The East Carolinian, February 8, 1983






�lie �aHt (Eawlintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.3
Tuesday, February 8, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Gov. Hunt Speaks At Chancellor's Installation
By DARRYL BROWN
Dr. John M. Howell was official-
ly installed as ECU chancellor Fri-
day in a formal ceremony attended
by several state dignitaries including
Gov. James B Hunt and UNC
President William Friday. A 25-year
veteran of ECU, Howell was sworn
in as the university's eighth chief ex-
ecutive.
In his remarks to the crowd of
1600, Howell talked on the future of
higher education and hazards faced
by universities in general. He cited
"a crisis of conscience within the
society as to the worth of traditional
higher education" as a problem
which educators must work to over-
come.
"In the tight-money days we now
face, we must reaffirm the belief in
the value of a college education and
show that universities do provide
services to society that, in the long
run, are worth more than they
cost
Hunt praised Howell as a
"scholar and a gentleman � a man
who will make things happen. He is
dedicated to the advancement of the
mission and well-being of this
university and eastern North
Carolina
Hunt also said "East Carolina
University is planning for the new
century by forging a special rela-
tionship between the university and
this region He praised the work of
the ECU medical school in pro-
viding quality health care to the
region and said that the Schools of
Art and Music have made Greenville
a cultural center in the state.
Several other speakers, including
Friday and board of trustees chair-
man Ralph Kinsey. praised Howell
as a scholar, leader and ad-
ministrator.
The 90-minute service was attend-
ed by represenatives of N.C col-
leges and universities as well as the
faculty of ECU dressed in formal
graduation gowns.
In his speech outlining the future
of the university, Howell said pro-
jections for declining enrollments
until the early 1990s will cause short
term difficulties for all universities,
but that an increase in enrollment l
expected later in that decade.
'�Uncertainties regarding faculty
tenure, a sharp curtailment ot ev
pansions and stagnating influer:
could b expected in the near future.
Howel1 said, but "the latter period
may well be marked b increasing
enrollments with a potential for new
faculty positions and the need for
expanding structure and pro-
grams "
Howell said two differ
strategies would be needed to guide
the unuersitv into the future, but
that "the role of a chief executive
officer in either period is limited to
charting a general course and thus
he would offer no detailed plan at
See TROUBLE, Page 3
Technology In Education
Computers Influence Debated
e oath of off.ee. A crowd of 1600 was in Wright Auditorium to witness the ceremony for
Hunt was the kevnote speaker.
which Gov. James B.
Phi Kappa Phi Symposium Looks At
The Future From Various Viewpoints
Ar the request of Chancellor John
M Howell, this year's Phi Kappa
Phi symposium was, held in con-
junction with Howell's installation
as ECU's eighth chief executive of-
ficer.
The symposium, titled "Toward
the New Millennium: Challenges
and Dreams offered a series of
nine lectures in which each partici-
pant was asked to discuss some
aspect of the new century as it
related to his or her area of exper-
tise.
A symposium committee headed
b Dr. J. William Byrd, chairman
o! the Department o Physics,
selected the eight faculty papers for
the symposium, while a subcommit-
tee headed by Erwin Hester, pro-
tessor of English and Angelo Volpe
of academic affairs selected the stu-
dent paper
Byrd called the symposium "a
great success and noted that he was
very pleased by the way in which the
theme was developed by the writers.
"The theme was well received by
the writers as well as by the au-
dience Byrd sai I
Dr. William A. Bloodworth,
chairman of the Department of
English began the symposium with
his paper titled "Reflections on the
American Dream
"Historically Americans have
been dreamers Bloodworth
saidand the American Dream has
gotten us into trouble
Bloodworth noted that the
"assumption of national destiny"
and the emphasis Americans focus
on individual success were two of
the problems associated with the
American Dream.
The final lecture titled "The Solar
System of the Future: In our Image
and Likeness" was delivered by
Department of Physics Professor
Dr. Carl G. Adler. Adler prefaced
his lecture by telling his audience
that if the world did not quickly find
a was to stop the continuing nuclear
arms race that there may be no
future for us to discuss. He said we
must defeat the almost
undefeatable problem we face" if
we hoped to have a future.
During his lecture, Adler discuss-
ed several aspects of space coloniza-
tion. A colorful slide show dipicting
models of these colonies accom-
panied his lecture. Adler claimed
that such colonies could possibly
solve many of the earth's problems
such as overpopulation and deple-
tion of resources.
In between Bloodworth and Adler
presentations, were seven other
presentations, five of which were
delivered on Thursday and two
others on Friday morning.
"The Political Impact of a
Changing Ethnic and Racial
Balance in America's New Millen-
nium" was delivered by Dr. Thomas
F. Eamon of the political science
department.
"Conceptual and Normative
Aspects of Alternative Futures" was
presented by Dr. James LeRoy
Smith of the philosophy depart-
ment.
"Will the First Amendment be
Eroded?" by Dr. Gene D. I.anier of
the Department of Library Science.
"Living from Wholeness Instead of
from Reaction" was delivered by
Mrs. Linda L. Warner, of the
psychology department.
Dr. Hal J. Daniel closed out the
Thursday program with his paper
titled "Signs, Symbols, and Such:
The Future of Human Communica-
tion "
On Friday Vice Chancellor and
Dean of the School of Medicine Dr.
William E. Laupus opened the sym-
posium with his paper titled
"Health Care: 2003
The second paper presented on
l-riday titled "The Value of Cieneral
Studies in the Undergraduate Cur-
riculum" was delivered by
undergraduate English student Dar-
ryl K. Brown. Brown was the only-
student chosen to deliver a paper.
See NINTH, Page 6
By DARRYL BROWN
uteuat N�i F4iior
The role of computers in the educational process
of the next millenium turned out to be a recurring
topic in the speeches given at the installation of
Chancellor John M. Howell in Wright Auditorium
Friday. Addresses were supposed to be directed to
the theme, "Toward the New Millenium: Challanges
and Dreams
Howell took the most cautious view of the new
technologies, saying that they "were designed to be
handmaidens of our efforts, yet threaten to become
our masters
"The computer or any other machine is an ethical-
ly neutral device incapable of moral judgments
Howell said. He stressed that computers are pattern-
ed after the human brain but cannot perceive of such
crucial factors as artistic abilities, compassion,
understanding and altrusium.
SCiA vice president Bob Mills, filling in for presi-
dent Eric Henderson, commenced the greetingvto the
chancellor's installation by predicting the eventual
abolishment of the university as a physical institu-
tion.
Forseeing the next millenium as the "age of com-
puters Mills predicted a college education would be
acquired pnvatelv at home, using computers and
television. He expects computer languages to become
a fundamental part of the college curriculum and ex-
pects societv will use technolog to make lite more
convenient while still keeping that human element.
Caroline LeRoy Avers, chair ol the faculty senate,
predicted computers and media to facilitate new in-
novative instruction methods in the next century
Contrary to thinking computers will replace
classrooms. Avers said computers will help to change
the was knowledge is transmitted She stressed the
importance of faculty, communication with students
for assistance and inspiration as well as instruction,
but said computers would pla a part in future
classrooms.
Gov. James B Hunt made onU a general allusion
to the role of computers in the next century . stressing
change as a constant element in the tuture. "Change
will bring us new technologies and a host of other
problems and )os he said
T'me magainc rccenils selected the computer as
the "fnachifvf oi the c�r. Ma college: arc c
periencing a boom of computer terminals in use by
students. Some institutions are scrambling to
regulate computer use for school work, while some
others have required students to purchase a personal
terminal for use at college
SGA Appoints Judicial Board Members
Bv GREG RIDEOLT
Sr�� Mllnr
The SGA Legislature approved a
recommendation by the executive
PhOtO Bv CINDY WALL
Mike Swaim
council (SGA president, vice presi-
dent, secretary, treasurer, the four
class officers and the speaker of the
house) to instate 15 students as
members of ECU's honor and
review boards. The 24-19 vote came
after a lengthy debate over two
students who were not selected.
The two students, interim board
members Ken Hooper and John
Necci, were added to the board by
ammendment.
The debate started when student
Attorney General Mike Swaim was
allowed to speak and voiced his opi-
nion that politics were involved in
the choices. Swaim, who spoke in
defense of Hooper and Necci, ac-
cused the executive council, and
especially senior class president
David Cook, of overlooking
Hooper's and Necci's experience
because of their support of Eric
Henderson during the turmoil of
last year's SGA presidential elec-
tion.
Becky Talley, SGA secretary,
then spoke in support of the ex-
ecutive council's decision. She ex-
plained that all members of the ex-
ecutive council were contacted and
had plenty of opportunties to voice
their opinion on the honor and
review board selections. She claimed
that the "only politics involved is
what is going on tonight
Cook also defended his decision
by saying that he evaluated all
members objectively. He said both
Hooper and Necci's responses to his
questions during the executive coun-
cil interviews were not as good as
the other applicants.
The review and honor boards are
arms of ECU's judicial system.
Under the control of the attorney
general, they preside over and
decide cases of infraction against
the university's honor code.
The debate ended when Speaker
of the House Gary Williams in-
structed the legislators on the pro-
cess involved in the board selec-
tions. He told the members that they
should trust the opinion of the ex-
ecutive council because the council
had had a chance to interview the
applicants and the legislators had
not.
See FIFTEEN. Page 5
Photo Bv CINDY WALL
David Cook
City Gets New Water Treatment Facility
Clement Hall Leads In
Campus Energy Contest
Despite a savings ot 31.33 percent
on their projected energy needs last
week. Garret dorm only ranks third
in the overall standings after the
third week of the Student Residence
Association Energy Contest.
With a cumulative total of 13.78
percent savings, Cement dorm
leads the second annual contest as it
enters the fourth week. Scott dorm
with a 12.77 percent savings is se-
cond .
Clement is top among the West
Campus area dorms. Scott leads the
College Hill area and Slay, with a
savings of 11.76 (fourth place
overall), leads the Central Campus
area.
"I feel it's going fairly well at this
point said Mark Niewald, vice
president of the Student Residence
Association and chairman of the
SRA Energy Committee.
"The reason we have this contest
is to help conserve energy and to
help stop further increases in dorm
rent Niewald noted.
According to John T. Gardner,
assistant to the vice chancellor for
student life, utilities account for 28
percent of the overall housing
budget that students must pay for in
See DORMS, Page 6
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Suff Wnicr
The city of Greenville has been
scheduled for funding to build a
10.5 million-gallon per-day
wastewater treatment plant, Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr announced Fri-
day.
The governor's announcement
was welcomed by city water and
sewer officials who have been work-
ing on the proposal for almost 10
years. "My first response is one of
elation said Greenville's Water
and Sewer Department superinten-
dent Wadie Lewis. "I spent a lot of
hours along with our engineers
working on a long range plan. We
are delighted that we are on the
list
Lewis said that although the $7.8
million federal grant has been an-
nounced for approval, the city still
does not have a grant to offer. "But
we are scheduled for funding on a
priority list Lewis said.
According to ECU Biology pro-
fessor Dr. Graham Davis, the new
plant will give a better effluent
quality to the river. Davis is a licens-
ed wastewater treatment plant
operator. "The plant they have now
is about worn out Davis said.
"There should be a better quality of
water coming out of that plant
A wastewater treatment plant is
needed to limit the amounts of
organic material released into the
Tar River from domestic and in-
dustrial sewage waste. If excessive
quanities of organic waste were
released into the river, an oxidation
process would begin that could
eventually kill all life in the river.
The wastewater plant receives the
sewage and treats it in large tanks to
remove the organic material from it.
"The plant greatly reduces the
amount of organic material in the
sewage Davis said. "If you put
the sewage directly into the river it
will be used as food by the bacteria
and fungi in the river
Davis said the bacteria respiration
process eventually would remove all
the oxygen from the river water if
the sewage was left untreated. In-
stead, the process is done at the
wastewater plant before the final
release of the sewage into the river
Lewis said the initial plans for the
new facility were begun in May
1973. During the 10-year process.
Lewis' office had to complete a
facility plan which gives a piece by
piece overview of the entire pro-
posal. A plan, called a 201, is a pre-
requisite requirement for new plant
proposals.
lewis said that the new facility
would probably be ready for use in
about two vears.
On The Inside
Announcements
Just The Way It Is
Entertainment
Sports
Classifieds
2
4
7
10
12
Toda is Tuesday, the 39th day
of 1983. On this day in 2 million
B.C I g said to his wife, Og,
"Hey, let's go out to eat tonight





