The East Carolinian, January 25, 1983






Wt iEaat (Eartfltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No�34-U
Tuesday, January 25, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Board Selects Hardee To Be
New Student Union President
Guess Why They're In A Rush
Photo By CINDY WALL
These eager young men rushed over to the Kappa Sigma fraternity house last week during Rush when they heard
about The Original Las Vegas Play Boy Bunny Night, complete with real "bunnies There mamas didn't raise
an fools.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Members of the Student Union
Board of directors selected ECU
sophomore Regina Hardee to be
1983-1984 Student Union president.
Hardee, currently a general college
student, will replace the current Stu-
dent Union president Joe Lewis on
April 15 when his 1982-1983 term
expires.
Hardee said she was both excited
and honored to be chosen for the
post. She was picked for the posi-
tion out of a group of three who had
applied for it earlier this month.
Hardee will be the only paid student
employee in the Student Union. She
will receive approximately $200 a
month.
Reaction to Hardee's selection
was favorable and optimistic. "1
Security Breaks Up Two Student Fights
By GREG HIDEOUT
S�� Miior
Fights at Mendenhall Student
Center and the Afro-American
Cultural Center kept campus securi-
ty busy during the weekend.
The first altercation broke out
just before the showing of the late
feature, Texas Chainsaw Massacre
at Hendnx theatre. According to
student night manager Howard
Wilkerson, two students, Lawrence
W Bryant and Thomas M. Peirsal.
both 19. were attempting to save
seats in the crowded theatre. Then,
police records show, Paul Thomas
and Gregory Thomas tried to sit in
the seat
Then according to James B.
Mallory, associate dean of
judiciary, either Paul Thomas or
Gregory Thomas tripped and fell in-
to Bryant and Peirsal and the fight
started. Mallory said the students
were under the influence ot
alchohol.
The fight ended when two ushers
arrived and subdued the par
ticipants. Student manager Wilker-
son said that he then instructed
another worker, Tracy Owens to
call campus security. The students
were then questioned by public safe-
ty officer Johnny Burns and the
records were turned over to Mallory
Monday morning
Mallory said no charges were fil-
ed. The incident will be turned over
to the honor board for investiga-
tion.
The other fight occurred early
Sunday morning during a party at
the cultural center given by Omega
Psi Phi fraternity. According to
Detective Lt. Gene McAbee of cam-
pus security, an altercation between
Sheridan Barnes and Dwight
Richardson resulted in the arrest of
Richardson for simple assault. The
case will be heard in Greenville
District Court.
In an unrelated incident, a stu-
dent foiled the attempted larceny of
two speakers from his dorm room
when he was awakened by the in-
truder.
Stephen Walston of Slay Dorm
found Paul Douglas Sigmon, 20, in
his room Sunday morning at 7 in the
process of stealing one of his
speakers. Sigmon had allegedly
stolen the key to the room earlier.
When Walston got out of bed a
chase ensued, during which time the
speaker was dropped and damaged.
A second speaker of Walston's
was found in Sigmon's room in Slay
dorm. Both speakers, valued at
$105, were recovered. The case will
be heard in district court.
think she'll be a good president
Lewis said. He noted that Hardee,
who was chairperson of the
1982-1983 Student Homecoming
Committee, had much experience
and would be competent in the posi-
tion. "She knows a lot about the
Student Union
Besides heading the homecoming
committee, Hardee has worked with
the Student Union on the special
events and entertainment commit-
tees while maintaining grades high
enough to put her in an honors pro-
gram. She is also a member of Phi
Eta Sigma honor fraternity.
"I am delighted to have the op-
portunity to work in 1983-1984 with
Regina Hardee said Associate
Dean of Activities and Director of
University Union Rudy Alexander.
"She has tremendous ability. She is
an outstanding young woman and 1
am confident that she will do a
magnificant job in the position
Both Lewis and Alexander are non-
voting members of the Student
Union Board of Directors.
