The East Carolinian, February 15, 1983






Qftiz lEaat (Earfllttttan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.
Tuesday, February 15,1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Dean Laing Of Art School Resigns From Post
D. fUUUM UDAU.A denartmnf nf the ;rhool into tWO the famltv anH arlminictrntirkn at thinoc fr� mv ahmif I aino "Hr I a- �IJ.� �,� � ;iui- u ,
Photo By NEWS BUREAU
Richard H. Laing
By DARRYL BROWN
Aatalaal Non Etlor
Dean of the School of Art
Richard H. Laing resigned his post
as the head of the state's only ac-
credited art school last week and
will step down as soon as his suc-
cessor is chosen.
Laing assumed the post in 1979
after being selected by a faculty
committee from the art school in a
national search. The post was made
vacant upon the death of Well-
ington G. Gray, who served as dean
for 21 years.
Laing is responsible for some ma-
jor changes and improvements in
the art school. Most notably, he
consolidated the nine smaller
departments of the school into two
larger departments of fine arts and
design last year.
Some faculty were in support of
Laing's methods and ideas. One
faculty number claimed that Laing
has increased the art school's
recognition and respect around the
country. "We are much better
known because of Dean Laing. He
has made us better known
throughout the U.S
The faculty member, who asked
not to be identified, said that ten-
sion among the some faculty and a
lack of support made Laing's job
difficult. He "didn't have support"
from all the faculty, the source said,
and was not fully appreciated. A
"problem of personalities" among
the faculty and administration at
times created "just an unpleasant
type of situation
Some faculty did agree with Laing
and the direction he was taking the
School of Art. "He was the right
dean for this school. We were head-
ed in the right direction
A contingent of faculty endorsed
Laing in a routine faculty evalua-
tion report last year. A standard
report must by completed by the
faculty of all university departments
every four years regarding its
evaluation of the department's ad-
ministration.
Dr. Angelo Volpe, vice chancellor
of academic affairs, had only good
things to say about Laing. "Dr. La-
ing is an artist and an art educator
of the first caliber he said. "His
creativity has enhanced the already
excellent reputation of our School
of Art
The ECU School of Art is the on-
ly art school in North Carolina fully
accredited by the National Associa-
tion of the Schools of Art. It is
ranked in the top catagory, division
A.
Laing had good communication
with students and a good awareness
of student work, the faculty
member said. Many students
agreed, saying of Laing that "his
door was always open
He was always available. He is a
very nice person said one fine arts
student
Laing supported the aquisition of
regional and national shows and ex-
hibitions by the school's gallery. He
was active in student recruitment
and in the founding of the Friends
of Art, a fund raising group created
late last year for the art school.
Laing, who could not be reached
for comment, will continue to serve
on the faculty as a professor of art
He holds degrees in art from
Eastern Michigan University and
Wayne State University and receiv-
ed a doctorate in education at Penn-
sylvania State University.
Increased Accessibility
New Automatic Doors Aid Handicapped
By PATRICK O'NEILL
The installation of seven
automatic door openers in four
campus buildings is welcome news
to ECU's handicapped students.
The students often had trouble in
the past using a number of entrances
around campus.
"1 think they're great said ECU
psychology, student Wayne Dawson.
"I've had a lot of trouble in the past
with certain doors on campus
Most handicapped students said
the installment of the door openers
was a valuable asset. Handicapped
students Brian Rangeley and Rich
Burke agreed with Dawson's state-
ment. These three students all rely
on wheelchairs to go places on cam-
pus. They live in Slay dorm where
one of the seven electric openers has
been installed.
According to Director of Han-
dicapped Students Services C. C.
Rowe, the university will be install-
ing nine additional door openers
during the spring semester, bringing
the total to 16. "We've had an on-
going program for removing
physical barriers Rowe said.
Rowe said that opening doors was
one of the major problems faced by
many handicapped students, par-
ticularly those students in
wheelchairs and on crutches.
"Many people sitting in
wheelchairs don't have the physical
ability to open doors Rowe said.
"They have to wait for somebody to
come along to open it for them
Burke and Dawson were both
grateful that an automatic opener
was installed in Spillman building
because the building's wheelchair
ramp goes to a front door that most
people don't use.
"1 got trapped in there (Spillman)
once Burke said. "I was in there
during lunchtime and nobody was
around to let me out Burke had to
wait 15 minutes before someone
came to let him out. "Now I don't
have to sit around and wait for so-
meone to come along. It makes me
more independent. Now 1 just go up
there and hit it (the door switch) and
go right in
Dawson said many doors are too
heavv for him to open and that it
was difficult for him to grip the
handles on some doors. Dawson
said that many of the students have
a handicapped that prevents them
from gripping the door adequately.
Burke and Dawson both said cer-
tain doors could cause serious
damage to wheelchairs and injure
the person in it. The students said
the new openers are much safer for
them and their wheelchair.
Dawson said that a door which
opens both ways is the easiest for a
wheelchair student to use. Most
doors on campus open one way, he
said.
According to Rowe the automatic
door openers cost $1,245 each. Bids
are now being accepted by the
university for the installation of the
other nine. The funds for the pro-
ject were taken from the Handicap-
ped Student Services budget for
maintenance and operations. Rowe
said no special federal funds had
been allotted for the project.
"This has been one of the things
that many (handicapped students)
felt was needed on campus Rowe
said.
A feature of the new door openers
includes a timer that can be set to
keep the doors open for various
amounts of time. The timer is now
set to keep the door open 12
seconds. Rowe said the door
openers were moveable and could be
changed to a different door if
necessary.
Besides Slay dorm and Spillman,
the automatic openers have been in-
stalled in Brewster and the Allied
Health building. The other nine
openers are scheduled to be installed
in Speight, Rawl (2). the Library (4),
Whichard and the library science
building. The wall plate has the blue
and white symbol of a wheelchair,
an internationally recognized sym-
bol for the handicapped.
Rowe said the new door openers
served many purposes and could be
a help to everyone, not just
wheelchair users. "I'm very happy
to see them installed Dawson
said.
"I've gotten a lot of use out of
them in just this short time they've
been in service Dawson said. All
seven openers have been install ed �
I B CtMOT WALL
Rich Barke is one of many students on campus who will make frequent
of the new automatic door openers being installed around campus.
Residence Life To Give New Award
In Honor Of Former Staff Member
By ED NICKLAS
SuflWrtht
Photo Sv CINDY WALL
The SGA Legislature approved $2000 for the construction of a new bus shelter at the bottom of College Hill.
Appropriated at the weekly meeting last night, the money is half the amount needed to consruct the shelter for
the ECU transit system.
SGA Appropriates Money To Build
Bus Shelter At College Hill Location
By GREG R1DEOUT
Nm Milor
The SGA in its weekly meeting
Monday night approved by an over-
On The Inside
Announcements
Editorial
Stan Landers
Entertainment
Sports
Classifieds
Page 2
Page 4
Page 4
Page 7
Page 10
Page 13
For the sports scoop on the
Converse Lady Pirate Classic
turn to the SPORTS section.
Read how number five-ranked
Cheyney State defeated the host
Lady Pirates to capture the tour-
nament crown. The Lady Pirates
finished in second place ahead of
Clemson and Detroit University.
whelming majority to appropriate
$2,000 to assist the Student Transit
Authority in constructing a bus
shelter on campus. The shelter is
tentatively scheduled to be built at
the bottom of College Hill, pending
approval of the Board of Trustees.
The bus shelter bill, passed by a
voice vote, had been brought up on
the legislature floor two weeks ago.
At that time, the bill called for the
SGA to appropriate the full $4,000
for the shelter. The original bill was
then tabled and sent back to the stu-
dent welfare committee for recon-
sideration. The SGA had $8,000 left
to spend two weeks ago.
The student welfare committee
rewrote the bill to say the SGA
would pay half the cost of the bus
shelter if the Student Transit
Authority would appropriate the
other $2,000.
SGA president Eric Henderson
spoke in favor of the bill. He ex-
plained that the transit authority is a
separate organisation from the
SGA and receive their own money
from student funds. But, he said,
they are planning to purchase new
buses collectively priced at $63,000
and need help to construct the
shelters.
If the College Hill site is not ap-
proved by the trustees at their
March 4, meeting, the bill calls for
construction of the shelter in front
of the Speight building on Fifth
Street. The site on Fifth street has
already been approved.
The $4,000 is the cost of the
materials. The labor is to be provid-
ed by the Industrial Tech Majors
Club.
One legislator did point out that
many students don't use the bus ser-
vice, and therefore, he thought the
bill should be defeated. He seemed
to be alone in his opinion of the bill.
Most of the other legislators
thought that the benefits for all
students outweighed the disadvan-
tages, pointing to the fact that the
system is overused at present.
Construction of the shelter will
begin after approval of the site by
the trustees in March.
Residence Life has announced
that it will present a Reggie Swinson
Service Award in mid-April, to
honor a student staff member who
has contributed most to serving
residence life and the ECU campus
during his or her tenure.
The award, which will be
presented annually, is a memorial to
former student staff member Swin-
son, who died last August from in-
juries suffered in an auto accident.
The recipient of the award will be
chosen by a selection committee
composed of two residence life ad-
ministrators, an area coordinator,
and two resident advisors.
The award process begins with
students and staff filling out
nomination data sheets, which can
be obtained from individual
residence hall offices. The nomina-
tion deadline is March 3.
The committee will narrow the list
to three or five nominees, who will
in turn partake in an interview pro-
cess to determine the award reci-
pient.
The award, although in part a
tribute to Swinson and his qualities,
involves other criteria. The nominee
must have a grade point average of
2.5 or above, have completed a full
year of service, have demonstrated
involvement in residence hall and
campus organizations and met the
selection process qualifications.
"We felt we needed to create
some sort of honor and recognition
for those who go above and beyond
the call of duty said Susan Ken-
nedy, who is the residence director
in Fletcher Hall and also chairing
the committee.
The idea for an award originated
when certain College Hill staff
members last August had talked
about giving out some type of an
award in memory of Swinson, who
was very popular among the staff
and students during his employment
at Aycock Hall.
"Reggie was energetic, involved
in campus activities (he was an ECU
ambaasador), an all-around type
person and respected by many
Kennedy said. "So, it was a good
chance to show our appreciation of
the student staff as well as provide
for an award in memory of Reg-
gie
Sleeping On The Job
�v cimov WALL
Osmosis and digestion may be popular methods of study, bat most pro-
fessors aad report cards will testify that they are not the most effective study
habits. Sleeping works as well on homework as it does on class lectures.

1 "





J
Stye izaat (Ear0itman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.4
Tuesday, February 15, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Dean Laing Of Art School Resigns From Post
hoto By NEWS BUREAU
Richard H. laing
By DARRYL BROWN
Dean of the School of Art
Richard H. Laing resigned his post
as the head of the state's only ac-
credited art school last week and
will step down as soon as his suc-
cessor is chosen.
Laing assumed the post in 1979
after being selected by a faculty
committee from the art school in a
national search. The post was made
vacant upon the death of Well-
ington G. Gray, who served as dean
for 21 years.
Laing is responsible for some ma-
jor changes and improvements in
the art school. Most notably, he
consolidated the nine smaller
departments of the school into two
larger departments of fine arts and
design last year.
Some faculty were in support of
Laing's methods and ideas. One
faculty member claimed that Laing
has increased the art school's
recognition and respect around the
country. "We are much better
known because of Dean Laing. He
has made us better known
throughout the U.S
The faculty member, who asked
not to be identified, said that ten-
sion among the some faculty and a
lack of support made Laing's job
difficult. He "didn't have support"
from all the faculty, the source said,
and was not fully appreciated. A
"problem of personalities" among
the faculty and administration at
times created "just an unpleasant
type of situation
Some faculty did agree with Laing
and the direction he was taking the
School of Art. "He was the right
dean for this school. We were head-
ed in the right direction
A contingent of faculty endorsed
Laing in a routine faculty evalua-
tion report last year. A standard
report must by completed by the
faculty of all university departments
every four years regarding its
evaluation of the department's ad-
ministration.
Dr. Angelo Volpe, vice chancellor
of academic affairs, had only good
things to say about Laing. "Dr La-
ing is an artist and an art educator
of the first caliber he said. "His
creativity has enhanced the already
excellent reputation of our School
of Art
The ECU School of Art is the on-
ly art school in North Carolina fully
accredited by the National Associa-
tion of the Schools of Art. It is
ranked in the top catagory, division
A.
Laing had good communication
with students and a good awareness
of student work, the faculty
member said. Many students
agreed, saying of Laing that "his
door was always open
He was always available He is a
ver nice person said one fine arts
.tudent
Laing supported the aquisition of
regional and national shows and ex-
hibitions by the school's gallery. He
was active in student recruitment
and in the founding of the Friends
of Art, a fund raising group created
late last year for the art school.
Laing, who could not be reached
for comment, will continue to serve
on the faculty as a professor of art
He holds degrees in art from
Eastern Michigan University and
Wayne State University and receiv-
ed a doctorate in education at Penn-
sylvania State University.
Increased Accessibility
New Automatic Doors Aid Handicapped
By PATRICK O'NEILL
staff Wnlc
The installation of seven
automatic door openers in four
campus buildings is welcome news
to ECU's handicapped students.
The students often had trouble in
the past using a number oi entrances
around campus.
"1 think they're great said ECU
psychology student Wayne Dawson.
"I've had a lot of trouble in the past
with certain doors on campus
Most handicapped students said
the installment of the door openers
was a valuable asset. Handicapped
students Brian Rangeley and Rich
Burke agreed with Dawson's state-
ment. These three students all rely-
on wheelchairs to go places on cam-
pus They live in Slay dorm where
vine of the seven electric openers has
been installed.
According to Director of Han-
dicapped Students Services C. C.
Rowe the university will be install-
ing nine additional door openers
during the spring semester, bringing
the total to 16. "We've had an on-
going program for removing
physical barriers Rowe said.
Rowe said that opening doors was
one of the major problems faced by
many handicapped students, par-
ticularly those students in
wheelchairs and on crutches.
"Many people sitting in
wheelchairs don't have the physical
ability to open doors Rowe said.
"They have to wait for somebody to
come along to open it for them
Burke and Dawson were both
grateful that an automatic opener
was installed in Spillman building
because the building's wheelchair
ramp goes to a front door that most
people don't use.
"1 got trapped in there (Spillman)
once Burke said. "I was in there
during lunchtime and nobody was
around to let me out Burke had to
wait 15 minutes before someone
came 10 let him out. "Now I don't
have to sit around and wait for so-
meone to come along. It makes me
more independent. Now 1 just go up
there and hit it (the door switch) and
go right in
Dawson said many doors are too
heaw for him to open and that it
was difficult for him to grip the
handles on some doors. Dawson
said that many of the students have
a handicapped that prevents them
from gripping the door adequately.
Burke and Dawson both said cer-
tain doors could cause serious
damage to wheelchairs and injure
the person in it. The students said
the new openers are much safer for
them and their wheelchair.
Dawson said that a door which
opens both ways is the easiest for a
wheelchair student to use. Most
doors on campus open one way, he
said.
According to Rowe the automatic
door openers cost $1,245 each. Bids
are now being accepted by the
university for the installation of the
other nine. The funds for the pro-
ject were taken from the Handicap-
ped Student Services budget for
maintenance and operations. Rowe
said no special federal funds had
been allotted for the project.
"This has been one of the things
that many (handicapped students)
felt was needed on campus Rowe
said.
A feature of the new door openers
includes a timer that can be set to
keep the doors open for various
amounts of time. The timer is now
set to keep the door open 12
seconds. Rowe said the door
openers were moveable and could be
changed to a different door if
necessary.
Besides Slay dorm and Spillman,
the automatic openers have been in-
stalled in Brewster and the Allied
Health building. The other nine
openers are scheduled to be installed
in Speight, Rawl (2), the Library (4),
Whichard and the library science
building. The wall plate has the blue
and white symbol of a wheelchair,
an internationally recognized sym-
bol for the handicapped.
Rowe said the new door openers
served many purposes and could be
a help to everyone, not just
wheelchair users. "I'm very happy
to see them installed Dawson
said.
"I've gotten a lot of use out of
them in just this short time they've
been in service Dawson said. All
seven openers have been installed
Rich Burke is one of many students on campus who will make frequent use
of the new automatic door openers being installed around campus.
Residence Life To Give New Award
In Honor Of Former Staff Member
By ED NICKLAS
Siaff MM
photo �y CINDY WALL
a onnn for the construction of a new bus shelter at the bottom of College Hill.
ZSXZiZZ� k h"f ,he �mo �"M ,o �"
the ECU transit system.
SGA Appropriates Money To Build
Bus Shelter At College Hill Location
.i � ��� tn rinrrhase nev
By GREG HIDEOUT
Ncan Mi
The SGA in its weekly meeting
Monday night approved by an over
On The Inside
Announcements
Editorial
Stan Landers
Kntertainment
Sports
Classifieds
Page 2
Page 4
Page 4
Page 7
Page 10
Page 13
For the sports scoop on the
Converse Lady Pirate Classic
turn to the SPORTS section
Read how number five-ranked
Cheyney State defeated the host
Ladv Pirates to capture the tour-
nament crown. The Lady Pirates
finished in second place ahead of
Clem son and Detroit University.
whelming majority to appropriate
$2,000 to assist the Student Transit
Authority in constructing a bus
shelter on campus. The shelter is
tentatively scheduled to be built at
the bottom of College Hill, pending
approval of the Board of Trustees.
The bus shelter bill, passed by a
voice vote, had been brought up on
the legislature floor two weeks ago.
At that time, the bill called for the
SGA to appropriate the full $4,000
for the shelter. The original bill was
then tabled and sent back to the stu-
dent welfare committee for recon-
sideration. The SGA had $8,000 left
to spend two weeks ago.
The student welfare committee
rewrote the bill to say the SGA
would pay half the cost of the bus
shelter if the Student Transit
Authority would appropriate the
other $2,000.
SGA president Eric Henderson
spoke in favor of the bill. He ex-
plained that the transit authority is a
separate organisation from the
SGA and receive their own money
from student funds. But, he said,
they are planning to purchase new
buses collectively priced at $63,000
and need help to construct the
shelters.
If the College Hill site is not ap-
proved by the trustees at their
March 4, meeting, the bill calls for
construction of the shelter in front
of the Speight building on Filth
Street. The site on Fifth street has
already been approved.
The $4,000 is the cost of the
materials. The labor is to be provid-
ed by the Industrial Tech Majors
Club.
One legislator did point out that
many students don't use the bus ser-
vice, and therefore, he thought the
bill should be defeated. He seemed
to be alone in his opinion of the bill.
Most of the other legislators
thought that the benefits for all
students outweighed the disadvan-
tages, pointing to the fact that the
system is overused at present.
Construction of the shelter will
begin after approval of the site by
the trustees in March.
Residence Life has announced
that it will present a Reggie Swinson
Service Award in mid-April, to
honor a student staff member who
has contributed most to serving
residence life and the ECU campus
during his or her tenure.
The award, which will be
presented annually, is a memorial to
former student staff member Swin-
son, who died last August from in-
juries suffered in an auto accident.
The recipient of the award will be
chosen by a selection committee
composed of two residence life ad-
ministrators, an area coordinator,
and two resident advisors.
The award process begins with
students and staff filling out
nomination data sheets, which can
be obtained from individual
residence hall offices. The nomina-
tion deadline is March 3.
The committee will narrow the list
to three or five nominees, who will
in turn partake in an interview pro-
cess to determine the award reci-
pient.
The award, although in part a
tribute to Swinson and his qualities,
involves other criteria. The nominee
must have a grade point average of
2.5 or above, have completed a full
year of service, have demonstrated
involvement in residence hall and
campus organizations and met the
selection process qualifications.
"We felt we needed to create
some sort of honor and recognition
for those who go above and beyond
the call of duty said Susan Ken-
nedy, who is the residence director
in Fletcher Hall and also chairing
the committee. .
The idea for an award originated
when certain College Hill staff
members last August had talked
about giving out some type of an
award in memory of Swinson, who
was very popular among the stall
and students during his employment
at Ay cock Hall. ,
"Reggie was energetic, involved
in campus activities (he was an ECL
ambaasador), an all-around type
person and respected by many.
Kennedy said. "So, it was a good
chance to show our appreciation of
the tudent staff as well as provide
for an award in memory ot Reg-
gie.
Sleeping On The Job
�, CIMOY WALL
Osmosis and digestion may be popular methods of study, bat most pro-
ZZZTJ report cards will testify that they are no. the �ostefteetiv. study
habits. Sleeping works as well on homework as it does oa class lectures.





