The East Carolinian, February 3, 1983






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Sty 2za0t (Eartfliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 NO3T-
Thursday, February 3,1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10.000
TKE House To Begin Repairs
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wniei
Assistant to the Chancellor
Charles R. Blake said he expects
renovation to begin soon on the Tau
Kappa Epsilon fraternity house that
was seriously damaged in an early
morning fire Jan. 8.
Blake, who is faculty advisor to
the ECU TKE organization, told
The East Carolinian that several
estimates on the cost of repairing
the damage have been received and
an effort is underway to secure a
construction loan to pay for the
repairs.
However, Blake said he feels cer-
tain that the house will be available
for occupation sometime in mid-
March. Currently the TKE building
has been condemned by Greenville
City Building officials.
Because of a series of errors that
Blake said were not the fault of any-
one individual, the fire insurance on
the TKE house was allowed to lapse,
resulting in no coverage for the re-
cent damages. Blake said sufficient
collateral would be needed to secure
a renovation loan.
According to Blake, much of the
help the TKE's are receiving is com-
ing from TKE alumni members.
"They're (alumni members) very
helpful with their moral support,
time and energy and financial sup-
port Blake said.
Blake indicated the TKE's would
probably be seeking financial
assistance from the family of Paul
Rose Harwin. Harwin, one of the
founding members of the ECU-TKE
chapter, died shortly after the
chapter was formed in 18.
At present, Blake said there are
between 10 and 12 TKE alumni
members who are involved in the ef-
forts to aid the ECU chapter. He
said that 180 TKE alumni nation-
wide were offering their assistance
in the effort. "We get calls offering
support every day Blake said.
Orginially it had been reported
that a representative from the TKE
national headquarters in Indiana
would be visiting Greenville to con-
sult with the local chapter on several
matters. However, according to
TKE national spokesman Gary
Eperson, the trip would not be
necessary because the situation was
being handled well by Blake and
other local officials.
"We're extremely pleased with
the attitude of the chapter and the
alumni Eperson said. "We are
looking forward to getting the house
fixed up and just resuming normal
operations again
Both Blake and Eperson have
been in regular contact with each
other on the situation. Eperson said
the national fraternity is willing to
provide whatever type of assistance
it can, such as advice and counseling
relative to the renovation.
Eperson said a fund for housing
See TKE. Page 3
Alcohol Use Levels Off Across Country
PilOto By STANLEY I 6ARY
TKE fraternity house was condemned after it was damaged by an early mor-
ning fire last month. Advisor to the fraternity Charles Blake said that
repairs may get under way soon. The fraternity did not have fire insurance.
By GREG RIDEOUT
NmMttor
The number of students who
drink alcohol � estimated at 82 per-
cent of the approximately 12 million
college students nationwide � may
have leveled off for the first time
since the 1950s.
Educators Cautious
Reagan's Aid Plan Considered
(CPS) � College lobbyists in
Washinton say they like President
Reagan's proposal for a new educa-
tion tax savings plan, but are
withholding support of it until they
hear the details.
"I think the principle the govern-
ment is putting forward here is ex-
tremely positive says Bob Aaron,
spokesman for the American Coun-
cil on Education and a leader in the
lobbying effort last year that helped
defeat the president's proposed
financial aid cuts.
But Aaron says much depends on
how the principle is put into effect.
The "principle" is something
called the Individual Education Ac-
count (1EA), which would be similar
to the Individual Retirement Ac-
count (IRA).
Under the plan, parents could put
away a certain amont of money �
say. $2000 a year toward their
child's college education and deduct
the amount from their total taxable
income. Consequently, the parents
pay less in taxes each year by saving
toward college.
The money stays in the account,
earning a high interest, until the
dependent starts college. As the
money is withdrawn, the parents
reportedly would be taxed on the in-
terest earned, but not on the amount
they originally deposited.
The tentative plan was leaked to
the press two weeks before Presi-
dent Reagan was due to publish his
proposed budget, which would in-
clude the IRA if Reagan ultimately
decides to adopt it.
One college lobbyist labeled it "a
trial balloon" to "see if it would be
palatable to replace the federal
capital contributions to the National
Direct Student Loan program, the
State Student Student Incentive
Grants and the Supplemental
Educational Opportunity Grant
Indeed, most of the lobbyists
questioned said they'd support the
idea if it wasn't used to replace
other forms of federal student aid.
"If the IEA would be a replace-
ment for need-based aid we would
not support it Aaron said. "If it is
a supplement to need-based aid, we
would support it
"Until we really see the budget
package as a whole, we don't know
how to react adds Dennis Martin
of the National Association of Stu-
dent Einancial Aid Administrators.
"If 1 were king, as it were, I
would hope it would not take away
from any existing student aid he
said.
"If this is being proposed in place
of a number of existing funds
observes William Laidlaw of the
American Assembly of Collegiate
Schools of Business, "I would not
be in favor of it
Laidlaw also wants to see the
plan's details before supporting it.
He wanted to know in particular
how much the money in the account
would be taxed when it is
withdrawn.
"If you take a tax bite out of it
when you're ready to use it, you
would kill it he asserts.
Details of the plan won't be
available for the time being, says
Duncan Helmrich, U.S. Depart-
ment of Education spokesman.
"Someone around here is working
on it, but we don't have anything to
release yet
Even before it is released, the lob-
byists' major criticism of the tax
savings principle is that it benefits
only wealthier families.
The tax break, Martin says,
"works only to the extent that you
have a meaningfully large income.
You can't save money you don't
have
"A family of four making
$12,000 a year is not going to be
able to sock away $2000 a year for a
college education Aaron adds.
"These (incentives) do not help the
intellectually-talented children who
are in the ghetto
Aaron speculates that in the year
2001 "we will look back on this pro-
posal and find the average family
taking advantage of it had an in-
come of $40,000
It may take that long for the real
benefits of the savings plan to ap-
pear, according to Martin. "We're
talking about assistance that will
come a generation from now. It
does not speak to the needs of the
students now
The study, coauthored by State
University of New York sociology
professor David Hanson and In-
diana University health and safety
professor Ruth Engs, found that
side effects due to heavy drinking
has also leveled off.
ECU's drinking population, 87
percent of students faculty and
staff, is following the same trend,
according to the director of the cam-
pus alcohol training program Jerry
Lotterhos.
Lotterhos' facts are based on a
study done by an alchohol task
force at ECU in 1980.
The Engs and Hanson study is the
first nationwide study of college
drinkers. The research used the
responses of more than 5000
students in 50 states. Their study
shows that problems associated with
alchohol abuse, such as fighting,
lateness to class and damage to
university property, are also leveling
off.
Nationwide, 18.4 percent of the
student population have missed
classes because of a hangover; at
ECU approximately 30 percent of
the students have missed at least one
class due to drinking.
Hanson believes part of the
reason for the leveling-off might be
because students are substituting
other drugs, such as marijuana, in
place of drinking, and ECU's Lot-
terhos tends to agree.
In the national survey students
who reported driving a car while
drinking has increased to over 45
percent. ECU students reported a
driving-while-dnnking rate of over
50 percent, with juniors topping out
the list at 60.3 percent.
Lotterhos said, for the most part,
the nationwide data is typical of
ECU's drinking patterns.
Among other findings of the
Hanson and Engs study: white
students drink more than black,
religous students drink less and
students with a low GPA are more
likey to drink heavily.
Even though, as the study sug-
gests, student drinking is leveling
off, college officials still have to
contend with the problems related
to campus alcohol abuse. Accidents,
vandalism and other crimes have
Po�� �, STANLEY LEAKY
Jerry Lotterhos
caused many campuses to institute
get-tough policies on drinking.
ECU's Department of Public
Safety has taken measures to curb
drunken driving on campuses.
Although, according to some of-
ficers, the rate is driving under the
influence has gone down because of
todav's students use of other drugs.
WZMB Celebrates A nniversary
Registration Resister Ford Stresses
Sign Up Is Only One Step To Draft
By STEVE DEAR
SUM Writer
Yesterday marked the first an-
niversary of the broadcasting life of
WZMB � and the students at the
station are proud of what they have
accomplished over the past year.
WZMB General Manager Warren
Baker and Programming Director
Jim Ensorman told The East Caroli-
nian that the station's first year of
broadcasting with what they call
"an alternative concept to radio"
was more successful than they had
anticipated. "We've got a lot better
station than anyone thought we
would have Ensorman said.
It had been a four-year struggle
before the station finally went on
the air last year. From the time in
April 1978 when John Jeter, then
the General Manager at WECU-AM
(which had suffered from
unrepairable technical problems and
eventually went under), first pro-
posed what was to become the for-
mat of WZMB-FM on the morning
of Feb. 2, 1982, when it began its
first radio broadcast, the station has
had many problems.
Equipment holdups, personnel
changes, license mixups, transmitter
problems and troubles with signal
tuning were only a few of the pro-
blems that plagued the station's first
four years.
Now those problems seem to be
all over for the station. Baker and
Ensorman said that most of the
listeners' responses to the station's
"album-onented rock" programm-
ing, along with several different
music programs, have been very
favorable.
The station now presents a wide
variety of feature, album-rock pro-
grams. These include: "The Eiectnc
Rainbow Radio Show featuring
heavy-metal rock from 3 p.m. to 6
p.m. on Friday and from 12 a.m. to
6 a.m. on Sunday morning;
"Adventures in Modern Recor-
ding at 11 p.m. on Thurday in
which selections from rock albums
are reveiwed; "Ennerveiw" (that's
with an "E"), a program at 8 p.m.
on Wednesday in which locally- and
nationally-known rock bands are in-
terviewed and "Forgotten Songs
and Unsung Heroes" (the name
speaks for itself) from 8 p.m. to 9
p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday.
The station also plays songs by-
feature artists everyday from 9 a.m.
See WZMB, Page 3
Draft Registration resister Russell
Ford spoke before several hundred
ECU students Wednesday during
seven public appearances on cam-
pus. Ford is the first person to be
sent to prison for draft resistence
since the Vietnam War.
The Wesleyan College
undergraduate began his rigorous
day at 9 a.m. and didn't finish his
"���� By CINDY WALL
Russel Ford
campus visit until after 9 p.m
when his final appearance in
Mendenhall coffee shop ended.
Ford, 19, is one of 13 men in-
dicted by the federal government for
refusing to comply with the new
registration law enacted during the
Carter administration.
Ford, who is currently out on bail
from Connecticut Federal Court,
said there are between 500,000 and 1
million men who have not
registered. Ford could face up to
five years in prison andor a
$10,000 fine.
Like the other dozen indictees,
Ford was open and vocal to govern-
ment officials regarding his non-
compliance with the law. Upon
reaching his 18th birthday. Ford
sent letters informing President
Reagan, the Selective Service
System and several other govern-
ment officials of his intentions to
not register. Failure to register for
the draft is a felony.
During his campus talks, Ford
told students that th federal govern-
ment was using draft registration as
a "trial ballon" to test the public
response to the idea. Ford warned
that a lack of opposition would be
giving a greenlight to the
govcrnemnt to re-enact a full draft.
"Selective Service Registration is
a trial ballon Ford said. "The
government wants to see if their
program will be successful
If successful, Ford believes the
government will not only resume a
full draft, but also use soldiers in a
"Vietnam-like interventionist war in
Latin America or the Middle East
"Registration is part of tne
government's militarization of the
United States Ford added. He
warned students that it would be
their "classmates, friends and
neighbors" who would be called on
to fight in such a war.
Student response to Ford was
mixed with an equal amounts of
students showing sympathy and
disapproval with Ford's position.
One English instructor who invited
Ford to speak in his class noted that
several of the students disagreed
with Ford's position, but that
See RESISTER, Page 5
� y CtNOY WALL
Wet Ground Hog Day
The Greenville ground nog probably stayed in his burrow yesterday as gusty winds and scattered showers made
the day a little unpleasant to some, Mild temperatures continued Down East, however, to make the rain more en-
durable.
�MMMMikPMlH





THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 3, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to nave an item printed
m the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian in care of the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications Building
Fuers and handwritten copy on
odd sued paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no cliarge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
ana suggest mji you oo not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline for announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
paDer and 3pm Wednesoayy tor
the Thursday paper No an
nouncements received alter these
deadlines wm be printed
This space s available to an
ca'npus organizations and depart
ments
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Volunteers needed to assist in a
physical activity setting on cam
pi s with handicapped children on
Wednesdays from 12 30 1 30 Con
tact Dr Dave Porretia �757 6441)
Good opportunity for field work
experience
HORSEBACK RIDING
The Outdoor Recreation Center
is sponsoring horseback riding
tr,ps to Jarman's Stables Reser
vations and payment for the
Thursday afternoon trips are due
by 3 00 PV each Thursday Rates
are SS 00 per hour Transportation
is provaed with shuttle leaving
Memorial Gym at 3 30 PM sharp
For more information or reserva
tions can or stop by the
Intramural Recreational Services
Outdoor Recreation Center (113)
Memorial Gym Phone 757 6911
Hours Monday and Friday 1 00
PM 5 00 PM Tuesday, Wednes
day Thursday 2 00 PM 4 00 PM
S. R. A.
Escorts are needed tor the
Escort Service Anyone interested
� r being an escort please contact
your dorm director if you are a
dorm resident of if you live oft
campus contact the SGA office
PUT A LITTLE HEART
IN YOUR SOUL
rha twelfth annua' wa'k tor
h iidr fy is convng up hs spring
The walk wm take place on April
16 beginning at Green Springs
Park Anyone interested in help
tg come to the Hunger Coalition
meetings on Thursday nights at
7 -X) p m at the Newman Center
�S3 East Tenth Street or call
TS1 4J16
ECU LARCRSSECLUB
Meet at the bottom of College
HiH on Monday Tuesday, and
Thursday afternoons from 3 00 to
5 00 PM For more into can
757 6064 or 757 1366
KAPPA SIGMA
the Brothers of Kappa Sigma
would like to congraduiate ano
wflcome the Alpha Upsilon pledge
ciass into our fraternity The
pledges are. Buddy Bundy, Mark
Potto. Mike Sosa. Steve Aman
Greg jolmson. Scott Perovea
Dean McCr.ckard Mike Geiger
and Paul Peck.ns so tar
Ae would also like to remind
everyone that BAHAMA
MAMA ' is coming soon!
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
The Greenville Peace Commit
tee meets every Friday night at
610 S Elm St GPC consists of peo
pie actively engaged in peace and
lustice work on a local, state, ana
naitonal level It you are in
terested m learning more about
the GPC, please call 7S8 490 or
come at 6 30 p m (Fridays) for a
dinner meeting
NEW STUDENT
ORIENTATION
PROGRAM
The Office of the Associate Dean
of Student Life, located in
vVhichard Building Room 210. is
now taking applications tor the
New Student Orientation Program
held in June and July Applicants
should have a good scholastic
average and should not be plann
mg on attending Summer School
Interviews of the applicants will
begin around the middle ot March
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Crawford Loritts a traveling
speaker with Campus Crusade of
Christ will be speaking this Fn
day. Feb 4th at 7 00 pm in
Mendenhaii Dm 221 He will be
speaking on The Direction of
Black America " Also he will be
presenting an upcoming con
ference entitled Direction '83
Refreshments will be served Ad
mission is tree
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed for Art Depart
ment self help positions are
available tor nude model.ng at
J5 02 per hour P Lease see the
following teachers Ray Elmore
Tran Gordley Davy Davenport
WesCrawley. Betsy Ross Michael
Voors
SCUBA DIVING
Spring break, March 6 12. dive
the Bahamas From Ft Lauder
dale, 540 00. includes meals, lodg
ing and diving aboard the 65' dive
boat "The Bottom Time " There
are a limited number of places
available and reservations are on
a first come basis For mtorma
tion and registration, call or visit
Ray Schart Director ot Aquatics.
Mmges Aquatic Center 757 6441
SCHOLARSHIPS
District 773 of rotary Intern
tionai is pleased to announce the
avaiiablity to two young people for
an academic year of foreign study
for 194 85 These awards include
transportation, tuition, books, sup
plies, and a stipend tor hying ex
penses
They may be in the areas of
Graduate Study undergraouat
Study. Teachers of the Han
dicapiped. Journalism or Voca
tionai Study
Applications must be made
through the local rotary Club in
the person's permanent residence
or in the place in which they are
full time students As it take
several weeks to complete the ap
plication process, it is necessary
tor interested persons to start im
mediately Submission of applica
tions must be no later than March
1. 1983
Traits which will be evaluated in
the selection process shall include
academic achievement, leader
ship ability, persona! character
and the promise of being an
outstanding ambassador of good
will to a foreign country
PSICHI
Psi Chi presents another In-
teresting and informative evening
on February 9 at 7 30 pm in Room
129. Speight The feature speaker
will be Mr F James, Director of
the Career Planning and Place
ment Office He will talk about job
opportunities in Psychology and
other related areas This is open to
members and any interested in
dividuals Psi Chi members, do
not forget to apply for the 2
scholarships available to you
CAREER CHOICE
The Strong Campbell Interest
Inventory is offered every Tues
day at 4 PM m 305 Wright Annex,
when school is in session with the
exceptions of examination period
and registration day This is
available to all students at no co- f
No formal registration is required.
LECTURESLIDE
Laurie Fendrich. painter,
teacher, lecturer will be at ECU
School to Art on Tuesday night,
February 8 at 8 PM, in Jenkins
Auditorium A workshopdiscus
sion is scheduled for Wednesday
morning, February 9 at 10 AM in
Jenkins 1326 All interested per
sons invited
COMMITTEES
Applications are still being ac
cepted tor students wishing to
serve on university Committees
tor 1982 82 school year Twenty
three (23) students positions are
open Committees with vacancies
are Canvassing &, Soliciting on
Campusll), International Student
Affairs (1). Residence Lite (3),
Status of Minorities (2), Status of
Women (3), Student Health Ser
vices ll). Calendar (1). Teaching
Effectiveness (2). Continuing
Education (1), Course Drop Ap
peals ID. Credits, (1), General
College 11), Teacher Education
(1), University Libraries (1),
University Curriculum (2) Ap
plications are available at the
following locations Office of the
Vice Chancellor tor Student Life,
204 whichard. Mendenhaii Stu
dent Center Information Desk,
SGA Office, Mendenhaii Student
Center. Office of Intramural
Recreational Services. Memorial
Gym and Residence Han Direc
tors' Offices Questions about
University committees and
memberships may be directed to
the Office of the Vice Chancellor
tor Student Lite (757 6541)
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
The Brothers and Lil Sisters of
Sigma Phi Epsiion would like to
welcome the following pledges
Jay Briggl. Timothy Burgess. Ron
Carrea Richard Cook, Sam Davis.
Scott Evans, William Gams. Mike
Hoard Randall James, Donald
Fail, Paul Fiores. Michael Liddy.
John McCall, Scott Short. Wiliam
Smothers, Brad vanzee. Greg
Wester. Chuck Wmgo, Mark Page
Be ready tor the most exciting
semester ever!
NEWSTUDENT
ORIENTATION
PROGRAM
The Office of the Associate Dean
ot Student Lite, located in
Whichard Building, Room 210. is
now taking applications tor the
New Student Orientation Program
held in June and July Applicants
should nave a good scholastic
average, and should not be plann
mg on attending Summer School
interviews of the applicants will
begin around the middle of March
UNDERWATER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Tuesday and Thursday,
February 15 24 from 7 10 pm Pre
requisite Basic Scuba Certifica
tion from a recognized Scuba div
ing association such as NAUI or
PAD 1 This is a course of under
water camera handling and
covers underwater photographic
equipment, films, photo techni
ques and lighting techniques Con
tact Division of Continuing Educa
tion, 757 6143.
OFFICIATING
Baseball Softball officiating
Monday, February 21 April 11
from 7 9pm The course is design
ed to be of interest to spectators,
players, coaches, and school
athletic intramural teachers and
to prepare those interested in job
opportunities in umpiring Contact
the Division of Continuing Educa
tion. 757 6143.
GAMMA BETA PHI
HONOR SOCIETY
Our next biweekly meeting will
be held on Thursday Feb 3 in
Mendenhall's rm 244 at 7pm Yes
members, it has only besen a week
since the last meeting but this
meeting is as important as the last
so plan to attend Interested per
sons are invited to attend
MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP
The English Department invites
applications for the Russell M
Chnstman Memorial Scholarship,
awarded annually to a junior
English major for exceptional
academic achievement, outstan
ding potential in the field of
English, and significant involve
ment in extracurricular activities
The amount of tne award is J500
Applicants should complete the
Student Scholarship Form
(available from the Student
Financial Aid Office) and send it,
together with a brief letter
describing their academic
achievements, extracurricular ac
tivities. and plans tor future study
or career goals to the Russell M
Chnstman Memorial Scholarship
Committee, co the Department ot
English The deadline for appnca
tions is March 4, 1983 For further
information contact Erwin Hester
101 English Department Annex
GRADUATION
Graduation announcements are
available in the Student Supply
Store They are 82 tor a pack of 5
ano are located at the jewelry
counter
Remember to pick up your cap
and gown before leaving school
These keepsake g-jwns are yours
to keep providing that the gradua
tion fee has been paid For those
receiving a Masters degree, the
tee pays tor the cap and gown but
there is an extra fee of til 75 tor
the hood
CORSO
On Monday February 14 at 5 00
CORSO will meet in the Allied
Health Building The meeting is
open to all Corrections and Social
Work majors ano intended ma
jors All interested students are
welcome and encouraged to come
NASW
To a" Social Work maiors and
intended maiors. The NASW will
meet Monday, February 14, at
4 00 in Room 103 at me Allied
Health Building Your attendance
will be greatly appreciated Thank
you
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V�
I -
FANTASY
The Student Residence Associa
ion presents Fantasy A semi
ormal dance will be at the Holi
lay Inn Hohdome on February
)6th from 9 1 There will be toun
rain drinks, buffets and a cashbar
Music will be provided by the Elbo
room Tickets are on sale for t5 00
a couple, an S R A card is re
quired They may be purchased
from any Vice President of a
residence nan or the S R A office
in the lobby of Greene Hall trorr.
2 4 Monday through Thursday
SIG EP YARDSALE
Attention! Sigma Phi Epsiion
will have a yard sale this coming
Saturday Feb 5. 1983 from 8 00
am to 4 00 pm items include
clothing ano other household
items' Location 505 East 5th
Street ph number 7S2 2941 across
from Jenkmgs Fine Arts Center
SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED1'
ALPLHA KAPPA
ALPHA
The Theta Alpha Chapeter of
Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority, inc
invites all interested ladies to our
1983 Spring Rush it will be held m
the Multi Purpose room in
Mendenhaii. Thursday Feb J at
7 30 Proper attire
COMMUNICATE IN
SPANISH OR GERMAN
Conversational Spanish Tues
day. February 15 April 26 7 8 30
p m Conversational German,
Tuesday, February 15 April 26
7 8 30 p m Botr courses are open
to both beginners and former
students who want to brush up"
on the language Contact the Divi
Sion of Continuing Education
757 6143
BASKETRY
A beginners course m Basketry
,s being offered on Wednesday
mghts beginning Feb 9 1983 trom
6 9 PM The instructor is Mary
Ann Hutlo The workshop is free to
all members of the Crafts Center
The cost of the Crofts Center
Membership is S10 00 per
semester Sign up in the Crafts
Center on the bottom floor of
Mendenhaii Student Center bet
ween the hours of 3 10 PM Monday
through Froay and l? 5 PM on
Saturdays For further inform:
tion, can Linda Barkand MSC
Crafts and Recreation Director at
757 66H ext 260 or the Crafts
Center at 757 6611 ext 271
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering two
Gravely Foundation Scholarships
for undergraduate art students of
the iunior and first semester
senior rank Each scholarship it in
the amount of $334 00 The Gravely
Foundation Scholarship is m the
School of Art has been established
at East Carolina University
through an annual contribution to
the East Carolina University foun
dation, Inc . by the Gravely Foun
dation of Rocky Mount, North
Carolina To qualify, a student
must nave a grade point average
ot 3 5 m art, and an overall
average of 3 0 Slides of five works
(name, title, media, and sue)
must accompany the scholarship
application form Application
forms may be obtained from the
School of Art Office The deadline
tor all completed application
material is March I, 1983
ECGC
United we stand, divided we
tall! The ECGC will meet Monday,
Feb 7 at 7 30 p m at the Newman
House tor a wine and cheese
social Activities for the semester
will also be discused So, bring
your favorite wine and cheese and
participate All interested persons
welcome
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
mg change of maior week for the
Spring Semester snould report to
Mmges Coliseum trom 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday. Feb 9. 1983
tor a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre
requisite for official admittance to
the physical education maior pro
gram More detailed information
concerning trie test is available By
calling 757 6497
Any student with a medical con
dition that would contramdicate
participation in the testing pro
gram should contact Dr Israel at
757 6497 Examples would include
heart murmurs, congenital heart
disease, respiratory disease or
significant muscuioskeletai pro
biems it you have and significant
medical conditions please notify
Or Israel even it you plan to be
tested.
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
General College students should
contact their advisers the week
pnor to February 21. 1983 to ar
range tor preregiStration
WZMB
The Electric Rainbow Radio
Show is on WZMB from 3pm to
6pm on Friday afternoon and 12
midnight to 6am Saturday night
That's right, 6 am on Sunday mea-
ning the Electric Rainbow Radio
Show finaiues Saturday night
Album specials are run at �pm and
2am respectively This week
Fridays album special will be the
new Triumph album "Never Sur
render" and Saturday ifs the
Who's "Meaty Beat, Big and
Bouncy" Tune to ERRS for the
jamiH
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HI telicw students! Would you
enjoy a chance to be YOU I Well
you can! Come 10m me tun and
fellowship at the Baptist Student
Union There you can find home
cooked meals for only 81 75 on
every Tuesday at 5 30 pm You
may even find a good volleyball
game when the weather warms
up1 On Thursday's at 7 30 pm. we
take a PAUSE to catch a Spiritual
breath from our rushed week of
student activities There are also
many other activities offered but
you'll never know what we nave
until you come and join us
752 4646
ACTING CLASS
Acting class meets Monday.
February 14 March 21 trom 7 9
p m Beginning Acting I w�ll ac
quaint you with basic acting
techniques reflective of the
method" approach instructor is
Steve Finnan, a tomer member of
the ECU Department of Drama
and Speech, who has directed off
Broadway productions m New
York Contact Division of Contmu
ing Education, 757 6143
WOMEN'S AWARENESS
MONTH
west Area Residence Count I
has set aside February as a
special month ot programs
dedicated to its residents The first
of these important programs will
be a discussion on women's legal
problems given by Greenville
lawyer Ann Heffelfinger on Thurs
day. February 3at 7 OOP m. in the
.Fletcher Hall Social Room
Throughout the month we wfll also
be presenting programs on rape,
women s health concern s. sexual
harassment and other topics that
women encounter in the academic
and professional areas All are
welcome to attend
NORTH CAROLINA
STUDENT
LEGISLATURE
Want to know what new rules
new regulations and new .ssues
may affect your future" Let nCSl
the North Carolina Student
Legislature help you find out what
might happen tomorrow today'
NCSL'S membership drive is still
going on, as are the Monday n.ght
meetings l7pm in room 212
Mendenhaii). so come by ano tnd
out what's new tor your future
with NCSL
CARNATION SALE
Umstead Dorm would like to an
nounce its first annual Valentine
Carnation Sate This Carnation
sale is open to an ECU students
Each canahon cost a mere SI 25
and a small charge of 25 icenrs,
tor delivery The carnations will
be sold in the lobby of umsteaa
Dorm pr.or to Valentine s Day
ELBO FLING
Unstead Residence hall would
like to invite an ECU students to a
social at the Elbo Room on Feb
10, 1983 Admission s one (II
dollar with Umstead SRA card
ano two i2) dollars without The
price includes admission beer
music and lots of tun The party
begins at 7 X and will continue un
til 9 30
FAITH, HOPE AND
LOVE
Faith Hope and Love a Chris
tian fellowship founoeo on me
word of Goo meets eat Fr day
mght at 7 X m Jenkins Art
Building Auditorium know mat
YOU are LOVED' Come 'Cxn 'e
action
CRAWFORD LORITTS
Crawford LOrttj a traveling
speaker with Campus Crusade tor
Christ will be speaking this Fri
day. Feb 4th at 7 X PM m
Mendenhaii Rm 22! He will be
speaking on "The Direction of
Black America Also he will be
presenting an upcoming con
ference for black students entitled
"Direction '83 " Refreshments
will be served Admission is free
S.A.B.
There win oe a meeting of 'he
Student Athletic Board Tuesday
Feb 8. 1983 in Room 242 of
Mendenhaii Student Center at
5 X Business includes our Spring
Semester Membership Drive
The East t arolinian
Sen
if aeoo'wpuj
umr I v.
"OW i �
Pubi.sneo every Tuesoa� �"C
Thursday during tne araoe"
fear ana ever Wednesday ou'
mg the summe'
The East Carolinian s � si
Leal newspaper of Eas'
Carolina Un.verS'ty. OwneC
operated ana published tor arc
by "e students of Eas" Ca� ivi
University
Subscription Rate 120 yearly
The East Carolinian officer
are located in the Old Sou
Building on the campus of EC'J
Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Senc aocev
cnanges to The Eas" Ca'c ' a"
Oid South Buiai"g ECL, &ree'
ne NC 27834
Telephone W 6364 MM .IC"
MASSAGE CLINIC
Need a muscle relaxed II �Ou
do. come tc 'he Massage C m : a'
the Beik Bunong on "ru-sca�
February 3 Tfe Junor anc Se" o�
Physical Therapy stjoets M
hoid.ng tne Massage Dink Irom
6 X 9 X p rr m me P I ae v
the trst floor of Beik The .� 3St ,
only $1 X ana ltchat are aa ab'�
at me door or can pe purdtBtM
trom any P T s'uaef Sc ma
on over -eiax ano en,oy
FLOWERS
Snow your apprec a' on 1st Inal
special girt or g-jy m you' ' e w
be taking orders tor 'OSes I U
6 S23 12 845 carnations IS i
6 S7 12 812 W'i be se ng Fee
2 �
CLOGGING
Tnere s sfin some room In the
Clogging ciass be-ng offeree bi
the Depa'tment ot Ua .e'S �
unions One must sign 'jp E� Ff
day February 4 1983 'o be eii,
bie indivduais who �oc'e � �e '
participate must register m pe'
son at me Mendenna S'uoe
Center Central Ticket ctftice bet
ween the hours of 10 X AM aa
4 X PM Monoay through Fr,aa�
For more information can Linda
Barkard MSC Crafts ana Recrea
tion Director at 757 mi I ext j�o or
the Central Ticket Office at ear
266
SCUBA CLUB
The next meeting has been
changed to Feb 14th at 5 X m
Memorial Gym rm 105 B For
more into can number 752 7384
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakhouse
Thurs. 3oz.
n 3.99
wSalad Bar '4.49
Fri & Sat 8oz. Rib Eye '4.99
wSalad Bar '5.59
FM 97 3
i 1st ANNIVERSARY s
CELEBRATION CONTINUES j
I THURSDAY FEB.3rd 8
All request programming with
HAVING PROBLEMS


