The East Carolinian, February 17, 1983






�he SaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 Nott
Thursday, February 17,1983
Greenville, N.C
12 Pages
C irculation 10.000
Reference
LIBRARIAN
ondkfyt
Hpb-Ttm 8i fy
fVkfay Gm-b?m
Saturday Skw-Spw
Library Vandalism
Costly Books Damaged By Careless Users
l�h�to By CIMDV WALL
librarian shows a page torn in an expensive library text. Librarians have noticed frequent damage to books
and periodicals bv students who tear out pages instead of having them photo-copied. The vandalism causes m-
conenience to students needing the resources as well as expense and trouble for the library.
World News At A Glance
United Press International
SAl I 1 AKE CITY � Artificial heart patient
Barney Clark was hack in intensive care today
because of "lung and kidney insufficiency A
University of Utah Medical Center spokesman said
Clark was using a respirator, but his condition still
was listed as fair.
JERUSALEM � The Israeli parliament today
defeated three no-confidence motions demanding
that Prime Minister Menachem Begin's government
step down because of the Beirut massacre commis-
sion report. The Knesset voted 64-56 along party
lines to defeat the challenges to Begin's ruling coah-
'�WASHINGTON - The House Budget Committee
chairman eluded the administration today tor claim-
ing that cutbacks in the military budget would under-
mine national security. Rep. James Jones. D-Okla
urged Defense beoeiaiy Caspar Weinberger to
"participate positively" in paring spending.
ADELAIDE, Australia - Roaring brush fires
swept southeastern Australia today, killing Hi peo-
ple injuring hundreds and destroying at least 100
homes The fires were whipped by 50 mph winds and
burned hundreds of square miles.
NFW DEI HI. India - Three policemen were ac-
cidentally shot to death by fellow officers today dur
ng noting in the northeastern state of Assam. Their
deaths brought to 277 the number of people killed �n
election violence this month.
WASHINGTON - There was a sharp improve-
ment in the nation's factory production last month
Most analysts consider that to be the best sign yet the
recession is ending. ,
NEW YORK -Stock prices moved higher in early
trading on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones in-
dustnai average .as challenging the 1.100 level tor
the second consecutive session.
WASHINGTON � The government will appeal a
court order barring clinics from telling parents their
teenage daughters are getting birth control pills or
devices. U.S. District Judge Henry Werker blocked
enforcement of a regulation covering health clinics
receiving federal funds until a trial is held.
WASHINGTON � Whistle-blower Hugh Kauf-
man savs an Environmental Protection Agency pro-
gram to clean up toxic waste sites is hampered by of-
ficials giving polluters "sweetheart deals He charg-
ed today that some polluters have asked the White
House to stop his accusations.
WASHINGTON � Secretary of State George
Shultz says the government's $14.5 billion foreign
economic and military aid request is an investment in
world stability. He told a House committee the funds
can help create conditions in less developed countries
that will reduce the need for military forces.
PHILADELPHIA � The Philadelphia 76ers com-
pleted a shakeup in their roster for the National
Basketball Association's stretch run. They traded
rookie forward Russ Schoene to the Indiana Pacers
for veteran forward-center Clemon Johnson.
GREENVILLE � Chancellor John Howell an-
nounced Tuesday that Janice H. Faulkner has been
named director of the ECU Regional Development
Institute. Faulkner has been acting director since
A long time faculty member in the English depart-
ment Faulkner was chosen from among 130 ap-
plicants to head the organization which works to pro-
mote economic and cultural projects in eastern North
Carolina. e
Faulkner has served as assistant director of the
organization since September, when she returned
from an 18-month stint as exective director of the
N.C. Democratic Party. Howell said the institute is
apolitical.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
S if) "Aritfr
Librarians at Joyner I ibrary have
seen an increase in the number of
books and periodicals vandalized by
readers who, according to some
library employees, are apparently
too lazy to make copies of the pages
they need.
"1 don't see how they have the
nerve to do it said Ruth Katz,
associate director of the library.
"It's hard for me to believe that
somebodv wouldn't go and spend a
dime Katz said several librarians
have reported an increase in damag-
ed librarv books.
Last week, an ECU student was
caught cutting pictures out of
magazines to paste onto a collage,
Katz said. The student was told to
repay the library for the cost of the
periodicals he destroyed. "The next
week, he came back to the library
and something was torn out of a
book he needed
Katz said she didn't want to ban
the student from using the library,
but she wanted to impress upon all
people that it was not right or per-
missible to destroy library materials.
In the library's reference section,
the problem with vandalism is much
more serious.
A student who was presumably
working on a finance class project
tore a page out of a new book that
belonged to a seven-volume set
worth over S700. According to
reference librarian Ralph Scott, the
page was from a book commonly
used by business students titled hey
Business Ratios.
Although the library ha- no proof
of who tore the page out of the
book, they did know the specific
classes working on the project. Katz
contacted the business school and
requested instructors to remind heir
students of the illegality of such ac-
tions.
"I feel sorry tor the next stu-
dentsaid Martha I apas, is head ol
the Joyner reference department.
"I've been blowing my stack
everytime I find another damaged
book. Some people pa their tuition
and thev think it entitles them to a
free copv of anvthing thev want
Lapas believes those people who
are vandalizing the library arc a
minority. She said she didn't view
the destruction as a tally
malacious act
I apas attributed most of the van
dalization to thoughtlessness and
carelessness. The real people hurt bv
the acts. I apas said, are the student-
who are denied use of the materials
When a book is vandalized
creates problems for the librarian-
too, said assistant professor in the
reference section Artemis Kares.
To repair the damaged books
Jovner employees have to make a
request to the inter-librarv loan
system for a copv of the missing
pages, which then must be glued
back into the book bindings. The
library sometimes replaces damaged
periodicals with microfilm.
Incidents of vandalw the
library occur about once a eek.
Lapas said.
"We try to emphasiK I in
Enelish 1200 classes 1 apas added
Katz challenged students to rut peer
pressure on students thev saw
destroying library propertv
Katz also noted that beside 'ne ac-
tual cost of replacing or repa
the vandalized item, the librae
to spend a lot of time tra �
down, processing and ordering new
materials.
Slay, Clement Cutting Corners
For Energy Contest's Top Spot
Slay and Clement Residence Halls
are locked in a battle for first place
as the Student Residence Associa
tion's Energy Contest nears its half
way pouil.
As the contest entered its si sin
week. Slay, with a 14.73 percent
savings, held a slight lead over Cle-
ment dorm which stood at 14.26
percent. Scott hall, second overall
last year, is presently in third with a
12.05 percent savings.
"1 feel it's (the contest) been go-
ing very well, but it could be bet-
ter said Mark Niewald. vice presi-
dent of the SRA and chairman ot
the energy committee. "I'd like to
see more dorms putting in more ef-
fort
A 30-week base was used to deter-
mine the dorms electrical use sav-
ings. Because these figures include
the nine-week totals from last year's
contest. Niewald expects this sear's
winners to actual!) have small
percentage totals
"It's harder for them to save as
much mi ci. Nkwatri �aul. l m
year's contest will span 11 weeks ex-
cluding the week of spring break.
The hall finishing with the highest
percentage of electricity saved will
win a cash prize of S250. The
runner-up hall receives S200 and
SI50 goes to the third place finisher.
In addition, any residence hall that
saves a total of five percent or more
will receive a$H� pria
There is currently a special con-
test that will award a $50 prize to the
residence hall which ha the highest
percentage saved for the two week
period ending Tuesday. Slav hall
with a total percentage of 19.19 sav-
ed during last week has, a strong lead
over Clement and Fletcher which
have one week totals of 15 19 tnd
.41 respectively
Total possible pne money from
the SRA contest is S2.250 Ntne
tnousanu aoiuu in electrical emt
was saved during last year's contest
Niewald said that electrical ap
phances, such as ovens and hair
dryers, use a major portion of elec
tricky in a dorm. He suggested that
students shut off appliances as soon
as they've finished using them.
Fletcher with a total percentage
savings of 10.17 is in fourth place
overall. Scott with a 9.14 percent
and Tyler with a 8.79 percent round
out the top six. Jones Hall with a
nine week total of 21 6 percent sav
ed was the winner of last year's con-
test. Scott with 20.38 percent was se
cond and Slay was third with 15.60
percent.
Colleges Put A Halt To
Fraternity House Pranks

TUCSON, AZ (CPS) University of
Arizona officials"just coulun't stand
it anvmore Over the last five
years, Sigma Nu fraternity members
had done everything from driving
golf balls off the roof of their frat
house occasionally hitting cars,
windows and bystanders - to dum-
ping trash on parked cars and even
throwing oranges and other objects
at campus police.
But then officials at the nearby
campus hospital discovered bullet
holes in an office window, and a .22
caliber bullet lodged inches from
where a hospital worker normally
sat Police traced the angle of fire to
a third floor window of the Sigma
Nu house.
"That was the straw that broke
the camel's back recalls Dean of
Students Robert S. Svob of the
shooting incident. "We finally had
to get tough
Less than a month later, on Jan.
10 1983, one Sigma Nu member
was facing charges of illegal
firearms possession, and the re-
maining 69 members of the fraterni-
ty � which had been on campus
since 1918 � were ordered to vacate
the house indefinitely.
There are, in fact, increasing
numbers of homeless brothers like
Arizona's Sigma Nu. Scores of
fraternity chapters around the coun-
try are being disciplined and
suspended in a new, nationwide get-
tough administrative crackdown.
It's the first time many colleges have
actually disciplined their frater-
nities.
A few schools are even toying
with the idea of banning the greek
organizations altogether. For the
first time in 20 years, for example,
the University of Georgia last spring
abolished a fraternity-Chi Phi
because of alleged hazing and drug
use. Alabama A&M permanently
banned Omega Phi Psi last semester
for repeated disorderly conduct over
the last two years. The final straw:
members abducted a student and
threw him over a cliff. The Universi-
ty of Arkansas-Pine Bluff suspend-
ed two houses last semester for
beating pledges, one of whom was
hospitalized for internal bleeding
after his brothers-to-be severely
paddled him.
Dozens of lesser penalties have
been handed out recently for similar
behavior. "The idea of excusing all
extremes of fraternity behavior
under the notion the 'boys will be
boys' just isn't the case anymore
observes Eileen Stevens, founder of
the Committee to Halt Useless Cam-
pus Killings (CHUCK), a citizens'
group working to stop fraternity
violence. Noise, litter, catcalling
and even violence aren't all that new
along college greek rows, she says.
What's new is the reaction against
il- A
"College administrators and na-
tional offices of fraternities aren't
tolerating the antics and pranks
anymoreshe notes. "There's real-
ly a pendulum effect involved
here says Jonathan Brant, presi-
dent' of the National Interfraternity
Conference. "Fifteen years ago
most schools kept a closer watch on
fraternities. Then, for about ten
Variations On A Theme
cimot w�u-
S� SUPPORT, P�ge 3
, �.� 10 ttk, .dvu of ,�!��� mild �mp.r.l�r�. Soooy �ki� .��11. m�c.r,
Reserve Board
i Sets Policy To
Maintain Trend
WASHINGTON (UPD
Federal Reserve Chairman Paul
Volcker todav detailed new mones
supply targets for 198?. targets that
keep the Fed on about the ame
policy course it has been following
The new targets contain ad
justments for changed Cir
cumstances in the banking world.
but Fed officials said thev are in et
feet about the same as those of Us.
vear.
' But since actual growth of the na-
tion's money supply exceeded last
vear's targets, the new targets, it
achieved, would involve shnw ac-
tual growth of the money supply
this year than last.
That is consistent with the bed s
long-range policy of gradually slow-
ing money growth to curb ����
Volcker told the Senate Banking
Committee the new targets are aim
ed at providing enough money for
the economy to recover but not so
much that inflation is rekindled.
The Fed left unchanged last year s
target of 6.5 percent to 9.5 percent
growth for the very broad measure
of the nation's money supply,
known as M-3.
For M-2 � a somewhat less broad
measure that includes many of the
new money market deposit accounts
that have changed banking figures
� it set a target of 7 percent to 10
percent growth for this year
Fed officials said that when ad
justments are made for these new
accounts, into which the public has
been pouring hundreds of billions of
dollars, this amounts to roughly the
same as last year's M-2 target of 6
percent to 9 percent.
J






