The East Carolinian, February 1, 1983






SJje �aat (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No3. � ,
Tuesday, February 1, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Symposium Kicks Off Chancellor's Installation
s U� Dl IUII L IIALII I
Pnoto By ECU NEWS BUREAU
Dr. Fred Broadhurst
Talks On Symposium
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff Wrllrf
The eighth annual ECU-Phi Kap-
pa Phi symposium will be held
Thursday and Friday. Organizers of
the event are strongly encouraging
student participation and atten-
dance tor the three-session pro-
gram.
This year's symposium will be try-
ing to examine the challenges and
aspirations of humankind in the
year 2000 and beyond. It will be
held in conjunction with the formal
installation of Dr. John ML Howell
as chancellor of the university.
At Howell's request, the sym-
posium titled "Toward a New
Millennium: Challenges and
Dreams will preceed his installa-
tion ceremony.
According to Dr. Fred
Broadhurst, an ECU professor in
industrial and technical education
and a member of the symposium
committee, Howell wanted the
general atmosphere surrounding his
installation to empasize scholarship.
For this reason Howell, a founder
of the ECU Phi Kappa Phi sym-
posium when he served as vice
chancellor for academic affairs, re-
quested his formal installation be
scheduled as part of the 1983 sym-
posium program.
Howell, who has his doctorate in
political science, was appointed
chancellor last spring and assumed
his official duties July 1. He had
been serving as acting chancellor
since the resignation of Dr. Thomas
B. Brewer in fall of 1981.
Gov. James B. Hunt, Jr is
scheduled to give the keynote ad-
dress during Howell's installation
ceremonies. William C. Friday,
president of the University of North
Carolina, will be presiding.
The symposium begins on Thurs-
day morning at 8:50 a.m. and will
be opened with a welcome from
Howell. Nine papers discussing the
future in terms of various academic
topics will be presented. An array of
ECU educators and scholars will be
reading their papers, which were
chosen from a large submission late
last fall.
Broadhurst praised the sym-
posium saying it will represent "the
challenges and dreams that we have
for East Carolina University for the
next two decades
The presentations will include
three sessions with three papers be-
ing delivered at each one. Dr. J.
William Byrd, chairman of the
Department of Physics, will be the
chairperson for session "A" Thurs-
day morning. Byrd is also the
chairperson of the symposium com-
mittee which selected the papers.
Dr. Broadhurst will chair session
"B" which begins at 1 p.m. on
Thursday, and Dr. Rosina Lao.
chairperson of the Department of
Psychology, will be chairing session
"Con Friday morning at 9 a.m.
Lao is also a member of the sym-
posium committee.
Eight of the nine papers being
presented were prepared by ECU
faculty members. The ninth, titled
"The Value of General Studies in
the Undergraduate Curriculum"
will be given by English
undergraduate student Darryl K
Brown. Brown, who is also the
assistant news editor for The East
Carolinian, received a $100 cash
prize for submitting the best student
paper.
The three presentations Thursday
morning will include "Reflections
on the American Dream" by I)r
William A. Bloodworth, professor
and chairperson Department of
1 nglish; "1 he Political Impact of a
C hanging Ethnic and Racial
Balance in America's New Millen-
nium" by Dr. Thomas F. Eamon,
a sociate professor Department of
Political Science and "Conceptual
and Normative Aspects of Alter-
native I utures" by Dr. James
LeRoy Smith associate professor
philosophy department.
Dr. Gene D. Lamer, a professor
m the Department of Library
Science, will open the Thursday
afternoon session with his presenta-
tion titled "Will the First Amend-
ment be Eroded?" Mrs. Linda L.
Wadrner, a lecturer in the
psychology department, will present
"I iving from Wholeness Instead of
from Reaction
Sign . Syn bob and Such: The
See PHI KAPPA PHI, Page 5
SGA Legislature
New Bus Shelter Bill Tabled
By GREG HIDEOUT
f�i I dn.n
The SGA Legislature decided by a
14�11 vote Monday to table a bill
that would have appropriated
$4,000 for a proposed bus shelter.
The move came after debate on the
floor tangled itself in parliamentary
procedure.
The bill, which was read out of
the appropriations committee
without recommendation, originally
included the financing of three bus
shelters for $12,000. The matter was
turned over to the floor in part due
to a letter by SGA member Rob
Poole that appeared in the Campus
Forum of Thursday's East Caroli-
nian.
In the letter, Poole stated that
money was not available in the tran-
sit system budget to allow them to
construct the bus shelters at this
time. He, and most of the members
of the SGA, agreed that the student
money would be well spent on a bus
SGA President
Set To Chair
Media Board
By DARRYL BROWN
Assistant Ses Editor
SGA President Eric Henderson
has been named acting chairperson
of the ECU Media Board following
the resignation of former chairper-
son Carter Fox, whose term would
normally end in approximately three
weeks. The board made the tem-
porary appointment to fill the
vacancy until April, at which time
they will select a permanent
chairperson for the upcoming year.
The student chairperson of the
board is the official head of the
organization, which has jurisdiction
over all media on the ECU campus,
including The East Carolinian,
WZMB and the Photo Lab. The
Media Broad is made up of student,
faculty and administration members
and has final financial control over
the media, who receive funds from
student activity fees, and over the
hiring of the staff of each medium.
Henderson will be eligible for the
permanent appointment to the of-
fice next year. As SGA president, he
has been serving as a member of the
Media Board, as specified in the
organization's constitution. The
student chairperson is selected from
the board's members by a majority
vote of the board.
Fox said that though there are
always difficulties for the board in
dealing with the various media, she
thought the problems were minimal
during her tenure. "I feel like it ran
pretty smoothly during my term
she said.
The chairperson is paid a salary
of one hundred dollars per month
for overseeing the board's actions
and supervising all meetings.
Henderson could not be reached for
comment.
shelter.
When the bill was presented to the
floor at Monday's meeting. Speaker
of the House Gary Williams inform-
ed the legislators of the SGA's
financial situation and the transit
systems financial situation.
Williams said the SGA currently has
approximately $8,000 dollars left to
appropriate until the end of the
school year. He then said the transit
authority had over $20,000 as of
Monday, according to the busing
system's balance sheets.
After the bill was placed on the
floor an amendment was offered to
reduce the original money to be
given from $12,000 to $4,000. The
amendment was never voted on
because of continuing debate on the
bill, even though most legislators
agreed to the amendment. Williams
then decided to ask for a vote to
table the amendment, which passed
14 � U.
The SGA and Student Transit
System are separate organizations.
Each student group receives money
from student fees to operate each
year; the SGA gets $7.50 per student
and the transit system $10.
The bill can be brought up by any
member of the legislature at future
meetings. According to some
legislators, the move to table the
motion was made to allow the
legislators to have more time to con-
sider the amendments in light of the
SGA's and transit system's financial
system
In other business, the SGA passed
a financial management act which
would require the group to reserve
25 percent of of its estimated
revenue during the annual budget
approval process. Budget requests
are made each March by student
organizations. The act also stated
that the SGA must have $4,000 left
in its budget at the end of each spr-
ing semester.
� �� CIMOV ULt.
The SGA legislature met last night and at laast temporarily settled the somewhat controversial Issue of funding
for new bus shelters requested by the ECU transit system. Also passed b the legislature in the Mondav meeting
was a financial management bill.
Coretta Scott King Attracts Crowds
To Program A bout Husband's Legacy
A standing-room-only crowd
turned out last night to hear Coretta
Scott King, wife of slain civil rights
leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr
give a lecture tilled "The Living
Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr
Mrs. King, who is president of
The Martin Luther King Jr Center
for Nonviolent Social Change,
spoke in Hendrix Theatre as part of
ECU'S 1982-83 Black Arts Festival
program. The Center for non-
violence is located in Atlanta, Ga.
After a brief introduction, Mrs.
King was immediately greeted with a
standing ovation from the crowd.
ECU student Connie Shelton
presented her with a corsage from
the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority for
the contributions she said Mrs. King
has given to humanity.
"It is a great privilege to be
here King told her audience
noting that this week was "a very
important week" in the history of
the nonviolent movement which she
said was led by her husband. She
was referring to the upcoming an-
niversary of four college students in
Greensboro who broke the pre-civil
rights segregation law and sat at a
whites-only lunch counter as a pro-
test.
King told her audience the time
had come for all people "black and
white, young and old, native
Americans, women, peace groups
and others to come together to chart
a "new nonviolent course
She noted that through her travels
she had met thousands of commit
ted people who tell her they want to
carry on the work of Martin Luther
King. "This is a great source of
strength for me King said. "The
nonviolent philosophy and strategv
of Martin Luther King Jr provides
the key to solving a host of crisis we
face today
King said a worldwide effort in
the name of justice, brotherhood
and peace is needed if the oppressed
people of the world are ever going to
be free. "One day we shall over-
come
King referred to her husband as a
prophet whom she noted, like other
prophets, had a very short life. But.
she added, "He had a very complete
life
She pointed out that Martin
Luther King Jr began to lead his
nonviolent movement at the age of
25, that he was selected as Time
Man of the Year at age 33, and he
won the Nobel Peace Prize at 34.
Many young people are surprised
when they hear that Martin Luther
King Jr didn't live to see his 40th
birthday. King was killed 15 years
ago bv an assassin's bullet at the age
of 39
Many people considered Martin
Luther King Jr to be gifted. King
noted. "Being gifted is not as im-
portant a what you do with that
gilt
Mrs King noted that all people
had to make a committment to a
complete life if they wanted to live
it. She spoke of her husband's belief
in a "three dimensional concept of
reality She described these con-
cepts as the concern for self, the
See KING. Page 7
MH By SCOTT LAftSON
Coretta Scott King, widow of Martin Luther King Jr spoke last night in
the Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre. A nearly packed house
turned out to hear Mrs. King. The Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority presented
her with an honorary corsage.
Jones Set To Replace Bundy
UNC Vice Chancellor
Checked For Misconduct
Walter B. Jones, Jr son of First
District Congressman Walter B.
Jones, has been chosen to replace N.
C. State Rep. Sam Bundy in the Pitt
and Greene Counties ninth district.
Bundy died in Raliegh Jan. 19 as a
result of a heart attack. He was 76.
Jones, 40, was picked as Bundy's
successor by the State House of
Representatives District Committee,
after he and three others were inter-
viewed during a closed session that
lasted for over two hours Monday
afternoon. Four others who were
being considered for the post chose
not to appear before the committee.
The District Committee, which
was made up of four members, two
each from Pitt and Greene Coun-
ties, met in Snowhill. The Pitt
County representatives were
Fredrica Jacobson, Vice President
of Greenville's WOOW radio, and
ECU Librarian Mary Williams. The
committee members representing
Greene County were the Rev. Lionel
Moore and Richard Price. Price,
who is an administrator with First
Citizens Bank and Trust Co. in
Snowhill, was chairperson of the
selection committee. The ninth
district encompasses areas from
both counties.
Price told The East Carolinian in
telephone interview, minutes after
the selection was announced, that
the choice of Jones was "a good,
honest and fair decision He added
the committee gave each of the eight
choices "equal consideration
whether they appeared in person or
not. "There was not one bit of
dissension among us in making the
final decision Price said.
Each applicant had submitted a
resume in advance of the commit-
tee's interviews. The four who ap-
peared were interviewed by the com-
mittee for 10 to 15 minutes each.
"I chose my candidate on specific
issues said Jacobson. "I have
known Walter Jr. for a number of
years and I trust him implicitly
Jacobson added that the ques-
tions addressed to the candidates
were "very specific
According to Jacobson the ques-
tions asked were politically pro-
gressive in nature. Candidates were
asked where they stood on issues
such as the Equal Rights Amend-
ment, fair housing, fair employment
and equal rights for all minorities.
Jacobson said the choice of Jones
See JONES, Page 5
CHAPEL HILL (UPI) � Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill Chancellor Christopher C. For-
dham III suspended Vice Chancellor
Donald A. Boulton for one month
Monday because of irregularites in
the purchase and installation of
linoleum in Boulton's home.
Earlier Monday, Orange County
District Attorney Wade Barber Jr.
said no criminal charges would be
filed against Boulton, vice
chancellor for student affairs.
Boulton bought the linoleum
through the university and universi-
ty workers laid it in his kitchen. The
university employees worked on the
tile during their off hours and
Boulton paid for their work.
Boulton, who has apologized for
the incident, has said the men
mistakenly charged the university
for their work but later returned the
extra pay from the school.
Fordham said he has issued a
written reprimand and a "Final
Written Warning" to three
employees involved in the incident
and that he believes "it is most
unlikely that there will be a recur-
rence of any improper action by
these individuals
Fordham said he met with
Boulton to discuss violation of
university rules and procedures.
"It is my understanding that the
district attornev beleves that Dr.
Boulton has committed no indic-
table offense, yet 1 believe that ad-
ministrative action in the wake of a
misjudgment and violation of pro-
cedures is necessary in order to
assure the entire university com-
munity and its many constituencies
of the vital importance of trust and
trustworthiness in all that we do
Fordham said.
Boulton's suspension, without
pay, began Monday.
"It is my hope that these actions
will serve to remind all of us of our
sacred trust, will reassure the
university community as to the in-
tegrity of the institution, and will
enable those individals who were
regrettably involved to resume ef-
fective service to the people of
North Carolina Fordham said.
A

� ' in� ' b.3frfcA






lHf I ASI C R(.)I INIAN
FEBRUARY 1. 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it � u �' pout organization
a he i �f i 't �� priOieo
1 � v s. � i u TM
� ts 'ypc on Bfl nnoun ernent
and send ii to me fcast
man m care of tne produc