rfSJB
two in a row programming
AT THE ATTIC VALENTINO
Ladies free til 10:30
1
with
DRUGS?� ALCOHOL?
SCHQOL?
FAMILY?
AY FEB. 4th

Take Out Service 2903 E. 10th St. � 758-2712
264 By Pass 756-0040
Hours ll:00a.m 10:00 p.m. � Mon. Thurs.
10 00a.m. 11:00p.m. FriSun.
1
Dedications Day
A T THE A TTIC DA YSTAR
Admission 91 for the first 91 students
SSATURPAY FEB. 5th

w
Wc Can Help
Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL A DRUG PDOGH AM
301-303 Erwin BIdg
757-6793
Concert Night
DOC HOLLIDA Y AT THE A TTIC
I Admission $2.91 5.�
SHOOT BILLIARDS,
OIL CHANGE
LUBE AND
FILTER
Major Brand Multigrada OH Up To 5 Qts
Ex of ret Fes IS
COUPON
FRONT END
Allignment

BUSY ?
i
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i
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i
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s10
$14.85,
I
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I
COUPON
'Expires Feb. is
mm aam am aaai ��� aaai aan �
J WGOODYEARi
TIRE �" CENTER!
OFFICIAL NC. INSPECTION STATION
DOWNTOWN
7� DICKINSON AVE
WEST END
SHOPPING CENTER I
!
756-9371
It
ON'T
FORGET YOUR CAR!
I
1
WZM
( ontinuwl From Page 1
to 11 am
Aside trom album
oriented rack. WZMB
also presents a jazz pro-
gram e from 6
p m. to 8 pm; a
highly-acclaimed
classical music program
trom noon until 6 p.m.
on Saturdav and Sun-
day; a soul program
from 8 pm to 9 :
on Sa
iempc
proerl
V a m
Bui
nev
eleven
over
ne'
time
Morals
i
�. i
science student da
:ng that she cannot con-
scientioush - for
anv cor-
poration that sv con-
tributing to the
"proliferation of
destruction' of
earth has vtritten 111
to several N
Carolina
organizations
Catholic church of-
ficials explain
plight anc; jl � .
assistance in
her a job.
Mary Ridei 12 a -
that as a
science major -�
accounting min
road to her .aree-
"pretty m
a job with big b
or the military
work my way up.
"The prob "
conscientiously I ca
go to work every
knowing that I'm h
ing to make our -
more dangercv.
to be
Rider wrote tetters
severai Cath pi
including F Jc
Gossman. the Bishop
of the Catholic Diocese
of Raleiah and former
x-xxxxxxx
I John's
I 503 E. 3rd Si
I & Pitt Plaza Shopr
1 We Will B
1 Sat. 12th, 8
&Sun. 13tl
1 We deliver oi
"Don't forgi
Sweetheart
special Day
- i
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3
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Phone.
.enclosed
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- Si'P 10 vHfly
�s Cironnun others
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ltl� CiTipus ot ECU
s c
6 -ft 6 3�" 630
PASSAGE CLINIC
1 muscle -
� �' � nil ��'


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�� 1 I� i able
' sec
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FLOWERS
r appre it -rrtai
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14
S 3 SS
A-5 Feft
CLOGGING
more "orn-aior. ca' v.ncia
Barbara WSC C-ati. ana ke
'�or D.rwlor at 7 5? b6H �� ?� or
m C'rai T rhf 0ce a e�i
SCUBA CLUB
lG PROBLEMS
with
COHOL? FAMILY?
HOOL?
anHelpV
elpins Students
IOI A DRUG PROGRAM
3 Erwln Bldj
57-6793
1
BUSY?$
i
THfc fcAiT CAROLINIAN
FfcBRl ARt 3. ;V83
WZMB Celebrates Anniversary All Month
Continued From Page 1
to 11 a.m.
Aside from album
oriented rock, WZMB
also presents a jazz pro-
gram everyday from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m a
h i g h ! y - a c c ! a i m e d
classical music program
from noon until 6 p.m.
on Saturday and Sun-
day; a soul program
from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.
on Saturday and Sun-
day night; and, a con
temporary gospel music
program from 6 a.m. to
9 a.m. on Sundays.
Baker and Ensorman
said that WZMB's
news department has
developed very much
over the last year. The
station now presents
news programs eight
times each day and in
the future will present a
news and public affairs
program called "One
Moment Please
Additional programs
include "Tennis Shoe
Talk Show" on Tues-
day and Thursday at
2:30 p.m. when ECU
intramuraJs are discuss-
ed. Also, a show
featuring National
Lampoon comedy
albums is presented im-
mediately after
"Ennerview" on
Wednesday.
During the last year
WZMB has increased
its staff from 30 to 50
members. All but five
members of the staff
are volunteer students.
Baker and Ensorman
told The East Caroli-
nian that they strongly
wish that the disc
jockeys received pay-
ment. Baker suggested
that they at least receive
the minimum wage for
the hours they are on
the air. They added
that with paid disc
jockeys the station
might be able to broad-
cast over vacations dur-
ing the school year. The
station does not broad-
cast during the regular
vacations (when most
of the students are not
in Greenville). Baker
said that the station
received a number of
complaints from
listeners in Greenville
because it did not
broadcast during
Christmas vacation.
However, during
both summer sessions
last year WZMB did
broadcast. Baker
described the station's
ability to broadcast
then as "a monumental
task
Baker and Ensorman
said that the station
does take suggestions
and requests from its
listeners. They stressed
that WZMB is both a
campus and communi-
ty station. "Although,
the students come
first Baker said.
Throughout
February WZMB will
be celebrating its first
anniversary by offering
its listeners a variety of
gifts (from grants
donated by local
businesses) and con-
certs at The Attic with
little or no admission
charge. Some of the
gifts which will be given
away this month are:
T-shirts, albums, din-
ner coupons, and roses
for Valentine's Day.
Morals Limit Job Choices
An ECU computer
science student claim-
ing that she cannot con-
scientiously work for
any company or cor-
poration that is con-
tributing to the
"proliferation of
destruction" of the
earth has written letters
to several North
Carolina peace
organizations and
Catholic church of-
ficials explaining her
plight and asking their
assistance in finding
her a job.
Mary Rider, 22, said
that as a computer
science major with an
accounting minor, the
road to her career is
"prettv well paved; get
a job with big business
or the military and
work my way up.
"The problem is that
conscientiously 1 can't
go to work every day
knowing that I'm help-
ing to make our world a
more dangerous place
to be
Rider wrote letters to
several Catholic priests
including F. Joseph
Ciossman, the Bishop
of the Catholic Diocese
of Raleigh and former
ECU Catholic chaplain
Father Charles
Mulholland, who now
lives in Cary, N.C and
directs the state chapter
of Pax Chnsti, an inter-
national Catholic peace
organization.
In her letters. Rider
described her dilemma
with the question,
"Where and how can I
use my degree to work
for peace and the bet-
terment of our planet?
"I can not in good
conscience go to work
for a multi-natinal cor-
poration that exploits
the people of South
America, Africa, the
United States or
anywhere else Rider
wrote. "Neither can I
go to work for one
which builds weapons
or anything else that
would be used for the
destruction of my
brothers and sisters and
our world. This limits
me greatly
Rider said that she
had been struggling
with this predicament
for years and was hop-
ing that some of the in-
dividuals and organiza-
tions she v. rote to could
help her find a solu-
tion.
"Whether you wash
windows, write the
payroll program, turn
the screw or push the
button, if you're work-
ing for General
Dynamics, McDonnell-
Douglas or countless
other companies you're
contributing to the pro-
liferation of destruc-
tion
Rider went on to say
that her dilemma is
more than not wanting
to work for companies
involved directly in
defense. "Almost all
multi-national corpora-
tions exploit people in
the name of profit
Rider said. "How
could I go to work for
Nestle's when I've been
boycotting them for
five years?"
"I have always tried
to live my life as a
Christian, specifically
as a Catholic Rider
wrote in her letters to
Gossman and
Mulholland. "I've been
concerned for some
time with the way our
world leaders most
often choose to resolve
conflict. Now I feel a
deepening call as a
Christian to be a
peacemaker
"I really don't know
what my options are
Rider told The East
Carolinian. "That's
why I've written these
letters. I figure, here
are the people who are
working to make our
world more just and
peaceful, maybe they
can help me figure out
how I can add my
knowledge to their
forces
Rider also sent letters
to the War Resisters
League, the American
Friends Service Com-
mittee, the North
Carolina Council of
Churches, the Peace
and Justice Commmit-
tee of the Diocese of
Raleigh
TKE House Gets Repairs
Continued From Page 1
renovation was
available through na-
tional headquarters.
The ECU-TKE frater-
nity can apply for such
aid if they desired. The
national TKE board of
directors would make
the final decision on the
loan.
Blake said that
although they had not
ruled out the possibility
of applying for the na-
tional loan, they might
apply for a loan
through a local bank
because they wanted to
incorporate the renova-
tion loan into a com-
plete new morgage.
Eperson said that an
annual visit by the na-
tional organization to
the local chapter would
probably take place in
mam
March or April. There
are approximately 350
chapters of the TKE
fraternity nationwide.
Blake said that
despite the current
situation, the ECU-
TKE chapter would not
fold as a result of its
current problems.
"They (the alumni)
don't want to see this
chapter not make it
Blake said. "That's a
mnuimi
concern of evervbodv
involved, but we're
gonna make it
Blake added that he
was working with the
ECU TKE's on what he
called "an extensive ex-
amination" of the
policies and procedures
of management being
used by the fraternity.
He said he would pav
particular attention to
finances.
Sag
Happy
Valentine
and a
Heart!
only M0.00
This beautiful bras
plated bud vise with a
clear glau tube hotds vour
big red heart valentine
and a pretty red roe bud.
lABuddi-Vase Von Can
Continue to Reuse
Open Sal Sun
� Mon. 1-5
eenvill Flower Shop
027 Evans Street
Phone 758-2774
t
VB�
W h
I John's Flowers
503 E. 3rd St. 752-3311
& Pitt Plaza Shopping Center 756-1 160
! We Will Be Open
Sat. 12th, 8:30 until
&Sun. 13th, 12-6
We deliver on Sunday
"Don't forget your
Sweetheart On the
special Day of love
123 E.5thStr
752-7483
Thursday - Spaghetti Special $2.49 all you can Eat 5-9
Friday Happy Hour 4-7:00
Dollar Specials
Friday night with Saturday night with
Steve Brian Ashley Bailey
Special on your favorite beverages of all types
Friday and Saturday nights 9-1 KM)
Sunday-Lasagna Special $2.99 ail you can Eat 5-9
Monday - Pizza and Pasta $2.99 allvoucantal5.9
Watch For Our Daily Luncheon Specials
Coming Next Week Our New and Improved Menu
pizza Utejs 100 zesty pizza
21 fewer calories.
Ear light tonight order PTA "pizza Lite delivered
Pizza Transit Authority
When it comes to pizza, PTA comes to you
757-1955
$ Send Flowers cj I m$M TOOE
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Conclusions paw l '� � ay tot :ne deeiop-
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Give a
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Valentine's Day
February 14th.