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 8, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or vour organization
would like to have an item printed
m the announcement column,
please type II on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian m care ot the produc
ton manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
otf.ce m the PuCiications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
coo sued paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements Du' space is otten
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
ana suggest thai you do not rely
solely on this column tor puDlidty
The deadline tor announcements
s 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paw and 3pm Wednesdayy for
the Thursday pape� No an
noin, ements received after 'hese
deadlnes will te pr.nted
Th,5 space is available to an
campus organizations and depart
menfs
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed tor Art Depart
ment se't help posit-ons are
available tor nude modeling at
IS 02 per hour Pcease see the
following teachers Rav Elmore
�un Goroiey Davy Davenpor'
VVesCrawiev Betsv Ross M.chaei
V oors
CAREER CHOICE
The 'ong CampDeii Interes'
i-iventory s ottered every Tues
dav a' PM n 305 Wr.gnt Annex
when school rs in session with the
exceptions of exam.nation period
ano regiS'ra'on day This is
a. a iaoie 'o a s'udents at no cost
No forma, 'eg.station .s required
LECTURE SLIDE
Lau'if Fenorich. panter
teacher lecturer will be at ECU
School lo Art on Tuesday night
February 8 at 8 PM, .n Jenkins
Audfor.um A workshop discus
- on ,s scheduled tor Wednesday
"0'i.ng February 9 a' 10 AM m
jenk.ns 1324 All interested per
sons 'nv'ed
SAB.
inere will be a mee' ng ot the
Stode Aflttel - Boa
Feb 6. '�83
Mendenhal!
' 3C Busness
neste Mef
jesoay
n Room 242 ot
udenl Center a'
v Ojr SprriQ
ersl . Drive
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
The Brothers ano dl Sisters ot
Sigma Phi Epsilon would like to
welcome the following pledges
Jay Bnggl Timothy Burgess, Ron
Carrea, Richard Cook. Sam Davis,
Scott Evans William Garns, Mike
Hoard. Randall James. Donald
Fail. Paul Flores. Michael Liddy,
John McCall. Scott Short, Wiliam
Smothers Brad Vaniee Greg
Wester Chuck Wingo. Mark Page
Be ready lor the most exciting
semester ever!
NEW STUDENT
ORIENTATION
PROGRAM
The Office ot the Associate Dean
ot Student Lite located in
Whichard Building Room 210, is
now taking applications tor the
New Stuoent Orientation Program
held m June and July Applicants
should nave a good scholastic
average and snouid not be plann
ing on attending Summer School
interviews of the applicants will
begin around the middle ot March
LECTURESLIDE
Laurie Fenorich painter
teacher lecturer wil be at ECU
School to Art on Tuesday n.ghf.
February 8 at 8 PM .n Jenkins
Auditorium A workshop discus
sion is scheduled for Wednesday
morn.ng, February 9 at 10 AM m
Jenkins 1326 All interested per
sons invited
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
The Greenville Peace Commit
tee meets every Friday night at
610 S Elm St GPC consists ot peo
pie actively engaged ill peace ana
,ust.ce work on a local, state and
naitonal level it you are in
terested in learning more abou'
the GPC please can 758 4906 or
come at 6 30 p m (Fridays) tor a
dinner meeting
PUT A LITTLE HEART
IN YOUR SOUL
The twelfth annual walk tor
humanity is coming up this spring
The walk will take place on April
16 beginning at Green Springs
Park Anyone interested m help
ng come to the Hunger Coalition
meetings on Thursday n.ghts at
' 00 p m at the Newman Center
953 East Tenth Street o' can
7S2 42'6
DAT
The Dental Aptitude Test will be
ottered at East Carolina Universi
ty on Saturday. April 16, 183 Ap
plication blanks are to be mailed
m time to be received by the Divi
Sion ot Educational
Measurements, American Dental
Association. 711 East Chicago
Ave , Chicago. Illinois 60011 by
March 21. I9S3 Applications may
be obtained from the ECU Testing
Center Speight Building, Room
105 Greenville. N C 27834
NTE
The National Teacher Exam.na
tions Core Battery will be ottered
at East Carolina university on
Saturday April 30 1993 Applica
tion blanks are to be completed
and mailed to the Educational
Testing Service. Box 966 R.
Princeton, NJ 08540. to arrive by
March 28 1983 Application blanks
are also available at the Testing
Center Speight Building, Room
105. East Carolina university
MCAT
The Medical College Admission
Test (MCAT) will be ottered at
bast Carolina University on Satur
day. April 9 1983 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the American College
Testing Program P O Box 414.
lowa City Iowa 52240, to arrive by
Marcri II 1983 Application blanks
are available at the Testing
Center Speight Building Room
105. East Carolina university
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOLARSHIPS
School of Businiess maiors in
CORSO
�� Monday February 14 a- 5 00
RSO ; mee' in me A lied
. " r, iding i1 "ei' ii s
. , correct ons ad Soc a
, � � ors a" Tended ma
A e,estc. s-udenfs are
�. me ano encouraged '0 come
ai
NASW
md4tt Fetoruar � a'
Roon '03 a" the B I 1
i ung You" attendance
-ea' . acc'f" a'pci " hanii
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
WORSHIP
A s'udeT s Epscopai service of
Hciy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday evening
Feb 6 in the chapel of St Paul s
Episcopa1 Church 406th Wes' 4th
St .one block form Garrett Dorm)
The service will be ar 5 30 P M
witr- ne Episcopal Chaplain me
Rev w-nam j Hadden Jr
e'ebrafing
COMMITTEES
Appica'icns are sf be.ng dc
cep'ed for students wishira to
serve or. university Committees
tor 1982 82 school year TwenS
three '23: students positions are
open Committees with vacancies
are Canvassing i. Soliciting on
CampuS'l1 international Stuoen
Affairs l Residence Lite 3
Status of Minorities i2) Status of
Women 31 Student Health Ser
v ces J' Calendar il Teaching
Effectiveness i2' Continuing
Educa'ion (I) Course Drop Ap
peais 11), Credits 11) Genera:
College D Teacher Educa'ion
I university Libraries I
University Curriculum 2 Ap
plications are available a' 'he
following locations Office ot 'he
Vice Chancellor tor Student Lite
204 Whicharo Menoenhan Stu
dent Center information Desk
SGA Ott'ce. Menoenhan Student
Center, Office of Intramural
Recreational Services Memorial
Gym and Residence Hall Direc
tors' Ottices Questions abou'
University committees and
memberships may be directed 'o
the Ott'ce ot the Vice Chancellor
tor Student Lie 751 6541!
teres'ed m insurance or in internal
auditing may apply tor scholar
ships to be awarded during this
semester
The Travelers Scholarship ot
$1 000 is available to an
undergraduate student enrolled
full time m the School of Business
Applicants may be m any business
curriculum Accounting, Decision
Sciences. Finance Management
Marketing - but must express on
the application form an interest m
nsurance as a possible career ob
iective Selection shall be made on
the basis of academic excellence.
citirensh.p ano need
The Raleigh Durham Chapter,
institute of internal Auditors
Scholarship o �3SC s available to a
full time undergraduate student m
'he Accounting Department ot the
School ot Business The recipient
must ha.t- a grade pent average
o' a' least 3 00 must have com
pie'eo a' least twelve semester
hours ot accounting courses anc
must nave expressed a strong m
terest in 'he internal auditing pro
fession Financial need anc
ci'izenship will also be considered
in selecting the recipient
Application forms may be
secured from the Financial Aid Ot
f.ce or one of the departmental of
l.ces m the School ot Business
Accounting R325 Decision
Sc ences R23B Finance R343
Management R 137 Marketing
R223 All completed forms must oe
returned to Ruth Jones R334!
Chairman ot School ot Business
Scholarship Committee by March
4 1983
SCUBA DIVING
Spring break, March � 12, dive
the Bahamas From Ft Lauder
dale. J540 00, includes meals, lodg
mg and diving aboo. d the 65' dive
boat. "The Bottom Time " There
are a limited number ot places
available and reservations are on
a first come basis For informs
tiona and registration, call or visit
Ray Scharf, Director ot Aquatics,
Minges Aquatic Center 757 6441
BAKE SALE
The History Honor Society will
sponsor a bake sale Wep , Feb �th
in BA 314 from 9am until 3 p m
Cakes, brownies, cookies and
other goodies will be available
Enioy a quick snack between
hump day classes Everyone
welcome!
PHIALPHATHETA
Phi Alplha Theta will present
Dr Mary Linoermann ot UNC
Wilmington with an informative
program entitled MEDICAL
NEMESIS IN HISTORICAL
PERSPECTIVE Dr Lindemann
will discuss eighteenth and nine
teenth century criticisms of pro
fessional medicine The program
will begin at 7 30 p m M Brewster
Bldg BB 104 Light refreshments
will be served following this
presentation The public is mv.ted
HISTORY MAJORS
Phi Alpha rhets, the interna
tional History Honor Society, is
now accepting applications tor
membership Participation in this
organization is an asset to all
students of History, especially
those planning to attend graduate
school Applications may be ob
ta.ned in the History Office BA 316
and will be accepted through
February 18 Our next meeting
will be February 15 at 2 00 p m m
the Richard C ToddRoom All in
terested persons are invited to at
tend For more information call
756 8495 at'er 9 00pm
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
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tuation mark and word space
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Return lo THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office b 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday publications.
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L


,�
�7�1
��.



.11�JL 1�1�i�i
INTER VARSITY
it you are interested in finding
out more about God s plan for your
life and m meeting new Christian
friends, come 10m us this Wed
mght at 6 30 m the Biology Bldg
102 Our gues' speaker will be our
staff worker Paul Leary We re
looking forward to an exciting
'�me ot praise and fellowship'
FRISBEE CLUB
Fnsbee Club meetings are held
on Monday n.ghts, 8 00 Rm 248
MSC Anyone interested in joining
the Club is urged to attend An
ultimate tournamen' is being plan
ned tor the spring the irates are in
training'
NCSL
Want to know what new laws
and regulations could shape your
tomorrow today Let NCSL the
North Carolina Sotudent
legislature help you find out'
They find out what new issues and
new laws are on 'he nor.on so you
candecidewha' you w an f NCSL s
membership drive ends soon, so
come by Monday n.ghts at 7 p m 'o
room 212 Menoenhan and fmd ou
wha' s new m your world with
NCSL'
PRCCLUB
PRC meeting Tuesday j" 00 m
the Auditorium Menoenhan
Cover dish supper and speaker
Ail PRC maiors are invited to a'
tend Please come
GRE
The Graduate Record Examma
tion win be ottered at Eas'
Carolina University or, Saturday.
April 23 1983 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service. Box
966 R, Princeston. NJ 08540 Ap
plications must oe postmarked no
later mar March 18. 1983 Applica
t.orrs may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center Room 105.
Speight Buiidmg
FLOWERS
Show your appreciation tor that
special girl or guy in your lite Will
be taking oroers for roses 1 14,
3S12, 6 $23 and 1245 Carna
tions 1 S2. 3 �5. 6S7, and 12 SI2
Will be selling at Student
Bookstore ano at all dorms Feb
3 9, Zeta Beta Tau
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Ar' is offering two
Gravely Foundation Scholarships
for undergraduate art students of
the lun.or and first semester
senior rank Each scholarship is in
the amount of V334 00 The Gravely
Foundation Scholarship is m the
School ot Art has been established
at East Carolina University
through an annual contribution to
the East Carolina University foun
dat'On, inc , by the Gravely Foun
dation of Rocky Mount, North
Carolina To qualify, a student
must nave a grade point average
ot 3 5 n art and an overall
average of 3 0 Slides ot five works
.name title, media, and sue)
must accompany the scholarship
application form Application
forms may be obtained from the
School of Art Office The deadline
tor an completed application
material is March 1 1983
BAPTIST STUOENT
UNION
H. tei'ow students' Would you
en,oy a chance to be YOU1 Wen
you can' Come idn the tun ancs
fellowship at the Baptist Studen'
ijn.cn There you can find home
cooked meals tor only SI 75 on
every Tuesday a' 5 30 pm You
may even tmo a good volleyball
game when the weather warms
up' On Thursday s at ' 30 pm. we
take a PAUSE to catch a Spiritual
Dream from our rushed week of
stuoent activities There are also
many other activities offered but
you n never know wha' we nave
until you come and ioin us
752 4646
RECRUITING
Representa' ves ot 'he North
Carolina State Highway Patrol
will be recruiting qualified to
d.viduais tor me position ot
Trooper on February
17 1983 in
the Lobby of Belk Building vAined
Health) from 9 00 a m until noon
The patrol is par�icuriy in
terested ,n recruiting women and
all woren students are encourag
ed to ilo�; by and see wha' s being
offered I belteve you w n be
pleasantly surprised abou' salary
and fringe benefits
ACT
The American College Testing
IACT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
April 16. 1983 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to
ACT Registration, P O Box 414.
lowa City, lowa 52240 Applica
tions must be postmarked no later
than February 18, 1983 Applica
tion may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center. Speight
Building, Room 105
ALPHAOMICRON PI
The Big Brothers of Alpha
Omicron Pi will meet Thursday.
February 10. at 4 30 pm All Big
Brothers are encouraged to attend
this meeting
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
The Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity
is having Little Sister Rush on
Tuesday ano Wednesday Fed 8
and 9 at 9 00 Rush will be held at
the Phi Tau house at 409 Elizabeth
St All ladies of East Carolina
Univ are tnvi'ed to attend
COMPUTERS
The East Carolina Microcom
pufer Users Group (ECUMUGl is
a campus and community
organization for people interested
in learning about and sharing
knowledge about microcom
pu'ers You do not need 'o own a
micro to belong ' Our next meeting
w II oe Wed February 9 7 30 pm
In the Multipurpose Room
Menoenhan Student Center
Topics ot discussion will be CP M.
pubnc domain software ano ques
tions for begnners
FANTASY
The S'uden' Residence Assoca
tion presents Fantasy A semi
formal dance will be at the Hon
day mn Hol'dome on February
26th from 9 1 There will be foun
lam drinks, buffets ano a cashbar
Music will be provided by the Elbo
room Tickets are on sale tor V5 00
a couple, an S R A card is re
quired They may be purchased
from any Vice President of a
residence hall or the S R A off.ee
,n the louoy of Greene Han from
2 4 Monday through Thursday
ECU CIRCLE K
Circle K will be nseetmg Tues
day at 7 00 in Mendenhall. room
221 Circle K is a club concerned
with helping others m our com
munify it you like helping others
and meeting new people come
visit one of our meetings
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
General College students should
contact their advisers the week
prior to February 21. I9t3 to ar
range tor preregistrafion
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
SORORITY
Any Greek Sorority or Fraterni
ty who haven't received a letter
and wishes to play m me Greek
Feud or would nke more intorma
tion call Alberta Robinson at
752 870 The game Greek Feud
will be based on the T v Family
Feud The purpose of the Greek
Feud will be to determine who is
the ultimate Greek on ECU s cam
pus. and to nave a lot of fun!
FEDERAL SUMMER
JOBS
The Coop office, in 313 Rawi
currently has a listing of federal
summer iobs Interested students
shou't visit the Co op office to app
iy
L.D.S. STUDENTS
LThe L D S Student Association
wants your support ano especially
your a'tendence at institute ciass
Please come and enioy Brother
Evenhu'S s inspiring lessons from
the Book of Mormon Another
Testament of Jesus Christ Bring
your fnends Class mee's
Thursdays from 6 30 8 p m m
Brewster room 203 B it you have
ani quesOns. teei tree to call
either Rick Sena L S S S A Pres
a' 752 1749 or Bill EvenhuiS. In
s'ltufe Coordinator at 7S6 1473
ELBO FLING
Unstead Res denee hail would
like to mvite all ECU students to a
socai at the Elbo Room on Feb
10. 1983 Admission is one II
dollar with Umsteeo SRA card
and two i2) dollars without The
price includes admission, beer
music, and lots of fun The party
begins af 7 00 and will continue un
til 9 30
IFC
There will be an IFC meeting to
day at 5 30 p m Ml Mendenhall
Student Center. Room 231 The Ex
ecutive Council will meet at 5 00'
SCUBA CLUB
The next meeting has
changed to Feb
Memorial Gym
more into call number 752 7384
been
14th at 5 30 m
rm 105 B For
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers of kappa Sigma
would like to congraduiate ano
welcome the new Little Sisters to
'0 our fraternity
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior our
ing change of maior week tor the
Spring Semester should report to
Minges Conseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday Fed 9 '983
tor a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre
requisite lor official admittance to
the physical education maior pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the tes' is available by
calling 757 6497
Any stuoent with a medical con
dition that would contramdica'e
participation in me testing pro
gram should contact Dr israe a'
757 4497 Examples would include
heart murmurs, congenial hear'
disease resp ra'ory disease or
Significant muscuioskeie'ai pro
blems it you nave ana significant
med.cal conditons please notify
Dr Israel even it you p�an to be
'es'ed
CARNATION SALE
Ums'eed Dorm wou'd � xe 'o an
nounce its tirs' annual vaien'me
Carnation Sale Tn s Carnaton
sa.e s open to an ECU students
Each cana' on cos' a mere S' 25
and a small charge of 25 .cents
tor delivery The carna'ions wm
be so'd in the lobby ot ums'eac
Derm pr.or to va'enne s Day
MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP
The Engish Depar'men' rr. -es
applications for �ve Russell M
Chnstman Memor a' Schoia'Sh.p
awarded annually 'o a un.or
Engnsh maior tor exceptional
acaoem.c achievement outs'an
ding pofer'a' in the field of
Engi-sn. and Significant .nvo've
men' n extracurricular act v � es
The amount of me award s S50C
Appi can's should compie'e NM
Studen' Scholars c r �r�
lavaiiabie from 're Sfuoe
Financial A.o Cftice �"a seno II
together with a brief letter
describing their academ c
achievements, extracurricular ac
fivities. and plans tor future study
or career goals to the Russell M
Chnstman Memor.ai Scholarship
Committee c o me Department of
English The deadline for applica
t.ons is March 4 1983 For furmer
information contact Erw-n Hester
101 Engnsh Depar'men' Annex
The fcast Carolinian
Pubnsheo every Tuesday a"d
Thursday during 'he acaoe (
year anc every Wednesday Our
ing he summer
The Eas' Carol.n.an is 'he o'
f.cai newspaper of Eas'
Carol na unvers 'y owned
opera'ed and pub' sned tor anc
b ne s'uoen's ot Eas' Carol na
Un versi'y
Subscription Rate 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m tne Old South
Building on the campus ot ECU
Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Seno address
"ages 'o The Eas' Caro n a-
Oio Sou'n Bund-ng ECU Green
. � NC 2734
Telephone '5' 4366 637 6309
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
Do you some' mes tee' a one
� e .x re me only pe-scv-
'ee's xe you 00' Wen you are no
a o-e Comf 0 B �s a" ne B�"
TlST STUDENT UNION an; ' "C
c'hers who a' ' mes ee xe you
do Good wen ba'ancec "ms a'e
on Tuesdays a 5 3C 'or S
PAUSE s on Thu-soars a- ' X '0
ret'ec or your week and your
place n "e wono 'ooay Can
?52 4�4� � you "y� any questions
B;c C � 3e .a �PuS HI 8 se-
AMBASSADORS
Congra'j a' cms 0" rO�' nduc
tion Ambassadors' Our nex'
mee' ng w��� oe on Wed Fee �"
at 5 0C - he MSC mull pu'ocse
room The ECU Today Progr�
a Ma A N gie- be
0 scussed P'ease axe p.a-s ��.
a"e- c:
GRADUATION
Graduation an-ncemen's are
a-a ab'e n trie S'uoen' Supply
S'ce Tney are SI tor a pack of 5
ana are .oca'eo at the Jewe'ry
counter
Rememoer ro pek up your cap
ano gown before leaving school
These xeepsake gowns are yours
to keep providing ma' me graoua
tion fee has been paid For those
receiving a Masters oegree the
tee pays tor the cap ano gown ou
there s an extra fee of S "5 or
�he nood
The Celebration Continues
Valentine's Day Cards
Creative excellence is an American uadit.on
Central Book and News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
756-7177
jfVj Presents
Concert
Night
AT THE ATTIC
BRICE STREET
Ladies Night
Ladies $1.91 til 10:30
CONCERT NIGHT
The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
H eds.jl adtes Sight-featuring Jne Poor Souls
from 7 .10-12:00 ladin tret till 7:00
Heavy, hot hor'duervts Poors open at 4:f0
Happy Hour 40-8:00pm
gAT THE ATTIC 50 Admissio
LADIES FREE THAT NIGHT
WITH HAPPY HOUR STAMP
Admission Free to
ALL ECU STUDENTS
���jjlfrf90�0��
1 W9ti� �& !
GREG LEE
TINA LEE
3002 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N. C. 27834
Telephone 757-3867
?
nun 1 The Breeze Band
Afford urry from 9:00-1:00 pm
Happy Hour 7.00-10:00 pm
$ off Admission with College IP
o Admission til 8:00oors oprn at Eg
" ri. I The Showman 9:W-i:00
Happy Hour 7:00-10:00pm Heavy, hot horsduervti
SI off 4dmission with College �
No Admission till 8:00pm Doors open at 00
Sat A Central Park 9:0o-i:00am
Happy Hour 7:00-9:00pm N() dmtsslon tilt 8:00pm
Sun.Valentines Party �" Band of Oz
"Jom 9:00-1:00am Happ Hour 00-9.00
Door Prizes Heavy, hot horsduervti
$ off with college ID So Admission rill 8:00pm
Coming Vied. teb. 16th North Tower
1104 N Memorial I't
cnrvs from t.reeniHe irpnrl
Closed Sundass except for special esents phone 5'JJO05 lor additional ttemtfea
Valentine's Special CO jl
Bring this ad in and receive g
$2.50 Off purchase of a doz. roses f
or carnations, or $1.50 off purchase
of Vidoz. roses or carnations
123E.5thStr
52-7483
Open Sun. Feb. 13 1-6:00
MonSat. 9-6:00
JL.JJJJiiifrrrjJJii��� ���
Tu�. - Pizza and Pasta $2.99 aiiyou can Eat 5-9
Lodies Nite with
Second Wind
(formerty singer with Sidewinder and Choice)
Ladies Admitted FREE Free droHf���
WedSolod Bar Special $2.15 all you can Eat 5-9 S
Thursday - Spaghetti Special $2.49 aiiyoucan Eat 5-9
Coming Friday and Saturday Night L
Lahnn and Lofton
Watch For Our Daily Luncheon Specials �
1TK0
present
DRAFT
NITE
Tues. Feb. 8,1983
8:30-1:00
Adm. $1.75 and 10C Draft
ALL NITE
Women
B MILLIE WHITE
�l'hough women arc
now enjoying more
freedom than ever
before, prejudice and
sterepev still exist in
a woman's world. To
help women overcome
the obstacles which
the must encounter
evervday, February
been sc
met Ai
Month" on
campus
LC I studenl
G a r e t a n d I
Templeton.
laboratior ft
ment I
Dire, I
John
ed a
Trouble A
Colleges, U
Come Early
( ontinued rrom Page 1
this time.
Conflict and :om-
petition among
in time-
public confidence,
financial support and
enrollme-
detrimental to h j
education in the state,
according to Howell.
He stressed u
among c t i t uen t
univer-r.ie in
Carolina and
Correction
In a story in
Thursday's edition
The East Cai
WZMB, the time of the
soul music pi
was inc
The time should have
been B p.m. to 10 r
on Saturday and Sun-
dav. Also, the ecu
name of a member of
the staff was missi
ed; u should have been
Jim Ensor
colle.
V '
sub
tie
rule-
-
Mi
�rv
w
Greenville's
Now Being
Most delivery pizzas
true quality and hav e
delivery costs in the pj
PIZZA INN has cham
all that!
We sell our de
pizzas at Men
No SurcharGe'l
g,ve FREE D
our large and
pizzas. TRY
CALL 758-6266 Greei
5 SALE GOOD THI
I FEBRUARY 14th.
J.D. DAWSi
I ote: Discounts are not app
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville. X. 27834
i 752-1600
Jewelers