Forms are
� � N t n' aroiintan
' � ; a' I "S Building
I - � � s md handwritten copy on
��.�" . pei i annot be at
hargje tor an
� � r$ but spat1 s otien
r her el re we annei
�� � tee " �' fQW announce
r will run as long as �ou wan-
gojesi rnai . x do not reiv
n n s mntoi pubiK '�
tea � � � ' ai unn eroents
v lay 1 � . T uesday
ino p n anesdav v tor
tv pa p ar
-1 a after these
. i � iva.iaoie i '�
PLEASE DO
NOT RELY
TOTALLY UPON
ANNOUNCEMENTS
r �: � �. ocreaseo :fga��2ion
ion i r I ne an
s v otumn of "e East
e would !�e to stress
e ave hmiteo space
are r ng ri see ,r,a
anv rn a we posvtoty
aoervng can-�paigr
jde a1 xmcnafttS,
a posi g i ef i mi
� oa'
�r�e r -message
pease use e
r"S af are
e a-3 piease
�.�
FRtSBEE CLUB
� -neetings are held
n Monday nights, 8 00 VSC rm
� a nvone interested in iooing
rh� I I learning dsc skills
� ' p'aying ultimate rrisoee
l attend look tor our first
mate tournament this spring
PHI SIGMA PI
rh 5 ga Pi national coed
� �� iternity will ho'cJ its mon
� rtnet meeting at 5 00 pm
lav �eDruary 2 1963 at
�� � � guest speaker
.�� �� "aten hj A
� � � piease plan ft attend fne
SCUBA CLUB
neel - nas been
14th at 5 30 in
- rm ,05 B For
Der 752 7384
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
1 'tested in the fine
� rig he Sgn Languages
av irtg a s.en dinner
� " ' � " 2 at Gootathe- s Pzia
� � be at 6 3C pm Met" n
Of Brewster at 6 00pm so
r - ne Ln ae a riae out
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
s neeaed to assist in a
�l act . 'y seeing op cam
" -i "ywi � , apped crntdren on
�, ,(j �, 3fn j 30 ' 30 Con
' t-ve Porretta i 757 6441)
ooo opportunity tor tieid worR
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
The international Language
Organization will be meeting on
February 2, !v�3 at 3 00 in BC 30S
All members are encouraged to at
tend this meeting All interested
people are welcome to attend You
do not have to be a Foreign
Language maior or minor
ECU CIRCLE K
The ECU K club will be having a
short meeting on Tuesday
February 1 1983 The meeting will
be concerned with making final
arangements for Wednesday
social with the Circle K club trom
Chowan College All members
please attend this short meeting
And it you are not a member ana
you are interested in helping
others you are welcome to attend
FANTASY
The Student Residence Associa
tion presents Fantasy A semi
formal dance will be at the Moli
day mn Moiidome on February
?6th from 9 1 There will be foun
tam drinks buffets and a cashbar
MuS'c will be provided by the Elbo
room Tickets are on sale for IS (X)
a couple, an S R A card s re
quired They mav be purchased
from any Vice President of a
residente haii or the S R A office
in the lobby of Greene Mall from
2 4 Monday through Thursday
SIG EP YARDSALE
Attention1 Sigma Phi Epsiion
Mrill have a varo sale this coming
Saturday Feb 5 1983 from � 00
am to 4 00 pm items include
clothing ana other household
items' Location SOS East 5th
Street pn number 752 2941 across
from jenkings Fine Arts Center
11 SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED! !
ALPLHA KAPPA
ALPHA
The Theta Alpha Chapefer of
Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority Inc
invites all interested ladies to our
1983 Spring Rush it will be held in
the Multi Purpose room in
Mendenhali Thursday FeB 3 at
r 30 Proper attire
CAMPUS CRUSADE
FOR CHRIST
Crawford Loritts a traveling
speaker with Campus Crusade of
Crist will be speaking this Fr,
day Feb 4th at 7 0C pm m
Menoenhai! Rm 221 He will be
speaking on "The Direction of
Slack America " Also he will be
presenting an upcoming con
�erence entitled Direction '83
Refreshments will be served Ao
m.ss'or is free
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
COMMUNITY
Hump Day Program Russei
Ford wit' be speaking at the
Newman Center Wednesday Feb
2 Who s he He is the first person
to go to prison since Viet Nam war
for refusing to register for the
draft it you have an opinion one
way or the other piease feel tree
o ioin ow Wednesday meeting
Rjsse' win give " s presentation
at 6 00 pm and would welcome a
d'SCJSS'Or abou his stance or the
issue tseif
COMMITTEES
Applications are still being ac
c epted for students wishing to
serve on University Committees
tor 1982 82 school year Twenty
three (23) students positions are
open Committees with vacancies
arc Canvassing i. Soliciting on
Campus(l). International Student
Affairs (1). Residence Life (3),
Status of Minorities (2). Status of
Women (3). Student Health Ser
vices (1). Calendar it). Teaching
Effectiveness (2). Continuing
Education (1), Course Drop Ap
peats (1). Credits. (1), General
College (1), Teacher Education
(1), University Libraries (1)
University Curriculum (2) Ap
plications are available at the
following locations Office of the
Vice Chancellor tor Student Life
204 Whichard. Mendenhali Stu
dent Center Information Desk
SGA Office. Mendenhali Student
Center. Office of intramural
Recreational Services Memorial
Gym and Residence Hall Direc
tors' Offices Questions about
University committees and
memberships may be directed to
the Office of the Vice Chancellor
for Student Lite (757 6541)
NEWSTUDENT
ORIENTATION
PROGRAM
The Office of the Associate Dean
of Student Lite located in
Whichard Building. Room 210 is
now taking applications for the
New Student Orientation Program
held ii. June ana July Applicants
should have a gooc scholastic
average, and should not be plann
ing on attending Summer School
interviews of the applicants will
begm around the rnadie of March
SNOWSKI
REGISTRATION
Alt persons who plan to ski
snowshoe during spring break
should register on Tuesday Feb 1
at 4 00 p m in Memorial Gym
Room 108 A S5 deposit will be re
quired at this time Space is
limited to tne first 80 who register
For package prices contact jo
Saunoers at 757 6000 Memory
Gym 205
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
The Greenville Peace Commit
tee meets every Fr day mgnt a'
610 S ElmS' GPC consists of peo
pie actively engaged n peace and
lustice work on a local, state ana
na'tonai level It you are
teresfed in learning more abou
the GPC piease cai1 "58 490� or
come at 6 30 c r- Fr oa,s tor a
dinner mee ng
CLOGGING
There 'S sT some room n the
Clogging class Deng ottered 0y
the Department of Umvers'ty
Unions One must sign up Dy Fri
day February 4. 1983 to be elg
bie individuals who would like to
participate must register in per
son at me Mendenhali Student
Center Central Ticket ottice bet
ween the hours ot 10 00 AM ana
4 00 PM Monaa through Friday
F or more ntormat'on can Lnaa
Barnard MSC Crafts aa Wetrea
fion Director at 757 1 1 ext 260 or
?he Central Ticket Ottice at ext
266
PUT A LITTLE HEART
IN YOUR SOUL
The twelfth annual walk for
humanity is coming up this spring
The walk will take place on April
16 beginning at Green Springs
Park Anyone interested �n help
mg come to the Hunger Coalition
meetings on Thursday nights at
7 00 p m at the Newman Center
953 East Tenth Street, or calf
752 4216
ALPHA EPSILON
DELTA
There will be a lecture on Sud
den Infant Death Syndrome or
Cnb Death given by Dr Todd
Savitt from the Department of
Humanities of the ECU School of
Medicine The lecture will be
given Tuesday, February 1, 1983 at
7 30 PM in Flanagan Rm 307
There will also he an executive
meeting and a pledge meeting at
7 00 PM
CHI BETA PHI
The chi Beta Ph. Science Honor
Fraternity will bse meeting in
room 103 m the Biology building
All science students are invited to
attend The meeting will begin at
6 30 pm
GAMMA BETA PHI
HONOR SOCIETY
Our next biweekly meeting will
be held on Thursday Feb 4 in
Mendenhali s rm 744 at 7pm Yes
members. t has only besen a week
smce the last meeting but this
meeting is as important as the last
so plan to attend Interested per
sons are invited to attend
MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP
The English Department invites
appiKat.ons tor the Russell M
Chnsfman Memorial Scholarship,
awarded annually to a junior
Enghsh maior tor exceptional
academic achievement, outstan
dmg potential �n the tietd of
English and signit,cant involve
ment in extracurricular activities
The amount ot the awaro is S5O0
Applicants should complete the
Student Scholarship Form
(available from the Student
Financial Ad Office) and send it.
together with a brief letter
describing their academic
achievements, extracurricular ac
t'vities, and plans tor tuture study
or career goals o the Russell M
Christman Memorial Sc not a �"�.�" p
Committee, c c the Deoartment of
Enghsh The deadl-ne tor app'c a
'ions is March a 1983 For further
intorm- �- � � fc r, r Hester
101 Egi-sh Dpa"fment Ann
GRADUATION
Graduation announce merits are
.rt rioie in the Student Supply
Store They are 2 tor a pack ot 5
and are located at the Jewelr,
Hemp't:�-r tx p.ex up �our cap
arc gown oetore eavng schooi
These xeepsake gowns are yours
to keep providing mat me gradua
tion tee has ten pa0 or those
rece vng a Masters degree the
tee pays tor the cap and gown but
there s an extra tee of S1J 75 tor
the hood
SAB
There MfMI be a met1 no. H " �
student A'hie'iC Board Tuesdar
f-etruar 1, lv�3 a' 5 30 PV in
Room 248 ot Mendenhali Student
Center
r 1Name
CLASS 111) ADS
use a separate sheet of paper if f you need more lines. There are 33 j itybtate units per line. Each letter, punc v, � � ; No.lines�ZipPhone t rnrlrwrf
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nyphenate words properly. Leave space at end of line if word doesn't fit. No ads will be ac cepted over the phone. We reserve the right to reject any ad. All ads must be prepaid. Enclose j 75� per line or fraction of a line. Please print legibly! Use capital and j lower case letters. Return lo THE EAST CAROLINIAN 1 office b 3:00 Tuesday before Wednesday publications 1 1 1


(





��i.JL
PSI CHI
Psi Chi presents another in
leresling and informative evening
un February 9 at 7 30 pm in Room
l?v. Speight Tne feature speaker
will oe Mr F James. Director of
the Career Planning ana Place
ment Ottice He will talk about iob
opportunities m Psychology ana
other related areas This is open to
members and any interested in
dividuals Psi Chi members, do
not forget to apply for �rte 2
scholarships available to you
ECU POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will
hold a meeting on Thursday even
ng at 8 00 in Mendenhali Room
24 The Forum is open to anyone
who would like an appreciative but
critical audience for his or her
poeiry Those attending are asked
to bring six or eight copies of the
work to be real ana discussed
The Forum s a student organ.za
tion also under the sponsorship of
the English department Forum
regularly meets on he first or third
Thursday ot each montn of the
school tear
MASSAGE CLINIC
Need a muscle retaner' if you
do. come to tne Massage Cimic a1
the Beik Buiri-ng on Thursday
February 3 The Junior ana Sen,or
Phys'cal Therapy students w n be
hoidmg tne Massage Cimic from
6 30 � 30 p m ,n the P T Lab on
the first floor of Beik The cost is
only f 1 00 and tickets are available
at tne door or can be purchased
trom an, P T student So come
on over re;a� and entoy
JOIN NCSL!
Aan' 'l how na new rutes
new reguiat cms ana new .ssues
ra. be in your tu'ure' Then ge'
nvolveo with NCSl tne Nor'h
Carolina Studen' egiSiafure and
f nc out whaf might happen to
your world tomorrow today'
NCSi s mempership drive is still
going one s are the Monday night
meetngs ,7 pm in room 213 t
V.enoenha'l so come by ana see
what's up for your tuture wifti
NCSl'
PHI ETA SIGMA
Tne Ph, Eta Sigma will meet
Tjescay February I, at 5 pm m
Room 22 at rne Mendenhali Stu
dent Cente' Plans w H be made
tor fee-jar so all members are
oeti N) attend
FLOWERS
Show your appreciation for that
special girl or guy in your life w � 11
be taking orders tor roses, 1 V4.
4 S23. 12 S5 carnations, 1 SJ, 3 S5.
�2. 12 S12 Will be sellng Feb
2 9
SCHOLARSHIPS
District 773 of rotary Intema
tionai is pleased to announce the
avaiiablity to two young people for
an academic year of foreign study
for 1984 85 These awards include
transportation tuition books, sup
plies, and a stipend tor living e�
penses
They may be in the areas of
Graduate Study, Undergraduat
Study, Teachers of the Man
dicaplped. Journalism or Voca
'ionai Study
Applications must be maoe
through the local rotary Club in
'he person s permanent residence
or in The place in which tney are
full time students As t take
several weeks to complete tne ap
plication process f is necessar,
tor interested persons to start m
mediately Suom ss on of apphca
tions must be no later man March
1 1983
Traits which wit be evaluated in
tne selection process shall include
academ t achievement leader
ship ability persona' charae'e'
and the prom-se of be ng an
outstanding ambassador of good
will to a foreign country
NCSL
NCSL the Norm Carolina Student
eg s'ature s a scuss ng and
deoa' n9 me topics of aca �'
wMi affect our nves tomorrow;
They deba'e ssues as dve-se as
ajtomoc ie safety to -egj a'ons to
�he'hrea'of njc,ear war NCSl. s
now conduct,ng ts mmpe's p
0' .e so wf no- see wi-a" NCSl. s
an about- The meetngs are held
Monday n.gnts a' ' p m a'
Menoenhai" m room 212
SCUBA DIVING
Spring break March 6 12 dive
the Bahamas From Ft L.auder
dale. SS40 00. includes meats lodg
ing ana div ng �txMra tne 6S' dive
boa "The Bottom Time ' There
are a limited number of places
ava-iabte and reservat ons are on
a first come basis For r�ora
tio ano reg.srration, can or v s
Ray Schar Director of Aqua' cs
M-noes Aauatic Cen'er "57 644'
SCEC
The Student Council tor Encep
tionai Children is having a
membership drive at the back en
trance to Speight Bunding The
dr.ve wilt be trom Jan 31 Feb 4.
9 00 3 00 For more information,
ask at table where the drive tor
membership will be Everyone s
welcome'
COUNSELING
The Strong Campbell interest
inventory s offered every Tues
day a 4 PM when school is .n
session with me exceptions of ex
animation period and registration
day Tn.s is available to an
students at no cost No formal
registration is required
HORSEBACK RIDING
The Outdoor Recreation Cen'er
s sponsoring horseback r.d ng
trips to Jar-ar s S'abies Reser
vations and payment tor -n,
Thursday aternoor trips are due
by 3 OO PM each T-ursca, Rates
are SS 00 per nour T'ansporat'on
s provided with shuttle ieay ng
Memor a Gym a' 3 30 PV sa'C
For more nformation or resera
t ons can or stop by the
Intramural RecreaTona Se c�i
Outdoor Recreation Center H3
Memor.ai Gym Phone 757911
Hours Monday and Fnoar I 00
PM 5 X PM Tesoa, Aed-es
ca. Tsda. : X pv 4 X pv
SAM
The ECU chapter of tne So f,
for the Advancement of Manage
mem w I nc:d a mee'ig Tuesoa�
February I ,n Raw 104
t'ws anc anyone �"�e'es'ec fl
becoming a memoe' arf .
a'tt?"C Tne ��"n oe a'
4 30
ASPA
Amer.can Socetf o Persorne
Aom n stra'ors n nee'
February 2 a 3 o cock n Raw's
Room 20T ASPA s tea'ure speaker
wi be Mr james trom 'he Career
Placement off.ee This meeting u
open to an? one who vy shes to at
teno See you tnere
ECU LARCRSSECLUB
Vee a � bottom 3 0ege
H n. Vo-nc.ii y Tuesaa ana
saa� a'ernoors from 3 00 to
5 x pv Fo more ntc a
'5' 6o64 or 75J 11AA
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
WORSHIP
A sfudent Episcoca' service of
Moiy Communion wi be
celebrated on Tjesday February i
in st Paul s Ep.scopai Church 404
A 4th SI one bloc from Garret
Dorm, Tne serv.ee w 11 be a1 5 30
PM wtn The Episcopa' Chap'a.n
The Rev Bin Madden ceieorant
D nner w.ii lo'ow
BASIC SAILING
Two Classroom sesS'Cns and
three weekend afternoons or. 19 2
foot baots or the Pamhco River
join m me Fun RegisTraTion is
dmiTed To i� so register eany
Meets "huriaai Aipnl 7. 21
7 30 9 30 0 m Saturday Aprn 9
!4 23 1 X 4 3� p m Contact The
D- Sion of ConTtnuing EducaTion
'57 413
BAHAMA MAMA
Com ng SOC
NErVS RELEASE
Sophomores ,n .y flic sen ors
currently tnrM ec ' a Norm
Carolina co'iege or Norm Ca- M
'esdef a'teno ng ar- awl of s'ate
��e -a.e wn ?��
app. � 'or e nstitufe o Govern
fnetti Sum-ner 1- Pra
g-am nj'j'f JCW'1-rf
-�, 'ee s3es o�
see'ted t, a" ad. scr. r�-n- �
fee tc par- ja-� - a v r-g
ea'nrg nter nahiB - Nor tti
Ci'c a sa'e ;ctf'
Sir� t�d ia �'� -ste o
&Oyff ' e se Ol
� r" e'S work
��z Va. Itnugt Sjj.v 5
Mmtsin '� 4C "ar5 eac "
���x - a -rssc'i c � pos or - a
i'a'e oeoare par pa -
f.f -JM Cj se -a-s a-c
oe pa - acc;i � ate . S'SC per
eex
ludanll -��-es'ed - ttM pra
gra s" 'ic s. rr a b' x'ear
nounc ng me program a"c a 'ae
?? Ny -a-c -a ace catkonlorfr
" ' � "ie sr un .e's ��
iiacement ot ce or .oca oe Se-
� � OH ce A or ef descr.p' on o�
possible nTemsh ps are ava 'at e
�i coi'ege ptaceme- crH ces
Stuoento -nre'ested Ml nvt Iff
sTiTuTe of Governmen' program
snouid maII an apt cat.on y0 The n
ST.TuTe ot GovernmenT K napp
Building OSVA Trie universiTy of
Norm Caroi-nm �t Chapei HIM.
Cape' MHt Norm Ca-cuma 275'4
; . � -r- .ar. ?12
-cc :�nts oe aczez-e
�rittl -�-rsi ��a.e se� COMV
"a'e-a j' g - -e g on ?r -an
j -ac
The Fast C arolinian
Serwirj kf �m HXUM
- I
Put shed every tjfsda. a-
T,1ui�3ai Our -� Itka a aoe i
iea'a-aeve' Aeonesca. ;
ng me Su" '
The Eas' Carol i,an s me
a -eAspaper of Eas'
Carol -a jn �e'S �
opera-ec a-c put r: � I a
Dy 'he s'�rjes i c as'
111 .e-s �,
Subscription Rate S20.ea- .
The East Carolinian officer
art located in the Old Soum
auiMJing on The campus of ECU
Grtennllc N C
POSTMASTER Send a- -
-nanges M ne La-
Old So Building. E
' Ma NJC 834
Teiepnone 'nitt �it-
CORRECTION
In Tufsdav's edition
of The Fas! Carolinian
It was incorrectl staled
that staff writer Patrick
O'Neill had paid a $50
fine for obstructing a
public entrance during
a demonstration. He
was charged bui did not
pa the fine. Hb trial is
set for Feb. 22.
S R A
EsVs a-� nt�(
Escor- Se .� � -
n being a- rv ;
- � .
ease
a-e a
dor -es de N if i -
:a:
SPEAKER AVAILABLE
R-sse fy: v be - Sreen
v 'e on t-ecr �r r ; a - . �e
The rst person 'o be se ha f
for retus ng To reg,s.e
dratt ivre �� . e�- �,ar �, ,
presen &j of Da . Fore -
� va.iaDie to soea .n Ecu ciaxMes
on any o� me above date� �e �
be spe�� "ia-srj �n-
Vendenna s Co'fee ouse a- - :
PV ��:
�� " s ea-e � �. �
"M 490
T.
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
FM 91.3
nTNESDAequestDaOpen HousgTHu
feb.2 � 12 noon-8:00p.m.
JTM
AT THE ATTIC SCHIZO
AND VALENTINO
ollege Night Students $.91
RSDAY
FEB. 3
Two in a Row
Programming

VM
SUNDAY
FEB. 6
Listen to WZMB for
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tjyjyix
ALB)JTIiNc)
ATTHE ATTICSCHIZO
AND VALENTINO
Ladies free til 10:30
FRIDAY
FEB.4
Dedications
Day
r

9 � '
r� a �
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Admission is 9lc for the
first 91 Students
WEDNESDAY
FEB.9
Concert
Night
PKIK
ATTHE ATTIC Locals
Night-FREE Admission to
HYJYNX
with Greenville I.D. fcollege Night Students $1.91
ATTHE ATTIC
PKM
THURSDAY
FEB. 10
Concert
Night
)OOot
ISATURDAY
FEB
ijT-Shirt Night
���
� �
f
i
visri
HE ATTIC
JOHN WEST �VISION
91C with WZMB T-Shirt
SUNDAY
FEB. 13
Concert
ATTHE ATTIC
BRICE STREET
Ladies Night
Ladies $1.91 'til 10:30
MONDAY
FEB
i
���
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4Y W Valentines Day
SATURDAY
FEB.5
Concert
Night
ATTHE ATTIC
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Admission $2.91
FRIDAY
FEB. 11
HAPPY HOUR
JOHN WIST A
2020 ROCK N' ROLL
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Live Music 5:30-6:30
Dedicate
a song to
your loved one
ATTHE ATTIC
PROPHET
mission $1.91 for Couples
Would Like To Thank Tom
and Bob And The Entire
ATTIC Crew For Making
Our 1st Birthday
Something Special
Suin
OMAHA, S e
A siudei
claiming an unjust
ted
go
med school has I
court battle to f
� k � k
wrd
He in

who've un-
ver gr;

med the

( enter
-
S
"F" in
� c � � �

-
-
The fedei -
�a i Rigt

i
re.e . -

V
(Men �

- i
ersil
In 1981, a
cou- .
I
gra
i
eno .
m
Me
got me "F
Mcrcuno ma
lor a rehearw
dmg to Paui I
a �rj a
LaPura ji-
real injustice �a
Mercurio t
pcaJ the grade
r
1983
BA!
INSI
PR(
EXi
BASl
HQvi
THE
I
Order bv
tO C r3
cha
Send me
Name
Address.
Oty
t