THE EASTC AROl INIAN
FEBRUARY J5, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organuation
would like 'o Have an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it t0 Tne East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Flyers ano handwritten copy on
odd sued paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
sofely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor announcements
�s 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper No ar
nouncements received after these
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to an
campus organizations and depart
ments
ULTIMAX
TOURNAMENT
Ultimax '83 is coming! On
ivVarcn 16 and 27 the ECU I Rates
will Most their first ultimate tour
nament Make plans to see some of
the best ultimate to be played on
the east coast this year The irates
are planning a road trip to
Gainsville, Fla over Spr ng Break
to piay in a tournament and catch
some rays too1 Club meetings are
Moo nights. 8 00 rm 248 MSC
Anyone interested is welcome
KARATE
On Thursday January 20 the
East Carolina Karate Club will
hold a belt test for its students m
the rst floor of Memorial Gym a'
J 00 p.m. Club instructor Bill Mac
donald invites the public to atteno
and observe some of tne finest
Md'tial Arts performance m the
south
NURSING
School of Nursing prereg'Stra
t.on for summer session and fall
semester. 1983 will occur during
daytime office hours of faculty ac
visors. February 28 through
March 4 To expedite th s process
a sign up sheet will be posted on
the office door of each faculty ad
vlSOr On foCiary 14 1983
Students are reijues'ed to indicate
or tnat sheet before February 26
their preferred conference time
Students nc expect to meet all
requirements for accep'ance mo
scprvmore leve clin � rHiri '��
Our�es � ' � s
secure ar informal on sheet arc
ar 'ntent to Enroll form in
NB 1S2 Failure to subm.t tne form
will result in the student s name
being placed on ar alternate list
for admission nte tnose conical
nursing courses
ECU SCIENCE
EDUCATION
ECU Science Education Club
will present Bill Crews Fossil
Collecting in Eastern NC' on
February 15 at 4 00 p m m
Flanagan 303
FELLOWSHIP
The Fountain of Life Christian
Fellowship meets every Wednes
day night at 7 00 p.m in the
Ledoma Wright Cultural Center
vou are invited to come out tor a
time of fun, telloship and Bible
Study
ASH WEDNESDAY
The 5 00 p m Mass for Ash
Wednesday. February 16th will be
held in the Library Science
Auditorium on the second floor of
the Library Science Building
Mass will NOT be m the Biology
building
ILO
The international Language
Organiiation will be meeting
Wednesday February 16 1983 at
3 00 The meeting will be held in
Brewster, C wing room 301 All old
members are encouraged to at
tend this meeting If you are not a
member but are mtersted in other
cultures you are .nvited to come to
our meeting You do not have to be
a Foreign Language maior or
m-nor to idn
ASPA
American Society tor Personnel
Administrators will meet
February 16 at 3 p m in Room 206
Rawls Featured speaxer will be
Rodne, Maddox Esq from NC
Dept ot LaDor. Ths is open to all
.nterstcd individuals ASPA
members do not forget our initia
tion dinner February 24
COUNSELING
A two part mini series offered at
no cost bv the university Counsel
� ng Center entitled How to Sue
ceed in College and Still Have
Fun on Monday. February 21.
1983 The other one is "How to
Avoid Test Anxiety on Tuesday.
February 22 1983 Both sesso.ns
wii be conducted form 3PM 4PM
in 305 Wright inrex TSJ 6661 No
advance registration necessary
SILENT DINNER
rite S gn language Dept offers
B i ni . rner each week so the
mmutify and Sign
angcage s'o-jents can socialize
and practice their skills This
e�'x tne Silent dinner wll be at
�� na Roma on Wednesday. Feb 16
a' � 00 p "
CAREER CHOICE
The Strong Campbe" interest
inventory is ottered every Tues
da. at 4 PV in 305 Wr.ght Annex
when school is in session with the
exceptions of examination period
ant: registration day This is
avanable to an students at no cost
No formal registration is required
WOMEN'S AWARENESS
MONTH
The la'es' X me s'og'ams tor
West Area s Women s Awareness
Month vyn be on Wednesday
February 16 a 30 pm ,n the Cie
ment nan wObby This week s pro
gram will be a discussion given by
an ECU student concerning the
traumas and emotions of rape vie
tims All who wish to attend are
very welcome
PHI SIGMA PI
A follow up pledge meeting
followed by Phi Sigma Pi's mon
thly business meeting will be held
at 5 00 pm in Rawl 130 on
Wednesday. February 16. 1983 All
interested persons who receive
bids and all brothers of Tau
Chapter are uroed to attend
A smoker for invited guests will
be given by Phi Sigma Pi National
Honor Fraternity Tuesday,
February 15, 1983 at 7 00 p m in
Room 103 of the Biology Building
Dress is semi formal The
brothers of Phi Sigma Pi cordially
invite all persons who receive bids
to attend the smoker
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our next bi weekly meeting will
be held on Tursday, Feb 17 m
Mendenhall's multi purpose room
at 7 p m Members are expectd to
attend Recently invited persons
are urged to attend as well a any
persons wishing to ioin A
minimum GPA of 3 0 is required
for membership
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta will meet on
Thursday, February 17 at 7 30
p m m the Mendenhall Cot
teehouse A poetry reading will be
given by Julie Fay and Peter
Makuck William Hallberg will
give a fiction reading Free pony
keg No admission All members
ano their guests are encouraged to
attend
WINTERFEST!
Sign Language Club members
GET YOUR TICKETS NOW for
WINTERFEST This an day gala
event will feature German foods
and dancing Transportation will
be provided to and from Raleigh
Advance tickets are S5 00 Sign up
in BA 114 Don't miss it' it's Sat
Feb �
YHDL
Young Home Designer s League
meets Tuesday. February 15th at
5 00 in the Van Landmgham room
BINGOICE CREAM
There will be a BINGO. ICE
CREAM PARTY on Tuesday. Feb
15. 1983 at 7 00pm In the
Mendenhall Student Center Mult'
Purpose Room All ECU students
faulty, staff and their dependents
are welcome Admission is 2SThe
prizes this month will include
tree passes to Bowling Billiards
Table Tennis, free tickets to the
Michael iceburg concert, a ticket
to Elly Ameling s concert, aria a
ticket to the Dinner Theatre Come
join n on the tun of Bngo and en
,oy the delicious ice cream Bring
a friend1
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
General College students should
contact their advisers the week
prior to February 21. 1983 to ar
range for preregistration
ABA
Alpha Beta Alpha, the library
science fraternity will be holding a
pledging ceremony February 22 at
5 30 pm in room 219 Library
science department All persons
interested in Librarianship are
welcome
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ
presents Prime Time Every
Thursday nite at 7 9pm in Biology
Building Room 103 A time of fun
fellowship and training m how to
live a victorious Christian life
ARCHERY
interested m Archery or Bow
Hunting if so there is a new sports
club forming iust for you
Members do not have to have any
skill whatsoever iust the desire to
learn the exacting sport of archer
First meeting Feb 17. at 7 00pm
m Room 102 Memorial Gym For
more information call Gene
Taylor at 752 0062
ALPHAOMICRON PI
Alpha Omicron Pi cordially m
v.tes yuou to attend Spring Rush
Wednesday. Feb 16. skating 7 9
Monday, Feb 21 Dinner at 5 00
rides or information call
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use th form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line If word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
7S per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return to THE EAST CAROUNIAN
office b 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday assbfceatfoaa.
Name
Address.
CitySute.
No. lines
.Zip.
.Phone.
.at 75 per line S.
.No. insertions.
.enclosed
����t�r��,


��tr�l1� f�
T1I1�A�'

H�
i�1

iI1 I,
For
7 58 4290
MCAT
Mr John S Childers, Director,
ECU Testing Center announced
that the new Meoicai College Ad
mission Test MCAT application
packets have arrived in the
Testing Center, Speight 105 The
test dates for 19S3 are Apr,i 9 1983.
arid
rtooer 1 1983 The deadline date
for April 9 test is March 11. 1983
and the deadline date tor submit
ting app'Cation for the October 1
1983 test is September 2 1983
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MAJORSCLUB
t(if P E MaiOrs C'uD s
avaiabie to donate time and ser
vices to any organizations or tune
t.ons on campus or m Greenville
who ned help with good cause
efforts that benefit peopie and the
commnity in general Char.ataC'e
organizations, numa" service
groups and other benevloents or
philanthropic groups are en
courage to contact tne club for any
assistance they may be able to
provide
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
will be meeting Wednesday
February 16. 19�3 at 3 X The
meeting w.H be held n Brewster.
C Wmg room 301 All old members
are encouraged to attend this
meefng it you are not a memer
but are interested W other cu'tures
you are invited to erne to our
meeting You do not hav e to be a
Fore gn nguage maor or mmor
to 0,n
CIRCLE K
The ECU Circle K dub will be
meefmg Tuesday February 15,
1983 at 7 00 in Mendenhall rm 221
This meeting is a dosed meeting
tor member only There will be a
spaghetti dinner afterwards
Members nave to supply their own
beverage nonalcoholic, If you
are not a member
terested Ml Circle K
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers of Kappa Sigma
would like to congradulate and
welcome the new Brothers into our
fraternity They consist of Ivan
Washburn. Steve Reavis, Steve
Edwards, Mike Sanoba Mike
Smith, Trey West Paul McArthur.
Dwayne Wiseman Greg Taylor,
Mark Hana, Greg Wyatl. Scott
Smith, Tony Mills. David
Sadlowski, Jason "PAIN" Davis.
Tony Carrea. David Feinbaum.
Chipper McDowell, and Dallas
PARTY Drake
INTER VARSITY
We would like to invite you to
share with us m the excitement
and ioy of serving our Lord Jesus
Christ' Our speaker this week will
be Mr Furnev James Wt meet
each Wednesday at 6 30 m the
Biology Bldg
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
There will be a general meeting
on Thursday February 17th at 00
p m The meeting will be held at
he nternaitona! house on E 9th
Street All members and in
terested persons are urged to at
tend An persons who signed up for
soccer please get m tough with
Luis Ovares at 752 206
If
and are m
come to our
next meeting Tuesday February
27. 19S3 m Mendenhall rmJ21 at
7 0 0
SAM
The Soc.ety tor the Advance
ment of Management will meet
Tuesday February 15, in Rawl
104 Mr Daiton D Bright of
Hooker Buchanan insurance
Agency of Greenville will be the
guest speaker Mr Bright will
speak on the a'terna've careers in
management and insurance
Everyone s invted to attend The
meeting wd' be held a' 4 �
SPECIAL ISSUE
ECU stuoenfs oe or tne lookout for
the an campus preregistration
issue The hst of all class
schedules will hit the newsstand
on Wednesday Staff members of
The East Carolinian would like
everyone to sign up
FILM
The film entitled "Burning
Hell" will be shown Wednes4lay.
February 73. ISM at the Ledonia
Wright Cultural Center at 7 00
p m Everyone is invited to attend
IFC
The inter fraternal council will
not meet this week but will hold a
meeting next Tuesday at 5 30
GRADUATION
Graduation announcements are
available in the Student Supply
Store They are S2 tor a pack of 5
and are located at the Jeweiry
counter
Remember to pick up your cap
and gown before leaving school
These keepsake gowns are yours
to keep providing that the gradua
tion f�� has been paid For those
receiving a Masters degree, the
fee pays for the cap and gown but
there is an extra tee of Sll 75 for
the hood
HORSEBACK RIDING
The Outdoor Recreation Center
is sponsoring horseback riding
trips to Jarman's Stables Reser
vetions and payment for the
Thursday afternoon trips are due
by 100 PM each Thursday Rates
era IS 00 par hour Transportation
Is provided with shuttle leaving
Memorial Gym at 3 30 PM sharp
For more information or reserve
tions call or stop by the
intramural Recreational Services
Outdoor Recreation Center (113)
Memorial Gym Phone 7J79U
Hours Monday and Friday 1 00
PM 5 00 PM Tuesday. Wednes
day. Thursday 2 00 PM 4 00 PM
PHIALPHATHETA
Phi Alplha Theta i present
Or Mary L'ndermann of UNC
Wilmington with an intormaf ve
program entitled MEDICAL
NEMESIS IN HISTORICAL
PERSPECTIVE Or Lndemanr
will discuss eighteenth �nd nine
teenth centvry criticisms of pro
fessionai medicine The prog'am
will begin at 7 30 p m m Brewster
Bldg BS 104 Light refreshment
will be served following this
presentation The public is invited
HISTORY MAJORS
Phi Alpha Thets, the interne
honal History Honor Society ,s
now accepting appicat.ons for
membership Participation m this
organization s an asset o a
students of History especially
those planning to attend graduate
school Applications may oe oe
tamed in the History Office BA 316
ano win be accepted tnrough
February 18 Our next mee'ing
will be February 15 at 2 00 p m in
the Richard C Todd Room All in
terested persons are mv ted to at
fend For more information call
756 Sa95 after 9 00 p m
RECRUITING
Representatives of the Norm
Caroina State Highway Patroi
wll be recruiting qualified m
dviduais tor the pos't-on of
Trooper on February 17. '983 n
the Lobby of Ben Bu Q ng a ec
Health from 9 00 am ur'i noon
The pafrol s particular1, H
terested in recruiting women ano
a! women students are encourag
ed tc stop by ano see w-at s oe �s
offered oeheve you will be
pleasantly surpr sed about salary
and fringe benefits
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
General College students shou'd
contact their advisers ne wee�
prior to February 2' '9S3 to ar
range for prereg'Stret on
FEDERAL SUMMER
JOBS
The Coop off ce n 313 Rawi
currently has a iStmg of eoe'a'
summer iobs nteres'ed suoen�s
shou'C V'Si he Cc op Off ce Ss app
I i,
PSI CHI
Psi Ctv presents Mr Va'
McGuire from he Campos
Alcohol and Drug Program on
Feb 22 Meeting wi be at 7 x
p m in Room 179 Speight Topic
will be on effects acohc has on
people around you and what c dc
about ,t open to all Psi Chi
members do not forget about two
scholarships available to you
SGA
FLASH Persons nterested "
fihng tor SGA Revew Board
piease do so In Room 778 of
Menoennaii Student Center Five
post.ons st'U open
FANTASY
The Student Residence Assoc a
ton presents Fantasy A sen?
tormai dance wll be at the moii
day nn Mo'dome on February
26th from 9 1 There win be foun
�am or nks ou�ets and a cesnoer
Music will be provided by the E bo
room T,cxe�s are on sale for S5 00
a couple, an S R A card s re
quired They may be crcaiec
from any v.ce P-es den' of a
residence nan or tie S R A otf-ce
.n �he iobbv of Greene Ha" "or
2 4 Monday tnroug" T"iS04�
CAMPUS ALCOHOL
AND
DRUG
Attention an members Nonmna
tions win be made for Vice
President and for Secretary The
meeting will be on Thursday
February 17 m Mendenhall Cot
teehouse at 4 15 For more nfor
matron coll 757 STO or come by
Erwin Hall room 303
SCUBA DIVING
Spring break March a 17. dive
the Bahamas From Ft tau�'
dale tS40 00 includes meals oog
� ng and divng aco-c the 65' dve
boat The Bo"cm T.me ' "ert
are � im -umber of pieces
aaat ano rssssrwat cms a'e v
MM � -s' come bass For "for � a
Hot! anc 'eg i"i' or ca' or vs I
Ray Schart Di'ec'or of Aquatics
V es acu�- ; Ceer W 6W
The hast C arolinian
-f r J� � �
-
Pj5 snec; r.f. "esca. and
soa. aut ng "e acaoe-r -
year anc every yved-esda. dtar
mg 'ne s IHIWSf
Tne Has- Ca - �' Stan :�
t c a -ewscace- at Ess'
Cam -a t'5 -�-
opera'ed ac pwtl sre: I
by 'I s'uden-s o� Eas- Zf: -�
- .e'Sr
Subscription Rate SIC ear , The East Caroim.an oM cfi are ioea,ed n � cue ScBuilding cm tne tingvl � EC. Green, ue N C
v - " � a-ges 'c Tne t as" .e Z r. South B- 3 "g EC . e NC 834adores re - ! ; S'ee- '
Teiepnorvr ;� �;�� 04" �ic
PE MAJORS
The nex -it' "J 0' 'he
ds :i Educe'ic" Ma or s Club
ariU be ha c 'jtvjn February '5
at 5 15 TS mee ng w concer-
spec'a' se'v ces o e Spec 1
O't-np'CS
SAB
There wll oe � SAB mee- ng
?on.ghf in Room 212 of Menoennan
at 5 X Ah members ar asked to
br rig a friend H possible
SLPHA EPSILON
DELTA
e'e � oe a- A ra E.
De 'a meet ng O" Aecnesc.
- g Fet-jar. M a- ' X c -
F anavar- R �' nn BMMJ
speaxer be � Jrm Ge o�.
or he AspeCS c Fa� - a
'�ce r w 1. be a c ear
mee' -g a"v: an exec ve �ee" ng
�� t 0C a eres'ec a'f ��
�o attend
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
A one aoce a pha sor hj �
socmsor a caxe sa'e cec lamina
100C. si "ve s'uoer" spo� SSSWS
-ea yOurse � c a �r- . � � 1
3ewee- asss
LDS INSTITUTE OF
RELIGION
The aer :a. Sa NaSWM
Assoc a' or 'es . -x. Si I
weex s Ml �� c ass �- . - pre
� ses 'c oe in e�i "ne s.r
�ec' w me aSSMStaHl jesus
C s and M s .�i at . -s- .� �
Me C ass�ee's an �-sce.s
from 6X1:� - B-ews'e-
room 203B it Uta Mas'er � gf
say t ne wee here we sa.
Come and See
Canon
w n�n
PROGRAM
Pro3rammed AutorTVition
Plus Shutter-Priority Sistication
stern Intratioa
Canon s AE-1 PROGRAM is the sophisticated SLR that s
so simple to use Just focus and shoot Shutter speed and ap-
erture settings are done automatically
� PROGRAMMED
AUTOMATlON-iuM
focus and shoot'
� SHUTTER PRIORITY
AUTOMATION
� Fully automatic dash
photography with op
tionai Speedlite 188A
� New splitmicropnsm
laser matte anti-
blackout viewfinder
screen stanriard-
1 5X brighter
Total ot 8 user inter-
changeable tocusmg
screens (optional)
� Optional Power
Winder A2 A and
Motor Drive MA ava
able for rapid se
guence shooting
� LED readout in view
finder
� Manual mode tor
creative photography
� Lightweight compact
and easy to use
� Includes Canon
USA inc one-
year limited
warrantyregistration
card
� Canon
The first computerized,
shutter-priority automatic SLR.
It changed the course of
fine photography
Canon s AE-1 is the world s favorite SLR camera And no
wonder1 It has automatic exposure ana s backed ud by an
incredible system ot lenses flash units and even a power
winder
2 29.95
ioeedine 'MtAar
P jwer W rioef K2 sriown OOl'onai
Shutte' priority auto-
matic exposure SLR
Incredibly light-
weight compact and
easy to use
Instant response
sensitive silicon ex-
posure metering
i
� Accepts an optional
Canon Dedicated
Speedi'tes tc fully
automatic flash
� Accepts more man
SO Canon FD wde
angle teiephot; jod
zoom lenses
� Optional Data Back A
available
� Includes Canon
USA Inc one year
limited warranty'
registration card
189.95
Speedt�te 'SSA ana
Powef Atioe' SfKMrf
art 4 coaerc. hop
r- 1 o cr4L � � W ��. �-sr a- xrs
518 South Cotanche Street
Greenville. N.C 27834
752-0688
c
Wed Thurs Fri Sat Feb. 16-19
tOALSp.
V
20
OFF ALL ART SUPPLIES
Canon AE-1 With 50mm 11.8 Canon Lenss 189.95
Canon AE-1 With 35-70mm f4.0 Canon Zoom Lenss249.95
Canon AE-1 Program With 50mm fl.8 Canon Lenss229.46
Canon AE-1 Program With 35-70mm f4.0 Canon Zoom Lenss269.96
Canon Sureshot107.96
Canon Super Sureshot 152.96
Canon Snappy 2096
Canon Snappy 50 nK
All Canon Lenses10 off
All Canon Accessories10off
While Supplies Last
No Rain Checks
OftCQBCfQ
V 518 South Cotanche Street
Greenville, N.C. 27834
752-0688
All Tasco
& �
Bushnell
Binoculars
12
Regusar Price
20
Ooff
Our Regular
Price On All
Kodak Cameras
& Projectors
All StaedtlerMars
And Rapiograph
Pens, Points, And
Pen Sets
30 OH
Regular Price
All Silk Screen
Inks, Liquid
& Silk Screen
Supplies
Minolta
Weathermatic
110 Camera
10 Off Our Regular Price
On All Nikon & Canon
Cameras & Lenses
20 Off On All
Nikon &
Canon
Accessories
ZAj O Off On
Kodak Photo Finishing
Brought In Feb. 16-19
40
Off
20o�
On All
80200mm
& 28-80mm
Zoom Lenses
Polaroid
One Step
Priso
Several EC L
:cnis. staff and
faculty ere among a
! -p of peopie ra-r
anng in an five
hour stuvlv session on
natives to in-
on Thursdav
The session focused
on the revommenda-
made by the
ens C
on Alternatives to !r.
oration in a
LSed report The
-
Durham-based
and Jail Projec
worked on
n of
eras (
21 memba
- - j ti w��
11 a - s
s C Court r -rr
Judge ru v
-
The Prison ar
Project is �
funded oi
thai
��� �
I