i
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Valentine's Day is February 14th.
Don't forget all those special
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117 E flFTH ST
GREENVILLE N C 27834





Stic East (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding miller, chiihimi�
Mike Hughes, Managmttduw
WAVERLY MFRRITT, Omc� 01 Mivtmn ClNDY PLEASANTS. Sp MM
Scott Lindley, ���� h Greg Rideout, n,� e�
Ali Afrashn m. j� mm Steve Bachner, an. i n iw�"
Stephanie Croon, �� Juliana Fahrbach, m-
Clay Thornton, rc�� To�D Evans, Pro�mm��
February 3, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
NCAA Upgrade
New Importance For Academics
The NCAA's recent controversial
upgrade in academic standards has
brought with it not only the ex-
pected patent disapproval of several
of the nation's black leaders but has
also raised several questions about
the feasibility and fairness of college
entrance testing itself. Once again,
the tides shift.
Critics have long condemned the
Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SAT) for
being "culturally-biased" in favor
of white students, a problem some
black leaders claim is evidenced by
recent testing figures. In 1981, for
example, 56 percent of all blacks
who took the SAT scored under 700
(the NCAA's proposed minimum
admissible score); in that same year,
whites averaged 927 in combined
mathverbal scores.
Perhaps the black leaders have a
point; perhaps the method of stan-
dardized testing in the U.S. does not
lend itself to an accurate estimate as
to how a prospective student will
fare in college. In fact, no standar-
dized examination can ever be whol-
ly and completely fair.
Thus, the black leaders decided at
an opposition meeting called by
Southern University President Jesse
Stone in January to reassess their at-
tack, which was originally aimed
directly at the NCAA's revisions.
Apparently, several of the leaders
realized the futility of fighting the
NCAA head on about the
academics issue. Hence, they decid-
ed to restructure their own battle,
attacking instead a system wholly
unrelated to athletics. Despite their
aiming the fight at the base of the
problem, it almost seems they're
trying to divert attention from the
major issue at hand. Perhaps they
don't have all the answers after all.
And wouldn't it seem just a bit
strange if a group of black leaders
� if, indeed, they take the title
seriously � should condemn an
upgrade in academic standards in
NCAA schools? Think about it.
For too many years, the collegiate
black athlete in the United States
has been consistently exploited
beyond shame. Consider the plight
of the "average" black collegiate
athlete (if there is such a thing) in re-
cent years: Playing out his or her
eligibility � and in the meantime,
making money for the university �
these students have all too often
(but, by no means, always) been
simply forgotten when the scholar-
ships expire. What it all boils down
to is that athletes are
characteristically pampered for four
years; they're encouraged � maybe
not directly and definitely not at all
schools � to downplay academics
and to concentrate on sports.
So, at the end of four years,
scholarships terminate, and where is
the average minority athlete? Well,
according to statistics, he's out in
the cold � "not good enough" to
make the pros and not educated
enough to find a fulfilling job on
the outside.
Along with the other black
university presidents, Stone has call-
ed the NCAA's rule changes
"patent racism because, in his
estimation, they will have the effect
of barring many blacks from inter-
collegiate sports. Apparently then,
Stone is a proponent of the status
quo; apparently, he'd rather see the
current practices of exploitation and
subsequent trauma continue.
Indeed, it is time the NCAA put
into practice the theory it has long
preached. Academics must play a
more important role in the life of a
studentathlete if the all-too-
familiar practice of cranking out
mere four-year sports investments is
ever to be eradicated.
Consider This
Two hundred and sixty-seven
years ago, on this date in history, it
was February 3, 1716, and contrary
to popular belief, Ronald Reagan
wasn't yet born.
Central America On Edge As
Reagan Recertifies U.S. Aid
By PAT O'NEILL
On Jan. 21, President Reagan, through
the state department, certified for the third
time that El Salvador should continue to
receive U.S. military aid.
According to the Reagan administra-
tion, the government of El Salvador,
despite "great obstacles is making pro-
gress on human rights. In a 67-page docu-
ment sent to Congress, Reagan also said El
Salvador was laying the foundation for a
democratic government.
Because of El Salvador's dismal record
on human rights, the state department is
required to give such certification on pro-
gress in human, political and economic
rights every six months as a condition for
continuing sending aid.
Three times, Reagan has supported the
re-certification of El Salvador, and on
each occasion, reputable human rights
organizations throughout the world have
issued statements of shock and disbelief.
Rep. Mary Rose Oakar, DOhio, called
the re-certification an "outrage Several
hundred protestors, including 10 from
ECU, went to the state department on Jan.
24 under the banner: "We are saying 'No'
to the lie of certification in El Salvador"
and " 'No' to U.S war movers in Central
America
The state department protestors issued a
statement of their own: "While Reagan
presents this facade of concern for human
rights to North America, the people of
Central America see a very different face
of U.S. policy � genocide in Guatemala,
not-so-covert war in Nicaragua, intensive
militarization of Honduras, scorched-
earth counter-insurgency in El Salvador
For the most part, Reagan supported his
human rights improvement claims by using
STCANGE1 (TO TOOK THIS SATURDAY MORNING TV
VIOLENCE BUSINESS SERIOUSLY, BEFORE
Independent Truckers Strike
Not A Viable A Iternative
By MIKE HUGHES
Although it is a still a relatively modern
form of showing dissent to one degree or
another, the workers' strike in the United
States and abroad has become the most
widely-used symbol of labor dissatisfac-
tion in the 20th century.
In theory, a strike, a shutdown, or
"walk-off as it is equally commonly
referred to, is generally intended to il-
lustrate two things: dissatisfaction over
working conditions and solidarity of union
members.
Unfortunately, in many strikes, unifica-
tion never seems to rise above the
theoretical stage; those goals which are
thought by some to be "common" among
all union members and parties concerned,
turn out to be the fledgling ideas, the
whims, of only a few.
Such a "devout" exhibition of solidarity
has become evident in the past few days.
The loosely-organized national indepen-
dent truckers strike, which entered its se-
cond day Tuesday, has been marred by
several incidents of senseless violence and
bloodshed. And for George Franklin
Capps, a truck-driver from Sclma, the
strike exacted a most costly toll. A sniper's
bullet, undoubtedly aimed from the gun of
a disgruntled Independent Trucker, found
its mark late Monday night. Capps was
pronounced dead shortly after 11 p.m.
Shortly after the killing, two other
truckers traveling U.S. 701 were also fired
on, only nine miles from the site of Capps'
murder. Another North Carolina man was
injured early Tuesday near Baltimore,
when a sniper's bullet struck just behind
his head, shattering glass.
As of Wednesday, random shootings na-
tionwide had resulted in 23 injuries among
independent truckers and had damaged
250 rigs.
Subsequently, many non-striking
truckers in Eastern North Carolina and na-
tionwide are arming themselves, traveling
in convoys of two or more and avoiding
driving at night.
Although state and national officials
claim they understand the complexities and
seriousness of the situation, it is ques-
tionable whether or not they actuallv
realize the far-reaching effects, the ab-
solute perils, which lay just around the cor-
ner. In fact, the newborn '�controversy" is
fast growing into a veritable war, with the
same senselessness, the same implications
as a war.
The strike, called by the 30,000-member
Independent Truckers Association, is the
latest action by the organization protesting
the recently enacted increases in trucking
fees and gasoline taxes But despite its na-
tional implications, it has been sanctioned
by neither the Teamsters union nor a good-
ly portion of the Independent Truckers
Association's own membership. Never-
theless, it goes on � toward what end isn't
exactly clear � but it goes on.
Ever the "objective bystanders state
investigators maintain they have not yet
determined whether these incidents are
related to the controversial strike. Well, if
that's not the case, then who in the hell else
do they think would be responsible? It
seems highly unlikely that hundreds of
similar violent incidents around the coun-
try are mere acts of random discontent.
having no connection whatsoever with the
strike Highly unlikely.
It is also unlikely that we have seen
worst of the strike. Undoubted!). the
violence will continue until an "agreeable"
solution is reached. No shortage of goods
has yet been seen by wholesalers or con-
sumers, but analysts agree that shortage-
could ensue if the strike persists.
And in the meantime, those trucker-
courageous enough to rise above the
fruitless protests � those who merely pur-
sue making a living � will continue to be
subjected to the violent harrassment which
has marked the controversy's first few
days.
What's more, spokesmen for the In-
dependent Truckers Association also ap-
pear to have delusions of grandeur insofar
as supposed outside support. Bennett
Whitlock. president of the American
Trucking Association, has already called
for an end to the violence and has con-
demned the strike as the work of "a few ill-
advised and frustrated individuals
But the delinquent truckers, intent on
"proving their point" (whatever their
"point" is), appear to have no intention of
listening to reason. They have been assured
repeatedlv bv Whitlock and other union
officials 'that the ATA will take everv
necessary action to have truck fees reduced
during this session of Congress.
Unfortunatelv, they want immediate ac-
tion. And if they're not satisfied with out-
side efforts to reduce trucking fees and gas
taxes, thev've already made it more than
obvious that they're ready and willing to
take the initiative.
rCampus Forum
Parking Poses 'Lots' Of Problems
the "body-count method The ad-
ministration claimed that "only" 5,840 El
Salvadorans were killed last year through
political violence. Human rights groups
put the figure at well over 10,000. The ad-
ministration's death counts were based
almost exclusively on newspaper accounts
of the killings reported by the
government-controlled press.
The policies of the United States in Cen-
tral America are disgusting. Our military
aid to El Salvador is being used by the
military to kill thousands of innocent peo-
ple. In Nicaragua, not-so-covert support
of the former followers of Somoza is being
used to destroy a decent government. Our
military activities in Honduras, which
borders Nicaragua, are expected to be used
in the destablization of their neighbors.
Guatemala, like El Salvador, is another
case of U.S. support of a murderous
regime.
Of course, all U.S. policies are justified
by the clarion call to prevent communism
� at all costs � from swallowing up Cen-
tral America. All Americans decry Soviet
intervention in Poland and Afghanistan,
yet U.S. activities in Central America,
which Ve just a dead wrong, are not sub-
jected to the same scrutiny.
All Americans should be concerned
about the injustices of our activities in
Central America, especially college
students, because if push comes to shove
down there, it will be you who will be
ordered to fight an interventionist war in
the region. It's no coincidence that Reagan
has continued registration for the draft.
He's got a plan, and anyone who doesn't
want to be part of it better begin to resist
now by saying "No" to the U.S. war
moves in Central America.
I am writing this letter on behalf of
many fellow students who are pursuing
an education, especially in the fields of
social sciences, nursing and medicine.
Each one these fields requires many
hours of research at the Health Sciences
Library. The new library is an excellent
educational facility. But there is a
definite parking problem at the library.
As of late, the East Carolina campus
police have started placing little pink
stickers on cars if they are parked in
"undesignated areas with a fine of
$12.00! I wish someone would pray tell
me where a student can park My car is
not registered with the university since 1
live off campus. I am also an employee
of Pitt County Memorial Hospital;
therefore, I have a red hospital sticker. I
cannot park my car at the hospital since
I am not working while visiting the
library, and the hospital also has a shor-
tage of parking spaces. What I would
like to say is that if students or faculty
are to use the library, then they should
have ample space to park.
I have always heard that a library was
designed to aid a student. When you
have to worry about your car being
ticketed, how can you concentrate on
your studies? Not only that, but what
about the safety of the parking areas?
The students have a parking lot across
the street from the hospital which has a
sign that reads: NO PARKING AFTER
5:00 P.M. If this is true, where do
students park at night? How safe is it for
a woman to be out alone in the dark
walking to a poorly lighted parking lot?
The campus police have some good
points though. They tell young women
to go in pairs at night. WeU, even if you
can drag someone with you to the
library, it still is not safe. What is so in-
teresting to me is where are the campus
police when they are needed? They are
always available to ticket your car. But
if you are being attacked by someone,
you cannot find an officer for miles
around.
I don't know what can be done about
this. But it still remains a major pro-
blem. The main solution I have figured
out is to turn the visitors parking lot into
a visitors of the library parking lot;
therefore, anyone who wishes to use the
library can. There are two reasons for
selecting this solution: (1) There is no
reason to have to buy a university park-
ing sticker if you are an off-campus stu-
dent. (2) How many visitors come to the
Brody Building at night when students
need to use the library and its many fine
sources?
Thank you for the extra worries you
are causing all of us who are continuing
our education.
Robin Ann Overton
Senior, Nursing
Hoop Etiquette
Having read Randy Mizelle's letter in
Tuesday's East Carolinian regarding
Coach Andruzzi's appeal for respect
from our fans, I would like to throw
some new light on the idea of "fan par-
ticipation" and "home court advan-
tage
Fan participation is an absolute must
for a truly successful athletic program,
and 1 am sure Coach Andruzzi would
like to see a good deal of it. There is just
nothing like the support of one's fans to
inspire an athlete's performance. But as
a former high school cheerleading spon-
sor, I instructed my squad to cheer for
us, not against the other team. In other
words, I refused their use of negative
cheers like the old ire-provoking "Look
at the scoreboard � see who's behind
and I forbade the leading of cheers dur-
ing foul shots. Such actions as those
constitute rudeness, not fan participa-
tion. Idealistically, a player should be
allowed to shoot a foul shot in silence,
giving him (or her) the respect that
Coach Andruzzi was calling for.
Furthermore, the home crowd advan-
tage means that our crowd is here to
urge our team on as it plays on its own
familiar surface. The term has nothing
to do with having enough fans present to
addle a foul shooter or yell rude remarks
to opposing team members.
What this all boils down to is that
Coach Andruzzi was asking for sport-
smanlike conduct from our fans. Let's
show our teams our enthusiasm, but
let's aim that enthusiasm in the right
direction, offering opposing teams the
atmosphere of respect and good sport-
smanship that we in turn hope to receive
at their courts.
Lucy Pake
English Department
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
i
Lead
(UPS) - Bia.k college
presidents opposition
to the National C
legiate Mhle
Associat i on' s new.
tougher academu -tan
dards for athle
Resister Fol
In ECU d
( ontinued rrom Pagt 1
overall it was � -
debate
sides were
minded
During an aftei
�ninologv a I
was asked
tions regar ; j
week fed
sentence la
He
were -vm i
his pii
Ford made -�.
points on ne -
betweer
�hat ol
porters
Julie
Flo!
-
t.rt
Open
752-5
"ThePers
We will
Sun.
FKOAf
12. -6 00
t ail f
ale
pecial r
200
ThursCom
Little Sim
FriAXA &
Happy Ho
Admissi
SatDadd
FreakenDeal
Adn
$1.00 Cl
SunJohn
Sho
-ECU&Gn
West-2
'The best Hai
"Quarterspoundj
ground
lhiseej
Sunday- C hees
tea an
Vi lb. of fresh
jlettuce. pickle, oj
Monday & Thui
urger, FF, and
I Tuesday & Fridi
Beef). FF,
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Sand v id
FrM,f�MtoM�taowi
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J
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 3, 1983
PRNINSTV
U ill
'native
�m discontent.
soever with the
��
.a e seen the
: strike I ndoubtedly, the
til an "agreeable"
N age of goods
. wholesalers or con-
agree that shortages
strike persists.
those truckers
to rise above the
se who merely pur-
will continue to be
� harrassment which
� vers 's tirst few
spokesmen for the ln-
ruckers Association also ap
.e delusions of grandeur insotar
&ed outside support. Benneu
president of the American
as alread called
to ' . lence and has con-
tr it - the work ot "a few ill-
:rated individuals
lent truckers, intent on
neir point" (whatever their
o have no intention of
. have been assured
ck and other union
re ATA will take everv
�.ave truck fees reduced
n of Congress,
inately. the want immediate ac-
if they're not satisfied with out-
Is to reduce trucking fees and gas
've already made it more than
i' they're readv and willing to
. e
oblems
eboard � see who's behind
fade the leading of cheers dur-
;hots. Such actions as those
rudeness, not fan participa-
listically, a player should be
shoot a foul shot in silence,
(or her) the respect that
Jdruzzi was calling for.
lore, the home crowd advan-
is that our crowd is here to
Jeam on as it plays on its own
irface. The term has nothing
having enough fans present to
shooter or yell rude remarks
lg team members.
is all boils down to is that
ldruzzi was asking for sport-
conduct from our fans. Let's
teams our enthusiasm, but
that enthusiasm in the right
offering opposing teams the
re of respect and good sport-
(that we in turn hope to receive
urts.
Lucy Pake
English Department
orum Rules
st Carolinian welcomes letters
all points oj view. Mail or
by our ojjice in the Old South
across from Joyner Library,
"�oses oj verification, all letters
iude the name, major and
ton, address, phone number
yure oj the author(s). Letters
to two typewritten pages,
iced or neatly printed. All let-
object to editing jor brevity,
land libel, and no personal at-
be permitted.
Leaders Shun Standard Exams
(CPS) - Black college
presidents' opposition
to the National Col-
legiate Athletic
Association's new,
tougher academic stan-
dards for athletes may
soon broaden into a
general attack on stan-
dardized tests, black
leaders at a special
meeting at Southern
University last week
warned.
Resister Ford Talks
In ECU Classrooms
Continued From Page 1
overall it was a good
debate because both
sides were open-
minded.
During an afternoon
criminology class Ford
was asked several ques-
tions regarding his five
week federal prison
sentence last summer.
He said most inmates
were sympathetic with
his plight.
Ford made several
points on the similarity
between his plight and
that of the early sup-
porters of the slavery
abolitionist movement.
He said that those op-
posed to slavery were
scorned and considered
"downright un-
American" for their
positions, but later
history proved them to
be right in their beliefs.
Ford, who arrived in
Greenville on Monday,
is here at the invitation
of the Greenville Peace
Committee. He has
also spoke at several
local schools and held
several press con-
ferences.
"We have not fought
hard enough against
standardized tests
Southern President
Jesse Stone told the
press after the meeting.
"This thing opens up a
real Pandora's box
Standardized tests
like the Scholastic Ap-
titude Test (SAT) and
the ACT (American
College Testing exam)
can't predict accurately
how the student is go-
ing to do in college,
Stone added.
Stone led the opposi-
tion at the NCAA's
convention in early
January to new rules
that will require
athletes to maintain a
2.0 gpa in a variety of
science and language
courses and to have at
least a 700 on their
SATs or a 15 on their
ACTs in order to be
eligible to compete in
intercollegiate sports.
At the convention.
Stone called the new
rules "patent racism"
because they would
have the effect of barr-
ing many blacks from
intercollegiate sports.
To press his charge,
Stone called the
meeting of 20 black
movement leaders last
week. But the leaders
decided to �go after
standardized testing
itself rather than the
NCAA at least for the
moment.
In a statement releas-
ed just after the
meeting, Educational
Testing Service Presi-
dent Gregory Anrig
agreed standardized
tests shouldn't be used
to determine academic
eligibility.
"The proposed use
of a fixed cutoff score
on nationally standar-
dized admissions tests
will have effects that
may not have been fully
realized befor this deci-
sion was reached he
wrote.
In using the tests as
factors in admissions,
different schools use
different cutoffs.
In addition, Anrig
noted that 56 percent of
all the blacks who took
the SAT in 1981 scored
under 700.
Anrig agreed "the
"issue cuts across racial
lines" because white
students' average score
in 1981 was 927.
Critics have long
criticed the SATs for
being culturally-biased
in favor of white
students. Stone says his
group will first try to
mobilize the black com-
munity to help him
publicize those biases.
STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES
We are looking for girls interested in being
counselors - artivit instructors in a private girls
camp located in Henersonville, N.C Instuctors
needed especially in Swimming(WSIl, Horseback
riding. Tennis. Backpacking, Archery, Canoeing,
Gymnastics. Crafts, Also Basketball, Dancing, Soc-
cer, Cheerieading, Drama, Art, Office work. Camp
craft. Nature study. If your school offers a Summer
Internship program we will be glad to help. Inquiries
- Morgan Haynes P.O. Box 400c, Tryon, N.C.
28782.
Julienne's
Florist
1703 W. 6th Street
Greenville, V.C.
Open I0am-5pm
Mon-Sat
752-5216
"The Personal Touch"
We will be open
Sun. Feb. 13
Call for the best
Valentines Day
Special in Greenville
200 West
ThursCondo Kid & AXAl
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Happy Hour4:00-7:00
Admission- .500
SatDaddy Kooi & The
Freaken Deacon 9:00-1:00
Admission-
Si.00 College ID
SunJohn Moore's Beach
Show 2:00pm
-ECU & Greenville's Best
West-200 W. 10th St.
flp-ssssssss?
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QMS
FINE
FOODS
Fantastic Friday Happy Hour
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75C Glass of Wine
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Regular happy hour prices
Every Mon Thurs.
All Domestic Beer To Take Out
s2.75 per 6 pac. sales tax
Please come and enjoy yourself however
tor those tew that tind it necessary
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Tommy & Danny Phoro
Located in Georgetown Shoppes
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This Week's Specials
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t