THE EAST CAROL INI AN
LLBRLARY 1, 1983
�'
Phone.
.enclosed
��

p

� 1,




,i i
IDENT
The Fast Carolinian
e E H W s 'he of
3 isoADer of Eas?
- ' . owned
Oea tor ana
- ' : as' Carolina
SuOscriptiOf! Rt� t?0 yearly
t Eait Carolinian office)
in '0aed n me Ola South
9 on ine campus of ECU
trwmiit N c
STMASTED Sena aaareii
" Te fca . M � n a-
. - ee'
'S7 ?!? 4J�? �J0�
CORRECTION
In Tuesday's edition
of The East Carolinian
it wu incorrectly stated
that staff writer Patrick
O'Neill had paid a $50
fine for obstructing a
public entrance during
a demonstration. He
was charged but did not
pa the fine. His trial is
set for Feb. 22.
S R A.
�' s't neeoec 'or 'Me
l z. � e e'es'ec
3 . . . � pteest cotac'
� rw or If vou are a
. e of'
ra r rfw SGA office
SPEAKER AVAILABLE
Bjm: fo's '� ae r ee-
� ie o eoruary I : anc 3 Me s
� ne its' person '� t se� to D' sor-
for rHuvno 'O 'ij.s'er tor nf
ara" siv:e� vr�r" oar Hn
pren ovi' or ba . oro�wnib�
avaiatie 'o speafc -r. ecu n��m
gm an, o 'r aoove oates h mw
bespeal at a pub meei ,
��e -40JS1 3 K
j proq' a �
to t n
K -aoc
lap M
TION
Concert
Night
HE ATTIC
HOLLIDAY
APPY HOUR
WEST A
ROCK N1 ROLL
E ATTIC
EST�VISION
IPY HOUR
.dmission
usic 5:30-6:30
r
e To Thank Tom
nd The Entire
ew For Making
1st Birthday
thing Special
Suing For Grades Futile
OMAHA, Neb
(CPS) - A student
claiming an unjustly
awarded "F" that cost
him a chance to go to
med school has lost his
court battle to get the
grade stricken from his
record.
He's the latest in a
long line of students
who've unsuccessfully
sued over grades
Gregory Mercurio
claimed the University
of Nebraska Medical
Center in Omaha and
his professor, Dr.
William Ruegamcr,
couldn't give him an
"F" in a biochemisty
course he took in 1978
because when Mercurio
asked to see his answer
sheets, Ruegamer
couldn't produce them.
The federal Educa-
tional Rights and
Privacy Act "poses a
duty on every educa-
tional institution which
receives government
funding to make
records available to the
students says
Richard Wood, the
University of
Nesbraska's attorney.
"At the time
(Mercurio) requested
them, they were gone
he conceded.
Mercurio contends
the "F" on his record
prevented him from be-
ing accepted by the
university's medical
school.
In 1981, a lower
court agreed with Mer-
curio, ordering the
school to erase the fail-
ing grade. But now the
state's Supreme Court
said the university had
enough "secondary
materials" to prove
Mercurio deserved and
got the "F
Mercurio may ask
for a rehearing, accor-
ding to Paul LaPuzza,
his lawyer.
LaPuzza says thes
real injustice was that
Mercurio couldn't ap-
peal the grade for nine
months because the
university's appeal pro-
cess was just then being
organized.
When Mercurio first
disputed his grade,
"the professor had
those papers" but
wouldn't show them to
the student, LaPuzza
argues.
Mercurio has re-
entered school, resum-
ing work toward a
masters in anatomy
after an 18-month
layoff.
Not many other
students have much
luck taking schools to
court to protest grades.
At the same time
Mercurio was learning
of his fate, a New
Jersey court disallowed
a $123,000 award to
Seton Hall University
law student Michael
Dotsko, who argued
the law school had
breached its contract by
not adequately in-
vestigating his charge
that he'd been unjustly
given a "D" in a 1976
class.
The judge cut Dot-
sko's award to $112,
though he allowed the
jury's decision that the
university was wrong to
stand.
In May, a California
court ruled against San
Jose State student
Laura Hylton, who
sued her communica-
tions professor for
refusing to raise her
grade from a "B " to
an "A
University of Texas
student Michael Gable
similarly lost his suit
last year against a UT
prof who flunked him
and "killed his grade
point average
The suit was dismiss-
ed because the pro-
fessor had been acting
in good faith for the
university, which as a
government agency
can't be a party to a
suit without its consent,
according to UT lawyer
Lynn Taylor.
In 1979, Robert
Miller lost a suit to
force the Hamline
University Law School
to give him another
chance to raise his
grade point average
before flunking him
out.
Undaunted, Univer-
sity of Wisconsin grad
student Gary Horowitz
wants $4 million in
damages from the
university, his pro-
fessors and the Educa-
tional Policy Depart-
ment for "breach of
contract" and for not
being allowed to retake
a flunked preliminary
exam for a doctoral
program, Michael
Liethen, the school's
attorney, reports.
"He has an er-
roneous concept of
what is involved in a
doctoral program
Liethen contends.
The case has not yet
come to trial.
N.C, Sees Violence As
Truckers Begin Protests
(UPI) � A truck driver
was slightly injured
Monday when an
unknown assailant
fired at least nine shots
at a tractor-trailer
traveling on a North
Carolina interstate.The
incident occurred im-
mediately after the
midnight strike
deadline set by in-
dependent drivers pro-
testing increased
federal taxes.
Police said Favion
Proveaux, a passenger
in the truck, was hit by
bullet and glass
fragments when a
.22-caliber rifle shell
"exploded" through
the passenger window
at 12:01 a.m. Monday.
He was released from a
local hospital after bits
of metal and glass were
removed from the back
of his head.
Elsewhere in North
Carolina, state highway
patrollers and truck
stop operators said
truck traffic appeared
somewhat lighter than
normal but apparently
was not significantly
affected by the nation-
wide strike. Indepen-
dent truckers said they
would park their rigs to
protest the Reagan ad-
ministration's increas-
ed gas tax and highway-
user fees.
The chief in-
vestigator for Halifax
County Sheriff W.C.
Bailey said it was
unclear whether strik-
ing truckers were
responsible for the at-
tack on Interstate 95
near the Lakewood
Truckers' Paradise. He
said police have
recovered shell casings
from a .22-caliber rifle
from a wooded area
beside the highway.
"As much as I know
the truckers, I don't
feel the truckers were
doing this he said. "I
just don't believe they
would do that to each
other. I feel there's a
possibility it was out-
side people agitating
it
The investigator said
the driver of the truck,
Ellis Warmack, of
Bamburg, S.C had
stopped to refuel at the
Lakewood Truckers'
Paradise near Roanoke
Rapids shortly before
the shooting incident.
At least eight bullets
struck the body of the
truck and one smashed
throuh the passenger
window shortly after he
returned to 1-95, he
said.
Police said Pro-
veaux, who was treated
and released at Halifax
Memorial Hospital,
was helping with the
driving. Warmack
works for Lifetime
Doors Corp. of Den-
mark. S.C. Proveaux is
believed to be from the
Bamburg, S C area.
The North Carolina
Highway Patrol had
cautioned officers to
watch for problems in
connection with the
protest but officials
reported no other
violence late Monday.
Drivers not honoring
the strike were having
no difficulties refueling
at truck stops,
operators said.
"We've had all our
people on alert to check
the truck terminals and
keep an eye out, but
there haven't been any
problems said Capt.
E.D. Young, com-
mander of the highway
patrol headquarters in
Asheville. Police of-
ficials in Greensboro,
Salisbury and Raleigh
reported truck traffic
was slightly diminish-
ed.
"I suspect it might
have been off a little
bit said Capt. OR.
McKinncy, Greensboro
troop commander.
"We should be able to
tell better later in the
week.
Many truck drivers
said they would honor
the strike, partially out
of fear for their per-
sonal safty. The In-
dependent Truckers
Association has said it
does not advocate
violence but a shut-
down by drivers in 1979
was marred by a
number of attacks.
"I'm just stopping
said Robert Keller, a
48-year-old driver. "It
is better to stop than be
killed
Do you want
II
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
HIGHER EXAMINATION SCORES
or
HIGHER GRADES ON YOUR TERM PAPERS
1983 SUMMER EMPLOYMENT - Many suggestions and addresses of 154corporat.ons,
41 federal agencies and 19 state governments with openings for summer employment
or internships. Order now. Publication date February 15, 1983. KMW
TO IMPROVE YOUR SCORE ON THE GRADUATE RECORD
Many sample questions
$5.00
BASIC TIPS
EXAMINATION - Proven strategies to increase your score.
from previous exams. 228 pages.
Ill
ADMISSION
ADMISSION
IV
INSIDERS GUIDE TO AN M.B.A IMPORTANT HINTS ON
PQnrmilRFS AND THE GRADUATE MANAGEMENT
EXAMINATION - This guide will help! It lists schools that accept part-time students,
C students, those without accounting and the very selective ones. 190 P38�
store price will be $9.95.
BASIC t.p TO IMPROVE YOUR SCORE ON THE LAW SCHOOL ADMISSION
TEST (Multistate Bar Examination) - Written by an attorney. Actual questions from
past exams. Many hints, 144 pages.
HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE MEDICAL COLLEGE ADMISSION TESTS-The
best in the field. Don't take the M.C.A. without this help. 340 pages. $10.00
VI
413 term papers. Topics from anthropology to zoology,
paper has an abstract. Actual term papers that received a grade of A- or A
THE TERM PAPER KIT
during the 1982 academic year at the University of Arizona or Arizona State University.
Ten pages of rules for preparing a bibliography and for proper footnoting. Order the kit,
review the topics and abstracts, then select one actual term paper which will be sent to
you within 10 days. These are not for resale or reproduction. They are for instructional
purposes only. Order the kit and see what top students do to get high grades.
Mail your order to:
University Research Services
Department 28
P.O. Box 7739
Phoenix, Arizona 85011
Order by number. Enclose cash, money order or a check. (Checks require 14 days additional
to clear.) Add $1.00 for postage. If you order two or more items, we will pay all mailing
charges.
in iv V VI (Circle your choice)
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ASSORTED
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She East (Karoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, !��!��
Mike Hughes. .v�i�f ����
waveri y Merritt. d, OJ Adr,a,nt Cindy Pleasants. sport, ��
Scott Lindley. m m Greg Rideout. mm ��
At 1 An shteh. o- ���� Steve Bachner. ��rrrr.�m,�,���
Stephanie Groon. , ,�,u,��, w Juliana Fahrbach. so���
Cl w Thornton. rM� &����� Todd Evans. iMMtaNMj
K-bruarv I. 193
Opinion
Page 4
Financial Aid
Delays Add To Confusion
If you're planning on applying
for federal financial aid for the fall
semester of 1983, then according to
Kathrvn Ribbey of the College
Board's Scholarship Service, you
had better do it soon and "do it
right the first time
Thanks to a two-month delay by
the U.S. Department of Education,
applications are just now being sent
out to financial aid offices around
the country.
The forms usually come out in
November, but education depart-
ment officials couldn't seem to
agree on the applications' wording
and format. However, the 60-day
holdover affected very little change
in the form itself. Most of the quib-
bling was over family contribution
schedules. In short, education
department officials spent two mon-
ths doing what boils down to
nothing just another discourag-
ing strand of bureaucratic red tape.
This latest unnecessary delay by
the Reagan administration brings to
mind several questions about the
underlying theories and practices
that administration has brought in-
to vogue. It is difficult to believe,
even in dealing with the federal
government, that a two-month
delay in processing forms � forms,
of ail things � is justified. Especial-
ly when the end result of their
"efforts" accomplishes nothing.
They have repeatedly stressed
their concern that thedefciy will con-
vince many students not to bother
to applv for aid this fall. But in fact,
if they cared at all about the
theoretical purposes of financial aid
programs � when last checked,
they were still theoretically suppos-
ed to increase a prospective stu-
dent's equal opportunities � the
education department officials
would, at least, have acted with
reasonable haste. As it stands now,
the situation seems merely another
signal of the "beginning of the end"
of financial aid under the Reagan
administration. By discouraging
students from applying � although
they, of course, deny that is their
purpose � the number of requests
for federal funds decreases, and
financial aid programs gradually
dwindle without much of a fight.
The forms for Pell Grants and
National Direct Student Loans are
long and complicated, and, as
students who have applied in the
past can attest, there is no room for
error. Naturally, all information
must be accurate.
But as most students can also at-
test, getting the forms filled out cor-
rectly is no simple matter. It is not
uncommon for applications to be
returned once, sometimes twice �
after even more bureaucratic red
tape � for corrections and revisions
before the form can be processed
and weeks or months before the stu-
dent actually receives funding.
But now, because of the depart-
ment's time-consuming tabling
measures, students and financial aid
offices simply don't have time for
errors of any sort.
Unfortunately, we cannot expect
the Department of Education to
reassess its priorities in dealing with
financial aid. Their lack of concern
for the needs of students � as
"unintentional" as it may be � will
persist. But students should not let
the government's apparent non-
chalance discourage them from ap-
plving for aid. Now, more than
ever, students should signal to Con-
gress that there is, indeed, a need
and a desire for federal financial
aid.
Because of the lateness of the
forms and the subsequent confusion
expected, the College Board has set
up a toll-free "hotline which
students can call to discuss the
status of their applications. The
phone number is printed at the top
of the new forms.
Gringos Rendered Penniless
As Mexico's Peso Plummets
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � The plummeting
Mexican economy and the ensuing dive of
the peso have proved a boon to many
American tourists. The devalued Mexican
currency allows them to get good bargains
with their strong American dollars.
But other Americans haven't been as
fortunate. The shrinking Mexican peso is
proving disastrous to elderly U.S. citizens
who invested their retirement nest eggs
south of the border. The once-promising
guaranteed government-interest rates are
being wiped out by the financial crisis af-
flicting the Mexican economy.
Lured into investing their retirement
savings in Mexican government-controlled
banks by tax breaks and fixed-term ac-
counts, these Americans find themselves
caught in the peso squeeze. The peso has
been devalued by nearly two-thirds com-
pared to the dollar, and strict currency
controls prohobit recovering all but
minimal amounts of investments. Some
estimate that Americans living both above
and below the border could lose as much as
$12 billion a year in the financial crunch.
One American particularly hard hit is an
84-year-old widow who moved to Mexico
to be with her son. She took the proceeds
from the sale of her home along with her
modest savings � totaling $40,000 � and
deposited the money in a fixed-term ac-
count in Mexico's National Financiera.
But the high altitude and problems with
the water didn't agree with her, and now
she wants to return to the United States.
Unfortunately, the air and water are the
least of her problems. Her bank account,
initially amounting to more than 10 million
pesos, has dwindled to less than three
million. She is prohibited from converting
the pesos back into dollars and is forbid-
den to leave Mexico with more than 5,000
pesos in Mexican currency. She also
becomes subject to criminal prosecution if
My
This column is faithfully dedicated to
my faithfully dedicated dog. At, without
whom, I'd probably have nothing better to
write about today. (Can you imagine?)
Al is the only surviving prodigy of the
world's first attempted chihuahuaSt. Ber-
nard mix-breed (a feat 1 would have loved
to have seen). Poor, Al. he's had a tough
life. Both his parents were killed in a tragic
auto accident back in '78 when he was just
a pup, forcing him to take to the streets.
Being iust a simple son of a bitch, Al knew
very little about the wau ol the world, for
months, he wandered around aimlessly, all
alone on the brink ol disaster.
That's when I found him 1 he rest is
his story.
You know, it's strange. Despite the ex-
ternal appearance ot a dog � albeit an in
credibly ugly dog � Al has never really
been much enamoured of the canine way
of life. On the contrary. I'm mute sure he
actuallv thinks he's � ol all things - a
cat. But even in his feline tendencies, Al is
an extremist in every sense of the word.
You talk about finicky? Al won't touch
anything I haven't tried first. Hell, he
won't even go near his catnip unles� 1
assure him its straight from Colombia.
You talk about mean? This dog watches
Championship Wrestling From i.eorgia
every Saturday and always cheers against
MIKF. HUGHES
-&&-&
Wahoo McDaniel. And that's nothing; he
only watches telethons so he can growl and
sneer at Jerry Lewis' kids.
But although he never finished his for-
mal training. Al's wits are certainly about
him. Sure, he's since taken a cor-
respondence course or two trom obedience
school at my request; nevertheless, his
natural, innate abilities are simply uncan-
ny. And, quite frankly, 1 exploit the hell
out of him.
Contrarv to popular belief, I don's get
ideas tor mv columns trom hallucinogenic
drugs. Well, not directly anyway. I let Al
take the drugs, and he corner up with the
ideas. My job is simple; I just jot them
down. Sure, it's an overused system � I
realize that � but then again, why tamper
with success?
Well, that's the way I see it anyway. Al.
on the other hand, has been a bit disgruntl-
ed of late. He's been dropping hints that he
wants equal billing, since he does "most of
the work Bov. I remember this one hint
he dropped last week � V hew' - it tool
me three days and two cans ot Lysol
clear the air.
He doesn't much go tor the typica
dog master relationship either Mavre I let
him read too much; 1 don't know It
seems strange that should have to tetch
the paper for him every night.
And his dating habits are utterly
despicable. He has no stvle. no grace what-
soever. He calls himelt an "entei
I'm sure you've seen (or at least I him
in front ot the hbrarv. outside � me
ec classroom or on the mall 1 don't know
how you could have missed him He's the
top halt ot pracucallv everv canine duo on
campus
v. es. he's a lot like an old roommate W
smoker too much; he drinks too much.
he's lazv. Sometimes he doesn't come
home tor davs at a lime, and in the process
of fathering 50 prtnt �? Greenville's
canine population, he's probably con
tracted every disease in the book
1 guess that's whv 1 like him so much.
Editor's Sole: Mike Hughes, who
despises the Washington Kedsktns and
especially John Riggins beyond alt human
comprehension, holds the world's record
Jor eating his mother 's mango pancakes.
r-Campus Forum
Helter Skelter Over Shelter Issue
she fails to deposit her U.S. Social Security
check with the Banko de Mexico for pesos
within 24 hours after receiving it.
SUBMARINE RACES: Remember that
unidentified submarine that escaped the
clutches of the top-secret Swedish naval
base last October? Intelligence sources say
at least five unidentified submarines were
spotted in the waters off Stockholm last
year.
Now, the Swedish government is taking
steps to crack down on these infiltrators.
Special information leaflets have been
printed on how to spot these hot subs, and
what to do if they are spotted. The leaflets
are being distributed to fishermen,
yachtsmen, customs agents and others on
the coast.
Meanwhile, Soviet dissidents from
Estonia, directly across the Baltic Sea, tell
another story. A gang of 200 political
prisoners have been put to work cleaning
Soviet nuciear submarines at a base near
Paldiski. Many of these prisoners are
thought to be suffering from radiation
sickness.
THE CRUMBLING CAPITOL: The
U.S. Capitol building, America's greatest
symbol of democracy, is cracked and
crumbling. This is not a new problem. The
building has been decaying for 25 years.
Still, Congress can't decide what to do
about the problem.
And, in typical fashion, our legislators
have commissioned Five separate studies
over the last 25 years to solve the dilemma.
The cost for the studies alone has totalled
$2.5 million. The latest analysis was com-
pleted four years ago and recommended an
extension to the Capitol that would cost
$70 million.
But there will undoubtedly be several
more costly investigations before Congress
will finally agree on what to do about the
problem.
Copyrifhi. 193
United Failure Syndicate. Inc.
I am writing in response to Rob
Poole's letter regarding SGA funding of
bus shelters which appeared in the Jan.
27 edition of The East Carolinian. I
want to take this opportunity to clarify a
few comments and correct some false
statements made by the writer.
A bill was introduced to the
Legislature concerning construction of
three (3) bus shelters at an estimated cost
of $12,000. The SGA Student Welfare
Committee examined the issue and
determined that the need did exist. This
committee then reported to the
Legislature and recommended the con-
struction of the shelters if the funds were
available. The issue was then presented
to the Appropriations Committee to
determine if adequate funds were, in
fact, available for the shelters. The Ap-
propriations Committee then postponed
the matter and made no final decision
nor reported to the Legislature. So, no
Final decision has been made to date.
However, the reason a final decision
has not been made is because money is
not currently available to fund all three
of the shelters. The SGA currently has
only $5,000 available for appropriation
for the remainder of the fiscal year (July
1, 1983). This is only an estimated figure
and isn't nearly enough to fund the
shelters.
The facts are:
� The SGA has an estimated budget of
$100,000, received trom student fees to
appropriate annually; however, some
$95,000 has already been appropriated.
� The Transit System has a budget of
some $145,000, received from student
fees (aside from the fees received by the
SGA), used to operate and maintain the
transit system.
� The Transit System has an estimated
surplus of $20,000 for 1982-83 which
could be used to fund the bus shelters.
The SGA is a service organization
responsible for funding student needs
excluding separate SGA programs, such
as Transit. The Transit System is respon-
sible for funding all matters relating to
transit.
The SGA Legislature is trying to do
the best job in a difficult situation given
the limited financial resources.
However, the Legislature cannot be ex-
pected to fund projects in excess of
available revenues. It is unfortunate that
the SGA president, vice president and
Mr. Poole (who failed to mention that
he is freshman class president and a
member of the I egislature) cannot
understand an obvious financial
nightmare.
Gary Williams
SGA Speaker
Graduate Class Pres.
Play It Again, Sam
In response to Rob Poole's commen-
tary 'Give Me Shelter SGA Says So in
The East Carolinian of Jan. 27, 1 would
like to point out some facts that were
misconstrued by Mr. Poole.
The students do receive approximately
$100,000 annually to be appropriated by
the SGA. However, much of that money
is appropriated to groups who sponsor
academic and cultural events for the
students and do not receive funding
from the university. Of the $100,000
received bv the SGA last July, all but
about $12,000 was spent by the 1981-82
legislature last spring and the executive
council last summer. When the bill re-
questing funds for building three bus
shelters was introduced, the SGA had
less that $5,000 left to be appropriated
through th" end of the first session of
summer school.
The cost of materials for one shelter is
estimated at $4,000. The industrial
technology department had offered its
services to the transit manager to build
the shelters free of charge this semester.
This bill requesting $12,000 dollars
for three shelters was brought before the
Appropriations Committee and tabled,
pending notification of whether the IT
department would agree to build the
shelters during the summer or fall, by
which time the SGA would have received
its $100,000 or so for next year's ap-
propriation. So, in fact, the SGA had
not said no.
If it is imperative that one shelter be
built this fiscal year, then that one
shelter would completely exhaust all
SGA revenues until July 1, 1983.
It is mv personal opinion that should
all the SGA's money be appropriated
toward the building of one bus shelter,
then newly-forming groups and groups
requesting additional funds for pro-
viding academic and cultural services to
the students at ECU would be deprived.
And the consideration of appropriating
the funds needed for building bus
shelters would be more feasible after the
new fiscal year when more money is
available for all who have need of it.
David Vvhitlev
Chairman, Appropriations Comm
A 20th-century Dictator?
Concerning our upcoming women's
basketball game with ODL. 1 feel it is
time to express a fan's view of our pro-
blem.
It was a sad scene at the women's last
home game with Appalachian State. As
a loyal fan of ECU Women's basketball.
1 was shocked at Coach Andruzzi's reac
tion when the sparcely populated
coliseum decided to show a little en-
thusiasm. We were leading, and an Ap-
palachian State player was at the foul
line. It was at that point that the crowd
began to make noise, and it was also at
that point that Coach Andruzzi took to
the microphone. She claimed we were a
"Class A" organization and that we
should show a little respect. She also
said that if we didn't like it. we could
leave. Well, I think if the people who
really didn't like it (her reaction) would
have left, including myself, there
wouldn't have been many fans remain-
ing.
Sure, one should show respect, but
isn't there an expression somewhere in
sports called "home court advantage?"
What she is so grossly protesting is what
goes on at all of the men's games and is a
vital aspect of the game.
1 think Coach Andruzzi should think
a little more about fan participation
before our upcoming game with ODL,
because fan participation helps player
enthusiasm. I know I'll be at the game
showing my enthusiasm whether Coach
Andruzzi likes it or not.
Randy Mizelle
Sophomore, Psychology
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oJ view. Mail or
drop them by our ojjice in the Old South
Builaing, across jrom Joyner Library.
For purposes oJ verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj the authorfs
Jones
Continued I ram Page 1
as based on his "very
strong political
background and not
because he as a con-
gressmen's son.
Committee member
Williams agreed with
Jaobson tha: "a very
fair process" was used
choosing Jones
"vAc eliminated some
of them and I
another look at
ones who looked
strong v
"Vve used the pro-
1
fii
te
Local
Bass
TopSidei
Conversi
Florsheii
to mentii
iiiiiw
SAYF NOW
BEAUTlf
14k GUI
puffed hk
Band gold
GUARANTI
ft g -
Gold Beat
Love'
14 KARAT
a-v are as�o�"iec!
stnet �-a
supe�t sty a'V! 1
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aasstsss
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�r� i � -