Carter Fox, Chairman of the
Media Board and Panhellenic
Council president also had praise
for Hardee. "I feel like Ms. Hardee
is a capable student leader, and I'm
confident that the Student Union
will benefit. We're lucky to have
her
Fox, a voting member of the Stu-
dent Union Board of Directors as
head of the Panhellenic Council,
said the selection process tor the
new Student Union president was
particularly difficult this year
because all three applicants were
highly qualified. "Each came across
in the interview as personable and
hard working ECU students era
Hunt and Tremaine W addell were
the other two candidates For the
post.
In her application letter to the
board Hardee wrote that she was
applying for the position because
she was "interested in serving :n a
capacity where my support, par
ticipation and determination
(would) help our Student Union to
be more successful than ever"
Hardee wrote that because ot her
experience as head of the homeom
ing committee, she felt she had
developed the "essential qualities"
necessary for a good leader in her
new position.
Hardee's responsibilities will in-
clude carrying out the policies of the
board of directors and administer-
ing the operations of the Student
Union from both a long range point
of view and day-to-day. She must
also approve the use of and except
See MENDENHALL. Page 3
President To Step Down
Lewis Praises Staff
Advisors Face New Interview Procedure
B ED N1CKLAS
According to College Hill Area
Coordinator Inez Fridley, Residence
Life will be hiring 40 to 60 residence
advisors for next fall under a
somewhat new interview procedure,
which will begin the middle of
February.
Fridley said that applications tor
the advisor positions can be obtain-
ed from anv residence hall director,
214 Whichard Building, or the in-
formation desk at Mendenhall. Ap-
plications are due Feb. 10 and inter-
viewing starts Feb. 15.
Under the new procedure, all ap-
plicants will first participate in a
general group meeting. In addition
to the group meetings, each appli-
cant will sign up for an individual
interview, which will take place
either the last week in February or
the first week in March.
A residence advisor position in-
cludes responsibilities ranging from
administrative to counseling related.
The advisor, who is the leader of 60
to 100 residents on a particular hall,
plays a prominent and influential
role. How well the advisor handles
situations and communicates with
residents and fellow staff usually
determines the cohesiveness of his
or her particular dormitory.
Therefore, a majority of the ap-
plicants chosen for an advisor posi-
tion are those who are genuinely in-
terested in bettering residence life.
"If you're looking for a chance to
have first-hand experience in in-
teracting with fellow students and
staff members, then it's a great job
to have said Robert Weathers, an
advisor in Jones Hall. "You really
develop good working relation
skills
According to Fridley, future
employers recognize that the advisor
position develops certain skills and
leaoership qualities. "It is really a
leadership position Fridley said.
"The actual experiences teach the
advisors a lot of skills. What the job
does is maximize their strengths and
minimize their weaknesses
Tim "Fish" Royster, who is a
programming assistant in Aycock
Hall, agrees that an advisor position
catches the eye of many employers.
"1 think it plavs a big part in getting
a job he said. "With any job, you
will be dealing with people. And
dealing with different kinds of peo-
ple is a main part of our job
The advisor position pays $3.35
an hour, two hours a day. With ex-
perience, an advisor can later apply
for head resident or programming
assistant position � as Royster did.
Despite the monthly paychecks,
Weathers, like most advisors, is
looking for experience. "I definitely
did it for the intangible benefits,
Life last year sent questionnaires to
former staff members, who in turn
reflected on their experience as an
advisor, Fridley said. The results of
the questionnaire showed that the
former members were presently
employed in diverse fields. Of the 40
who replied to the questionnaire,
only two were unemployed.
Furthermore, each former
member was asked to list the top
three benefits that he or she obtain-
ed from the job. Sixty-two percent
said the training sessions were most
beneficial; 42 percent said the
friendships obtained were predomi-
nant; 35 percent said the money was
most beneficial; 22 percent enjoyed
the fun involved and 15 percent en-
joyed the recognition the most.
Perhaps the most pertinent fin-
did it tor the intangiD.e oc.ic.us - quesllonnaire related to
although the monthly paycheck fmg of the quest, n
comes in handy.
