j term m S
:s a' ' oo p ��� .1
1 general College
d'Or in Speech
td-tory Patho'ogy
for bummer &
onaa� February
' Brewster D 103
CO�OP
Summer positions are available
at North Carolina state parks For
example, a park attendent will be
hired in Gatesville Duties consist
of general maintenance of the
park (mow grass, keep area clean,
etc) Also a naturalist will be
hired The naturalist must have
compoefed at least three years of
college and maiored m a natural
science jobs are also available at
other state parks such as Cliffs of
the Neuse Hammocks Beach,
Fort Macon and others Life
guards, naturalists, clerk typists
ana general laborers will be hired
Come by Rawl 313
NEED A NEW MAJOR
interested m a health career but
don t know which one' Want a ma
ior with good employment oppor
tun.ties Learn more about the
various health professional pro
grams ottered at ECU by signing
up tor HPRO 2000 Survey of
Allied Health Professions A dif
terent health career will be
featured each week and this
course will give you an opportuni
iy to learn something about each
profession as well as meet some of
the faculty from each department
CONGRATULATIONS
The Brothers ot Pi Kappa Phi
would like to say congratulations
to our new little sisters who were
iust initiated We hope that being a
little sister has been worth wa.tmg
for Also the Brothers would like to
announce the results of the recent
pledge class elections Those
elected were Jeff Luedeke as
president Thomas Hopper as Vice
President in charge of fund rais
ing. and John Ramey as secretary
Good luck, and keep up the good
work
SLCMEMBERS
Yes, it is time tor another club
meeting. Sun Feb 27 at 6 30 pm
This will be a covered dish dinner
with a very important business
meeting afterward We will
discuss our spring activities
Everyone is invited to after J You
do not need to know Sign language
The meeting is held in the
Multipurpose room at
Mendenhall
HORSEBACK RIDING
The outdoor recreation center is
soonsor.ng horseback r-dmg tr.ps
�o Jarman s Staples Reservations
and payment tor the Thursday
afternoon trips are due by 3 00
p m each Thursday Rates are
$5 00 per hour Transportation is
provided with the shuttle leav.ng
Memorial Gym at 3 30 p m sharp
For more information or reserva
tions call or stop by the
intramural recreational services
aufdoor recreation center .1131
Memorial Gym Phone '57 6911
BASKETRY
There s still room in the
Basketry Course being ottered by
the Department ot university
unions Anyone interested should
sign up n the Crafts Center on the
ao'tom tioor of Mendenhai. Stu
dent Center Class s scheduled to
Deg,n Wednesaay. March . 1983
Alt ECU students faculty, staff
and their dependents who are 18
years or older may ion the Crafts
Center The Baskery Workshop is
included in the membership tee of
HO 00 per semester The class will
be held from 6 9pm on
Wecnesdavs and the instructor is
Ma y Ann Hufto
For further information call Lin
da Barkand MSC Crafts and
Recreatoin Director at '57 6611
ext 260 or the Crafts Center at ext
271
SLC
Each week, the Sign Language
Dept offers a silent dinner so the
sign language students and the
deaf community can socialite and
practice sign language skills This
week the silent dinner is Thurs
Feb 24 at Plain Jane's Dinner
will be at 6 X pm
LEGS
Guys, tiave nice legs? Girls,
know a guy who does? Then bring
them down to the Elbo tonight for
Phi Sigma Pi's 1st annual Best
Male Legs Contest! Cash awards,
door prizes, and lots of fun for all
Come on down to night. Feb 22
and help Phi Sigma Pi raise
money for the American Cancer
Society
PHIALPHATHETA
The Phi Alpha Theta initiation
Dinner will be held Thursday,
Feb 24 at 5 15 pm The Western
Stiilin' on Tenth St is the location
Tickets are available in the
History Office (B A 314)
Members J2 00 Faculty $3 00
All members are urged to attend
Guests and spouses are welcome
ATTENTION
Nominations will be made for
Vice President and Secretary at
the meeting on February 24 at
4 15 The meeting will be held in
Room 221 m Mendenhall Student
Center All members please at
tend1 For more information call
757 6793
FREE
The Central Campus Area
Residence Council will be hosting
a Talent Show on February 24,1
983 it will be held in Wright
Auditorium at 7 00 p m The ad
mission is FREE and the public is
invited Come out and see all your
fr,ends perform
PPHA
The Preprofessional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday. February
24, 1983 at the Afro American
Cultural Center All old and new
members should make plans to at
tend this meeting Any other in
terested parties art urged to come
and see how (PPHA) can help you
The meeting will start at 5 30 p m
NCSL
Did you ever want the chance to
tell your legislators how you feel
what new laws should be made
what topics concern you. and so
on? Lei NCSL help you out! NCSL
the North Carolina Student
Legislature discusses the issues
of today that can affect tomorrow
tor us an'Our forum' meets at 7
p m Monday nights m room 212.
Mendenhall come on by and we'll
help you enforce your public r.ght
to know iust what s what m
government'
BENEFIT BALL
A benefit ball wli be held a' the
American Leg.on Hall iBYOB Set
UPS sold on Saturday night
Februar, 26lrom9 1 T.cketsS2 0C
in advance .at Apple Records!
and 2 50 at the door Proceeds go
to Oxtam America ana Pitt Co
Emergency aid For more infor
mation call 752 4216
MASH
Delta Sigma Ph. M'A'S'H Rush
Party and Little Sister Rush
Party-Monday Feb 28 at � 00 un
till! The Delta S'f House s located
at 518 East igi street on the cor
ntr of 10th ana Laurence Come
dressed as favorite character' For
more information and riaes can
752 9608 Get SM'A'S'H on
Hairybuttaio1'
TAXES
Volunteers from the ECU Ac
counting Society and the National
Association of Accountants will be
m the mam lobby of Mendenhall
Student Center to help individuals
prepare tax returns from 4 to 7 pm
each Tuesday and Thursday in
February, each Tuesday in
March, and Tuesdays and
Thursdays in April through April
15
HONORS PROGRAM
Undergraduates who have earn
ed a 3 5 qpa at East Carolina are
qualified to take courses in the
Honors Program These courses
include Honors sections of regular
freshman aqnd sophomore
courses and special Honors
seminars on specific topics
Students may take Honors for
General Education credits or as
free electives in the areas of
ANTH, ENGL, HLTH, HIST,
LIBS. SOCI, and MedRen
Studies See the Coordinator. Dr
David Sanders. Austin 218. for fur
ther information
PAGEANT
Miss N C Southern Beauty
Pageant! The search is on tor con
testants. Ages 1 24 years old
Each age division is limited and
the deadline date April 1, 1983 The
pageant is scheduled to be held
April 29 30, 1983 in High Point,
NC All young ladies are invited to
participate Age divisions are 1 3.
46. 7-9. 1012, 13 16. 17 24 State
winner m each age Division will
receive a cash scholarship, crown,
trophy, banner and flowers, also
other awards will be presented
For information send a stamped
self addressed Long envelope to
Miss N C Southern Beaury
pageant P O Box 5432.
Greensboro. N C 27435 0432 The
phone is 919 294 0295
1-
I
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or j
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33 j
units per line. Each letter, punc- j
tuation mark and word space j
counts as one unit. Capitalize and j
hyphenate words properly. Leave j
space at end of line if word j
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac- j
cepted over the phone. We j
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75c per line or friction of a line, j
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return to THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office b 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday publications
L
Name
Address.
CityState.
No. lines
.zn.
Phone.
at 7jc per line S.
.No. insertions.
.enclosed
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- 1 1 I I I II 1 11 II 1 II I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I
NEW COURSE
Looking for as unique and ex
citing way to satisy your General
College humanities requirements?
Preregister for ASMR 2000, a new
interdisciplinary course in
Medieval and Renaissance
Studies, schewduled for tall 1�S3.
Mondays 6 30 9 30 pm The
course will survey the bsic con
cepts of medieval and
Renaissance art history,
literature music, philosophy For
more information call or visit Dr
McMillan. English, 757 6516, or
Dr Nischan History 757 6956
BAKE SALE
The Alpha Xi Delta's will be
having a bake sale m front of the
student store Thursday February
24. 1983 from 8am until 3pm
TKE BOXING
TKE Boxer Registration is go
,ng on now at Memorial Gym from
5 30 to 7 00 pm Monday through
Thursday until February 24th AH
amateur boxers welcome 8th An
nual Tournament takes place on
March 15 16. 17 at Mmges Col
�seum This boxmg event ts sane
t,oned by the Amer.can Boxing
Federation
AMBASSADORS
There will be a general meting
of the ECU Ambassadors on Wed .
Fee 23 The meeting will begm at
5 00 in the MSC multi purpose
room We have lots of Sign up
sheets to till Please make plans to
attend th.s meeting
YARD SALE
Alpha Xi Delia sorority will
have a yard sale Saturday Feb 26
starting at 8 00 a m Clothes, odds
and ends. anythmc and
everything! 508 E 11th Street
Watch tor the signs!
PIRATE WALK
The Pirate Walk is an escort ser
vice which provides the women of
ECU a walking companion after
dark to campus locations and the
immediate vicinity if you have a
night class, place your call ahead
of time and arrangements will be
made to escort you home The
Pirate Walk operates Sundays
through Thursdays from 6 00 to
12 00 Call 757 6616 to arrange for
an escort
PREMEDICAL
SYMPOSIUM
The North Carolina Premedical
Symposium will be held at the
Brody Building at the East
Carolina School of Medicine on
Saturday Februuary 26. 19i3 from
9 00 to 4 00 p m Dr William
Laupas Dean of the East Carolina
School of Medicine will speak on
"Medicine in the Year 2000" and
Mrs Susan Darrow from the
Kaplin Center will discuss How
to prepare for the MCAT There
will also be a Question Answer
Forum concerning what happens
to an application after i1 is receiv
ed by the medical school Dr Dean
Havek. from the ECU School of
Medicine nd Dr Suydam
Osterhout. from the School of
Medicine Duke University
CIRCLE K
The ECU Circle K club aril be
meeting Tuesday. Feb 22 1983 at
7 00 in room 221 Mendenhall All
interested persons are welcome to
attend
WOMEN'S AWARENESS
MONTH
The final program for West
Area's Women's Awareness
Month will be a film and discus
slon given by Dr Ken Wilson, of
the Sociology Department, concer
ning Sexual Harassment This pro
gram will be held in the Garrett
Hall Looby on Tuesday February
22 at 7 00 p m. AM ECU students
are very welcome to attend
CO�OP IN NAGS HEAD
Retail sales positions art
available at Nags Head in aod
lion positions for lite guards and
individuals that are interested m
hotelmotel management exist
For details come by the Co op of
fice. Rawi 313 (phone 757 6979)
Due to the shortage of atforddabie
housing at Nags Head, students m
terested in work there this sum
mer should begm their iob house
hunt now )
BALLROOM DANCE
Ballroom dance for faculty and
staff will begm on Thursday Feo
24 Classes will be held at 12 00
noon (T Th) in Memorial Gym
Room 108 Dances taught wli be
the Cha Cha and the Beach Bop
(Shag) No fee is charged and no
experience is necessary iust
come and bring your tnenos Con
tact Jo Saunders at 757 6000 lor
more information
PRE�MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGY MAJORS
Prereg straf on for ai pr
VEDT maitxs w��� be held or
Tuesday March I 1983 at 7 p v
Brewster D 102 Student who
r-ave Oen noM.eo of their accep
tance intc me Depar'mer" �
a'so complete change of maior
forms at 'his me if you art
u-aoie to at'end (Ml sess or
please call Mr Rabey or Ms
McGrafh at 757 69�i'c smec �
a'terr-a'e apooi
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
�N Greenville Blvd.
754-3023 �24 MRS.
PLAZA SHELL
24 hour Towing Service
I -Haul Rentals
Available
i
CARPET SALE
average roll is 12,
all colors sizes at
Alpha Phi parking lot
�Tues. the 22nd-25th
The hastarolinian
VrwngI
unct v
PuDi'Shed every Tuesaar anc
Thursday dur ng "ie acaoer
year and every Wednesddr dur
,ng 'ne summer
i nt Eas Carolinian .s 'he of
fir i a � newspaper ot Eas
Carolina Uftiversitx owned
opera'ed ano pubi'Shea tor and I
by 'he s'udents ot Eas' Carol na I
Un.versity
Subscription Rate S20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville. NC
POSTMASTER Send aooress
ctvangesc The fcast Carolinian
Ofd SOu'n Bulding ECU Green
vnle NC 27834
Telephone 757 t66 4347 6)09















INC.
Ieuinrs li ftn simteni teacher's
OFFICE SUPPLIES, SCHOOL SUPPLIES
SOCIAL STATIONERY. GIFTS, GREETING CARDS
422 Arlington Blvd. (OpposHe Pitt Plaza)
756-4224
GREENVILLE, N.C.