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 1, 9i
Pal, AI
nbei this one hint
w hew ! it took
cans ol I ysoJ to
rnuc toi the tpical
hei Mdhe I let
' ' know. It just
d lave to fetch
ts arc utterly
� o grace what-
an "entertainer
least heard) him
de youi home-
1 don't knov
' He's the
er canine duo on
an Id roommate: He
UK- too much:
d �esni come
d in the process
oi Greenville's
he's probably con-

much.
.t Hughes, who
M i hington Redskins and
id lohn Riggins beyond uli hurrun
rehension. holds the world's record
ifms his mother's manao puncakes.
ter Issue
�: money is ' it.
Da Appro;d V hit lev : .mm.
20th-t entun Dictator?
tball . � pres3ur upcomir Dl 1 ' 1: '� lew.g women's 1 teel it is ur pro-
at the women's last
game with Appalachian State. As
kl :an ol ECU A omens basketball,
Ishockec ich Andruzzi's reac-
men the spared) populated
um decided to show a littie en-
sm V. e were leading, and an Ap-
h:an State plaer was at the foul
ft was at that point that the crowd
to make noise, and it was also at
toint that � Vndruzzi took to
pcrophone i med we were a
I v '��- n and that we
trie respect She also
I � �' ' like it, we could
Well, I think it the people who
didn't like it (her reaction) would
left, including myself, there
n't have been manv tans remain-
le one should show respect, but
pere an expression somewhere in
called "home court advantage?"
Jshe is so grossly protesting is what
n at all or the men's games and is a
xct of the game
link Coach Andruzzj should think
e more about fan participation
our upcoming game with ODU,
in participation helps player
iasm 1 know I'll be at the game
ig my enthusiasm whether Coach
i" likes h or not.
Randy Mizelle
Sophomore. Psychology
Forum Rules
East Carolinian welcomes letters
ing all points oj view. Mail or
hem by our ojjue in the Old South
tng, across Jrom Joyner Library.
mrposes oj venjication, all letters
include the name, major and
Yication, address, phone number
gnature oj the author(s).
I
Jones Will Replace Bundy
Continued From Page 1
was based on his "very
strong political
background" and not
because he was a con-
gressmen's son.
Committee member
Williams agreed with
Jacobson that "a very
fair process" was used
in choosing Jones.
"We eliminated some
of them and took
another look at the
ones who looked
strong Williams said.
"We used the pro-
cess
Williams said one
candidate whom she
felt was "a strong one"
was never interviewed
and was out of town
during the selection
hearing.
Jones is native of
Farmville. His wife is a
public high school
teacher in Pitt County.
They have one
daughter.
Selection Committee
members were par-
ticularly impressed with
Jones experience in the
political arena. From
1977-1980 heVorked a
representative of Gov.
Jim Hunt's office. His
job, which included
work in 25 North
Carolina counties, was
to help bring the gover-
nor's office closer to
the people. He also did
extensive work for the
democratic party dur-
ing the 1980 Carter
reelection campaign.
Jones is a graduate
of Atlantic Christian
College. He also at-
tended N.C. State
University for some
years before transferr-
ing to ACC where he
received a degree in
political science and
history.
While at N.Cghstate,
Jones was president of
the Young Deomcrats
Club and the Political
Science Club. He work-
ed as a legislative assis-
tant to the N.C.
Gereral Assembly in
1963. Presently Jones is
working as a consultant
and representative for
PS Investments and the
Southern Association
of Loggers.
According to Jacob-
son, Jones was chosen
because of "his own in-
itiative and talent
She added that all the
committee members
wanted a permanent
candidate for Bundy's
post. There was some
indication that an in-
terim candidate was go-
ing to be appointed.
"We all agreed that we
did not want an interim
candidate Jacobson
said. "We wanted to
get a young person in
there who could learn
the job
LAST YEARJHANDGUNS KILLED
48 PEOPLE IN JAPAN.
8 IN GREAT BRITAIN.
34INSWTTZERLAND.
KIN CANADA.
58 IN ISRAEL
21 IN SWEDEN.
42 IN WEST GERMANY
10J28 IN THE UNITED STATES.
GOD BLESS AMERICA.
Phi Kappa Phi Forum
Starts Off Ceremonies
Continued From Page 1
Future of Human
Communication" will
be given by Dr. Hal J.
Daniel, a professor in
the Department of
Speech, Language and
Auditory Pathology.
Friday's program
will begin with "Health
Care: 2003" being
presented by Dr.
William E. Laupus,
Vice Chancellor and
Dean School of
Medicine. Brown's
presentation will follow
�.
. � �.��� ����
� , � �. � � . �. . �� � .�
� ���;� ���.� ������: ��.���.�

The Shoe Outlet
Located next to Evans Seafood
on West 9th St.
Brand name shoes
at
Bass discount prices
TopSider
Converse
Florsheim
to mention a few.
mM& 'MB
SAVE NOW ON
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The final presenta-
tion will be given by
Dr. Carl G. Adler, pro-
fessor Department of
Physics, on "The Solar
System of the Future:
In our Image and
Likeness
All Symposium
presentations will be in
the auditorium of the
ECU School of Nurs-
ing.Howell's installa-
tion will begin 4 p.m.
Thursday in Wright
Auditorium.
Other platform
speakers, besides Hunt
and Friday, at the in-
stallation include Dr.
Caroline L. Ayers,
ECU Alumni Associa-
tion president John C.
Lennon Jr of Raleigh,
ECU board of trustees
chairman C. Ralph
Kinsey Jr of
Charlotte, UNC Board
of Governors chairman
John R. Jordon Jr of
Raleigh, ECU SGA
president Eric Hender-
son and N.C. Court of
Appeals judge Gerald
Arnold, a distinguished
ECU alumnus.
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February 3-4, 1983
Nursing Building Auditorium � Room 101 � East Carolina University
You may attend all presentations or as many as your schedule permits. Short
Thursday, February 3
SESSION A - CHAIRPERSON
Dr. J. William Byrd
Professor and Chair
Department of Physics
8:50 a.m.
Welcome
Chancellor John Howell
040 a.m.
"Reflections on the American Dream"
Dr. William A. Blood worth
Professor and Chairperson
Department of English
10:00 a.m.
"The Political Impact of a
Changing Ethnic and Racial Balance
in America's New Millennium"
Dr. Thomas F. Eamon
Associate Professor
Department of Political Science
IMiam
"Conceptual and Normative Aspects
of Alternative Futures"
Dr. James LeRoy Smith
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy
Chair: Dr J WOban Byrd
Dr Frad Broadbont
Or Traaftoa C. Davfc
Or Envii Hate
Thursday, February 3
SESSION B - CHAIRPERSON
Dr. Frederick L. Broadhurst
Professor
Department of Industrial and
Technical Education
M p.m.
"Will The First Amendment be Eroded?'
Dr. Gene D Lamer
Professor
Department of Library Science
200 p.m.
"Living From Wholeness Instead of
From Reaction"
Mrs. Linda L Warner
Lecturer
Department of Psychology
3cWp.m.
"Signs, Symbols and Such:
The Future of Human Communication"
Dr. rial J Daniel. Ill
Professor
Department of Speech, Language, and
Auditory Pathology
Symposium Committee
break between presentations.
Friday, February A
SESSION C - CHAIRPERSON
Dr. Rosin Lao
Professor and Chairperson
Department of Psychology
"Health Care: 2003"
Dr William E. Laupus
Vice Chancellor and Dean
School of Medicine
'The Value of General Studies m the
Undergraduate Curriculum"
Mr Darryl k Brown
I'ndergraduate Student � English
1140 a.m.
"The Solar System of the Future.
In Our Image and Likeness"
Dr Carl C Adler
Professor
Department of Physics
Dr Robert Hok .
Dr Roataa Lao
Dr Robert Malar .
Dr. low Ryaa
Dr Aaaafe Volpa
AHan