?
IHfc EAST � AROI IN1AN
Style
FFBRLAfO I. 1983
Page 6
King 9s Mystique
Coretta Spreads The Word
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SuffWrtm
"When we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring
from every village and every hamlet, from every state
and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when
all God's children, black men and white men, Jews and
Gentiles, Protestants and C at holies, will be able to join
hands and sing in the words of the old ,egro spiritual:
'Free at last. Free at last. Thank God Almighty, we are
free at last "
Lincoln Memorial, 1963
Martin Luther king, Jr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. has been dead for almost 15
years. Despite his short life. King left an impact on
United States history that will never die.
Besides his famous speeches and several books on the
subjects of equality, justice and non-violence, King's
message is being kept alive by the people who struggled
with him in the movement for civil rights, a movement
still in its embryonic stages. Coretta Scott King, wife ol
the slain "prophet" is one of the people who keeps this
movement alive today. Though she doesn't possess the
oratorical skills of her husband, Mrs. King has emerged
as perhaps the most well-known black woman in the
world.
She visited Hast Carolina this Monday and as is most
often the case, the house was packed with standing
room only accomodations. Standing ovations capped
both ends of her lecture with two more in between.
In 1969 she founded the Martin Luther King Jr.
Center for Nonviolent Social Change, INC. in Atlanta.
Georgia. Since that time King has traveled around the
world trying to keep the "dream"alive.
The King Center is a living memorial to the late Dr.
King reserving the legacy of what the civil rights move-
ment accomplished under his ledership, while at the
same time serving as a focal point for continuing the
non-violent campaign for social political and economic
justice throughout the world. Under her direct leader-
ship, the Center promotes the concept of non-violence
through seminars, workshops and institutions for
teachers, communitv leaders and government offcials.
During her lecture King praised her husband for the
leadership he gave to the movement for "Justice,
Brotherhood and Equality King, was dressed in a
finely tailored black outfit and seemed to show few
visable effects that she had aged much in her 20 plus
years of activism.
Words like "unity, togetherness and solidarity" were
repeated many times to her standing room only au-
dience which seemed to be equally filled with both
young and older faces. There was, however, a
noticeable lack of white faces.
She spoke of poverty, racism, and war and violence as
the "triple evils" in our world today, war being the
"ultimate violence "These issues effect people univer-
sally she commented.
King also mentioned that the struggles for freedom
and peace were particularly difficult ones for people liv-
ing in the third world countries. She particularly men-
tioned nations which she said were struggling for their
own self determination. King also spoke of the struggle
for equality that blacks are facing in South Africa. She
quoted her husband as saying that Johannesberg, South
Africa was the most segregated city in the world.
"Johannesberg is still segregated King said, "But the
system of apartheid in South Africa is not as strong as it
once was
King saved her strongest comments when recalling the
struggle that black Americans made during the US civil
rights movement.
King referred to the movement that was largely led by
her husband as "a movement that changed the course of
the history of this nation She quoted her husband's
comment that Birmingham, Alabama is the second most
segregated city in the world.
Birmingham was one of the places where it all began.
Citizens there, under the leadership of King, banned
together for over a year in the successful effort to stop
segregation on city buses, "they refused to ride
segregated buses for 381 days King said, "they were
as determined to keep us in bondage as we were deter-
mined to be free
King also recalled the actions of four college students
in Greensboro, North Carolina, who in 1960 gained na-
tional attention by sitting at a segregated lunch counter,
"nobody ever heard of Rosa Parks until she sat down
King said in another reference to a famous civil rights
activist who sat down in the tront of a segregated bus
She sat down and freedom fighters everywhere stood
up
King spent a great deal of her lecture time promoting
three things: the recently released movie about th life of
Mahatma Gandhi called Ghandi; the activities and work
of the Martin Luther King Center, and the next major
event that the center is sponsoring which is the 20th an-
niversary celebration of the famous "Mack on
Washington" which took place on August 28, 1963.
King referred to the 20th anniversary event as the "I
have a dream celebration She encouraged everyone
who is concerned about the problems of unemployemnt,
poverty and racism to attend the event.
Coretta Scott king
MMM �. �COTT LllKM
Iceberg Coming In February
Michael Iceberg, a Julliard trained, one-man, multi-keyboard
showman who has been performing continuously to enthusiastic
crowds crowds at W alt Disney W orld for seven years, will bring
his show to Hendrix Theatre, Feb. 21 at 8 p.m. Tickets are on
sale at the Central Ticket Office at $1 for students, $2 for
youngsters and $3 for faculty, staff and the public.
Minimum
New Booi
By EMILY CASEY
Fncounters With the Future: A
Forecast of Life in .he 21st Century,
by Marvin Cetron and Thomas
O'Toole, McGraw-Hill (1982), 308
pp $12.95.
The Metaphors of Consciousness,
ed. by Ronald Valle and Rolf von
Eckertsberg, Plenum (1981), 521
pp $25.
The first book is a sweet sweet
cake with cherries in it. The second
is cake too � a delicious, nutritious
cheesecake, to be eaten and digested
joyfully a wedge at a time.
Cetron, president of Forecasting
International, presumably furnished
data and conclusions to journalist
O'Toole. O'Toole then put together
a fascinating read. This review con-
cerns the content not the style.
Cetron has three fairlv rare
strengths. He goes out on limbs. He
is concrete. He puts toether plausi-
ble international scenarios. Join
these virtues with his insistence on
validating exhaustive computer
studies by checking with top ex-
perts, and you get a lot from the
horses' mouths. Chapter 4, daring
to consider the survival of nations,
is particuarly good for its stability
analyses and telling details (France's
separation from NATO, the Shah's
major mistakes, Argentina's
fragmentation, Iran's confused
bleak prospects, Nigeria's polariza-
tion, more). Cetron bravely
forecasts the reunification of Ger-
many, with reasons!
Similarly, Chapters 8
(Telecommunications Revolution),
9(Robotics), and 10 (Jobs for
Tomorrow) are strong. Chapters 2
(What If People Lived as Long as
Trees), 3(Energy Sources for
Tomorrow), and on rnonev are
much weaker; I turn there now.
Dramatic halt-truths are tossed out
concerning, for example, jogging,
dopamine, aggression, and central
nervous system repair, the section
Life Span of 150 Years is a house of
cards. Careless statements on the
Alaskan pipeline, energy waste, fu-
sion power, and aerospace stocks
are easy to spot There are a tew
troublesome contradictions (p. 283
vs. p. 287 on human space
tolerance, p.89 vs. p. 90 on the cost
practicality of solar cells).
But this book, Flncounters With
the Future, is a fun read. Almost
everv page contains useful tidbits.
But when social factors enter, look
out for overlooked major forces.
(Republican House gains in 1982
were predicted.) But I don't know
that any future tank (see p. 6) has
done better than Cetron's especially
on international probabilities.
There is no way I can overpraise
The Metaphors Of Consciousness
fcvery one of its 23 chapters (by 25
authors, including torewordist Fnt-
jof Capra) is a treasure.Many of
them are not available anywhere
else. The chapters on radical
behaviorism, on Bohm's holomove-
ment, and on kant's recoil from
vital "Thymos" were revelations to
me. If Timothy Leary and Swami
Rama write with intoxication, thev
can be forgiven for the thrill they
give. And the other 23 chapters are
written with responsible scientific
care.
Hard Times: A Remembrance Of Old ECTC
By MIKE HAMER
Staff Writer
Fifty years ago the United States was in the middle of
the Great Depression. Everyone has heard stories of
what life was like then, and some have perhaps been
curious about how their family members who were liv-
ing back then fared through those hard times. Those
persons who were attending college at the time were
perhaps the lucky ones. Here are a few glimpses of life
at East Carolina University in the winter and spring of
1933.
Tuition at the school was twenty-five dollars per
quarter, or seventy-five dollars fcr an entire school
year. Tuition plus room and board for a prospective
teacher was $85 per quarter, or $255 the year. Student
loans were available through trust funds which had been
set up and donated by previous graduating classes.
In the spring of 1933, East Carolina University was
called East Carolina Teacher's College. If one were a
male student on campus at the time, it may have been a
kind of awkward paradise. There were a thousand
"girls" attending ECTC at the time and only a hundred
"boys The boys were called "co-eds The university
has grown significantly since those days. ECU currently
has 12,400 students, 56 pecent of which are women.
Mr. Troy Burnette, a native of Greenville, was one of
those lucky males attending ECTC back then. He gave
me an idea of what campus life was like in the "good ol'
days Burnette is currently retired after 35 years of
running his own insurance agency in Nashville, N.C.
"I was a history and economics major back then
Burnette said the other day, "but I changed my mind
when it came time to do my student teaching. Soon after
I graduated from schoool war came up. When I return-
ed from the war in 1945 I spent some time trying to
figure out what I was going to do, and then I decided to
get into the insurance business. I had my own insurance
business for 35 years
"I played as an end on ECTC's first football team
Burnette said, "and I played outfield and pitcher on the
baseball team. I played center on the basketball team,
too. There weren't many of us boys back then so those
of us who played sports could be on all the teams The
Jan. 25, 1933 issue of the TECO ECHO, The East
Carolinian's counterpart of that day, shows that Troy
Burnette scored four points in a low-scoring game in
which ECTC defeated Chowan College by a score of
38-27.
"A lot of the girls would come to the basketball game
back then, and a lot of the townspeople would come,
too. We played our games at Wright Gymnasium. I
guess they haye a new gym over there now, don't they?"
"I don't remember any mention being made of Hitler
on campus those days Burnette said. "There wasn't
much discussion of current and political events on cam-
pus. Dr. AD. Frank would discuss issues in some of his
classes, but things were generally apolitical
The Jan. 31, 1933, issue of the News and Observer
carried a United Press lead story stating that Hitler had
been named Chancellor of Germany. The story from
Berlin read, "Adolf Hitler, dapper fascist apostle of an
unfettrered Germany was joyously acclaimed by a sing-
ing, laughing populace tonight as Chancellor of a new
era
The New York Times for the same day carried an
editorial claiming that there was no need for immediate
alarm concerning Hitler's election, but the editor called
for a close watch on the political situation in Germany.
I asked Mr. Burnette if students talked about the
Depression very much. "No, not really he said.
"Students basically accepted the fact that they didn't
have any monev. We didn't expect anything until it
came our way. If you took a girl out, she wouldn't ex-
pect you to spend any money. The girls often talked
about graduating, but they didn't talk about politics
much
In the six month period from January to Jrne of
1933, the TECO ECHO only made two references to the
Depression. One was an announcement that the
previously mentioned Dr. Frank would be giving a lec-
ture at Sheppard Library on the subject, "How the
Governemnt Can Control or Relieve Depressions The
other reference is made by a girl writing in the school
paper that perhaps after the Depression the school
will be able to have concrete walkways because the
board walks are quite bouncy
The Jan. 31, 1933 issue of The Sews and Observer
had two front page stories dealing with the Depression.
Only three jobs were listed in the "help wanted" section
of the paper, and all three of the jobs in sales.
The editor of the Daily Reflector for the same date
was complaining about the number of fines that were
not being paid by the people in Pitt County. Perhaps the
people had no money with which to pay the fines.
Blount-Harvey of Greenville placed an ad in the
TECO ECHO advertising hats for the men in "New
Spring Shades of Gray, Tans and Browns" for $1.98.
The Jan. 11, 1933, issue of the TECO ECHO an-
nounced that the first campus movie of the term was At-
torney for the Defense. The comedy was Micky Mouse
in Blue Rhythm. The paper announces that all comedies
for the term would be either Mickev Mouse. Krazy Kat
or Silly Symphonie.
In this same issue, Willa Mitchell Dickey wrote an ap-
peal on the editorial page calling for an open forum m
the newspaper in which the letters would be censored.
The YWCA sponsored a group of Friday night lec-
tures for the term. Some of the topics were: "Men,
Women and Romance" by Dr Rcbarker, "Do Students
Need Religion?" by Rev. Lillycrop. and "What About
Our Clothes?" by Miss Heltzclaw.
Bowen's store was selling new spring dresses for 95
cent to $5.95.
McLellan's was selling nationally known "Toilet
Preparations" at the popular price of 10 cents.
The Wednesday. Feb. 22. 1933. issue of the TECO
ECHO contained an essay on � hands. "Your hands
may be clean, dirty, dingy or what have you. You look
at a person's hands � you have an idea as to their per-
sonal pride. So often you are judged
Although some people may say that racial harmony
has a long way to go today, one could safely say racial
justice in the 30"s was in dire need of improvement
On Wednesday, Feb. 22, 1933. the Daily Reflector
announced that a public meeting would take place at the
court house to inform the public as to the dangers of
tuberculosis. The meeting was an aftermath of a warn-
ing issued some time in the past by the Pitt County
Department of Health in which the public was urged to
be careful in employing young negro nurses or servants
The paper said, "The statement said tuberculosis was
quite active among young negro women and that the
situation would become more serious unless they were
See ECTC, Page 7
Ear
C Ofllinurd
� .
before
in I
ser
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Gt
S
B
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3
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VOLKSWAi
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!