THE FAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 8, 1983
Phone.
.enclosed
j�, � �.
�t��i'
Ml
t
i l
�pa Sigma
�ajors
A
I ht r asl.iroliman
� �
If c a
I � � . e i r I y
ottice
�ne oo South
.impui ot ECU
-
4j� 636? 63?
H NATION SAlE
TULMK.
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
' � 'e�- a one
A � . � .
US H rhe BAP
EMI . s. . s a; � "C3
. � h�c he vOu
. - m meats arc
� � 11 "5
saavs at 7 EX to
� v: your
� ' 'd. Cat'
luestions
� star
AMBASSADORS
� �-
arsrl t
� �
� ' � �-�. "
GRADUATION
emeriti are
lent �pc ,
� r a pack ot 5
itec it tue .�
- ��;���� . kup �x,r cac
town oe�ore eav rq scoo1
"�"�f eC.afce gcw�ns afe yours
' ����: .� . ting ��� me 3- -
H �- ra J Por ow
ALAMO
nt & Mghtclub
leuesf nightspot & eatery.
I he Pour souk
-
-
�� H ind

I � Tlin
- .r JliJ'riC
rai Park
00 pm
Hand of ()
-
orth 1 ilHrr
. � rmation
1TK0
present
DRAFT
NITE
Tues. Feb. 8,1983
8:30-1:00
Am. $1.75 and 10 Draft
ALL NITE
e Early
Women's Programs Offered
By MILLIE WHITE
mriri�
Although women are
now enjoying more
freedom than ever
before, prejudice and
stereotypes still exist in
a woman's world. To
help women overcome
the obstacles which
they must encounter
everyday, Februarv has
been selected as
"Women's Awareness
Month" on the ECU
campus.
ECU students Laurie
Garet and Lori
Templeton, in col-
laboration with Cle-
ment Hall Resident
Director Janet
Johnson, have arrang-
ed a series of programs
devoted exclusively to
women. These pro-
grams, which will run
throughout February,
cover a variety of topics
from dieting to rape.
According to Garet,
the programs were
designed to make
women more aware of
problems which they do
not normally think
Trouble Ahead For
Colleges, Universities
Continued From Page 1
this time.
Conflict and com-
petition among schools
in times of declining
public confidence,
financial support and
enrollment are
detrimental to higher
education in the state,
according to Howell.
He stressed unity
among constituent
universities in North
Carolina and coopera-
Correction
In a story in last
Thursday's edition of
The East Carolinian on
WZMB, the time of the
soul music program
was incorrectly stated.
The time should have
been 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
on Saturday and Sun-
day. Also, the correct
name of a member of
the staff as misspel
ed, it should have been
Jim Ensor.
tion among private
schools and community
colleges.
Another hazard for
higher education is
bureaucracy in which
' 'procedure is
substituted for
"substance Howell
said. He warned of
rules and resolutions
that are impractical or
cumbersome in real
lite, and of the in-
timidation of
technology such as
Be
Mine?
computers that cause
people to lose sight of
the machines' original
purpose � "to be
handmaidens to our ef-
forts according to
Howetl.
"The computer or
any other machine is an
ethically neutral
device Howell said.
"We should not lose
sight of the fact that
computers are an ex-
tension of the human
brain
Howell stressed that
the university is a
human structure that
can restore public con-
fidence and fulfill its
educational goals by
working together and
using intelligent plann-
ing.
"In harmony and
trust amongst
ourselves, we can con-
vey to society at large
our sense of commit-
ment to the needs of
future student genera-
tions, our immediate
region and the nation
as a whole, restoring a
sense of confidence
he said.
about.
Among the problems
which will be discussed
are rape and assault
prevention on Feb. 8.
Jolene Jernigan of the
Campus Health Service
will discuss women's
health concerns on Feb.
9. One of the topics she
will address is eating
disorders which plague
many women.
Garet urges students,
both women and men,
to attend the programs
and learn more about
women and their uni-
que problems.
�On Feb. 8, a make-
up and skin care
demonstration will be
held at 7 p.m. in the
Greene Hall lobby.
�Corporal Rhonda
Gurley of the Campus
Public Safety Depart-
ment will present a pro-
gram on rape and assult
prevention at 7 p.m. in
the White dorm lobby.
�Feb. 9, Jolene Jer-
nigan of the Campus
Health Service will pre-
sent a program on
women's health con-
cerns at 5 p.m. in the
Fletcher social room.
�Feb. 15, Lorna
Gilbert, a graduate stu-
dent, will launch a diet
program that will run
throughout the month
in Clement.(Tentatively
scheduled, look for fur-
ther details.)
�Feb. 16, Rebecca
Hales will discuss the
feelings and traumas of
rape victims at 7:30
p.m. in the Garrett lob-
by.
�Feb. 22, Dr. Ken
Wilson of the sociology
department will present
a film and discussion
on sexual harassment
as it pertains to women
in both the job and
academic settings at 7
p.m. in the Garrett Hall
lobby.
�-BESSES'
S15�� OFF ANY
COMPLETE PAIR OF
EYE GLASSES
Ptenl coupon tor discount Sol $ood
with oihn lv�-niMd �pe�. i�U
�XQM2f&
The
OPTICAL
�5
SOFT
CONTACTS
Is' H IA- MtM l UtANTCI
�HO Rl KIT
99
PALACE
703Gtevnttit :1U.1
(.arv M Hars 1 ii .��� 1 I I

� f f1" r'1 N�1 1 , I HA Kalt.
0i 9 10 a ii, la h d m M
EZ Tax Form Available
By GREG RIDEOL'T
Nr�t I dlini
Once again. Uncle
Sam is after ECU
students' green. But
this year Mr. Reagan
and the almighty IRS
god have blessed the
student taxpayer with
the 1040EZ tax form. A
student no longer has
to be a graduate stu-
dent in accounting to
fill out his tax forms
correctly.
To be eligible to use
the new, improved
form you must be
single, claim only one
personal exemption
and have no
dependents. The IRS
alsr says that all your
income must come
from wages, salaries,
tips and up to $400 in
interest income. Now,
for those students earn-
ing more than 550,000
and claiming tax credits
1 sorry! you must use
the standard 1040.
The 1983 edition of
tax forms (1040, 1040A
and 1040EZ) allows a
new 25 percent partial
deduction on a person's
first $100 given to
charity.
Eleven lines. That's
how many steps there
are in the 1040EZ. Like
the 1982 1040A, which
has twice as many lines,
the EZ is divided into
steps that guide the tax-
payer through the
form.
The average student
should be able to com-
plete his EZ form in
less than 15 minutes,
and that includes the
time it takes to seal the
envelope and find a
stamp.
Students wishing to
find out more informa-
tion, or students who
are having trouble com-
pleting the forms can
contact the IRS toll-
free at 1-800-424-1040.
The lines are open from
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Fri-
day. Good Luck.
PHI
KAPPA
TAU
Little
Sister Rush
Tuesday and Wednesday
FIS ST9
9:00-urnil
409 Elizabeth St.
Phone 752-4379
Copyright 1983
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Fefc 9
thru Sat Feb 12 1983
XYL
on
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be readiiv available for
sale m each Krogar Savon, except
as specifically noted in this ad it we
do run out of an item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable
item when available reflecting tre
same savings or a ramchacfc whicn
will entitle you to purcrvaae tne
advertised item at tne advertised
once within 30 days
ovftmt
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
VALENTINE'S DAY
GOFT GIEIMTEI
KROGER
Orange
Juice
,i
�?

12-Gai
Ctn
re
Block
gula
tabc
r 7
1 inM
I
FOR VALENTINE'S
DAY AND ALWAYS
10 OFF OUR
ALREADY LOW
CATALOG PRICE
ON ALL HEART
SHAPED JEWELRY
IN STOCK
J SALE GOOD THRU
j FEBRUARY 14th, 1983
J.D. DAWSON COMPANY
Mote: Discounts are not applied to previous sale merchandise
2818 E. 10th St. 102 E. MAIN St.
Greenville, N.C. 27834 Belhav, V.C. 27810
L 752-1600 943-2121
Jewelers- (Jemologists
Pepsi Cola jj
N.R- 1
pEpsi FREE OH
COST CUTTER
SANDWICH
Bread V
1v2-Lb
Loaf
KROGER
IN OIL OR WATER
CHUNK
PERSONALIZED
CHOCOLATE CHIP
Heart Shaped
Super Cookie
$99
� vs Ea
MMJJj
FRESH FROM
THE DELI
Gourmet
Turkey Breast
$099
Lb. AH
SAVE
S1
SAVE
39�
yj
HERSHEVS
Hot
Cocoa Mix
$-39
1-Lb. �
6v2-Oz.
Can
FLEECE
ASSORTED
wMmmmmmmmmA
'
Can
COST CUTTER
Corn Chips
$409
16-Oz 1
Box
Paper Towels
2 1
� Jumbo m
Jumbo
Rolls
CALl
k�
lave.
FORNIA
JEET
Oranges
SWEET
SALISBURY STEAK.
TURKEY OR
CHICKEN & DUMPLINGS
Kroger
Easy Dinners
113-
Size
Each
2.
Lb
Pkg
99
LIMIT 3 WITH $10 00 OR
none Annitmuti aior-uAcc