,
-v , .
J





� '�
A THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 1, 1983
Students, Staff
Protest Against
El Salvador Aid
A group of 15 ECU
students, staff and
faculty held a one-hour
demonstration at the
Post Office on 10th
Street Thursday to pro-
test the re-certification
of El Salvador for con-
tinued military aid.
The demonstrators
were reacting to last
month's certification
decision by the Reagan
administration which
paved the way for the
strief-torn central
American nation to
receive another $26
million in military aid
during the next six
months.
According to a
report issued by the
State Department,
there has been an
"increased con-
sciousness" by the
Salvadoran govern-
ment of the importance
of more effective action
on human rights. The
report, which was
presented to Congress,
also concluded that the
progress was slow.
Several Human
right's organizations
have condemned the re-
certification decision
claiming that actual im-
provements in human
rights violations have
been negligible.
The local protestors,
many of whom belong
to the ECU Committee
on El Salvador, also
condemned the State
Department's conclu-
sion. Several of the
protestors had been
among a group of 11
people from ECU who
took part in a larger
demonstration at the
State Department on
the previous Monday.
ECU English student
Suzanne Darwin, who
was arrested for civil
disobedience at the
State Department in the
earlier protest, told The
East Carolinian Thurs-
day that the United
States was sending
military aid to El
Salvador "in the name
of fighting comm-
munism" but that the
real problem in El
Salvador was one of
poverty and hunger.
"These people are
hungry and scared
said Darwin "By our
actions, we are only
causing them further
hunger and greater
fear
Darwin, who was
holding a homemade
placard stating "No
Guns To Central
America added her
hope that those who
saw and heard about
the protest would be
convinced that
"collectivelv" people
can make a difference
in slopping the war in
El Salvador
Another protestor,
who refused to be iden-
tified because of their
foreign citizery, noted
that U.S. support of
the Salvadoran govern-
ment was actually en-
couraging Communism
bescause it was further
allienating the poor
people.
The State Depart-
ment noted findings
released by the San
Salvador-based El
Salvador Human
Rights Commission
that said 5,840
Salvadorans were killed
last year compared with
13,000 in 1981, thus
supporting the Reagan
administration's con-
tention that the
political violence is
declining.
Local protestors
distributed a flyer
refuting the claims of
the El Salvador Com-
mission. They claim
that 12,501 "unarmed
civilians" had been kill-
ed last year. "The
Reagan Administration
says it is seeking
democracy and peace in
Central America
stated the flyer "aid is
guaranteed by the deep
U.S. business and
military interests in
Latin America, not in
order to support
democracy
The group also listed
the four conditions
which the Salvadoran
government must meet
to be eligible for con-
tinued aid.
Patrons and passers-
by were asked to sign
two petitions being cir-
culated by the group.
One, which was ad-
dressed to U.S. Con-
gressman Walter B.
Jones called on him to
oppose further military
aid to the government
of El Salvador. The
other was addressed to
Soviet leader Yuri An-
dropov, the chairman
of the Central Commit-
tee of the Communist
Party.
"We arc petitioning
our government today
to cut off military sup-
port to the government
of El Salvador. We
would like to know that
Soviet Citizens were
also free to petition
their government for
such actions as
withdrawing from
Afghanistan stated
the petition.
Afgan Rebels To
Talk On Soviets
Eormer Afghanistan
Ereedom fighters will
be lecturing at ECU
later this month. The
Afghans will be on
campus February 9, in
room 244 Mendenhall
at 7:30.
The ex-fighters are
currently employed as
taxi cab drivers in New
York City. They will be
taking several weeks
off from work to travel
to various campuses
throughout the U.S.
The event is being
sponsored by the ECU
chapter of the N.C.
Federation of College
Republicans. Each
fighter will discuss a
different area of the
war. Topics such as
yellow rain and the
Soviet use of chemical
warfare will be discuss-
ed.
Dennis Kilcoyne,
Prsident of the ECU
College Republicans,
stated that the term ex-
freedom fighters wasn't
accurate. "I really
hesitate to call them ex-
freedom fighters. The
only difference is that
now they're fighting
with words instead of
bullets
In December of 1979
the Soviet Union invad-
ed the Afganistan,
which is close to the
Persian Gulf. The four
freedom fighters are
among thousands of
farmers and peasants
who have taken up
arms against the
Soviets. One of the
rebels coming to cam-
pus has reportedly
witnessed an actual
"yellow rain" attack
by the Russians. Yellow
rain is a form of
chemical warfare that
has been banned by
Geneva Protocol in
1925.
After four years of
fighting, the war is at a
stalemate. The majori-
ty of the countryside is
still controlled by the
freedom fighters. The
rebel weaponry mainly
consists of captured
Russian weapons, and
weapons supplied
through the "black
markets
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Schools Trying To Halt Tuition Increase Trend
(CPS) - After near
� a decade of annual
tuition and fee hikes
that have lately become
semester-by-scmester
increases, some schools
are actually pledging to
King
put future fee hikes on
hold for the moment.
Faced with the pro-
spect of pricing their
students out of college,
some collegses in
Hawaii, New York,
West Virginia, Califor-
nia, Arkansas,
Massachusetts, Texas
and others have
adopted "freezes" to
halt temporarily the
dramatic escalation of
Talks To Students
On Legacy Of Husband
C ontinued From Page 1
outreach to others and
the faiti in Cod to
guide.
Mrs. King said that
all people were con-
nected by what she call-
ed "an inescapable net-
work of mutuality"
and that if we are to
live the complete life
exhibited by her hus-
band "we must reach
up and discover God
"Make God a power
in your life King con-
tinued. "Seek him
On numerous occas-
sions King referred to
nonviolence as the true
power of the effort for
justice, peace and
brotherhood. "We
shall meet your
physical force with soul
force she said. "We
will wear you down by
our capacity to suffer
"Our victory will be
a double victory King
continued. She also ad-
vised her audience to
see the recently released
motion picture
"Ghandi a portrayal
ot the lite of India's
great nonviolent leader.
King invited
everyone in the au-
dience to the "I have a
dream celebration"
which her organization
is planning for Aug. 27
in Washington, D.C
the 20th anniversary of
the early civil rights
"March on
Washington" in 1963
when her husband
delivered his famous
speech.
Mrs. King was
honored at a reception
in Mendenhall im-
mediately after her
presentation.
tuition and other fees.
A lower inflation
rate, salary cuts and
other belt-tightening ef-
forts are enabling the
schools to hold student
costs to 1982 levels,
they say.
Sometimes the
"freeze" is nothing
more than foregoing a
previously-unplanned
mid-year tuition hike,
though such increases
have become common
over the last two years
on campus.
West Virginia
University officials, for
instance, recently
decided against increas-
ing student fees by $50
this semester because
"students and their
families already have
made financial plans
for this academic year
and we dislike adding
to their burden in these
poor economic times
To make future in-
creases less burden-
some, promises WVU
President Gordon Gee,
the school will
"propose any increases
well in advance" so
students and their
families will have time
to plan for them.
Millersville State
College in Penn-
sylvania will also offer
its students "next
year's education at last
year's prices says
President Joseph
Caputo.
Officials at Spr-
ingfield ICollege, a
small, private
Massachusetts school,
have agreed to freeze
tuition and room and
board charges until
next September.
"The continuing rise
in college costs was
really affecting our
students explains
Springfield spokesman
Joseph McAleer.
Last year, he adds,
the college lost nearly
100 students who could
no longer afford tuition
and housing charges.
"In light of the
economy and the cuts
being made in
Washington, we
wanted to take some
action to help our
students. Now, at least,
when families sit down
to budget their ex-
penses, they'll be
guaranteed what their
college expenses will
be McAleer explains.
Springfield students
will no doubt ap-
pareciate the gesture.
Tuition and fees have
risen an average of
10-to-15 percent a year
for the last five years,
McAleer says, from

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$3939 in 1979 to $6880
this year.
Stanford may even
lower its tuition for
1983-84, according to
Provost Albert
Hastorf Although tui
tion was projected to
increase by 12 percent
from the current $8220.
Hastorf wants to
"substantially lower"
that amount instead
"I feel stronglv
we've been driving tui-
tion (increases) too
hard and fast. We've
got to get (the rate of
increase) down he
said.
A recent American
Association of State
Colleges and Univer
sities (AASCL) survey
found that state college
costs rose much more
slowly than explected
this year, although
researchers were at a
loss to explain why.
VMule reluctant to
predict if other colleges
might join in this freeze
movement, AASCU
spokeswoman
Meredith Ludwig says
that "all schools are
very concerned now
with not imporing too
much of a cost burden
on their students
The movement is
hardlv general in scope.
Many schools have
already announced in-
creases for next year to
help compensate for
often-drastic state
budget cuts. Even
traditionally "free"
California community
tuition for the first time
next fall
Less egalitarian
schools certainly will
Princeton wants to
raise its tuition to
$12,900 next fall, a 13
percent jump
That's about par for
the course among Ivy
League schools, Yale
officials admit M IT
may also soon raise its
rates
Med school students
fare just about as bad
ly. Average medical
school tuition nation-
wide is now over
$10,000, according to
the Association of
American Medical Col-
leges. The average rr.av
go up another 10 per-
cent next fall, the
association savs
colleges may impose
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Tues Feb.1,1983 9:00-1:00
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ViSA'







THE EAST CAROL INIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY I. 1983
Page 8
Dance Display
A Long Vigil,
But Worth It
By DARRYL BROWN
UttllaBl Nm t dimr
When asked if college dance
departments were a legitimate train-
ing ground for serious ballet
dancers, George Balanchine once
responded with an emphatic "no
The students are, he said, too old by
that age to still be training for a
serious career in classical dance;
that must be done in the teen and
pre-teen years.
Though there are exceptions
(Melissa Hayden and Heather Watts
are cases-in-point; both came com-
paratively late to careers as principle
dancers with the New York City
Ballet), by and large, Balanchine is
right. Male dancers have the advan-
tage of being able to overcome a late
start in training more easily than
girls, but most good classical
dancers are professional by their
late teens, some even younger. A
significant number of the members
of major ballet companies aie made
up of girls hired at age 16 or 17.
Modern dance is an entirely dif-
ferent situation. College campuses
have always been a wellspring of
talent for contemporary dance
Modern dancers traditionally begin
training later than ballet dancers,
and much of significant modern
dance has come from college dance
classes. Earlier in this century, Ben-
nington College was a home for
many of the greats of modern
dance, and the acclaimed dance
troupe Pilobolus began with a few
imaginative but untrained college
students in a phys. ed. dance class.
Thus, a dance department such as
ECU's has marks both for and
against it with respect to the training
of professional dancers, at least in
the opinion of some. The depart-
ment's annual performance last
week included examples of modern,
ballet and jazz, showing a wide
spectrum of styles and techniques,
sometimes with considerable suc-
cess, sometimes with less than.
The long (too long � over three
hours) "Evening Of Dance' (or
Dance Marathon) began with two
modern pieces. Dimensions oj Time
and Space followed by Floor Play.
The first featured the bamboo and
cord sculptures of Tom Grubb like
those that have become familiar
around Greenville for the last year
or two, along with five male dancers
in the choreography of Patricia Per-
talion. This short but gallant work
had a flavor slightly reminiscent of
classical Greece with its muscular,
masculine movements, and ended
with some nice visual effects using
colored ropes strung by the dancers
into interesting lighting patterns.
The second piece featured an all-
female cast with music by Vivaldi.
The classical-style choreography for
which Vivaldi's music is often
chosen was handled well by the
dancers, and had a couple of
unusual twists by its creator Patricia
Weeks. However, both of the first
two dances were, as they say, a little
too close to the exercise book, at
times pedantic instead of dynamic.
The next piece was a multi-media
work by Weeks, .4HI Dances, using
abstract film on stage. The dancers
and projection worked well
together, each stretching and expan-
ding the other in this avante-garde
work. Weeks is trying to work on
the edge of progressie modern
dance with this one. and the result
was fairly good, though not
outstanding There is an energy even
to walking and standing on stage
which the dancers didn't fulfill, but
thc worked well as an ensemble.
The first act ended with a wonder-
ful version of Streetcar which
possessed some of the best
choreography and strongest perfor-
mances of the evening. Susu Corbitt
ignited the stage in her opening solo
as Blanche, and continued to power
the piece with her sultry, dynamic
performance. She enlivened her
character and the scenario with a
strong stage presence and acting
ability. Barry Ambrose was nearly
as captivating in the role of Stanley,
giving a tough, consistant quality to
his role.
The entire cast was above
See NIGHT, Page 10

I Snv'fl
1 1 �
3
zzTarr � .
Soviet Emigre Orchestra Performing A: Hendrix Next Week
: tn
The Soviet Emigre Orchestra, under the direcUon of Lazar Gosman,
will be performing on Thursday, Feb. 10, at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
Stu nt Center's Hendrix Theatre. This concert, presented by the
University Unions Artists Series Committee, replaces the cancelled
Orpheus concert. Season ticket patrons can use their season tickets
for admission. Other tickets may be purchased at S2.50 for students
and $7.50 for faculty, staff and the public. All tickets sold at the
door will be $7.50. Tickets may be purchased at the C entral Ticket
Office, MSC, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m Monday through Friday.
New Bern Had Blues In '30s
ro
i -i�f( 4a4 Wtrr Rtporti
1933: Franklin Roosevelt was
newly elected president. The
Depression had moved out of the
ra,do and , into the kitchen, and
Richard Henry, age 12, moifed with
his mother and younger siblings
from Beaufort to New Bern, N.C.
They were hard times. Sevety-five
cents would pay a weeks rent, and
that kind of money was hard to
find. Richard Henry quit school and
went to work carrying groceries.
Taking care of the younger children
started for him in 1933, and
children have been a given in his life
ever since. And so has the Blues.
Blues had just become acceptable
for recording in the 1930s when the
decline of sharecropping in the
South took country blues to the city
via its migrating creators. The blues
wasn't playing much around
Beaufort at that time, but New Bern
was attracting live Blues performers
whose names have since become
esoteric trivia with the exception of
Fats Domino. By the 1930s, the
Blues was as common as a baby's
cry, but not to Richard Henry:
"I'd take groceries to people's
houses and hear the music, playing
it on piccolos. I'd get home. Mama
would ask, 'Henry, where you been
so long?' I'd make excuses, slip out
nights, go to the joints to hear them
play the Blues
It was one of those furtive even-
Richard Henry Reminisces
ing outings that Henry heard Fred-
dy Miller from Sumpter, S.C On
the spot. Henry resolved iO leafn'
"to play just like that man. And
when I was fourteen Henry says.
"I could play the guitar better than
I play now
Henry began accompanying Fred-
dy Miller to New York In the
1930s, The Blues wa in Harlem
where he came to know the musu o4
Blind Boy Fuller, Big Bill Broonzy.
Lightnin' Hopkins. Sonny Terry
and Brownie McGhee. "Their lives
were so hard. Everything against
them, but I think that's what made
them good
Lightnin' Hopkins, whose music
defines the tradition of country
blues, continually sold the rights to
his music as it was recorded. After
each cut he'd hold out his hand to
receive fifty dollars. Then he'd
record another. Fifty dollars. And
so" on. album after album Wwrtf
term reward, long term hardsnip.
That's what kept the Blues alive.
Blind Boy Fuller, with the added
advantage of blindness, sang lines
like, "know my dog by his bark,
know my woman in the dark "
Seems he did He even managed to
find her with a bullet once which
took him to jail for awhile He sang
of the experience in the language of
the Blues.
Big Bill Broonzy had a voice that
conveyed the necessary feeling
without being in the middle of the
circumstance. Many Blues musi-
cians then and now have learned a
lot about singing the Blues from Big
Bill Broonzy.
Quinn Still Zorba
Actor Recreating Best Role
v
Dutch Soprano Elly Ameling Performing In February
Dutch-born soprano Elly Ameling, "one of the world's foremost sopranos and one of the most
universally beloved and acclaimed artists of our time will appear in Hendrix Theatre on Thurs-
day, Feb. 24, at 8 p.m. Tickets for concert, which is sponsored by the University Unions Artists
Series Committee are $2.50 for students and $7.50 for faculty, staff and the public. All tickets sold
at the door will be $7.50. Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student
Center between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m Monday through Friday.
ByJAYSHARBUT
mWmmmWmm
NEW YORK � He's played many men. A Mex-
ican revolutionary. The French painter Gauguin. A
shifty Arab chieftain, Barabbas. A punched-out pug.
Henry II. The pope. He also once had a chance to
play God on Broadway, but said no dice.
Anthony Quinn chuckles, "God wasn't a very
good part he says.
But he's due on Broadway next season in what for
him was a very good film part in 1964 � the ex-
uberant, hedonistic, knockabout peasant he played
to great acclaim in the movie, Zorba, The Greek.
His stage Zorba is a new version of the 1968
Broadway musical that was adapted from the novel
by Nikos Kazantzakis.
Because of his lusty, memorable film Zorba,
Quinn "owned" the role, as they say. But he turned
down the chance to reprise it on Broadway in 1968,
he says, for one reason: "I hated the opening line
Which was?
"Which was, 'Life is what you do waiting to die I
said that's completely the antithesis of what Zorba
says. Zorba says "You live every moment
Which is what Quinn has done all his life since his
birth in Chihuahua, Mexico, 66 years ago during
Pancho Villa's revolt. Raised in poverty in the bar-
rios of East Los Angeles, the son of a Mexican
woman and an Irish-American father, he's had a
robust life.
As a kid, he shined shoes, sold papers, toted a
water bucket for workers building the Los Angeles
water system, preached with Aimee Semple McPher-
son. Later, he tried boxing, sparred with Primo
Camera.
He became both an actor and a young intimate of
the greats, the colorfuls, or both in Hollywood. Guys
like John Barrymore, the painter John Decker,
screenwriter Gene Fowler, and a slightly eccentric
half-Japanese, half-German poet, Sadakichi Hart-
mann, whom Barrymore insisted was "sired by
Mephistopheles out of Madame Butterfly
Quinn has made 119 films, from two Bing Crosby-
Bob Hope "Road" comedies to La Strada and Zor-
ba, and won two oscars, one for his Gauguin in Lust
for Life, the other for his revolutionary in Viva
Zapatal.
Wealthy, twice married, father of seven children,
he owns a spacious manse in Italy where he usually
lives and contentedly pursues his second career and
first love � painting and sculpting. He'd be happy
just doing that, he says.
Why then Zorbal Quinn shrugs.
"Like Muhammad Ali, I've got to realize that I'm
going to hang up the gloves one day he says. "I'm
not a young man anymore. Sure, I still have a lot
of fight, run five miles a day. swim a mile in the even-
ing.
"I don't know when it" � retirement from acting
� "will happen, if at all. But before it does, I want
to do one good play
He and the show, its offending opening line chang-
ed and the upbeat emphasized, start an eight-month
tour Tuesday in Philadelphia and head for Broadway
in late fall, if all goes well.
Quinn, his once-black hair now gray, his chin spor-
ting a week-old stubble, spoke quietly about the pro-
ject in a melodically rasping voice, in gentle, rolling
cadences, an earthy utterance occasionally punc-
tuating his thoughts.
But he seemed a little tired from morning's
rehearsals. Tired, that is, until asked: Does he still
have that suit of armor John Barrymore gave him
years ago?
See ZORBA. Page 9

Zorb
Continued From Page 8
His brown eyes light
up Words and
memories tumble out.
good talk of hard times
and fast friends and a
tiny bookstore in
Hollywood Ir.t
bookstore was where �
as a starving, unkn m
18-year-old given
books on the -
kmdlv clerk � he met
"the original Zorr
Wilham Saroyan.
to write "The Hut
Corned v
The j - stand
His voice rises
craggy � . ows
animated as he
the author who.
says, blithely ign
the Depressi
cheery,
"Gonna be all - .
It's gonna be i
fellas
"He had a fai
effect on me. a
tastic Q
sav. smiling.
were
remember, to
timev V.
I
as
NCt
BaJ
iru
tic
Ai
COMPLETE
AUTOMOT1VI
SERVICE
? '0 GreniHe B!e
754 3023 � 24 HRS
PLAZA
24 nour Towing v
t-Haul Rentals
Available
Lowest 11
Prices In
$18
THLERBfTTV
2905 East 10th S!re
NOW
- -
ane i
tLR WLDI
ITALIAN
5 P.M91
ALL-YOL-C
1 �SPAGHETTld
� �l SAGNA
�RAVIOLA
with Garlic B
iff'
6
Ll-lH-CAN-t'
FLOINDE
DINNER
cSHON
205
Greenvl
Blvd