f
AR i, N83 Page 6
f
V COTT L4ISQK
are
ements
wallo w
overlooked major forces
(Republican House gains in 1982
were predicted.) But I don't know
that any future tank (see p. 6) has
done better than Cetron's especially
nternational probabilities
There is no way can overpraise
he Metaphors Of Consciousness
Ever one of its 25 chapters (by 25
authors, including forewordist Frit-
Capra) is a treasure.Manv of
�'hem are not available anvwhere
The chapters on radical
behaviorism, on Bohm's holomove-
ment, and on kant's recoil from
vital Thymos' were revelations to
me. If Timothy Leary and Swami
Rama write wuh intoxication, they
can be forgiven for the thrill thev
give. And the other 23 chapters are
written w,th responsible scientific
C3XC
ce
CTC
fcld be e.ther Mickey Mouse, Krazy Kat
sue Wilts Mitchell Dickey wrote an an-
fonal page calling for an open forum in
Inont HhC leUerS W�U,d be cened
Iponsored a group of Fnday night lec-
Irm Some of the top.cs were- "Men
,abXbSim RebarkerD� Student
by Rev Lillycrop, and "What About
f Miss Heltzclaw. ut
was selling new spring dresses for 95
selling nationally known ToiIm
the popular price of 10 cents
�� feb. 22. 1933, issue of the TECO
an essay on hands. "Your hands
Kv dingy or what have you. You fook
fe- y�u have idea as to their �r
If ten you are judged
people may say that racial harmonv
go today, one could safely sayTa al
. Feb. 22, 1933, the Daily Reflector
llorm the public as to the dangers of
meeting was an aftermath oTtZJ
lime in the past by the Pitt r�
Uh ,n which the plbUc � f�
bvmg young negro nurses observant,
Fhc statement said tuberculosTs lL
k young negro women and 2tT�
kome more serious unless they �
See ECTC, Page 7
Early ECTC Prejudiced
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 3. 19J3
Continued From Page 6
subjected to complete
physical examination
before being employed
in homes as nurses or
servants
There were no blacks
at ECTC in 1933. Sec-
tion 5864 of the
General Assembly
statutes quoted in the
college bulletin stated,
the said college
shall be maintained by
the state for the pur-
pose of giving young
white men and women
such education and
training as shall fit and
qualify them to teach in
the public schools of
North Carolina
The state of North
Carolina repealed its
racial classifications for
higher education in
1957. Blacks first
entered ECU in 1963.
Thirty years previously,
in 1933, a student
writer for the TECO
ECHO referred to a
black staff member as
"the darkey Over ten
percent of the current
ECU student popula-
tion is black. An older
black woman who
returned to the campus
for some teacher recer-
tification courses told
me, "This school sure
has come along way
since the earlv days
The TECO ECHO,
like its present day
counterpart, had its
copy-editing problems.
In an article about a
limited amount of stu-
dent aid the writer says
that, "The admiration
in making assignments
gives preference to
students who are ap-
proaching gradua-
tion
Franklin d.
Roosevelt took office
on March 5, 1933. No
mention was made of
this in the TECO
ECHO.
An editorial in the
March 29, 1933, issue
of the school paper
begins, "College Girls!
Are the pictures in your
room correctly selected
and hung?"
In the Wednesday,
Jan. 25, 1933, issue of
the TECO ECHO, a
girl writes about her
job in the Y store (the
ca npus store). The
wruer complains about
a girl who walks into
the store and asks,
"Are your dopes cold?
If they aren't, I don't
want one (Note: A
dope was a soda in
those days.)
The W.T. Grant
Company was offering
chiffon hosery for 50
cents.
White's Stores, Inc.
on Dickerson Ave. was
holding a sale on New
Spring Millinery � 49
cents to 98 cents (for
women's hats).
Gene Austin was
playing in Broadway
Rhapsody on Tuesday
evening at the State
Theatre in Greenville.
I asked Burnette
about the social life on
campus fifty years ago.
"The atmosphere was
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JAZZ LOFT
Friday FEB 4th
8:30 until
Michael O"Keys
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really friendly he
said, "and the students
all knew each other.
We boys weren't allow-
ed to live on campus in
those days, but every
night after dinner a
group of students
would go to Wright
Gymnasium, and they
would put records on
the record player and
dance. There would be
fifteen or twenty guys
there and about fifty or
sixty girls. We had a lot
of fun
"In the spring, sum-
mer and fall, the
students would often
go to the lake (where
the gazebo currently
stands, behind the
biology building) to
talk or enjoy the quiet.
You know, the girls
couldn't go off campus
with out permission.
They weren't allowed
to smoke either, and
boys weren't allowed
on campus on Sun-
days
There were no bars in
Greenville in 1933, as
prohibition was not
naitonally repealed un-
til December of that
year, Burnette said, "I
don't recall seeing any
beer on campus, but I
do remember that
sometimes a batch of
bootleg whiskey would
show up at a party
Burnette
remembered the movie
stars at the time as be-
ing Bing Crosby, Betty
Grable, Fred Astaire
and Wallace Beery.
Some of the radio and
recording stars of the
time were Al Jolson,
Eddie Cantor, Rudy
Vallee, Kate Smith and
Bing Crosby. Burnette
recalled that Paul
Whiteman's Orchestra
had appeared at ECTC
in the recent past.
People in North
Carolina were concern-
ed about their public
schools at this time.
The Feb. 1, 1933, issue
of hte News And
Observer told of 4,000
persons from all over
North Carolina who
went to the legislature
demanding that the
state strengthen its
schools.
At that time, every
student at ECTC had to
pass both a hand-
writing test and a spell-
ing test with a score of
90. The rules from the
Division of Certifica-
tion read: "Before any
certificate will be issued
for teaching in the
elementary schools, the
records from the in-
stitution in which the
applicant received her
training must show that
she has reached a
satisfactory stage of
proficiency in spelling
and penmanship
So it was back in the
"good ol'days If one
failed her handwriting
test, I guess she could
always get permission
to go off campus and
down to Lautare's to
get a strawberry sundae
with whipped cream for
a dime. Yes, things
have changed a bit here
at old EC.
Fri & Sat Nt 4:30,7,9:30 Hendrix Theatre Adm
ission: ID, Activity Card
Feb 3 is Dollar Day
At Bicycle Post
dollar day only
ask about lay away
Bicvae
POS
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Shogun 400 12 speed CrMo Frame
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February specials include:
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BIG OR LITTLE INITIATIONS
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select from a wide variety of handpainted
items or special order your personalized gift
(ready in two weeks)
Tires 27x1 Gum wall was $7.95
Cannondale Seat Bags was $9.95
Zap Pads (set) was $12.95
Sedisport Chains was $9.95
Zetal Frame Pumps was $6.95
now $4.95
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Spring fashions ore coming in so select early
Celebrating
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Calvin Klein $26.95
BilfBtess $29.95
Chic $24.95
Tres Joiie 520.95
Sasson 527.95
Zeno 526.95
Tom Boy Pouts 524.95
Mono 10 Pom 524.95
Tom Boy Tope 523.95
Hang 10 Tope 513.95
Palmetto Shorts 55.95
Mono 10 Shorts $15.95
La Blanca Swim wear from $28.00 to S44.00
Select Group of tops, Additional 25 discount
Join our Pants and tops Club and help save the Green.
Always priced 30to 50 below Retail
Present your student ID and got an extra discount, except on sole items
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tome in today Hours 10-6 Mon-sat Compare Prices
Boast Sweaters half price
Robert Spruce Sweaters half price
Adidas Warm Ups 20 off
As always,All ECU students recieve
10 off any nonsale item
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757-1955