THFEASTl AROI INI AN
FI BRl AlO 1 198
Announcements
FILM
Th film entitled Burning
Meir wiH be snown Aednesdav
February 23 1��2 at the Ledon.a
Wrigm Cultural Centei at 7 00
pm Everyone is mvited toattcnd
ULTIMAX
TOURNAMENT
Ultima 83 s com.ng On
March 26 and 7 the ECU iRa'es
will hov their tust ult.ma'e tou'
nament Make plans to see some ot
the best ultimate to be piayed on
the east coast this year Theirjtes
are planning a road tr,p to
Gatnsv.ile. Fia over Spr 'ig Break
to pi a v m a �oui namii ,ia catch
some rays 'oo' Club meeTnqs are
SAon n-ghts(V rm 24fl VSC
Anyone neres'ed s f imp
REVIEW BOARD
Persons interested in Ming tor
SGA Rev ew Board please do so in
Room 228 o Menoenhaii Student
Center F.ve positions st,n open
TAXES
volunteers trom the ECU A
counting Soc e'v ano the National
Association ot Accountants will be
in the ma1 lobby ot Mendenhal
Student Cente' fo neip no vduais
prepare tax returns trom 4 to 7 pm
eai" Tuesfla. anr Thursday "
Feb' oar ea. h Tjesaa. n
SAa'vh ano Tuesdays ana
Thursdays in April through April
15
TKE BOXING
TK E Boxer Regist-at.or .s go
ng on now at Vemor.a' G 'rom
5 30 to 7 00 pm �onaay through
Thursday until February 24th All
amateur boxers welcome 8th An
p.uai Tournament takes piace on
March 15 16 17 at M nges C01
seum Th.s odx ng event is sane
t.oneo by the American Boxing
Federation
CO OP
Positions 'Of le guards
historians naturalists and clerk
typists are available a Nortt
Carolina state parks th.s sui,r
Locations iiK ude c ort Macon
Hammocks Beach ano Hanging
Rock among others A SO � "
County yv-ii hire three people tor
summer receaton pes '
Come by Raw 313 c' "e
'5' iVi I tor cie'a 5 Hurry
DELTASIGMA THETA
� t vou re go-no o be n town s
wcekrno havi � n ' ike
��me out from studying and par
w.th Delta Sjma Theta Fnoar
mght Iron- 10 0C 2 00 A' the
edon. a A gt ' ' ' entei
The cos' ' ' r5 tor students
and V 00 'o- nor si � � -�'� �� 1
mere
WZMB
ice V' he "OS's tne
E ecyrk Rainbow Radio Show '
AZVB Fr-aa. atternoons from 3
to 6 pm and Sal � � � � � Bhts �� rr -
13 mideiiotil ' the incredible
-1 � irr Album spe ins a'e area
a'4p- and 7-1" Fi layttiealbum
specai s by the group Demon and
P �� T i- �pecTec
Guest Sa'urda. 'he album
soecia z. the Scorp.ans aio s
entitled ho' and "eav. Wan'
su'e you- o.a' is set to oi 3 a' ev
�rres thank you
ZBT HAPPY HOUR
Ze'a Be'a Tau Fraternity ar:
Pantaoa Bob s are having a Map
py Hour ana d'aw ng tor pr.zes on
cxe's can be
jr from one Ot
� K enl aonaton
- ,� rnt � � �" New '
GRADUATING
ACM ECU Chapter invites you
to 10m us on Thursday Feb 17 at
3 30 tor a look at Resumes Jim
Westmoreland will be speaking on
how to create an effective resume
Meetings held in Austin Rm 132
Seniors are encouraged to attend
YARDSALE
Alpha X. Delta sorority will
have a yard sale Saturday Feb 26
start ng at 8 00 a m Clothes odds
ana ends anything and
everything1 508 E 11th street
Watch tor the signs1
PHI KAPPA PHI
Fo prospective members o Phi
Kappa Phi Honor Society if you
yOU are a Jonior with a J 8 &PA or
a Senior with a 3 6 GPA oe on The
aiert tor a invitation ot member
sh.p The letters are being sent to
the student s permament ad
iieress Reply mus be made by
March 1 i�83
NCSL
Aant to know what 'he state ana
national governments are getting
nto? Get ,nto NCSL the North
Caro'na Student Legislature
where we nc out wna s new ' We
discover what s new w th ruies
ano regulations on safety the
economy defense ana other
tun -ssues Cnme on by for
yourself and tna what s new w th
NCSl every Monaay night at 7 pm
in room 212 Menaenrtan ve.an
promise ntr.gue tHjl we can tr ! !
ABA
Alpha Beta Alpha the library
sc lence fraternity will be holding a
pledging ceremony February 22 aT
5 30 pm in room 219 Library
science department An persons
nterested in L.brarianship are
welcome
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
There will be a genera) meeting
n T hvrsdav cebf uary IJffi at 6 00
p ii The meel ��- � be he'd at
he ipternatonai house on E 'th
Sftef' � i- m&er s and in
tere.e pesofs are urged to at
fpnd All persons who signed up tor
soccer cleave ge n 'ough wth
u'S Ovares at J$2 �
CAREER CHOICE
� hp Strong Cannptoetl n'eres'
inventory s ottered ever, Tues
:a, a' a PV p J05 yr-ght Annex
when SChOO! S ' s�-vs ?n wth the
� � i ptiOftS ot eam naon period
and registration t- h-s is
tva abe tc an students a no cost
No formal reg.strat-or srequired
COUNSELING
A twc� pa't rr.n. ser es ottered a
no cost Cy the ijn.ye'S t. Counsel
.ng Center entitled How to Sue
ceed in College ano Still Have
Fun Oil Monda. February 21
-�hpr one
Test Anxiety
February 22 1983 B
will be conducte � � I
. 5 Ar.ght Anne�
s Mow tc
I " tsoar
'h sessoihs
� V 4PM
SJ 6�i Nr
"uesoay Fee
oba ned a' ttie r7or
the brothe
ne by a
On The Bioc�
acace regisat.on nee essar,
PHI ALPHA THETA
Pn. Alpha Theta win present Dr
Mary l ndemann of UNC A with
an tnforrnative prograrn intftted
Medical Nemesis in H stor ca
Perspective Or Lindemann will
j s.j5 eghteen�r and
nmetheenth century criticisms of
protessonaf medicine The pro
gram will be Thurscay Feb 17 at
7 30 p m in Brewster B 104 L gh
refreshments wi" be served
Cow�ng he presetT on The
Puoi'C s im led
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our next bi weekly meeting will
be held on Tursday Feb 17 m
Mendenhall s multi purpose room
at 7 p m Members are expectd to
attend Recently invited persons
are urged to attend as well a any
persons wishing to iOin A
minimum GPA of 3 0 is required
tor membership
WINTERFEST!
Sign Language Club members
GET YOUR TICKETS NOW for
MNTERFEST" This all day gala
event will feature German foods
and dancing Transportation will
re provided to and trom Raleigh
Advance tickets are 15 00 Signup
in BA IW Don't miss it1 it's Sat
Feb 19
SIGMATAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta will meet on
Thursday. February 17 at 7 30
p m in the Mendenhall Cot
leehouse A poetry reading will be
given by Julie Fay and Peter
Makuck William Hallberg will
give a fiction reading Free pony
keq No admission All members
and their guests are encouraged to
attend
RECRUITING
Representatives of the North
Carolina State Highway Patrol
will be recruiting qualified in
dividuais for the position ot
Trooper on February 17, 1983 -rx
tne Lobby of Betk Building Ali.ed
Health; from v 00 a m until noon
The patrol 'S particularly ;n
terested in recruiting women and
ati women students are encourag
ed to stop by and see what is beng
ottered i believe you will be
pleasantly surprised about salary
ano fringe benefits
ARCHERY
I nterested m Archery or Bow
-�- nting it so there is a new sports
i lub forming iust for you
Members do not have to have ar
Skill whatsoever iust the desire to
learn the exacting sport of archer
First meeting Feb 17, at 7 00pm
in Room 103 Memorial Gym For
more information call Gene
Taylor at 752 0062
IFC
The fraternities of ECU would
liKe to congratulate coach Ed
Emory on his excellent recruiting
season and wish the entire P.rate
'earn good luck during their
163 84 season
FAITH HOPE AND
LOVE
- ; th Mope and Love, a Chris
1 an fellowship founded on the
A or- of God meets each Friday
nrgm at 7 30 m Jenkins Art
I ng Auditorium Learn how
o live victoriously in Christ and
a'was know that Yov are Loved'
CONGRATULATIONS
T s sers of Alpha X- Delta
would 'ike to congratuidde our
new spring pledges Kim
liodte'ter Kim Dudley Karen
Pr dgen l sa Spares JOy Wnkins
arc Sharon Winfield Good luck
gins' You're in for a terrific
semester
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MAJORS CLUB
The PE fvaiOrs Ciub s
available to donate time ano ser
vn.es to any organizations or tune
tions on campus or n Greenville
who need help with 'good cause"
efforts that benefit people and fhe
commnity in general Cnanatabie
organizations, human service
groups and other benev loents or
philanthropic groups are en
c our age to contact the club for any
ass.stance they may be able to
provde
NURSING
School ot Nursing preregistra
tion tor summer session and fall
semester, 19S3 will occur during
daytime office hours of faculty ad
visors. February 28 through
March 4 To expedite this process,
a sign up sheet will be posted on
the office door of each faculty ad
visor on February 14. 1983
Students are requested to indicate
on that sheet before February 26
their preferred conference time
Students who expect to meet all
requirements for acceptance into
sophomore level clinical nursing
courses, fall semester, must
secure an information sheet and
an "Intent to Enroll" form in
NB 152 Failure to submit the form
will result m fhe student's name
being placed on an alternate list
for admission into those clinical
nursing courses
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ
presents Prime Time Every
Thursday nite at 7 9pm in Biology
Building Room 103 A time ot fun
fellowship and training in how to
live a victorious Christian hfe
WOMEN'S AWARENESS
MONTH
The f'nai program for vVest
Area's Women's Awareness
Vonth will be a film and discus
sion given by Dr Ken vVilson, of
the Sociology Department concer
ning Sexual Harassment Ttvspro
gram will be held in the Garrett
Hall Lobby on Tuesday February
22 at 7 00 p m All ECU students
are very welcome to attend
PHI ALPHATHETA
Phi Alpiha Theta will present
Dr Mary Lmdermann of UNC
Wilmington with an informative
program entitled MEDICAL
NEMESIS IN HISTORICAL
PtRSPECTivE Dr Lindemann
will discuss eighteenth and nine
teenth century criticisms of pro
tessional medic me The program
will begin at 7 30 p m in Brewster
Bidg BB 104 Light refreshments
will be served following this
presentation The public is invited
Program .s on Thursday Feb 17
SABMEETING
The Student Athletic Board will
meet Tuesday. Feb 22. 183 at 5 30
in Room 212 Of Mendenhall
MCAT
Mr jOhn 5 Chiiders. Director
ECU Testing Center announced
that the new Med'tai College Ad
mission Test MCAT application
packets have arr.ved in the
Testing Center Speight 105 The
test dates for 1983 are Apm 9 1983
and
ttooer 1 1983 The deadline date
tor Apr.i 9 est 'S Marcn n 1983
ana the deadline date tor submit
' ng apP'cation for the October 1
1983 test s September 2. 1983
LDS INSTITUTE OF
RELIGION
The Latter oay Sant student
Association inv.tes you to this
week s Institute class which pro
mises to be enlightening The sub
tect w.n the Atonment of jesus
Chr.st and His Laws of Justice and
Merc� Oassmeefs on Thursdays
trom 6 30 8 00 p m in Brewster
room 203B Like the Master m.ght
say if he were here we say
"Come and See '
NEED A JOB?
Freshmen and Sophomores if
roc need a tub and can type at
least 60 words a mnute with few
mistakes contact the Productions
Manager at the East Carolinian
between 3 00 and 6 00 757 6166
6367 6309
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1 L u . JII J
The Fast Carolinian
Serving rn�' oonnu communtty
smu- 1925
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during The acarnic
year and every Wednesday dur
ng tne summer
The fcast Carolinian is the of
t c i a i newspaper ot fcas'
Carolina University, owned
operated and published tor and
by the students ot Eas' Carolina
University
Subscription Rate (20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus ot ECU
Greenville. N C
PO S T MA S T E K bend addr ess
hanqes To Tne East Carolinian
Old Soutn Building ECU Green
v.lle NC 27834
Telephone ?S7 63e6 637 6J0
STARTS
TOMORROW
plaza �a
cinema V2-3
PITT-PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
CONGRATULATIONS
The Brothers and Little Sisters
ot Pi Kappa Phi would like to con
gratuiate our new pledges tor their
excellent progress They rate
been working hard and learn.nq
much They consist ot Scott
Berr, Barry Deans Elv, for
rest Joe Franc .s Pett- Giynn
Chip Hachmeister j.mmr
Hardee Mike Holloman Thomas
Hopper Carl Krai: Jett iuedeke
Phiihp Moore. Todd PoMard Alan
Poweii johnn, kainey Greg
Umsteao ana Ed Aaida Keep up
the good work
AMBASSADORS
There win be a general meting
ol the ECU Amoassaaors on Wed
Feb 23 The meeting will begin at
5 00 In the MSC mult, purpose
room we nae lots oi sign up
sheets to till Please make plans to
attend this meeting
ECU BAHA'I CLUB
Tne ECU Baha i Assentation a II
meet in 241 Mendenhan eac h T ues
da� trom 11 unTii noon Baha � s
beneve m The oneness ot God. The
Unity of Mankind and that the
maior world religions stem from
the same Creator Anyone in
terested s welcome to come anc
share your thoughts with us For
more information call 752 4483 or
752 1018
AHEA
vrn meet Monda Feb 2' at
5 00 m 'he Vanlandingham Room
We will work on the Scrapboofc
MemoeS are encouraged To at
tend
tm
iw
oliVof'
MrtitKicfcJwyn-liayer pmb
A McElroy Mcf boy Production
A Peter Weir Film
MEL SIGOURMEY
GIBSON WEAVER
The Year of Living Ddiigeroifcly
BiUNerT Michaelfroriv Lindarlunt Ptaeirema
I
MON -FRI SAT & SUN
3-7 9 05 O 2 50- 55-7-9 05
PG �MOTti 9MK
��� f I .1
ECU DISCOUNT
on all prescription
eyeglasses
Selected Art Supplies
and Weaving Apparel
SPRING
EAMIMG
Sale begins
MondayFeb. 21 and
ends FriFeb. 25.
i
4 6
t 9
V.
Come on in and mop up
on the great bargains!
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Owned and operated by East Carolina University Wright Building

Supp
ontinurd From Y
-
adults, and ou
N
mo-
I ' i
� -
i

Series O
By Dept
Bv (,KM. KIDrOl I
-

!
-
SI
wel
rented
401 S. EVANSl
-ARVONY HOI.
"VQUR PROFEJ
1
8t
ANN
R
TIME
- 1
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
I-EBRL'ARY 17, 9�3
Support Increases For Control Of Fraternities
i