Pauhg sa - rn asi
convinced that
pr is f stem
During he-
Pau. .
i d
the � pagi
. .
uatisrksi � pt rt ha
claim tha
N Pr
"Tc
- . v: e m is
ma it
violence. Pj - -
More1
Steps
� CPSi � M�
College, an a.
all-black insl tul
about ZilOO stttdt
doesn't mind p a
second fiddle to
L niver-
harmonv either
- - Yafc -
equest bj '�
Departmen'
Polish So
s i
rmeric
cast Mor
dent H (
o I u n I e e
scac 4s -
record the song
ale Pres
Bart let i G j
eo down the v f
Department req I
because of the � j
pohev ac
ting "one
cause
matter how.
the a�
But Morehc
president d
request in quite
same cootexl
tormed joverBBB
and Vo� Mnerf
officials that his sew
Survey
Librar
BsM.hr HXMVl
Studen
naires concerning
use Of Jovner Lit
anH be distn"
Mendenhall.
Croatan. the S
Supply Store am
library Tuev3av
Wednesday of
week.
Maury Vork.
curator of
manuscript coii
at ECU, said abo
questionnaire,
dealing vsih the 1
Evaluation ComJ
which is charge
making a foul
-
A





JHEEAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 15. 1983
.Phone.
.enclosed
1��Ir
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I hf K avt t aroliniun
tesoa� ana
Mv 3ur
Eas-
� � V"a
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In Old South
;jmp Ol E CU


SLPHA EPSILON
DELTA
�S �'� � 't-saav
" � t a ' X r � -
"��" � �,�
prakci wii be D w �a oa.
�tn Asoe -s ?�- , P'SC
TT��f aril se a r age
V
�nexei
ALPHAKAPPA ALPHA
� r� Alpha so) � �.
� bake a - � �
' s'uae" supply store
Tral coursed ha a .�r s ,
between asses
LDS INSTITUTE OF
RELIGION
The ,a"e- day -a -�
� ' ' s rov T �- �
�� � ' � � � - pro
. � e" -g "le sot
- � � �-� ai mmenl s4 �, s
�' �- � � jsi land
sc��s
� 08 P tr - Brewster
OB L ka Itie vas'e m gi"
�.a. � - ware -e-e we sa.
- � � and i�
hop
v
G

?
PPLIES
Silk Screen
iks, Liquid
Silk Screen
Supplies
olaroid
ne Step
2
95
Prison Situation Studied
Several ECU
students, staff and
faculty were among a
group of people par-
ticipating in an five-
hour study session on
alternatives to in-
carceration Thursday.
The session focused
on the recommenda-
tions made by the
Citizens Commission
on Alternatives to In-
carceration in a recent-
! released report. The
group was led by
Kristin Paulig, a staff
member with the
Durham-based Prison
and Jail Project, who
also worked on the
preparation of the
document.
The Citizens Com-
mission was made up of
21 members including
lawyers, judges,
legislators, ex-
offenders and clerics.
N.C. Court of Appeals
Judge Willis Whichard
chaired the two-year
project.
The Prison and Jail
Project is a privately-
funded organization
that lobbies to reduce
the number of people
sent to prison. "We ad-
vocate de-carceration
of the prison system
Paulig said. "I'm just
convinced that the
prison system just
doesn't work
During her presenta-
tion, Paulig led the
group in a discussion of
the 140-page report.
She cited a number of
statistics to support her
claim that dramatic
changes are needed in
the N.C. Prison
System.
"To me the prison
system is institu-
tionalized state
violence Paulig said.
"Prisons are as
destructive to the
keepers as they are to
the kept
Paulig said N.C.
prisons are extremely
over-crowded when the
number of inmates per
square foot is
calculated. The N.C.
Department of Correc-
tions overcrowded
figure is 15 percent.
Paulig said the first
step to reducing the
prison population is to
educate the public. She
also stressed a need to
personalize the process
of sending people to
prison.
Paulig said there was
a need for involvement
of the victim and of-
fender in regards to
prosecution. She said
most crimes are non-
violent property of-
fenses. Paulig feels they
could be dealt with at
the community level.
The Whichard Report
promoted "community
based treatment" as
one of its major
remedies to the higher
crime rates.
ECU corrections stu-
dent Mary Shiels at-
tended the study ses-
sion to gain more in-
sight into the solutions
of the current prison
problems.
"If we're interested
in rehabilitation rather
than punishment
Shiels said, "it is
necessary to try alter-
native ways of dealing
with the criminal of-
fender
Paulig said that
because of prejudice
and racism, blacks and
other minorities were
more likely to be sent to
prison for a crime than
white people. "A lot
of people say black
people commit more
crimes � that's not
true Paulig said.
"Black people just go
to prison more. There's
racism in the whole
system from the begin-
ning to the end
Shiels said that facts
support her claims of
prejudice in the
criminal justice pro-
cess. "It's just pre-
judice, punitive at-
titudes and myths that
are putting up
resistance to alternative
ways of dealing with
the offenders
Both Paulig and
Shiels agree that prison
is needed for certain
violent offenders.
Paulig said there was
a strong correlation
between a person's
economic status and
the likelihood he would
be sent to prison. She
said people who can't
afford bail are much
more likely to be sent to
prison. "If you can't
afford bail, there is no
justice. You got to go
to jail Paulig said.
Paulig pointed out
statistics in the report
which showed that fun-
ding for prisons was
North Carolina's third
highest budget priority
($163 million). It costs
$16,000 per year to
keep a person in prison.
"On any given day,
55 percent of the in-
mates in N.C. prisons
are there for non-
violent crimes Paulig
said. Fifty-nine percent
of N.C. inmates had no
prior criminal record.
Shiels agreed with
Paulig that the prison
system is a failure
because "rehabilitation
is not a priority
Besides community
based treatment, Paulig
also mentioned two
alternatives: pre-trial
releases and client
specific planning.
Pre-trial release,
which has been used ef-
fectively throughout
the country, would in-
volve asking the accus-
ed offender a series of
questions to determine
his or her eligibility for
personal recognizance
release.
Client-specific plann-
ing would be a specific
sentencing plan tailored
to each offender. This
plan would outline a
series of recommenda-
tions for the offender
to follow and, would
keep the person out of
jail.
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THE EAST CAROLINA
PLAYHOUSE
PRESENTS
Morehouse College
Steps In For Yale
�ftjOW
KOU bTTUUENTS
(1ENERAL rVUJLU-
(CPS) � Morehouse
College, an all-male,
all-black institution of
about 2000 students,
doesn't mind playing
second fiddle to Yale
University, or second
harmony either.
After Yale's glee club
turned down a recent
request by the State
Department to sing the
Polish Solidarity theme
song on an interna-
tional Voice of
America radio broad-
cast, Morehouse Presi-
dent Hugh Gloucester
volunteered his
school's glee club to
record the song.
Yale President A.
Bartlett Giamatti turn-
ed down the State
Department request
because of the school
policy against suppor-
ting "one political
cause or another no
matier how compelling
the cause may be
But Morehouse's
president didn't see the
request in quite the
same context, and in-
formed government
and Voice of America
0t�- u that his school
would be glad to par-
ticipate in the Dec. 13
radio broadcast honor-
ing Solidarity and com-
memorating the institu-
tion of martial law in
Poland two years ago.
President
Gloucester read that
Yale had refused to
(record the song), and
he felt inspired to offer
to do it explains
Wend all Whalen,
Morehouse Glee Club
director.
"I think it was main-
ly a matter of compas-
sion for what the peo-
ple in Poland have been
through Whalen says
of the decision to
record the labor
union's theme song.
"In any black com-
munity like
Morehouse, where we
have had our share of
experience with op-
pressed people, it's not
hard to understand
what the Polish people
are going through
Indeed, Morehouse's
glee club has often par-
ticipated in political
events.
The group has sung
at Jimmy Carter's in-
auguration in 1976 at
the funeral of Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King in
1968, Whalen says.
CALL 757-6330
You May
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In One Of The
Prestigious
Colleges
Of Chiropractic
In The Nation
Survey Studies
Library Trouble
By MIKEHAMER
Staff WriMi
Student question-
naires concerning the
use of Joyner Library
will be distributed at
Mendenhall, the
Croatan, the Student
Supply Store and the
library Tuesday and
Wednesday of next
week.
Maury York, the
curator of the
manuscript collection
at ECU, said about the
questionnaire, "We're
dealing with the library
Evaluation Committee
which is charged with
making a four-year
evaluation of the
library. The two ways
we're doing this is by
using questionnaires �
one for students and
one for faculty. The
faculty questionnaire
has come back and
we're evaluating it
now.
"We're trying to get
a response from the
general student popula-
tion York said.
"We're trying to find
out why nonusers do
not use the library.
Choosing a wide spec-
trum of the student
population is important
to our survey
NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE
OF CHIROPRACTIC
Loflee credits you've already earned may well qualify you for enroll-
ment at Northwestern College, one of the highly regarded chiropractic
training centers in the nation.
If you are motivated by a desire to help your fellow man. and desire the
prestige and security afforded by a career in the health care field. North-
western College of Chiropractic can help you achieve your goals.
For more information, complete the coupon below and mail to North-
western College of Chiropractic. Enrollment is limited, so do it today!
I
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Please send me information on Sorthwestern College of Chiropractic.
OR Call collect at (612) 690-1735 and ask for Admissions.
Name
Address
City
State
Zip
Current level of Education
Send to:
Admissions Office, Northwestern College of Chiropractic, 1834 South
Mississippi Boulevard, St. Paul, MN 55116,
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT. FEB. MATA&PM m n C
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���
t