ZBT
Happy Hour

jf it
ATPANTANA BOB'S TUES. 1
FEB 22nd 5:00-10:00pm
I A DRA WING WILL BE HELD AT
9:30pm
I TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED
AT THE DOOR OR FROM A
�BROTHERFORA50 DONATION.
COME AND MEET THE
II ' WE W G U YS ON THE BL OCR
!
Cliffs Specials
rj J Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
I
st Annual
Central Campus
Talent Show
7:00 pm
Thursday Feb. 24,1983
At Wright Auditorium
Sponsored by:
Central Campus Area Council
Admission is Free
The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
Weds. Ladies Night-Featuring The Entertainers
from 7:30-12:00 Ladies Free till 7:00
Heavy, hot hors'duerves Doors open at 4:30
Happy Hour 4:30-S:00pm
A11 ECU Students with ID A dmitted Free till 9:00pm I
Thurs.
D.J.
Happy Hour 7:00- 10:00pm
No Admission til 8:00-Doors open at 7:00
Fri. JANICE 9:00-1:00am
Happy Hour 7:00-10:00 Heavy, hot hors'duerves
A11 ECU Students A dmitted Free till 9:00 with ID
Pi Sigma Phi
present
Male Best Body
Contest
Tues. Feb. 22, 1983 9:00-1:00
Adm.1.00
Happy Hour Specials
Prizes
Sat. JANICE 9:00-l:00am
Happy Hour 7:00-9:00
No Admission till 8:00pm
" IIMN Memorial Dr.
Closed Sundi e��pl for special events
Across froa OtwMc Airport
rtMHM TS7-M0S for a4�iUoaal laformliM
$100.00 Plus a 3 ft. sub from Subway
& 1 year's Free Pass to the Elbo
2nd $50' ��&1 year s Free Pass to the Elbo
3rd$25- ��&1 year 5 Free Pass t0 the Elbo
Come
Early
Spoitsortd by:
Klmnh's Surf A St.
�anlam Bob l
' H.f.
Mtctwam Gardliu
Submmy
PuwiJant i
TrtHoMU
F.T.A.
Jarmlho
SaulHus
ft
Gmnvilk Cmbk TV
Htmrl i Vilf hi
Jim Woods, Jr.
Appk Kttords
Ptttwoi
Coco-Colo
Board U
The N.C. Goverr - -cgard;ng the dij
aN'e Management of toxic baza
Board outlined its plan
eilnesda for Dcpartm
regulations that would Human R-
be more stringent thar I
irreni redera! rule- Morr m is one
Bill Wants Fu
Schools A id in
( "ntinued rrom Page 1
i Boudrea a urged all
red � �-
re their- N �
K �
cl
'
f they doi
. �


. ' s-
�.
the .I
�end a
Vietnam Vete
Innocent To I
DLRHAM .1
A :c'narr
- BM
ting pret
vummer in the R
rriangk Park
innocent M nda
murder and
ges.
ia�e: I t

I
Writer Stands Tn
For Public Stand
East C .
write! Patrici
is -c
in w
D.C on c
obstructing a public en-
trance at the S ii.
Department
0Ne � � � " �
while taking part in a
demonstration against

N
pai
He


WOMEN S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN jofn
DEPEND ON
on
S�PV1CE$
' �
� �
� �
THE FLEMI
CENTI

4





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 22. 1983
P.
.Phone.
.endowed
j ! '
��h
i�t�i����'�
-Ht-

TT
1
1
m
iNCE
PRE-MEDICAL
TECHNOLOGY MAJORS
- � HI pri
0 on
m �� i p v
are
s vss on
fcjp an
1PETSALF
C roll is12,
hi parking lot
ihe22nd-25th .
g
g







.RDS
ual
mpus
ow
24,19831
Utorium
by:
rea Council
is Free
208 5th St.
758-7979
kry night
The N.C. Governor's
Waste Management
Board outlined its plan
Wednesday for state
regulations that would
be more stringent than
current federal rules
regarding the disposal
of toxic hazardous
waste.
Department of
Human Resources
Secretary Sarah T.
Morrow is one of a six
Waste
member panal on waste
management who at-
tended the board's
meeting in the Willis
Building.
Morrow said the two
overriding concerns of
Bill Wants Funds Cut To
Schools Aiding Resisters
Continued From Page 1
Boudreaux urged all
students registered for
the draft to secure their
Registration
Acknowledgement Let-
ter as soon as possible.
If they don't have one,
they should write to the
selective service as soon
as possible, since it may
take more than the two
to three weeks promis-
ed b the government
to send a new copy of
the acknowledgement
letter.
On Capitol Hill,
Rep. Gerald Solomon,
R-N.Y recently pro-
posed a bill in the
House requiring that
schools who give
private funds to
nonregistrants have all
federal funds and
grants withdrawn.
Several schools
around the country
have promised to
replace federal finan-
cial aid not awarded to
nonregistrants with
private funds.
Boudreaux said ECU
was proposing no such
program because it
does not have the
private resources to
replace federal funds.
Solomon admitted
that the chances for the
bill's passage were slim,
but that it may have a
better chance for
passage as an amend-
ment to a defense bill.
the board were the type
of materials allowed in
landfills and the
number and kinds of
liners required for land-
fills and surface im-
poundments.
"Under the new
EPA regulations, some
volatile and liquid
wastes could be allowed
in landfills Morrow
said. "We must not
allow that to happen
Although North
Carolina presently does
not have any active
landfills for hazardous
waste disposal, there
are now requests before
the General Assembly
to allow them.
The board's presen-
tation expressed op-
position to the use of
landfills as a primary
waste disposal
measure, but several
citizens objected to
even considering the
use of landfills.
Claud "Buck"
O'Shields, chairman of
the board, said the
panal was in favor of
recovery, reprocessing
and recycling of hazar-
dous wastes and favors
the use of landfills only
if no alternative is
available.
"The way the EPA is
regulating toxic hazar-
dous waste is not in the
best interest of the
general public said
ECU environmental
health graduate student
Larry Martin, who
gave a presentation at
the meeting on behalf
of the Sierra Club, an
environmentalist
group.
Martin cited three
main areas of concern:
the imposition of strict
liability insurance for
companies that handle
hazardous waste; the
� j r:5nNs Coupon
ftawa"�� i5 off
Vietnam Veteran Pleads
Innocent To IBM Killing
double scoop
(cup or cone)
Tues Weds. & Thurs
� j Feb. 22,23,24 1983
LedeemoJbleolyarolina East Mali I
DURHAM (UPI) �
A Vietnam veteran ac-
cused of killing an IBM
employee during a
shooting spree last
summer in the Research
Triangle Park pleaded
innocent Monday to
murder and other
charges.
A lawyer for
Leonard Avery entered
the plea in 'Durham
Superior Court after
Judge Thomas Lee re-
jected defense efforts
to delay Avery's ar-
raignment.
Although defense at-
torney Thomas Loflin
entered an innocent
plea, he said he will
Writer Stands Trial
For Public Stance
East Carolinian staff
writer Patrick O'Neill
is set to stand trial to-
da in Washington,
D.C on charges of
obstructing a public en-
trance at the State
Department.
O'Neill was arrested
white taking part in a
demonstration against
U.S. aid
Salvador.
to
O'Neill said he took
part in civil disobe-
dience as a last resort.
He related that he had
tried all other
democratic means
available to him. He
faces a possible 90-day
prison sentence.
present an insanity-
defense when Avery
goes on trial for
murder, assault and ar-
son.
Loflin also requested
court-ordered drug
therapy to restore
Avery's memory of the
incident last Aug. 30 at
an IBM facility.
Witnesses said a man
dressed in military
fatigues entered the
plant and opened fire
with a semi-automatic
rifle, killing one worker
and wounding several
others. The man also
threw several fire
bombs before leaving.
�f-v?�5.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
'Coupon
Right Bros.
Bike Shop
207 B East Fifth St.
phone 752-6181
"Quality Repair Work At
reasonable Prices