THE EAST CAROL INI AN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY I. 198J
Page 8
Dance Display
A Long Vigil,
But Worth It
ByOARRYI BROWN
AMbUM Nm 1 ditur
When asked if college dance
departments were a legitimate train-
ing ground for serious ballet
dancers, George Balanchine once
responded with an emphatic "no
The students are, he said, too old by
that age to still be training for a
serious career in classical dance;
that must be done in the teen and
pre-teen years.
Though there are exceptions
(Melissa Hayden and Heather Watts
are cases-in-point; both came com-
paratively late to careers as principle
dancers with the New York City
Ballet), by and large, Balanchine is
right. Male dancers have the advan-
tage of being able to overcome a late
start in training more easily than
girls, but most good classical
dancers are professional by their
late teens, some even younger. A
significant number of the members
of major ballet companies are made
up ot girls hired at age 16 or 17.
Modern dance is an entirely dif-
ferent situation. College campuses
have always been a wellspring of
talent for contemporary dance
Modern dancers traditionally begin
training later than ballet dancers,
and much of significant modern
dance has come from college dance
classes. Earlier in this century, Ben
nington College was a home for
many of the greats of modern
dance, and the acclaimed dance
troupe Pilobolus began with a few
imaginative but untrained college
students in a phys. ed. dance class.
Thus, a dance department such as
ECU's has marks both for and
against it with respect to the training
of professional dancers, at least in
the opinion of some. The depart-
ment's annual performance last
week, included examples of modern,
ballet and jazz, showing a wide
spectrum of styles and technique
sometimes with considerable suc-
cess, sometimes with less than.
The long (too long � over three
hours) "Evening Of Dance (or
Dance Marathon) began with two
modern pieces. Dimensions oj Time
and Space followed by Floor Play.
The first featured the bamboo and
cord sculptures of Tom Grubb like
those that have become familiar
around Greenville for the last year
or two, along with five male dancers
in the choreography of Patricia Per-
talion. This short but gallant work
had a flavor slightly reminiscent of
classical Greece with its muscular,
masculine movements, and ended
with some nice visual effects using
colored ropes strung by the dancers
into interesting lighting patterns.
The second piece featured an all-
female cast with music by Vivaldi.
The classical-style choreography for
which Vivaldi's music is often
chosen was handled well by the
dancers, and had a couple of
unusual twists by its creator Patricia
Weeks. However, both of the first
two dances were, as they say, a little
too close to the exercise book, at
times pedantic instead of dynamic.
The next piece was a multi-media
work b Weeks, ARP Dances, using
abstract film on stage. The dancers
and projection worked well
together, each stretching and expan-
ding the other in this avante-garde
work Weeks is trying to work on
the edge ol progressive modern
dance with this one. and the result
was fairly good, though not
outstanding. There is an energy even
to walking and standing on stage
which the dancers didn't fulfill, but
the worked well as an ensemble.
The first act ended with a wonder-
ful ersion of Streetcar which
possessed some of the best
choreography and strongest perfor-
mances of the evening. Susu Corbitt
ignited the stage in her opening solo
as Blanche, and continued to power
the piece with her sultry, dynamic
performance. She enlivened her
character and the scenario with a
strong stage presence and acting
ability Barry Ambrose was nearly
as captivating in the role of Stanley,
giving a tough, consistant quality to
his role
The entire cast was above
See NIGHT, Page 10
I
"a&acr.
�,mmt9S3S3�jr
HC tjti
Soviet Emigre Orchestra Performing At Hendrix Next Week
The Soviet Emigre Orchestra, under the direction of Lazar Gosman,
Mill be performing on Thursday, Feb. 10, at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student (enter's Hendrix Theatre. This concert, presented by the
I niversitv I nions Artists Series Committee, replaces the cancelled
Orpheus concert. Season ticket patrons can use their season tickets
for admission. Other tickets may be purchased at $2.50 for students
and $7.50 for faculty, stff and the public. All tickets sold at the
door will be $7.50. Tickets may be purchased at the Central Ticket
Office, MSC, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m Monday through Friday.
New Bern Had Blues In '30s
? r� si.f( AW Win Rqtoru
1933: Franklin Roosevelt was
newly elected president. The
Depression had moved out of the
rqdio and ,into the kitchen, and
Richard Henry, age 12, movted with
his mother and younger siblings
from Beaufort to New Bern, N.C.
They were hard times. Sevety-five
cents would pay a weeks rent, and
that kind oi money was hard to
find. Richard Henry quit school and
went to work carrying groceries.
Taking care of the younger children
started for him in 1933, and
children have been a given in his life
ever since. And so has the Blues.
Blues had just become acceptable
for recording in the 1930s when the
decline of sharecropping in the
South took country blues to the city
via its migrating creators. The blues
wasn't playing much around
Beaufort at that time, but New Bern
was attracting live Blues performers
whose names have since become
esoteric trivia with the exception of
Fats Domino. By the 1930s, the
Blues was as common as a baby's
cry, but not to Richard Henry:
"I'd take groceries to people's
houses and hear the music, playing
it on piccolos. I'd get home. Mama
would ask, 'Henry, where you been
so long?' I'd make excuses, slip out
nights, go to the joints to hear them
play the Blues
It was one of those furtive even-
Richard Henry Reminisces
ing outings that Henry heard Fred-
dy Miller from Sumpter, S.C. On
the spot, Henry resolved to teafiV
"to play just like that man. And
when 1 was fourteen Henry says,
"1 could play the guitar better than
I play now
Henry began accompanying Fred-
dy Miller to New York In the
1930s, The Blues was in Harlem
where he came to know the music of
Blind Boy Fuller, Big Bill Broonzy,
Lightnin' Hopkins, Sonny Terry
and Brownie McGhee. "Their lives
were so hard. Everything against
them, but I think that's what made
them good
Lightnin' Hopkins, whose music
defines the tradition of country
blues, continually sold the rights to
his music as it was recorded. After
each cut he'd hold out his hand to
receive fifty dollars. Then he'd
record another. Fifty dollars. And
so on. album after album Sttnrt
term reward, long term hardship.
That's what kept the Blues alive.
Blind Boy Fuller, with the added
advantage of blindness, sang lines
like, "know my dog by his bark,
know my woman in the dark
Seems he did. He even managed to
find her with a bullet once which
took him to jail for awhile He sang
of the experience in the language of
the Blues
Big Bill Broonzy had a voice that
conveyed the necessary feeling
without being in the middle of the
circumstance. Many Blues musi-
cians then and now have learned a
lot about singing the Blues from Big
Bill Broonzy.
Quinn Still Zorba
Actor Recreating Best Role
S
ji
Dutch
Soprano Elly Ameling Performing In February
Dutch-born soprano Elly Ameling, "one of the world's foremost sopranos and one of the most
universally beloved and acclaimed artists of our time will appear in Hendrix Theatre on Thurs-
day, Feb. 24, at 8 p.m. Tickets for concert, which is sponsored by the University Unions Artists
Series Committee are $2.50 for students and $7.50 for faculty, staff and the public. All tickets sold
at the door will be $7.50. Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student
Center between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m Monday through Friday.
ByJAYSHARBUT
AT Dram Writer
NEW YORK � He's played many men. A Mex-
ican revolutionary. The French painter Gauguin. A
shifty Arab chieftain, Barabbas. A punched-out pug.
Henry II. The pope. He also once had a chance to
play God on Broadway, but said no dice.
Anthony Quinn chuckles, "God wasn't a very
good part he says.
But he's due on Broadway next season in what for
him was a very good film part in 1964 � the ex-
uberant, hedonistic, knockabout peasant he played
to great acclaim in the movie, Zorba, The Greek.
His stage Zorba is a new version of the 1968
Broadway musical that was adapted from the novel
by Nikos Kazantzakis.
Because of his lusty, memorable film Zorba,
Quinn "owned" the role, as they say. But he turned
down the chance to reprise it on Broadway in 1968,
he says, for one reason: "I hated the opening line
Which was?
"Which was, 'Life is what you do waiting to die I
said that's completely the antithesis of what Zorba
says. Zorba says "You live every moment
Which is what Quinn has done all his life since his
birth in Chihuahua, Mexico, 66 years ago during
Pancho Villa's revolt. Raised in poverty in the bar-
rios of East Los Angeles, the son of a Mexican
woman and an Irish-American father, he's had a
robust life.
As a kid, he shined shoes, sold papers, toted a
water bucket for workers building the Los Angeles
water system, preached with Aimee Semple McPher-
son. Later, he tried boxing, sparred with Primo
Camera.
He became both an actor and a young intimate of
the greats, the coiorfuls, or both in Hollywood. Guys
like John Barrymore, the painter John Decker,
screenwriter Gene Fowler, and a slightly eccentric
half-Japanese, half-German poet, Sadakichi Hart-
mann, whom Barrymore insisted was "sired by
Mephistopheles out of Madame Butterfly
Quinn has made 119 films, from two Bmg Crosby-
Bob Hope "Road" comedies to La Strada and Zor-
ba, and won two oscars, one for his Gauguin in Lust
for Life, the other for his revolutionary in Viva
Zapata
Wealthy, twice married, father of seven children,
he owns a spacious manse in Italy where he usually
lives and contentedly pursues his second career and
first love � painting and sculpting. He'd be happy
just doing that, he says.
Why then Zorba? Quinn shrugs.
"Like Muhammad Ali, I've got to realize that I'm
going to hang up the gloves one day he says. "I'm
not a young man anymore. Sure, I still have a lot
of fight, run five miles a day, swim a mile in the even-
ing.
"I don't know when it" � retirement from acting
� "will happen, if at all. But before it does, 1 want
to do one good play
He and the show, its offending opening line chang-
ed and the upbeat emphasized, start an eight-month
tour Tuesday in Philadelphia and head for Broadway
in late fall, if all goes well.
Quinn, his once-black hair now gray, his chin spor-
ting a week-old stubble, spoke quietly about the pro-
ject in a melodically rasping voice, in gentle, rolling
cadences, an earthy utterance occasionally punc-
tuating his thoughts.
But he seemed a little tired from morning's
rehearsals. Tired, that is, until asked: Does he still
have that suit of armor John Barrymore gave him
years ago?
Sec ZORBA, Page 9
Zorb
Continued 1 rum Page 8
His brown eyes light
up. Words and
memones tumble out
good talk of hard times
and fast friends and a
tiny bookstore in
Hollywood Tr.e
bookstore was here �
as a starving, unkn -
It-year-old ven
books on the -
kindly Jerk - - he met
"the original Zorba
William Saroyan. late-
to write "The Hut
Comedy '
The k tnd up
His voice r:scs. hn
craggv . ws
animated as he mimics
the author wno. he
says, blithely
the Depre-
chee-�
"Gonna be a
It's gonna be ail - .
fellas'
"He had
effect or.
tastic eftc
says, smiling
were b a
remerr
times My,
as
see
a �
B
I
I
s
I
I

COMPLETE
ALTOMOTINr
SERVICE
tit Gre�nViHe ftwa
7S4 3023 � 24 HRS
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Phone; r
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en
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ALL-YOU-C

�SPAGHETTI
�LASAGNA
lRAVK)LA
Iwith Garlic Bread
rTTT Tfe v-�"i
ALL-Ol-C'N-l K
FLOINDF
DINNER
SHON
205
Greenvil
Blvd
mmmmmmmmmm






!
r xt H eek
or student
�ld at the
trai luket
ridai
'30s
Reminisces
receive mt dollars. 1 hen he'd
recow) another Fift dollars. And
iftei a hum hort
!rdhip.
B � i i �'
i Jded
j lines
bark,
I a i k
ii iged '
�� hich
He -ang
S tage ol
?ice that
teehng
ruddle of the
n Big
IZorba
est Role
. � � eccentric
� h Hart-
i 'sired by
a Bing (. ro,b-
I a trada and .or-
(Jduguin in Lust
�nar in I iva
� v.en children,
ere he usually
�nd career and
He'd be happy
alize that I'm
lay he says. "I'm
ire, 1 still have a lot
� ii a mile in the even-
tirement from acting
all But betore it doe I want
ffending opening line chang-
ea? emphasitd. start an eight-month
Philadelphia and head for Broadway
es ell
ice-Hlack hair now grav, his chin spor-
stubble. spcike quietly about the pro-
allv rasping voice, in gentle, rolling
t rthy utterance occasionally punc-
"ujhts.
fed a little tired from morning"s
J that is. until asked: Does he still
t armor John Barrymore gave him
�ee ORBA. Pae 9
I
Zorba Returns To Stage
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 1, 1983
Continued From Page 8
His brown eyes light
up. Words and
memories tumble out,
good talk of hard times
and fast friends and a
tiny bookstore in
Hollywood. The
bookstore was where �
as a starving, unknown
18-year-old given
books on the sly by a
kindly clerk � he met
"the original Zorba
Wilham Saroyan, later
to write "The Human
Comedy
The actor stands up.
His voice rises, his
craggy face grows
animated as he mimics
the author who, he
says, blithely ignored
the Depression with a
cheery, booming
"Gonna be all right'
It's gonna be all right,
fellas
"He had a fantastic
effect on me. a fan-
tastic effect Quinn
says, smiling. "These
were bad times,
remember, terribly bad
times. M God, you'd
go out to the beach and
as far as the eye could
see, from Playa del Rev
all the way up to Santa
Barbara, you could see
these Hoovervilles, lit-
tle shacks, people on
the beach living off dir-
ty mussels from the dir-
ty water.
"Hope was gone.
And all of a sudden,
there's hope, one guy
preaching hope
In time, as he began
making his way as an
actor, Quinn met
similarly sunny,
supremely talented
souls, among them Bar-
rymore. "These men
lived intensely, as do
children and poets and
jaguars Quinn says.
His friendship with
Barrymore began in
1935 when Quinn made
his stage debut in Los
Angeles. Barrymore,
whose career and
health were fading, saw
him onstage. The Great
Profile liked Quinn's
work and "took me on
as kind of a surrogate
son Their friendship
grew.
"And when he was
sick and knew he was
dying, he said, 'Well,
kid, when an old
matador's about to
retire, he usually gives a
young matador his
sword. And so I want
to give you the armor I
wore as Richard III
"Yes Anthony
Quinn says gently. "I
still have it
������������������ttttttttttttttfrttttttttttttttftJi
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'
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'i
ii
Black
Arts
Festival
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
� Talent Competition � February 1,800pm Hendrix
Theatre $1 00
� Mattye Reed: Gallery Talk and Reception � African
Heritage Art Exhibition � February 2,6 30pm,
Mendenhall Gallery No Charge
� Movie: Black Orpheus � February 2 800pm, Hendrix
Theatre ID and Activity Cards or MSC Membership
� Dr John Fleming: The Black Religious Experience �
February 3, 7 30 p m . Hendrix Theatre No Charge
� Ronald Maxwell and Leah Kendncks: Jazz and Blues �
February 4 & 5, 9 00 p m Coffeehouse 50C
������������������������,
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Monday, February 21, 1983
8:00pm Hendrix Theatre
tickets- 1.00 ECU Students
$3.00 Faculty,StaH and Public
$2.00 Youth tickets
All tickets at door $3.00
Sponsored by Student Union
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Every Monday and Tuesday rvgm every week
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 1, 1983
Night Of Dance ' Varied'
Continued From Page 8
average; good costumes
with belter lighting
gave Paula Franz
Johnson all she needed
to display one of the
outstanding works of
the evening.
The second act com-
menced with a generic
pastiche called
Pastiche, Pertalion's
more humorous work
on the program.
Despite the disadvan-
tage of having to suffer
the worst and most
distracting costumes of
the evening, the piece
came off fairly well.
The choreography was
somewhat inconsistant,
with one-fourth being
cute enough for the
high school Jr. Miss
pageant, one-fourth
terrific, and the other
half pretty good. Per-
talion got energetic per-
formances from her
dancers; a strobe light
effect evoking a silent
movie was a clever au-
dience favorite.
oh- Lay Me Down
To Sleep was the last
piece by Weeks on the
program, and again a
modern dance work.
This was her best crea-
tion of the evening, as
well her most serious.
The dramatic work
dealt with the aliena-
tion of an individual by
a group in some
nightmarish sequences.
Some horrifying and
almost brutal images
showed the group bat-
tle aggressivelv against
the individual, with
fright, loneliness and
bewilderment as
resulting emotions. The
piece was not without
its slight humor
however, and did end
happily in an awaken-
ing from the nightmare
with the lone person ac-
cepted and embraced
by the group.
The perennial ballet
favorite Le Corsair was
next on the program,
with new choreography
by Petrus van Muyden
in the style and spirit of
the original. The
classical pas de deux
with an idyllic, roman-
tic theme was handled
well by students
Thomas Bell and Anna
Maria Sistare. Bell pro-
ved to be an excellent
partner and Sistare
looked gracefully light
in the well executed
lifts. They are a pair
who work well as part-
ners and gave virtuosic
displays of technique
(the primary reason for
a classical grand pas de
deux) strong enough to
bring appluase from
the audience.
The Tale of the
Tongue-Cut Sparrow
was a contrast to both
Johnson's first piece
and everything else on
the program. The tradi-
tional oriental fairy tale
was at times fairly well
interpreted into dance
by Johnson but overall
was rather lethargic
and thematically inap-
propriate for the pro-
gram. The piece would
work much better for a
children's audience,
where youngsters
would delight in it
while parents could
probably enjoy it
through their young
sons and daughters. It
was, though, a little
sophomoric for the
evening's program.
The last piece of the
evening was a diver-
tissement from The
Nutcracker, reinter-
preted by Petrus van
Muyden. Another
favorite with ballet au-
diences, the
choreographer created
his version to get the
most from his dancers.
Classical ballet is the
most technically
demanding of dance
forms, as it is often
designed to display
dance technique first,
story second. Thus a
cast weak in training
can yield only an inade-
quate performance.
This version,
however, used its
dancers' abilities in the
best light and came up
with some fresh ideas
on the traditional
dances; the Mirlitons
and Arabian Dance
were especially nice,
different from the
original version. The
composition of dancers
in the ensemble finale
was exquisite, creating
a flawless picture on
stage and proving the
creator to be a
knowledgeable
dancemaker. It is a
shame this was his
farewell performance,
for he handled the
students in classical
dance better than any
other faculty member
on the program.
The night's perfor-
mance by the ECU
dance department was,
overall, rather good if
uneven. The program
was an uncomfortably
long challenge to the
kidneys and should
have been shortened or
split into two evenings.
Better yet, there could
be more than one pro-
duction by the depart-
ment each year. They
showed they produce
good work and could
have an improved pro-
gram with better judg-
ment applied to some
weak spots. The packed
houses seemed to enjoy
and appreciate the local
talent and may wish
for, as I do, a shorter,
slightly more consistant
program. Nobody
could ask for a more
varied and eclectic one.
Fri & Sat Nt 4:30,7,9:30 Hendrix Theatre Admission: ID, Activity Card
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For the second i
years, last-second r
ngh! enabled the El
sneak b UNC
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test
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the most impor:ar-
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Head Coach Ma:
were. Stanle accu?
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Anne Donoa dun
Denkler held Dooon a
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especially shockin
who has known StJ
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my whole life. I ius
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757-1955