A






S1E iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fiei ding Miller, c;Wr���,��,
Mlkt" Hl'GHES, Managing Editor
Waverl Merritt, i Muni Cindy Pleasants, spo,t,Eduor
Scott Lineh ey, bw .� Greg Rideout, nm emmt
At i Afrashteh, (r i Steve Bachner, bmmimw
StephanieGroon. , .� , -ri-n- Juliana Fahrbach. ����
Ci ay Thornton. s . - Todd Evans, production m�w
Februar 8. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Birth Control
New Rule A Hasty Proposal
On the day before he resigned as
secretary of the U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services,
Richard Schweiker proposed the ad-
dition of new birth-control regula-
tions, commonly referred to as the
"snitch rule Stipulated in the
Schweiker proposal is a requirement
for all family planning advisors to
inform parents when teenagers
("minors" under 18) get birth con-
trol drugs or devices.
And although Margaret Heckler,
Schweiker's probable successor, re-
mains skeptical about it, the "snitch
rule" will go into effect 60 days (in
late March or early April) after be-
ing published in the Federal Register
� Schweiker's final act as secretary
was to re-pubiish the rule in the
Register � pending court interven-
tion.
The rule applies to
"unemancipated minors" under 18,
a term that lives up to the U.S.
bureaucracy's fine reputation for
vagueness. The legal definition of
"emancipated" may ary from
state to state, providing for further
complications if and when the new
rule takes effect.
But unfortunately, murky wor-
ding is probably the least of the new
regulation's problems. In fact, the
brunt of cause-and-effect dif-
ficulties lie in the future, the not-so-
distant future, when the regulation
is actually implemented.
Although it may, indeed, be jum-
ping the gun just a bit, it is, never-
theless, conceivable that the "snitch
rule" will bring nothing less than
tragedy.
Consider the 16- or 17-year-old
female living at home. All questions
of morality aside, let's say she is
sexually active (and statistics in-
dicate that many are). As it stands
now, her options include obtaining
birth-control drugs and devices, as
well as advice, from a family plann-
ing center � without the threat of
parental intervention. If and when
the new rule takes effect, however,
the impending trauma of parental
intervention becomes a decisional
factor, a major decisional factor.
Maybe it should be. After all,
parents do have a right to know
about the practices of their depen-
dent children, but the adverse ef-
fects of the rule seem, at least, to
outweigh its advantages.
Even today, without the regula-
tion, thousands of "unwanted"
children are born each year to
teenage mothers, who haven the
will nor the means to care for them.
And when faced with the prospect
of parents "finding out about
their sexual habits � a overwhelm-
ingly traumatic prospect for any
young person � a woman's
"options more often than not,
diminish.
Subsequently, she probably re-
mains sexually active, but now
without any means of protection.
The end result: a tragic increase in
the number of unwanted children in
the United States.
Granted, the above illustration
may assume a great deal. Never-
theless, its realization is not far off.
But it should be noted that the
new regulation is not just another
ignorant bureaucratic means of at-
tempting to legislate morality.
Parents do have a right to know.
Thus, the dilemma unfolds, bring-
ing but one conclusion about the
issue at hand.
The concerns of both parents and
teenagers must be considered more
fully � much more fully � before
such a rash and seemingly impulsive
regulation is permitted to take ef-
fect.
THIS MUST BE A WOP PLACE-ALLTHE TRUCKERS STOP HERE
in
Dismantling Nuclear Arms
Yuri's Plan Freezes West
By KEITH BRITTAIN
Soviet leader Yuri Andropov has made
an offer to reduce R-issia's number of
intermediate-range missiles aimed at
Western Europe. It is very apparent that
this is yet another attempt to freeze the
West into a dangerous disadvantage.
Russia currently enjoys a massive advan-
tage in intermediate missiles. Included in
their arsenal are 345 SS-20 missiles with
three warheads each. The SS-4 and SS-5
varieties number 291. The total: 636
intermediate-range missiles with 1.325
warheads. The United States has zero.
By 1979, the Carter administration had
become very alarmed at the growing
number of Soviet missiles. The rate of
deployment for the weapon was one per
week. To counter this growing threat to
Western Europe, it was decided that the
U.S. would deploy 572 Pershing II and
cruise missiles. These missiles are needed
to preserve democracy against a nuclear
onslaught by the communists. They will be
deployed in December, pending an arms
agreement with the Soviets.
However, at present, the U.S. is serious-
ly pursuing an arms limitation agreement.
With the threat of nuclear war so real, one
might ask why the Soviets aren't commited
to arms reduction. The answer, of course,
is the ever-burgeoning peace and activist
movements.
Russia is "banking" on the peace move-
ment's ability to delay the deployment of
American missiles. ia mid-January, Soviet
Minister Andrei Gromyko unleashed a
propaganda "blitzkreig" upon Western
Europe His aim was the social democrats
and "Greens" of western Europe. The
Greens have a long leftist history of listen-
ing to the Soviets with "reverence
The social democrats, under Hans-
Jochen Vogel, have also fallen prey to the
"tough-guy" rhetoric by Gromyko. Vogel
believes that the American missiles will
threaten peace, not realizing that they will
ensure it. The Christian democrats, under
Chancellor Helmut Kohl, are determined
to have the missiles deployed. They, like
Japan, have not given in to the Russian
threats.
The peace movements of West Ger-
many, Holland and the Netherlands are ac-
tively pursuing a unilateral disarmament of
allied forces. They are not in the least bit
disturbed at the powerful SS-20s aimed at
them. Their only concern is the American
weapons. This fact alone should illustrate
that the "peace" sought for by these ac-
tivists is a Soviet-dominated Europe.
Reagan's zero-option plan is a realistic
step in the right direction for peace. He
proposes that the U.S. cancel the deploy-
ment of American missiles in exchange for
the Soviets' dismantling of the SS-20s. Is
there any better solution to the problem
than eliminating the missiles entirely. I
think not.
To regain lost propaganda points, An-
dropov has proposed his latest "plan for
peace He has offered to cut the missiles
to the level of France ana Britain � 162.
On the surface, this might appear plausi-
ble, but look again. The net effect of this
plan � nil. The Soviets would still attain
the advantage. For one thing, the SS-20s
are mobile. The 100 missiles they have
trained on China could easily shift toward
Western Europe.
One has to remember also that France
and Britain are sovereign nations. The
U.S. does not control NATO missiles, only
its own. Thus, the net effect of the agree-
ment is that the Soviets would give up
nothing, while America gives up
everything. This precedent has been
established by every U.SSoviet agree-
ment. Is there any difference between
missile ratios of 6O0-to-zero and 300-to-
zcro? The Soviets would have us believe
so.
The Andropov offer was greeted with
thunderous applause from leftist and com-
munist sympathizers in Europe and the
U.S. These subversive groups are trying to
teach us that traditional American values
are archaic and no longer pliable. These
values are love of God, love of country and
a strong national defense. When the true
goals of these groups are brought out in
public, they point the ever poignant finger
and scream McCarthyite. Recognizing the
world-domination goal o communism is
pure and simple realism, not McCar-
thyism.
Vice President Bush is currently in
Europe reemphasizmg the American com-
mitment to peace and freedom. In the
absence of an agreement, the Pershing II
and cruise missiles will be deplored to en-
sure freedom, not threaten it. The peace
groups eloquently speak out for
"freedom" and the horrors of nuclear
war. Actually, though, their goal, which is
American disarmament, will bring about
nuclear war, not prevent it.
Washington's commitment to true
freedom includes insuring that Western
Europe and Central America are not tam-
ed into communist dictatorships. This in-
surance policy can only be kept by military
strength. Reagan and Bush are trying I
prevent Russia from turning Western
Europe into what it once was, a great
wasteland.
On Pain And Itch
Hemorrhoids: Inflation For The '80s
-Campus Forum-
Today's advice concerns an issue that's
really had our mailboxes swelling lately, an
issue that's fast becoming a real pain in the
rear � inflation.
At some time in our lives, we all pro-
bably suffer from inflation. And especially
older people � who, more often than not,
live on fixed incomes and can't afford the
rising cost of state-of-the-art medication
� are finding the 1980s more painful (and
subsequently, itchy) than ever. By now,
I'm sure you all know I'm not talking
about economic indicators. I am, of
course, talking about hemorrhoids.
1 . �1
Ah
MIKE HUGHES
Inflation For The 80s
or
Quelling The Swelling
The word "hemorrhoids" comes from
the Greek, haima � blood, and haimor-
rhois � "vein liable to bleed The origin
of the colloquial term "piles" for hemor-
rhoids is not clear but may stem from the
Uatin pila (a mass), referring to a mass or
cluster of veins.
Hemorrhoids come in two basic types:
internal and external. But to go into more
detail would be utterly disgusting and
would probably make us all want to vomit.
So, let's just say there are two kinds and
leave it at that.
But, you may ask, what causes dilation
and engorgement of the hemorrhoidal
veins to produce hemorrhoids? Well, there
are many theories about just what in the
world is behind hemorrhoids. They're pro-
bably not inherited, but man's upright
posture may have something to do with
their development, since they are not
found in four-legged animals. There is
evidence that some things can exaggerate
them, but, once again, it would be
disgusting to elaborate.
I'm sure we all know that hemoirhoid
sufferers are often the unfortunate butt of
bad jokes. They all too often bring up the
rear in our social stratification. They're at
the tail end of our respectability lists. And
opinions against them continue to grow
and swell. Needless to say, this is unfair,
and I personally don't think they should
stand for it. But that's just my opinion,
and it really doesn't matter much anyway,
does it?
But if you or someone you love suffers
from hemorrhoids, don't throw in the
towel. It's not the end. Well, it is, and then
again, it isn't. The problem is, indeed,
ever-growing; nonetheless, there's still
hope.
Contrary to popular belief, not all
hemorrhoid treatments require a lengthy
stay in the hospital, but, once again, to
elaborate on the various methods of out-
patient care would make us all sick. I
know; I've read about them.
However, I will take at least a small
amount of space to discuss a newer method
of dealing with inflation in the 80s �
elastic band ligation of internal hemor-
rhoids. This new treatment is practically
painless and can be carried out in the doc-
tor's office, while you wait, providing an
entertainment experience for kids of all
ages!
I hope my advice has at least helped to
quell the discomfort all you letter-writers
are feeling. Hopefully, at some point in the
near future, medical technology will allow
us to put hemorrhoids behind us.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a renown-
ed gospel singer from Enema Grove, N.C
is an authority on pains in the rear, having
worked at The East Carolinian for two
years.
The (Falling) House That Ron Built
1 was recently watching the news, and
out of all the pain and misery com-
municated by the news show, one remark
really made me stop in my tracks and take
notice. A church minister, one of many
who house hundreds of homeless people in
his church each night, was talking about
the ever-increasing number of people who
are losing their homes and are being forced
into the street. Hundreds of thousands of
these people are finding refuge in churches
at night all across the country, while
thousands of families are living in their
cars and tents at this very moment. The
minister said that the middle class of this
country are becoming the poor right before
our very eyes. This, of course, is not brand
new information or some sudden revela-
tion, but the way he put it and the reality
behind the statement made me wonder
about what got us into this mess that we
are sinking deeper into all the time.
I cannot pick up the newspaper or watch
a news show without being bombarded by
facts about the insensitivity, naivete and
sheer stupidity of some of the aspects of
our present government. It's not just the
president, but I refuse to believe that it is
simply built into the system. Every time so-
meone mentions the alarming rising
unemployment rate to Reagan, he cites the
distinct drop in interest rates since he took
office. When people blame him for a
budget deficit that is unfair and cannot
possibly be good for our collapsing
economy, he points to a reduced inflation
rate since Carter was president.
He has backed up the biggest tax cut in
history, which he agrees was aimed mainly
at the wealthy and big business (for
economic stimulation), with tax increases
aimed straight at the working class, such as
a "user fee" on gasoline and assorted ex-
cise taxes and fees on the trucking in-
dustry. He doesn't seem to realize that the
main "users" of our gas are truckers, who
transport virtually all of our food to the
stores, along with just about everything
else we buy. So not only are we hit at the
gas pumps, but then again at the stores,
where the increased expense of transpor-
ting consumer goods will be passed on to
us. Even if the present decline in OPEC
prices is enough to offset the gas tax, the
additional taxes and fees levied at the
trucking industry are enough to put many
of our independent truckers out of
business. I wrote this before the trucker
strike, but look at the violence and turmoil
the tax policy has already created, and it
doesn't even go into effect until next
month.
It seems that there is a mental block
created by our decision makers, and I get
the feeling that many of our government's
policies are not exactly being thought all
the way through. When Reagan talks of
our country's ill's and woes, he tends to
reduce everything to charts, graphs and
statistics. He has never acknowledged the
amount of human suffering involved with
every percentage increase in unemploy-
ment. For two years, he has claimed that
we are on the "upswing" of the graph and
that recovery is just around the corner. He
has claimed that his election is viewed as a
mandate from the people, but what he has
failed to realize is that the only reason he
was elected is that re-electing Carter would
have been a grave mistake.
What we need in this country is a little
less name-calling and scapegoating and a
lot more action, such as a closer scrutiniza-
tion of defense spending, a restructuring of
the over-generous tax cuts, elimination of
pork-barrel projects and taking a closer
look at our foreign aid policies, to name
but a few options. After all, how can we
justify providing billions of dollars to cure
the world's troubles when we cannot even
get our own economic house in order?
Mike Highsmith
School of Business
Freedom Fighters
At four million, they constitute the
largest refugee population in the world.
The occupying army, numbering at least
100,000, has brought death to no less than
half a million civilians. The invaders are
using a variety of tactics to terrorize the
population into submission, including
wholesale extermination of hundreds of
villages, the use of chemical weapons and
bombs disguised as toys. Yet the people are
carrying on a jihad (holy war) against the
invaders and are more than holding their
own.
The people are the Afghans. The in-
vaders, of course, are the Soviets. All the
little wars in Central America combined
are miniscule when compared to the moun-
tain of skulls accumulating in
Afghanistan.
Discussion in America on this war has
tapered off in the last year; however, it is
we who may be subject to the saem type of
holocaust sometime in the future if we fail
to learn more about it. And what better
way to learn about it than from first-hand,
personal accounts.
If you wish to do so, Wednesday night
will be your chance. Four mujahedin (holy
warriors) from Afghanistan will tell of
their experiences fighting the Soviets when
they speak at 7:30 p.m Feb. 9, in
Mendenhall 244. The talk will center on
the personal experiences of the freedom
fighters while battling the imperial Soviets
and the future of the struggle itself. All are
invited and encouraged to attend.
World War II taught us that what we as
Americans must do is learn the truth about
our enemies. These freedom fighters are
giving us that opportunity to learn. Don't
miss out on it.
Dennis Kilcoyne
Sophomore, POLS
Gree
Moore, tht
10-month old
mid afflict
i, rece
ma
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English