Good For $10.00 Discount
On Any New Bicycle Or
10 Discount On
Accessories & Ports
Coupon
revocation of the Har-
dison amendment, call-
ed the handcuff amend-
ment by environmen-
talists because it limits
N.C. regulators to
legislation no more
strict than EPA stan-
dards; and annual
reports to the public on
the conditions of waste
sites and disposal pro-
cedures.
Several local
representatives from in-
dustry were present at
the public meeting.
Burroughs Wellcome
manager John McCon-
ney told the board that
his company believes
all wastes, hazardous
and otherwise should
be disposed of in a
responsible and safe
manner. "There is no
manufacturing opera-
tion that doesn't pro-
duce some waste which
is classified as hazar-
dous McConney
said.
Martin accused the
EPA of "walking hand
in hand" with industry,
saying the EPA's
hazardous waste
regulations were not
adequate.
Martin hopes the
state will authorize
matching funds needed
for the state to be eligi-
ble for federal
"superfund" grants for
the purpose of cleaning
up hazardous waste.
O'Shields said that
the board would be
submitting its recom-
mendation that
the board be allowed to
toughen up EPA stan-
dards. Martin said that
input from the public
would be crucial during
this time. "I hope we
can get these recom-
mendations through
Martin added �
JUNIORS AHD SENIORS
EARN OVER $1000.00 PER MONTH
If you are a math, physics, chemistry or engineering major �ith a
snn96,0' beUer edrn 0ver '1000-� per month through your
junior and senior yearssummers included! The Navy's VJP0C
(Nuclear Propulsion Officer) Collegiate Program is looking for
qualified individuals. Other bemfits include:
�V�m ibonus lately upon acceptance into program
� �?FTi?J!wJ?ts?1ary" $40'000 after Just four
hREE Medical Dental care and many other TAX FREF henefits
30 days PAW annual vacation
1 year graduate level training
Immediate responsibility
Valuable engineering experience
Education benefits
Job security with fast promotions
If you're interested in finding out more, send resune or
transcripts to:
NELSON SKINNER
1001 Navaho Or.
Raleigh, NC ?7609
Or call 1-800-662-7231
8an-4pm, MonFri.
r
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion a cMRcutt aec
DEPEND ON. sionthat smaaeeasef Dv
" �- ����- f ttieHermng Center Coonsetors are
; at e day and -gt to support ana under -
� ar cx� safety comtort ana pnvacv ate
jred t. roe caring s'aff of the fiemmg Center
SERVICES � 'uesaav � Saturday Atxxtior Ap-
: ntmentsB 1st& 2na'rmes'ei Aport'ons up to
Week! � ee Pregnancy Tests � very Eany
Pregnancy 'es'sUA' inc.usive eesB insurance
Accepter � CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
' THE FLEMING
2� � j as CENTER
w
studentfac
DAY
april 16.1983
Scooby Doo says,
� 'look for more details
in the
I March edition
ultyfc
C of the
ENTEBTAINE
and the
EAST CAROLIMA . V.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
tIBS 00 Pregnancy Test Birth
Control and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
� 33 0535 (Toll Free Number
�00 22) lit) between � AM
nd 5PM Weekdays
RALEIGHS WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
Ml West M-rgan St
Raieigi
123 E.5th Str.
I TUESDAY -PJzzafi, Pasta All You Can Eat 5-9
h Lodies Nite with
Kenny Shore
Free draft for the Lodies Ladies odmitted Free
WedSolod Bor Special $2.15 All You Can Eat 5-9
Thursday - Spaghetti Special $2.49 All You Can Eat 5-9
Come check out our new menu
IT 5-9 A
Watch for our daily Luncheon Specials.
c
WELL PAY YOU
TO GET INTO
SHAPE THIS SUMMER.
If you have at least
two years of college left,
you can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp this summer and earn
approximately $600.
And if you qualify, you
can enter the ROTC 2-
Year Program this fall and
receive up to1,000 a year
But the big payoff
happens on graduation day.
That's when you receive
an officer's commission.
So get your body in
shape (not to mention your
bank account).
Enroll in Army ROTC
For more information,
contact your Professor of
Military Science
ARMY ROTC
BEALLYOUCANBE.
in Room 324 Erwin Hall, 757-6967
Drop by The Coffee House in the
Basement of Mendenhall Student Center
on Feb. 24th anytime between
3:00 and 6:00pm to find out
more about ROTC Basic Camp
M
How to follow Fellini.
, Talk it over, over a cup of Orange Cappuccino. Creamv-rkh, with
an orange twist, it's a little bit of la dolce vita. And ifs just one of six deliciouslv
different flavors ��� �
from General Foods
International Coffees.
lEEEJ
ggra I try 3C3
Sir
GENERAL FOODS INTERNATIONAL COFFEES
AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR
IT





Stye last (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mil ler. ommwtmmm'
Mike Hughes, Manaimt tanor
WAVFRl V MlRR1TT. �� �� ClNDY PLEASANTS. .V��s EW
Scott Lindley. � �� Greg Rideout- " "�
Al 1 AFRASM 1 EH. c� STEVE BACHNER. t����, �
STFPHAN1E GROON. � �. l JULIANA FaHRBACH, � �.
Clay Thornton. r�-c- s ToDD EvANS- �
February 22, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
The Aid Dilemma
Congress Oversteps Boundaries
If a bill recently introduced in
Congress becomes law, colleges and
universities that help out students
who refuse to register for the draft
may get in as much trouble as the
students themselves.
Rep. Gerald Solomon, R-N.Y a
congressional proponent of military
registration who's alarmed by col-
lege administrators' promises to
replace financial aid lost by
nonregistrants, is trying to extend
the link between colleges and the
draft to private forms of financial
aid.
As of July t, college men will
have to show proof they've
registered for the draft in order to
get federal financial aid.
But several institutions around
the country, like Earlham College in
Indiana and Haverford College in
Pennsylvania, have pledged to get
private aid for nonregistrants whose
federal aid is cut off.
Thus, Solomon's bill proposes
punishing colleges that lend money
to draft resisters by withdrawing all
federal funds and grants from the
schools.
Once again, the dilemma is set.
Questions arise as to the legalities
invloved in an institution's condon-
ing felony violations, and by gran-
ting aid to draft registration
resisters, that's just what these col-
leges will be doing � at least in the
eyes of government officials, who
view such assistance in the same
light as aiding murderers and com-
mon criminals.
But universities, on the other
hand, will undoubtedly argue that
draft registration resisters who they
deem worthy have just as much
right to private financial assistance
as anyone else. After all, private
forms of educational aid are in-
dependent from federal control.
Thus, administering these grants
should and must be at the discretion
of the institutions themselves, with
no outside influence. And, without
a doubt, the impending threat of
losing all federal funding severely
hampers an institution's options.
Despite admitting that survival
without federal aid would be
nothing short of impossible, most
college officials who have pledged
to support nonregistrants are not in-
timidated by the new proposal. "If
a student is denied federal aid
contends Kathy Malutich, aid direc-
tor at Earlham, "for whatever
reason, and he still has an unmet
need, then we feel we have a com-
mitment to fill that need.
"These students wouldn't be
denied an education because they
resisted the draft per se" she ex-
plains. "It's a question of whether
or not they have the money
"We just don't have the money
says University of Minnesota aid
Director Robert Misenko. "If a stu-
dent who is already getting private
funds turns out to be a
nonregistrant, I would say to that
person you might as well forget
about pursuing a higher education.
Virtually no one gets through school
these days without some form of
aid. What the government is deny-
ing these people isn't money. It's
the right to an education
But the major question at stake
here is not the legality of draft
registration. Rather, the focal point
of this argument is the question of
whether or not the federal govern-
ment has the right to hamper an in-
stitution's options on how to issue
its own private funds to whomever
it chooses.
It would seem the purpose of
private funding programs would be
to enable an institution of higher
learning to use its own discretion in
doling out money.
Some may contend that
nonregistrants deny themselves of
federal rights and privileges when
they take the option not to register.
But whether or not this is a
legitimate argument is beside the
point, since accepting assistance
from a private aid program has
nothing to do whatsoever with any
governmental benefits.
Proponents of the new bill have
promised to fight for its passage in
Congress and to re-introduce
similar legislation if this particular
bill does not pass.
But Congress would do well to
divert its attention from this specific
issue and re-focus on the issue of
prosecution of all nonregistrants.
The random prosecutions which
have been carried out to date only
exemplify the federal government's
inadequacy at dealing with the pro-
blem of registration resisters.
Punishing nonregistrants is the
responsibility of the federal govern-
ment, not financial aid offices.
Congress passed the registration
law; it's up to them to carry out its
enforcement.
'Man's Inhumanity To Man
By MIKE HUGHES
Man's inhumanity to man
Unfortunately, this all-too-familiar
tragic theme seems, now more than ever,
destined to carry the world through the
80s. And now, more than ever, the con-
cepts of peace and justice seem but distant
ideals. The dream that history has shown
to be always just beyond our grasp now
seems further from realization than ever
before.
Man's inhumanity to man
First came the wanton executions of
men, women and children in Iran. Because
their beliefs dictated otherwise, because
thev could not bring it upon themselves to
support a murderous Khomeini regime,
hundreds of lives have been terminated by
the "righteous" of Iran since 1979.
Then ca'me the tragic mass slayings in
the Palestinian refugee camps at Chatilla
and Shabra. Possessed by haired, deter-
mined at all costs not to understand the
concepts of equality and peaceful co-
existence, teams of Christian (the ultimate
irony) militiamen, again "righteous" in
their own twisted minds, rode through the
bleak oases of the downtrodden refugees,
the outcasts of the Middle East, killing
everv living being in sight.
But deny it as we would certainly like to,
tragic events of this sort do offer a lesson.
What's done is done. However, as if this
act of senseless bloodshed weren't horrible
and horrifying enough by itself, the initial
reaction of leaders in the surrounding Mid-
dle East nations was not heart-felt sorrow.
In fact, aside from affecting perverse
finger-pointing accusations at one another,
the slayings at Chatilla and Sabra seemed
to have little effect on those whose
negligence made the killings possible.
The most recent instance of man's in-
humanity to man occurred last Friday,
when Hindu tribesmen, wielding hatchets,
spears, machetes and old firearms, killed
600 to 1.000 Moslem villagers for defying
an election boycott in the violence-torn
Assam state in northeast India. Reports
coming from New Delhi said the tribesmen
rampaged through 17 villages in the state's
Nelli district, stabbing, shooting and
mutilating helpless victims "hacking
them to death
One journalist who visited the scene
reported that in the remains, "There are
women and children with disfugured
faces children hobbling about with gap-
ing wounds in their stomachs. Paddy fields
between Nelli and the affected villages are
strewn with thirsty and exhausted wound-
ed, their wounds smeared with mud
These disgusting and senseless events
lead to but one question: Why? To what
possible end could such mutilation and
hatred be aimed?
The answer, as always, makes as little
sense, holds as little meaning, as the kill-
ings themselves. Spokesmen for those
responsible for the slayings said the Hin-
dus were angry that the Moslem villagers
had defied a boycott of the scheduled elec-
tions.
Prime Minister Indira Gandhi ordered
elections in the state in January after talks
collapsed with the powerful student-led
Assamese native movement, wl
demanded that officials revise voter
and expel the Bengali-speaking Moslem
settlers.
Thus, most of the violence stems from a
widespread movement among Assam's
predominant Hindu population to disen-
franchise and expel more than 1 million
Moslem settlers who have immigr
since 1961 from Bangladesh, formerly Eas!
Pakistan. The Hindus want the Moslems
out, so what do they do0 Thev attempt
their own version of a smali-sca.e
genocide.
And although these three isolated events
of recent history have, indeed, attra.
the greatest media attention, they are, bv
no means, to be misconstrued a unique
Mass murders continue to be carried out
all over the world bv fascist regimes and
power-hungr juntas. And not all are so
conveniently distant from the home-front
In fact, logic and history tell us that the
turmoil and bloodshed in El Salvador.
Nicaragua and Guatemala, among other
neighboring nations, has just begun.
Inherent in a column of this sort is the
realization that mere words are practically
worthless. And they are. After all. nothing
ever written, even bv the greatest of minds,
has ever, will ever, reverse the professed
hatred and injustice that have guided our
planet throughout history.
But however worthless the words,
however menial the essay, we must all be
made aware of the fact that the world a il
is, with man's continued inhumanity to
man. is leading us down a one-wav path
to destruction.
Afghan Rebels Call For American Support;
But Military Aid Is A Dangerous Proposal
. j - -�-�� tmr irrinaino trip �MehaT
By PAT O'NEILL
"There is a tragedy going on in this
world. I feel the people - of the free world
should know about it. "
� Afghan Freedom Fighter Omar Samad
Since 1979, the Soviet Union has oc-
cupied, dominated and controlled the
country of Afghanistan. The U.S.S.R.
continues to spread its wrath of violence
and murder on an innocent populace. The
visit to ECU on Feb. 9 by the three Afghan
freedom fighters gave me a broader
perspective on the magnitude and dimen-
sion of the Soviets' actions.
Like Samad said, there is a tragedy go-
ing on and indeed, something needs to
be done. The three freedom fighters
painted a grim picture of the situation in
their homeland: one million people killed,
many by excessively cruel and violent
means; seven million refugees, and the
possible use, by Soviet troops, of yellow
rain, a chemical which causes severe burns,
internal bleeding and ultimate death.
Whether or not their information was
factual isn't really the issue. Maybe it's not
a million dead, and there is still question as
to the use of yellow rain, but the basic facts
are clear. The Soviet troops have brought a
reign of terror to a country which is strug-
gling for its own right to self-
determination. Clearly, the Soviet Union
should get the hell out of Afghanistan.
Certainly the ECU College Republicans
The Risks Of Bestiality
Iff
From Delusions
More actual viewer mail:
Dear Stan Landers: After reading your
column in Tuesday's East Carolinian, I
decided thai you are the only one who
could solve my problem. I'm taking library
science 1000 this semester, and I just notic-
ed (his very cute football player in my
STAN LANDERS
Like Wow, Man
class. The only problem is that the class
ends this month, and I have never seen this
boy during the day except for that class. I
need to do something quick to get his at-
tention and his phone number. Got any
suggestions? Signed: FRESHMAN FROM
FLORIDA
Dear FROM: First of all, I want you to
know that I understand. The college years
can be very trying, and we've all experienc-
ed the same marred perspective you seem
troubled with right now. But you're old
enough to make decisions for yourself, so
I'll hold back on my bestiality sermon for
another time. Besides, you probably
already know the risks involved. But let's
see now, you say you're afraid that when
the class ends later this month, he'll be out
of your life for good. Personally, From, 1
fail to see the problem there. But if you're
intent on getting his attention, as you say
you are, the first step is to establish some
interest on his part, some common ground,
if you will. You've got to show him that
you share at least some of the same likes
and dislikes if you want to catch his eye. 1
suggest you bring several coloring books
and pretty crayons to class, or perhaps a
Dr Seuss reader or two. I guarantee that
when your offensive "pet" sees you with
Horton Hears a Hoc, he'll be sure to come
over and ask you to read it to him. About
getting his phone number, though, be
careful how you ask; you don't want to of-
fend him. He may not know it right off
hand. One final note: If all else fails, don't
worry. All is not lost. Chances are you'll
be able to find him right back in LIBS 1000
next fall! Good luck.
Dear Stan Landers: My roommate says
your advice column sucks. She says you
don't know anything about anything. She
says you probably make up all the letters
that you answer. She says you 're probably
just some fat, ugly creep who makes up for
his own inadequacies by belittling others.
She says you can f take criticism and you
answer your critics with sharp, bitter un-
truths aimed at diverting attention from
your own shortcomings. I'm terribly con-
fused. How do you plead? LADEN IN
AY DEN
Dear LADEN: Boy, for someone who
writes reasonably well, you sure are a
moron. And you certainly listen to your
roommate a lot, especially considering the
fact that she's nothing but an overweight
bulldozer-driving slut with all the looks
and mental capabilities of a sub-par yak.
Nevertheless, Laden, I can influence you
but so much. And the decision's up to you
as to who you're going to believe: An un-
sightly trollop roommate who I, personal-
ly, wouldn't even let near my dog? Or a
nice guy like me?
Editor's Note: Stan Landers, who, by
some misfortunate oversight, was not
chosen to be featured in the 1983 "Men of
ECU" calendar, is in a bad mood today.
Mike Hughes, on the other hand, is in a
bad mood today.
Stan's Rules
All letters to this column must be
reasonably true. I maintain the right to
make necessary corrections on subjects
that I have a hard time believing or sub-
jects that I have no answers for. Letters
from buxom blondes must be accompanied
by a glossy photo. Letters from male
members of the species needn't be accom-
panied by anything at all, and letters from
fat, unsightly slobs needn't even be sent.
deserve credit for arranging the Afghans'
visit. The information they had is impor-
tant for all of us io know . If ever any single
issue had th� consensus support of almost
all Americans, this is surely it. Republicans
and Democrats alike abhor the Soviet ac-
tions. Where we differ, however, is on the
subject of what actions the United States
could take in response to the Afghanistan
situation.
According to Samad, the three men are
lecturing in the U.S. to "raise pubhc
awareness" about the Afghan situation,
but that's not all they have in mind. "We
onlv vant � need � materials, arms and
supplies for Afghan freedom fighters to
strike against foreign forces in
Afghanistan Samad told the Dmly
Reflector in a recent interview. He did,
however, state clearly that he does not
want and is not suggesting that U.S. troops
should directly intervene in the fighting.
But his implication, which could be just as
dangerous as intervention, was that he
would like to see some U.S. military aid
going to his country.
That's where I, and hopefully most
Americans, would draw the line. I'm no
political scientist, but it's not too difficult
to realize that U.S. military aid to Afghan
rebels would be, without a doubt, a
dangerous folly. Imagine the reaction we
would have if the Soviets started to ship
full-scale military aid to El SaKadoran
rebels.
The key point is that anytime a situation
arises that potentially stands the chance of
further polarizing U.S. Soviet relations,
it's too dangerous to risk. The possibility
of such actions escalating into a
U.SSoviet conflict are not unrealistic. In
a nuclear age, such risks simply cannot be
condoned.
It is, however, critical that the United
States respond in as many ways possible to
the Soviet policy of domination of its so-
called "satellites 1 suggest that we begin
by setting a good example, by discontinu-
ing our own questionable policies in some
other countries, which, like Afghanistan,
are also struggling for self-determination.
Once we do this, we can begin a process to
make our world a safer � freer � place to
live.
SR