3t?e East (Ear0ltnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, Gmmimm
Mike Hughes, ���tduor
Vv'AVERLY MERR1TT. ammtttMmUm ClNDY PLEASANTS, sporu Ed.ior
Scott Lindley. mm ,��� Greg Rideout. � &��-
Al l AFRASHTEH. Cm Ha-unrr STEVE BACHNER. Ena.nmtn, Editor
Stephanie Groon. oom. Juliana Fahrbach. ���"
Ci ay Thornton, uckmcd Todd Evans, ��� uger
Lehruar 15. ls83
Opinion
Page 4
Financial Aid
Cuts Spur Short-Term Solutions
As the belt of federal financial aid "Colleges are coming up with all
resources tightens on the nation's kinds of ways to replace money they
colleges and universities, several have lost from funding decreases
schools around the country are tur- says U.S. Department of Education
ning to new methods of producing spokesman Duncan Helmrich. Such
much-needed educational funds: creativity, he adds, is "proving that
Georgetown University, for ex- a lot can be done, as President
ample, is going into the energy Reagan said, when you put your
business. Brown has jumped into mind to it
the mail-order business, peddling And at this point in time, with the
gifts ranging from $10 to $10,000 in record federal deficit looming
a special "pull-out gift catalogue" overhead, such belt-tightening
alumni newsletter. St. Andrew's measures are a necessary first step in
Presbyterian College has leased out evening the federal keel, so to
10 acres of land to a shopping speak. And, indeed, since necessity
center, sold 40 to a hospital and is is the mother of invention, most
readying more land for sale to schools are finding 1983 a tough
private residential developers. Stan- year � but not an impossible one.
ford, Princeton and the University But even those administrators
of Dallas have also sold land to who have wilfully made concessions
JHt
Hunt's DUI Crackdown Leaves Loopholes
generate income. The University of
San Francisco is building a
"windmill farm" to save energy,
while Dakota Wesleyan fired
salaried support workers and hired years to come.
to keep their respective institutions
in operation admit that at its present
rate of decline, federal financial aid
will pose major problems in the
cheaper student workers to take
their places. Texas Wesleyan is try-
ing to attract donations through
celebrity golf tournaments, and
Texas Christian works toward the
same end with "phone-a-thons
All this ingenuity has the Reagan
boasting
"All of our efforts are to offset
losses says Joseph McAleer,
public relations officer at Spr-
ingfield College. "Obviously, we
won't have the resources to offset
the government funding cuts
forever. I just hope we don't have to
find out when that is
administration boasting success
What To Do When Life Bites The Big One
B PAT O'NEILL
Very few of us would deny that drunken
driving is a serious problem in our country.
Each year, approximately 25,000 people
are killed on U.S. roadways, and countless
others are injured as a result of accidents
involving drunk drivers. Although this is
not a new problem, it has only been in the
last few years that the public has decided to
take action to reduce the number of DUI
offences.
People are angry, and they hae a right
to be. Almost everyone has had the per-
sonal experience of knowing someone who
has died or been injured in an accident
with a drunk driver. Something must be
done, but the answer will not be found in
any of the major recommendations of the
Governor's Task Force on Drunken Driv-
ing, which are now before the General
Assembly.
Hunt's plan will not work because it
fails to go to the root of the problem of
why Americans need to drink in order to
have a good time. The plan also misses the
mark in several other ways. It's ridiculous
to think that raising the minimum drinking
age will actually reduce the number of peo-
ple who drink. First of all, almost everyone
I know who drinks alcohol began to do so
in the early teenage years. As Dr. Jerry
Lotterhos, director of the campus alcohol
abuse program, said in a recent interview,
"If the law at age 18 is not working, why
do we assume the law at age (19,20 or) 21
will work?"
As a civil libertarian, I also cannot agree
with the proposal to raise the drinking age.
At 18, I can be ordered to fight in a war,
and I am allowed to vote for the leaders of
my state and nation, but I cannot be
trusted to make a responsible decision
regarding my drinking habits?
Tom Haines, owner of the Attic night
club, points out that raising the drinking
age will, in actuality, increase the number
of drunken drivers. "They won't stop
drinking he said. "They'll just change
the way they drink
Haines also makes the point that
because the new law will be so difficult to
enforce, it will only increase the amount of
time that police officers will have to spend
on enforcement.
Tony Simeone, another alcoholism
counselor in Washington, N.C points out
that the new laws regarding drunk driving
will only serve to increase the number of
people who are being sent to North
Carolina's already overcrowded prisons
and jails.
Considering that the number of
Americans estimated to be suffering from
alcoholism is close to 15 percent, it seems
to me that jail is a bad option. What these
people really need is treatment, counseling
and rehabilitation.
Another consideration of raising the age
law is the impact it would have on the
economy of our state. Many
establishments that serve alcohol will pro-
bably be forced to shut down, putting
many people out of work.
1 must confess that I have driven down
the road many a night keeping a sharp eye
out for drunk drivers. I'm just as anxious
as anyone else to get these people off the
roads. That's why I'm opposed to the
governor's plan. I say we should enforce
the laws we already have regarding DLTs.
In my opinion, a person convicted of
drunken driving should get his or her
license revoked for an extensive period of
time and should be sentenced to perform
community service If they're addicted,
they should get help; if they refuse, thev
shouldn't be allowed to drive. That's that
Finally, I must agree with both Lot-
terhos' and Haines' suggestions that young
people in America begin to be taught what
responsible drinking means so that what
Lotterhos calls "the legacy of
misconstrued notions about booze" can be
dispelled.
Words (For Morons) To Live By
Here are some answers to my most asked
questions:
Dear Stan Landers: I am a 20-year
native of Greenville. But, believe it or not,
that's the least oj my problems It all
started last week, when I was fired from
my promising career as a Weiner King
manager trianee for spitting in the relish
bin. Everyone else did it, but I was the one
who got caught And as if that's not
enough, my girlfriend, Agnes, left me last
week for a muffler specialist at the K-Mart
Auto Center. Said she was moving up in
the world 1 had a beautiful house out in
the country, but without a job, I was three
months late on the payments, and they
came and towed it away Then, the fami-
ly doctor informed me that Myrna, my
bloodhound, needed a $2,000 operation to
correct her unsightly skin condition. She
knew damn good and well that I couldn't
afford it, but she set up an appointment
anyway. We had a terrible argument, and
she wouldn't talk to me for days
STAN LANDERS
Advice For Schleps
Maybe you can discuss your problems with
your cellmates. (The blimp may be your
best bet since the status of the Latino is
questionable.) And think about the real
questions: Can you live without a job? A
house? A car? A dog? A girl? My bet is
you probably can't But then again,
what do I know? Good luck.
Dear Stan Landers: Like the guy in the
letter above, I'm writing as a last-ditch ef-
fort. I have a terrible problem. My hus-
band of 12 years, Mel, whom I love dearly,
came home last week with mascara
smeared on his lapel and smelling of cheap
perfume. Twice again this week, the same
thing, except I found lipstick on his cheek
as well. He doesn V come home until 2 or 3
in the morning and is always too tired to
talk to me. I really can't imagine what he
could be doing all these nights out. What
should I tell the kids? Should I leave him?
ETHEL FROM BETHEL
Dear BETHEL: First of all, don't
apologize for writing me as a last resort.
To tell the truth, the only reason I'm prin-
ting your letter is because no one else wrote
in this week, and I have to take up a certain
amount of space. So, you see, we're ac-
tually in the same boat.
Now, about your problem. I suppose
you have already prepared yourself for the
worst, the inevitable. I mean, don't be so
naive, Ethel. Put two and two together.
It's not that difficult. Mel comes home at 3
a.m. spotted with mascara and lipstick,
reeking of cheap perfume. He won't tell
you where he's been And you can't
figure it out? Ethel, pardon my
straightforwardness, but you, my dear, are
a moron. It's no wonder that he's out
looking around. After 12 years with you,
he's probably wondering whether or not
there is, indeed, intelligent life on Earth.
And personally, I couldn't care less what
you tell the kids. But write back soon, and
let me know how things turn out!
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, great grand-
son of Yassir Abdulla Hughes, a famous
Arab chief tan, enjoys life's simple
pleasures: a quiet walk along the beach,
the loyalty of a fine dog and target spit-
ting. He drinks Lite Beer from Miller
because it's got a third less calories than
their regular beer.
Anyway, I went downtown to file for
unemployment insurance (which, they told
me, I'm not eligible for because I didn't
have a real job in the first place), and my
car got towed while I was inside. So, I sold
Myrna to get some quick cash, but when I
went to reclaim my car from Ned's Exxon,
Herb, the brake man, informed me that it
had been stolen from the lot. All my per-
sonal belongings gone, I called the police,
who came two hours later and arrested me
for having 23 outstanding parking tickets.
So, here I am, writing as a last-ditch effort
from a jail cell I'm sharing with a Puerto
Rican child molestor, a 300-pound used-
car salesman and two pyromaniacs who
like to smoke in bed. (I also think they're
secret lovers.) I should get out soon, but I
really don't have a lot to live for. What
should I do? ON THE BRINK
Dear BRINK: Sounds to me like you're
getting too much caffeine. Have you
thought about suicide? Ha, ha, only kid-
ding. But seriously, there is something I
need to know before anything else: Is your
child molestor roomy of Puerto Rican
ancestry or does he only molest Puerto
Rican children? This distinction may play
a key role in your eventual recovery.
Anyway, you certainly do have a lot pro-
blems on your hands. Therefore, my ad-
vice, here as always, is for you to assess the
situation from a more objective point of
view. Take time to think about things.
Campus Forum
U.S. Selective Service Is 'Selective Indeed'
In last Thursday's PointCounter-
point, Mike Hughes missed a few very
basic, but overwhelmingly important,
points.
(1) To say that many men have followed
their consciences and then to equate the
life and actions of a man such as Martin
Luther King with one like Adolph Hitler
is ludicrous to say the least. I believe
what Mr. Hughes failed to realize is that
men like King and Ghandi followed their
consciences in a nonviolent manner, just
as men like Russell Ford are attempting
to do, while Hitler and Khomeini were
anything but nonviolent.
(2) Mr. Hughes, the Selective Service is
selective indeed. At this time, the only
men who are being prosecuted are those
who make their resistance public.
Thousands of men who have not
registered are being neither prosecuted
nor persecuted. To the best of my
knowledge, the purpose of the draft is to
provide a fair way of choosing men to go
to war. This seems anything but fair.
(3) Whether all draft registrations
have been followed by an actual draft
and sooner or later a war as Steve
Dear stated, or past draft
resurgences were subsequent actions
to meet the demands of existing wars
as Mr. Hughes believes, seems unimpor-
tant. What is important is the fact that
war, especially nuclear war, is a form of
mass murder, and to comply unques-
tioningly with a system preparing for
war seems to me both unconscienceable
and immoral.
Mary Rider
Senior, Comp. Sci.
Editor's Note: The purpose, Miss Rider,
of "comparing" the likes of Khomeini
with the likes of Ghandi was to illustrate
the ironies inherent in the "supreme
conscience argument not merely to
restate the obvious.
Furthermore, you maintain that the
purpose of draft registration is "to pro-
vide a fair way of choosing men to go to
war I agree wholeheartedly. But it
seems somehow strange that you should
bring up this point as some sort of
defense for registration resisters, who
have failed to comply in the first place.
Perhaps you forget that in a system such
as ours, rules and regulations are no less
than a necessity for maintaining order.
So, you speak of fairness? Well, how
fair is it for those young men who have
complied with the law? I think I speak
for a majority of those who have
registered when I say that very, very few
of us want to go to war. However, we,
unlike some, are able to comprehend the
distinction between going to war and
draft registration.
Countering The Point
In the February 10 issue of The East
Carolinian, Steve Dear said that the only
thing that draft registration resister
Russell Ford did was follow his cons-
cience in his refusal to register. Since
when did conscience-following make
breaking a law right? If John Hinckley
had said that he was following his cons-
cience when he shot President Reagan,
would that have made him innocent?
Can a person break into someone else's
house just because, in his heart, he knew
it was right? Be realistic.
The simple matter is that Ford was
breaking the law. And in this country,
most people think that law breakers
should go to jail.
By the way, Mr. Dear, even if history
has shown us that a war followed every
peacetime draft, it has also shown us
that the U.S. has not started any wars.
We started the registration because con-
ditions in the world have dictated that
we have a force ready in case war were to
start. Adolph Hitler didn't attack
Poland because we had a peacetime
draft. The Japanese didn't attack us for
that reason either. As a matter of fact,
the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor to
knock us out of the Pacific. Luckily,
they failed.
Finally, just because seven percent of
the people eligible for the draft sign-up
don't agree with it doesn't mean that it
should be abolished. After ail, that
means that 93 percent do support it.
And in this country, the majority rules.
David Payne
Freshman, Drama
Playbo.
For A
It seems to happen
everytime thev do
and the Atlantic
Conference i- m
fere p Playboy
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"Girls of the
Coast Conferer �
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Legisla
Safe R
RALEIGH
The two eg i
most re
handling (
B. Hum -
drunl
package prepai
da
p sal quick �
.r Gene .
committees this wee.
The Senate Judicial
111 Committee a'
peared to have
ii . struggle oer
most controversial pai
of the bill when a su
committee last v�e
agreed to corr
language on the "draral
shop" proposal I
section m a ?. t i
bartenders
salesmen lega
for civil damage
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person i
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Barnes. D-Wa
committee cl l
said the odds i
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committee wil app j
the entire 72 p
Tuesdav a A
mend it �
Senate-
Wednesday
dav
Hunt's
Glide
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After mon:
painstaking -
Gov James B Hu:
Jrs proposed
tion to combat drunk
drivers ap? cl
move more quickl
through the Ge j
AssembK this �W
Sen. HettSOE Baml
and Rep Ma I
caster, chairmen r
two coaaaaittees ei
amining the mea
said Mondav thev
pect their panels �
recommend -
altered versions dut
the next few davs a
send them to the
House and Senate
Despite the appar
speedup. Hunt's
Roads Act still ml
make many more st
before it becomes
and lobbyists al
legislators are likely
propose many ml
changes.
But one major
of consensus was rea
ed late last week H
Senate Judiciary
subcommittee 1
tatively endorsee
compromise to
I





IHEEAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 15, 1983
BY THE
LEBANESE
CHRISTIAN
MILITIA,
oopholes
sc to 15 percent, it seems
is a had option What these
etil need is treatment, counseling
anon
nsideration or raising the age
I : ;mpac: il would hae on the
ouI a t e . Many
e alcohol will pro-
shul down, putting
,1 work.
al 1 have driven down
ghl keeping a sharp eye
Jinn .
le else
pi
x
I'm just as anxious
these people off the
I'm opposed to the
a we should enforce
hae regarding DUIs.
person convicted of
ould get his or her
'� � an extensive period of
uld he sentenced to perform
rvice It they're addicted,
' they refuse, they
dme. That's that.
I must agree with both Lot-
ggestions that young
begin to he taught what
i mg means so that what
jos calls "the legacy of
Irued notions about booze" can be
deed'
jst because, in his heart, he knew
ight? Be realistic.
Is'mple matter is that Ford was
lg the law And in this country,
eople think that law breakers
to jail.
le way. Mr Dear, even if history
wn us that a war followed every
ie draft, it has also shown us
U.S. has not started any wars.
ted the registration because con-
in the world have dictated that
I a force ready in case war were to
Adolph Hitler didn't attack
because we had a peacetime
he Japanese didn't attack us for
son either. As a matter of fact,
anese attacked Pearl Harbor to
is out of the Pacific. Luckily,
lied
py, just because seven percent of
jle eligible for the draft sign-up
jree with it doesn't mean that it
be abolished. After all, that
that 93 percent do support it.
this country, the majority rules.
David Payne
Freshman, Drama
Playboy Ads Look
For A CC Women
It seems to happen
everytime they do it,
and the Atlantic Coast
Conference was no dif-
ferent. Playboy has
decided to spotlight
"Girls of the Atlantic
Coast Conference" in
their fall "Back to
Campus" issue. The
controversary began.
After running the ad
in its Tuesday editions,
John Drescher, editor
of UNC's Daily Tar
Heel was paid a visit by
an irate group of
women students claim-
ing the ad was sexist.
At Duke University,
Todd Jones, advertis-
ing manager for the
Chronicle, Duke's cam-
pus newspaper had first
declined to run the
Playboy ad. Jones said
he thought the ad was
"sexist in nature" and
portrayed women in a
"meat market" sense.
Late last week,
Jones' decision was
overridden in a closed-
staff vote, and if
Playboy was still in-
terested, the ad would
run. The ad has also
been run in the campus
newspapers at N.C.
State and Wake Forest
Universities.
Reid Barker, adver-
tising manager for the
Technician at N.C.
State, expressed sur-
prise at the response of
the UNC women. At
Wake Forest, there was
a different kind of con-
cern for the Playboy
ad. Student emploveers
of the Old Black and
Gold were concerned at
what reaction they
might get from the ad-
ministration of the
Baptist-run school.
"Six or seven women
(from the Association
of Women Students)
came into my office,
and we sat around and
taiked about the ad
Drescher told The East
Carolinian. The women
claimed that the ad
itself was sexist, and we
should not run j. for
that reason.
T he women
students also objected
to a Tar Heel editorial
which Drescher said
took "a light hearted
look at the whole
thing
"I didn't think the
editorial was sexist
Drescher added.
He quoted a section
of the editorial that
said: "This paper, in its �,
great tradition of
defending equality, can
only say that it eagerly
awaits an ad from
Playgirl seeking "Guys
of the ACC
Drescher has
welcomed and received
letters to the editor and
opinion columns on
both sides of the issue.
In a more recent opi-
nion, Drescher said
that the "women at
UNC are old enough to
make up their own
minds without this
paper censoring ads
directed at them
Legislators Set For
Safe Roads Proposal
i
RALEIGH (UPI) -
The two legislators
most responsible for
handling Gov. James
B. Hunt Jrs ami
drunken driving
package prepared Mon-
day to push the pro-
posal quickly through
their General Assembly
committees this week.
The Senate Judiciary
111 Committee ap-
peared to have ended
ls struggle over the
most controversial part
of the bill when a sub-
committee last week
agreed to compromise
language on the "dram
shop" proposal. That
section makes
bartenders and
salesmen legally liable
for civil damages if
they sell liquor to an
underage or drunken
person and that person
later causes an acci-
dent. Sen. Henson
Barnes, D-Wayne and
committee chairman,
said the odds are
"pretty good" the
committee will approve
the entire 72-page bill
Tuesday and recom-
mend it for the full
Senate's consideration
Wednesday or Thurs-
day.
But Rep. Martin
Lancaster, D-Wayne
and chairman of the
House Judiciary III
Committee, isn't going
to wait for the full
Senate to act before his
panel begins consider-
ing the Senate's ideas.
He said he hopes to ap-
point a subcommittee
Tuesday to examine the
governor's dram shop
proposal and consider
the Senate subcommit-
tee's compromise.
"There is no need for
us to struggle with our
own compromise
without having to take
into account what the
Senate has done he
said.
Lancaster's commit-
tee has lagged behind
the Senate in its
analysis of the entire
package, and it has yet
to discuss the dram
shop provision, which
is the last major section
of the bill.
But the Goldsboro
attorney said he hopes
the full committee will
be able to finish work
on the committee this
week, have it con-
sidered in the Finance
Committee next week
and then see it moved
quickly to the House
floor.
Hunt has urged
General Assembly
members to make his
"Safe Roads Act" the
first major piece of
legislation they pass
this session.
In other legislative
developments:
Sen. William Staton,
D-Lee filed a bill that
would make it impossi-
ble for courts to ex-
punge major crimes
from the records of
juvenile offenders.
Staton said that
when offcndrs now
turn 16, they can ask
that their records be
cleared so that they
won't have those
crimes staining their
adult life. But Staton's
bills would make cer-
tain that all major
felonies would stay on
a person's record for
life.
Staton also introduc-
ed a bill that would
force state counselors
to take a juvenile's case
to court if he were ac-
cused of a first-or
second-degree sex of-
fense.
Both bills are ex-
pected to be referred
Hunt's Proposals Should
Glide Through Assembly
Raleigh (UPI) �
After months of
painstaking scrutiny,
Gov. James B. Hunt
Jrs proposed legisla-
tion to combat drunken
drivers appears likely to
move more quickly
through the General
Assembly this week.
Sen. Henson Barnes
and Rep. Martin Lan-
caster, chairmen of the
two committees ex-
amining the measure,
said Monday they ex-
pect their panels will
recommend slightly
altered versions during
the next few days and
send them to the full
House and Senate.
Despite the apparent
speedup. Hunt's Safe
Roads Act still must
make many more stops
before it becomes law,
and lobbyists and
legislators are likely to
propose many more
changes.
But one major sign
of consensus was reach-
ed late last week when a
Senate Judiciary III
subcommittee ten-
tatively endorsed a
compromise to the
"dram shop" pro-
posal. That section
would make bartenders
and salesmen liable for
civil damages if they
sell liquor to an
underage or drunken
person and that person
later causes an acci-
dent.
Sen. Henson Barnes,
D-Wayne, said now
that the compromise
has been reached the
odds are "pretty good"
the full committee
would approve the en-
tire 72-page bill today.
ECU Grad Given
Award To Seminar
ECU graduate stu-
dent Don Blanchard
recently won a full-
tuition scholarship to a
5-day intensive Direct
Marketing Educational
Foundation seminar at
the Danbury Hilton in
Danbury, Conn.
Blanchard, whose
home is in Greenville,
has been employed by
Overton's Competition
Skis. He has completed
work as a graduate
assistant to the chair-
man of the Department
of Marketing.
One of 30 students
selected from over 230
applicants, he obtained
a pratical introduction
to basic direct
marketingmail-order
techniques under the
personal guidance of 12
top industry executives
from the fast-growing
S125-billion direct
marketing industry.
After being selected
by their universities,
students are then
selected by a panel of
direct marketing ex-
ecutives based on facul-
ty recommendations,
academic standing, in-
terest in advertising and
marketing, their record
of extra-curricular,
school-related activities
and employment.
Scholarships cover all
tuition fees, room and
board.
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FOR RIDES OR INFORMATION CALL 758-4290
KROGER
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Items and Prices
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thru Set Feb 19. 1963
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niein