-
Fifteen
To Fill
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lotyvem
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� �
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 8. 1983
5TDPHERE
in
West
Soviets would give up
America gies up
- precedent has been
)j ecr I s Soviet agree-
ier� am difference between
600-to-zero and ?00-to-
d have u believe
p ffei was greeted with
�' ist and com-
path zers in Europe and the
gi ips are trying to
.nal American values
iger pliable. These
� (rod, ioe of country and
tiona; defense. V hen the true
- .ire brought out in
I the ever poignant finger
fci arth ite Recognizing the
communism is
pie realism, not McCar-
resident Bush is currently m
smphasizing the American com-
Jto peace and freedom. In the
If an agreement, the Pershing 11
ai be deplored to en-
l threaten it. The peace
�� . -peak out for
h rrors of nuclear
goal, which is
will bring about
meni to true
irinj ' V estern
al America are not turn-
al irships This in-
be kepi by military
and Bush are trying to
i fi m turning Western
fhat it once was, a great
'as a i
on Built
reedom Fighters
million. Tie. constitute the
igee population in the world.
,ing army, numbering at least
s brought death to no less than
lion civilians. The invaders are
nety of tactics to terrorize the
into submission, including
extermination of hundreds of
' ise of chemical weapons and
juiscd as toys. Yet the people are
n a jihad (holy war) against the
nd are more than holding their
ple are the Afghans. The in-
course, are the Soviets. All the
in Central America combined
u.e hen compared to the moun-
skulls accumulating in
ion in America on this war has
ft in the last year; however, it is
ay be subject to the saem type of
sometime in the future if we fail
lore about it. And what better
rn about it than from first-hand,
accounts.
Iwish to do so, Wednesday night
ur chance. Four mujahedin (holy
from Afghanistan will tell of
nences fighting the Soviets when
ik at JO p.m Feb. 9, in
la.Il 244. The talk will center on
)nal experiences of the freedom
mile battling the imperial Soviets
iture of the struggle itself. All are
id encouraged to attend
War II taught us that what we as
is must do is learn the truth about
ues. These freedom fighters are
mat opportunity to learn. Don't
on it.
Dennis Kilcoyne
Sophomore, POLS
Greenville Child Receives Life-Saving Operation
Douglas Moore, the
10-month old Green-
ville child afflicted with
leukemia, received a
bone marrow
transplant from his
22-month old sister
Latasha in an operation
last Tuesday morning.
On Wednesday even-
ing, Latasha was releas-
ed from the hospital
and Douglas was doing
well. He is listed in
stable condition. Ac-
cording to Dr. Sam
Gross, the attending
physician, "It is much
to early to tell" if the
rare operation has been
a success. The infant
must be watched close-
ly for six weeks to be
sure that infection does
not set in.
Gross is chief of
pediatrics oncology at
the Shands Teaching
English Major Wins Scholarship
East Carolinian
Assistant News Editor
Darryl Brown has been
awarded a Gravely
Foundation scholarship
tor having the highest
grade point average in
the undergraduate divi-
sion of the Department
ol Fnghsh.
Brown. 21, received
the news of his selec-
tion for the award after
he delivered a paper to
the annual Phi Kappa
Phi svmposium Friday.
11 e r Brown
delivered his paper titl-
ed 'The Value of
General Studies in the
I ndergraduate Cur-
riculum Dr. William
Bloodworth, chair-
man of the Department
of English, made an an-
no un cement that
Brown had won the
scholarship. Brown
also received a $100
cash award because his
paper was selected for
presentation in the
symposium.
Brown's paper
outlined his belief that
undergraduate educa-
tion is becoming too
focused on occupa-
tional training rather
than a general, basic
education in fun-
damental areas of
knowledge.
"The college educa-
tion should be more
than job training
Brown said. "It is and
should be a more com-
plete, well-rounded,
enlightening education
that developes more
than the student's oc-
cupational skills
Brown pointed out
that because of increas-
ed specialization,
students were limiting
their areas of
knowledge, especially
in ' 'common
humanities and basic
arts and sciences
Brown tailored his
paper to the sym-
posium theme
"Toward the New
Millenium: Challenges
and Dreams
Chairman of the
Fifteen Students Selected
To Fill Board Vacancies
Continued l-rom Page 1
The 24-19 vote over-
rode the council's deci-
sion and placed Hooper
and Necci on the
Review Board. There
were five open spots on
the Review Board.
Other members of the
board are James L amb,
Mike Roger and Daniel
Prevatte. Students ap-
proved for the Honor
Board are Donna Man-
sour, Mike West, Jerry
Bruner, James Pearce,
Ken Adams, Robert
Shook, Dwayne
Black man, Greg
Drake, Joseph Robin-
son and Steve Sherbin.
The SGA also ap-
proved the appropria-
tion of $500 dollars to
the ECU Poetry Forum
by overriding a veto by
president Eric Hender-
son.
Department of
Psychology Dr. Rosina
Lao, noted that Brown
is a member of the
Sigma Tau Delta
English Honor Society,
a member of the ECU
Honors Program and
winner of the 1982 Paul
Farr Memorial Essay
Contest in her in-
troductory remarks
before Brown's speech.
"In a time when
many students think
about college only as a
form of training for
specific jobs, I am
pleased and surprised
to see how clearly and
throughly Mr. Brown
understands the
benefits of general
education Blood-
worth said. "I am con-
vinced that students do
themselves a disservice
when they see college
only as training. By do-
ing so they limit
themselves.
"Darryl spoke of
college as a time of in-
tellectual exploration,
of preparing oneself
not so much for a
career but for a life
Brown was "right on
track" in his analysis.
Hospital which is af-
filiated with University
of Florida Medical
Center in Gainsville.
Shands is one of only a
handful of U.S.
facilities that conducts
the bone-marrow
operation.
The case of the
Moore infant came to
light when ECU
Catholic chaplain
Father Girard Sherba
appealed to ECU
students to make dona-
tions to help defray the
medical expenses of the
Moore family. The
family could not afford
Advertising Salesperson
Needed
Apply in person
at the
East Carolinian advertising dept.
on Wed. Feb. 9
from 10:00am-12:00 noon
or
call 757-6366
V
COFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
To sign up
Come by Rm. 234
Mendenhall
Fri. & Sat.
Feb. 11 &12
the high cost of the
operation.
5 Sherba called the
response to his emo-
tional appeal
"overwhelming" as
over $400 flowed into
the fund in less than
one week of collecting.
The ECU students who
heard Sherba's appeal
during a Sunday wor-
ship service responded
with over $350 in dona-
tions.
Initally doctors con-
sidered the case of
Douglas Moore to be
nearly "hopeless" giv-
ing the child less than a
20 percent chance for
survival. It was only
after tests were con-
ducted on his older
sister, which showed
her to have the same
blood type as her
brother, that doctors
began to have hope.
According to Hunt,
the greatest danger in a
bone marrow
transplant operation is
infection.
Before the operation,
the younger Moore in-
fant went through
radiation and
chemotherapy treat-
ment to kill the
cancerous blood cells in
his bone marrow. This
process, known as im-
munosuppressed,
essentially destroys the
bodies immunity
capabilities, which in
turn heavily increases
the chances for infec-
tion.
The Moore infant
will be housed in a
completely isolated
sanitary ward. Anyone
working with the child
must wear gowns and
gloves at all times. The
gloves and gowns are to
prevent the child from
getting an infection. He
is more susceptible now
that his immunity is
low.
The parents of the
Moore child are at pre-
sent living free of
charge at the Ronald
McDonald House in
Gainsville. Mrs. Moore
said she was grateful
and surprised at the
response of the people
in Greenville to her
family's needs. "I'm
still so surprised
Mrs. Moore said. "It's
nice to know there's
still people like that left
in our world
z
I
They are here!
They are going fast!
j Get yours before they are all gone
i
MEN OF ECU
Calendars
i
i
On Sale now for $3.00 at the i
Buccaneer Office
10:00-3:00
Monday-Thursday
call 757-6501 for more info.
I
!
i
I
How to be a romantic
and kiss nextyear's tuition
good-bye.
(Utkiai rvnry form
State
Zip,
aV �!
GeincraI Foods
JWIWggWilB
CAFE AMAHETID
MAN STYLEJttSJANT COf FEE BEVERAO
ROMAN STYL
NC tV-AlC OMOtlCy
GRAND PRIZE: One student will
win a free full-year's tuition. SECOND
PRIZE: On each college campus, one winnef
will receive $50 towards a romantic dinner for two. SPECIAL BONUS:
On Valentines Day, the first 100 students who bring their entry forms
to their campus bookstore will receive a red "silk" rose.
OFFICIAL RULES 1. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY To enter com
paste ana depoar! the Omael Entry Form in tw Cat Amaretta entry
boa at your partiopaftng cortege bookstore
I Alternate �� ot entry � you do not easr lo or cannot vtvt
'006 inaddaton pnnt Die tutt name ol you coaegt on the loarar-
left-hand comer of your nvang envelop voi, may also enter by
randPrinhng your name and compwej address and the aaxds
GATE AMaWeTTO- on a r � S pane ot paper
i Enter aa often as you me but aet entry must be sent by ��-st
Ma�maaom entry oeren�e�opecydepcwted�prarey No
rrMcnancaf reproduce! entnea At entries must be deposited by
March frX and mae entries received oyMarch 3t t3 to be
eagMe Own � be Held on Aprs is tSM
iTheGrand FVlje a on yew s coaeg turtron to- o"t person The
Grant) Prvte earner ar be selected n a random drevnng from m
�MM receded prior to the deedfcne by Warden Kane tnc an avte
pander a: tudnetn oroanuahon whose daemons are ��J Pruepey
mSStwZSSi StK, �w snn. dvectty o the coaor
uwewaai al vihch ha ar�i a rsyssenyd Payment aal be -rodepor
subeeaaion and �erca��m o documents ���"�� ��'�� �
njwf solaiii ai m- it �r�- immjam�t-nn payment
tnawevent the een-
�rssa coaaaa sersor
and does not asset to
�nro m a graduate
the current year � be -nmrMseti 'ases � any ant soar nnoonai
berty ot �flnner No tranaJer eicnange or sueaaauaon of prte Grand
Prue asajasl w be norrhed by ma an7 �ns be "eowed lo sign an
AfUdavt cv fcngoaty and MaaasfJ Odns ot aaaaaaj the Grand Pnre
depend upon the number ot entries eceived
S From earn oarhc�ahnq coaaqe on warmer ot a ISC 00 grft certit
case tor a snnei tor Nvo ens be ssstvtart -n a random aseaatttj Odds
ot earesng depend upon me aaaaaaS ol entrars i named at each
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 8, 1983
Ninth Symposium Examines Future
Continued From Page 1
Adler claimed that such
colonies could possibly
solve many of the ear-
th's problems such as
overpopulation and
depletion of resources.
In between Blood-
worth and Adler
presentations, were
seven other presenta-
tions, five of which
were delivered on
Thursday and two
others on Friday morn-
ing.
"The Political Im-
Dorms Win
Prize Money
Continued From Page 1
their dorm fees.
"We saved $9000
through the energy con-
test last year, and I
hope we can do at least
as well this year
Gardner said. He is ac-
ting as advisor to the
SRA energy committee.
"All of the money for
utilities comes right out
of the dorm rent
Gardner continued.
"Increases in utility
costs brings about in-
creases in dorm rent
"The energy com-
mittee has done a
tremendous job said
Associate Dean and
Director of Residence
Life Carolyn A.
Fulghum. "I think it
(the contest) does en-
courage students to
work in a group for a
common goal. This can
hold down their room
rent as well
Fulghum, who is also
an advisor to the SRA
energy committee, add-
ed that all students
have a moral respon-
sibility to conserve
energy.
Fulghum praised the
committee members for
working together and
sharing energy-saving
ideas with each other.
"The energy officers
in each dorm play a
very important role in
the effectiveness of the
contest added
Niewald, who heads the
16-member committee.
"They've all done an
excellent job
pact of a Changing
Ethnic and Racial
Balance in America's
New Millennium" was
delivered by Dr.
Thomas F. Eamon of
the political science
department.
"Conceptual and
Normative Aspects of
Alternative Futures"
was presented by Dr.
James LeRoy Smith of
the philosophy depart-
ment.
"Will the First
Amendment be Erod-
ed?" by Dr. Gene D.
Lanier of the Depart-
ment of Library
Science. "Living from
Wholeness Instead of
from Reaction" was
delivered by Mrs. Lin-
da L. Warner, of the
psychology depart-
ment.
Dr. Hal J. Daniel
closed out the Thurs-
day program with his
paper titled "Signs,
Symbols, and Such:
The Future of Human
Communication
On Friday Vice
Chancellor and Dean
of the School of
Medicine Dr. William
E. Laupus opened the
symposium with his
paper titled "Health
Care: 2003
The second paper
presented on Friday
titled "The Value of
General Studies in the
Undergraduate Cur-
riculum" was delivered
by undergraduate
English student Darryl
K. Brown. Brown was
the only student chosen
to deliver a paper.
Byrd said he was
pleased with the wide
variety of contempla-
tions of the future that
were chosen by the
writers. "We didn't in-
tend to place any
restrictions (on writers)
and we got a nice varie-
ty of responses Byrd
added.
Byrd said that an
overriding concern for
people and the quality
of life available to them
in the next millennium
were evident in the nine
papers delivered.
"There was a concern
for the ideals we might
prescribe to; there was
a concern for their
lifestyles in terms of
quality of living and a
concern for norms for
which we would stan-
dardize our behavior
Byrd added. "There
was concern that we are
really moving along,
that we are developing
a super-high tech socie-
ty in which to live
Byrd said, adding that
he personality did not
lament that. "On the
other hand, we do not
wish to sacrifice the
chief benefits of being
educated persons by
losing the qualities of a
liberal education that
allow us to bring
together the best
elements of our past
with the promises of
the future
Byrd, admitting that
there was a basis for the
less-than optimistic
views expressed by
some concerning the
nuclear arms race,
noted that people need-
ed to be as positive as
they can in light of this
great threat.
"I suppose that all of
us feel a great deal of
threat from having
around us the possibili-
ty of our own annilila-
tion Byrd said. "But,
I personally have high
hopes that the political
elements on our earth
will summon the
wisdom to pull up short
of any situation from
which we can't retreat.
Fla. Climate No. 1
For Business, Jobs
(UPI) � A national-
ly recognized accoun-
ting firm has ranked
the business climate in
Florida as the best in
the nation for the se-
cond consecutive year,
Lt. Gov. Wayne Mix-
son said Monday.
Florida finished
above the national
average on 20 of the 22
factors used by Alex-
ander Grant Co. to
compile the ranking
and widened its lead
over second-place
Texas from the
previous year's list.
North Carolina rank-
ed third. South
Carolina fifth and
Georgia sixth.
Florida ranked first
nationally on factors
controlled or influenc-
ed by state or local
government and was se-
cond nationally on fac-
tors not controlled by
government.
Gov. Bob Graham
made a simultaneous
announcement in New
York, saying the new
ranking "recognizes
the achievements of
Florida's economic
development program
and adds to our
economic momen-
tum
Mixson, who doubles
as secretary of the
Commerce Depart-
ment, said the survey
results were significant
but that the most
serious challenge was
still ahead.
"The real task is to
translate this recogni-
tion into the creation of
more jobs and better
incomes for our
citizens he said.
Despite the state's
top ranking last year,
new industry and plant
expansions were down
in 1982 as a result of
the deepening national
recession.
The ranking was bas-
ed on 1981 data and in-
cluded such broad
categories as state and
local government fiscal
policies, state regulated
employment costs,
labor costs and
availability and pro-
ductivity of labor
force.
The survey did not
consider such intangi-
ble factors as "quality
of life
Mixson said that
despite Florida's pro-
blems with transporta-
tion and crime,
"quality of life" re-
mained the single most
important factor in at-
tracting new industry to
the state and would
have enhanced the
state's top ranking.
The nine-state
southeastern region
was rated as having the
best business climate
among the eight regions
used in the Alexander
Grant survey. Five of
the top 10 states in the
list are in the southeast.
Florida's high na-
tional ranking in in-
o�.i �. J-J�i
dividual categories in-
cluded:
�The third lowest
unemployment com-
pensation benefits paid
at an average $41 per
covered worker per
year.
�The fourth lowest
proportion of non-
agricultural workers
who were members of
unions or labor associa-
tions at 11.8 percent.
�The fourth smallest
expenditure on en-
vironmental control at
. 15 percent of the total
state expenditures.
� The fifth lowest
amount of non-
agricultural work time
lost due to work stop-
pages over a two-year
period.
Florida ranked below
the national average
only in its average
workers' compensation
insurance rate and in
the cost of energy.
In other economic
news, the Chicago Title
Insurance Co. said
Monday that new home
construction slowed
dramatically in Florida
last year but remained
well above the national
average.
The statewide ratio
of new construction per
100 existing households
fell from 3.63 in 1981
to 2.38 last year. The
national ratio was only
1.33.
Hunt Allows Helicopters
To Fight Strike Violence
RALEIGH (UPI) �
The strike by indepen-
dent truckers entered
its second week Mon-
day with truckers still
on the road facing a
continued threat of
violence in North
Carolina.
National Guard
helicopters, grounded
during the weekend as a
storm dropped storm
over much of the state,
resumed patrolling in-
terstate highways and
major trucking routes
Monday morning. Use
of the helicopters was
authorized late last
week by Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr.
Mr. Russ Ed-
monston, spokesman
for the state Depart-
ment of Crime Control
and Public Safety, said
reports of shootings
and other incidents of
violence against trucks
continued to come into
his office.
A mail truck was
fired on in Moore
County about 1:15
a.m. Monday but there
were no injuries.
In Goldsboro Sun-
day night, two men in a
car with a flashing blue
light stopped a truck.
They then threatened
the driver of the truck
with a shotgun and
knocked out the truck's
headlights.
It was the second in-
cident since the strike
began that a trucker
had stopped for a blue
light only to be
threatened.
Statesville police said
they were looking for a
sniper who shot at a
truck shortly before
noon Sunday. No one
was injured but a bullet
struck one of the
truck's tire rims.
Two rear tires of a
truck were shot at 11
p.m. Sunday in Nash
County. At 8:45 p.m.
Sunday, a bottle broke
the windshield of a
truck in Nash County.
Law enforcement
authorities in some
counties said they were
using citizen band
radioes to monitor con-
versations between
truckers.
"We're hoping that
if there is an incident,
the truckers will use
their CBs to call us,
rather than radio
another trucker to
place a call or stop and
find a phone said
Capt. D.F. Waller of
the Wake County
Sheriffs Department.
"That should help our
response time
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needed especial!) in SwimmingfWSI). Horseback
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- Morgan Haynes P.O. Box 400c. Tryon, N.C.
2782.
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THi
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has him h
made in m
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Bea
By JOHN RtH
NEW YORK
Use most the most
in the histon ol rod
ccssful. the moa
craiized and. a I
the mo
The band hKt
all through the
i I � i
reunite No na
wc
ec ' d npf)
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are pti I '
Bea a -
have �
distiru h -
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cars ia
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Beatle
A
Mov
aM
HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood this v-
rang out 1982 � a
the box office but
the moguls hap
�as opening ith i
temporarily in the
Christmas sav
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Crazy and H�5, bj
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The prospects tc
cheering "We're 1
says entertainment j
timing of the pro,
better. Coming of)
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By summer, thej
continuing exploit-
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Sean Connery u
Travolta, back in
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will be the megahit
the S�or Wars sagi
Still, Hollyw
handful of blockbi
industry. "If you l
Jack Valenu, presi
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1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 8. 1983
Page
Hoffman Does
Double Take
In 'Tootsie'
Harrison Ford Stars In Futuristic Earth Thriller 'Blade Runner'
Superstar Harrison Kord stars as a 21st century gumshoe detective in
Blade Runner, a futuristic thriller that takes place on earth. The film
has him hot on the trail of dangerous "replicants" (slave robots
made in man's image) that have gone berserk and escaped to Karth
seeking life-sustaining information. Blade Runner is this week's Free
Flick and will be shown on triday and Saturday night at 5, 7:15 and
9:30 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre. Admis-
sion is by ID and activity card for students and MSC membership for
faculty and staff. The film is sponsored by the ECU Student Union
Films Committee.
Beatles File Still Impressive
By JOHN ROCKWELL
Nr� � or r i�w. Sr�i s�r� r�
NEW YORK � The Beatles were
liK most, the most influential group
in the history of rock, the most suc-
cessful, the most idolized, the most
idealized and, almost without ques-
tion, the most talented.
The band broke up in 1970, but
all through the past decade, people
nurtured the hope they would
reunite. No matter that any reunion
would have been almost preordain-
ed to disappoint; the hope remain-
ed- L .
But now, with John Lennon s
murder in late 1980, all those hopes
are past. The three remaining solo
Beatles will continue to pursue their
varied careers. But "the Beatles"
have been frozen into the past, a
distinct historical entity that started
in 1962 and ended for good, eight
years later.
Even before Lennon's death, the
Beatles nostalgia and memorabilia
industry was in full swing. There
were Beatles books, Beatles
songbooks, Beatles bootleg and live
and greatest-hits albums, Beatles
collectors, Beatles conventions,
Beatles Broadway shows, Beatles
discographies and bibliographies,
even a Beatles concordance.
With Lennon's demise, the in-
dustry escalated into 24-hour shifts.
In recent months we have seen a
flood of Beatle-abilia, including
several more handsome books and
still further record recyclings as well
as videos and contests.
Earlier this month, to celebrate
the 20th anniversary of the first
Beatles British single, "Love Me
Do released Oct. 5, 1962, Capitol
issued an LP of the 20 top-selling
Beatles songs.
But all of these pale before a
massive, 14-disc, ominous-looking
black box that has just been releas-
ed in a limited, 5.000-copy edition
for the holiday season. It is called.
portentously, "The Beatles: The
Collection" issued by Original
Master Recordings (no catalog
number) and carrjb a suggested list
price of $325.
All you need is cash, and for the
Beatles fan who has, or wants,
everything, the price may well be
worth it.
What we have here are the basic
British Beatles albums � what
might now be called the canonical
collection � in audiophile super-
fidelity, cut with the half-speed pro-
cess direct from EMI's master
tapes.
A sequential listening to these
recordings, in their pristine sound,
does not significantly alter one's
memory of what the Beatles achiev-
ed; it only reinforces one's admira-
tion for that achievement.
Yes, George Harrison's songs are
often banal, Ringo Starr was not a
virtuoso drummer, Paul McCartney
had (and has) his sentimental side.
and Lennon could lapse into self-
indulgent ranting.
But all that pales beside the seem-
ingly endless flow of memfltrable
scmgs. Tire evolutfbh " overnhese
eight years and 145 discs is
remarkable, from vital yet simple
early-60s rockers to affecting
ballads, stirring anthems, bold ex-
See BEATLEMANIA. Page 9
By MICHAEL SRAGOW
Rolut Mow
When Dustin Hoffman accepted
a Best Actor award from the L.A.
Film Critics Association for Kramer
vs. Kramer, he confessed that he
felt the best male performance of
1979 was Michel Serrault's as the
flamboyant drag queen in La Cage
aux tolles. In Tootsie (now playing
at Greenville's Buccaneer Theatre),
Hoffman's first film since then,
he's taken a tip from Serrault: he
plays a talented but struggling ac-
tor, Michael Dorsey, who poses as a
woman to win a lucrative role in a
daytime TV soap opera. He gives
two terrific performances.
Tootsie is a tribute to the power
that acting � taking on new roles
� can have in changing people's
lives. For when Michael Dorsey
creates an actressalter ego named
Dorothy Michaels, two things hap-
pen: Dorothy Michaels becomes an
inspiration to women everywhere
for her forthright enuciation of
female rights, and Michael Dorsey
becomes a much more sensitive and
av v man
Hottman is drawn to intense
characters like Dorsey. and he plays
them with churning energy without
sentimentalizing them. As Dorsey,
the erft-New York actor's actor,
Hoffman uses the driven riveting
edge-against-the-world that he
displayed as the crook in Straight
Time or the reporter in Agatha, or
een as the adman in Kramer vs.
Kramer, when he had to beat the
Christmas holiday calendar to find
a job before the new year. Though
desperate for work, Dorsey gives
his directors no mercy when they
make what to his mind are stupid
decisions. You can see how his
sound artistic instincts are all coiled
up with his mulish masculine pride.
Dorsey is versatile and dedicated
(particularly to staging Return to
the love Canal, the latest work of
his playwright-roommate, the
weirdly hilarious Bill Murray). But
he's also a bit of a user, especially
when it comes to women. His affair
with a struggling actress-friend
named Sandy, played with great
humor and poignance by Ten Garr,
is the kind of casual, careless liaison
that's barely a step up from a one-
night stand.
Michael Dorsey has Dustin Hoff-
man's nasal voice, but what comes
out of Dorothy Michaels' mouth is
miraculously mellifluous. Dorothy
Michaels is able to relate to people
without the burden of Michael
Dorsey's personal ambition. She
drops all of Dorsey's porcupine
spikes � except when it comes to
preserving the integrity of her role.
When she defends her professional
conviction that the hospital super-
visor she plays in the soap can be
both strong-willed and feminine,
she's a tigress. Precisely because
Dorothy Michaels is a fictional
character � a Michael Dorsey crea-
tion � she can speak her mind
about feminism with less fear than
someone who has to inhabit a
female identity for a lifetime.
Hoffman's acting is full of
marvelous moments � Dorsey
keeps surprising you both when he
stays in Dorothy's chatacter and
when he breaks out ot it. Hoff-
man's great triumph is that, at the
end, he makes you feel that both
parts have merged. Working with
young Justin Henry in Kramer vs.
Kramer, he began to find his middle
range as an actor. Working with
Jessica Lange. who plays, with con-
siderable delicacy, the soap opera
sexpot Dorsey Dorothy falls in love
with, Hoffman displays an adult
tenderness that never turns to
mush.
Coproducer and director Sydney
Pollack has kept his movie's many
ingredients straight and has healed
them all up to ihe right
temperature He's pulled all the
stops out of a remarkably load and
witty script written by (among
others) Larry Gelbart, Murray
Schisgal and the uncredited Elaine
May. It's an extremely nimble job
See DOUBLE, Page 8
Any More E.T.s?
Movie Forecast Good For '83
By GREGG KILDAY
RolltBf Slow
HOLLYWOOD � There was reason to celebrate in
Hollywood this New Year's Eve. As the movie industry
rang out 1982 � a difficult year that broke records at
the box office but also caused ulcers in the processi �
the moguls happily toasted the year to come. For 983
was opening with a bang and Hollywood found itself
temporarily in the money. "Generally it was a good
Christmas says marketing consultant Charles
Powell "It's not as great as 1980, when we had Stir
Crazv and 9 to 5, but after the horrendous fall, it s cer-
tainly good. There are a lot of successful films out there
Tneospects for the rest of the year are even more
rheerina "We're in a strong product cycle right now
Temertainment analyst Arthur E. RockwelL "The
timine of the product and its positioning couldn t be
LX ComingPoff the Christmas period 1983 is get-
ting off to a strong footing, and across the board, the
upcoming projects look very commercial
By summer, the movie theaters will be full of the
continuing exploits of Superman (Superman III), two
Sling James Bonds (Roger Moore in (Mopussyand
Sean Connery in Never Say Never Again); John
Travolta back in his dancing shoes for a reprise of
SaTurday Night Fever, the Sylvester Stallone-directed
sequel Staying Alive, and, what all observers pred.c
will be the megahit of the year, the third installment of
the Star Wars saga, The Return o) the Jedi
Still Hollywood's power brokers also realize that a
handful of blockbusters alone cannot support an entire
industry "If you look at the past five years cautions
Jack Valenti, president of the Motion P.cture Assoaa-
Xr �f America "eight out of ten movies did not
Sriev ttor otal investments during their theatrical
rekase! and even when you consider ancillary markets
like pay TV and network sales, six out of ten movies
still did not retrieve their investments, period. That
leaves only a forty percent margin of profitability
With an eye to the ever-encroaching bottom line, the
movie industry is facing 1983 full of hopeful resolu-
tions � determined to keep a tight rein on budgets, to
aim movies squarely at the public and to exhibit films
only under the best possible circumstances. But in the
ever fractious world of Hollywood, all that may be
easier said than done.
From studio to studio, the call has gone out for more
economical projects. Marvin Davis, owner of Twen-
tieth Century-Fox, appointed his son John to head a
special unit charged with making movies for $5 million
or less. Lorimar Productions hired independent pro-
ducer Irwin Yablans, a whiz at turning out low-budget
hits like Halloween, to oversee a new no-frills film divi-
sion. And cash-strapped MGMUA announced that it
doesn't plan to spend much more than $7.5 million for
any individual movie (with the exception of Octopussy,
its $25 million Bond movie).
But Hollywood's newfound frugality may be short-
lived. "Right now, everyone is paying lip service to the
concept comments Yablans. "But I think you'll find
it all depends on which studio you're talking to and
which end of the financial curve it's at. Those that are
most aware are the ones that have had a lack of hits or
a cashflow problem. Below-the-line costs the costs
of actually making a movie � can be controlled if
you're responsible and anticipate problems. But it's the
above-the-line costs � the price of the talent � that
can still be a problem. And despite what you're hear-
ing, stars are still demanding and getting astronomical
sums for their services.
Frank Price, chairman of Columbia Pictures, mam-
See MOVIE, Page 8
t .������5 ��
Dutch Soprano Elly Ameling Performing In February
nutch-born soprano Elly Ameling, "one of the world's foremost sopranosjind one of the most
hT F?b,24 .t 8 pm. Tickets for concert, which Is sponsored by the University Unions ArtBte
SriW Committee are $2.50 for students and $7.50 for fealty, staff ami the �MMM�H
ITZ doTr will be $7.50. Tickets .re on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenlmll Stadent
Center between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m Monday through Friday.
�tivMa
�M � "
A
f. ;