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARYS, 1983
� �
Gf&
Man'
ement, h i c h
e se voter lists
.iking Modern
stems from a
Assam's
ation to disen-
I million
migrated
rmerly East
he Moslems
rhey attempt
a small-scale
ited events
itti acted
are, b
led a unique.
uried ml
I all arc SO
me-front.
is that the
I I Salvador.
;maia. among other
USt begun,
in a column of this sort is the
iere words are practically
til, nothing
of minds.
Afl
I as 11
anit to
own a ��' h
Support;
Proposal
Afghans'
. had is impor-
If ever any single
; port of almost
� Republicans
tior the Soviet ac-
wever, is on the
. United States
� e Afghanistan
three men are
to raise public
fghan situation,
jve in mind. "We
- need � materials, arms and
.edom fighters to
eign forces in
d the Daily
iterview He did,
he does not
hat 1 S. troops
n 'he fighting.
h could be just as
ntervention, was that he
ee iome U.S. military aid
and hopefully most
l a the line I'm no
it's not too difficult
military aid to Afghan
uld be, without a doubt, a
is folly. Imagine the reaction we
Ive if the Soviets started to ship
military aid to El SaKadoran
point is that anytime a situation
rt potentiallv stands the chance of
polarizing 1. S Soviet relations,
langerou to risk The possibility
actions escalating into a
i- nflict are not unrealistic. In
age, such risks simply cannot be
however, critical that the United
kpond in as many ways possible to
ft policy of domination of its so-
itellites I suggest that we begin
a good example, by discontinu-
wn questionable policies in some
jntries, which, like Afghanistan,
Is ruggling for self-determination.
ldo this, we can begin a process to
world a safer � freer � place to
SRA Contest Sparks Energy-Saving Ingenuity
The stiff competition
in the Student
Residence Association
Energy Contest has
made many students
think of new methods
to save energy in their
halls. 1 he East Caroli-
nian asked experts in
the area of energy con-
servation for their sug-
gestions on ways to
conserve.
"The biggest con-
sumer of energy in the
dorm is the cooking
said ECU Plant
Engineer Larry Snyder.
"It probably accounts
for over half the power
usage
SRA energy commit-
tee chairman Mark
Niewald agreed with
Snyder.Toaster ovens
and hot plates are ma-
jor users of electricity,
he said. He advised
students to shut-off
their cooking ap-
pliances after using
them and to get
together with their
roomate when cooking
dinner.
Robbie Tugwell,
energy services officer
with the Greenville
Utilities Commission,
said energy could be
saved in three areas:
cooking, hot water
usage and lighting.
Tugwell said all
students can save elec-
Herpes In The Hot Tub Is Hoax
(CPS) A
fraudulent letter in the
U n i er s i I y of
California Santa Bar
bara student newspaper
from someone claiming
to have caught herpes
in a hot tub caused "a
pretty significant
decline" in business at
a nearby spa, and near-
ly boiled into a libel suit
against the paper.
The letter, supposed
ly written by a female
student who said she'd
been infected with
herpes at the spa, "had
a prettv big influence
on business recalls
Richard Weiss, owner
of the Shibuki Gardens
Spa and Sauna.
"It's total
malar key Weiss says.
"Scientifically, this
isn't possible. There's
no way you're going to
catch herpes sitting in a
body of chlorinated
water
Alarmed, Weiss
complained to the Dai-
ly exus, the student
paper that had printed
the letter. The Nexus
subsequently found out
the letter was a fake.
There was no woman
with the name on the
letter enrolled at UCSB
at the time, and no one
with the name lived at
the address on the let-
ter.
Weiss says the letter
was eventually traced
to "this 43-year-old
(male) dropout who
lives across the street"
from the spa, who was
"apparently bothered
by the people coming in
and out and the music
and everything
He hasn't confronted
the "dropout
however. "What good
would it do?" he asks.
He has confronted
the Nexus, though.
"We came so close to
suing. The fact is the
Nexus failed to verify
the letter. They were
negligent. The only
reason we didn't sue
was the court time. It
would have taken three
or four years before it
was settled
Instead, the paper
has now agreed to print
"a series of front page
retractions and to
give Shibuki Gardens
"a substantial amount
of free advertising
Weiss says.
Business, he says, "is
picking up again" after
slumping for several
months following the
letter's appearance in
the fall.
"It was pretty amaz-
ing. You realize how
vulnerable you are to
rumors
tricity by taking shorter
showers and turning
off lights when leaving
a room.
Snyder complained
that many students
were using the shower
stalls as steamrooms by
turning on all the
showers at once to
build up steam. Besides
wasting large amounts
of energy, Snyder
noted that the
building's hot water
supply would decrease
more quickly.
Snyder said lighting
was not a big energy
consumer. He did cau-
tion, however, that fre-
quent use of the light
switch would shorten
the bulb's life. He said
more energy is needed
to turn a light or ap-
pliance on because of
the initial surge.
Snyder said televi-
sions, stereos, radios
and small, absorption-
unit refrigerators were
not big power users. He
said most students have
absortion-unit
refrigerators while
others have a
compressor-driven unit
that requires more
energy. Snyder said
there is a wattage limit
on refrigerators.
Tugwell advised
students to check their
refrigerator door to see
if it is closing properly.
If it's not sealing pro-
perly, the gasket should
be replaced. He said to
keep compressor coils
free of dust. He advised
vacuuming the coils to
keep them clean.
Niewald asked
students to shut off
lights, televisions and
steros when leaving
their rooms.
Snyder said that
larger televisions con-
sume more energy.
Tugwell had addi-
tional advice for off-
campus students. He
said small electric space
heaters were good as an
auxilliary heat source.
Tugwell said resistance
heaters, which warm
the air first, and quartz
heaters, which warm
objects first, were two
most common types of
space heaters. Both
cost about the same,
nine cents per hour, to
operate, Tugwell said.
Tugwell said that
kerosene heaters were
economical to operate,
but they could be
dangerous if used in an
unventilated area.
"They could cause
carbon-monoxide
poisoning Tugwell
said. "If you run a
kerosene heater, it's
recommencded you run
it in a room with door
open where you have
plenty of air
Space heaters and
kerosene heaters are
not permitted in the
dorms.
Tugwell said plastic
placed over the outside
of windows would help
insulate the dwelling.
Treat the crew and well treat you
Every
Monday
&
Tuesday
Night
No Coupon Necessary
757-1955
Ever Monaa ana Tuesday mgnt. every eek
ol the year, order any large 2orim��limping
pizza lor the crew, ask tor the "Family Night Special
and we'll treat you to your owr small P�a wth the same
number of topp.ngs FREE. �"d �e�vered free to our
service zone. 3� minutes or less
Or D'CVUD two pizzas m 15 minutes
Two pizzas for ttve price of one . . now tHata treat vou cant beat!
When it comeso pizza pta comes to vou
Not good with any other special
Remounts
I CJ Custom Design f&
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A ll H ork Done On Premises
704 5th St
4pp�e cofids
Soft Cell
Journey
Bob Seger
Duran Duron
Dan Fogelberg
Phil Collins
Def Leppard
Missing Persons
Oxxie Osborne
Red Rider
Christopher Cross
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U,hu used Albums. I all f"
Details :7tt
ATTIC
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CLUB
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Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
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at
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your favorite retailor
on March 10th