To obtain a statistical perspective
of the advisor position, Residence
Student Union Board Names Russo
As Chairman For Rest Of Semester
I he Student Union Board of
Directors named Student Resident
Life president Tory Russo as their
new chairman for the remainder of
the 1982-1983 term.
Russo, who recently helped
organize Pirate Walk, ECU's new
student escort service, is replacing
Ron Maxwell. Maxwell had to give
up his seat on the Board earlier last
fall when he resigned as President of The Student Union Board of
the Society of United Liberal Directors is made up of eleven
Students During the interim period members who are heads of other
Assoce Dean8of Activities Rudy organizations. It acts as ari advisory
Alexander temporarily performed and policy making board for the
the duties of the chair. Student Union.
"I'm very happy Russo said The ten members of the board
after being picked for the post. "It's besides Russo are Carter Fox presi-
a responsibility I'm honored to dent of the Panhellenic Counctl;
the importance of communication
skills. "Communication skills were
listed by 92 percent of the
respondents as the most valuable
aspect learned while being an ad-
visor Fridley said.
Contrary to some belief, only five
percent experienced a decline in
grades. "The job might at times
alter your studying schedule
Weathers said, "but not to the point
where it affects your grades
B PATRIC KO'NfcUX
Outgoing Student Union Presi-
dent Joe Lewis was full of praise for
the people who have worked under
him for the past year and he was
very pleased with the "great work"
carried out by the Student Union
during his tenure in office.
"I had a great set of people to
work with Lewis said. "And all
my committee chairpersons did an
extraordinary job Lewis, whose
1982-1983 term expires on April 15,
will be replaced b y newly appointed
sophomore Regina Hardee.
Lewis had especially strong words
of praise for Tremaine W addell who
headed the Minority Arts Commit-
tee. "Tremaine really did a great
job Lewis said. "She was one of
mv outstanding chairpersons
Lewis noted that W addell was
responsible for bringing the Chinese
Opera to ECU.
Lewis also praised Vera Hunt,
head of the Special Concerts Com-
mittee, for doing a fine job. Hunt
introduced the Campus Entertain-
ment Network to ECU. The
1982-1983 Campus Entertainment
Network events included two live
performances brought to ECU via
satellite.
Lewis congratulated Major At-
tractions Committee head Jerry
Dilsaver for the sell-out crowd that
came to see .38 Special during
homecoming week.
He praised his other committee
heads for their fine efforts and pro
mised more to come in the next two
months of his term. I es; aid that
later this spring the Special Events
Committee, headed by Cathy Ed-
wards, would be sponsoring
Barefoot on the Mall, which Lewis
claimed would be the biggest event
of the year.
The Travel Committee under the
leadership of Jennifer McQuillan is
presently sponsoring a trip to
Florida during spring break.
Other committee heads who
worked during Lewis' term included
Marty Hardin of the Art Exhibition
Committee, Juliana Fahrbach of the
Films Committee and Kim Edman-
son, head of the Coffee House
Committee. Lewis thanked all three
for their fine efforts.
Associate Dean of Activities and
Director of University Unions Rudy
Alexander praised Lewis. 'It has
been a personal pleasure to work
with Joe. and I look forward to con-
tinuing through the balance ot his
term of office Alexander said.
"He has done a good job
Alexander added that he con
sidered Joe Lewis a very fine young
man. "I think the Student Union
has really benefited under his
leadership this year. His successor is
going to have her work cut out for
her
Carter Fox, who is president ot
the Panhellenic Council and sat on
the Student Union Board of Direc-
tors with Lewis, also praised him for
his efforts. "I think the Union ran
smoothly under his leadership
Fox said.
Vice Chancellor Volpe Picks Smith
To Head Department Of Philosophy
� nmrniiT �ativ�. nf Cirove Citv. Penn an
The
Announcements
Just The Way It Is
Entertainment
Sports
Classifieds
� � �
2
4
6
8
10
Today's AP-wire weather
report was lost in a Alaskan bliz-
zard. So, our staff, being the
fearless weather forecasters they
are, have decided that it might
snow if it isn't dear or doesn't
rain. So it goes
L
receive, and I hope I can fulfill the
task
Russo, who was nominated for
the post, was voted in by the Stu-
dent Union Board last Thursday.