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THE EASTC AROl INIAN
Sports
Wright Rescues Pirates
By KEN BOLTON
�"��! Snorts tailor
For the second time in three
years, last-second heroics by Barry
Wright enabled the ECU Pirates to
sneak by UNC-Charlotte. this time
by a 66-64 score in last night's con-
test.
Two years ago, Wright hit a
jumper at the buzzer in overtime to
give ECU a one-point victory.
Last night, ECU had the ball with
15 seconds left and trailing by one.
Johnnv Edwards attempted an out-
side jumper which bounced off the
rim and into Wright's hands.
Wright laved the ball back in with
three seconds remaining.
UNC-Charlotte had one more op-
portunity, but the inbounds pass hit
the scoreboard. ECU took over and
John Williams was immediatelv
fouled.
Williams sank one of two free
throws for the final two-point
margin A desperation shot by the
49ers wa well short, and the Pirates
were victorious for the fourth time
in five games.
The Pirates were in the lead
throughout the game, building up a
nine-point margin with 12 minutes
remaining.
At that point, ECU had the ball
but Edwards was called for his
fourth persona foul. After pro-
testing too harshly, Edwards was
assessed a technical foul.
UNC-C's John Gullickson hit the
technical and the 49ers retained
possession. Leroy Smith then con-
verted a three-point play to cut the
lead to 51-46.
From then on, UNC-C outscored
ECU 12-3 to take a 58-56 lead with a
little over six minutes remaining.
The Pirates got a break with two
minutes left, trailing 59-60. Melvin
Johnson missed an easy layup and
Johnny Edwards was fouled.
After Edwards made both free
throws. UNC-C scored four straight
points to take a 64-61 lead.
Edwards again made two free
throws, and UNC-C called time out
with 35 seconds left and the 49ers
winning 64-63.
UNC-C appeared to be in good
position, but a turnover by Smith
set up Wright's last-minute heroics.
"It's about time something good
happened to us ECU coach
Charlie Harrison said. "It was a
crazy game
The Pirates were led in scoring by
Edwards, who was playing in front
of his hometown fans. The 6-5
freshman, who played in high
school at South Mecklenburg,
finished with 26 points and seven re-
bounds.
Edwards bounced back from a
poor performance Saturday night
against Navy with 10 for 14 field
goal shooting and six of seven from
the free throw line.
While playing the last 12 minutes
with four fouls, Edwards added
seven rebounds and hit four crucial
free throws in the last two minutes
UNC-C was led in scoring by
Gullickson with 21 points and
Emery Atkinson, who chipped in 16
points.
The Pirates got needed support
for Edwards from the backcourt,
where Tony Robinson and John
Williams played solidly.
Robinson hit six of nine field
goals for 13 points and added three
assists and three steals.
"Tonv reallv took control of the
game stated Harrison. "And 1 felt
that John Williams played his
strongest game to date
6-6 senior Thorn Brown turned in
another strong performance. He
scored 10 points and grabbed eight
rebounds before fouling out with
1:40 left.
Over the last four games, Brown
has averaged 10.3 poins and 8.8 re-
bounds per game.
Both teams shot well from the
floor, with the 49ers holding an ad-
vantage in field goal percentage,
57.1 to 51.9 percent.
The ECU-UNC-C series con-
tinues to be an exciting one. The last
three parties have been decided by a
total of five points, all ECU vic-
tories.
"They shot extremely well but we
played hard Harrison said. "The
kids continue to amaze me
ECU is now 10-9 overall and the
49ers fell to 5-13 on the year.
The Pirates return home on
Saturday night for a key ECAC-
South game with George Mason, a
team which beat the Pirates by one
point earlier in the year.
Gametime is 7:30 p.m.

'��.
ECL's Barry Wright made winning layup as the buzzer sou
Pirates a win over UNC-C
STANLEY LEAST
nded to give
Lady Pirates Bounce Back To Defeat Lady Mountaineers
Bv CIND PLEASANTS
porls t dilor
After falling to East Tennessee
State, 63-54. on Saturday, the ECU
I adv Pirates immediately retaliated
against Appalachian State Sundav,
winning, 68-53.
I'm verv pleased with our win
said head coach Cathy Andruzzi.
"Our players took the loss to East
Tennessee badly, but we came back
against a team who had won their
last couple of games after losing 14
in a row
Sophomore forward Darlene
Chaney pumped in 24 points and
grabbed 14 rebounds to mark two
career highs. From the floor, she hit
12 of 13 shots-
"She had an excellent game
Andruzzi said. "It's something I'm
not surprised about. She's certainly
capable of it. We needed it from
4noTrrr)ig person She played her
smartest game
Another player, freshman Sylvia
Bragg, scored 17 points to tie her
career record, which had been set
the previous day against ETSU.
"I'm pleased with her play the past
couple of games the head coach
said. "1 don't think she knows what
she's capable of. She gives us depth
on the perimeter
Andruzzi praised both Chaney
and Bragg for their leadership out
on the court. "Darlene Chaney and
Sylvia Bragg contributed a total of
41 points which is 41 points we've
never seen before Andruzzi said.
"To come off the bench and fill our
needs is certainly bright at this time.
Both have extreme potential
ECU jumped out to a 20-0 lead
before the Lady Mountaineers
scored. ASU's Rhett Culslasure
made their first basket with 12:19
remaining, and fought back to only
trail the Pirates, 36-24. at halftime.
"We did an extremely good job
of controlling the tempo Andruz-
zi said, "and played the type of
game we need to play at this time.
We had only nine turnovers (The
Bucs had 18 in their previous
meeting).
"We prevented their inside game.
We played very smart basketball.
ASU played hard. They are a very
intense defensive team and are verv
smart offensively. We're usually
slow starting, but we exploded out
there in the first half
Senior All-America Marv
Denkler, now the nation's fifth
leading scorer, added 19 points
despite constant pressure from
ASU's defense. "Mary's been
double triple and quadrupled out
there, and she still comes up with a
great shooting percentage
Denkler now needs only 13 points to
become the number two all-time
scorer at ECU. The 6-0 captain has
1,558 career points so far.
The Pirates suffered a bitter
defeat against East Tennessee State.
Leading 36-23 at halftime, the
Pirates were unable to hold on as
the Buccaneers sank one freethrow
after another to .sAav .ahead during
the second period
The Lady Rats shot only six
freethrows while ETSU hit 15-of-20.
Leading by 13 points at halftime,
ECU made 54 percent of its shots,
with Sylvia Bragg popping in eight
Druzz Not Looking
Forward To ODU
No coach looks forward to play-
ing against a team ranked among
the top five schools in the. nation,
but ECU Head Coach Cathy An-
druzzi has more reason than usual
to feel uneasy about the Pirates'
game agains' Old Dominion Univer-
sity this Wednesday night.
On Jan. 14, the Pirates travelled
to Norfolk, Va to take on the Lady
Monarchs. The Pirates lost, 92-52,
but the turnout of the game was not
the most important issue at hand
that night.
The accusations made my ODU
Head Coach Marianne Stanley
were. Stanley accused ECU All-
America Mary Denkler of inten-
tionally hacking ODU's 6-8 center
Anne Donovan during the game.
Denkler held Donovan from scoring
her usual 16.4 points per game to
just seven points.
Cindy Pleasants
A look Inside
Not only was Stanley's statement
entirely out-of-lme, its' only pur-
pose was to to tarnish the reputation
of a player who has proven herself
again and again as a great athlete in
every sense of the word.
Her unprotessionalism was
especially shocking to Andruzzi,
who has known Stanley for many
years.
"I certainly don't look forward to
playing ODU because of Marianne-
Stanley's statement she said.
"That's something I'll never forget
my whole life. I just want to get the
game over with.
"It really hurts me that she would
make such comments about 'The
Denk and I think it hurt Denk's
performancesafter the ODU
game). I told Mary before the
Georgia game that things like that
of 11 shots to give her 1" points in
the first period.
Denkler picked up three fouls in
the first half and moved outside in
the second period, but the Pirates
shot a cold 33.3 percent from the
floor to trail behind. The ETSU
Bucanneers, on the other hand, shot
62.5 percent. Marsha Cowart, who
averages 23.4 points, was held to
only 10 points.
"This is the best game we've
played Andruzzi said. "We show-
ed a lot of heart, and a lot of intensi-
ty out there. I'm not disappointed at
all in our efforts � we did a super
job.
"We controlled the boards and
played verv disciplined basketball.
We need to do this right now. We
are limited in depth in certain areas
of player personnel
I he Bucs were playing without
wr'mtJ"VfX!tXQtM starrer, freshman"
Delphine Mabry and Loraine
Foster, who both had surgeries.
Foster underwent arthroscopic
surgerv performed on her knee to
repair cartilage. Foster was averag-
ing 14.5 points per game and led the
team in assists with 48. Mabry had
reconstructive surgerv done on her
left little finger and will be out for
the season. She was the team's
third-leading scorer at 7.4 points per
game at 'he time ot the injury.
Andruzzi commended the I adv
Rats for being able to adjust to a
new starting lineup. "I'm amazed at
the adjustment our players have
made from the beginning o the
season she said. "When you lose
two very quick defensive players in
the backcourt. you feel the hurt. It's
almost like starting a new season.
"Fran Hooks has played the post,
the no two position, the no. four
position and the role of point guard.
W hat she has given us in leadership
and quick adjustments has been
creativity on the court She always
Jffinds tne frVSOllSn -i ,cjLa� ers ot
The Lady Rats have added a new
member to their squad. 6-2 Junior
center Darlene Hedges, who placed
on the team last season, has been
added to the roster.
The Lady Pirates will p
nationallv-ranked Old Dominion
University this Wednesdav night at
7:30 p.m. This will be the Bucs' first
home game since Dec 11
the opponent ream
"If our players would rise to the
occasion like Marv Denkler. Caren
Truske and Hooks have, then I
would feel good about the final 11
games
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happen. It's like life sometimes �
how unfair people can be
Andruzzi praised Denkler for car-
rying the load of the team this
season. "Mary has had the burden
of the team on her this season. She's
such a hard competitor. Because our
team is so young, she's been
counted on and she's really come
through for us
The Pirates will be playing ODU
at home after playing one of the
toughest road schedules in the coun-
try. The Lady Rats just returned
from two road games this weekend,
and Andruzzi said she hasn't really
been able to think about the ODU
game until this week. "To tell you
the truth, I haven't been concerned
with ODU. I've been more concern-
ed with injuries and the games we
played before ODU.
"Now I am thinking about ODU,
and I know they'll come in here
fired up. We can expect them to
have a lot of changing defenses
Andruzzi said she and the team
happy to return to Minges Col-
iseum. "We've been on the road for
such a long time she said. "Our
kids have been on the road and
never complained.
"They've experienced a lot and I
have too this year, but it will help us
to grow. Our team is so young, but
they've played very tough.
"It's very hard sometimes. Peo-
ple expect so much out of us. I don't
want them (the players) to feel that
they have to live up to reputations
of the past.
"They're doing a heck of a job
According to Andruzzi, she
knows that tensions will be high
during Wednesday night's match
up, but she will approach ODU just
like any other team on the schedule.
"I don't look at this game as a bitter
rivalry she said. "I look at it as
another very tough game
Baker Named
Photo by GABY PATTMSO.
ECU'S Mary Denkler will once again go up against ODU's 6-8 center
Anne Donovan Wednesday night.
Art Baker, the head football
coach at The Citadel from 1978 to
1982. will become East Carolina
University's offensive coordinator
and associate head coach head ECU
coach Ed Emory announced Mon-
day.
Baker, who was fired at The
Citadel following this season after
posting a 5-6 won-loss record, was
the most successful coach the school
ever had. Baker accumulated a
30-24-1 mark in five years.
Baker, 53, previously was the
head coach at Furman from 1973 to
1978. Baker was 27-23-2 at Furman
and defeated both North Carolina
State and East Carolina in 1970.
Baker turned a 1-10 football team
into a 7-4 squad in 1973, a feat
which earned him Southern Con-
ference Coach of the Year honors.
He also received the National Chur-
Bucs Sunk By Navy In Thriller
In a key conference game for both
teams Saturday night, the Navy
Midshipmen sank the ECU Pirates
60-58 on a last-second shot by Gary
Price.
ECU had rallied from a 15-point
deficit midway through the second
half to tie the score at 58-58 with 26
seconds left on a Johnny Edwards
breakaway dunk.
The Midshipmen then worked the
ball around and had to settle for a
desperation 25-footer by guard
Dave Brooks. The ball missed the
entire basket but Price was there to
tap it in as the final horn sounded.
The Pirates were hurt by their in-
ability to hit from the floor against
the Navy zone. ECU hit just 41.4
per-cent of their shots as compared
to 55.1 percent for Navy.
Edwards, who came into the
game shooting 56.9 per-cent from
the field � second best in the league
� was only able to hit five of 16
shots. He was the dominant force
on the boards, however, with his 15
rebounds being a season high for the
Pirates.
Senior co-captain Thorn Brown
added 14 points and nine rebounds,
while playing the entire 40 minutes.
Reserve guard Bruce Peartree was
the only Pirate able to hit from the
field. Peartree was six of seven from
the floor and finished with 12
points.
The Naval Academy was led by
their top scorer, Dave Brooks, who
scored 21 points. Price added 12 and
Rob Romaine chipped in 11 points
and nine assists.
ECU'S three-game winning streak
was stopped by Navy, and the Mid-
shipmen have now won five in a
row.
Navy has been the surprise of the
conference so far this season.
USNA finished last year with a
12-13, 2-4 record, and is now only
one victory short of their win total
of last year.
Saturday night's contest was only
the second meeting between ECU
and Navy. The Midshipmen now
lead the series, 2-0.
ma
right
Brown
tdwards
Robinson
Peart ree
Williams
Gitchmi
Harris
MP M, FT � A F Pi
40
40
31
2?
20
20
2 9 2 '
6-13 22
5 16 6-
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0-0
1-4 0-0
M) 0-0
0-0 0-0
3 3

I
5
i
o
24-M M-13 M IJ
S.T,
Butler
Whiiaker
Maun
Brooks
Romaine
kuirai
Price
Knar
Ton
E
Na�y
MP FC FT � A F Pi
ft
6
23
31
jj
35
21
10
17-40
2 5 2 2
0-0 0-0
3 7
2I
0-0
3 5
5-6 12
II 0-0
6 0-1
I 2 0-0
4-M
� it m m
3J
m-
27
Turnovers � East Carolina II I SNA 15
Technical foun � None
Officials � La.Hi and (. aianuro
All - I.TOO
chman's Hall of Fame Coach Of
The Year award.
From 1970 to 192. Baker served
as the offensive back field coach and
coordinator of the running game at
Texas Tech. Tech participated in the
Sun Bowl game twice during those
three years. Baker served in that
same capacitv from 1966 until 1969
at Clemson. In 1965 he was Clem-
son's freshman team coach, posting
a 4-0-1 mark.
A native of Sumter, SC, Baker
earned a degree in history from
Presbyterian in 1953. He was a
quarterback there and wrestled and
ran track. After a two-year stint in
the army, he coached 10 years in the
South Carolina high school ranks:
two years at McColl, two years at
Newberry, and 10 years at Eau
Claire in Columbia SC. His combin-
ed record at Eau Claire was 47-13
Baker, whose high-powered of-
fenses have been ranked in the na-
tion's top-twenty a number of
times, has coached the likes of Larrv
Robinson at Furman, Stump Mit-
chell at The Citadel, David
Whitehurst and Byron Walker
Robinson broke the Southern Con-
ference rushing record set bv ECU'S
Carlester Grumpier, and Mitchell
broke Robinson's record later at
The Citadel. Whitehurst is the back
up quarterback for the Green Bav
Packers and Walker plavs for the
Seattle Seahawks.
Baker is married to the former
Edith Edens and they have four
children; Artie, a high school foot-
ball coach in South Carolina. Kim
Kirkman, a school teacher in South
Carolina, Ryan, a freshman in col-
lege, and Curtis, a senior in high
school.
"I'm extremely excited about be-
ing here said Baker. "I left with
the best record anvone ever had at
The Citadel
"I'm certainly aware of the
challenge of the schedule next
year he added. "The people at
East Carolina have worked real
hard. I'm looking forward to get-
See COACH, Page 14.