8
THl (AST i AROl INI AN
FEBRUARY 8, 1983
A

Movie Forecast Good For '83
i ontinued From Page 7
tains a more flexible
stance. "I've never
understood a lot of this
talk he says. "For a
studio to say it's not
going to do pictures
that cost over $10
million makes as much
sense as a dealer in the
stock market refusing
to buy stock that goes
over ten. Part of the
business is making
judgements about what
a proper dollar risk is.
If you have Dustin
Hoffman for Tooisie,
is it worth it to pay him
the money? You make
a judgement. It would
have been crazy to
spend $10 million on
Double Take
Continued From Page 7
of directing; Pollack mixes sweet and sour
flavorings with the deftness of a Chinese chef.
He turns this into an actor's actor's movie. He
tills the cast with troupers, like the risable, oro-
tund George Ciaynes as the soap opera's aging
I othano. or Dabney C oleman as the soap
opera's director (Coleman's most accomplished
dumb male animal yet) Best of all, Pollack
himself, vsho started out as an actor, contributes
a subtle, prick 1) performance as Dorsey's agent.
Pollack and Hoffman's scenes, together are vir-
tuoso duets of showbiz digs.
Recently . most of the enjoyable comedies (and
omed dramas hae been period pieces like My
bavorite Year and Diner. C omedies tend to rely
on puncturing fixed attitudes about sex or
money, and when such attitudes are amorphous,
the can defeat the efforts of the swiftest
humorists. What's amasing abou4 the
ultracontemporary Tootsie is that its theatrical
milieu clarifies rather than complicates the
characters romantic and career ambitions.
They're constantly asking themselves what their
true toles are in TV, in theater � and in life. This
questing makes the movie both opennded and
sure-footed. Indeed, laugh for laugh, Tootsie is
prohabh ihe funniest, most touching movie com-
ed about sexual confusion since la Cage aux
roller
Tootsie if we hadn't
had Hoffman. I also
think all this talk about
averages is very decep-
tive. We have a picture
for Easter called Spring
Break that cost $3.7
million, and that's a
good bet. On the other
hand, we have a picture
called Blue Thunder
that cost $22 million,
and that's a good bet
Because of the conti-
nuing high interest
rates, the studios are
also making a greater
effort to rush their
movies straight from
the soundstages onto
the screen, rather than
allowing them to sit on
the shelf, where they
gather additional bank
charges. Even before
Paramount Pictures
began filming Staying
Alive on January 4th,
it had scheduled the
movie's national
release for June 10th.
Similarly, The Keep, a
terror tale that recently
completed filming in
England, will debut on
June 3rd. Gene
Kirkwood, one of its
produceis, says, "On
most of our films now,
we have release dates
even before we start
shooting in order to
keep the interest costs
down. It puts a clock
on the director � he
doesn't have eight
months for
postproduction � but
,M
mi
�LS,
"L
DIET
CENTER
s
Deiner's Bakery
815 Dickinison Ave.
752-5251
"Greenville's finest
bakery for 63 years. "
0 freshly baked Of
Valentines cakes and cookies
for ydor sweetheart
all sizes available
Gl CmouHaqcc F-que and
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awo TMt boo� babu ;
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This beautiful brut
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lABuddi-VaseYouCan
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Open Sat Sun
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1027 Evonj Street
Phone 758-2774
EVERY WEDNESDAY
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FLOUNDER �.
DINNER .VV
cSHONETo
205
Greenville
Blvd.
I like working this way,
as long as it doesn't get
too ridiculous.
Inevitably, a lot of
the movies that will
come rushing off the
assembly line this year
will be aimed squarely
at the twelve-to-
twenty-four-year-olds
who make up the bulk
of the moviegoing
public. This year's
release schedule
reflects that audience.
In addition to the
unavoidable Porky's
� The Next Day, there
will be a new military
school drama, Lords of
Discipline; a tale of
pint-size entrepreneurs,
Hideo; and a juvenile
prison drama, Bad
Boys. Most intriguing
of the lot are Francis
Coppola's two for-
thcoming screen ver-
sions of S.E. Hinton
novels � The Out-
siders and Rumble
Fish, both starring
Matt Dillon. With
typical hyperbole,
Coppola describes the
novel The Outsiders as
14the Gone with the
Wind for fourteen-
year-old girls" and
promises the film will
be "a Godfather for
children
Hollywood's dogged
attempts to excite jad-
ed juvenile tastes can
also be seen in its conti-
nuing fascination with
3-D. Paramount plans
to unveil a top-secret
3-D feature in May,
and this summer, thrill-
happy moviegoers will
come face to face with
poltergeists in
Amity ville 3-D and
enter the belly of the
beast in Jaws 3-D.
Douglas Trumbull,
who engineered the
pioneering special ef-
fects in 2001: A Space
Odyssey and Close En-
counters of the Third
Kind, is convinced that
movies must up their
visual ante with such
big-screen gimmickry.
"We're coming to a
fork in the road he
insists. "All the smaller
movies � the love
stores, the mysteries,
the little action-
adventures � are going
straight to television.
The second-run
theatres are going to
start closing, essential-
ly leaving you with the
first-run theaters, and
the public's appetite
for first-run theaters is
going to be for large-
screen, stereo-sound
productions
At the same time,
other entrepreneurs
counter that bigger
isn't always better.
Taking his cue from
the proliferation of
four-and-five-screen
multiplexes that invad-
ed American shopping
centers in the Sixties
and Seventies, Cana-
dian producer Garth
Drabinsky paved the
way for a new kind of
theater complex when
he opened the twenty-
one-screen Cineplex in
Toronto's Eaton Cen-
tre in 1979. Although
the theaters in the
Cineplex are small �
ranging from 75 to 250
seats � they allow the
exhibitor to play
special-interest films,
booking a hit movie in-
to several screens while
keeping a movie of
more limited appeal
alive in a single theater
for weeks on end.
"There's always going
to be a certain type of
moviegoer who wants
to see extravagant
types of entertainment,
but they're expensive
to exhibit
vl
DAILY SPECIALS AT
tSUBlMV
Famous Foot Long Sandwiches
MON.
SNAK BMT (HAM, PEPPERONI, GENOA, BOLOGNA
& CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA FOR $2.09
TUES
SNAK ROAST BEEF, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL
SODA FOR $2.09
WED.
SNAK MEATBALL, BAG OF CHIPS, AND A SMALL SODA
FOR 51.59
THURS.
SNAK HAM, BAG OF CHIPS AND A SMALL SODA
FOR $1.89
FRI.
SNAK ALASKAN KING CRAB, BAG OF CHIPS, AND
A SMALL SODA FOR $2.39
SPECIALS RUN FROM 11 A.M. UNTIL 2 P.M. DAILY
Put Your Heart On A String
And Fly High On Love
Order Now For Valentines Weekend
We will deliver on Sun. Feb. 13th
call 752-3815
lOonvlOpm
Beautiful Valentine Bouquets
Bakers Dozen Delivered With a
Heart Felt Song $20.00 plus tax
Mylar Heart in a tote delivered
with a song $10.95 picked up $5. SO
We accept VISA r
end mastercard Balloons Over Green vilie
Greenville's Fire and Fine Balloon Service
OIL CHANGE
LUBE AND �Q QC
FILTER fO.J
Maic Brand MLnqfade Oil Up To 5 Qts
EXPIRES 230
1
I
New Valve Stems, No Other Charge k
FRONT DISK
BRAKES
$49.88
EXPIRES 2 30
��������� COUPON . � � � .
wgoodyeari
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OFFICIAL NC INSPECTION STATION
DOWNTOWN WEST END
7MDICKINSOH AVE SHOPPING CEN'tS
752-4417
756-9371
Busy? Don't Forget Your Corf
4-A78xl3 Power Streak Block Tires S t 46 10
otal
All taxes Included, Mounted, Computer Balance,
New Valve Stems, No Other Charge
The Winterville Javcees
.
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
present
5th Annual Ladies Best
Leggs Contest
Wed. Feb. 9, 1983
Adm. $1.00
45 and 50- cans all night
Prizes
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakhouse
1st $100.00 year, FREE Pass ta the Elba
2nd $50.00 "�������. toheEibo
3rd $25.00 Ptus a years FREE Pass torheElbo
Entries can call 758-4591
Come Early
TUESDAY SPECIAL
4 oz. Sirloin $2.49
with Salad Bar $3.49
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
Chop Sirloin $2.79
with Salad Bar $3.79
Take Out Service2903 E. 10th St.� 750-2712
264ByPass 754-0940
Hours: 11:00.m� 10:00p.m.� Mon.Thore.
10:00a.m.1100p.m. Fri. Sun
10 Discount
beginning Feb. 1 st
on all
dinners & biscuits
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 l Block from Ca
I
The Jph�-OTjJ
Lniver
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td
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Alpha
Feb.
5,7:15
Admisj
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ROBIN Al
grand and
romant
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Lod
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Date
Locatij
Seconl