Russo's responsibilities will in-
clude various organizational tasks
for the Board such as setting dates
for board meetings, approving and
signing the minutes of the meetings
and officiating the general business
procedures of meetings. Russo will
also be responsible for calling any
special meetings if the need arises.
Besides his position as SRA Presi-
dent, Russo is no stranger to ex-
tracurricular posts. He has served as
both president and vice president of
his hall and worked on last year's ad
hoc traffic committee, which helped
revise ECU traffic regulations.
Barbara Battle, new president of
SOULS; Bobby Pierce, president of
the Inter-Fraternity Council; Jesse
Riggs, day student representative;
Gary Williams, graduate student
representative; Vice-Chancellor for
Student Life Dr. Elmer Meyer, ad-
ministration representative; Dr.
Lawrence Hough, faculty represen-
titive; Joe Lewis, Student Union
president; Associate Dean Alex-
ander and SGA president Eric
Henderson. Lewis and Alexander
are both ex-officio members of the
committee.
"I look forward to working with
all the committee members Russo
said. He added that he also looked
forward to working with Student
Union president-elect Regina
Hardee.

t ay ecu Nawt surkau
Dr. James Leroy Smith
By GREG HIDEOUT
Acting Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs Angelo Volpe
named associate professor James
Leroy Smith acting chairman of the
philosophy department. Smith will
fill the post until a search committee
finds a permanent replacement.
The appointment, announced Fri-
day, is the third in a series of acting
positions named as a result of the
resignation of Dr. Robert Maier
from his post of vice chancellor for
academic affairs. Dr. Eugene Ryan,
who was chairman of the
philosophy department, is now dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Volpe, the current acting vice
chancellor, had previously been the
dean.
Smith, 39, has been a member of
the ECU faculty since 1969. He is a
native of Grove City, Penn and
received his bachelors degree in
philosophy in 1966 from Penn
State. He went on to get his masters
in 1967 from Penn State and his
doctorate from Tulane University in
1969.
Smith, an active member ot the
faculty senate, was recommended
for the job by outgoing chairman
Ryan. He has been published in
various scholarly journals and is a
member of a number of profes-
sional societies.
Smith was out of town on Mon-
day and unavailable for comment.
Vice Chancellor Volpe said he
thought Smith was an excellent
choice and called him a "class A in-
dividual
Smith, who teaches the class
"Philosophy of medicine started
the new job on Monday.

laagi.
� �� �
-�'Yr
p





&z iEaat (Eartfltttian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.3
Tuesday, January 25, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Board Selects Hardee To Be
New Student Union President
Guess Why They "re In A Rush
Photo By CINDY WALL
l'hese eager young men rushed over lo the kappa Sigma fraternity house last week during Rush when they heard
about The Original Las Vegas Play Boy Bunny Night, complete with real "bunnies There mamas didn't raise
am fools.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Members of the Student Union
Board of directors selected ECU
sophomore Regina Hardee to be
1983-1984 Student Union president.
Hardee, currently a general college
student, will replace the current Stu-
dent Union president Joe Lewis on
April 15 when his 1982-1983 term
expires.
Hardee said she was both excited
and honored to be chosen for the
post. She was picked for the posi-
tion out of a group of three who had
applied for it earlier this month.
Hardee will be the only paid student
employee in the Student Union. She
will receive approximately $200 a
month.
Reaction to Hardee's selection
was favorable and optimistic. "I
Security 'Breaks Up Two Student Fights
By GREG RIDEOUT
New hdilor
Fights at Mendenhall Student
(enter and the Afro-American
Cultural Center kept campus securi-
ty busy during the weekend.
The first altercation broke out
just before the showing of the late
feature. Texas Chainsaw Massacre
at Hendnx theatre. According to
student night manager Howard
ilkerson. two students, Lawrence
V Bryant and Thomas M. Peirsal,
both 19, were attempting to save
seats in the crowded theatre. Then,
police records show, Paul Thomas
and Gregory Thomas tried to sit in
the seatv
Then according to James B.