:
OoWw yn-Mayer praots
ray ft ntiEhoy Production
A Peter Weir film
SKKXJRNEY
3W WEAVER
tear of Living Dangerously
LindaHunt Mod
p; �Miri. imuc Mtirci ?
l:
mop up
largains!
RE
it Building
Continued From Page 1
years we got away from
that, and adopted the
attitude that 'you're all
adults, and you can
supervise yourselves
But Brant adds,
"Now we're seeing
more interest and con-
cern and better supervi-
sion. Man schools are
bringing onboard so-
meone specifically to
supervise fraternity
members and to work
with them
Brant attributes the
crackdoun on fraterni-
ty violence and pro-
blem behavior to "a
higher caliber of
awareness" among ad-
ministrators and
students. Others at-
tribute it to the growing
number of lawsuits
against fraternities and
the colleges themselves.
Last semester, a
Virginia court found
the Phi Kappa Sigma
fraternity at the
University of Virginia
liable for $125,000 in
damages after a student
was hit in the head with
a beer can by one of the
fraternity members.
And a University of
Delaware student is
currently suing both his
fraternity and the
university for injuries
he suffered during an
intiation ritual two
years ago. At that time,
a member of the Sigma
Phi Epsilon fraternity
poured lye-based
cleaner over the stu-
dent, causing second-
and third degree burns
on the pleage's face.
head and chest.
"I think one of the
main reasons schools
and national chapters
are getting increasingly
concerned over frater-
nity problems are
because of just such
lawsuits and the
damages they've had
to pay notes CHUCK
founder Stevens, who
herself sued Alfred
University and the Klan
Alpine fraternity after
her son died in a 1978
hazing incident there.
Moreover, she
saysstudents
themselves are bringing
about changes on some
campuses. Now
students are coming in
much more aware that
they don't have to par-
ticipate in dangerou;
rituals, and they are
Series Of Films Given
By Dept. Of Marketing
B GREG RIDEOl T
St�� EdHat
The Department of
Marketing in the
School of Business will
present an introductory
film series on
Marketing in March
and April. The six dif-
ferent movies on
various topics will be
shown in room 130 of
Rawl Building. Anyone
interested can attend.
Cheryl Parker, a lec-
turer in the marketing
department, will coor-
dinate the film series.
She said the project was
being undertaken to e
pose business and
marketing students, as
well as other interested
people, to the field oi
marketing.
I he films are being
rented from different
schools across the
country, Parker said.
The first film, to be
shown on March 2, is
an overall view of
marketing. All films
will be shown at 3 p.m.
Dr. Edward Wheatley,
chairman of the
marketing department,
will speak and be
available for questions
at this film.
The next film, on
March 3, will be in-
troduced b James
Furnev, career plann-
ing director at ECU. It
will cover opportunities
for jobs in marketing.
On March 23 and
March 24. films ex-
plaining the promo-
tional aspects of
marketing will be
shown. The first film
will be on advertising
and the second on sales
management.
The final two films
of the series will be on
marketing research and
retailing. They will be
shown on April 13 and
April 14.
Dr. Wheatley sug-
gested that students
come to the first film to
get an overall view of
marketing, and then
pick out an area of in-
terest and come to the
see the film on that sub-
ject.
The funding for the
film series is coming
from an SGA grant.
Parker said the Stu-
dent Marketing
Association is also
helping in setting up the
event.
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
olH & RINC Ml
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(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHON E 7523866
"VQUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT PEALER
Introducing
Tbe
"Luanda Chi Alpha
little sisters"
I 1 M
I ill II I
at
200 West
i m inuavs
8th
ANNUAL TKE Boxing
REGISTRATION
beginning to question
the need for having on-
ly greek organizations
at all on campus.
About 500 students
at Stephen F. Austin
University recently
showed up to par-
ticipate in a debate on
whether the entire
DATES
PLACE
TIME:
. Feb.2 Th- Feb.25
MEMORIAL GYM
onE.CU.CAMPUS
5:30 �o 7:00
MONDAY THRU THURSDAY
TOURNAMENT DATES MARCH 15th, 16th,17th
u . h a Tmateurboxingstanding to b� abk to box
greek system there
should be abolished.
And a faculty-student
committee at Trinity
College in Connecticut
last semester recom-
mended that the
school's six fraternities
and two sororities be
abolished permanently.
"The committee
simply concluded that
the fraternities had
outlived their
usefulness says Trini-
ty spokeswoman Kathy
Frederick. Among
other things, the com-
mittee said the greek
svstem was so
"inherently divisive
that it fostered
"exclusionary practices
based on secret codes
and agreements It
concluded that, "in
short, no need exists"
for them.
Sometimes off-
campus authorities take
a similar view. The
Davis, Calf, city coun-
cil is pondering new
laws punishing noise
and litter oftenders
along Cal-Davis'
fraternity row. UC-
Davis, moreover, is
ready to "initiate
disciplinary pro-
cedures" against Sigma
Alpha Epsilon and
Sigma Nu if members
again harass certain
campus women'v
groups. Vice
Chancellor for Studeni
Affairs Tom Dutton
warns.
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�tf� Safit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, g�
Mike Hughes, stawgEduor
w v midditt Cindy Pleasants, sports �diw
WAVERLY MERRITT, Dvrctor of Advrrtuing v �"
SCOTT LINDLEY. �. � REG R.DEOUT, ta �
All AFRASHTEH. o- �- STEVE BaCHNER' ��� �-
STEPHANIE GROON. ��. ��- JULIANA FAHRBACH, W �
CLAY THORNTON. MM � T�DD EVANS' uf �"
February 17, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
The Vandals
Joyner's Books Getting The Axe
Employees of Joyner Library
recently expressed their anger and
distress at the growing number of
incidents of vandalism occurring
there. Books and magazines are all
too commonly found with pages
torn out, partially torn or scribbled
on. Estimates on the extent of
damage at present are, of course, in-
conclusive, but considering the fact
that the problem is ongoing, un-
doubtedly the toll runs into
thousands of dollars.
Perhaps some students simply
don't realize what reference
materials cost nowadays. (For in-
stance, one recently vandalized
reference book was but a single
volume in an extensive set valued at
more than $700.) And worse yet,
those same students may not com-
prehend the problems that arise as a
result of their self-centered
carelessness.
It's downright sad that something
like this has to be written in the first
place, but it seems there are a few
among us who could definitely
benefit from a little "parental" pep
talk. After all, children will be
children.
So, you little kiddies who like to
color in Joyner's books or tear out
the pages to make a pretty collage to
cover up the bare space on your wall
next to the Micke Mouse poster,
listen up: Coloring on or tearing out
pages of books that don't belong to
you is wrong. It's bad, bad, bad.
Sure, all the other kids may be do-
ing it, but we all know that doesn't
make it right, don't we? Come on,
kiddies, we're in college. Twelve
years is plenty of time to outgrow
those nasty habits you acquired in
kindergarten.
In this paper's opinion, the direc-
tors of Joyner Library would be
well within their rights to revoke
library privileges of those students
who fancy themselves artists and
editors at the library's expense.
Other, stiffer penalties � fines,
suspension or perhaps tooth extrac-
tions could also be enforced with
no abridgement of justice.
Penalties, however, are not the
real problem. Without imposing on
the library a virtual Nazi state, cat-
ching students in the act is next to
impossible. Hence, you students
who wish to misuse library books
and magazines are at an obvious ad-
vantage. It's practically guaranteed
that you won't be caught. So, the
ball's in your court
But before you tear out or scrib-
ble on a page from a library book,
consider just two more things: Con-
sider yourself in the position of the
next person who wishes to use the
reference. How would you feel if
you opened a book � say, one you
needed for a research paper � and
after a half hour of index scanning
for your topic, you found page 898
facing page 901? Would you be able
to laugh it off? Would you
"understand?" Hardly.
And finally, one last request:
Consider the cost of the damage you
propose to do to the book. That
figure will undoubtedly be con-
siderably less than the lowly dime it
takes to operate a copy machine.
NIV jp
I HEAR HE WAS HORSE OF THE YEAR UNTIL HE JOINED HIS
KIDNAPPERS AMP CHAW HIS NAME TO TANYA
Washington's Answer To The Gas Glut
Ongoing Circle Of Heat
B JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � If you heat your
home with gas, you don't need to be told
that the price of natural gas is
skyrocketing. Some American families are
paying as much as 70 percent more to heat
their homes this year than they did last
winter.
Who is to blame? Congress, the gas pro-
ducers and President Reagan.
In 1978. Congress passed a truly terrible
law that regulated natural-gas prices. It
was a time of natural-gas shortages, and
Congress wanted to encourage producers
to drill for "deep-well" gas. So they allow-
ed producers to charge more for deep gas
than for shallow gas.
Now there is a natural-gas glut. So, pro-
ducers are selling their deep gas and
holding back on the shallow gas. It earns
them more profit.
Congress tried to prevent this kind of
gouging in the 1978 law bv requiring the
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to
protect consumers from ripoffs. The com-
mission was given the power to prohibit
natural-gas contracts that were excessive,
fraudulent or abusive.
This is where President Reagan comes
in He appointed energy commissioners
who are more interested in the gas pro-
ducers than their customers.
The Reagan appointees have interpreted
their authoritv very narrowly. They have
decided thev can prohibit a natural-gas
contract only if it contains outright
falsehoods.
In effect, an open season has been
declared on gas customers. The producers
can gouge you all they want, as long as
tHe don't lie to you.
Now things are right back where they
started � in Congress. A move is under-
way to rewrite the 1978 law to prevent
price-gouging by natural-gas producers.
POWER STRUGGLE: The En-
vironmental Protection Agency is beginn-
ing to look like the OK Corral.
Bureaucratic bodies are littering the land-
scape.
Last week, President Reagan fired the
head of the EPA's hazardous waste sec-
tion, Rita Lavelle. and two of her top
assistants. Our sources say as many as 10
more EPA officials may also be dismissed.
Protection of the environment has hard-
ly been at the top of the Reagan ad-
ministration's list of priorities. So why all
the bloodletting at EPA?
It wasn't the result of any deep
ideological differences of opinion. It was
simply a bureaucratic power struggle bet-
ween Lavelle and another top EPA of-
ficial. Here are the details:
Lavelle was an old Reagan friend from
California, but she had made some serious
mistakes. And the White House was wor-
ried about its fight with Congress over the
contempt citation voted against EPA chief
Anne Gorsuch.
So Lavelle got the sack. Firing her made
it look as if the White House was finally
doing some housecleaning at EPA, but it
also protected Gorsuch.
Lavelle's most serious mistake was lying
to Congress about a conflict of interest.
She used to work for Aerojet-General, and
Aerojet-General used to dump toxic wastes
at the Stringfellow Acid Pits in California.
The Stringfellow dump is one of the
government's highest-priority cleanup pro-
jects. Lavelle promised Congress she
would have nothing to do with the pr
because of her past connection �
Aerojet-General.
But a congressional committee obta:
a document which showed that vhe
been working on the Stringfellow ma
She not only was implicated in a conflict
interest, but she broke her promise to Con-
gress about it.
Lavelle also had a scrape with Rober
Perry, the EPA's enforcement chief I:
seems that Lavelle had offered lo settle a
waste-dumping cae with Monsanto
Chemical Company, but she neglected to
tell Perry that she had cut the deal. He
later turned down the settlement.
Monsanto was furious because the
tlement had already been agreed U
Perrv was furious because he hadn beer,
told about the agreement.
Lavelle wa dose to President Reag-
top assistant. Ed Meese. and expected him
to stick up for her when push came
shove. But she apparently overestimated
her influence and now is out o a
HEADLINES AND FOOTNOTES:
Federal law enforcement agencie- arc
feuding over the right to bear arms. The
labor department's inspector general wants
permission for its agents to carry guns. The
justice department agents are worried, thei
say, because they are required to in-
vestigate mobsters and cannot defend
themselves without weapons
� Both the United States and the Soviel
Union are quietly courting tiny isolat:
Albania. The reason: Albania's ai.
Adriatic ports would give Moscow -
foothold on the Mediterranean and p
threat to the U.S. Sixth Fleet.
qpqp p H3
United Feature $ -
Soviets Finding Afghans Unyielding
A Valuable Lesson In Expansionism
By GREGORY RIDEOLT
The visit last Wednesday of three former
Afghan freedom fighters was a stark
reminder to ECU of Soviet realpolmk. The
story the trio told is vivid testimony to the
Soviet Union's expansionist brand ot
foreign policy. .
Ever since the Bolshevik Revolution of
1917 the Soviets have dealt with other na-
tions to the Soviets' advantage They have
often come to the bargaining table in what
we and the rest of the world thought was
good faith, and then ignored the treaty
Terms they had just signed. An example
would be the Soviet Union's agreement at
the end of WWII to provide for free elec-
tions in Poland. The elections were never
held, and a communist government was
forced upon the Polish people.
The Soviets invaded Afghanistan
because the nationalist communist regime
of Hafizullah Amin was becoming too in-
dependent of mother Russia. The boys in
the Kremlin needed a puppet in Kabul in
order to control their interests on the Per-
sian Gulf, so they engraved their own in-
vitation and sent 80,000 troops over the
border.
By Dec. 27, 1979, Amin was dead, and
Babrak Karmal was placed into power by
the Soviets. The Soviet Union, under the
Campus Forum
Class Cut-Ups Cut Low
mm& A PLAN WE W WASHINGTON ON LIVE WITH
Ml
Today in class, a few students were
"cutting up and the instructor, who is
foreign, asked them what was going on
One student repliedShe's laughing at
the way you speak
As 1 glanced around the room, most
of the students had a look of shock and
disbelief at what this student had said
The instructor, who is a very competent
teacher, expressed his negative reaction
to the rudeness of the few students. 1
can't believe the audacity of these
students and others who are so
disrespectful of instructors. If they can t
behave as mature college students, why
don't they go back to high school, or
better yet-kindergarten? wiechman
Lonely Prisoner
I am a prisoner on death row at the
Arizona State Prison, and I was wonder-
ing if you could do me a favor. I have
been here for quite a while, and I don't
have any family or friends on the outside
to write to. I know that you are not a
pen-pal club or anything like that, but I
would really appreciate it if you could
help me.
I am 35 years old and simply desire
correspondence with either male or
female college students. I want to form
some kind of friendly type relationship
and more or less just exchange past ex-
periences and ideas. Will answer all let-
ters and exchange pictures.
Jim Jeffers
Box B-38604
Florence, AR. 85232
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
so-called Brezhnev Doctrine, claims tt ha
the right to intervene in any socialist coun-
try if the existence of communism is
threatened. The use of the doctrine in
Afghanistan was pure power politics and
in no wav was meant to help the country
But the small country of 17-mfflion peo-
ple was determined not to be another jewel
in the Russians' growing crown. Men land
bovs) like the Afghans who spoke here
took to the hills to protect their nation s
sovereignty. Today. 80 percent ot their
country is free of communist control but
the official government in Kabul is still run
bv the Soviets.
'There was a time when it was good
politics to stop communist aggression;
Korea, and then Vietnam. have since
soured the American people on the idea ol
containment and direct military invorve-
ment. So, todav, in an effort to thran the
Soviet's expansionist tendencies, we
publicly condemn the action and impose
economic sanctions. But, privately we are
helping.
The freedom fighters are using stolen
Russian-made guns in their fight for
freedom; when a gun needs a spare part,
there are none. Obviously, we can't send
them parts, but we do indirectly "send
the Afghan rebels weapons through
Pakistan.
The experts say the Soviet Union is plan-
ning to withdraw from Afghanistan in an
effort to somehow save face. New Soviet
leader Yuri Andropov is more liberal and
more open to new ideas. Maybe the
Soviets, after realizing they can't win, will
leave Afghanistan; yet that doesn't mean
they won't try again when their dominance
of the communist world is challenged.
The United States and the free world
must always be attentive to the lessons
history has taught us about the Soviet
Union. Although the Marxist Leninist
principle of an all-communist world has
been abandoned in the face of political
reality, we must still be watchful of the
power plays of a highly-militarized super
power.
Afghanistan could be the place at which
Soviet foreign policy is derailed and put on
a different track, but maybe it won't be.
Fern
B PATRK K
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The two dozei
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lobby of Gar re" Hd
Wednesday e-
probably net
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IRS
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StBVC�

KJuCOP
208 fl
SNAK BM'
& CHIPS
SNAK RO-
SODA FOI
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FOR S1 -5r
SNAK Hi
FOR $1 �1
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ASMALI
SPECIAI

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HI





M
IHEEASTCAROUNIAN FBWUAKY 17, IV83
NEIN�,
Heat
th the project
onnection with
committee obtained
- h sh tcd thai -he had
matter.
a conflict of
e to Con-
scrape with Robert
emeni
lef. It
had ff -(tie a
!onanto
eglected to
deal. He
a ise the set-
tg fed upon;
idn'l been
Reagan's
id Meese, and expected him
came to
estimated
� a job.
S ND F(X)TNOTI S
ment agencies are
to bear arms. The
inspector general wants
to carry guns. The
��' � they
. . red to
the Soviet
lationist
lbania - valuable
e Moscow a
ean and pose a
ielding
me Doctrine, claims it has
em any socialist coun-
e of communism is
ise of the doctrine in
ire power politics and
ant to help the country.
lall country of 17-million peo-
br mined not to be another jewel
fens' growing crown. Men (and
fghan poke here
� protect their nation's
percent of their
ommun I titrol, but
ernment in Kabul is still run
i a time when it was good
mmunist aggression;
then Vietnam. hae since
an people on the idea of
and direct militar involve-
. �� � i � irt to thrawrt the
tendencies, we
demn the action and impose
But, privately we are
mi fighters are using stolen
le guns in their fight for
ten a gun needs a spare part,
)ne. Obviously, we can't send
but we do indirectly "send"
rebeis weapons through
Its say the Soviet Union is plan-
)draw from Afghanistan in an
lehow save face. New Soviet
JAndropov is more liberal and
to new ideas. Maybe the
lr realizing the can't win. will
pistan; yet that doesn't mean
r again when their dominance
lunist world is challenged.
Ed States and the free world
be attentive to the lessons
taught us about the Soviet
lough the MarxistLeninist
in all-communist world has
?ned in the face of political
rust still be watchful of the
4 a highly-militarized super
in could be the place at which
In policy is derailed and put on
rack, but maybe it won't be.
Female Student Talks From The Heart On Rape
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Si.ff Wricfr
The two dozen
women who gathered in
�obby of Garrett Hall
Wednesday evening
probably never ex-
pected Rebecca Hales
lecture on the "feelings
and traumas of rape
victims" to be quite so
honest or quite so
graphic.
Hales, 20. a ECU
surgical technology stu-
dent recounted each
detail of what she call-
ed an "extra-ordinary
violent" rape that hap-
pened to her when she
was 16 years-old.
Hales was invited to
speak, by west campus
coordinator Janet
Johnson and west area
programing assistants
Lorianne Templeton
and Laurie Caret, as
part of the west campus
Women's Awareness
Month program.
During her attack,
Hales was seriously in-
jured both physically
and mentally. She was
beaten severely and
received several knife
wounds from her
assailant, who was
never apprehended.
During a three week-
period after the attack,
her weight dropped
from 128 lbs. to 89 lbs.
Because of the trauma
she was feeling, Hales
told only her best
friend about the attack
and kept it from her
IRS Over Reaching Into Waiters9 Pav
News Commentary ,i .u
? Part claim th� ihc n�i� ni� ,u�. .i .� .
family by making up
lies about her facial in-
juries.
Her friend eventually
told guidance officials
at their high school and
Hales was told she had
to report for medical
attention. She was ad-
mitted to the hospital
News Commentary
WASHINGTON
(UPI) - The long arm
�f the law, as
represented by the In-
ternal Revenue Service,
is trying to reach out
and touch waiters, bar-
maids and other
restaurant workers like-
ly to collect tips.
The IRS says manv
taxpayers who toil in
the food industry have
serious memory lapses
when it comes to listing
tips on their Forms
1040. So eight percent
of their total sales has
been made
automatically subject
to taxation.
Restaurant
employees for their
part claim the the new
law is causing
"crippling disrup-
tions" in their business.
That I can readily
believe.
Any customer who
only leaves an eight
percent gratuity is like-
ly to find that service at
his table has been crip-
plingly disrupted.
Nevertheless, some
waiters and waitresses
complain they rarelv
serve the last of the big
spenders. When their
tips don't add up to the
minimum percentage,
they say, the sales totals
their bosses report to
the IRS are misleading.
I don't necessarily
quarrel with the princi-
ple that the IRS is en
titled to extract a
pound of flesh for
every beefsteak coming
out of a restaurant kit-
chen. What I question
is the fairness of singl-
ing out waiters when so
many other potential
taxpayers get away with
not reporting huge
chunks of income.
Someone once sent
me a copy of "a special
message to taxpayers"
prepared by the
Massachusetts revenue
department. It remind-
ed Bay State residents
they were liable for
taxes on income deriv-
ed from kickbacks,
stealing, drugs, cash
skimming and other il-
legal activities.
"Not reporting such
income can lead to pro-
secution for perjury
and fraud it solemnly
and straight-facedly
warned.
I commend that ap-
proach to President
Reagan and Congress
as they struggle to
reduce the federal
deficit.
As things now stand,
the entire budgetary
burden is borne by
those of us who have
only legitimate sources
of income. So how
about tightening collec-
tion procedures on the
millions of dollars in il-
licit revenue that goe
unreported each year?
How long has it been
since kidnappers paid
taxes on ransoms? How
long since hostage-
takers forked over to
the government the in-
dicated portion of cash
and valuables received
i� exchange
agreements? How long
since airline hijackers
were soaked by the IRS
for transportation
benefits?
I don't know exactly
how much in taxes
thieves, prostitutes and
drug dealers avoid pay-
ing each year. It might
might turn that, with
all the deductions they
could claim, they
would owe little or
nothing. Income
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earners in these fields
have heavy business ex-
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Even in these days of
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frightfully expensive.
But most bank rob-
bers, narcotics traf-
fickers and the like file
no returns at all. Worse
yet, they obviously can
afford to leave big tips
when they eat out.
These are the tax
evaders the government
should be going after.
Another new law ex-
tending the withholding
system to ill-gotten
gains could put the
budget in the bUck.
suffering from fatigue
and malnutrition.
Hales went on to
discuss the subsequent
social alienation she
had to face from her
family, friends and
church after the truth
became known. She re-
counted the ridicule
that her schoolmates
put her through.
Sometimes the ridicule
and alienation were so
severe that Hales
sought psychiatric
counseling.
Even today, four
years later, Hales
claims that the impact
of the attack is still pro-
nounced. She said peo-
ple in her hometown
still treat her differently
at times.
It was three years
before Hales was able
to date again. She said
she no longer has a
desire to be involved in
a relationship with a
man.
During her lecture,
Hales discussed her
more recent experience
of working with a rape
crisis center. She spoke
of a justice system
which doesn't protect
the victim and rarely
convicts a rapist. "A
lot of people say it's
(rape) a crime of pas-
sion, but it's not. It's a
crime of violence
Hales said.
Besides recounting
her tragic story, Hale
also had words of war-
ning for the students
who listened attentively
for over an hour.
"Prevention" is the
most important work,
she said, and part of
prevention is the pro-
spective victims ability
to physically thrawrt an
attacker. Hales
demonstrated a series
of self-defense tactics
she had learned from a
karate class she's taken
since the attack.
"I'm scared said
sophomore Amy Lund,
who listened to Hales
lecture. "She's
definitely put some fear
in me. The more and
more I hear about
rape she continued,
"the more I think I
realh need to protect
myself. It really brings
out awareness Lund
added.
"Basically, we tried
to choose topics that we
thought would be of in-
terest to female ECU
students said Garet.
"Our major goal for
these programs is to
make students more
aware of problems that
women are facing in the
1980s added
Templeton. Both
women were very pleas-
ed with Hales program.
Hales, who also
spoke about her attack
to several social science
classes at different
times, was urged to do
so by one of her
freshmen professors.
"It's therapeutic to
talk said Hales. "It's
helping me get things
off my chest
The final program
scheduled during
Women's Awareness
Month will be on sexual
harassment as it per-
tains to women in the
work force. Dr. Ken
Wilson w,n be
leading the program
slated for Tuesday,
Feb. 22, at 7 p.m. in the
lobby of Garrett.
INC.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abobtio � ,
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After 9 $1.00 off wjth College I.D.
Hot, heavy hor'duerves
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71
t
i
i"