THE EAST r ABOI INIAN FEBRUARY IS, 1983
Is There 'Hair' Without Nudity? Only In Iowa
(CPS) � Is there
Hair without nudity?
There was at Iowa
State when the curtains
went up on a student
production of the fam-
ed musical that wowed
New York with a brief
nude scene when it
opened off-Broadway
in 1967.
The performers at
Iowa State kept their
clothes on, although
they'd wanted to strip.
About nine of the 16
cast members in the
nude scene had agreed
to appear naked,
generally saying they'd
do it "for art's sake
But the nudity for
art's sake was scratched
for the sake of keeping
the university's liquor
license.
"They're just stifling
our artistic freedom
complains cast member
Gina Zaffarana.
The play was staged
at the Student
Memorial Union, but
an Iowa obscenity law
makes public nudity il-
legal in places holding
liquor licenses.
Scott Smith, manag-
ing director of the
Union Board Theatre,
decided the cast would
remain clothed to keep
from risking losing the
license.
The county attorney
and a representative of
the Iowa Beer and Li-
quor Control Board
"said we were in a very,
Venereal Disease Frequency Up In Pitt County
According to a
spokesman of the Pitt
County Health Depart-
ment, there has been a
signifigant increase in
the number venereal
disease cases being
reported in Pitt Coun-
ty. The increase has
been most apparent
among Greenville's
male gay community.
James Cox, the com-
municable disease in-
spector with the health
department, said 34
cases of syphilis were
reported to his office in
1982 compared to only
10 cases reported in
1981 and 14 in 1980.
"Seventy-five percent
of that figure was in the
gay community Cox
said.
Dr. James H. Mc-
Callum, director of
ECU's Student Health
Center, said that
although he was aware
there were "rumored
increases" of venereal
disease nationwide,
that there was not a
"noticeable increase"
at ECU. He added that
there ws absolutely no
reason for students to
panic about the campus
situation.
Cox pointed out that
syphilis has an incuba-
tion period of between
10 and 90 days with an
average incubation
period of 21-28 days. A
person who contracts
the disease will pro-
bably not know it until
the incubation period is
over. The disease is also
not contagious during
the incubation period.
Cox said that after
the incubation period,
the disease enters the
"primary stage" dur-
ing which the male vic-
tim may notice signs of
the disease such as a
sore on the penis.
"If you really want
to treat it (syphilis),
your best prevention
time is in the first six
months Cox said.
Cox said there was a
less alarming, but
substantial increase in
the number of cases of
gonorrhea that were
reported in 1982.
The health depart-
ment treated 898 cases
of gonorrhea in 1982,
749 cases in 1982 and
only 688 in 1980. Cox
pointed out that gonor-
rhea has only a 3-15
day incubation period.
"As a public health in-
vestigator, you're not
going to do a whole lot
of prevention because
gonorrhea has such a
short incubation
period Cox added.
As is the case with
syphilis, symptoms
associated with gonor-
rhea are more likely to
appear among men.
"Eighty percent of the
males get symptoms;
Eighty percent of the
females don't Cox
said.
Both Cox and Mc-
Callum stressed that
anyone noticing the
symptoms of venereal
disease to come in for
treatment immediately.
Treatment is generally
done with penicillin in-
jections and is basically
simple.
McCallum noted that
no records of the
number of students
contracting venereal
disease are kept and
that all information is
"absolutely confiden-
tial
"I think students are
aware of the symp-
toms McCallum said.
"Many of them have
been made aware
through their health
education classes or
from the Student
Health Center's
outreach efforts
very sticky situation,
and a potentially illegal
situation, " Smith said.
When the cast heard
the hair-raising news
two weeks before open-
ing night, they staged a
demonstration featur-
ing placards proclaim-
ing "Bodies Are
Beautiful" and "The
End Is Near, Lets See
It
Although the
demonstration didn't
help the cast's cause, it
did boost ticket sales,
Smith says. The initial
Thursday night perfor-
mance was almost sold
out.
"We weren't going
to throw it in the au-
dience's face says
cast member Bill
Heyser. "It would have
been very distasteful
"Audience reaction
was really good" even
to the clothed scene,
which occurs at the end
of the first act, Smith
reports.
The scene, he adds,
was designed to present
the vulnerability and
confusion of the
characters.
"I think it's a very
effective scene, but 1
don't think their
vulnerability comes
through with the scene
now
Heyser agrees,
believing nudity would
have added a different
mood to the scene. "It
would have put the ic-
ing on the cake
Happy Valentine's Day y
� I 4 f om S�'�
Owl PL M�j
LAI TARHS JEWELERS
ESTAPL'HtO 1912
GREENVILLE. N C
�� our. ts - Custoa Design - Repair
kV. iforl Do!M or Premises
w5tnst.
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SoKC�M 1�MM (MLappard Hoiwck�tTriwmpfc CHriilophf C� MMotWofk Goriand Mt�T�
Phil Collins Might Ro�9rHank William If.
DtveHttm ustd Albums Cmtlfor
BMMBIW-MI7
200 West
AXA &EEE
Happy Hour
Tuesday, Feb. 8
9:00-1:00
Admission $1.00
Happy Hour Prices
Throughout The Night
ECU's Best 200 West
200 W. 10th St.
A
TWestem Steer
Family
STEAKHOVSE
Banquet & Party
Facilities for 15
to 150 Persons
Take Out Orders
Call 758-8550
3005 E. 10th St Greenville
Open SunThur. llam-fpm
Fnday-Saturday llam-lOpm
OIL CHANGE
LUBE AND
FILTER
Maior Brand Multiqrade Oil Up To 5 Ots
EXPIRES 2-30
� m m m m COUPON ����!
FRONT DISK
BRAKES
$49.88
EXPIRES 2-3C
COUPON
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7M DICKINSON AVE SHOPPING CENTER
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Treat the crew
r�r
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M
Zr
and well treat you
�r . -�
-

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Y-
.
Every
Monday
&
Tuesday
Night
No Coupon NKHMry
757-1955
Every Monday and Tuesday night, every week
of the year, order any large 2 or rxxe topp-g
pizza tor the crew, ask for the "Family Night Special'
ana we'll treat you to your own small pma with rne same
number of toppings FREE, �nd delivered free. In our
serv.ee zone, 30 minutes or less
Or pick up two pizzas in 15 minutes
two pizzas for the price of one now that s a treat vou can t beat!
When it comesto f pizza, pta comes to vou
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8 ��� ����������������������-�
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4-A78x13 Powor Streak Block Tiros SI 46.10 total
All taxes Included, Mounted, Computer Balance,
New Valve Stems, No Other Charge
I
DAILY SPECIALS AT
Famous Foot Long Sandwiches
MON.
SNAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA)
ft CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2.09
TUES
SNAK ROAST BEEF, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
SODA FOR $2.09
WED.
SNAK MEATBAcL. BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.59
THURS.
SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.89
FRI.
SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND
A SMALL SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 AM. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY.
ECU Buccaneer
present
The Men of ECU
Wed. Feb. 16, 1983 8:30-1:00am.
The debut of ECU's Award Winning
Male Calendar Models
Ladies Lockout til 10:00
Ladies Free & 5- draft while it lasts.
Hump Nite Specials too! (45 A 504 cans)
Ladies Come Early and Meet
ECUs Finest Males in Person
& pick up calendar
Come Early

��

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So
Bv vTr
tj
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tkmystei
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tions - :S
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n Iowa
BKJ situation,
Itentiallv illegal
Smith said
te cast heard
raising news
s before open
-hey staged a
ition featur-
rds proclaim-
lodies Are
and "The
ear. Lets See
,h the
ion didn't
t's cause, it
icket sales.
is The initial
r ght perfor-
almost sold
eren"t going
in the au-
ce savs
lb e r Bill
Heyser. "It would have
been very distasteful
"Audience reaction
was really good" even
to the clothed scene,
which occurs at the end
of the first act, Smith
reports.
The scene, he adds,
was designed to present
the vulnerability and
confusion of the
characters.
"I think it's
effective scene,
don't think
vulnerability
a very
but I
their
comes
through with the scene
now
Hevser agrees,
believing nudity would
have added a different
mood to the scene. "It
would have put the ic-
ing on the cake
fjNTLN
X
ell treat you
r '
Z$
sday
light
ever� week
norm topping
Famuv Night Special
limaii ciia witti np sae
I -e'lverea fre in our
'pc
�at you can t beat'
r ' ;ou.
aneer
ECU
-1:00am.
d Winning
lets
0:00
it lasts.
& 504 cans)
id Meet
Person
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
New Film May
Get Nelligan
Some Notice
FEBRUARY 15. 1983 pMe 7
By STEVE BACHNER
EarrtaiBBmi Mitoi
Years from now, a disquieting lit-
tle mysterythriller called Without a
Trace will pop up on the network
late show and commercial interup-
tions will make it impossible to
watch. Since the film is sometimes
intentionaJly erratic in tone anyway,
t requires an even concentration!
But by then, most people will pro-
bably stick with it because of its
star, an actress who, for the time, is
known only to a relatively small sec-
tion of the movie-going population
m the United States. If Without a
Trace (which opened Fridav at
Greenville's Buccaneer Theatre)
doesn't do it for Kate Nelligan, then
something else very soon will.
Canadian-born Nelligan is well
established in England where she
has acted in many plays on the Lon-
don stage and worked in BBC and
PBS television productions. Her
best known American films thus far
have been Richard Marquand's
1981 Eye of the eedle and the up-
dated 1979 version of Dracula in
which she played opposite Frank
Langella. There is no question that
the versatile Nelligan could master
any number of characters; her
choices v�,il determine whether or
not she will eventually become, in
this country, an actress with the
sanv marketability as Meryl Streep
or ihe slow-blooming Jessica Lange.
Her performance in Without a
Trace allows her to rise above occa-
sionally banal material.
Beth Gutcheon's screenplav, bas-
ed on her novel Still Missing, is
perhaps a little broader in scope
than it might have been. It is the
story of Susan Selky (Nelligan), a
professor of English at Columbia
University in New York, whose six-
year-old son (played by newcomer
Danny Corkill) mysteriously disap-
peares one morning on his way to
school. The police are called in, but
fail initially to make any progress.
No ransom is demanded and all but
one lead goes nowhere.
Fact-based explanations are
sprinkled about but the real focus of
the film, right up until its inex-
plicably incongruous finale, is on
Susan Selky. Producerdirector
Stanley Jaffe wisely allows the hor-
ror of the event to grow out of the
psychological trauma of the
mother. Nelligan's Selky is rigid, in-
tellectual; the loss of her son coupl-
ed with her estranged husband's in-
fidelity force her to become cold,
withdrawn and tough. When she
finally does break down (while
bathing), it becomes an intensely
personal and uncomfortable spec-
tacle.
Other performers are fine-
notably, Judd Hirsch as an
understanding detective and
Stockard Channing as a close
friend. But it is Nelligan's film.
As a deliberately-paced thriller.
Without a Trace works pretty well!
As a psychological horror storv and
a character study, the film works
much better. The surprise wrap-up
and feel-good conclusion (i.e. An
Officer and a Gentleman) are added
for commercial purposes. One
wishes that they too would disap-
pear without a trace.
k nh �, � co ,�. �,� frora Mw mmmtmm, wmm A Tnct The nm sttn m Hinck
Will The Real Sting Please .
By DEAN JOHNSON
mnwml
BOSTON � So who is this fellow
born Gordon Sumnera and now bet-
ter known simply as Sting? Is he the
hard-working bassist for the police
who affects a spartan pose when on
tour, shunning all temptations of
the flesh (and otherwise), keeping
regular hours (for a musician, that
is), reading voraciously and so on
and so forth? Or is he more like the
fellow who sued his music
publishers, then during the trial, put
on a display of bonhomie with his
fW