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LAUGHING
MATTER
Coming March 4th
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$1 00 ADM. FOR STUDENTS
Advanced Tickets Sow On
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Record Bars & Apple Records
,�
N BftCSCHAlOMS
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Wj INCLUDES St DAY GUAJUNTEf
AND CARE KIT
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703 U.fnvUI�. Blvo A"0.� Ftorn Pitt PUi. N�mt To t RA Re-ltv)
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264 By Pass,
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 22.19t3 Page6
t?
Wier's Latest
Par With His
Other Efforts
Winkler And Long Star In Weekend Free Flick, 'Night Shift"
Henry Winkler and Shelley Long star in Ron Howard's sleeper Center's Hendrix Theatre. Admission to the film is by II) and ac-
comedy hit of 1982, Sight Shift. The film will be shown this Friday tivity card for students and MSC embership for faculty and staff
and Saturday night at 5, 7 and 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Student on campus.
Angelic Smith Rages In Role
By JERRY BUCK
KV !HfMU�� Wrilrr
I OS ANGELES - Jaclyn Smith
didn't think too much of it when
author Sidney Sheldon suggested at
a party that she was right for the
lead in Rage of Angels.
"I was pregnant at the time and I
forgot about it she says. "But
after the baby was born the script
arrived. I'd turned down about 20
scripts. 1 knew I wanted to do this.
"I've had such a constant fight
not being Charlie's Angels again.
Not being that slick character. This
role is certainly not that
Miss Smith starred as Jennifer
Parker in the NBC miniseries
adapted from Sheldon's best-selling
novel, which aired Sunday and
Monday nights at 9 p.m. She played
a beautiful young woman lawyer
who's fired from the district at-
torney's office in a scandal and rises
to become one of New York's top
trial lawyers.
"It's the best role I've ever done,
the most in-depth character she
says. "There are so many changes in
this girl. She starts out wide-eyed
and innocent and ends up cynical.
But it's understandable after what
she's been through. She has affairs
with two men at opposite extremes.
"She's vulnerable and spunky.
People like her. When I read the
book I thought she would make a
nice friend
Sheldon, disappointed with prior
translations of his books to film,
took personal charge of the produc-
tion. He says it is the "first of my
novels that has been adapted for the
screen where I've been pleased with
the final product
The miniseries also starred Ken
Howard as the lawyer who becomes
a U.S. senator and one of Jennifer's
lovers; Armand Assante as the
suave underworld attorney who
pursues her, and Kevin Conway as
the struggling, hard-drinking
private investigator who takes her in
and becomes her partner after she's
fired from the D.As office.
Coincidentally, the movie pitted
Miss Smith against another former
member of Charlie's Angels. Cheryl
Ladd starred in the title role of
Grace Kelly last night on ABC.
Miss Smith, who is married to
cinematographer-director Tony
Richmond, starred in the television
movie Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy
before she was pregnant. Her son,
Gaston Anthony Richmond, is now
9 months old. He was named after
Miss Smith's grandfather, who was
a Methodist minister in Texas.
She is in the sitting area of her
upstairs bedroom of her home in
Bel Air. The Pacific Ocean can be
seen in the distance. She says her
next project will be a commercial
directed and photographed by her
husband.
"It's very important that it be
perfect she says. "He's a British
Academy Award winner for Don't
Look Sow, so I feel in good hands.
We met when he did Sight Kill. It's
the best I've ever been photograph-
ed
Miss Smith w as the only actress to
stick with Charlie's Angels during
its entire tenure. "I had a con-
tract she says. "I watched the pit-
falls of leaving. I had a commitment
and I felt it was right to stay. I had
offers like everyone else, but I'm
happy I stayed.
"Charlie's Angels got so much
media hype. So many stories were
exaggerated or untrue. We were just
three girls on the screen in a slick,
glamorous show. I'm not putting it
Cheryl As Grace
Another 'Angel' Still Acting
By LAWRENCE EISENGBERG
NEW YORK � The backstage story had all the
elements of Greek tragedy, though nobody would have
guessed it at the beginning: Cheryl Ladd and her hus-
band, producer Brian Russell, were invited to Monaco's
annual TV festival a couple of years ago.
"It was like a fairy-tale town beautiful, clean,
with tons of flowers, like no place else in the world
Miss Ladd says. "And Princess Grace was gorgeous
and sweet and � her name was so appropriate
While they were still basking in the glow of the ex-
perience, Russell had an idea for Miss Ladd: Why not
star in a movie about Princess Grace?
"Did I relate to her? Miss Ladd says. "Oh, God,
yes. I began to read her life story and was fascinated by
her courage. She came from a family of three daughters
and was the middle child who was kind of overlooked.
They were all athletic and she wasn't. And she went
against her family's wishes to become an actress. I was
surprised to find that in her early years she did
toothpaste commercials and soap ads. She didn't need
the money, but wanted to do it on her own because she
needed a sense of self-worth
Miss Ladd says her own life was not much different.
"Coming from a family in South Dakota and being a
middle child, I felt stifled and I wanted to become so-
meone on my own term, be my own person She adds
wryly, "And, it only took me seven years to become an
overnight sensation
Fade-in to the offices of Embassy Television, a divi-
sion of Norman Lear's entertainment complex. Cheryl
Ladd and Brian Russell are in a meeting with executives
to negotiate a development deal. Miss Ladd says the
first project she wants to do is a movie about Grace Kel-
ly.
"It didn't take us long to get a deal at ABC says
Michael L. Weisbarth, co-executive producer (with
Russell) of the film. An announcement hit the media:
Grace Kelly, a two-hour film, was going to be presented
by ABC-TV. (It aired last night at 9 p.m.)
Off in Monaco, the press reported subsequently,
Princess Grace was sitting at breakfast, scanning her
morning paper when she dropped her croissant. Why,
she wanted to know, didn't anybody ask her permis-
sion? Invasion of privacy came to mind, exploitation
next, legal action third.
A scene planned for the private zoo at the palace was
scrapped and later reproduced on the grounds of a Los
Angeles convent.
Even the Riviera hill town of St. Paul, which is the
setting for romantic moments between Grace Kelly and
Oleg Cassini, couldn't be used � the town of Villefran-
che played the part of St. Paul, says Miss Ladd, who
adds, "This is a television movie. It's not David Lean
A spokesman for the Monaco government com-
ments, "They were very careful that week. Because the
mourning period was not over and because they were so
close to Monaco, they were asked to be very discreet
and they requested that the press stay away That's
like locking Elizabeth Taylor in Cartier's overnight and
asking her to stay in the silver department.
Most of the rest of the film was shot in Hollywood
(though some of the action is also set in Philadelphia
and New York), always cautiously, with a press
blackout. But the initial controversy, compounded by
the death of Princess Grace, cast a pall over the produc-
tion and the public's perception of it.
Miss Ladd says the public need not worry. She has
told other reporters that before Princess Grace died, the
princess said: "It's really a nice script. I wish my life
had been as nice as this
down. It had an audience and it was
a training ground. But people say
there was no reality to it. So that
See RAGING, Page 7
B JULIANA FAHRBAC H
The Year of Living Dangerously
(now playing at Greenville's Plaza
Cinema) is yet another brilliant
achievement of Australian director
Peter Wier. It is a story set during
the cultural and political upheaval
of Indonesia in 1965.
Mel Gibson, the acclaimed
Australian actor who has been
previously seen in Tim. Mad Max,
The Road Warrior (the sequel to
Mad Max) and Gallipoli. plays an
eager and ambitious journalist, Gu
Hamilton, sent to this hot bed of
political unrest.
Sigourney Weaver, known tor
Alien and Eyewitness, is a British
attache, Jill Bryant, who at the
beginning of the film is due to leave
Indonesia in three weeks.
Of course, a torrid romance
develops between these two
characters and this is basically what
the film is centered around The
chemistry between Gibson and
Weaver is present and the few
scenes of them together are almost
too personal to watch.
The film is carried by Linda Hunt
who plays the cameraman Billy
Kwan, a Chinese Australian dwarf
who uses his camera to see the ab-
solute povertv that exists in In-
donesia and whose heart is torn with
despair for these people. Kwan is
the narrator for the film and also
the joining factor between Jill
Bryant and Guv Hamilton.
The Year of I ft ing Dangerously .
based on the novel b C J Koch, is
another exercise in vivid
cinematograph), but it fails to real-
ly touch on the true situation in In-
donesia and the outcome.
Review
This film seems only concerned
with the relationship between
Hamilton and Bryant. This is not
necessarily a condemnation because
Peter Wier has never truly covered
any factual situation thoroughly.
He tells the story with the camera
and lets the viewer interpret it. We
have seen this in two of his past
films. Picnic At Hanging Rock and
dallipoli. These films where both
based on factual situations, but
Wier managed to introduce a sense
of time suspension through the use
of the camera and the concentration
on a particular group of people
In The Year of Living Dangerous-
ly . the object poverty is seen and
felt. The overwhelming reality of
this countrv and its situation is
screamed to the viewers.
David Williamson wrote the
screenplav for The Year of Living
Dangerously, as he has previously
for W ier's Gallipoli.
The film is not for everybody. It
is not what I would deem
'entertaining" but possibly could
be labeled an exercise in thought
and feeling. For those who admire
Peter W ier. as I do, it is a must.
Also in Greenville Plaza Cinema:
One Dark Sight, Sting II Buc
caneer Theatre: The lords of
Discipline. (,handi, Tootsie Plitt
Theatre E.T Officer and a
dentleman. 48 Hours. The Verdict
TO
VI TJk
Acting Company Coming To Campus In March
The love stricken Duke Orsino (Jack Stehlin) is attended by his servant (Ronna Kress) is the Acting
Company's production of William Shakespeare's Twelfth Sight, directed by Michael Langham.
The company will perform the play on Friday. March 25, in the Hendrix Theatre. Under the artistic
direction of respected actor John Houseman, the company will also perform Moliere's Tartuffe on
Saturday, March 26. For ticket information, call Mendenhall Central Ticket Office at 757-6611.
ext. 266. The performances are part of the '82&3 Department of I Diversity Unions Theatre Arts
Series.
Bo
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The l erdict