THE HAST CAROLINIAN
KH1RIIARY17. 1983
More
WASHINGTON
(UPI) President
Reagan is embarking
on a selling campaign
to promote support for
the building of the MX
missile, his military
spending increases and
his foreign policy.
On all three fronts,
he still must convince
Congress and the
public that he is on the
right track.
As a result, he is call-
ing in some old pros to
help launch a drive to
improve understanding
of his policies and to
win backing for them at
home and abroad.
He has tapped Max
Friedersdorf, his
former chief lobbyist
on Capitol Hill, to
return from his
diplomatic sojourn in
the Bahamas to lend a
hand in selling the need
for production and
deployment of the con-
trovrsial MX missile.
In the foreign policy
field, his administra-
tion has committed $65
million to a program to
support democratic in-
stitutions throughout
the world through stu-
dent and leader ex-
change programs, and
aid to foreign educa-
tion and broadcast
outlets.
News Analysis
Reagan also recently
dispatched Vice Presi-
dent George Bush to
Europe to shore up sag-
ging support among
European leaders for
his "zero-zero" nuclear
arms proposal to the
Soviets. Many of the
leaders are urging a
more flexible policy
than the U.S. proposal
that calls for the
elminination of all
intermediate-range
missiles on the conti-
nent.
And he sent
Lecture Discusses Nuclear Threat
The final program of
the FCU School of
Medicine's winter
"Prospectives" lecture
series will take place
Monday with a pro-
gram entitled "The
Last Epidemic: Medical
Consequences of
Nuclear Weapons and
Nuclear War The
noontime lecture will
be moderated by John
C. Moskop, assistant
professor in the
medical humanities
program of the ECU
School of Medicine.
This is the fourth
program in the
"Prospectives" series
and was developed by
Todd Savitt and
Wilhelm Firsell, Loret-
ta Kopelman, docdtors
in the medical school's
humanities program.
Kopelman is the head
of the program.
Savitt. an historian
of medicine, began a
successful informal lec-
ture series at the
University of Florida.
He became involved in
a similar project at
ECU and he claims the
response so far has
been "very nice
The "Prospectives"
series kicked off last
fall with a four-lecture
program and another
series in planned for the
spring.
"1 wanted to give
people a chance to
think about things
other than the everyday
concerns of clinical and
basic science Savitt
told The East Caroli-
nian. "What we were
concerned about were
the ways that the rest of
the world impinges on
the world of
medicine
Moskop's program
Monday will begin with
a half-hour film presen-
tation of a conference
that discussed the con
sequences of a nuclear
explosion and the more
general consequences
of nuclear war. The
film titled "The Last
Epidemic" was loaned
to Moskop from the
North Carolina
Triangle Chapter of
Physicians for Social
Responsibility.
The film features ex-
perts in physics,
medicine and the
military delivering
papers on several topics
related to nuclear
weapons and nuclear
wars. Moskop said the
film centers on a
discussion of what
could happen if a
nuclear explosion took
place in San Fransisco.
It also show original
footage of the after ef-
fects of the first atomic
weapon the United
States dropped on
Hiroshima in 1945.
film include: the effects
that a nuclear explosion
sould have on the ear-
th's ecological system,
the immediate blast ef-
fects, the feasibility of
civil defense, the
dangers of a launch on
warning policy and the
prospects for survival.
Moskop said he
chose this topic out of a
special personal in-
terest. "I'm very con-
cerned about the
danger of nuclear war
and the need to inform
people about the
almost unimaginable
devastation that it
would cause he said.
Savitt and Moskop
welcomed students to
attend the
"Prospectives" lec-
tures. Savitt said a stu
and will be held in the
upstairs conference
room of the hospital
cafeteria.
Secretary of State
George Shultz to China
to mend fences in a
continuing dispute over
the U.S. relationship to
Taiwan. Shultz also
stopped in Japan where
relations between the
two countries are
strained over trade and
Japan's contribution to
Asian defense.
At home, Reagan
makes no bones about
the fact that he is
bothered by critics who
think he is spending too
much money on
military programs and
taking away from the
poor.
He has brought in
William Greener, one
of the spokesman for
the White House and
the Pentagon in the
Ford administration, to
advise on making a bet-
ter case for the $30
billion increase in the
defense budget, and
improving understan-
ding of the need for a
buildup.
"1 know there's been
a constant drumbeat
about defense spending
as if that's responsible
for all our ills
Reagan told a business
gathering earlier in the
week.
In the near future,
Reagan plans to deliver
a major address on his
foreign policv and on
defense needs. Aides
are counting on his
considerable powers as
a super salesman to
turn around the public
opinion polls that have
shown a dramatic drop
in support for the
trillion-plus increases in
defense during a five-
year period.
Also under way at
the White House is a
review of Reagan's
media and public rela-
tions offices to deter-
mine how well thev are
working. The president
has been holding a
series of sessions with
out-of-town cor-
respondents and broad-
casters who have are
briefed on his budget
and are given a chance
to question him on a
range of subjects.
At midterm, the need
for selling his policies is
obvious. The Western
allies appear to be pull-
ing in another direc-
tion, and Reagan has
yet to establish himself
as the leader in the
field.
If the selling cam-
paign succeeds, it will
be because Reagan has
managed to persuade
Americans that the
must stav ahead of the
Soviets and convince
Europeans that he of-
fers the best hope for a
peaceful better world
SRA Plans Benefit
For Heart Charities
0NS0U DATED
rADULTS $2.00 TIL 5:30 g0J)
HEATRES
"BUCCANEER MOVIES
lit 3391 � Gr��nll� S�u�.� Shopp.n, C�nt.
Moskop said that the
topics discussed in the
jhe Student
Residence Association
announced it will be
conducting a fundraiser
for the Heart Fund
Wednesday on campus.
Lindsey Williams,
SRA publicity chair-
man, said that each
residence hall vice
president will set up a
collection table in his
dorm. There will also
be people collecting
contributions at the
Student Supply Store.
dent bus was available Each group will collec
to bring students to the money from 9 a.m. to 4
lectures. The lectures p.m.
are open to the public The SRA will be giv-
ing away free balloons
to those people who
donate money.
The American
Health Association is a
non-profit, volunteer
organization that raises
funds for heart and cir-
culatory ailment
research.
A spokesman for the
Pitt County chapter of
the organization said
heart disease causes 54
percent of all deaths in
the United States. The
SRA feels the project is
a worthy one from both
a community and cam-
pus perspective
���-�����;�
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Feb 16.
thru Sat Feb 19 1983
Open Mon. thru Sat. Sam to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
tv
AOVEBTISEDITEM POLICY
E�cr of these advertised items is re
Suired to be reed-iy available 'or
Ml. in MCh Kroger Savon jxc.pt
u �IHClllfWy not! m hit ad Vh�
So runout of an Mm we ��. offer
vou your choice of a comparable
rmwhen mm �Kfii. c
Mm. Mv.ngs or a r�,ncJh n.
advertised item at n�
price within 30 days
jLimimiiiinmiuiimumiimiiiimmmmimmmmi.miimmi.im�m.mmi.�mimim.mimimuie
CLfiAftAttClT
FROM THE DELI
Extra Lean
Roast Beef
Lb.
399
SAVE
90c
KROGER
IN OIL OR WATER
Chunk
Light Tuna
69
FRENCH'S
CHEESE SCALLOPED
Wed. Feb. 16 thru Sat. Feb. 19
ECU Students will
receive an additional 10�� off
the sale price
Excluding Todd 1 Worm-Ups
which are already Vi price.
-
Great Savings
Adidas on
Nike Herman Survivor Hiking Boots
New Balance Abel Raincoats
Pony Russell Baseball Undershirts
Adidas & x Jodd
r - Warm-Ups
i


ftiimmiHii!
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tuMMmm.immmm.�mmmiH
ILL HODGES CO.
210 E-WTH ST. GREENVILLE
�������mi���'����'�i
Me
Do
B MIK
s �
Wi an
theFC M
cur:
v.1 :
corr �
I
buiidir
him H-
lur
noon. .
and a . -
Hamer
tions ab
Ianpuv
k.i -
dc.
De:
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qiK
cha � i
the
ob-
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cv
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mass cona
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everybody
caJavc- -
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Vargas s
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hav

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1 '





jort
� efed on his budget
and arc given a chance
on him on a
ibjects.
n dterm, the need
celling his policies is
obvious The Western
ippeai to be pull-
another direc-
d Reagan has
;tablish himself
in the
celling cam-
iccecds, it will
Reagan has
aged to persuade
v that thev
a lead of the
d convince
that he of-
pe tor a
tx tei world.
5:30 ��� su)
f 'ir;
xomming
Soon
I he Rollins stones
I et's spend the J
ight Together
flHi li
r
I UllllillMIII1
illltlllllllllllllllillli
Sot. Feb. 19
its will i
:ional 10�- off I
price
1 Warm-Ups j
ody Vi price.
javings
'vivor Hiking Boots
Abel Raincoats
iseball Undershirts
Toddl
Warm-Ups
GESCO. 1
GREENVILLE
limiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiMiiiiiiiiHiitiiiiiiiiiiHiiiie
I HE I SI CAROt 1NIAN'
Style
FEBRUARY 17. 1983 Page 1
Med School's Dean Laupus
Doesn t Only Play Doctor
By MIKE HAMKR
SUM Wrtlr
Softspoken, congenial Dr.
William E. Lanpus has been dean of
the ECU Med School since 1975. He
currently heads up a Med School
with 201 students, 166 faculty, 209
community physicians, and 425
staff persons. I went to the Brody
building last week to speak with
him. He hadn't had a chance to eat
lunch yet, though it was late after-
noon, and so he snacked on nabs
and a coke while we talked.
Hamer: Did you have any reserva-
tions about coming to Greenville?
Lanpus: The only reservation I had
was whether I had made the right
decision. I was the chairman of the
Department at the University of
Virginia Medical School. It's a
question of whether you take a new
challenge. I'd had a lot of interest in
the ECU Med School, but it was an
obvious challenge to come here. My
wife is from eastern North
Carolina, and so I was familiar with
the area.
Hamer: Could you tell me a little bit
about where you grew up and where
you've lived before coming to East
Carolina?
l.anpus: 1 grew up in Sevmour, In-
diana, and I attended the local
public school system there. Then 1
went to Yale on a scholarship and
after that I went to the Yale Med
School. 1 did my residency at New
York Hospital � Cornel Medical
Center. I've practised in New York;
Marion, Indiana; Detroit; Augusta,
Georgia; Richmond, and now I'm
in Greenville. Most of my profes-
sional career has been in pediatrics.
Hamer: What are some of the needs
in the field of medicine in this part
of the state that you have observed?
Lanpus: Well, you could say that in
eastern North Carolina there is a
general need remaining to upgrade
the health care. We've been working
in such areas as pediatrics, high-risk
obstetrics, genetic evaluation,
hematology-oncology and allergy-
immunology. We also have the
Neonatal Intensive and In-
termediate Care Unit over at the
hospital.
Hamer: Have logistics been a pro-
blem for some of the counties in the
eastern part of the state?
Lanpus Sure, the greatest part of
our population comes from a 60
mile radius of Greenville. The pa-
tients beyond that find it difficult to
get anywhereo When you have
more than an hour's travel.
Hamer: Does the Med School have
any plans to set up any family prac-
tice centers beside the one in Bethel?
Lanpus: We don't have any active
plans. This is neither a plan to do or
not to do. At this point in time the
Family Practice Center here and the
Bethel Center provide the ap-
propriate experience for our
students. I would not exclude that
as a possibility, but our role is more
in teaching in that sense than
necessarily in providing local ser-
vices. We have a necessity to pro-
vide local services of the nature I've
described, but we tend to prefer to
assist the local communities in
recruiting physicians.
Hamer: Are most of the Med
students from the eastern part of the
state?
Lanpus: Oh, as things break down
in any given class, I guess about a
third are from this eastern area of
the state. Another third are from
the Piedmont, simplly because of
the concentration of its plopulation,
and about a third are from the
western part of North Carolina. We
really have sdtudents from across
the length and breadth of the state.
Hamer: Are any med students from
out-of-state?
Lanpus: We have a couple of
transfers from out of state, but they
had in-state connections. They're
hybrids rather than purly out-of-
staters.
Hamer: Are there any plans to get
more residents at the med school?
Laupus: The residency program is
gradually expanding. We have, I
believe, 94 residents at the present
time. Our residents are in six major
disciplines: family medicine, inter-
nal medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry,
obstetrics and gynecology, and
surgery. By July, we'll have
residents in emergency medicine,
and we'll have residents in
rehabilitation medicine sometime in
1984-85. So, we'll keep adding
residents gradually. Emergency
medicine is real special. We are con-
sidering residency in pathology,
also.
Hamer: In your eyes, what makes
the ECU Med School different from
the other medical schools in the
state, or from other med schools
that you've been acquainted with?
Laupus: Well, in a great sense,
medical schools are more alike than
they are different. They all have to
meet the same general standards.
They differ in their locations and in
See LAUPUS Page 8
ECU'S Dean of the School of Medicine. William E. Laupus
Nude Modeling A Pretty Revealing Pastime
By GORDON IPOCK
M�ff Wriirr
ECU art is cool. ECU art students, running a gamut
in stvle from clones of Greenwich Village Bohemians
circa 1969 to Paris new-wave 1983. are cool too. Usual-
ly bv choice,they tend to stand out in a crowd of
business majors. Even their curriculum is cool. Take
required courses for instance. A journalism student
must endure such donkey-work as legal problems in
mass communication; in contrast, art students are re-
quired to draw naked people � often of the opposite
sex � or the same sex. There's something for
everybody. Next to freshman med students cutting on
cadavers, the esoteric goings on in these closed studios
on the second floor of Jenkins are probably the most
intriguing classrooms on campus to outsiders.
Pedestrians walking down Fifth Street are often seen
glancing toward Jenkin's studio windows hoping for an
opening in the curtains that screen the figure drawing
classes from the outside world.
I was ready to cancel my subscription to Playboy and
put mv free electives to good use learning to draw the
Vargas stvle girls that I imagined awaited me in Art
1030. Then Wess Crawley, an ECU art professor whose
name is synonymous here with figure drawing, explain-
ed that the classes are restricted, with rare exceptions,
to art students. To get into a figure drawing class I'd
have to pass six hours of foundation courses in color
and design and show a real flair for drawing rocks and
other dead things.
At this point Wes gave me a mini-lecture on how we
learn to draw, very little of which 1 understood. It was
about training both hemispheres of the brain; learning
to see seeing is learned; conceptual knowledge;
geometryanatomy; breaking the percept down into
stimuli; seeing lines, direction; logic assembled into
space. Then he explained why figure drawing is impor-
tant to the artist.
"For example he said, "if you're drawing rocks, I
may never have seen vour rock, so I can't say 'Bump
number three is too large But if the pec is too big �
the pectoral � I can say 'Hey, that pec is too big.
Make a limb on a tree three inches too long and nobody
minds. Make a nose three inches too long and
everybody cries. So that's the why of figure drawing,
and boy is it important. It's your basic language
Somehow this didn't fit my idea of what firgure
drawing was all about. 1 had imagined standing at an
easel, perhaps wearing a beret and French sunglasses,
with perfect nude coeds lounging on beanbags before
me. Confused but still intrigued, I talked toTran
Gordley. Tran, lik Wes, came to the ECU art school in
1959 and seemed a logical source for information about
the figure drawing classes.
"There was figure drawing here when 1 first came
he said. "But the models weren't nude. They wore
bathing suits or tights
Gordley explained that the switch to nude models oc-
curred in the mid-60s about the time the art school
began expanding.
"When Wes and I first came, there were only five
faculty members. We started adding two and three a
vear after that and it really started growing. Then we
updated the curriculum an addded the BFA. There was
no professional degree program when I first came
I asked Gordley if there had ever been any problems
from groups inside or outside the university that oppos-
ed nudity in a classroom.
"No. It's always been handled professionally here.
Figure drawing classes are not open for visitors of
course. Crawley is the one responsible for it (nude
models). He got permission. We investigated with the
attorney general in Raleigh to make sure there was no
law forbidding it before we started
Gordley noted that the inhibitions of student models
are no longer as great as they once were.
"In the beginning it was always easier to get girls to
model than boys. I remember one girl told me, 'We're
used to showing off all the time Now boys are no
more inhibited than girls Then he laughs. "Today
everyone is willing to take their clothes off. But overall,
I think the attitudes of today's students about things
like nudity are healthier than they were twenty years
age Gordley recalled that some of his first female
models wouldn't pose in bikinis. "Bikinis were con-
sidered shocking at the time (1960). None of the local
stores even sold them. I had to order them from
Frederick's of Hollywood
I asked Gordley what the requirements were for a
good nude model.
"Well naturally, good physical proportions and
development, both in male and female. And then, in
addition, a certaing kind of poise and grace about their
movements, which some people innately have and
others don't.Sometimes training, as in dance, can
enhance that. Sometimes it becomes a handicap
Somehow Gordley's description of drawing nude
figures wasn't quite as erotic or exciting as I had im-
agined.
"For one thing he said, "you are so busy trying to
learn how to draw and about art and all, that you don't
have much time for erotic impulses. I'm not saying
that's not there, because that's always a part of art,
even if it's not the nude figure. There's a certain sen-
sual quality that's imperative in all the arts
It seemed logical that seasoned instructors would
have no qualms about working with nude models. But
what about art students? For the Bohemian like fine
arts students majoring in painting or drawing, a nude
figure is about as exciting as a new set of acrylics.
They're looking at nudes constantly. Perhaps the
students in the design department, compelled to take
figure drawing only as a foundation course, would
have different notions.
Ten Cates is a junior pursuing a degree in commer-
cial art. Tall, lithe and blonde, she's prettv enough to
model for Playboy 1 wondered how she reacted to
figure drawing classes.
Did vou know before starting into art that you would
have to draw nudes as a part of the art curriculum1
"Yes. 1 sure did
So it didn't frighten you?
"Well, 1 wondered what my reaction would be and
how I'd feel in class she said. "1 wasn't really afraid
of it though. I knew it was a part oi art school
"So the first time you had to draw a nude model, it
didn't phase you?
"No. The reason why was because everybody was in
there to learn to draw. The first reaction of everyone is
that they don't want to show it if they're embarrassed,
because they're in the class trying to become profes-
sional people
"Was the class worthwhile for commercial art pur-
poses?
"Oh yeah. Even in commercial art vou're going to
have to draw the human bodv.and its probablv one of
the most complex things to draw. It trains your eve very
well, learning to see all the muscles and structure
See NUDE, Page 9
'More Media' Exhibit Opening On Sunday
r � the Student Union Art Exhibition Committee opens its first show for spring
This Sunday, February 20, tne � The Qne pefson ghow m&g ,More Meda, and lts
semester in Mendenhall s an gamj member Roxanne Reep (pictured above). The show
featured artist and creator is sen may manjpuljted by the wearer)
will include mixed riJaZ received from ECU. The show is running through March 4, with an
from Reep's masters thesis' "h,5" d from 3 until 5 p.m. The public is invited to turn out.
opening reception to be held tnis 3unu,y
Keyboardist
Iceberg
Performing
Michael Iceberg, a Julliad train-
ed, one man multi-keyboard
showman who has been performing
continously to enthusiastic crowds
at Walt Disney World for seven
years, will bring his astonishing
show to East Carolina University's
Hendrix Theatre, in Mendenhall
Student Center, Monday, February
21, 1983, at 8 p.m. Tickets for this
Student Union Special Events Com-
mittee program go on sale February
7 at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center and are
SI. for ECU students, and $3. for
ECU faculty, staff, and the public.
Youth (age 14 and under) may pur-
chase ticket for $2. and all tickets
are $3. at the door. Tickets may be
purchased Monday � Friday, 10.00
a.m � 4:00 p.m. after February 7.
The concert begins with a center
stage view of a seven-foot copper
pyramid, bathed in a rosy, gold
wash of light. As errie strains of
music begin to emanate from the
structure, the apex slowly rises
revealing Michael Iceberg and the
Iceberg Machine, already inside the
pyramid, and playing. At the same
time, smoke is seen to be seeping up
from beneath the pyramid, which
soon billows into clouds, engulfing
the entire set. What follows is a
totally engrossing musical program
for a most unique nature, with
selections ranging from Rock to
Classical to original works.
The Icebeg Machine is the result
of more than thirteen years worth of
research by Michael Iceberg to
See ICEBERG, Page
1