� � 1
1 Y
New Band Rod And The Reals Coming To The Attic
Rod and the Reals, a new Raleigh-based band led by former ArroganceGlass Moon guitarist Rod
Abernethy, will perform this Sunday night, Feb. 20, at Greenville's Attic nightclub. The band
plays mostly original material as well as old favorites like "Satisfaction" and "I Fought the Law
Described as "a modern, danceable rock � roll group the foursome also includes former Brice
Street members Jack Atchison (drums) and Barry Webb (keyboardsguitar), and also former No
Vacancy bass player Bobby Patterson.
Persona
estranged wife? Is Sting the bassist
the same Sting who, following an
out-of-court settlement of the
aforementioned suit, jetted off to
the Riviera with a new lady friend to
attend a party thrown by Saudi arms
dealer Adnan Kashoggi? The same
Sting who, upon returning to the
U.S scuffled with the paparazzi on
hand to record he and his travelling
companion's arrival?
The blonde-haired bassist doesn't
tackle such issues head on, but sug-
gests his starring role in Richard
Loncraine's Film Brimstone and
Treacle might be rife with clues as to
the exact nature of his personality.
In the film. Sting portrays Martin
Taylor, an odious vagrant with a
Jekyll-Hyde streak, whose
malevolence is on a par with that of
Malcolm McDowell's Alex in A
Clockwork Orange. In real life.
Sting appreciates having Taylor
muddy up his image a bit more.
Says Sting: "I think that by doing
tangential things like Brimstone and
Treacle I will offset that very
natural process where they love you
one minute and want to destroy you
the next. By throwing curves at peo-
ple, like this movie, they'll get con-
fused. That's a deliberate policy on
my part so that I don't paint myself
into a corner, in effect. People
won't say, 'Oh, yeah, the sex god
or horseshit like that
The role of Martin Taylor,
though, has deeper, more personal
resonances for Sting. In Tavlor, he
sees a reflection of his darker im-
pulses � and remember, this is a
character who one minute mouths
wimpoid homilies on the order of "I
love housework; it's such a peaceful
art' and next ravishes a
quadriplegic young girl (played bv
Suzanna Hamilton) when no one is
looking. "I feel well-cast Sting
observes, without cracking a smile.
T find it quite easy to be Martin
Taylor in that I feel he is an exag-
geration of m own ambiguities.
What interests me about Taylor is
that he is actually nice sometimes.
He's kind and generous. He's also a
shit. That polarity is his character is
just fascinating. Reality is like
Brimstone and Treacle People are
good and bad They have the facUu.
to be totally evil or quite gocJ. I
think it's important to realize that
any of us can be Hitler or the
Boston Strangier. or St. Francis of
Assisi
But a strong identification with
the part wasn't enough to carry the
day for Sting, a fledgling actor
whose screen appearances include
minor roles in the Sex Pistols' Rock
'A" Roll Swindle, Quadrophenia
(showing on campus as a late show
this spring). Secret Policeman's
Other Ball, and a quirky BBC
thriller entitled Artemus '81. For
one, co-stars Denholm Elliott
(whose film credits include The
Boys From Brazil, King Rat and
Raiders of the Lost Ark) and Joan
Plowright (aka Mrs. Laurence
Olivier) are hardly thespian light
weights; their presence tested Sting,
whose competitiveness stopped
short of one-upsmanship.
"The demand to be on a par with
actors of that caliber was not in-
timidating, but challenging he in-
sists. "I realized I had to prove
myself to them every day and work
harder. I came into the movie as a
learner, and I made it very clear to
them from the start that I was there
to learn. I wasn't an upstart or a big
star. I was an apprentice
And for Sting the apprentice, in-
terpreting Martin Taylor's dual per-
sonality proved a demanding chore.
"1 had to act and be seen to be ac-
ting by the audience Sting ex
plains. "So in a sense I had to be
convincing enough to convince the
other characters, but not the au-
dience. I've spoken to other actors
since I did the part, and they tell me
- it's one of (he mot difficult roles
for a young man to take on. Where
do you pitch the performance? Are
you real or not? 1 picked quite an
elusive part, and I'm glad 1 did
Where does all this activity leave
the Police? In addition to Sling's
solo performances in Brimstone,
Andy Summers has released a
critically-acclaimed collaboration
with Robert Fripp Advance
Masked), and Stewart Copdand's
working on the soundtrack for
Francis Ford Coppolla's
Rumble fish film. According to
Sting, these outside projects are
vital, but momentary, distractions
from the band's work.
"We've been together for six
years, and we need a break from
each other he says straighfor
wardly. "What I do in my spare
time is make movies, and what they
do is their own business. There are
no conflicts, reallv
Bands Abounding
Ball Should Benefit The Needy
By JOHN HOWARTH
Staff Writa
The ECU Hunger Coalition and Pitt Co. Hunger Pro-
ject are sponsoring a Benefit Ball on Saturday night,
Feb. 26, from 9 till 1 a.m. at the American Legion Hall
which is located near the Beef Barn. The dance will
feature three local bands who have donated their ser-
vices.
Proceeds from the Ball will be divided evenly between
Oxfam American and Greenville Church Ministries
United.
"We chose Oxfam America because they have been
identified as being one of the relief agencies that spends
the least on administrative costs said Mike Hamer,
one of the organizers of the event. "Also, the Hunger
coalition favors Oxfam America because they deal with
self-help projects
Lenore Olmstead is Senior Coordinator at the Oxfam
America offices in Boston. She described one of the
organization's emergency projects which is takir g place
in the town of Khian in Lebanon:
"Basically, the town has been completely
devastated she said. "We're providing emergency
repairs for housing, and we're also setting up an outpa-
tient clinic there. It's an area that people are starting to
rebuild. They have very few materials to work with.
"Ail of our projects in India are centered around
women's self-help projects. There is a women's group
of lacemakers called 'Godavarai The Irish mis-
sionaries introduced lacemaking in the area. These
women make $.65 for every 2,615 yards of lace which
they crochet; that comes out to about $. 10 a day. This is
the same rate that they made 40 years ago. Through our
help, the women have learned how to put the pieces
together, and they've figured out how to market the lace
and raise their wages. Thus they've helped to sustain
their families
Greenville Church Ministries United will be receiving
50 percent of the monies raised. This organization func-
tions as a clearinghouse for funds which are then chan-
neled to the Salvation Army, Catholic Social Services,
Real Crisis Center and the Department of Social Ser-
vices.
"The most urgent needs that are surfacing in this area
are for food, medication, rent and utilities said Liz
Wilkerson, a volunteer working with GreenviUe Church
Ministries. "The needs have increased dramatically dur-
ing these winter months
The three bands who will be playing for the Benefit
are The Lemon Sisters and The Rutabaga Brothers, The
Lightning Weils Blues Band, and The Amateurs.
The Lemon Sisters and Rutabaga Brothers play a
mixture of swing, rhythm and blues and soul music.
They have recently been drawing large crowds at the
New Deli and at the Rathskeller.
The Lightning Wells Blues Band plays mainly
Chicago-style blues, rhythm and blues, and rockabilly.
The band has been playing in eastern N.C. and in
Raleigh over the past 3 years.
The Amateurs play original music in a variety of con-
temporary styles. All three bands feature seasoned
Greenville musicians who have played in several bands
over the years.
Setups will be sold at the Benefit. Persons are urged
to bring their own alcoholic beverages. Advance tickets
are on sale for $2 at Apple Records. Tickets at the door
will sell for $2.50 apiece.
' ��-j v� kV r t,� ��

J







HE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 15. 1983
ROOMMATE WANTED
Responsible male or female wanted to
share three bedroom duplex with working
ECU student Within walking distance of
campus. Call Charles at 752 4935 or
756 8865.
SUN TANNERY
Get Ready For That Florida Trip
15 Visits -$22.50 10 Visits 15.00
Also other exexcl�e SpGCldlS �
Call NOW!
UNITED FIGURE SALON
ipm tr� :$ ��'
� :�.
French Thriller 'Diva'At Hendrix Theatre Tomorrow Night
Frederic Andrei stars as a young mailman whose passion is opera in the
acclaimed French thriller Ohm, directed hy Jean-Jacques Beineix. The
film Hill be shown tomorrow evening at 8 in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre. Admission to the ECU Student I nion
Wednesday Special Films Series is by in and activity card for students
and MSC membership for faculty and staff. Upcoming spring semester
Special Films include Mad Max and Road Warrior (March 2). Oblomov
(March 16), Juliet of the Spirits and Satyricon (April 6) and Best Foreign
Film winner Mephisto (April 20).
Hall And Oates Quest May Be Over
Pizza inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
Bv MARK MEHLEB
Rrrord
NEW YORK � Time passes, as is its wont,
but Daryl Hall and John Oates cling to the status
quo. Since 19" they've been on an ascending
curve of popularity that took a big leap in 1980
when the duo's Voices L P produced multiple hit
singles. The following year. Private Eyes went to
the well time and again for hit singles, and their
latest. Hfi, is an odds-on favorite to repeat its
predecessors' achievements.
In fact, Hall and Oates' life is so stable in so
many respects that they've even maintained the
image problem that's dogged them throughout a
checkered career spanning thirteen years, four-
teen albums, a (figurative) death and a rebirth.
You know, everybody recognizes the name and
the sound, but who knows from the guys? They
aren't distinctive personalities; they don't show
up on TV very often, they're not associated with
political or social issues; loo many photographs
find them affecting chillingly-detached pretty
boy poses.
So what's new with Hall and Oates this time
around? Mainly that they've recognized the
distance between their own, the public's and, yes,
the press' perception of Hall and Oates. Oates,
the diminutive, swarthy, slightly menacing half
of the duo, admits he and his partner "had to
learn how important image is in pop music.
Things we didn't take seriously because we were
naive or young or just stupid, people looked at
and went, 'Ooooh, look at the perversion
Specifically, Oates is referring to the metallic
silver cover of their 1977 LP, Daryl Hall and
John Oates, on which a dolled-up H&O could be
figured for having something more than a
musical relationship. (An H&O discography.
issued by RCA in 1980, is jocular and derisive in
citing the notable aspects of this album. To wit:
"Daryl and John move to the West Village with
Sara Smile thereby proving their heterosexuali-
ty and "on the album cover Daryl Hall por-
trays the girl he would most like to meet) "It
was all part of losing control of our act Oates
says. "Not just us. but our managers, too � we
all made mistakes. That happens when you start
out
"We got so tired of people not knowing what
the fuck we were about Hall says of the confu-
sion surrounding the duo "But I'll tell you this,
people are definitely seeing it now. There's only
one image we ever wanted: two musicians who
play rock and soul music
An admirable goal, but one, in this case, not
easily attained. Before Hall and Oates could
separate fact from fantasy in the image-making
department, they had to "break down and then
rebuild as Oates puts it, on the business side.
"We were never really in control Hall states.
"Not of the music, nor of the presentation of it.
Our career was a circus. But we've come to grips
with the world
Oates, speaking in something approaching
second-degree psychobabble, points to his and
Hall's music as a major source of inspiration for
their hard-won victories in the realm of
marketing and merchandising. "The theme of
self-determination has been a major one in our
work he says. "Doing what you believe is
right, as opposed to what others tell you. Taking
control of your life; not following the masses
As artists, Hall and Oate have helped bring
order to a disorderly world by not only writing
and arranging their material, but by producing
themselves as well. Earlier in their career, Hall
notes, recording was little short of a hanowing
experience. "I see our career going straight from
Abandoned I uncheonette (their critically-
acclaimed second album, released in 1973) to
yokes, with everything in-between just a bunch
of good songs that needed a lot more work. 1 love
a lot of songs on those mid-period albums, but
the producers screwed up most of them. Other
than David Foster (who produced Along the Red
ledge) and Anf Mardin (uncheonette) � good
musicians who stayed out of the way � every
other producer we ever worked with tried to do
things to the music without the slightest
understanding of what we were
Believing in the importance of the individual
song � particularly their individual songs �
Hall and Oates took to producing themselves on
Voices, followed in 1981 by Private Eyes, in both
cases, the results, as noted at the outset, were as-
tounding. HjO mines the same rich vein of
memorable pop hooks, well-tempered melodies,
and soaring harmonies.
Thematically. Hfi is also of a piece with its im-
mediate predecesors, dealing as it does with the
daily flotsam and jetsam of emotional life; little
murders, tiny betrayals, white lies, "the failure
of ideals
"It's an emotional record, perhaps the most
angst-filled IP we've ever done Hall says "1
don't think you can call it negative, but. let's face
See H&O, Page 9
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V"
teven Spielberg has fascinated, mystified
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(lOSt I N (HMI KSOf I HE THIRD
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Now. he takes �u into a world irf lerrifving
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DRY FOR ONLY 35"
Just for trying our New Step.
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South Pork Shopping C�ntr
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�j Center
Sandwich Gome
tng Wednesday
"Custer � Brought To Stage
Gary Weathersbee (foreground). Robert Willie
and Gregory Watkins star in the ECU Playhouse
N.C. premier production of Custer, to be per-
formed Feb 17-22 at 8:15 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre. Robert Ingham's drama sets General
Custer, Elizabeth Custer, Colonel William Ben-
teen and Major Marcus Reno in limbo telling
the.r versions of that fateful dav at the Little
TShSii Resera,ions can m�de by calling
H&Os �H20'
A Genuine
Pop Triumph
Continued From Page 8
it, this is what the world is like and we'll have to
live in it. John and 1 are still trying to figure out
where all the angst comes from. We didn't see
any recurring theme of betraval until we sat
down and analyzed the lyrics. It must be in our
lives; both of us have done a lot of bumping up
against the rotten part of the world
When it's pointed out the As high-gloss pop
sheen comes dangerously close to undercutting
the emotion in their material. Hall and Oates go
to pains to point out that the album is, in fact,
one of their least intricate studio recordings!
"Basically, it's a rhythm ection, or its
equivalent, and a couple of instruments on top "
Hall notes. "On 'Open All Night you've got'a
rhythm section with a string thing on it in one
ti'U-TV and itpertronic. Synergy pattern on
Sf- i" un �ne of the thin8 I've always
shared with Fnpp is a belief that vou don't need
four or five guitars to flesh out song, if you pick
the right part in the precise tonal range
"If I had to pick out a dominant instrument, it
would be the drum adds Oates. "On a tune like
'At Tension for example, we tuned a drum
machine to correspond to each chord change in
the song, so we were able to construct the entire
song harmonically with the drums before we add-
ed the chords. The whole thing is integrated.
That's where the intense, depressing military
feeling comes from
Yet Hfi also has a feeling of triumph, of artists
in high spirits, at the peak of their craft. Some
rigid types have scoffed at their blue-eyed soul
mannerisms as being calculated enough to
qualify as racist, but Hall says that if HjO
presents he and his partner in a more possesed
state, it's because they've not forgotten from
whence they came. "All this fighting about us co-
pying blacks Hall complains. "If you grew up
in Philadelphia like John and I did, singing doo-
wop � his voice trails off. "Man he con-
tinues, "if you ever lose that, something's wrong
with you. It's not the technique of the thing, it's
the essence. Soul isn't color; it's the important
part of the music � whatever kind of music
you're doing � and every song's got to have soul
in it or it's not a good song
In surveying a career that suddenly seems in
order, the two musicians cite the formation of
their first permanent band � G.E. Smith on lead
guitar; Charlie Dechant on saxophone; Tom
"T-Bone" Wolk on bass; and Mickey Curry on
drums � as further evidence that H&O has jell-
ed. "Frankly says Hall, "we never found
anybody good enough to keep. Their limitations
always came up. It happens that way with
sidemen; they do some things and not others.
The guys we have now are versatile. They're
from the east coast, and they've got our rock and
soul roots. They came into the studio, we played
them our demos, we did one or two takes, and
they left, and John and I did our little overdubs.
That's how we want to make records
What we're talking about here is a working
band. Last May, Hall and Oates completed a
grinding year-long tour, then spent two months
closeted away in their New York apartments,
writing twenty new songs in advance of July's
sessions for Hfi. In September they made a series
of U.S. television appearances, and embarked on
a tour of Japan. They've already started a com-
pletely sold-out three-month U.S. tour. In defy-
ing Reaganomics and the sagging fortunes of the
record industry, H&O has become one of only a
handful of acts to have been given a new life dur-
ing the recession.
Hall shrugs. "It's the Hall and Oates luck syn-
drome he says with a slight laugh. "We get big
when it's impossible to get big. If we were doing
in 1978 what we're doing now � what am I
taalking about? We tried that and nobody cared?
Now they care like crazy, except nobody has any
money to buy records, or else they're busy taping
them off the radio
Having taken some profound steps towards
solving their image problem and restructuring
their professional lives, one wonders just how far
afield Hall and Oates would be willing to take
that audience of theirs that "cares like crazy
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
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FEWl K 15. iJ p"f
Lady Wolves Capture Tourney Title
By KEN BOLTON
Aabuil Sporti i4Utx
The Cheyney State Lady Wolves
used the hot shooting of tournament
MVP Rosetta Guilford to capture
this weekend's Converse Lady
Pirate Classic.
Guilford scored 33 points in Sun-
da) night's championship game to
lead the Lady Wolves to a 85-57 vic-
tory over the host Lady Pirates.
Cheyney State, the 5th ranked
team in the nation, improved its
record to 19-1 while the Lady
Pirates' mark evened at 10-10.
Guilford was the runaway choice
for MVP, ar her smooth jump shot
resulted in 63 points for the two
rounds. The 5-10 junior hit 29 of 44
shots from the field to lead the
powerful Lady Wolves.
Both Cheyney State and ECU
made it to the championship game
as the result of strong first-round
performances on Saturday night.
The Lady Pirates defeated Clem-
son 05-51, and the Lady Wolves
turned back Detroit 80-61 to set up
the final contest.
ECU jumped out to a 4-2 lead
during the first two minutes, thanks
to a pair of jump shots by Darlene
Chancy.
But from then on, it was all
Cheyney State. During the next 12
"linutes, the Lady Wolves outscored
Lv.l 24-8.
The visitors from Cheney, Pa. us-
ed a tenacious 2-3 zone to take ad-
vantage of the height differential.
The Lady Wolves started a front
line of 5-11 Yolanda Laney, 6-1
Deborah Thomas, and 6-4 Sharon
Taylor.
The score at halftime was 43-24,
but the two teams traded baskets in
the second half until an 8-0 streak at
the 12:00 mark put the game out of
reach.
Three Cheyney State players �
Guilford, Taylor, and Laney �
made the all-tournament team.
Rounding out the squad was ECU's
Mary Denkler and Clemson's Janet
Knight.
Denkler was ECU's main force in
Sunday night's title game. The 6-0
senior scored 26 points against the
tight Cheyney State zone.
A pair of freshmen, Sylvia Bragg
and Lisa Squirewell, were also in-
strumental in the Lady Pirates' ef-
fort.
Bragg contributed 11 points while
Squirewell added nine points and a
team-high 10 rebounds.
Besides Guilford's effective pro-
duction, the Lady Wolves were
boosted by 19 points from Laney
and an eight-point, 13-rebound per-
formance from Taylor.
Cheyney State's height advantage
was apparent by the final margin in
rebounding � 50-29. The Lady
Pirates were unable to off more
than one shot against their shifting
zone.
The Lady Wolves also held an ad-
vantage in field goal percentage,
55.9 percent as compared with 43.3
percent.
Neither team was effective at the
free throw line, as ECU made five
of 13 and Cheyney State converted
on nine of 19.
ECU head coach Cathy Andruzzi
stated after the game that one pre-
game strategy was to force the Lady
Wolves to foul.
"We tried to get the ball inside
and draw some fouls Andruzzi
said. "But our free throw shooting
was poor
This weekend's tournament was
the second annuaJ Converse Lady
Pirate Classic. Last year's event was
won by the ECU squad.
"We were certainly pleased with
the tournament Andruzzi com-
mented. "There was a lot of en-
thusiasm from all of the teams par-
ticipating
Andruzzi was disappointed in the
outcome of the final game, but
realized that Cheyney State was pro-
bably ECU's toughest opponent of
the year.
"They are an excellent team,
from top to bottom she said. "We
knew that we were going to have to
stop their perimeter shooting, but
they shot right over us
The fifth-year coach was pleased
with her squad's effort, even though
they came out on the short end of a
lopsided score.
"Hey, we scored 57 points against
a very good team Andruzzi
responded. "We took some pretty
good shots, but they just wouldn't
go in. The same shots were falling
last night
In the consolation game, the
Clemson Lady Tigers took third
place with a 83-58 drubbing of the
University of Detroit.
The Lady Tigers were led by all-
tournament selectee Janet Knight,
who finished with 23 points and 12
rebounds. Clemson is now 9-13,
while the Lady Titans from "the
Motor City" are 6-16.
This weekend's tournament was
the latest installment of the "new
five With injuries to backcourt
starters Loraine Foster and
Delphine Mabry, ECU has been
forced to play with a new lineup and
a depleted roster.
"Our kids showed a lot of intensi-
ty out there Andruzzi responded.
"They played another good game
from the heart. The game was never
out of reach in our kids' eyes
The Lady Pirates return to aciton
this Thursday night when they host
the Morehead State Lady Eagles.
Gametime is 7:30 p.m.
Pt�e� ft. JA�Y PATTC�SO
ECU Fran Hooks in action during this weekend's tournament. The
I.adv Pirates finished second out of a field of four teams.
Green Returns to Action
Vengeful Pirates Crush Baptist Buccaneers
The Pirates may have
underestimated Baptist College in
their last meeting, but they certainly
were prepared for Saturday night's
second confrontation.
With sophomore forward Barry-
Wright pumping in a season-high 25
points and Johnny Edwards racking
up 24, the Bucs came away with a
73-59 victory.
Unlike the first contest, the
Pirates had Charlie Green moving
msidc in the second half, which also
secured the win. Green, who return-
ed alter suffering a separated
shoulder, pumped in 10 points, hit-
: g three of three from the floor
ai . I )ui of six from the foul line.
�Getting Charlie Green back
helped us a great deal said head
coach Charlie Harrison. "He is so
quick and he allows us to do other
things both offensively and defen-
sively. He really helps us on the in-
side defensively and he provides us
with more rebounding and inside
power
"The Pirates were down 37-35 at
halftime, but came back and
outscored Baptist, 12-4, in the first
five minutes to pull ahead 47-41.
Baptist cut the lead to three points
twice, however, ECU outscored
Baptists, 14-2, during the next four
minutes to give them a 64-51 advan-
tage with 3:01 remaining.
The Pirates, avenging a previous
64-56 loss against Baptist, are now
11-11 and ended a two-game losing
streak.
Harrison was especially pleased
with the Bucs' play in the second
period. "In the second half, I
thought we had better perimeter
defense he said. "In the first half,
we went after every ball fake, but in
the second half we staved down bet-
ter on defense.
"We saw a play in the first half
that we could pick on but the shots
didn't fall in the first half. They did
the second half
The Pirates finished with a 51.2
percent shooting average from the
floor. Baptist did even better
though, hitting 52.3 percent. Each
team had 15 turnovers. The dif-
ference for the Pirates proved to be
on the free throw line. ECU made
31 of 38 free throws to Baptist's 13
of 17.
ECU barely outrebounded the
Buccaneers, 26-25. Edwards had
nine, while Barcus Beasley grabbed
five for Baptist.
Wright, who scored 15 of his 25
points in the last 20 minutes of the
game, hit nine of 10 field goals and
seven of nine from the free throw
line.
Edwards shot 100 percent from
the free throw line, sinking 12
baskets. From the floor, he was six
for 16.
Baptist's Reggie Walker, who led
the Buccaneers with 16 points, did
not play against the Pirates in their
first meeting.
In the firsl half. Baptist jumped
out to a 9-4 lead after scoring five
straight points. But the Pirates
retaliated and tied the game, 13-13.
with less that 13 minutes remaining.
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Emory Announces 16
More Early Recruits
East Carolina University head
football coach Ed Emory announc-
ed last week that 16 more players
have signed grants-in-aid to attend
ECU next season. That brings the
total to 26 who have said they will
continue their careers at ECU.
Heading the list is Anthony Simp-
son, a 5-10, 210-pound full-back
from Brooklyn, NY and Thomas
Jefferson High School. Simpson, a
linebacker throughout his high
school career, was switched to
fullback during his senior season
after intercepting a pass and return-
ing it for a touchdown. He was im-
mediately moved to the backfield
and proceeded to gain over 900
yards in a wishbone offense. Many,
including Simpson's high school
coach, believe that he is the most
physical back to come out of Jeffer-
son High since John Brockington
(Ohio State-Green Bay packers).
Many believe that Simpson is better.
Simpson made the "Big 44 the
top 44 players in the city of New
York and was all-Scholastic twice by
the New York Daily New Simpson
is a June nominee for the Iron
Horse Award, presented annually to
the finest high school football
player in the city of New York.
Simpson joins teammate Joe
Grinage with the Pirates, who was
released yesterday. Simpson chose
East Carolina over Michigan and
Syracuse.
Also leading the group is Leon
Hall, a 6-5, 240-pound defensive
tackle from Bayside High School in
Flushing, NY. Hall, also a track
standout, was listed by Blue Chips
Magazine as one of the best defen-
sive linemen in the country.
Other defensive linemen signed
include Joe Grinage, a 6-3,
235-pounder from Brooklyn, NY
and Thomas Jefferson High School.
Grinage, captain of the New York
Senior Bowl and all-City offensive
line, was named to the "Big 44
the top 44 players in the City of New
York. Another NY linesman is
Henry Ferraro, a 6-4, 220-pound
tackle from Inwood, NY and
Lawrence High School. Ferraro was
all-Long Island, all-County,
Hicksville MVP, MVP of the Farm-
ingdale Championship game and led
his squad to four 1A Conference
championships.
Offensive linemen include Dave
Skenadore, a 6-3, 260-pounder from
Granby High School in Granby, VA
and Rom Lundy, a 6-15,
235-pounder from Havelock High
School in Havelock, NC. Skenadore
was first-team Eastern Region, all-
Tidewater and honorable mention
all-State. Lundy was all-East
honorable mention, team captain
and all 3A Conference.
Three linebackers were also sign-
ed: Essray Taliafero, a 6-0,
200-pounder from Smithfield High
School in Smithfield, VA, Vinson
Smith, a 6-1, 210-pounder from
Statesville High School in
Stsatesville, NC, and Glenn Geist, a
6-4, 222-pounder from North
Schuykill High School in Ashland,
PA. Taliafero was all-District and
MVP of his squad while Smith earn-
ed all-State, all-Piedmont, all-
Conference and team MVP honors.
Smith was also a pre-season all-
America. Geist was named to the
all-East squad, and to the all-
Anthracite and all-County teams.
Walker then pumped in two
jumpshots as Baptist sparked an
8-point spurt.
Now up, 21-16. ECU narraowed
the lead to three but Walker scored
six points to keep the Buccaneers
up, 29-22
Edwards made two baskets to cut
the lead to four, but Baptist rallied
for six points to go up. 3-29 �
their biggest lead in the first period
The Pirates m11 pd confer.
foe Richmond this Wednesday, night
in Minges Coliseum Gametime is
7:30 p.m.
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Bucs Dump Detroit
ECU forward Charles Green returned to acton Saturday night after
missing four weeks due to a separated shoulder.
He participated in the Two-County
all-Star game.
The Pirates inked highly-recruited
Ron Jones, a 5-10, 180-pound
quarterback from Portsmouth, Va
and Norcom High School. Jones
was second-team all-State as well as
the Portsmouth Sports Club
"Player of the Year Jones also
made all-Tidewater and first-team
all-Eastern Region.
Several junior college players will
transfer to ECU. Among them arc
Tyrone Johnson, a 6-0, 230-pound
linebacker from Hines Junior Col-
lege, Greg Sokoklohorsky, a 6-5,
290-pound offensive lineman from
West Chester Junior College, and
Ricky Hilburn, a 6-5, 273-pound of-
fensive lineman from Chowan
Junior Cololege. Johnson was an
honorable mention junior college
all-America and played in the
Mississippi Junior College all-Star
game. He was all-State and all-
Region and led Hines in tackles in
1982. Johnson was all-Warren
County, all-Delta Zone and all-Cap
Eight Conference for Vicksburg
High School. Sokolohorsky, a
massive offensive lineman, was an
all-League choice in 1980 while win-
ning the coaches Award.
Sokolohorsky was also all-League
for the North Rockland High
School lacrosse team in Garnerville,
NY. Hilburn, a Chadbourn, NC
native, was an honorable mention
Junior College all-America and par-
ticipated in the Coastal Junior Col-
lege all-Star game. Hilburn was all-
Region and all-Conference and
Most Valuable Offensive Lineman
for Chowan.
Also signed is Henry Williams, a
5-6, 176-pound wide receiver-punt
returner from Northwest Junior
College in Senatobia, Mississiplpi,
and Ed Varnes, a 6-0, 192-pound
defensive back standout from Lecs-
McCrae Junior College. Williams,
currently running track for the
Pirates, led Northwest to the Na-
tional Junior College Championship
game in which they defeated Ferrum
Junior College. Williams was a
member of the National Junior Col-
lege all-Star team and was MVP of
the Northwest track squad. He
holds the Mississippi state juco
See TOP, Page 11
In the opening contest ot the
Ladv Pirate Converse Classic, the
Bucs advanced to the championship
game by a resounding win over
Detroit, 95-51.
Leading. 39-26, at halftime. the
Bucs blew the second period wide
open with five players winding up in
double figures.
ECU's Mary Denkler was
10-for-18 from trie floor to score 24
points, putting her over the
1600-point mark in her career (See
Related Article). Denkler also pull-
ed down 15 rebounds.
Sylvia Bragg, who had just four
points at halftime, nailed six field
goals in the final period, with four
during the first three minutes of the
second half.
Sophomore forward Darlene
Chaney added 18 points and grabb-
ed nine rebounds while her team-
mate, senior Fran Hooks, followed
with 16. Freshman Lisa Squirewell
scored 10 points during her 16
minutes of play and made six of
eight freethrows.
The Pirates broke two of
Detroit's single game records. The
95-point total edged out ODU's
90-point win in 1979, and the
44-point margin surpassed Kansas
State's 35-point advantage in 1981.
Overall, the Lady Pirates shot 53
percent from the floor, including
65.5 percent in the second half.
Detroit, on the other hand shot a
low 35 percent for the game.
Every player on the team had the
chance to score and Head Basket-
ball Coach Cathy Andruzzi was
more satisfied than she's been all
season about their performance.
"I think the girls played the best
game they've played all season
she said. "They played mroc
unified, and they played smart
basketball.
"Everybody was a player tonight.
They played with a great deal of
heart and intensity
Andruzzi commended Hooks for
her efforts aga'nst Detroit. "She did
a tremendous job out there in con-
trolling the ball she said. "I knew
thev'd come at us with a full court
press and we broke it. We played to
win and we played to win as a
team
The starting five who are now
Sylvia Bragg, Darlene Chanev.
Mary Denkler. Fran Hooks and
Karen Trusk were impressive as a
team and Andruzzi was glad to see
the players looking for each other
on the court. "They are just now
seeing their potential. They're still
young, but anything's possible.
They needed this for themselves.
They won as a team with a lot of
consistency.
The Bucs got into a fast break
several times against Detroit �
something Andruzzi has been wan-
ting to see more of. "That's the firsl
time this year she said. "We ran
the ball well, got good shots or
brought it back outside
One reason for the team's im-
proved play is because of Chanev's
outstanding performances and the
leadership she's exemplified out on
the court. "Chaney has made the
whole difference in our team An-
druzzi said.
Against Detroit, the Pirates caus-
ed the Lady Titans to make 19 tur-
novers, while ECU had six. Andruz-
zi credited her assistant, Beth Burns,
for her thorough scouting job. "We
knew their strengths and
weaknesses Andruzzi sard. "We
knew where our advantages were
In rebounding, the Bucs pulled
down 45 to Detroit's 31. Bragg led
the team in assists with five.
The Lady Pirates, making 14 of
18 shots, built a 71-36 lead in the
first nine minutes of the second
half. But the Titans onlv made five
of 13 baskets in the stretch.
In the last 10 minutes, the Bucs
maintained their marginal lead over
the Titans, and surpassed the
90-point marks after Riu Simmons
Tmske and Bra�g combined for
nine freethrows in the final thr
minutes.
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aid.
gainst Detroit, the Pirates caus-
the Lad Titans to make 19 tur-
ners, while ECL had six. Andruz-
-redited her assistant. Beth Burns.
jr her thorough scouting job. "We
Few their strengths and
eaknesses Andruzzi said. "We
m where our advantages were "
n rebounding, the Bucs pulled
n 45 to Detroit's 31 Bragg led
ffe team in assists with five.
The Lady Pirates, making U of
hots, built a 71-36 lead in the
st nine minutes of the second
If. But the Titans only made five
13 baskets in the stretch.
In the last 10 minutes, the Bucs
laintained their marginal lead over
le Titans, and surpassed the
-point marks after Rha Simmons
fuske and Bragg combined for
Se freethrows m the final thr
knutes.