In March
nna Kressi is the �ctinjj
h Michael I angham.
Ibealre. I nder the artistic
�m MoliereS Tartuffe on
Wet Office at 757-ftll,
bit) I nions Theatre Arts
Ztoor Defines
CIA's Role
In Guatemala
B KM IIV CASEY
The CIA in Guatemala,
by Richard Ti. Immerman,
University of Texas Press, 1982,
call number: n.p.
OS 48l.G23.5l88.i9S2),
200 pages
Immerman, a young history pro-
fessor at the University of Col-
orado, holds the United States
government responsible for the
military overthrow of Guatemala's
government in 1954. He documents
his case with 672 footnotes. His 19
page bibliography includes un-
published archival papers, personal
interviews, correspondence, ar-
ticles, speeches and two TV
transcripts � as well as the usual
newspaper, primary and secondary
sources. His main line of argument
concludes that "The CIA's 1954
coup has made moderation impossi-
ble" in the decades since.
He makes other damning conten-
tions. He sav the coup's replace-
ment of the elected president
Arbenz with the invader Castillo
Armas led to the growth of Com-
munism in Guatemala and the
region. He says it returned the
economy to United Fruit control,
again draining Guatemala. He says
the Mayan majority, which had
been gaining increasing liberation
since the tyrant Ubico's overthrow
in 1944, was again brutally repress-
ed, with forty thousand murdered
since the coup. He says the 1954
Guatemalan coup led to thinking
which was directly responsible for
the Ba of Pigs disaster in 1961
Just as the 1953 CIA coup in Iran
directed by Kermit Roosevelt was a
step leading to the Ayatollah, so he
foresees a Central American whirl-
wind coming.
The case is strong. I'm not com-
petent to make technical criticisms.
However, some general counter
points can be made. There is no gain
from fixing blame unless we have
the power of acting differently and
better in a coming, similar situation;
but the book does not analyze the
current situation. There is an ignor-
ing of deeper causation: behind the
CIA was Allen Dulles, in turn
directed by his brother John Foster
and by Eisenhower. But behind
them as behind United Fruit and its
management and its stockholders,
pressed the legitimating, blind,
hydraulic force of the United States
electorate, inexorably insisting on
its material way of life, of which
whosever backs it is built on.
A third counter point is the com-
petence of the haves to keep socie-
ty's machinery running. More
broadly. The CIA in Guatemala
doesn't treat the complex net of in-
tangibles that constrain possibility,
including the ideologies of the ac-
tors (especially Catholicism and
Marxisms), their education (moral
and fraternal as well as scientific
and technical), and their organiza-
tions (unions, army, coops, etc.).
So other books should be written.
With this solid 200-page building
block of professor Immerman's, we
can then support U.S. policymakers
as they set about building a sane and
honorable policy in Central
America.
Raging 'Angel' Smith Feels
She's Still Moving Forward
Continued From Page 6
puts up a barrier.
"The whole thing was so
peranaJvvzed. We did get into
iathmg-suits, but I hardly ever kiss-
ed a guy. Granted, it wasn't
Shakespeare, but we got a lot of
putdown. I had to prove myself.
"But that show taught me
discipline in my work. Still, the im-
age of that show detracts from the
part of you that is a serious ac-
tress
She says she has no interest in a
Charlie's Angels reunion movie,
should one ever come up. "I've
done it she says. "I'm thankful
for the fie years. It opened a lot of
doors, but I wouldn't go back. Each
thing I've done since then has been
well thought out and a step away.
"Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy
was a departure. It was a character
role, with the makeup and the
dialect. Rage of Angels is another
departure. The role has so much to
it. It's an in-depth character study
of a girl who goes to New York with
stars in her eyes and watches her
dream fade
Miss Smith's production com-
pany has several films in develop-
ment, including a remake of Sen-
timental Journey.
"I'm reading several scripts and
there's talk of a series based on
Rage of Angels she says. "I'm
really looking forward to working
with Tony in a film, either as
cinematographer or director. I'd
love for him to direct me. Who
knows me better?"
Is she interested in a series?
"I don't know. I'd have to think
about it long and hard. I have a lit-
tle boy � I was recently shooting
something and 1 had to run home
for his bath. But if I had to do a
series, this would be it
ROOMMATE WANTED
Responsible male or female wanted to
share three bedroom duplex with working
ECU student. Within walking distance of
campus. Call Charles at 752-4935 or
756 8865.
Pizza itun
Greenville's Best Pizzas
Now Being Delivered
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
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We sell our delivery
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give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
Are
d
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 22, 1983
DIET
XZENTER-
SWING INTO
200 West
AXA & EN lil sisters
Happy Hour
Tuesday, Feb. 22
9:00-1:00
Admission $1.00
Happy Hour Prices
Throughout The Night
EGU't Best 200 West
200 W. 10th St.
CAN DO
25 Offset Resumes for
$12.50
1
Photocopies 5C
curry II
COPY �
CENTER of Greenville 752 1233Exp,res4 3083
includes Typing,
second sheets & envelopes
8' jX 11 1 side
OasS'C Laia Paper
412 EVANSMALL DOWNTOWN
East Carolina Pirates
UNC-Wilmington
3�e
,
v4i
Seahawks
T7T
fr
fc.
Saturday-7:30pm
"The Rivalry"
L
Watch the
THIS SUNDAY
While vacationing in the Greek Isles,
famous detective Mercule Poirot spotted
a beautiful woman on the beach. Realizing
that she was dead, he did not ask her to dinner
wiwnajffT naxjRti presents an cm nin presentation
A Xm DRADCNRNE AND RICNARD COODWIN PRODUCTION A JOHN QMILLERHIN ALTI
PETER USTINOV JANENRKIN LOIS CHILES DETTE DAVIS niA FARROW
JON FINCH OLMAHUSSET CEORCE KENNEDT
ANGELA LANSTHJRT SIHON HAC CORKINDALE
DAVID NIVEN nAQCIE SmTN JACK WARDEN IN AQrtTrW CJWSTTS
DEATH ON THE NILE'
WITH rWRRT ANDREWS 15 XXWR rNSIC COHPOSED DT NINO ROTfl
SCREENPLAT &T flNTNCr SHAFFER
PRODUCED DT JOHN &RADOMRNE AND RICHARD QOODW1N
DIRECTED PT JOHN QMILLlRTIIN dWWriOMm Efll PICTURE ,
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3 SMASH HITS Festival Begins Sunday At 3:30 P.M. With 'And Then
There Were NoneDeath On The Nile' At 5:30 P.M.�'Evil Under The Sun'
At 8 P.M.AII Films Shown In Hendrix Theatre, MSCAdmission Free With
Student ID & Activity Card Or MSC MembershipSponsored By The ECU
Student Union Films Committee
r

T





I HI t M l KOl INIAN
Sports
IIHfl r
Pirates Capture Big Conference Win
Bv Mlkr 111 (.HIS
Mina(in I dttor
PORT OF CM 1 GREEN
VII 1 t It Coach Charlie Har
rison was "eniotionalK drained"
after Saturday night's come-from
behind victory ovei the Naval
Academy and beyond a shadow
of a doubt, he was drained he
certainly had good reason to be.
Emotionally drained because his
Pirates almost blew an 11 -point
halt'time lead Emotionally drained
because a pave ECl controlled tor
the first 30 minutes began to slip
awav Emotionally drained because
Nav was proving that his job, too,
could be an adventure. Emotionally
drained because a contest that in the
first half seemed like a shoe-in for
the Pirates came down like so
many others this season - to one
final shot
"We just got sloppy Harrison
commented after the gaine "We
missed the eas shots rhat's the
story of our season But oui kids
had patience, they
up "
And give up. they didn't. Behind
excellent first-halt performances '
Charles Green, Ba Wright and
Johnri � ! dwards, the Pirates built a
J9-28 ead al the end of the first
hall r' to see il dwindle in the
game's waning minutes.
tiling Navy by three with 1:38
remaining, ECl guard fony Robin-
son rallied the Pirates to withm one
with ! foi it lumper at the 112
mark With the score now h-66
Navy, Harrison calleda
characteristic calm-down timeout
"You know Harrison reflected,
"I think I've used every timeout
every came cccpi maybe aga
South i arolina (one of the Pirates'
tew games (his season that hasn't
gone down to the wire)
And. indeed, the timeout proved
a worthwhile tactic with nisi ovei a
nnnute to play. Harrison called lor
full court pressure on Navy's m-
bounds pla And when play resum
ed, the Middies found the Pirates
harder to shake than a (lock ol
dock-side hussies
But a 10 second back court viola
tion, which would have turned the
ball over to the Pirates with 1 03 re-
maining, went sour. Referee Eddie
Laws, who called the 10 second
violation, reversed the verdict atter
learning that only nine seconds had
elapsed in the back court Navy got
the ball in the front court,
But the Academy's James Ku
ma, who apparently fancied himseli
a destroyer, plowed ovei Barry
Wrighl on the inbounds play, turn
ing the ball back over to ECl with
I 02 � a ng
I he Pirates wen l a 40 second
giving I la on time to
his final strategy tiei a time �
the 22 mark, the Pirates worked the
ball let right and centei living to
draw Naw out from underni
Then, with four seconds left, I n
Robinson spoilt. C harlt
Green under the basket I rtuna
foi the Pirates, (ireen' lay a
one "easy shot l hat Ii i pped
Back-to-back timeouts and a
set ond "Hail-Mary" t i
mid court b Na ' Ron Ron a
fell short, and ECl emerj I fi n
�' :� i 68 67 ictoi
I
same plav we had designed against
George Mason But this rune, they
came out aftei rony, and we were
able to gel the ball inside tobailie.
rhey did a super job toward the
end
Despite sitting out the first 10
minutes, Edwards led all scorers
a h 21 points, all rebounders with
M He made his presence known on
defense as well, making two
unassisted steals late in the game.
right finished the game with 16
points and ft rebou Is, w hile
holding Navy's tart g I �rw irds to
a iiital ol lo points sore C harles
Green pumped in 14 wl mling
in w rebound Bi ice Peartree
added 9 pon e Pirau it
Romaine led v- i � with
1 h pom; and assists He was
followed ' ifford Maurer,
6 i nter, who added
14. ai ' ' � id Bi oks (who
.
I I � � '
It's

: t w a
H
'
I
t a qua
:
Witl Pirate I � C AC - S
� � '
"Right now he said,
"Madison's placing better than
anyone else in the league I hen g lys
can all shoot, rhey can fill il up
from anywhere on the court
I hey've been there before
With three games remaining
(Madison on the 23rd, UNC-
Wilmington on the 26th and Penn
State-Behrend on March 3), oach
Harrison needs but one victors to
insure a winning tirst
yeai as head coach, a ' � - h
signifies that the turnai I I i
Ii basketball lias ai: i . . in
But. as he has emphasized fron
'We're taking I game at
i ' me
� �
sir i � . , , f.
Lady Rats Split Pair
The E( I Lady PiraW
their record at 11-1 Sunday aftei
noon with an 82-62 victory
Boston University.
The win helped the I ad Pirates
avenge a Thursday night loss to the

an le
L a,
Piratei
fects
Morehead State
games were
iseum
The Sunday
ovc Iht ' ���
by an 11-0 i
ith �i.x �
EC I winning 2
; Svivia Braai
lagles
M nge
Both
of then depleted rosier as only six
ECl placers sjv action and four of
. Denkler, Hooks,
V e played the en
It tl ' lids
them Br.
and, trei 1
: n
lay :
� M i
65 � � n