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IRS
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HIPS AND
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�HF4
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DISK
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t forget Your Car
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Computer Balance
� H UI' � C barge
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interville Javcees
present
nnuol Ladies Best
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to the fclbo
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S 49 j
Early
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v.US
ID CHICKEN
ORiVC THRU WINDOW
iscount
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nail
& biscuits
S2 1373 1 Block from Campus
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FfcBRUARV8. 1983
Beatlemania Still Surging
Continued From Page 7
periments and complex
mini-operas.
As much as anything
else, their lasting con-
temporaneity defines
the greatness of the
band. For all their
epitomization of their
time, they seem to have
tapped some secret of
universality. Even such
songs as "All You
Need Is Love" or
"Come Together"
which might seem im-
possibly dated, still
ring fresh.
They achieved this
universality by their in-
nate talent and by the
fact that their evolu-
tion, still denounced by
some as a betrayal of
rock, really amounted
to an abandonment of
rock's parochialism in
favor of a broader,
more lasting popular
sensibility.
The basis of any pop
song is its melody and
its words. On both
counts, the Beatles, in-
dividually and collec-
tively, were masters of
the pop genre, and re-
mained so throughout
the life of the band.
The Alpha-Omega Players in a scene from Noel Coward's classic comedy hit. -Private lives
Ringo's few songs
are cute, but the basis
of the Beatles
songbook are those by
Lennon-McCartney.
We now know that the
bulk of those songs
were written by one or
the other.
But hearing them all
together again makes
one realize the
closeness of their col-
laboration. Often
songs by Lennon are
sung by McCartney,
and vice versa. Mc-
Cartney, justly famous
for his ballads, could
also write biting
rockers, and Lennon
had his soft side.
In their cellar-
dwelling Hamburg
years, and even on
their First couple of
LPs with Ringo, the
Beatles were a fierce lit-
tle rock-n-roll band,
one that could match
the young Rolling
Stones blues lick for
blues lick.
Later, as they ex-
panded into a cultural
phenomenon, their
commitment to the
narrow, strict direct-
ness of rock lessened,
and for that they have
been exoconated by
rock purists.
But it was that very
diversification that en-
sured their universali-
ty. Their evocations of
an older British music-
hall tradition, their
modest but ingenious
formal experiments,
and above all their will-
ingness to reach out.
By reaching wide,
'he Beatles reached
deep It was the ac-
curacy of their age that
allowed them to trans-
cend that age. and to
speak to us as they did
two decades ago
University Unions Presenting C
'Private Lives'As Next Dinner
N hat do you expect
would happen if on
your second honey-
moon, ou discovered
that your ex-spouse
as .necking into the
adjoining suite on
her second honey-
n? I his is the sub-
leci of Noel Coward's
wittiest buffoonery
Private Lives which
will be presented Feb.
15-18, tor the I niversi-
Unions Dinnei
! eatre.
1 he pla :s again to
be presented b the
Alpha-Omega Players,
a highly-talented tour-
ing company which has
been seen recently in
Same Time, Next Year
and C hapter Tho.
Their reputation tor an
excellent shovv is well-
known.
The four-day run
begins Tuesday. Feb.
15 with a dessert per-
formance at 7:15 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student
Center's Auditorium
244. The next three
nights are dinner per-
formances beginning at
6:30 p.m. in the same
location. Servomation
will cater.
Private Lives is a far-
cical comedy about a
couple who can't stand
each other, yet can't
stand being apart.
1 hey divorce, but meet
again as they start
honeymoons with new
sets of spouses. I hen,
the outlandish fun, and
fireworks, begin.
I ickets are available
now at the Centra!
Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student
Center. I ickets for the
dessert performance
are S4 for students and
o ward's
Theatre
for faculty and
staff. There are no
public tickets available
tor this performance.
Tickets for the dinner
performance are $8.50
tor students and S12.50
tor faculty, staff and
the public. Tickets
must be paid for no
later than "2 hours
atter the reservations
have been received by
the Central Ticket Of-
fice (open Monday k
through Friday from
1" a.m. until 4 p.m I
J-T
Western Steer0
Family
STtAKHOVSI
Banquet & Party
Facilities for 15
to 150 Persons
Take Out Orders
Coll 758-8550
3005 E. 10th St Greenville
Open Sun Thur 11am 9pm
Friday Saturday llam 10pm
Feb. 11,12
5, 7:15, 9:30 PM
Admission: ID, Activity Card
Hendrix Theatre
HARRISON FORD
A LAOO COMPANY RELEASE IN ASSOCIATION WITH SIR RUN RUN SHAW
THRU WWWK1 BOOS Q PANAVISKX 9 TSCHWCOtOW �
A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY
� 1962 the Ladd Company AH Rights Reserved
IE
-J-LL
SEAN
CONNEKY
AUDREY
HEPBURN
in
ROBERT
SHAW
ROBIN AND MARIAN is a
grand and enthralling
romantic saga which jells
gloriously and
artistically'
- Re. Reed
Love is the greatest
adventure of all.
C oluabla
Picture
Dp �AJKNUl GUIDAMCt SUGGOTfD
MOVIE
Date Feb. 9
Time 7 PM Admission Free.
Location Hendrix Theatre
Second Feature At 9 PM, The Adventures of Robinhood
CoUHTRV COPJCIMI
2 BKK AS WEST OF MEN'S DORMS
Bring this ad in
�JJ ����� MM III
J for Fried Chicken Special J
J plus two vegtables
k. �f" t"fc A Lp m t jmb dJm � . � C 1 fiCi �w
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Open 11-8
752-0476
� 7 davs a vveek
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Tar Landing Seafood
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Phone 7580327
All You Can Eat
combination of any 2
Shrimp Oysters Flounder
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JUNIOR ixfCS
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if S .
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Full nedical, cental, unlimited S'ck
leave, JO lays annual paid vacotion,
t srad education projr0-s and
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itions ore still available in the
follow, r.g arf-as: Kanagement (technical
and non-technical), Fngineering,
Nuclear, Teaching, Intelligence,
Aviation Kanagenent, Diving, Pilots,
tir.ance. Personnel kanagenent. Worldwide
locations - i.e pay relocation expenses.
Ml SON SKINNER
Navy OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh. NC ?609
Or call l-800-f62-?31
8aa-4pa. MonFri.
Vm&l JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS at �n b.a.11 r
anc Zimt Seafarer n,i,i e-TT" : 'a p Si �u "S
Serving as a. caitp counselor ia
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Reward ,ng opportunity tO Wrt with �Hm
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North Carollm 27605 M76' R�l�19h.
You Should See Our
W Valentine
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Jefferson
Florist
Op�n Sunday F�b 13 I 2 Noon til fc P M
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I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 8. 1983 Page 10
Pirates Collapse In Double Overtime
By CINDY PLEAS A NTS
Sports h duof
In what proved to be their longest
game of the season so far, the
Pirates were outlasted by conference
foe George Mason in double over-
time, 59-58, marking ECU's second
one-point loss to the Patriots this
year.
Although history did repeat itself
Saturday night in Minges coliseum,
the Pirates desperately tried to
change that in the final 10 addi-
tional minutes. But a 50-minute
game took a toll on the Bucs,
especially since ECU's five starters
played the majority of the game.
"We got tired said ECU Head
Coach Charlie Harrison. "We just
weren't as sharp
In the first overtime, ECU's
Johnny Edwards hit a 12-foot jump-
shot with 4:38 remaining to put the
Pirates up, 56-54. GMU's Carlos
Yates then sank a 20-foot shot to tie
the score, 56-56.
With 1:29 left, the Pirates began
holding the ball for a final shot, but
Yates caused a five-second call
against Wright, and the Bucs turned
the ball over with :20 remaining on
the clock.
The previous five-second call oc-
curred with :22 left in the regulation
period as the Pirates again held for a
final shot.
Why two five-second calls?
"They didn't want to throw the ball
away Harrison said. "Nobody
was open. Our legs got tired.
"All we wanted to do is get a
good shot. We could only do so
much with the situation
With one second left in the first
overtime, Wright fouled junior
guard John Niehoff, who went to
the freethrow line for two shots but
missed both.
Tied, 56-56, the two teams went
in to a second overtime, ECU's first
of the season. The Pirates had
previously played in one overtime
situation this year and won, 50-47,
against the Wilmington Seahawks.
In the first overtime, ECU guard
Bruce Peartree stole the ball and Ed-
wards canned a hookshot to give the
Bucs a 58-56 advantage with 4:12
left.
But 6-5 freshman forward Rob Rose
came back with a layup to tie the
score, 58-58, with 2:54 on the clock.
The Patriots went ahead of the
Bucs, 59-58, after 6-3 freshman
Ricky Wilson iced a freethrow with
1:32 in the overtime. The Pirates
had the ball in possession during the
last 20 seconds. After a timeout,
ECU junior guard Tony Robinson
missed a 25-foot jumpshot around
the freethrow line as the buzzer
sounded.
In the second half of the regula-
tion period, ECU and GMU were
tied 52-52 with 6:53 remaining, but
Peartree pumped in a 20-foot jump-
shot at the 4:44 mark to take the
lead.
Calling a timeout, ECU came out
on the court with 4:22 in the game.
Wright them picked up his fourth
foul, putting Carlos Yates, the
ECAC-South's leading scorer, on
the freethrow line. Yates fired both
shots in to tie the score, 54-54, with
4:09 on the clock.
The Pirates led 32-31 at halftime
and came out to build a three-point
lead, 36-36, in the first two minutes
of the second period.
Yates, however, made three
jumpshot to keep the Patriots alive
with 10:46, GMU was up 48-44. Ed-
wards and Peartree combined for
four points to boost the Pirates up,
50-48, with 9:19 remaining. Yates
came through again for the Patriots,
knocking in two straight field goals
and two freethrows to tie the game.
Both teams shifted form tight
zone to man-to-man defenses, with
the Patriots mainly staying in man-
to-man positions in the second half.
In such an aggressive game, few
fouls were called on the Pirates' end
of the court, and Harrison, obvious-
ly, wasn't very pleased. "I think it
(the officiating) smells said a
disturbed Harrison. "There's no
way a team can play as aggressive as
they did and us not get into a one-
and-one situation.
"1 refuse to believe that they
didn't make seven fouls in the last
30 minutes of the ballgame when
they're playing a man-to-man and
fastbreakinc us
The Pirates outrebounded the
Patriots. 36-31. and made 25 of 61
shots tor a 52.9 percent shooting
average.
In the first half, GMU jumped
out to a 6-0 lead, but Edwards hit a
fastbreak layup, a jumpshot and a
tip in to give the Pirates to a 7-7 tie
with the Patriots. The Bucs gained
the lead three times in the last 10
minutes of play. The Patriots stayed
ahead during the final five minutes
until freshman Curt Vanderhorst
scored a fastbreak layup to give the
Bucs a 32-31 lead.
Edwards, who was named as the
ECAC-South's "Rookie of the
Week scored 25 points and grabb-
ed 11 rebounds to lead the Pirates.
He has been honored with the title
four times in the pas! eight weeks.
Peartree followed with 13 points
and Wright had nine. Thorn Brown,
who finished with seven points,
pulled down II rebounds while
Wright had eight.
GMU's Yates, who led the
Patriots with 23 points, was named
as the ECAC-South's "Player of the
Week last year, Yates was
selected as the conference's
"Rookie of the Year Wilson pop-
ped in 13 points, while Rose add 10.
Despite the conference loss,
which places ECU last in the stan-
dings, Harrison said he wasn't too
concerned with ECU's status in the
regular season.Instead, he's looking
forward to the ECAC-South tourn-
ment on March 10-12 when the
Pirates ma once again have the op-
See PIRATES, Page 11
K�H V STAN LliT
Forward Barry W riRht looks for an opening underneath against GMU's
Carlos ates.
Bucs To Face Injuns
When ECU travels to
Wilhamsburg, Va. tomorrow
night, the Pirates will be facing
the top team in the ECAC-South
conference.
The William & Mary Indians,
coached by Bruce Parkhill in his
sixth year, are currently on top of
the league standings with a 4-0
record and a 12-6 mark overall.
While scoring and rebounding
have been rather balanced on the
William & Mary squad, Keith
Cieplicki has been the big force.
The 6-4 sophomore is fifth in
the league in scoring with a 14.8
per-game average.
The current league standings are:
EC ACOverall
William & Mary4-012-6
Navy2-111-8
George Mason3-313-7
James Madison2-211-8
Richmond2-310-10
ECU1-510-10
Hurdler Sets Princeton Record
Player Of The Week � Carlos
Yates, George Mason
Rookie Of The Week �
Edwards, ECU
leading scorers:
Carlos Yates, GMU
Johnny Edwards, ECU
Dave Brooks, Navy
Dan Ruland, JMU
Keith Cieplicki, W & M
Johnnv
27.3
18.4
16.7
15.0
14.8
Lady Pirates Streak
Past James Madison
The ECU Lady Pirates used the
poised play of streaking sophomore
forward Darlene Chaney to defeat
the Lady Dukes of James Madison
in a Saturday afternoon contest,
54-48
Chaney scored 15 points and pull-
ed down a career-high 18 rebounds
as the Lady Pirates upped their
record to 9-9. JMU falls to 5-13.
Over the past four games, Chaney
has averaged 15.5 points and 14.5
rebounds per game.
ECU head coach Cathy Andruzzi
praised Chaney for her perfor-
mance. "Chaney had another real
good game she said. "She's show-
ing a lot of poise and when she con-
tributes, out club flows
JMU jumped out to an early 8-1
lead, but the Lady Pirates bounced
back to take a 28-22 lead at
halftime.
The beginning of the second half
saw the teams playing relatively
even. But a 10-0 ECU spurt that
began at he 11:50 mark put the
game away for the Lady Pirates.
The ten-point spurt was keyed by
freshman Lisa Squirewell, who
scored on two straight three-point
plays. Sqwuirewell finished with
seven points.
Besides Chaney and Squirewell,
the Lady Pirates were led by Mary
Denkler with 13 points and Sylvia
Bragg with 12. Denkler also added
eight rebounds to go along with
Chaney's game-high total.
The Lady Dukes were led by Rue
Manelski with 18 points. Susan
Flynn, Michele James and Mary
Gilligan each had 10 points for
JMU.
"James Madison teams are
always hard nosed and this year's
squad is no exception Andruzzi
stated. "We went there knowing
what we had to do and we played
very well
ECU finished the day with a
season-low eight turnoves, a statistic
that pleased Andruzzi.
"It shows we controlled the tem-
po of the game and we didn't try
things we weren't capable of she
added.
With the recent loss of backcourt
starters Loraine Foster and
Delphine Mabry, the Lady Pirates
have been forced to play with a
revamped lineup.
In the JMU game, the Lady
Pirates used only six players for the
entire game.
"It was the best performance
from the new five that I've seen
responded Andruzzi. "We now
know where our limitations are
ECU only hit 23 of 60 field goal
attempts (38.3 per-cent), a fact
which has bothered Andruzzi lately.
"We need to gain more con-
fidence in our shooting Andruzzi
said. "We've asked people to be of-
fensive contributors who have never
been that before. Our team was
young to begin with, and I have to
compliment the team on the effort
they've given
The ECU-Richmond game,
originally scheduled for Sunday
night, was cancelled due to bad road
conditions. The contest is in the pro-
cess of being rescheduled.
This weekend, ECU will host the
Converse Lady Pirate Classic with
the opening-round games on Friday
and the championship on Saturday
night at 8:00 p.m.
On Friday, Cheyney State and
CTemson will start things off at 6:00
p.m followed by ECU and Detroit
at 8:00 p.m.
By CIND PLEASANTS
Sport rdllm
In the small town of Chinquapin,
hurdles were hard to come by. So, a
young Craig White lined up a row of
bar stools and practiced his jumping
techniques faithfully.
He practiced and practiced until
finally he could look back, still try-
ing to catch his breath, and see each
bar stool standing high. This was
one ol the biggest thrills ot Craig's
young track career.
This weekend. Craig experienced
the biggest thrill of his college track
career. Traveling with the ECU
track team to the Princeton Relays
in Princeton. N.J the freshman
placed first in the 55-meter hurdle
race. But that's not all Craig did.
Not only did he out-hurdle
Rutgers' John Norman, a two-time
all-America who was ranked ninth
in the country last season, he tied
VUIanova three-time all-America
Rodnev Wilson's meet record of
7.33.
"I just threw my arms up Craig
said. "I was thrilled to finally get a
first (place). If I won. I knew I'd be
beating out some of the best guys in
the nation. Since I was in the cham-
pionship, I knew the competition
was going to be there.
"I just had to concentrate and not
look at the other guys
Craig also anchored the shuttle
hurdle relay team to a third place
finish with a time of 6.7. In the
trials, Craig ran a 6.6. Walter
Southerland (7.4), Tony Jones (7.4)
and Vernard Wynn (7.5) were the
other hurdlers in the event.
White
In the 55-meter event, Craig was
up against upperclassmen, but the
freshman said he wasn't in-
timidated. "I believe I've grown out
of that stage he said. "They put
their shoes on just like 1 do
Craig's coach. Bill Carson, ad-
mitted that he was surprised when
his freshman placed first. "I looked
for him to finish third Carson
said. "I mean, here he was up
against a runner ranked in the na-
tion, but he beat him over that first
wire and led all the way.
Carson added that Craig's in-
dividual hurdle race was not his lone
victory. "Craig had three super hur-
dle races Carson said. "We
finished in a good third place, but
without Craig we wouldn't have
placed
Craig, who has numerous athletic
accomplishments, chooses his words
carefully while being interviewed,
saying "1 don't want to seem like
I'm bragging But if anyone does
have anything worthy of bragging
about, Craig surelv does
Because Craig's junior high
school didn't have a track team, he
began his competitive track career at
his 2-A high school. "The first time
I ever saw track 1 didn't know what
to do he saidI didn't know what
was going on
Craig had pole-vaulted in junior
high at Field Day and set the
school's record, leaping 5'4"in the
eighth grade. But Craig hurt his lip
while vaulting in ninth grade and
started trying other events.
That's where hurdling came in. "I
had watched the top hurdlers in the
world on T.V people like Renaldo
Nefiemiah and I reaiiv kj .�
By the end of his tenth-grade
year. Craig was hurdling and runn-
ing the 100- and 200-yard dashes In
his first meet, he placed first in the
16-110 meter hurdles. His junior
year he placed second in the state in
the 110-meter hurdles and captured
third place at the state meet his
senior year in the 300-meter hurdles.
He received all-conference honors
three years in a row.
But as many track stars, he not
only participated in one athletic
sport. In football, he gained over
1,000 yards as a runmngback. and
was named all-cor.ference in both
basketball and football at East
Dublin High.
Track, however, was Craig's first
choice when he decided to par-
ticipate on a college level "I a
told by a lot of peopie my re:
choice would be track Craig said
"Track is somewhat individual. If I
do it wrong or I do it right, it lie- or.
me
Craig also enjoys the team aspect,
especially since he and his high
school coach were the only two
traveling to meets his senior year
See WHITE. Page 11
Hooks Boosts Lady Bucs
Bv RANDY MEWS
�uff �nief
The ECU Lady Pirates have had a
few bad breaks this season, but
thanks to steady leadership provid-
ed by the seniors, the Lady Pirates
have still been very competitive.
One of those seniors is co-captain
Fran Hooks. Hooks, a 5-8 guard, is
averaging 5.1 points and 3.5 re-
bounds per game.
Hooks, who won three letters
playing basketball at Goldsboro
High, said East Carolina was the
logical place for her to attend col-
lege. "They had a growing women's
athletic program which I felt I could
contribute to, and it was very close
to home
Hooks saw limited playing time
her first two seasons, playng behind
all-time greats like Laurie Sikes and
Kathy Riley, but moved into a star-
ting role as a junior and has been a
steady performer ever since.
Although not very fast. Hooks
makes up for her lack of speed with
court sense and hustle. Currently
she is second on the team in assists
and third in steals.
"She plays with heart, and is an
extremely intense competitor says
head coach Cathy Andruzzi. "Often
times she guards the best people on
the other team; she always gives 100
percent on and off the court and to
top it all off. she's a good student "
Hooks, who enjoys softball as
well as basketball, starts for East
Carolina's nationally ranked soft-
ball team. Although she stays busy
all year round, Hooks manages to
maintain a 3.0 grade point average.
"Coach Andruzzi stresses how
important it is to do well in school
Hooks said. "And everybody on the
team has to atend a mandatory two-
hour study hall every day
Upon graduating. Hooks wants
to enter graduate school. She is
presently a Health-Physical Educa-
tion major and hopes to get a job in
teaching or coaching one day.
Currently, the Lady Pirates hold
a 9-9 record, but Hooks says she
hasn't been disappointed with the
season thus far.
"There are a lot of freshman on
the team, and we've plaved an ex-
tremely difficult schedule she
said. "We've been getting better
and I think we're surfing to gel
right now
Waters To Play At ECU
Ptwte ky CINOY WALL
ODU's Beth Wllkerson skies over senior guard Fran Hooks.
According to an undisclosed
source, high school tailback Bubba
Waters, a 6-1, 205-pound senior
from Bath, N.C has announced his
intentions to attend ECU. Waters,
who led his team to the State I-A
state championship play-offs, is one
of the most heavily recruited
athletes in North Carolina, being
sought after by such schools as N C
State and UNC-Chapei Hill.
I
Trad
B KAND1 Ml
�mt rmrr
The ECL vs
track team broM
school records
participating
Wolfpack All-
meet this week�
Chape; Hill
In the sp-
relav which cons)
running a 400. 24
300 meer stretc!
team ol Kathj
Teresa H
Cremedv
Kent took t
in
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Pira
Spll
In fcC
meet I
Pirau- - -
a sp
do .
De-
The
Blue De
ECL 'r
Rf K
ma:r ;
for
"1
good
saic
in four
Ea- Rej
Our guy;