12
HI I M AROI INIAN
H BKIARY I. 1983
Swimmers Dump UNC-C
Pftoto b, CART PATTEKSOM
K'l (.uard Karen 1 ruske
By CINDY
PLEASANT
The ECU men and
women swim teams
easily glided past UNC-
Charlotte this weekend
to capture a much
needed victory over the
Forty-Niners.
The Pirates were
totally devastated by
UNC-Chapel Hill on
Jan. 20.
The men, now 5-5,
outscorcd UNC-C,
60-20, while the women
won 60-35. The Lady
Pirates are now 4-5.
"This is the first time
the kids have had a
chance to have an easy
win said Head Coach
Rick Kobe. "It feels
good. A lot of the
swimmers were swimm-
ing out of their regular
events but they still
turned in pretty good
times
The women's team
set two fresnmen
records. Joanne Mc-
Cullcy, Nancy Ludwig,
Jessica Feinberg and
Suan VanArnam com-
bined in the 200-medley
relay for a time of
1:57.79. Another team,
Kaky Wilson, Tracey
Hope, Joanne Mc-
Culley and Erin
Gaydash, made a new
mark in the
200-freestyle relay.
The ECU divers had
a great deal of success,
with Kim Lowe qualify-
ing for the NCAA Divi-
sion II meet in the one
and three meter diving
events. Rene Seech,
who had previously
qualified for the na-
tionals, set school
records in the one-
meter diving with a 270
(for six dives) and in
the three-meter diving
with a 274 (for six
dives).
Scott Eagle, a
sophomore from
Winston Salem, set two
varsity records. In the
one-meter diving, he
scored 320 for six dives
to surpass the old
record of 288, which
was set in 1973. In the
three-meter diving, he
scored 335 points to
beat the old record of
317 which had been set
in 1973.
Both scores qualified
him for the the NCAA
Division-I nationals.
Last week against
UNC, he set a new
school record in the
one-meter diving for 11
dives with a mark of
490.
Kobe praised Senior
Andrew Giovine for his
performance in the
meet. Giovine had four
first place finishes in
the 400 individual
medley, the 200
breaststroke, the
400-medley relay and
the 200 freestyle relay
"The outstanding
swimmer of the meet
had to be David
Giovine Kobe said
"He just swam super
Kobe stated earlier
that the meet should
prove to be low key.
especially since this is
the first year Charlotte
has had a swim team
"When you start a
team from scratch
you've got to start
somewhere Kobe
said. "It's rough
Both teams will !aK
on Duke on I-eb 5. and
Kobe isn't expecting
this meet to be an eas .
one. "Duke is a big
meet for us he �.
"They have a good
team this year, the
be tough.
'If our women beat
them . we'll have an
even season, and if our
guys win, we'll have a
winning mark
would be the first time,
so it's important
The meet will get
underway at 1 p.m
ECU'a Andrew (,ioine glances to see his time after race.
S
1500
OFF ANY
COMPLETE PAIR OF
EYE GLASSES
i J IhUlWS
J I hfwni oupon tot cltflH ounl Not good � D(. Jtt
I �lth hi h-i adverttM-d �rr talk
3 LWWIiMftJ
HAi s H A llNH
SOFT QQ�i I
CONTACTS
I �MI UAtuni
Wr C n Affwy
An r.yr I jm
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Thr Sjiiih I)jv
The
OPTICAL
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Lady Pirate Basketball
vs.
Old Dominion (6thranked)
Tomorrow Night
7:30pm-Minges Coliseum
see "the great rat race"
at halftime, sponsored by Budweiser!
Watch the Ladv Pirates A ttaox
Bandit
TAMPA. Fla iLPIj
� The Tampa Bav
Bandits, hyped with a
hollywood connection
and the siogan "all rhe
fun the la allow
opened training carr.r
Monday with a number
of former NFL ?.at
on the 115-man roj
The Bandits, coa
ed b former Heisrr.
Tropy winner and M .
quarterback S t e v e r
Spurrier, will oper.
United States Kx
League seasor
the Boston Breai
March b a-
Stadiurr
One of the
re-v-ogn
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Rea ma
sity of I
bac� n
the Cinai
Philadelpti
and Houston (
the NFL
Othci
are Jimn �
formerly wit
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Bradsha -
Terr Bradshaw
a as wi 11
bi el
K Knce . .
of .
Ra:
Former Sr
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UHCM B
r E VE MING
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It' Dr � e - c window
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141
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M.L
Todd 1
BoastS
Robert
Adidas
As always,Al
10 oft
tf





p UNC-C
Both teams will take
rela) and on Duke on Feb. 5, and
. e rda Kobe isn't expecting
utstanding thi meet to be an easy
the meet one "Duke is a big
David meet tor us he said.
" 1 he have a good
earn this ear; the"ll
be - tted earlier be tough.
the meet should
ow kev. "It out women beat
them . sAe'll have an
si yeai charlotte even season, and if our
I swim team guys win, we'll have a
start a winning mark. That
scratch would be the first time,
to star! so it's important
Kobe 1 he meet tll get
"it's rough " underway at 1 p.m.
� �� .i
Cf
?

�? .�
k mceN to ee his time after race.
s

00 zesty pizza
wer calories.
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ansit Authority
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7-1955
sketball
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ight
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tes A ttack
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRLARv 1, 1983
13
Bandits Open Camp
TAMPA, Fla. (UPI)
� The Tampa Bay
Bandits, hyped with a
hoUywood connection
and the slogan "all the
fun the law allows
opened training camp
Monday with a number
of former NFL players
on the 115-man roster.
The Bandits, coach-
ed by former Heismann
Tropy winner and NFL
quarterback Stever
Spurrier, will open the
United States Football
League season against
the Boston Breakers
March 6 at Tampa
Stadium.
One of the more
recognizable names on
the roster is John
Reaves, former Univer-
sity of Florida quarter-
back who played for
the Cincinnati Bengals,
Philadelphia Eagles
and Houston Oilers in
the NFL.
Other quarterbacks
are Jimmy Jordan,
formerly with the New
Orleans Saints, Craig
Bradshaw, brother of
Pittsburgh quarterback
Terry Bradshaw and
who was with Houston
briefly, and Nat
Koonce, quarterback
of the Florida A'M
Rattlers last season.
Former NFL running
backs include Leon Mc-
Quay who was with the
New York Giants after
a stint in the CFL,
Willie Wilder of the
Green Bay Packers and
George Ragsdale of the
Tampa Bay Buc-
caneers.
Other players with
NFL pasts include
defensive lineman Sam-
my Green, a second
round pick of the Seat-
tle Seahawks, wide
receiver Danny Buggs
of the Washington
Redskins and the Buc-
caneers, offensive
lineman Ron Mikola-
jczyk who was with the
and the CFL, and of-
fensive lineman Milton
Hardaway of the
Oilers.
Jimbo Covert, the
offensive tackle from
Pittsburg who was the
Bandits' number one
draft pick, stopped in
last week to meet with
Bandits' officials but
indicated he might
decide to what a lot of
others drafted by USFL
teams apparently are
doing, wait for the
NFL draft in April to
determine which league
to go with.
But Spurrier said he
isn't going to wait.
"We're not going to
run a camp where we're
running players in and
out all the time he
said. "We will choose
the players who will
give their best effort for
the duration of the
season. We plan to
stick with them and
spend some time with
them.
"A lot of these guys
(draftees) are making a
mistake in letting some
other guys come out
where and get ex-
perience under their
belt and win a posi-
tion Spurrier said.
Primary owner of the
Bandits is millionaire
John Bassett, who
helped start the old
World Football
League, but actor Burt
Reynolds � a five per-
cent owner � is in the
spotlight more than
Bassett.
The team name is
from the scries of
Smokey and the Bandit
movies starring
Reynolds, his buddy
Jerry Reed has written
and recorded the Ban-
dits' fight song and his
close friend, Loni
Anderson, adorns area
billboards promoting
the Bandits.
Track Team Bumped
By RANDY MEWS
Pfcafeby CINOY WALL
Indoor Soccer Action
Coach Bill Carson
took his mile-relay
team of Eddie Bradley,
Wayne Richardson,
Nathan McCorkle and
Reuben Pierce to New
York City last Friday to
compete in the star-
filled Wanamaker-
Milrose Games
The meet featured
such names as Herschel
Walker, Stanley Floyd
and Carl Lewis. World-
record holders Mary
Decker Tabb, Dwight
Stones and Stephanie
Hightower also took
part in the competition.
Although highly
competitive schools as
Howard, Tennessee,
Auburn and George
Mason participated,
the event in most part
was a meet for in-
dividuals.
ECU had the third
best relay time going in-
to the meet, but due to
a mishap, the Pirates
were disqualified for
what appeared to be
another team's fault.
In the first heat, the
Pirates faced George
Mason and Auburn.
Rounding the first
curve, an Auburn and
George Mason runner
collided. The Auburn
runner fell, and in do-
ing so, bumped ECU
runner Eddie Bradley.
The Pirates com-
pleted the event in
3:24.1, behind first-
place finisher George
Mason. However, for
reasons unknown,
ECU and George
Mason were both dis-
qualified, making
Auburn the eventual
winner.
"I'm very unhapps
about the whole
thing commented
Coach Carson 'Ve
were looking for a 3:19
which would have been
a good performance
and most likely put us
into the finals "
The Pirate relav team
will head North again
this weekend when thes
participate in the
Princeton Reia in
Princeton, New Jerses
Camp Smapajmr
mm: '��JS FOR CAMP COUHSaORS at "amp Sea Gull hoys
�r : eafarer sirls). Serving as a camp counselor is a
Hailengit : and rewarding opportunity " �crk wi
young
e pie, �ce- 7-16. Sea Gull anci Seafarer are hea'th and
haracter development camps located on the coast of North
:3rnna and 'eature sailing, motorbcating, and seamanship
plus many usual ramping activities including a wide variety
� maicr sports. Qualifications include a genuine interest
ir urg oeople, aoility to instruct in one phase of the
camps' programs, and excellent references. For farther
information and application, please wrte a brief resale' c
training and experience in area's) skilled to Don Cheek,
rector, Camps Sea Gul1'Seafarer, P. 0. Box 10976, Raleigh,
North Carolina 27605.
Feb 3 is Dollar Day
At Bicycle Post
dollar day only
ask about lay away
Bicvae
P0S
GA TV e
5ALCS SEfl
Shogun 400 12 speed CrMo Frame
Reg.$239.95 Now $199.95
Celebrating
Dollar Days at
H.L. Hodges
Todd 1 Warm Ups half price
Copyright 1963
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
February specials include:
Tires 27x1 M Gum wall was7.95
Cannondale Seat Bags was $9.95
Zap Pads (set) was $12.95
Sedisport Chains was $9.95
Zetal Frame Pumps was 56.95
now $4.95
now$?.5
now $8.9
now $5.95
now$ 3.95
� �N,
Expires: Feb. 28, 1983
Boast Sweaters half price
FRESH
SNO-WHITE
Cauliflower
Robert Spruce Sweaters
Adidas Warm Ups 20 off
c
As always,AII ECU students recieve
10 off any nonsale item
H. L. HODGES CO.
210 E. FIFTH ST. GREENVILLE
rers an Prices
Effective veo cec 2
thru Sat FeD 5 1983
ADVERTISED ITEM POUO
Each of these advertised tems s �e
quired to be reediiy available 'c
aate m each Kroger Sav-on exceed
as specifically noted - this ac? if
do run out of an rr we w" o"e'
you your choice of a comparable
iter when available reflecting rtm
same savings or a ramchec which
will entitle you to purchase the
advertised tem at the advert s�3
price within 30 davs
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight � Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
FRESH FROM
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CHEESE OR
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For
$400 v�ii
T KROGER SLICED
White
FAMILY SIZE
BATHROOM TISSUE
Cottonelle
2 6 $0
Roll aj
Pkqs
WISE BBQ
OR REGULAR
Potato Chips
$400
24-Oz
Loaves
KROGER
ALL MEAT
CHUNK STYLE
JIF
Peanut
Butter
$3
18-Oz
Jars





14
JHE EASTCAROLONIAN
FEBRUARY I, 1983
Pirate Club Slated
The East
Carolina Universi-
ty Educational
Foundation, the
Pirate Club, has
named its slate for
the 1983 executive
board.
Selected to serve
as Executive Presi-
dent is Bill Clark,
an East Carolina
graduate and cur-
rent operator of
BUI Clark Con-
struction Co. and
Clark-Branch
Reality. In addi-
tion, Clark serves
as co-chairman of
the special $1
million fund drive
now underway for
ECU athletics.
Mike Bunting of
Greensboro has
been elected Ex-
ecutive Vice-
President. Bunting
attended East
Carolina and has
been elected Ex-
ecutive Vice-
President. Bunting
attended East
Carolina and has
been a very avid
worker and sup-
porter of all pro-
grams at the
University.
Those elected as
one-year Executive
Directors are: Les
Garner of Green-
ville, Phil Dixon of
Greenville and Lou
Hallow of Green-
ville.
Those elected as
two-year Executive
Directors are: Dr.
Ray Minges of
Greenville, co-
chairman of the $1
million fund drive;
Riley Roberson of
Washington and
Bill Jackson of
Fayetteville.
Also serving on
the board are:
George Turner of
Raleigh, immediate
past president;
Richard Dupree,
Executive
Secretary; Cliff
Moore, Executive
Treasurer; Dr. Ken
Karr, Director of
Athletics; and Dr.
Ernest Schwarz,
athletic faculty
representative
Coach Chosen
Cont'd From Page 11
for over 25 years from
when he was a suc-
ting back into cessful high school
coaching. And I'm real coach to when he was
excited about the young extremely successful as
men returning here on an assistant coach and
offense. I'm impressed then a head coach
with the quality of said ECU coach Ed
players and coaches. Emory. "We are just
We like Greenville � fortunate he will pursue
they're our kind of peo- his career here at East
pie Carolina against one of
"I have known Art the most challenging
schedules in the coun-
try. I feel like our cur-
rent staff is one of the
strongest assembled in
the state of North
Carolina
264 By Pass,
Next Door to
Toyota East
Classifieds
PERSONAL
EMPTY Even thou�n you re 11
and sophisticated you rt still
holding out on those spintloss
nights "I know what I'm doing "
That's not what wo hoard "Right
hero. Buddy, right herel
(Jerrv-n Jenny) Oh wall, the
search goes on Oon'l torget. we
have an appointment with me
"Boss in March, you big "L
CINDY Happy birthday and
many thanks lor the hard work
and time you put in tor us YOUR
STUDENTS
TO THE BUTT SISTERS. BER
THA AND ACNES: Thanks tor let
ting me practice my roping on
you I gotta admit, you guys are
sure tough But ttianks to you. I'm
sure to win at the rodeo TEX
CARt. A Happy big Jli Oh. damn
I can t think of anything to say e
cept I love you. Xanadu From Me.
GREG, your humble yet willing
to-do-anything lover
COME ON OUT The local chapter
o the national chapter ot the inter
national chapter ot the Slim Whit
man Fan Club (based, ot course
in England where Slims record
sales continue to dominate the
charts) will be holding auditions
tor a Shffl Whitman Look alike
Conies' to be held sometime in the
near future No previous yodelling
tipenenct is necessary Only a
willingness to learn and an if
resistable mustache Guitars and
groupies will be provided Those
wishing to audition must appear in
person when the time comes, but it
hasn t come vet. so you really
don I have to worry about it right
now. do you?
BLONDES MAY HAVE MORE
mtm. bwt according Ni recent
studies frtey ere nr9 times more
prone to contract some strand ot
social disease They also have
more babies SO THERE
SERVICES
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EXCELLENT TYPIST
Reasonable rates. All papers Call
757 137t after 4pm
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE Complete audio repair call
alter I p m Mark 7J2 :�?
WANTED
WANTED HANDCRAFT and
POTTERY items lor resale on
commission basis only Land and
Sea Outlet. Greenville Square
Shopping Ph 75 �7?o Open
FLORIDA SPRING BREAK.
Reservations now being taken lor
a trip to Daytona Beach. Round
trip out (are with KEOS 7 nights
accomodaiion at King's inn
Beachfront Free parties with live
band and unlimited brow. Priceu
till.SO for everything except
meal. Call 7S�-7g7a tor oeteiit
alter p.m. Limited space, so
don't wit.
SINOINO VALENTINE
TELEORAMU: To make this VD
day one your benoy will tnrly
remember, call LADYBUG
LIMITED for eetaiii ISS-lto or
7Se 7�J.
EARN BIO BUCKS in your sport
time representing News wee and
other maor publishers We offer a
full line et student products pay
mg higei commissions No direct
selling CPU IM Kensington St
Brooklyn. NY I HIS. llU4e31�S.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for two
preschoolers 4-t hours per week
Please call Dr. and Mrs Andrew
Hevrn 7� a$xi
ROOMMATE
WANTED
lt77 CAMARO: Excellent condi-
tion. HI13II after p.m. U.SQs.
HIDE A BED SOFA.
FOR SALE
best offer, call 7�-S4t4
FURNISHED PRIVATE
BEDROOM ami bath at 10OC
Eastroost. Come by mis week for
more In for ma Won. Poof, laundry
� f lOameeiTh.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
IIIS �� Pregnancy Tost. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
111 �JJI (Toll Free Number
oe Ml -mm between � AM
and 5PM Weekdays.
RALEIOMS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St
Raletgf C
Buy 4 Tacos or
Super Supreme
& get medium
Dr. Pepper for 5
Not Good With Any Other Special
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
S FOUR (4) Tacos
I for just 51.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT
pizza Be
Finally the end
to the endless
argument.
Tonight, make it
PTA pizza Lite"
100�o zesty pizza,
21 : fewer caiones
Unbelievable?
TRYIT!
Tonight, eat right.
Eat "pizza Lite
only from PTA.
NEED A. PLACE TO LIVE?
3 bedroom apt , share I) rent
i�� per month and 11 utilities 1
miles from campus Bos service
Contoct Susan. 757-MB.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN AsoenoN a drmcutt dec
DEPEND ON. s-on that i made easier Dv
ie women o'ttierrmngCentet Counselors ate
avaiiaDie day and night to support and under-
stood you -out safe comfort and pnvacv ore
assured by t,ne coring staff of the Fieming Center
SERVICES � jesday � Saturday Abortion Ap
pcuntnTents � st & 2nd Trinneste( Abortions up to
18 Weeks � free Pregnancy Tests � Very Eory
Pregnancy Tests � AM inclusive Pees � insurance
Accepted � CAU 761-W50 DAY C NtGHT �
Healthcare counseling TUC Cl CkJIsVlr"
ana education for wo ,Mt rLfclVIIN�
men o� gj ages CENTER
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
EAT PIZZA
EAT LIGHT
wt-ven it comes to pizza
pta comes to you
757-1955
123 E. 5th Str.
Tues. - Pizza and Pasta $2.99
Lodies Nite with
Bruce Frye
Lodies Admitted FREE Free draft for the Lodies
WedSalad Bor Special $2.15 nil you can Eat 5-9
Thursday - Spaghetti Special $2.49 aiiyou can Eat 5-9
Coming Fri, Feb. 4
Steve Brian
Watch For Our Daily Luncheon Specials
Coming Next Week Our New and Improved Menu
Cliffs Specials
rr 9 Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
A Special Film Presentation Tomorrow Night At 8 PAA Only
Hendrix Theatre Admission By ID & Activity Card
Sponsored By The ECU Student Union Films Committee
.

r
wasoMosM
HBoM � BaWRaJMBO
j






Title
The East Carolinian, February 1, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 01, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.245
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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