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 3. 1983
Page 8
Lady Pirates Lose Second ODU Duel
By CINDY PLEASANTS
tjMantoi
Although the difference in scor-
ing was almost the same, the game
between ECU and Old Dominion
Wednesday night was a sharp con-
trast from their previous contest this
season.
The Lady Pirates lost to the na-
tionally sixth-ranked Monarchs,
76-37, in a well-officiated, well-
played game.
The only aspect of the bout that
wasn't so good was the Lady Rats'
shooting. Overall, ECU made 17 of
58 shots for a 29.3 percent shooting
average.
In the last nine minutes of the se-
cond period, the Pirates only made
five of 16 shots.
"What can you say?" said head
coach Cathy Andruzzi. "We didn't
take good shots
But all-America senior Mary
Denkler did make enough shots to
place her as ECU's second all-time
leading scorer in women's basket-
ball history. Denkler scored 13
points to give her a career total of
1,571 points � one point over
previous record-holder Debbie
Freeman.
Right now, Andruzzi would like
to have quite a few Mary Denklers
on her team. With two backcourt
starters out (Loraine Foster,
Delphine Mabry), Andruzzi is
depending on her freshman players
more than ever. But the head coach
said she wasn't let down by the
team's performance against ODU.
"We're young. We're having people
play different positions and getting
used to playing with each other.
Frankly, I thought they rose to the
occasion
An ODU player also rose to the
occasion. While the Bucs were hav-
ing trouble shooting at one end of
the court, ODU's Medina Dixon
was having a field goal day at the
other end. Tying her scoring record,
Dixon pumped in 24 points to lead
the Monarchs. After playing 15
games at the University of South
Carolina, Dixon transferred to
ODU last year. Two years ago, Dix-
on was the most highly recruited
player in the country.
ODU's highly-touted 6-8 center,
Anne Donovan, was held to nine
points by Denkler. Donovan, who
averages 16.2 points per contest, has
been held below double figures three
times this year and has been con-
tained twice by ECU.
ODU Coach Marianne Stanley
complimented Andruzzi and the
Lady Pirates for their performance.
"I certainly feel for her (Cathy An-
druzzi) she said. "1 don't think
there's a coach in the country that
would want to change places with
her.
Pirates Face GMU
By KEN BOLTON
AMtatMt Spar Mllof
When ECU plays host to George
Mason this Saturday afternoon, the
Pirates will be going up against the
nation's second leading corer.
Carlos Yates, a 6-5, 210-pound
sophomore, is currently averaging
27.8 points per game for the
Patriots.
Yates was the rookie of the year
in the ECAC-South last year, and
has proven to be worthy of that
award so far this season. In each of
the last three games, Yates has
scored over 30 points.
ECU head coach Charlie Har-
rison points out that the Pirates will
stick to their aggressive man-to-man
defense against George Mason.
"We're not going to do any thing
different for them Harrison
stated. "1 don't think you can ap-
proach one individual or one team
differently than any other.
"He (Yates) is playing extremely
well right now the first-year coach
added. "He's going to get his
points, but we're just going to have
to play mistake-free and execute as
well as possible
ECU is currently 10-9 overall and
1-4 in the conference, while the
Patriots are 11-7 and 2-3.
In this year's first meeting of the
two teams, George Mason won by
one point, 69-68, in Fairfax, Va.
The contest with the Patriots was
ECU's First conference game of the
year. The Pirates rallied from a
nine-point halftime deficit to pull
within one twice at the end of the
game.
ECU had nine more field goals
than Mason, but Mason made 27 of
33 at the line, compared to ECU's 8
of 15.
Yates was held to one of his
lowest-scoring league games by the
Pirate defense in the first meeting,
as he scored 20 points. Andy
Bolden, who led GMU with 21
points, will miss Saturday's game
for academic reasons.
After playing seven games in 18
days, the Pirates are currently in the
middle of a six-day reprieve, one
which Harrison welcomes.
"Our kids need some rest
responded Harrison. "But more im-
portantly, they need to get back to
school. We've been on the road for
a while
The next couple of weeks will be
important for the Pirates, as five
out of the next six contests are con-
ference games.
ECAC-South
ECU is currently in its second
season of play in the ECAC-South.
The Pirates joined the league in
1981, following four years as an in-
dependent.
The ECAC is the nation's largest
athletic conference, comprised of
233 schools. The South Division is
in its fourth season, while the
ECAC as a whole was founded in
1938.
Upon completion of regular
season play, the ECAC-South Tour-
nament will be played in Richmond,
Va. at the Robbins Center, March
10-12. The tournament winner will
receive an automatic bid to the
NCAA championship tournament.
The William & Mary Indians,
ECU's opponent next Wednesday,
are currently on top of the league
standings with a 4-0 mark. Before a
Monday night loss to VCU, the In-
dians had won eight in a row.
The standings will be important
for all six teams, as tournament
seedings will be determined by final
regular season positions.
The current standings are:
ECACOverall
William & Mary4-011-5
Navy2-111-6
James Madison2-210-8
George Mason2-311-7
Richmond2-39-10
ECU1-410-9
Player Of The Week � Jeff Pehl,
Richmond
Rookie Of The Week � Vernon
Butler, Navy
������
Scoring Leaders:
1. Carlos Yates, GMU 27.6
2. Johnny Edwards, ECU 18.0
3. Dave Brooks, Navy 17.1
4. Keith Cieplicki, W & M 14.9
5. Dan Ruland, JMU 14.4
6. Jeff Pehl, Rich. n.9
Barry Wright, ECU 11.9
Rebounding Leaders:
1. Vernon Butler, Navy 8.8
2. Johnny Edwards, ECU 8.3
3. Dan Ruland, JMU 7.7
Former Tiger Assistant
Hired By Pirate Staff
Rex Kipps, a 30-year old native of
Biacksburg, Va has been hired as
ECU's new defensive line coach.
Kipps had been part-time tight
end coach at Clemson for the past
three years.
Previously, Kipps had been a
graduate assistant at Richmond in
1977-78, and full time defensive line
coach in 1979.
Kipps, a 1976 graduate of the
University of Richmond, played of-
fensive tackle for the Spiders for
two seasons after transferring from
Ferrum Junior College.
At Ferrum, he was an all-
conference lineman in 1974. Ferrum
won the national junior college
championship his senior year.
With the addition of Kipps, the
Pirate coaching staff has only one
more vacancy remaining.
"She's done well to make the ad-
justments she's had to with all the
injuries. They play good basketball.
Even when we were up 38 points, I
was nervous. I knew how they
would come out and play
During ECU's last contest with
ODU, Stanley made accusations
against Mary Denkler, claiming that
she was intentionally hacking
Donovan. Stanley also said that
ECU "played dirty" and blamed
the coaching staff for letting the
game get out of hand.
But this game was in control and
as far as both coaches are concern-
ed, the two teams' last meeting is
history. "That game's behind us
said Stanley. "I think the team was
mentally prepared for this game.
This was probably the best road
game we've had this year except for
the Tennessee game.
"This is the first time in 17 games
I've seen them play with the killer
instinct and by that I mean to play
with intensity
The Monarchs were up 30-16 at
halftime, but the Pirates only hit 5
of 11 field goals during the start of
the second period. ECU's Darlene
Chaney scored 10 points in the final
half and grabbed a total of 13 re-
bounds to give the Bucs a boost, but
Miller and Dixon combined for 12
points to keep the Monarchs up,
58-35, with 5:14 remaining.
The Pirates didn't score again un-
til the last 59 seconds of the game.
Denkler hit a 25-foot jumpshot to
push her over into second place in
the ECU record book.
ODU's Pam Elliott and Dawn
Cullen sank five freethrows between
them in the final minute of the game
to give the Monarchs a 76-37 edge
over the Lady Pirates.
"They go right to the boards
said Andruzzi.
"We just don't have the caliber of
individuals to handle top 20 schools.
That's not saying anything against
our kids. That's just being
truthful
ODU shot 49.2 percent from the
floor and outrebounded the Pirates,
50 to 25.
Andruzzi described the game as a
learning experience, and said the
team mainly needs to gain more
confidence. "They've got to start
believing in themselves she said.
"I don't know think they know
what they can io yet.
"They're 8-9 right now and that
ain't bad. We've come across some
top people. I thought they showed a
lot of poise out there, they never
gave up
Andruzzi praised senior guard
See LADY, Page 10
Sne
Fa v o r i tci
Court
Sevea; teal
to be favoritd
tramural bj
season rolls I
cond week
favorites to
champions in
independer
are
Eigl
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game Jon
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win the mei
hai. .
Alp' .
pears to be t
beat an
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and the Ht
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depender
Garret:
Fletcher arc I
t-I" r� Ho�ofc CINDY WALL
A,U s Darlene Chaney takes the hall to the hoop against ODU's Anne
Donovan.
Women's Track Team Loses Runners
The ECU women's track
team has trimmed down in size
somewhat since the beginning
of the season, with six runners
exiting in all.
Head coach Pat McGuigan
admitted that there were per-
sonality conflicts between she
and some of the players.
"You've got to remember that
these girls are young she said.
"Sometimes it's hard for them
to make the transition. Many of
them acted like they were still in
high school
McGuigan saidhe would not
tolerate any bad-mouthing from
her team. "It's hard for these
girls to come in and hear others
talking with a lot of
pessimism she said. "All that
poison was spreading
Liz Graham, who was only
one of two sophomores on the
team, cited several reasons why
she decided to turn in her sweat-
suit. "There was a lot of con-
flict on the team � a lot of con-
fusion she said. "I hen I had
a heavy load with my schedule
and working. Third, 1 couldn't
deal with Coach McGuigan.
"As far as a track coach, she
is quite competent. On a per-
sonal level, I think in relating to
her athletes, she was immature
Cindy Pleasants
1 Look Inside
"She wanted to be a friend, a
buddy first and then a coach. I
think you lose a lot of discipline
that way
McGuigan contended,
however, that immaturity was
the sole reason why most of the
girls quit the team. "They have
to be motivated and want to
work hard. The majority of the
girls who quit came from well-
to-do families. They've had
everything handed to them
But the nine remaining girls
on the team are quite different,
according to McGuigan.
"These girls have never had
anything handed to them on a
silver platter 1 hey don't take
things for granted "
Another former trackster,
Carolynarr. accused
McGuigan ol "getting into the
girls' private lives
"I don think you should do
that unless it interferes with
track karr said.
McGuigan denied the accusa-
tion defiantly, saving, "We're
not the tootbali team We don't
have set curfews, �.o thev have a
responsibility no! onlv to
themselves but to the team.
"I merely checked up on
them occasionally to see if they
were upholding that
Now with nine members re-
maining, the team is in much
better shape now than before,
McGuigan said. "We don't talk
about the girls that quit she
said. "We're looking ahead
McGuigan praised the team
for being such hard workers.
"They're putting back in 10
times more than the program is
giving them she said
Because the budget is so
limited, we really can't a:
any more runners. The girls
understand our limitations,
though. The) appreciate
everything they get
The Lady Pirates will travel
to Virginia Tech this weekend lo
compete in four relay events.
the sprint medley, the 55-meter,
the one-mile and the 4 1
relays
McGuigan said the team runs
much better in relays than in-
dividual events. "They get all
fired up and cheer each other
on she said.
"Individually, sometimes it's
hard to get up if your team-
mates aren't doing well "

1 t
f
9
Richards Shows True Versatility
ECU Sports Info.
Now in his third year on the
squad, Kevin Richards has become
one of the leaders of the ECU swim
team.
"Kevin is probably the most
talented swimmer, in terms of multi-
events, who has ever been at ECU
said head swim coach Rick Kobe.
"He is also one of the most popular
team members
For most of last season and so far
this year, Richards has swum the
backstroke and individual medley-
events. But his role as backstroker
HMi �y STANLKY LB Aft Y
ECU's Johnny Edwards in earlier action against league-leading William
and Mary.
wasn't planned. His best event in
high school was the butterfly, which
he swam his first year at Ed .
"Our backstroker didn't return
added Richards. "I don't mind
which event 1 swim if it helps the
team
Kobe has come to count heavily
on Richards.
"We don't have a lot of depth in
the back events and we count heavi-
ly on Kevin said Kobe. "So far,
he's done well, scoring consistently
in meets
At the end of the regular season,
Richards switches back to the but-
terfly events for the NCAA Eastern
Regionals. Richards goals, both for
the team and himself, center on the
regionals.
"As a team, we're looking to
move up from last year (when the
Pirates finished fifth). Everyone
who goes should be should be able
to score. I want to place in the top
three in all three of my events, plus
I'd like to win one
According to Kobe, "Kevin has
the potential to be an Eastern cham-
pion � something ECU hasn't had
in a while
Last year, Richards set an ECU
varsity record in the 200 fly at the
regional meet. That wasn't bad for a
swimmer who doesn't usually get a
chance to practice his event.
"Kevin goes against swimmers
who have had all year to practice;
think what he could do if he didn't
have to switch
The 1982-83 swim squad is a
young one, with the majority being
freshmen and sophomores. As a
junior, Richards believes thai puts
an extra burden on his shoulders.
"Some of the newer swimmers
look to us as leaders said the cor-
rectional service major. "I think it
has helped me this year and next
year I look forward to being a leader
as a senior
Richards is pleased with the blend
of this year's team.
"It's a good team explained
Richards. "We're really clos-
Everybody pulls together fo.
everybody else. In the past there
were some divisions, but now we're
working together. It's really fun
Swimming is also a "family" af-
101'
ft
H
Kevin Richards
fair for the Richards family.
"My brother John swam for two
years at ECU and is swim coach for
the Greenville Swim Club said
Richards. "My dad works as a
starter at meets. And my brother
Rose is a loyal supporter
"I've been swimming since I was
eight-years old and 1 still enjoy ,t "
offered Richards. "After I finish
swimming competitively, pro
bably still work out some. I think I
ESSr in iss,su '� �y
I