Razorbacks Defeat
Duke In Tourney
NORTH LITTLE
ROCK, Ark. (UPI) -
Arkansas tennis coach
Tom Pucci said his
Razorbacks played
with intensity and con-
sistency in downing
Duke University 8-1
and winning the sixth
Wal-Mart Collegiate
Classic tennis tourna-
ment.
Arkansas, which lost
6-3 to Wichita State in
its first team defeat of
the season on Friday,
posted a team total of
32 Sunday to win the
five-day tournament at
Burns Park Tennis
Center in North Little
Rock.
Southern Ulinois-
Edwardsville, finished
second in the tourna-
ment with 27 points,
followed by Wichita
State with 26, Duke
and Michigan with 16
each and Oklahoma
State with 15.
Arkansas opened the
tournament with 8-1
wins in its first two
matches against
Michigan and
Oklahoma State. After
falling to Wichita State
Friday, the Razorbacks
slipped past SIU-
Edwardsville 5-4 on
Saturday.
In the match against
Duke on Sunday, the
Razorbacks won each
match against the Blue
Devils except for No. 1
singles, where Duke's
Marc Flur downed
Arkansas' Peter
Doohan 6-4 6-3.
In other matches
Sunday, Wichita State
defeated Michigan 6-3,
and SIU-Edwardsville
downed Oklahoma
State 5-1, with the
doubles matches
cancelled.
Top Players
Decide To
Play At ECU
Continued From Page 10
record in the 220 in
20.6 and placed third at
the juco nationals in
20.9. He also holds the
Mississippi state high
school long jump
record of 24'5
Varnes is an all-Region
and all-Conference
selection from Lees
McCrae. He played in
the Coastal Juco all-
Star game. Varnes is
from Lake Butler, FL.
Cornell Brockington,
a 5-11, 188-pound
fullback from
Elizabeth High School
in Elizabeth, NJ is
another recruit stan-
dout. Brockington
played in the New
Jersey state all-Star
game and was all-
County, all-Conference
and all-metropolitan
Area. Brockington is
the 26th player signed
by East Carolina.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN FEAS'
5P.M9P.M.
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
1 �SPAGHETTKChoice WITH
A 'LASAGNA of 3 L
dL'RAVIOLA S"11") can
jO.with Garlic Bread �Ay
Yn
Pftf

mm! "rat;
ALL-YOl-CAN-EAT
FLOUNDER -
DINNER 3.W
Lad Pirate forward Darlene Chaney pulls down a rebound in Saturda nigh
Pirate Classic.
State Charged With
Recruiting Violations
Photo by GABY PATTERSON
t's opening round of the Converse Ladv
Complete Automotive
Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jarlran Rentals Available
Buck's
Gulf
SHONEYS
205
Greenville
Blvd.
2704 E. 10th St
758 1033
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI) � The Atlantic
Coast Conference has
issued a public repri-
mand to North
Carolina State Univer-
sity for recruiting viola-
tions during the
1981-82 school year.
North Carolina State
Counsel Clauston
Jenkins said Monday
ACC Commissioner
Robert James told the
university by letter that
the conference voted
7-0 to reprimand it.
The reprimand was
"for violations of the
NCAA contact rule and
for providing more
than the allowable
number of campus
visits to a prospective
student-athlete
Jenkins said.
He said the universi-
ty would not comment
further on the matter
because North Carolina
State must appear later
this month before the
NCAA's Committee on
Infractions.
Jenkins said North
Carolina State's own
investigation indicated
the school violated the
rules in the recruitment
of one player. Former
football coach Monte
Kiffin has identified
that player as Reggie
Singletary, a defensive
tackle from the
Whiteville area.
James said the con-
ference voted for the
reprimand last Friday
during its meeting in
Florida. North
Carolina State did not
participate in the
voting, he said.
He said the con-
ference decided to act
independently of the
NCAA because "there
should be some
acknowledgement" of
the publicity attendant
to the alleged viola-
tions.
He said the con-
ference members made
their decision based on
the information North
Carolina State sent to
the NCAA.
1$k
We Are Now Open 11:00 a.m.
to9:00p.m.
arcs
FINE
FOODS
Located in Georgetown Shoppes
Across From the Highrise Dorms.
We are now serving
genuine homemade Italian
spagetti and lasagna dinners.
We have a 31 item salad bar that nicely complements our
new Italian dinners.
Come on down and
give us a try.
You'll Love It!

m
AOir
Big Brothers
present
Lonely Hearts
Club Night
For All the Lonely Hearts after
Valentine's Day
Tue. Feb. IS, 1983 9:00-l:00am
HAPPY HOUR PRICES
Adm. $.50
Come Early
Aitch.
Hair Styling
�M
s
FREE
756-3050
2 For 1 Coupons From Pizza Transit Authority!
Wednesday, when ECU PLAYS RICHMOND
in Minges Colisuem at 7:30.
Bring A Friend Special
2 Haircuts
for the price of 1
Haircuts Regular $4.00
Tuesday-Saturday
L Ad I Vi MA IN WE to sign up for Budweiser beer case
stacking contest! Must sign up by 5:00pm Wednesday
for round one on Thursday when the LADY
PIRATES PLAY MOREHEAD STATE
at 7:30pm.
WIN TRIP TO DALLAS �mw
Saturday when ECU PLAYS NAVY 7:30pm.
Given by Delta Airlines and Greenville Travel Center.
Watch the Pirates attack.
A