1
ir
'Custer Opening Tonight
Gary Weathersbee (foreground), Robert Willie and Gregory
Watkins star in the ECU Playhouse N.C. premier production of
Caster, to be performed tonight through Feb. 22 at 8:15 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre. Robert Ingham's drama sets General Custer,
Elizabeth Caster, Colonel William Benteen and Major Marcus
Reno in limbo telling their versions of that fateful day at the Lit-
tle Bighorn. Reservations can be made by calling 757-6390.
. �
�tH
.� '�.






8
TH! ! s
1S1 AN
il lik
! g(f �
Laupus' Med School A Well-Oiled Machine
Nude
( Mill
Continued From Page 7
their numbers of
students Oui classes
are smaii We have
about 60 students in a
class, while Chapel Hill
has 160 in a class W e
think that the number
ot students that we
have is about i ighi 1 he
students in the program
are able to have close
contact i t h I h e
teachers l Ik la gc i
classes lend to lose his
closeness, and t he
students gel
much benefil from the
teachers.
The second
consider is the ta.
itsclt ()ur facutl) tends
to be a blend of m
dividuals in the basic
sciences 1 think that
the close relationship
with the students ex-
tends over to the
residency naming pro
gram as well. It's a
i losei relationship than
in the large schools
I he ommunity in
�hich the live is om
Portable . ireenv ille :1.1s
a ven nice, comfoi
table atmosphere where
students can go about
theii business l he rela-
tions bet w een the
students and the
townspeople is quite
good. 1 think bv know
ing the student better
we tend to feel more
responsible to them and
the maximum of educa-
tional opportunity is
provided to them. The
truth 01 the matter is �
med schools are more
and more like each
othet As the standards
become higher and
higher. the necessity of
conforming to them
tends to make pro-
grams more like each
other
Hamer: How do you
feel about the med
school library'7 Is it
adequate
laupus Well, this
library has been grow
ing for the last 12 years,
and it's a very ade
quate library. The
library staff is superb;
they're always very
helpful. The students
feel comfortable with
the staff and the at-
mosphere is congenial.
We have close relation-
ships with other
libraries; we can go to
them, and they call on
us, too.
Hamer: A lot of people
complain about the
cost of medicine. Do
you find that the med
students talk about
this-1 or do the faculty?
Or is this really an
issue?
I aupus Oh, 1 think it's
an issue. The issue is
not really clear in some
ways. The public
spends a large part of
its income, on heart
care either voluntarily
or not, because of the
cost of the system. In
one way or another,
people need to get the
best medical care. I he
poor and near poor
always have it more dif-
ficult. In North
Carolina there is a pret
tv good set-up - 'he
poor as well as the
more well off hae
good access to care.
Modern technology is
here to stav and it's mst
a part ol a lot ol things
that contribute to the
cost It's hard to know
just where to start to
cut down on costs
Physicians tees are
about 19 pei cent of
health aie costs.
llamer What kinds of
research are going on
here0
laupus loo main to
list all of them We're
very excited about our
research in transplanta-
tion 1 mmunology ,
specifically related to
kidney transplants
Drs. Frank and lud
1 homas have been do
ing this research In
pediatrics, resean hen
any
yes,
ha v e bee n making
studie of human milk
and vaious kinds of
t hemk al contaminents
thai are ingested bv the
mothei
Hamer Have
come up with
results s. 1 fai '
laupus Well,
we're pan oi a national
studv on this
Hamer li.v.j a
elusions been reached'
laupus Well,
know. there are a lot of
P U i around W
immune to the
chemicals in the en-
ironment
Hamer How does
dine ' Med

I
I aupU'
Iaupus
legi ��
provide
education ev
sears Wc
everytl Hamer
hut I think the.
committed
�ill
Hamer 1

'
student
I knov
Med -
Iaupus
thinl
know


met '


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Monday, February 21,1983
8:00pm Hendrix Theatre
tickets-$1.00 ECU Students
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All tickets at door $3.00
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THURSDAY
HENDR � -
SPONSORED B





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Nude Modeling Revealing
! I! I t -X - !
Continued From Page 7
v mild you considei
modeling nude tor a
class?
I sure would.
espev iall) aftei being in
a :ass know in: how
artist looks at the
model lt not in a pio-
acativ e w a .as a sex
siukl I here's a tjii
ference between nude
and naked
nd what ol the
models themselves? All
models at the I t. I
school o t art are
students Mans are an
students, but the in-
structors are receptive
other students as
Models are paid
V (Z an hour. one-
and a halt times the
minimum wage that all
other campus work
and it is alwas a hit
traumatic
v. ho's moi e unconi
fortable, them oi you '
" 1 hem But the ver
lust time 1 ever did it. I
was petrified, panii
stricken But 1 r
( raw le introduced me
and was ver nice and
complimentary he's
u'n ea s on his
models' he respects
them and all And then
the aci ol taking ofl
your robe, .uki then
faces, and o u i
face . It's prett) in
tense But aftei two oi
three minutes, you stai I
getting used to it
So you're no lonj
o ei K sell conscience '
" on ha
� h
ae a
stlKIS
�bs pa
But
what sort ot stud
would pose nude
bonal ide geek
I figured
I talked to s firistine
c amp, w ho has model-
. ularh over the
pa si two eai s foi the
art sc h i She is a 26
i eai old student ma
nj tabrn design.
he looks
ew hat like a former
.mnasl n use alar but
no tongei stripped
tireh I natural bod
II a �� e v o u e '� .
Chrisl deled I

health attitude ab
your bod rhat's the
important tl i
E ou don't
� have anythinj
hide I ike I w
through ;he wI
ise ol beinj
chested when I was
youngei and be
const ious about it Bui
I overcame thai and
the bod looks in real
life. And people are not
all pei feet. But a lot ol
students really enjoy
t he moi e robust,
Rubinesque i pe
Ar'Omen oi men It's
very boring io iiist
draw the (heesecake
girl oi athletic male
Bui sometimes, you
know, when you've
gamed a tew pounds
and everyone draws
you a little fat, it at
fects ou
1 las modeling taught
you patience?
' 'Oh, en or mou s
amounts I sell
control, sell
disc ipline.l ike w hen
in itch righi
in 11 .i voui
I, and you're in tins

� -all it. you'll
v id
� . ui model
t i r s i
nn parents have no
qualms. But some peo
pie give me a rough
time about it like Mrs.
Fisher, m weaving
techei. Shi al i s talks
about when she was in
Ohio, and they had
th( se girls that were
models. And th .
come in ofl the street
I hev really had sail
gn Is?
"Yeah, they really
had some sleaze bags
Seems like thai
would have been ex-
pensive? Bui i guess
they didn'i pay'em
their rates
"No rhey jusl
them modeling i �
But all the people in
w eav ing a i I fabric
design sal 'I his; rj
see how
that?"
Well, foi . .
working as a :
del beats . �
McDonalds
'Bv
j,
.
'leas

"PI
wa I
body. It's a
g
v il : � mode! il
- ere �
tha
"I hav
I fi I ked
ing I:
us a i
I

No,
I worl Ki
couldn't stai
nothing to d
ai :areer.
U thing about il
i
e v e i v
en tea
r level