Dei
ba

kets
apiece from m close.
Atter a timeout bv Boston, Bragg
hit a free throw and Denkler added
a 15-foot jumper to cap the spurt.
The two teams traded buckets for
the rest of the half, and ECU went
to the dressing room up 39-22 at
halftime.
The Terriors pulled back to
within 12 points three times during
the second half, but were never able
to get any closer 12 of ECU's last
14 points were scored from the free
throw line as Boston was forced to
foul.
Denkler and Bragg both scored 22
points to pace the Lady Pirates
Bragg hit 11 of 16 free throws and
handed out seven assists
Denkler tied teammate Darlene
Chaney for game-high rebound
totals with 11. Senior co-captain
Iran Hooks scored 12 points, grab-
bed nine rebounds, and dished out
� assists.
The Terriers were led by Val
DePaolo with 18 points, and
.4s. w e - e
Blackl ' : P
nds Rita Bei
added 15 point
Morehead St;
11-point ads a
but the 1 adv Pi
within 34-27 at 1
ECU was able
with the 1 dd I
: by Pi
oint? 18
d 1 v mi M .c
� a .icd ti
tme
ang fairh
lose
:�� until 'tie uist
two minutes, when Morehead State
scored the last seven points to widen
the final margin to 75 59
1 he 1 adv Pirates were led in scor-
ing by Denkler and Hooks, who had
14 points each Denkler also pulled
down 11 rebounds, second only to
Blackford's IS.
II was as ineffective from the
free throw line as they were from the
field. The I adv Pirates hit only 11
ol 21 from the charity stripe
With only four games remaining,
the Lady Pirates need to win three
of them to assure a winning season.
ECU's next game is tomorrow
night when they travel to Wilm-
ington to take on the UNC-W
Seahawks. Gametime is 7:30 p.m.
Photo by SCOTT LARSON
Pirate Sprinter Reuben Pierce blows it out against Wolfpack and Tar
Heel runners. Pierce placed sixth in the 440-meter dash with a time of
50.8
1I sharlcs Green gos up high t�r
night's v K ti�r liver Njw
two ol his 14 p'unts in saitinta
Golfers Open Season
g forwa il
Lee said "1 i
was
ai a
me I an
Dominion Seascape
i
Czaja Old
Conn. , v
nun
.

the top "s. six
will
three
John Rii
I ee "W(
; ran �
� a

tea .
aloi
Helms, wl
Photo by GABY PATTERSON
ECU freshman Sylvia Bragg pumped in 22 points Sunda to lead the
Lady Pirates to a 82-62 victory over Boston I niversitv.
nament
with juniors Mike
aftei ii-1' I N A
Bei' ' id W odard K
New Va
and 1 ).i- I - are
freshmen who gamed experience in
the fall Kelh N' t art i ��
Charlotte, is playing this season
after hem i freshman
t
N( A Na
I
ill ah
-
18-2"?
five
one or tw
"11 w
a bid : NCAA 1
- -
N
(
White, McCorkle Pace Pirates
Hv R N)N Ml Vs
I he E I men's track team plac-
i most every event this
weekend al the t arolina Invita
tional track meet in Chapel Hill.
( raig hite broke the 11
resold for the 55 meter hurdles in
2S He finished second ovei all
and his time qualified him for the
nationals Vernerd Wynn placed
fifth in the same event in 7.41
Nathan Mc( oikle broke anothei
i record in the 55-meter
finishing, third in t 2s leiiy
Brown came in fifth with a 6 41 ami
Henry Williams finished sixth in
6 42
In the 44H-meter dash. Wayne
Miller took second in 49.8, Eddie
Bradley tinished thud in 50 5 dnd
Rueben Pierce came in sixth at 50.8
1 he mile relay team ol Bradley
Miller, Keith Clarke and Pierce
placed second in 3:22.8 behind a n.i
tionally ranked South Carolina
team "II
like it did Saturday
chance ol placing in the lu.
said va, Coach B
I one i in theii
foi 1 v l were Kav ick
Vernerd Wynn. Dickerson finished
thud in the m� meters in 1. i ; 6
while in the 55-meter high hurdles
vim placed sixth in 7.41
In the long uimp. .
McGlawhorn and Chris Brooks
tinished fifth mk sixth, respectively
McGIa whoi eap

23 1"
"We did I
Nortl v
mented v ars -
.
'� people, ai
score in every even: we ent
1 h Pirates �
' weekend when
m the George Mas .
Fairfax, rgin i
ECU Women Impressive In Last Meet
By RANDY MEWS
sl.ff ttnlrr
women since I've been coaching
here
The adv Crate track team In the 60-yard dash, Regina Keni
traveled to Chapel Hill this weekend took first in 7.08 and iusl missed
and turned m their finest perfor-
mance of the season
"We did fantastic exclaimed
Coach Pat McGuigan "It was the
best performance bv the I�( l
the team this fall, placed fourth in 1 he mile relay team � k-
the mile run in 5:34 7 athcart. I eepet amd I
In the 440-metei dash kathv posted then best time ol the
1 eepei finished fifth in f2 while veat. taking record in 4 11-
also taking third in the long lump
qualifying forthe nationals eressa with a leap of 173" he 1- c I women will hav
Hudson finished fifth in the event in In a down-to-the wire race, Jamie P'oximately a month off unt Mh
"42. and RobinCremedy took sixth c athcart edged out hei opponent to begin their outdoor 5,
in 7.44 capture first place in the 600 yard opens with l he Viraini. i�
Renee Felder, who walked on to run tumals ld lnv"a
Wor
Calt
ft
-A
K I all mf
grabbel 1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Pagt
FEBRUARY 22, 1983
e Win
i
j
t�oto 6v ov E WILL tMS
t his 14 points in "aturda
pen Season
iblt of play-
said I ee
day, anyone of them
�. anyone else. It just
depends on hos playing well at a
time. 1 am looking to find a
i fifth man. though
e'duie includes
th trips to the
March
� pril
� Invita-
7-19. 1 no
� ' v ' � Iina

third
l � latii rial,
Bi li S a lej
( c c - ue mi
edule, accor-
probabl) meet
top 50 ranked
. ' added I ee
petition in our di �
-� m UNC
is currently
ted - md the
( arolina State squa .�. �
: eighth in the Na
last vear a- .
ir. Wake Forest a
be i it
Pirates

even' a. -
� Mas
last Meet
he m,le relav team o( Kent
Cathcart, Leepcr amd remed.
posted their best time of th
i vear. taking record in 4:1 5
Thet I "omen will have a
proximatelv a month off until f
to begin their outdoor season l'l
JrJ opens w,ih The v,r hlch
tionals Irgmia hlvita-
Students Place In
ACU-I Tournament
12 East Carolina
University students
qualified to attend the
Association of College
Unions-International
Regional Tournaments
that were held at the
University of Tennessee
in knoxville on
February 10, 11, and
12. Teams representing
universities from five
states competed in
Bowling, Table Tennis,
Backgammon, Chess
and College Bowl.
In order to qualify
for these events, the
students had to first
defeat competitors in
dorm, day-student, or
intramural events.
They also had to be
full-time student with
at least a 2.0 GPA.
Then, they had to win
the All-Campus Com-
petition in their event.
The Department of
University Unions
sponsored the fully
paid trip for these 12
students to Knoxville,
Tennessee.
Dr. Lawrence
Hough, Associate Pro-
fessor of Political
Science coached the
College Bowl Team
consisting of Joel
Argent, Jeff Jones,
Ken Hopper, Mike
Swaim, and Joel
Mauger.
Linda Barkand,
Mendenhall Student
Center Crafts and
Recreation Director ac-
companied the recrea-
tion participants.
Tim Merck, Mark
Klumpp, and Trent
Rackley represented
ECU in the Men's
Bowling events.
Rackley brought home
a second place plague
in the Men's High-
Series competition.
Frank Necci and
Stuart Long won a
point for ECU in the
team chess competi-
tion. They finished
first in the state and 5th
in the region beating
out or drawing Masters
and Grand Masters in
the process.
DeAnne Cates,
Backgammon and
Tommie Douglas,
Table Tennis held their
own before being
knocked out of their
double elimination
competitions.
.Tar Landing Seafood.
Resu
n unidentified Boston Uaiversitj wilck doctor puts the hex on ECU's Lisa
the air unconirollahh
P1WO o, OAKY PATTEVSON
Sijuirewell. causing her to jump into
Women Booters Lose
The ECl W01
Socce. v
ii - fir game I "
spring jm to 1
State oa Sat
W olfpac n
hv the score ol 5-0
OTisidenns was
r first gan
said ,
Pre � : r
was
played I gethet as a
rmsion � �
.
rcnth has 16
�� I ties
; rovide
ildsmith
Clul
11. ol n,
111 si
eason
Duke v� a -
I uc t O s 111 v.
eeks ago Rico
n, added pu .i is the coac h
Complete Automotive
Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jartran Rentals Available
2704 E. 10th St
758-1033
Buck's
Gulf
Spot Filled
team
Theii .es had
seera� drives,
but rud ofl as
numers on goal
were stoppedor went
wide
TheWomens Soccer
Club,whichis under
I asl . arolina I i
ball coach Ld Emory
announced the comple-
tion of his staff yestei
da wah the appoint-
ment of Charles Elm-
quist to a fulltime job.
Elmquist has served Universitj ol Min-
as a volunteer coach for nesota and Eastern
the past two sears. He Michigan University.
k w ith the 11 tiht
ends.
� gradual e 01
Eastei n Michigan,
Elmquist served as an
assistant coach at the
Cole Relishes Victory
DAYTON A
BLACH, Fla. (UP1) -
Winning the Daytona
X) was just what the
doctor ordered for Cale
Varborough.
The victim of a spec
tacular crash during
qualifying last week �
less than a lap after sur-
passing the 200-mph
mark � Yarborough
had a stiff neck, a
variety of bruises and
an injured psyche all
week.
But he felt a lot bet
ter attei Sunda) 's race
As his Pontiac zip
ped across the finish
line safely ahead ol a
trio of chasers, the
three-time 500 winnei
pumped his hands on
the steering wheel and
cracked an ear-to-ear
grin that was firml in
place more than an
hour later.
"1 was happy said
Yarborough, who
claimed the winner's
purse ol $119,600 at
NASC -k tiisi SI
million aftai 1. "I still
am
Otheis weren't
thrilled.
Budd) liakcr, who
lost the lead to Yar-
borough a mile from
'he finish, was mad at
himself Joe Ruttman,
who dogged Y a r -
borough but fell into a
race with Baker at the
finish and off the pace,
was mad at Baker.
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
ECU all-America basketball player Mary Denkler scored 22 points and
grabbed 11 rebounds against Boston I'niversity Sunda.
5S2SK22S3S32Z;
All You Can Eat
Specials
TuesTrout for $2.99
Wed. & Thurs. night
Shrimp for $5.99
1 105 Airport Road
!
Greenville, N.C.�
grange Juice
KROGER
SANDWICH
Items and Prices
Effective Wed. Feb 24
thru Set. Fed. 26. 1983'
on
ADVERTISED TOM POUCT
Each of these advertised items la r�
quired to be readily available for
sale in each Kroger Sav-on. excact
as specifically noted In this ad. If we
do run out of an item we will offer
Cyour choice of a comparetue
n when available, reflecting the
same savings or � rekneheck whtcf
will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
pnee within 30 days.
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Viz-Gal
Ctn.
White Brea
22$a09
Loaves I
WELCH'S
Grape Jelly
$439
KROGER
Peanut
Butter
$499
24-Oz. I
Jar "
32-Oz.
Jar
CHEF BOY-AR-DEE
SPAGHETTI WITH
MEATBALLS OR
Ravioli
$1.75
ORANGE
DRINK MIX
HEAVY-DUTY
DETERGENT
Rinso
$4
44-Oz. �
Box