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gainst ()I)l Anne
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
rtBRLARY 3, 1983
Sneaker Sam Sez
Favorites on the
Court
Seveal teams appear
to be favorites as the in-
tramural basketball
season rolls into its se-
cond week. Strong
favorites to repeat as
champions in the men's
independent division
are the fabulous Joint
tight, who have
averaged 87 points per
game. Jones Enforcers
Level II are picked to
win the men's residence
hall division, while
Alpha F'hi Alpha ap-
pears to be the team to
beat among the frater-
nities. The Kastbreak
and the Heartbreakers
are destroying the nets
jin the women's in-
dependent division.
Garrett, Clement, and
Fletcher are in conten-
tion for the women's
residence hall title.
Alplha Delta Pi and
Alpha Phi are
undefeated in the
sorority division, with
the Kappa Sigma Little
Sisters favored to win
the I if Sis Division.
Rollers Roll On
The fast-paced ac-
tion of intramural
roller hockey is near
finishing one complete
week of stiff competi-
tion. Even though
many participants have
discovered the hardness
of the floor, many
teams still remain in the
race for the playoff
selections. Some of
these top teams in-
clude. Rolla Doobie, El
A slap-shooting bat-
tle took place when the
Loco Flyers, Night
Cruisers, True Pros
and Slay Hippies on
Wheels.
defending champs,
Night Cruisers, met
sticks with the Puckers.
The skill level between
these two teams ap-
peared to be equal. The
Night Cruisers led by
Bill Burnette managed
to score four goals by
the end of the first half
while the Puckers
squeaked in one point.
During the second half
of the contest, Teresa
Vick scored two points
for the Puckers while
the Night Cruisers
answered a scoring
drive with one final
goal. The Night
cruisers held to their
namesake, "cruising
by" the Puckers with a
final score of 5-3. Joy
Admarak and Julie
Bassett led the Night
Cruisers on the defen-
sive side of the contest.
Arm Wrestlers "Grip" Scott
Into Action (176-199
The in-
tramuralBudweiser
Arm Wrestling Tourna
Quisenberry (135 lbs.
and under), and Susan
Bass (136 lbs. and over)
in the women's and in
the men's, Al Adams
(150 lbs. and under),
Thompson
lbs.), and
Racquetball Doubles
The four-wall
madness of racquetball
ment began Tuesday as will be offered in the
the men's 151-175 lbs. form of a doubles tour-
weight class division nament starting
went into first round February 14. Registra-
action. Some of the tion for this event con-
favorite strong arms tinues through next
that advanced included Thursday, February 10.
Curtis Sendek, Steve So grab a partner and
Elgin, and Reggie come by 204 Memorial
McDonald. The com- ICym to sign up!
petition continues
tonight, with the Upcoming Events
quarter-and semi-finals The Intramural
on Febdruary 8 and 10. Department's upcom-
Other favorites in the ing activities include
tournament are Laura the weight lifting meet
and co-rec bowling.
Regis.ration for the
weight lifting meet is
just a press away,
February 14-22. Just
down the lane lies the
entry dates for co-rec
bowling, February
14-16.
Weight Room Instruc-
tion
The Intramural
Department will pro-
vide an instructional
clinic for those in-
terested in learning how
to use the new weight
equipment in the
Memorial Gym Weight
Room. The clinic will
be held on February 10
at 12:00. Instructors
will determing an in-
dividual's working
weights and discuss
steps and repetitions to
achieve specific results.
Stale Borg Won ft Return
CHAR LOTTE,
N.C. (UPI) - Bjorn
Borg, unable to regain
the winning spirit that
made him No. 1 in the
sport, said he hopes his
fans will remember him
"as a great tennis
player
Borg, 26, said
Wednesday his decision
to retire, announced
two weeks ago in
Thailand, was "final
Borg is meeting his last
tennis obligations with
a five-city U.S. exhibi-
tion in preparation for
his last tournaments in
Monte Carlo and
Tokyo.
"I knew I still had
four or five years of top
tennis left but I felt that
I needed to do
something else in life
said Borg. "For me,
the most important
thing is to enjoy and be
happy
doing '
with what I'm
The Swedish-born
player, whose 11 year,
of professional tennis
ranked him among the
sport's top money win-
ners, said when he
began practicing last
October to try to regain
his No. 1 World rank
ing, he found he had
lost his love of the
sport
OPEN24HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
10 Discount
beginning Feb. 1st
on all
dinners & biscuits
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 l Block from Campus
Kein Richards
�rds family
�win id
, .enef S� Club sa.d
M dad works a
at meets And rm brother
e is a loyal supporter "
be�i swimming since I was
t � old d I snil enjov it "
fredRichard. "After I finish
It .rung competitivelv. Hi pro
v still work out some I thmk I
T1' 1,ke t0 ln,0 coachin.
� as an assistant to
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fro mention a few.

Pirate Cager Drops
From B-ball Team
Mike Fox, a junior
guard from Raleigh,
has decided to quit the
ECU basketball team in
order to concentrate on
school work.
"Mike has talked
about this for some
time ECU head
coach Charlie Harrison
said. "He has decided
that basketball is secon-
dary to his school work
and his grades
Fox played in high
school at Raleigh's
Sanderson High. While
playing for coach Bill
Harrington, Fox won
all-conference and all-
metro honors his senior
year.
He averaged 18
points per game as a
senior, 14 as a junior
and 13 as a sophomore, i
"Mike has elected to �
concentrate on his !
studies Harrison said
of the 20-year old
business major. "I'm a
bit surprised of his
decision, but yet
understand and honor
his decision
The ALAMO
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-Support YOUR ECU Team -
Watch the Pirates A ttack
t






10
I HI EAST CARPI INIAN
FEBRUARY 3, 1983
Classifieds
PERSONAL
JANE It Tartaa dotvi't get you a
gift lot Valentin j Day, are you
going to wrap the vine around hit
neck? Southern Belle
MATT Our double dinner date
with K H and J w was a Mast?
(giggle gigglel Did you
remember driving home thu
time? S P
KC How about that tuperbowl
party Sorry the second halt was a
blur, we II have to go to the movies
more often How bout them
Hogs GP
LIFE GOT YOU DOWN? Yeah,
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Continued From Page 8
Karen Truske for her
efforts. "Karen Truske
played a heckuva game
tonight she said.
"She only played a few
minutes last year, and
tonight she was guar-
ding a 5-8 superstar
(Helen Malone)
In the first half, the
Pirates made the first
two points of the game
but then went 8:10
without scoring while
ODU racked up 16
points.
Freshman Sylvia
Bragg hit a bankshot to
JU
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break the ice, but the
Pirates were unable to
catch up as the Monar-
chs completely
dominated inside the
lane.
ECU made seven of
29 shots for a 24.1
percenting average in
the first period.
The Lady Pirates
again return to the road
this weekend to take on
James Madison Univer-
sity on Feb. 5 at 2 p.m
and then play Rich-
mond on Feb. 6 at 3
p.m.
kfeo�oA�Jatoo.�JaafrOtf0)tftatoOa'
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Pregnancy Counielmg For
further information call
� 33 0535 (Toll Free Number
000 221 2540) betweenA V
and 5 P v Weekdays
RALEIGHS WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan S'
Raleiqt
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN abortion icwi �
DEPEND ON �or mcrrsmocteeasterl
" �� met ���� g Center Counselors are
iv i �� :� ana night t- support and � '�
� r i you our safety rrrfort and dnvoc, are
v�� vedt . " �� raring staH (theFlen ng ��� ��
SERVICES �Tuesday Saturday Abortion Ar
. . g � . j . . -nrriester ADort r! "
� - �� � Free Pre tests � et I
� ��� y : � All . Feesfl � nance
Accel ted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
: THE FLEMING
���� � i ��:� CENTER
l
Eat right, pizza Jjite
pizza lite-is 100 zesty pizza
with 21 fewer calories
� unbeiievable?
TRY IT!
Pizza Transit Authority jFRK imwi
When it comes ro pi?z3 pta comes to you
757-1955
urn r. Mali
TO I I I
!njifmnmignnMiiiia�mn
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALLGOLD& SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA& CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
rOl&RINcMAA,
VW 0f �fV SAIES CO m? I�
401 S. EVANS ST open 9 30 530 mon sat
(HARMONY house SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
&
3
The best Pizza
in Town � Honest
LUNCH BUFFET Mon thru Fri 11 2 only 2.99
y? EVENING BUFFET Mon and Tues 530 8pm only 3.09
ij SPAGHETTI Wed all you can eat Compare at only 2.65�
'SJ
KROGEP �
Lowfat
Milk
ft 2 s$3
FRESH
SNO-WHITE
5
itti
It's the fun
place to eat.
Spaghetti Ev-ry Wd�. 5 0O-8 OOp m
"Just like �oting at horn wHti Mem
All you can �at-ONLY 2.65
"J OpenMon. Thurs. 11:30a.m. 11 p m ;
IS Fr' and Sat. - 1130 am. 12 p m A
io 300 E. 10th St aaVt
(
758-6121

"IMMFR JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS at Camp Sea Gull (boys
and Camp Seafarer (girls). Serving as a. camp counselor Is a
challenging and rewarding opportunity to work with young
Deople. ages 7-16. Sea Gull and Seafarer are health and
character development camps located on the cdst of North
Carolina and feature falling, motorboating, and seamanship,
plus many usual camping activities Including a wide variety
of major sports. Qualifications Include a genuine Interest
in young people, ability to instruct in one phase of the
camps' programs, and excellent references. For further
information and application, please write a brief resume of
training and experience In area(s) sklled-to Don Cheek,
Director, Camps Sea GullSeafarer, P. 0. Box 10976, Raleigh,
North Carolina 27605.
Cauliflower
terns a
- ��� re Wed Feb 2
It Fer c '983
ADVEOTiSED EM POLiCv
EaC ot these ad�e" sed 'terns s e
quired to be readily avaiatie '
3ae in eac Kroger Sav or e�:e
as spec il can w noted �sac: I ��
CiC run ou? OT an item e r"P
you your choice of a compa'ar e
Mem h�n avaiaDie naMacttrwj the
same savings or a ramchec mh
will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advent.sed
price within 30 days
Open Mon thru Sat 8am to Midnight - Sun 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
PRESH PROM
THE DEL!
CHEESE OR
Pepperoni
Pizza
c �
k-� .
KROGER SLICED
$m affcaft KROGER SLIC
100� white
Bread
PAMILY SIZE
BATHROOM TISSUE
i Coa jE Cottonelle
6 $
Roll
Pkgs
24 Or
Loaves
WISE BBQ
OR REGULAR
Potato Chips
$4 00
JIF
Peanut
Butter
1802
Jars
KROGER
ALL MEAT
CHUNK STYLE

t
� pat





Hardeer
COST CUTTING COUPONS
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TM





MardegJ
A BIG DELUXE" BURQER. REGULAR
FRIES AND MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $1.79
Good at all participating Hardees restaurants Please present this
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer, per visit, please
Customer must pa am sales tax due on the purchase price Ih.s
coupon not good in combination with am other otters
OFFER GOOD AFTER BREAKFAST MEM HOURS
THROUGH FEBRl ARY 9, 1983
OEI n,s t v. �
� -� � Food Svswi
Hadggr
UNO BACONI� EGG
BISCUITS $1.29
Good at all participating Hardees restaurants Please present this
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Customer must pa am sales tax due on the purchase price This
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OFFER GOOD DURING BREAKFAST MEM HOURS
FEBRUARY 10-16. 1983
- �
1903 - . � ��
Wardeej
A CHICKEN FILLET SANDWICH. REGULAR
FRIES AND MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $1.99
Good at all participating Hardees restaurants Please present this
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Customer must pay am vales tax due on the purchase price This
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OFFER GOOD AFTER BREAKFAST MEM HOITLS
FEBRl'ARY 17-23, 1983
� - . lems �
� �� � ���
Ytardee
TWO SAUSAGE & EGG
BISCUITS $1.29
Good at all participating Harder s restaurants Please present this
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer, per visit, please
Customer must pay am sales tax due on the purchase price This
coupon not good in combination with am other offers
OFFER GOOD DURING BREAKFAST MEM HOITIS
FEBRl ARY 2 MARCH 2, 1983
Ylardeei
TWO REGULAR ROAST BEEF
SANDWICHES $1.89
Good at all participating Hardees restaurants Please present this
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer per rail please
Customer must Pa am safes tax due on the purchase price This
coupon not good in combination with am other offers
OFFFR GOOD AFTER BREAKFAST MEM HOURS
THROUGH FEBRl ARY 9. 1983
�� �
.Ybrdrex
A HOT HAM � CHEESE" SANDWICH. REBUIAR
FMES AND MEDIUM SOFT DMNK $1.79
Good at all participating- Hardees restaurants Please present this
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer per visit please
Customer must pax am sales tax due on the purchase price This
coupon not good in combination with am other otters
OFFFR GOOD AFTER BREAKFAST MEM HOURS
FEBRl ARY 10-16. 1983
HM . -
.
L
.Hadoer
A REGULAR ROAST BEEF SANDWICHL nJGULAR
FRIES AND MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $1.69
Good at all participating Hardees restaurants Please present this
coupon before ordering One coupon per customer per ��. please
Customer must p� am safes tax due on the purchase price This
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OFFFR GOOD AFTER BREAKFAST MEM HOURS
FEBRl ARY 17-23, 1983
Refi RB -�� � �

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J22S
TWO HOT HAM � CHEESE
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Good at all participating Harder s restaurants Please present this
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Customer must pav am sales tax due on the purchase price This
coupon not good in combination with am other offers
OFFER GOOD AFTER BREAKFAST MEM HOITLS
FEBRl ARY 24-MAKH 2. 1983





Title
The East Carolinian, February 3, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 03, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.246
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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