w hal I had learned into
practice
Is the nude modeling
here anything like pis
ing foi photographs in
girlie magazine?
"()h. there's no com
parison. N one '
(Reflects) Now I have
taken - ome poses that I
iidei to be quite
sensual. I here is a sen
suousness in the bodv
is inherent, am!
I'm noi afraid ol that,
but it's not my main in
to be verv
demure. ond never
see me posing in
� omething like a centei
told shot "
'i ou seem to be an
honest pei son
"I'm extremely
honest I iust come
righl out with
everything. 1 have pro-
blems sometimes with
that
lo yo i think tr al
modeling is a
manifestation ol your
"Yes � I! I
lid see
ildn'i handle
it
! h i n k
entious person with
ould
eve' ti ai
'
" N I r: e � ' t
a designer, (laughs) Il
takes an open, hoi si
i
� rimt ' ' be
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-
-
-
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
For full information- a- ��
2442 E Collier S E . Grand Rapids. Michigan 49506
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Iceberg Man Cometh,
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1 Ht EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Fl BKl -k1 n ��
Pirates Sting Spiders In 2nd Overtime
By CINDY PLEASANTS
sptl t dic.r
The Pirates celebrated their se-
cond conference win of the season
Wednesday night by edging out
sharp-shooting University of Rich-
mond, 79-75, after a double
overtime showdown.
With the second overtime just
underway, ECU's Charles Green,
who just recently returned after a
four-week layoff with a separated
shoulder, made a tip-in to give the
Pirates a 75-73 lead with 4:49 re-
maining.
UR's Andy Hehrer then made a
basket underneath to put the
Spiders back up by one. But ECU's
Barry Wright, who has been sick
with the flu this week, came in and
iced two freethrows to boost the
Bucs ahead, 77-75, with :57 left on
the clock.
Richmond had a chance to score
but missed three shots under the
basket. Regaining possession, the
Bucs held the ball and Peartree was
fouled. The Pantego native sank
both freethrows with :04 on the
clock to give the Pirates a 79-75 win.
"This is a hell of a win for our
kids said Head Coach Charlie
Harrison after the game. "We did
some awfully unintelligeni things
out there, but there were times when
they did some good things.
"Richmond played completely
different than thev did at Rich-
mond. They decided to pick up their
tempo and they damn sure did it
The Bucs lost to the Spiders,
68-56, in Richmond on Jan. 15.
Peartree hit a 30-foot jumpshot at
the buzzer in the regulation period
to put the Pirates into overtime.
Tied 69-69, the two teams battled to
break the lead, with Richmond go-
ing up first when Guard Kelvin
Johnson made two freethrows.
Peartree, however, came back and
scored two from the freethrow line
to tie the score, 71-71, with 3:38 re-
maining in the first overtime.
Wright and Edwards' single
freethrows and a jumpshot by
Johnson tied the score again, 73-73,
with 1:17 on the clock. The Spiders
held the ball, but guard Tom
Bethea's shot at the buzzer didn't
fall, putting the teams in a second
overtime.
The Bucs have only played one
double-overtime game this season
(against George Mason), and Har-
rison commented after the one-
point loss that the 50-minute contest
took a toll on the Bucs. But with
more fouls being called and a cons-
tant rotation of guards, the Pirates
kept up a steady attack throughout
the game.
Losing 41-34 at the half, the
Pirates struggled to catch up after
Richmond shot 70.8 percent from
the floor in the first half to keep a
solid lead during the first 20 minutes
of play.
With 13:29 remaining in the se-
cond period, ECU cut the Spiders
lead to 53-49. UR's outside
shooting, however, put the Spiders
up, 61-52. with less than seven
minutes left in the game.
That's when all the controversy
began. According to the clock
keepers, the score clock began
malfunctioning, with both team's
scores appearing wrong on the
clock.
Richmond's John Newman,
meanwhile, was standing on the
freethrow line after being fouled by
Green. He made his first throw, giv-
ing the Spiders a 62-54 lead.
As ECU's official scorebook
keeper listened to the clock keepers
and coaches veiling about the clock.
Newman sank another freethrow,
but the freethrow was not credited
on the scoreboard or the the official
scorebook. The game was stopped,
but resumed after a momentary
Clockkeeping Error �
Leads To Confusion
If anyone should be questioned
about the scoring error in Wednes-
day night's ECl-Richmond game.
it should be the clock keepers.
With 6:17 remaining in the second
period of the contest, the clock
keepers claimed the clock was
malfunctioning and was failing to
keep the points scored correctly.
Both team's scores were appearing
wrong on the scoreboard
During all the confusion, Rich-
mond's John Newman shot two
Cind Pleasants
look Inside
freethrows and was only credited
�� h one on the scoreboard. ECU's
fficial scorebook keeper. Wood)
Peele, who was listening to the
shouting of the clockkeepers and the
coaches, did not record Newman's
final freethrow. The score on the
board was, 62-54, but should have
been, 63-54.
Before Newman shot the
freethrows, the game was only
delayed for a few seconds before
starting again, and nothing on the
scoreelock was changed.
�lter the game, some were blam-
ing the official scorebook keeper for
the mistake. But anyone who knows
Woody Peele also knows that if an
error was made, it certainly was not
intentional one.
Especially Head Coach Charlie
Harrison. "I don't think anyone
who knows Woody Peele could
question his integrity he said. "If
a mistake was made, it was an
honest mistake
According to Harrison, am ques-
tions about the score should have
been raised at that moment oi at the
end of the regulation period.
"Something like that should have
been corrected as soon as possible,
or something should have been said
at the end of the regulation period.
"The kids think they won the
game, and as far as we're concern-
ed, they did
If anyone on the Richmond bench
did indeed have reservations about
the score appearing on the clock,
they should have confronted the
scorekeeping box much sooner than
thev did. preferablv at the moment
the mistake was made. But thev
didn't.
It there were was am slight con-
fusion about the correct ssore, the
game should have been stopped un-
til everything was cleared up. But it
wasn't.
Pointing an accusing finger at the
scorebook keeper will not change
anything, and questioning Woody
Peele's integrity is not only unfair, it
is preposterous.
In fact, there's really only one
question that needs to be answered.
If the scoreelock was malfunction-
ing, then no one is to blame. But it it
wasn't, the competency, mind vou,
not the integrity, of the clock
keepers should be examined.
The men and women's track teams
will compete in the Tar Heel Invita-
tional this Saturday in Chapel Hill.
delav.
When asked about the confusion,
Harrison said he had no idea what
the score was. "The score kept shit
ting so much. I don't know what the
score was he said. "If there was a
mistake, it's unfortunate, but 111
tell you this, the man who takes care
of the books (Wood) Peele) is as
honest as Abe Lincoln It he'd do
anything, he'd go the other wav
Harrison added that the game
reallv didn't make that much Jit
ference as far as the ECAC-South
tournament is concerned "We're
not gonna get a bve because we won
this game and we're gonna be up
against the same teams he said
The onlv wav the game sould
have an effect on the tournament is
in the seeding ol each team. Lhe
Pirates were in last (sixth) place in
the conference league, while Rich-
mond is placed fifth. "We're
fighting our asses oft to get out of
the basement Harrison said.
"That's all we're trving to do
The Pirates are now 2-6 and Rich-
mond is 2- in the conference
Overall, the Buo shot 45 re-
cent from the floor and 69.7 percent
from the freethrow line. Richn
had an outstanding shooting night,
making 30 oi 47 field g ah tor a
63 B percent shooting iv
From the line, the Spid t 65.2
percent
Edwards, EC! si
turn, led the Pirati
26 points and pulled .
bounds Green, wh
during the last 23
game, scored 15 :
team in rebounding
was reported!)
alter his tail ai
experience a sell � �
Peartree followed in
12. V ' �
anderhor
For the S
Tom Be" I
for the �' I New
was eighi I i
Johnson. : �
shots, finished
ed the 5
and said thev (the tea
ff�
trouble from n
ad
Ihe Pirates �
nferei
i the) play. Navy i
s u da � i 7 !
�� 2
: � ��
� i H � ii
Virginian Added To
ECU Football Squad
EC I "s
Kt(hi a
� �COTT LARSON
!n Robinson (left! and Curl Nanderhnrxl trap Richmond's Lorn
in last nighl's double overtime thriller.
Head I ootball coach Ed 1 m n
announced Ve
I ondon, a 6-3, 190-pound sti
safet) from Hampton, .i . will be
attending I (. I on a
schola 11 sea
I ondon is the one �f 27
sign with the Pirates
I ondon. a set i
choice as a tight end a
end. hail n B
I ion was a first-tean i R
� !
Robinson Supplies Leadership
Bv kr B() ION
In football, the quarterback is ex-
pected to provide guidance and
leadership. These same attributes
are expected on the basketball court
from the point guard position.
ECU point guard Ton) Robinson
IS a true quarterback on the basket-
ball floor. A starter in ever) game
thus far this season. Robinson is
called on mostl) for his ball handl-
ing and passing skills.
Ihe 6-1, 1 "2-pound junior leads
the Pirates in assists with 65, and is
also third on the team in steals.
Robinson is currentl) averaging
5.7 points per game, a figure which
could be higher it needed be.
"I'm not reallv a scorer said the
smooth-playing Goldsboro native.
"M main responsibility is to plav
smart, play good defense, and keep
the flow of the game going at the
right lempo
After living the first eight years ol
his life in Goldsboro, Robinson
mmed to the cold weather and
asphalt courts ol the Northeast.
Robinson lettered three times al
Brighton High School in Hyde
Park, Maryland. After high school,
he decided to attend Jamestown
Communit) College, where his team
went to the National JUCO I ourna-
ment championships to sears run-
ning.
Alter completing his two years al
Jamestown. Robinson was one oi
the top junior college recruits in the
country.
He decided to attend ECL) in
order to be close to his family and to
take advantage oi the warm climate.
After arriving at ECU, Robinson
qui kly I
between playing m juni i
and pla. ng I a four-yeai sc!
"In junior colk.
run-and-shooi game R
responded "Here, the playei
lot bigger and vou have to al
time and work tor a good �
With players like Johnn) Ed
wards, Barrv Wrighl and B
Peartree. Robinson realizes whal his
job is and doesn't mind :
scoring opportunities
"I'd rather get the assisl
time he commented. "M)
job is to set things up and Keep
evcrybod) calmed down
With the recent return ol senior
forward Charles Green, the Pirai
have set their sights on three weeks

VI
NC
a - .
- �
- '
R
S� PIRATES Page 11
Diver Makes A Splash
By RANDY MEWS
Staff � riler
With two very successful seasons
already behind him on the ECU
swim team, diver Scott Eagle is
pointing towards this year's NCAA
Regionals.
As a freshman, Eagle set marks in
both the one and three-meter diving
events.
Eagle, who had never dived off a
three-meter board before coming to
ECU, said it was hard for him to ad-
just.
"Last year on the high board I
just wanted to survive the dive and I
wasn't concentrating on my form or
anything like that he said.
Eagle did well enough his
freshman season to earn himself a
trip to the NCAA Eastern Regionals
and finish a respectable eighth
place. "I was pretty nervous going
in Eagle stated. "There was a big
crowd and the meet was televised. I
didn't dive as well as I think I could
have
Eagle was hampered by numerous
injuries for most of last year. At one
point in the season, he had ten-
donitis in both knees, but this year
the Pirate diver has remained
healthy.
"Aside from a little back strain
that bothers me once in a while, I'm
completely over all my injuries
commented Eagle.
Eagle also feels he has improved a
great deal from last year. "It's
unbelievable how much better I am
this year. I'm doing dives now I
never dreamed I could have done
before
Scott Eagle
Eagle only uses one dive from the
high board that he used last year.
Eagle came to ECU from R.J.
Reynolds High School in Winsdton-
Salem, N.C. As a sophomore at
Reynolds, Eagle finished third in the
state in diving competition, and his
junior and senior years he was state
champion.
Eagle became interested in diving
by competing in summer leagues
during his junior high days. Then
one day at the pool, an AAU coach
suggested that he go to a diving
camp. "1 went to N.C. State's camp
for two summers, and then I started
diving competitively my sophomore
year in high school explained
Eagle.
This year Eagle has once again
qualified for the Eastern Regionals.
In a meet last month against UNC-
Charlotte, he broke two varsity div-
ing records that had stood since
1973. In six dives, he scored 335
points on the three-meter board,
and scored 320 points on the one-
meter board. One week earlier, he
broke the one-meter diving mark for
11 dives, scoring 490 points.
Scott Eagle is one of the best, if
not the best diver ECU has ever
had exclaimed ECU diving coach
Jon Rose. "He has tremendous
potential, and what makes him so
good is that he has a great attitude
Although a great diver, Eagle is
also a fine artist. In fact, he's atten-
ding ECU on an academic scholar-
ship in art. "I've been taking art
lessons since I was seven said
Eagle, "and while in high school, I
took a lot of college-level art
classes
See ECU, Page 11
East Carolina Baseball
Pirate Baseball 1983
fl
V
� 1982 NCAA Playoff Participant
� 1982 ECAC-South Conference Cham-
pion
� 1982 Won-Loss Record of 34-14
� 1982 Pitching Staff Ranked 6th Na-
tionally
I 9oxDen7ifexlla,lked 9th Na�onallv
� 1982: 30th Winning Season in 31
Years
vfars01"1 NCAA Play�ff Ber,h in Three
Mar. 2
Mar. 3
Mar. 4
Mar. 7
Mar. 8
Mar. 10
Mar. 11
Mar. 12
Mar. 13
Mar. 14
Mar.
Mar.
Mar.
Mar. 19
Mar. 21
Mar. 22
Mar. 23
Mar. 24
Mar. 26
Mar. 28
Mar. 29
Mar. 30
Mar. 31
15
17
18
Va. Commonwealth Univ
Atlantic Christian
N.C. State Univ.
N.C. State Univ.
N.C. State Univ.
Va. Commonwealth Univ.
Va. Commonwealth Univ.
Univ. of Connecticut
Univ. of Connecticut
Fan field Univ.
Farifield Univ.
Clemson Univ.
George Mason Univ.
George Mason Univ.
N.C. State Univ.
Campbell Univ.
Ohio Univ.
Ohio Univ.
James Madison Univ.
Baptist College
Baptist College
UNC-Wilmington
William and Mary
3:00
3:00
2:00
2:00
2:00
3:00
3.00
2:00
1:30
3:00
3:00
3:00
3:00
2:00
3.00
3:00
3:00
3:00
2:00
3:00
3:00
3:00
3:00
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr. 14
Apr. 15
Apr.
Apr.
Apr
1
4
5
6
8
10
11
12
I VWilmington
North Carolina
Old Oominion I niv.
Va. Weslevan
James Madison
I niv of Richmond
N.C. Weslevan
N.C. Weslevan
North Carolina
American I niv (tent.) (2)
William and Marv
Univ. of Richmond
UNC-Wilmington
UNC-Wilmington
Campbell I ni.
Campbell I niv.
Atlantic Christian
Baptist College
Baptist College
Atlantic Christian (2)
Head Coach .Hal Baird
Coach: Gary Overton
iB hold type.
Apr
Apr
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
May 1
16
17
19
20
22
23
25
29
30
3:00
7 W
7C
7:00
3:00
1:30
7:30
7:00
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7:30
7:00
7:00
2:00
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7:00
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20
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i





I HE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 17, 9l
11
rtime
s freshman sensa-
irates in scoring with
pulled down nine re-
. w ru �a re-injured
25 seconds of the
5 points and led the
mnuing w '
u k

10. Green
condition
upected to
Ming with
and Curt
- ders, senioi guard
veni seven tor 11
Newman, who
� " ed 1 S points
i s i e ol e en
Harrison
iheii plav
and coaches)
- a ds to be
ed "We had
P ayers offen-
pated he
rel another
- Saturday
Minges on
Navy, who
"orenee. is
-U S ith's stan-
is 13-8
ided To
11 Squad
'cam all-
civ and
was the Most
District tor
I will also
a State High
Mike was
R mond for
it Easl Carolina
rta State and
rship
: � al is the
E -C-South
ird to
i a sc-
. 20-year old
B: A. "But our
i� right now is Navv
l 'S oppcnent Saturdav night in
�es)
winn : the tournament
an automatic bid to the
. tournament, an opportunity
obinson has alwavs dreamed
l would be a big step for me to
in the toui Robinson
�d 'The exposure could open a
see PIRAihs paVje 11
m
!