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 22, 1983
Classifieds
PERSONAL
HEYii Mow 'boot them beach
OumsM Look out Oaylona Beach
Here comet ECUH There's still
space available tor the year's
wildest PARTY I Don t miss it.
call "� '07� alter 6 00 tor details
LITTLE MS RIDER Happv
HEARTDAY latter). You are
truly a wondertul Valentine
Thanks tor being my triend Love.
PADDY
HEY OBO JUAN! I heart you
more than the apple, pretiel. pear
and banana combined' And it I
could only save one person, you
know it would be you1 Have a Hap
py V D Signed YOUR FRIEND
THE ORANGUTAN
MYRNA Id sure love to take a
roll in the hay with you. girl
Specially since you got that
cellulite reduction operation on
your thighs Whew' What a dream
girl! TATER
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Arkansas or
along I 40 West Spring Break
Call Pam. 757 J�24
LOST AND
FOUND
ait
FOUND: COLD CHARM DKP
engraved on one side 11 IS-li TAJ
Engraved on opposite side In
quire in Cashier's Ottice
FOUND: TONDA THERING'S ID
CARD Call 7J1 MSJ.
LOST 1 YEAR-OLD small black
temale dog White markings on
chin and paws, no tail. Answers to
CLO Please call 7M 120 after
4 00 p m it seen or too t
MISC.
WE BUY USED MUSICAL IN
STRUMENTS CALL 7J4 t�77
FLORIDA" SPRING BREAK
Reservations now being taken lor
a trip to Daytona Beach Round
trip bus tare with KEGS 7 nights
accomodation at King s Inn
Beachtront Free parties with live
band and unlimited brew Priccis
tltS 50 tor everything except
meals Call 7S4 7074 tor details
alter 4 p.m Limited space, so
SPUING BREAK PARTY: In-
cludes 7 nights and I days on "The
Strip" In sunny Ft. Leuderdaie.
Fla. Various activities within
walking distance including a tree
keg daily at the Button. Occupan-
cy available at three hotels with
range in prices from tllS.M. For
further Info contact Bath or Lisa
CHARTER BUS TO FORT
LAUDEROALE. FLA Round
trip motor coach to Ft. Leuderdaie
$��-00 plus tax. Contact Beth or
Lisa at 744 tJ73 or 757 �W
ECU STUDENTS. FACULTY,
STAFF Welcome to our Flea
Market at the Pitt County
Fairgrounds located on N. Green-
ville Blvd Open every Saturday
and Sunday t till 5 Crafts, tools,
furniture, books, etc. Displays of
old postcards, buttons, antique
pistols and collectors' items. Real
IBM Selectnc typewriter. Call
Lame Shiva 7St SMI or GAIL
JOYNER 7Se leal.
TYPING: Term papers, thesis,
etc. Call Kempie Dunn. 7S1-47JJ.
EXCELLENT TYPIST.
Reasonable rates. All papers. Call
7S7I17I attar 4 p.m.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE: Complete audio repair call
after 4 p.m. Mark 751 1 We.
HABLA ESPANOLT II not. tutor
ing available in Spanish literature,
grammar and conversation. No
espere hasta el ultimo minutoi
Call 7S7 3254 before 7:00 p.m.
FOR PROFESSIONAL FLIGHT
INSTRUCTION, call JOE.
7S�-4f41.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
bargainsi I
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE, experience quality work.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Kings
Row Apartments, 1 bedroom,
split utilities and rent Contact
Jan. 752-0114
WANTED
COUNSELORS for co-ed summer
camp in the mountains of North
Carolina. Room, meals, laundry,
salary and travel allowance. Ex
penence not necessary but must
enoy living and working with
children. Only clean-cut. non
smoking college students need ap
ply. For applicationbrochure,
write: Jack Levine. Camp
Pinewood, I44M N E 20 Avenue.
North Miami Beach. Florida
Wei.
FOR SALE
COTTAGE FOR RENT at N Myr
tie Beach Spring Break 1125.
Easter 5200 Summer S500 per
month. Sleeps six, call 77�-KHr�
(Raleigh).
BOB SEGER TICKETS Fri .
March II in Greensboro Best ol
fer, 75 7t�4
Western Steerc
Family
ste;u:iiovse
Banquet & Party Facilities tor 15
to 150 Persons Take Qut Qrder$
3005 E. 10th St Greenville Call 758-8550
Open Sun Thur Ham 9pm Friday Saturday 1 lam IC
NOW OPEN
118 E r-fTn S-
SERVING HOME - 1T'J
F X) AT REASONABLE
PRICES
LJt.Cn a cusser spe: a. s
DAiLi FOB � 2 SB tax
II am - 9 pm DAlLr
All f itree are Home Wu �
lart RittKTurd fcWf Rsb oh�hr P.�! pr
�ri SfM�WtU or Baked Chirk
fhun -Hamburger Irak or Brrad rat i uttrf
Pirate runner Ray Dickerson finished third in teh 600-meter race in
1:13.6 at the Carolina invitational track meet this past weekend.
Kf � K�
Ytadeer
TWO BACON 4E66 BISCUITS $1.29
IV-asz proem this 11 K4T� m be �v I mlcnnjt nr i1 �� m per i
umcT per vv4i phase iN �tkt rrnrJ ru im m1i ux Thi
l i nTi m r hi � xl in . c imhirulK m with in i xhrr i ifkrr
t Iftrr )& n xl tlunns; rv inTuJ hn-jxlAM h mr� i il Ji Ihr
t. 4l.rn.injj I Unkx I RrsUiirniv l" iKan.hr
Mrrfl d �r I KRhSwen 'rfrcmilir
M ofltTmxxJihrixjjcti Mj 1 l'i
?iliWll
r'ii-tiiiii
' A HOT HAM M CHBSE;
SA�WI(REflUU�FWES
I MEDIUM s6nOWHK $1.79
rVJ�pxrcT�hjsi.iiur�inh�Kr .xJrnnjt ��sc�.��T�inpcr
lUSomrr per vtMt plcavuMimrr musi ji ini silo Ux ThiM.xj
port n ixxl in 11 xntxruin with xm txt nftrr
Vr erxiJ ittrr 10 Mi M liuh i�iK n rbr hllwtne, Umlrt- �� Restaurants 910
(iiunt-hr surrt A .90 r. 10th rrrt (rfrrmiUr Hfc-r,jixxJ(hrouftfi Ma JI
1983
Wacdeer
TRAM&L ON
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts. Sleeping Bags,
Backpacks Camping Equip
menl Steel Toed Shoes. Dishes
and Over 700 Different New and
Used Items Cowboy Boots.
tit � S
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
r
Uptown Clothing Co.
'Manager B'li Eva
ABORTIONS
i 74 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 OS75
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
In the Corner At Greenville Square
Men's & Women's Desiqner Fashions
New Spring Casuals Are Coming in so Gear up now for Spring Breok.Select Early
Happy Legs shirts
Palmetto Knit Tops
Equitation Knit tops
Jordoche Knit top
Palmetto shorts
Plus,Tops by OP,you Bobes.Pure Gold
Hang 10-15 off
La Blanca-15 off
Daffy-10 off
EeniMoeni-10off
Greenville Square Shopping Center
756-9509
Hours: 10-6. Mon -Sat
saalts
MIOh KKPAIK
113 Grande Ave.
755 1228
ADVERTISED
ITtM�OLiCr
Each of thm� aoVaMlBed Mams � rsqutrad to ba readlh avaHaoia tor saia at or
Ibatow th� eoverHaed prlca In each AAP Store eicapt as apacrficalty notad
In 8Mb Bd,
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU Sot. Feb. 26 AT A4P1N Greenville, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Squore Shopping Center
Greenville, N.C.
SELLABRATION
Between now and F�b 26. we will
redewm all national manufactur-
er s cents-ofl coupon up to SO
for double) their value Offer good
on national manufacturer cents
oft coupons only (Food retailer
coupons not acceptedCus-
tomer must purchase coupon
product in specified size Ex-
pired coupons wiH not be hon-
ored One coupon per customer
per item No coupons accepted
for free merchandise Offer does
not apply to A&P or other store
coupons whether manufacturer
is mentioned or not. When the
value of the coupon exceeds 50
or the retail of the item, this offer
is limited to the retail price
Clip thm Mmnufmcturmn' Cents Off
Coupons from your mmM, newspapers
and mmgmxmms. . . then bring them to
your A P Food Store f
Sawin�s are Gnat with ASP s
SAVIHGS C0UP0MS'
savings i
DOUBLE
e�CS couponcaarrsorr� AOOCO TOTAL COUOOM cctrrs off �t �
COUPON A25�25' 50
COUPON B18�18' 36'
COUPON C5050 $100
COUPOND75'25 $1.00
GOOD
SUN
MON.
&
TUES.
ONLY
MARKET
STYLE
Ground 4
Beef
5 lbs. or
more
AaP QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE
Sirloin Tip
169
lb. I
9-12 lb.
avg.
A4P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
Chuck Roast
129
lb. I
Bone
In
CALIFORNIA CRISP SOLID ICEBERG
Head
Lettuce
2
ftftc
big
heads
III
CALIFORNIA SWEET & JUICY
Navel Oranges
B b�v size �
PLAIN-SELF-RISING
PiJIsbury Flour
S-cat Groce.
Savings y
WASHINGTON STATE
EXTRA FANCY RED
Delicious Apples
49c
lb
Coke
Mello Yello
Diet Coke
2 Liter Bottle
1
09
REGULAR
f PEPPERONI � SAUSAGE
CHEESE
Ann Page Pizza
ANN PAGE
Ice Cream
139
2 gal.
ctn.
SUPER SAVER COUPON
You Pay Only 1
SAVE 90' ON �� An !
Bean CM
Coffee ITl i
3 lb. M
bag b 618
Eight O'Clock
GOOD THRU SAT. FEB. 26 AT AAP LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER
SUPER SAVER COUPON
HUNTS
SAVE 20c ON
You Pay Only
Tomato Ketchup
32
02.
btl. 'egew emmr a
GOOD THRU SAT. FEB. 26 AT A&P LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER I
89
0
JSr1" M " P jB SUPER SAVER COUPO?
' SUNSHINE SAVE 30� ON
You Pay Only 1
Krispy Crackers
1 lb.
pfcg.
59
0
GOOD THRU SAT FEB 26 AT A&P LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER '





Title
The East Carolinian, February 22, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 22, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.252
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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