won
Kobe pra
Sebr . I
ding �- a
believ e thai :
Pira
B RAM Ml
Everv member
ECU men-
recieved a I
weekend �
petinf - the Pr
Relays in
N J.
The
remarka
mance
tearr -i k
Villanova, H 1
S � Ha Manf
and Mi
Craig V b
11 yea- d meet
and bea
Whih
At Pi
Continued
"Most oi :ne gj
couldn't �
would go
reaiiv e
Ace
ly hurdlec
senior vea
college
showed t-
jump "Cot
to the field, an.
shou.c. re
my lead leg w hej
and oq I
Still impro. :
hopes to be a p
tiona! team
reaching h
1984 Olympic
M
Ed G�ar





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 8. 1983
11
ime
A
"Ho1 By STAN LftIT
nderneath again! dMl 's
cord
� ' crade
J runn-
�- � lashes In
- : rsl
" ' irdles junior
�cj second n the state in
0-meter hurdles and captured
placeai the state meet his
f Yearin the 300-meter hurdles.
r( ce honors
La fie not
- i over
- ick and
���both
il East
par-
1 a
� aid.
lal It 1
� .the team aspect,
C ' '

ee WHITE, Page 11
ady Bucs
if ten
e on

t and to

a
- Last
w.
'��'��� - now
todow � ii
'And everybody on the
itend a mandatory two-
1 hall eery dav "
lr. graduating. Hooks wants
er graduate school. She is
Itjy a Heaith-Pnysical fcduca-
ajor and hopes to get a job in
!ig or coaching one day.
gently, the lady Pirates hold
ecord. but Hooks sas she
been disappointed with the
thus tar.
ere are a lot of freshman on
)m, and we've played an ex-
difficult schedule she
'We've been getting better
nk we're starting to gel
low
At ECU
tampionship play-offs, is one
most heavily recruited
in North Carolina, being
after by such schools as N C
md L'NC-Chapel Hill.
Track Records Set
By RANDY MEWS
Staff Writer
The ECU Women's
track team broke three
school records while
participating in the
Wolfpack All-Comers
meet this weekend in
Chapel Hill.
In the sprint medly
relay which consists of
running a 400, 200 and
300 meter stretch, the
team of Kathy Leeper,
Teressa Hudson, Robin
Cremedy and Regina
Kent took fourth place
in 2:34.88 and broke
the ECU school record.
Another school
record was broken by
the 4 x 150 meter relay
team of Leeper, Kent,
Hudson and Jamie
Cathcart which finish-
ed fourth in 1:16.59.
In the 55-meter dash
Kent and Hudson
finished first and se-
cond in their heets.
Kent came in at 7.19,
while Hudson finished
7.44. Kent finished
third overall.
In the 1600-meter
relay, Kent, Cathcart,
Leeper and Rene Felder
took fourth place in
4:06 and also broke the
ECU record.
"I'm not surprised at
all the school records
being broken said
coach Pat McGuigan,
"The girls are getting
used to runing indoors
and have been getting
better with each meet
The Lady Pirates wil
return to action
February 19th, when
they once again travel
to Chapel Hill, this
time to participate in
the Tar-Heel Classic.
Pirate Swim Teams
Split With Devils
In ECU's last dual
meet of the season, the
Pirate women salvaged
a split with Duke by
downing the Blue
Devils, 93-56.
The Pirate men were
defeated 69-44 by the
Blue Devil swimmers.
ECU head coach
Rick Kobe remains op-
timistic about the re-
mainder of the season
for the Pirates.
"The men have had a
good season Kobe
said. "Our big meet is
in four weeks (the
Eastern Regionals).
Our guys will get a
chance to do like the
women did today
Kobe praised Erick
Sebnick as the outstan-
ding swimmer, and
believes that he is ready
for a good Regionals.
The women were
very successful against
the Blue Devils, as two
varsity records were
set.
Nan George set a
new standard of 53.79
in the 100-Free and
Nancy Rogers swam a
best ever 1:56.46
200-Free.
Along with the two
records, 15 national
cuts were made by the
women.
"This is probably the
best meet ever for the
women Kobe com-
mented. "We swam
against a good team, an
ACC team, and best
them easily
Of the 17 individual
and team events, the
ECU women won 11 of
them.
"Three women really
stood out added
Kobe, who is in his first
year as ECU's head
coach. "Nan George
and Nancy Rogers each
had a varsity record
and Sharon Holt took
the 200-Fly and the
50-Fly. She's really
come on
The remaining ECU
swim schedule:
March 3-5 Men's
Eastern Regionals �
Syracuse, N.Y.
March 16-19
Women's Nationals �
Long Beach, CA
March 24-26 Men's
Nationals � Indian-
napolis, Ind.
Pirates Gain Medals
By RANDY MEWS
Mrr � nlf
Every member on the
ECU men's track team
recieved a medal this
weekend while com-
peting in the Princeton
Relays in Princeton,
N.J.
The Pirates
remarkable perfor-
mance came against
teams such as Rutgers,
Villanova, Howard,
Seton Hall, Manhattan
and VMI.
Craig White tied the
17 year old meet record
and beat out two-time
Rutger's All-American
John Worman in the 55
meter hurdles, taking
first place in 7.33.
In the 55-meter dash,
Nathan McCorkle
finished third overall in
6.50, while Henry
Williams came in a
close fourth at 6.51.
In the shuttle hurdle
relay, the team of
Walter Southerland,
Tony Jones, Vernerd
Wynn and Craig White
finished third in 29.4.
In an extremely close
event, the sprint medly
relay team of Rueben
Pierce, Eddie Bradley,
Wayne Richardson and
Chris McGlawhorn
took second in 1:57.4
In the field events,
Chris McGlawhorn was j
the only Pirate to place;
He had the second best �
long jump of hte day at �
23'6 j
Coach Bill Carson j
was extremely pleased:
with his teams perfor- j
mance. "Our runners
performed remarkably.
It was a tough meet,
and this is the first I
remember every person
on the team winning a
medal
ECU will be in action j
next week when they
compete in the West
Virginia Invitational.
White Sets Track Mark
At Princeton Relays
Continued From Page 10
"Most of the guys (team members)
couldn't miss class so he and I
would go. Coach Wulzyn (John)
really encouraged me at the meets
According to Craig, he never real-
ly hurdled the correct way until his
senior year in high school when a
college coach took him aside and
showed him the proper way to
jump. "Coach Carson took me out
to the field, and showed me how I
should be using the opposite arm of
my lead leg when I hurdle. I did that
and my times began to improve
Still improving his times, Craig
hopes to be a part of the junior na-
tional team this summer before
reaching his ultimate goal � the
1984 Olympic trials.
And after his showing at
Princeton this weekend, Craig is
probably just beginning a more-
than-elaborate gold collection.
Pirates Fall To
George Mason
In Overtime 2
i ky STAN L�AST V
ECU Guard To�y Robinson
Continued From Page10
portunity to overcome the Patriots.
"It's all upfor grabs in this league.
The regularseasondoesn'tmakea
damn difference when you get to the
tournament.i
The Pirates will take onWilliam
& Mary Wednesday nightat 7:30
p.m. in Williamsburg, Va.
� Ooffc Mm� Sf. ECU SI
ECl.MP FG FT R A FPi
Wnghi483-6 3-68 5 09
Brown503-6 II10 2 37
Ed�rd�5012-25 1-2II 1 025
Robinson470-9 2 22 4 32
Peart r�J46-10 1-21 1 113
Williams160-4 0-01 2 10
Vandcrttorsi31-1 0-10 0 02
McUod20-0 0-00 0 00
Tatak250 25-61 (-14 Mi IS �51
en�MP FG FT � A FPi
Row355-7 CM)3 4 110
Grace313-4 0-07 0 06
Hanlm90-0 1-21 1 1
Wilson396-12 1-23 2 213
Vales4510-16 3-44 4 223
Niehorr4215 0-21 1 22
YoheII1-2 CM)0 0 02
Shannon�1-5 yo9 2 02
Tata25 27-51 5-1 3114 1��
EaatCaraOaan i12 2 2-51
KjtOt'ft MMNn i i -59
Turnovers - ECU 16. GMU 1$.
Technical fouls GMU. Yates
Officials � Cafe and Fine.
Alt � J.350
Freshman sensation Johnny Edwards pumps in two more from the floor en route to a game-high
, . . . ��� OT STAN LEAHY
25 points against George Mason.
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12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 8, 1983
Whitworth To
Continue Golf
ATLANTA (UPI) �
Kathy Whitworth em-
pathizes with Bjorn
Borg and Arnold
Palmer.
At 43, she
understands how Borg,
26, can be "burned
out" at the peak of his
tennis career and why
Palmer, 53, is still com-
peting on the PGA tour
even though he hasn't
won there in a decade.
"It's something I
contend with every
day said Whitworth
who has won more pro-
fessional golf tour-
naments (83) than any
other woman. "I keep
telling myself that I'm
capable of plaving just
as well as I did 15-20
years ago when I was at
the top of my game.
But I know that isn't
true, 'hat time has
taken us toll.
"I have no desire
right now to retire
said Whitworth, who
tied for fourth and fifth
in this year's first two
LPGA tournaments,
finishing strong after
poor opening rounds.
"I still enjov both the
competition and the
social life. But I don't
want to stick around to
the point where I can
no longer compete.
"Having made all
that money ($25
million), Borg can af-
ford to quit said
Whitworth. "It's hard
for people who haven't
been in his position to
understand what Borg
was going through. No
one else knows how
much of himself he put
into being No. 1. To
become No. 1 and stay
there can be very drain-
ing, physically and
emotionally.
"I went through
much the same thing
about 10 years ago
when I was winning a
lot of tournaments
she said. "My aim in
the early years was to
be the best. But when I
got there, staying there
was even tougher. I'd
be so exhausted after a
tournament that I'd go
back to my room and
be unable to relax. I
don't know what I
might have done if we
had been making the
sort of money back
then we are making
now.
"I did decide I had to
cut down, and I did. If
I hadn't, I wouldn't be
playing today. I would
have burned out long
ago
Whitworth won her
82nd (tying former
record holder Mickey
Wright) and 83rd (the
present record) pro
titles last year and more
money ($136,698) than
at any other time in her
24 years on the tour.
This past week, at
Miami, after starting
out with a 5-over par
77, she shot 690-71
for a 1-under 287 that
was only two strokes
off Nancy Lopez' win-
ning pace.
"I still play at times
as well as I ever have,
but getting off to bad
starts � choking in
reverse I guess you'd
say � have made
things more difficult
Whitworth said rueful-
ly. "There are so many
good young golfers on
our tour that just play-
ing pretty good isn't
good enoughany
more
Whitworth said
Palmer, who has a suc-
cessful second career
going on the Seniors
Tour, once told her he
continues to compete
on the regular PGA
tour because he feels he
has an obligation to his
public.
"He feels there are a
lot of people at those
tournaments who want
to see him and that cer-
tainly appeared to be
the case when he had
just about the entire
gallery at Los Angeles
where he was leading
midway through the
final round she said.
"Oh, how I wish he
could have held on and
won that one. What a
shot in the arm that
would have been � for
him and for golf
Whitworth said
talent alone doesn't win
golf tournaments.
"There are a lot of peo-
ple who have the talent,
but you also have to
have the desire, that
something extra.
"It bothered me last
year that I was having
trouble getting
motivated she said.
"You've got to be up
for a tournament to
play well.
"I've never felt I had
to win, even when I was
winning seven-eight
tournaments a year
said Whitworth. "I
never went out saying I
have to win this week,
or even that I have to
make this putt.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
OR. Q Bahama!? Tahoe?
Snowsnoe? I'll go anywhere. I lava
you. Truly. SWEET P.
TO ALAN WOOOARO: Dear
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Bear. Little. Luke, Boommm �
Happy Ji, oo what??
SOUTHERN BELLE: Either way.
it doesn't matter The vine is too
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FOR A GOOD TIME, call the t,m
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ROOMMATE
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ROOMMATE:mature female
wanted as live-in housekeeper
Expenses paid plus other con-
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only, pi ease
COUNSELORS for co-ad summer
camp in Me mountains of Norm
Carolina. Room, meals, laundry,
salary and travel allowance. Ex-
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Reasonable rate. All papers. Call
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AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE Complete audio repair call
after BM. Marti lit- 11H.
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WANTED: HANDCRAFT and
POTTERY Items fee resale an
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FLORIDA SPRING BREAK.
Reservations new being taken far
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 8, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 08, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.247
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57532
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