-


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lington3:00
lina7:00
ion I ni.7:00
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lison3:00
chmond1:30
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ryan7:00
jlina7:00
L niv (ten:(2j1:00
d Mary2:00
ichmond3:00
mngton- JO
liinnton7:00
I niv.7:00
l niv.2:00
hristian7:00
liege7:00
left1:00
K-istian(2) d1:00
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Ivpe.
Sneaker Sam Sez
Sport Club Action
Various sport clubs
will be in action this
weekend on the ECU
campus. The team
handball club will host
Washington, D.C. in
Memorial Gym. Games
Saturday will begin at
6:00 p.m. for the men
and 8:00 p.m. for the
women. On Sunday
morning, the men start
at 10:00 a.m. with the
women's game at 11:45
a.m.
The women's rugby
club will go against
Reedy Creek Saturday
at 1:00 p m. on the
Allied Health field.
The women's soccer
club will see action at
2:00p.m. on Sunday in
Ficklen Stadium as thev
play N.C. State.
Strongest Sur-
ev en
sights
The
vive
On Saturday
ing, it was the
and sounds of physical
strain as eyes bulged
and veins rose to the
surface at the finals of
the Intramural-
Budweiser Arm Wrestl-
ing Tournament. The
intersitv was high as the
finalists gave their best
shots to become a
strong arm champion.
Congratulations to the
champions, and thanlo
to Budweiser and all
who participated.
Men's champs are: 150
lbs. and under - Ben
Strickland; 151-175 lbs
- Curtis Sendek;
176-199 - Mark
Williams; and 200 lbs.
and over - Mike Grant.
Women's champs are:
1351bs. and under -
Laura Quisenberry;
and 136 lbs. and over -
Lori Greene.
Basket Excitement
As the last week of
the regular season in in-
tramural basketball ap-
proaches, the real ex-
citement is about to
begin. Playoffs will
start February 27 for all
teams which have a 50
�7o or better win-loss
record. Playoff
brackets will be posted
by Friday, February 25
outside 204 Memorial
Gym.
A Slapshooting Af-
fair
The wild and crazy
sport of roller hockey
will finish its regular
season today Several
of the co-rev teams
have already received
plav off bids. These
teams include: Night
Cruisers, El I oco
Flyers, Rolla Doobie,
True Pros, H.R.S,
Puckers, lambda
Alpha kappa, and
Magic Carpet Ride.
Playoff action will
begin on Monday,
February 21 at Sport-
sworld. Catch a glimp-
se of this slapshooting
attair!
Weight Lifting Meet
If you haven't
started training for the
weight lifting meet,
time is running short!
You have until Tues-
day, February 22 to
sign up. The meet will
be held on February 23
at 6:00 p.m in the ECU
Strength Complex.
Events will include
Squat, Dead Lift, and
Bench Press with the
weight classifications
for men: 130 and
under, 131-150,
151-170, 171-190,
191-210, 211 230, and
231 and under. Weight
classifications for
women are: 115 and
under, 116-135,
136-155, and 156 and
above. If you are not
participating come
spectate � it's sure to
be a powerful event!
Wrestling
Registration for
wrestling begins Mon-
day, February 21 and
continues through
Thursday, February 24.
Matches start February
28 at 5:00 p.m. in room
102, Memorial Gym.
Matches are scheduled
for Monday through
Thursday with a single
elimination tourna-
ment.
Ride Like the Wind
The Intramural
Department, in
cooperation with Kitty
Hawk Kites, is offering
a hang gliding trip to
Nags Head, N.C. on
March 26, 1983. Flights
and instruction will
take place on Jockey's
Ridge, the highest (13
stories tall) sand dune
in the East. Payment
must accompany
registration which will
be taken at the Outdoor
Recreation Center (113
Memorial Gym)
through March 17,
1983. For $41.40 a
three-hour course is of-
fered. An advance
course is also offered
for those with proof of
previous participation
in a beginning course.
For more information,
a short film presenta-
tion will be provided by
the staff of Kitty Hawk
Kites on February 23 at
7:30 p.m. in Brewster
C-103.
Handball Teams Face
the Germans
The Men's In-
tramural Handball
team will play the Ger-
man Air Foice from
Washington, D. C. this
weekend at Memorial
Gym. The two teams
will meet Saturday at 6
p.m and Sunday and
10 a.m. The women's
sqad will take on the
Washington Club team
on Saturday at 8 pm,
and Sunday at 11:45
am. The Washington
Club is made up of
daughters of foreign
ambassadors.
ECU Diver Shows
Off Sharp Physique
Coot. From Page 10
To maintain his art
scholarship, Eagle must
keep his grade-point
average above a 3.0.
Currently he carries a
3.5 average.
With a full range of
activities which include
weight training, diving
practice and working
on his art projects,
Eagle has found time to
pose for the "Men of
ECU" calender.
"That was
something my
girlfriend talked me in-
to he said. "It was
quite an experience
Eagle is also hoping
to encounter another
experience this season.
His ultimate goal is to
make it to the NCAA
National Finals, and
with five school records
already under his belt,
he's certainly off to a
good start.
tUH v OARV FATTHSON
ECU head coach Cathy Andruzzi will lead the Lady Pirates against
Morebead State tonight in Minges at 7:30 p.m.
Pirates' Floor General Calls The Signals
Cont. From Page 10
a lot of doors for me.
tions. But he maintains
a realistic attitude and
The pinnacle of any doesn't rely on lofty
basketball player's ambitions,
career is to play in the "I would like to play
NBA, and Robinson pro ball, but it's not the
shares these aspira- biggest goal in my
life Robinson com-
mented. "The biggest
thing for me right now
is to get an education
Aside from setting
up other players.
Robinson is also
responsible for calling
offensive plays and
designating the defen-
sive alignment.
As Tony Robinson's
first season at ECU
winds down, the Pirate
floor general continues
to prove to ECU fans
that football isn't the
only sport where a
signal-caller can prove
his worth.
yPLllNG !
.ssin&I
puWWG
!
� 200WEST ;
Thur. Ladies Lock In
with the Condo Kid
Doors open 8:30
Adm. 50C
Guvs admitted at 10:00
Lambda Chi Happy Hour
Doors open 4:00-7:00
50CAdm.
nite
G! Cimoulla9ed Fatigues �rtd
T Shirts Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks Camping Equip
men' Steel Toed Shoes Dishes
ana Over 700 Different New ana
Usea Items Cowboy Boots
ARMY-NAVY
150' i Evans
Street
STORE
Sorority Night
Doors Re-Open at 9:00
Adm.50C
200 W. 10th St.
Sun.
John Moore's Beach Party
4:00-7:00pm
ECU�Greenville's Best 200 West
fmmkmmmaMmammMKMma&Ks
3
THE GREAT POKER SHOOTOUT
HERE'S THE 3RD AND 4TH SET OF CLUES IN THE BUSCH BEER CONTEST
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Rod Abernethy of Arrogence
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HEAD FOB THE MOUNTAINS
BUSCH
�������������
mmmn
fc
You were saymg said
Ramdance that the cards in
each player s hand add up
to the same number Sounds
a mite odd to me
Nothm odd about it
said the BUSCH Cassidy
Course I ain't telliri what that number is but
anybody who s seen that big poster should be
able to find it - if they let their eyes roam '
A barmaid came by with ice-cold glasses of
BUSCH Beer for all the players and onlookers
Once again BUSCH CassiOy raised his glass to
Diamond Li' ?his time bowing from the waist
You got something goin on with her
inquired the Kid
Now, Cdssidy laughed it s sort of a private
joke Diamond Lil tells everybody she s
descended from royalty but there am t a speck of
truth in it Sure shesholdm one of the two aces
that s been dealt but they re of minor importance
You haven t saia much about Black Bart the
Kid said
Nothm much to say. cept he s always
wearing black suits when he plays Thinks it gives
him class
Golly saia Ramdance you got most
everybody sized up But you am t mentioned Doc
riQUida.
"later, said Cassidy
You were asmn me
about Doc Hoiiiday said
BUSCH Cdssidy as he and
the Kid watchea the big
poker game m the Last
Chance Saloon
Yeah said the Kid He
keeps geftm up from the 'able ana 'hen comm
back weann a different outfit
True indeed saidCassiay Doc hes
superstitious ana he thinks changm clothes will
bring him luck That s why he s always got four suits
with him
doaedare said Rdmdance i surety am
impressed with your know-how And that deserves
another ice-coid BUSCH
The Kid and Cassidy downed the mellow
brew then returned to observe the action at the
taoie
This hefe game is right interests observed
BUSCH Cassidy
How SO
Aei there s only one King dealt ana iust five
hearts And l iust now remembered
somethm aDout Wyatt Earp
Would you care to share that
information asked tne Kid
Later said Cassidy
( Look lor me 5th
and final set ol
clues in this space
next week ;
WiJ MMMrtMCk Inc SI LoulvM063H�Pnn��ainUSA
rewre�tttt�ttirew��
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
fe
7
ss
MH)r RKPAIK
113 Grande Ave.
758 U28
STl DENT OPPORTUNITIES
We are looking for girls interested in being
counselors - artivit instructors in a private girts
camp located in Henersonville, N.C. Instuctors
needed especiall in Swimming(WSI), Horseback
riding. Tennis. Backpacking, Archer, Canoeing,
(.tmnaslics. Crafts. Also Basketball. Dancing, Soc-
cer. Cheerteading, Drama. Art, Office work. Camp
craft. Nature stud). If �our school offers a Summer
Internship program we will be glad to help. Inquiries
- Morgan Hasncs P.O. Box 400c, In.on. N.C.
28782.
NOW OPEN

Til
HTHEIOS,
DIET
CENTER-
swing INTO
118 E FIFTH ST
an: m boon stRN
SERVING HOME - STYLE
FOOD AT REASONABLE
PRICES
LUNCH a DINNER SPECIALS
DAILY FOR 2 88 TAX
II am-9 pm DAILY
411 hntrtei an Unmt Wadi
TONIGHT, The Lady Pirates vs Morehead State
7:30pm-Minges Coliseum
SATURDAY
ECU vs. NAVY
7:30pm-Minges Coliseum
Delta Airlines and Greenville Travel Center to give trip for two to
Dallas,TX. Air fare free from Raleigh to Dallas, with free motel
accomodations at the Mandalay Four Seasons in Dallas. Your Student
ticket stub good for drawing,or register in advance at Greenville
Travel Center or the athletic ticket off ice. Delta is ready when
you are,now with non-stop service from RaleighDurham to Dallas
Fort Worth.
Lady Pirates vs Boston U.
3:00pm-Minges Coliseum
SUNDAY,
Watch the Pirates attack.
44�4���WWt40
1MBMHHP
m


I





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 17, 1983
Classifieds
PERSONAL
DEAR TAM KYPU and Map�V
Birthday.
EAT MORE BEANS
ROOMMATE
WANTED
EXCELLENT TYPIST.
Reasonable rates. All papers Call
7171171 attar a.m.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER-
VICE : Complete audio repair call
attar 4 a.m. Marie 7I1-IW.
MABLA ESFANOLT II not. tatar
mo available In Spanitfi literature
grammar and convariatlaa No
espere hatla i ultima minulai
Call M7HI batara l.U p.m.
FOR PROFESSIONAL FLIGHT
INSTRUCTION, call JOE,
rtte42.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Kln�s
Raw Aparlmants; 2 Bedroom,
split utilities and rant Contact
Jan, 73241M.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TTPINO SER
VICE, aKparianca. quality wart,
IBM Selactric tyaawrltar. Call
Lania Shiva 75a-SJ�l or OAIL
JOYNER 7J 101
TYPING: Tarm papers. Ifcasls,
ale. Call Kampta Dunn, 751-47M.
PRESENTLY
RESEARCH an aaallal
Naad la Interview a maM and a
tamai who hava me mfect.o
(separata intarvlawt). Cantidan
tiai.ty guaranteed aa names r�-
quirad II interested, call Or
Chanawalh at MJ-eMl (ECU) ar
7M-UI7 (attar I p.m.) WIM pay �
lor 4S minute) mtarviaw.
WANTED
COUNSELORS tor ca-ad summer
camp in tha mountains of North
Carolina Raom, maals, laundry,
salary and traval allowanca. Ex-
parianca not nacassary but must
enjoy livinf and working with
childran. Only clean cut, non-
smoklnf coiia-o stvdonts naad ap-
ply. For application brochure.
wrlta: Jack Lavlna, Camp
Pinowood, 1e4et HE. 10 Avanua.
North Miami Baach, Florida
mil.
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Arkansas or
along I- Wast, Spring Braak
Call Pam, 737 uu
MISC.
WE BUY USED MUSICAL IN
STRUMENTS: CALL 7Sa-oT77.
FLORIDAII SPRINO BREAK.
�enervations naw being takan tar
a trip to Daytana Baach. Bound
trip bus lara with KEOS. 7 nights
accomodatlon at King's Inn
Baachtront. Fraa partias with liv
band and unlimited brew Pricois
JUS SO lor everything aacapt
doing maa
h) CaH f�-?�, lar datails
altar a a.m. Lhmitad spaca. sa
don't wait
SINGING VALENTINE
TELEGRAMS Ta maka RMS VO
day on your haaay will truly
r.mambar. call LADYBUO
LIMITED tar datails JSVJva ar
7S4-7M3.
SPRINO BREAK PARTY: In
cludas 7 nights and � days aa Tha
Strip" m susaay Ft Laudardal.
Fla. Varlaus activities within
walk ma distanc includuaf a tree
keg daily at Iha Button Occupan
cy availabta at thro hotas with
range In prtcas traan iliS� Far
turthar inf . cantact Bath ar Lisa
pi 7S-sn ar 7S7-mt.
CHARTER � �$ TO FORT
LAUDERDALE. FLA Round
trip motor coach ta Ft Laudardal
Mf M plus taa Ceatecf Both or
Lisa at Tjd-aglar 717 MTt.
fTilTsTUDBNTS. FACULTY.
STAFF WaKawta ta aur Flea
Markat at "�� P,M Cunty
Fairground lacatad an N Green
villa Blvd Opan avry Saturday
and Sunday � till S Crafts, tools
furniture, baabs. tc Displays el
aid pottcardi buttons antique
pistols and celled � items aMi
bargeman
FORSALE
177 CAMARO E.cetleet C0W-J
tion ajjj ajjaj after a p m u sa
DORM SIZE REFPiGEparQa
US Call 7S1 IbM Asa for JAN
171 DATSUN )�� I ?JJ t�j
FOR SALE Lady i '� ieg
Rass i mk frame aacaasaatcai
ditioo. can '53 M after � at
LOST AND
FOUND
FOUND GOLD Chasm t
engraved on on aJjAj 11-14 TaVl
Engraved on oppoi . . 3. �
quire in Cashier i Ottxt
FOUND TONGA THEIiN� 5 -
CARD Call 7 )2�3
Take a kid bowling today




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Title
The East Carolinian, February 17, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 17, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.251
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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