'
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ntie
aneers
Detroit

B
r e n g 11 :
-
I ad P rates mal g 14 ol
id in the
nine minutes of the second
But the Titans onlv made five
l kets in the stretch
1st 10 minutes, the Bucs
ed their marginal lead over
Titans, and surpassed the
marks after Rita Simmons
ske and Bragg combined tor
: treethrows m the final thr�
i tes
I Ht 1AM V AKII INIA
FhHKl ARY IV IVfO
11
Razorbacks Defeat
Duke In Tourney
NORTH LITTLE
ROCK, Ark. (UPI) �
Arkansas tennis coach
Tom Pucci said his
Razorbacks played
with intensity and con-
sistency in downing
Duke University 8-1
and winning the sixth
Wal-Mart Collegiate
Classic tennis tourna-
ment.
Arkansas, which lost
6-3 to Wichita State in
its first team defeat of
the season on Friday,
posted a team total of
32 Sunday to win the
five-day tournament at
Burns Park Tennis
Center in North Little
Rock.
Southern Illinois-
Edwardsville, finished
second in the tourna-
ment with 27 points,
followed by Wichita
State with 26, Duke
and Michigan with 16
each and Oklahoma
State with 15
Arkansas opened the
tournament with 8-1
wins in its first two
matches against
Michigan and
Oklahoma State. After
fall:ng to Wichita State
Friday, the Razorbacks
slipped past SIU -
Edwardsville 5-4 on
Saturday.
In the match against
Duke on Sunday, the
Razorbacks won each
match against the Blue
Devils except for No 1
singles, where Duke's
Marc Flur downed
Arkansas' Peter
Doohan 6-4 6-3
In other matches
Sunday, Wichita State
defeated Michigan 6-3,
and SILEdwardsviile
downed Oklahoma
State 5-1, with the
doubles matches
cancelled.
Top Players
Decide To
Play At ECU
Continued From Page 10
record in the 220 in
20.6 and placed third at
the juco nationals in
20.9. He also holds the
Mississippi state high
school long jump
record of 24'5
Varnes is an all-Region
and all-Conference
selection from Lees
McCrae. He played in
the Coastal Juco all-
Star game. Varnes is
from Lake Butler, FL.
Cornell Brockington,
a 5-11, 188-pound
fullback from
Elizabeth High School
in Elizabeth, NJ is
another recruit stan-
dout. Brockington
played in the New
Jersey state all-Star
game and was all-
County, all-Conference
and all-metropolitan
Area. Brockington is
the 26th player signed
by East Carolina.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
ITALIAN FEAS
5P.M9P.M.
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
J, �SPAGHETTI(Choice W,TH
' �LASAGNA of 3 J.
�RAVIOLA Sauces) JJj
ith Garlic Bread cat
Photo By GAR PATTERSON
I ad Pirate forward Darlenehane pulls down a rebound in Saturdav night's opening round of the Converse I ad
Piratelassie.
Complete Automotive
Service
24 hr. Towing Sen ice
Jarlran Reniah Available
liOi E. '0th St
758 1033
Buck's
Gulf
AIX YOl-t AN EAT
FLOUNDER -
DINNER 3.VV
6H0NEYS
205
Greenville
Blvd.
State Charged With
Recruiting Violations
RAl EIGH, N.C.
(UPI) The Atlantic
Coast Conference has
issued a public repri-
mand to North
Carolina State Univer-
sity for recruiting viola-
tions during the
1981-82 school year.
North Carolina State
Counsel Clauston
Jenkins said Monda
ACC Commissioner
Robert James told the
university b letter that
the conference voted
7-0 to reprimand it.
The reprimand was
"for violations of the
NCAA contact rule and
for providing more
than the allowable
visits to a prospective
student-athlete,1
Jenkins said.
He said the universi-
ty would not comment
further on the matter
because North Carolina
State must appear later
this month before the
NCAA's Committee on
Infractions.
Jenkins said North
Carolina State's own
investigation indicated
the school violated the
rules in the recruitment
of one plaver former
football coach Monte
Kiffin has identified
that player as Reggie
Singletary, a defensive
tackle from the
James said the con-
ference voted for the
reprimand last Fndav
during its meeting in
Florida. North
Carolina State did not
participate in the
voting, he said.
He said the con-
ference decided to act
independently o the
NCAA because there
should be some
acknowledgement" o
the publicity attendant
to the alleged viola-
tions.
He said the con-
ference members made
their decision based on
the information North
Carolina State sent to
the NCAA.
We Are Now Open 11:00 a.m.
to 9:00 p.m.
aros
FINE
FOODS
Located in Georgetown Shoppes
Across From the Highrise Dorms.
We are now serving
genuine homemade Italian
spagetti and lasagna dinners.
We have a 31 item salad bar that nicely complements our
new Italian dinners.
Come on down and
give.usa try.
You'll Love It!
AOTT
Big Brothers
present
Lonely Hearts
Club Night
For All the Lonely Hearts after
Valentine's Day
Tue. Feb. IS, 1983 9:00- 1:00am
HAPPY HOUR PRICES
Adm. $.50
Come Early
number of campus Whiteville area.

H
V.
Bring A Friend Special

it

S
V




































Han Styling
756-3050
FREE
2 For 1 Coupons From Pizza Transit Authority!
Wednesday, when ECU PLAYS RICHMOND
in Minges Colisuem at 7:30.
LAj I WllVNIWt to sign up for Budweiser beer case
stacking contest! Must sign up by 5:00pm Wednesday
for round one on Thursday when the LADY
PIRATES PLAY MOREHEAD STATE
2 Haircuts J

for the price of 1

Haircuts Regular $4.00 �

Tuesday-Saturday



at 7:30pm.
WIN TRIP TO DALLAS ���
Saturday when ECU PLAYS NAVY 7:30pm.
Given by Delta Airlines and Greenville Travel Center.
Watch the Pirates attack.
XI
V h :
i





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 15. 1983
Denkler Adds Needed Stability
By RANDY MEWS
Staff WrtMr
ECU'S second all-
time leading scorer
Mary Denlker has once
more become the stabl-
ing force on the Lady
Pirates basketball
team. Despite changes
in the starting lineup,
Denkler, a 6-0 forward,
has maintained a 21.6
point scoring and 7.1
rebounds per game
average.
The Street and Smith
preseason All-America
candidate is connecting
on 53.5 percent of her
field goal attempts and
is shooting nearly 80
percent from the free
throw line.
Last year, Denkler
was named to the
Women's Basketball
News Service All-
America team, as well
as making several all-
tournament teams. She
has ranked as high as
fourth in the nation in
scoring this year, and
has scored in double
figures 66 of the last 70
games in which she has
played.
Denkler said she
became interested in
playing basketball
because of her three
older brothers. "They
used to shoot around
all the time, and the
more I played with
them, the more I began
to like the game
Denkler began playing
organized ball in
seventh grade for her
school team.
Denkler, from Arl-
ington. Virginia, at-
tended Bishop
O'Connell High
School Since she
plaved for a private
school, she didn't get
that much exposure
and wasn't heavily
recruited.
Denkler decided to
attend George
Washington University
and had even signed
with them, but then she
and Phil Mueller met.
Meuller, a former
wrestling Ail-American
from ECU, began
coaching at Denkler's
high school her senior
year. Mueller saw
Denlker play and ar-
ranged a meeting bet-
ween her and Lady
Pirate head coach
Cathy Andruzzi.
Denkler liked the ECU
campus and decided to
come here instead.
Adjusting to college
life wasn't that hard for
Denkler. "At first I
didn't like being that
far away from home,
but I adapted pretty
quickly. As for playing
basketball, the only dif-
ference from high
school is that you have
to be more intense and
be mentally ready for
every game
As a freshman,
Denkler was one of the
first people off the
bench, and she moved
into a starting role her
sophomore year.
"Mary has gradually
improved each year in-
to one of the greatest
players in ECU
history said Coach
Andruzzi.
Denkler, who has a
career average of 15.0
points and 7.0 re-
bounds per game, has
been praised by coaches
across the country.
"Mary Denkler is one
of the finest offensive
players we've faced.
She is as creative as anv
forward in the country,
and is an absolute
scorer who will burn
you outside, inside or
off :he drive said
Georgia head basket-
ball coach A n d
Landers.
Notre Dame coach
Mary Distdanisalo
stated, "Mary Denkler
has made the most of
her talent. That's a
coach's dream. She's
tenacious, aggressive
and is the kind of
player who always goes
that extra mile
Denkler just recently
became the second
leading scorer in ECU
history, and now has
1,634 points; but she
said that wasn't one of
her goals at the beginn-
ing of the season. "My
goal is to do the best 1
can every time 1 play. 1
get as many rebounds
as 1 can, play tough
defense and just try to
have an all around
good game
"Mary Denkler is
one of the finest players
I've worked with said
Andruzzi. "She has graduate after the se-
great intensity on the cond semester of sum-
floor, and always puts
forth a tremendous ef-
fort
Denkler, who is call-
ed "Denk" by her
teammates and friends,
said she picked up that
nickname in high
school. "That's what
everyone used to call
my brothers, so when I
entered high school
people just started call-
ing me that. The name
carried over to college
and now everyone here
at ECU calls me
"Denk
Denkler, who is an
Urban Planning major,
carries a 3.0 grade
point average. She will
mer school, and she
hopes to enter graduate
school in the fall.
Denkler does not talk
about this year's season
with disappointment.
"We've had injuries to
a few key people, and
the freshmen have had
to come right in and be
expected to contribute.
We've played a very
tough schedule, and
have lost a couple of
close games we should
have won
When talking of
Mary Denkler, Coach
Andruzzi has nothing
but praise to offer.
"I've known Mary for
four years and 1 have a
great deal of respect for
her. She is a fine
student-athlete who has
set good goals for
herself. If each person
on the team would give
a little of what Mary
Denkler has con-
tributed to ECU. Pirate
basketball will go a
long way
?�




Mary Denkler
flj THE I OS
cv
V:
DIET
CENTER-
B.







�.






to
LIGHTNING J

attic
752 () 7303
TUE.
Will be available
at your favorite retailor
on March 10th











WELLS
SH
JOE
ALITY
E REPAIR
S l)
MIDI Kl l� UK
113 Grande Ave.
758 1228
WED.
LEFTY
!�����!
students
SI.00 udmissiiin
THUR.










We are looking forward
to serving you.

I Ki KCMMM UniTS �
GRADUATE
TO GOLD
AND
DIAMONDS!
With a Diamond College Ring
from ArtCarved.
Your ArtCarved Representative
s here now With the beautifully aflord-
able Designer Diamond Collection An
ArtCarved exclusive Exquisitely crafted designs, all set with genuine
diamonds, in 10K or 14K gold Or. choose the elegant diamond-substitute
Cubic Zirconia
Let your ArtCarved Representative show you this beautiful class ring
collection today Gold and diamonds its the only way to go1
Feb. 16,17, 18
I Wednesday-Thursday-
Friday 9-4
I OATE
IRK7IRVED
V. CLASS RINGS INC
Student Supply Store Lobby
TIME
Deposit Required MasterCard or Visa Accepted
PLACE
Nothing else feels like real gold







Taylor Beverage Co.
103 E. North Carolina St.
Goldsboro


















�����������������������������ft
How to make peace withTblstoy.
If the academic wars are Retting vou downT
with a rich and chocolatev cupot Suisse Wh, i? a " Tak a break
different flavors from fJrffFgSli mm � tlVe dehoousl
General Foods fe.2p fcrf w �
International Coffees.
GENERAL FOODS INTERNATIONM auttr,
AS MUCH A FEH INC AS'a FLAVORT S
rg'1fi3
�����- m KCP
Cld
PrrW

MEG
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w�

ttw i-rrr
I HI t hS ! M' ,1 IM AN
HMKI AKi
13
IX Is Herb GUcfcrisf Mt-v up the referei
b recent game against theamphdl arnrK
The Piratei are nm H-11 -nd will br ,i
templing an earlier 12-point loss auamsi ih�
I niersit of Richmond Wednesdu night �i
7:30 at Minge oliseum I he splfj�rN ar�
also 11-11 and 2-4 in the EX Nouthon
ference. making the matchup a ke game tr
both clubs. ome out and support Ih-
Piratev (Photo b (,H P A II 1 KsiiSi
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ajowiON
DEPEND ON
StSTViCES �
I � '
.��. � Free �
� � ��� - �
� CAj. ��� S5SC DA- "t N �
' . : - THE FLEMING
� � � CENTER
Classifieds
PKKM)NM
R ' - m a pp . . a
GREG
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m a� ' pood �
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ANN
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boy ma ice o
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my
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h t t Hot -���
Bum! � �� r � -
- y - Dnifi i rh
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I Party, �
ilti i
WAMKI)
KSELORS tor co vd sun mi
the n
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i�iry �nd tnv( 1 i E�
nee essa' � ti'
�q and 0' k i"q '
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Fo �pf) �' " '�
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F� - H 1
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nan nno 4
who hj
I A

Dr
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ay SIC
.
mm s
motr call L A D I B U G
LIMITED �or details JiS 2S4J o
�6 i)
SPRING BREAK PARTY In
c ludes n.qhts and 6 day s on Tru-
Sti.p ,n iuin� Ft Lauderdale
Fia various activities ith.n
walking distance including a Irec
eg 3a . a' lha Button Occupan
. a.a aDU a' three hotels ith
-4 in pnees Irom J'iSOO For
Iner into contact Beth or Lisa
a' 'i� �i '3 or 'S- 112
CHARTER BUS TO FORT
LAUDERDALE FLA Round
trip motor coach to Ft Lauderdair
V89 oc plus tai Contact Beth or
T Y Ping T pap Ihests
etc Call Kemp,)- Djbh s; e"J3
EXCELLENT TYPIST
- abii
171 after 4pm
AUDIO ElfcCTROMICS SER
VICE Complete aud
a'tcr spm Ma� '53 �
LOST AND
FOUND
ROOMMATE
WANTED
M ABL
h q A
gr am n
esp�r�
.1
f SPANOl '
iaDie in Spa
A' AQ con
not lul
' � afure
S A ' '
FOUND GOLD CHARM DKP ROOMMATE WANTED Kings
engraved on one side : . a: taj Row Apartments 2tedroom
tnqra-ed on opposite side In split utilities and rent Contact
� - Cashier s Ottice Jan ;si oitt

i
i

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i
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ikt:T
S15�� OFVANV
COMPLETE PAIR OF
EYE GLASSES
I Prr�nt c ouport tot di-Mir- Si i
�Mh other advertised p-i iasi
dlOPTICAL
BJLkIia
SOFT qg
comac rs
S . H ' �
PALACE

U I scros f-i am r'm lla;a N, �� - �
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sa at
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n Breali
MISC.
rVE B - N
- VlENl � � c �
SPRING B�t AK
m being taken tot
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ir.p b , Ian - Hi KfcGS F nights
accomodatton at Kings Inn
� � . 'h live
band a - Pi tceis
V - - " 'y c�( ept
- or details
p rn L iti tted spa
a '
S N G .A.rNTINE
t � � make n.s vo
truly
FOR SALE
��� CAMARO E�cellent condi
tion b;5 i38' alter � p m �3 S00
DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR
�6i Can Til :o0 Ask tor JAN
�� DATSUN �0 2 'ST' '322
FOR SALE Ladv s 10 speed
Ross 2! inch frame e cellent con
dition call '52 0141 after 5 OC
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE experience quality work
IBM Selectnc typewriter Can
Lame Shive � �� S301 or GAIL
JO Y NER 7S4 1042
IfSCO
CIO
1
WEDNESDAY $
SPECIAL

264 By PcSS,
Next Door to
iyoTa hast
1
FOUR (4) Tacos
J
Catch The Pirate Attack
Against
The University of Richmond
Wednesday Night at AAinges Coliseum
Gametime 7:30 p.m.
for just s1.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakbouse
TUESDAY SPECIAL
4 oz. Sirloin $2.49
with Salad Bar $3.49
�oKi�mncnaas�
yy- &
VXNVNXNN.NVXNX.NN.NiXNNNSVXVV NiXN
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
Chop Sirloin $2.79
with Salad Bar $3.79
TakeOutServ.ee 2903 E 10th St.
264 By Pass 7Se0040
HcHiri 11 00 m tOOOpm -�Ao� Thor�
10 00� m 11 OOP "i Fr. Sun
Cliffs cpeciols
a jM Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St extension
Tuesda, W ednesdav
& I hursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
4
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
123 E. 5th Str
Tuei. Pizia and Pasta $2.99
t�u can La -
mmm.i�����������i�m�mw�iiti�wWBn
Lodies Nit wet
Mike Edwards
Lodies Admitted FREE Free draft tor the Lodies
W�dSolod Bar Special 52.15 trl k c�r 9
Thursday Spaghetti Special $2.49 s romcwEc -
Coming Fridoy ond Soturdoy Ntght
Bruce Frye
,xoem check. oU our ne� MENU �
Watch For Our Daily Luncheon Specials
5
4





14 THE EAST CAROLON1AN FEBRUARY 15, 1983
516 9. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
c&&
��
Three Cheers for U.B.E.S BIGGEST Coupon Sale EVER!
Out tfam outf &Ut$t6entdMvH,f Save money, f
i r
-i r
Regular $10 95
Hooded Pullovers
$2.00
off with coupon
Expires 21983
Regular $6 95
Sweat Pants
$1.00
gf off with coupon
a
$!�
Expires 21983
i r
Regular $6 95 10 95
Crewnecks
$1.00
off with coupon
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Regular $11 95
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Regular $12 95-29 95
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I
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 15, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 15, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.249
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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