Mallory, associate dean ot
judiciary, either Paul Thomas or
Gregory Thomas tripped and fell in-
to Bryant and Peirsal and the fight
started. Mallory said the students
were under the influence ot
alchohol.
The fight ended when two ushers
arrived and subdued the par-
ticipants. Student manager Wilker-
son said 'hat he then instructed
another worker. Tracy Owens to
call campus security. The students
were then questioned by public safe-
ty officer Johnny Burns and the
records were turned over to Mallory
Monday morning
Mallory said no charges were fil-
ed. The incident will be turned over
to the honor board for investiga-
tion.
The other fight occurred early
Sunday morning during a party at
the cultural center given by Omega
Psi Phi fraternity. According to
Detective Lt. Gene McAbee of cam-
pus security, an altercation between
Sheridan Barnes and Dwight
Richardson resulted in the arrest of
Richardson for simple assault. The
case will be heard in Greenville
District Court.
In an unrelated incident, a stu-
dent foiled the attempted larceny of
two speakers from his dorm room
when he was awakened by the in-
truder.
Stephen Walston of Slay Dorm
found Paul Douglas Sigmon, 20, in
his room Sunday morning at 7 in the
process of stealing one of his
speakers. Sigmon had allegedly
stolen the key to the room earlier.
When Walston got out of bed a
chase ensued, during which time the
speaker was dropped and damaged.
A second speaker of Walston's
was found in Sigmon's room in Slay
dorm. Both speakers, valued at
$105, were recovered. The case will
be heard in district court.
think she'll be a good president
Lewis said. He noted that Hardee,
who was chairperson of the
1982-1983 Student Homecoming
Committee, had much experience
and would be competent in the posi-
tion. "She knows a lot about the
Student Union
Besides heading the homecoming
committee, Hardee has worked with
the Student Union on the special
events and entertainment commit-
tees while maintaining grades high
enough to put her in an honors pro-
gram. She is also a member of Phi
Eta Sigma honor fraternity.
"I am delighted to have the op-
portunity to work in 1983-1984 with
Regina Hardee said Associate
Dean of Activities and Director of
University Union Rudy Alexander.
"She has tremendous ability. She is
an outstanding young woman and I
am confident that she will do a
magnificant job in the position
Both Lewis and Alexander are non-
voting members of the Student
Union Board of Directors.
Carter Fox, Chairman of the
Media Board and Panhellenic
Council president also had praise
for Hardee. "I feel like Ms. Hardee
is a capable student leader, and I'm
confident that the Student Union
will benefit. We're lucky to have
her
Fox, a voting member of the Stu-
dent Union Board of Directors ,
head of the Panhellenic Council,
said the selection process lor the
new Student Union president a-
particularly difficult this year
because all three applicants were
highly qualified, "fcach came across
in the interview as personable and
hard working ECU student Vera
Hunt and Tremaine Waddell were
the other two candidates for the
post.
In her application letter to the
board Hardee wrote that she was
applying for the position because
she was "interested in serv.p.c in a
capacity where my support, par
ticipation and determination
(would) help our Student I nion to
be more successful than ever
Hardee wrote that because ol her
experience as head of the homecom
ing committee, she felt she had
developed the "essential qualities"
necessary for a good leader in her
new position.
Hardee's responsibilities will in-
clude carrying out the policies of the
board of directors and administer
ing the operations of the Student
Union from both a long range point
of view and day-to-day. She must
also approve the use of and excei
See MENDENHALL. Page 3
President To Step Down
Lewis Praises Staff
Advisors Face New Interview Procedure
Bv ED N1CKLAS
st.ff Writer
According to College Hill Area
Coordinator Inez Fridley, Residence
Life will be hiring 40 to 60 residence
advisors for next fall under a
somewhat new interview procedure,
which will begin the middle of
lehruary.
fridley said that applications for
the advisor positions can be obtain-
ed from any residence hall director,
214 Whichard Building, or the in-
formation desk at Mendenhall. Ap-
plications are due Feb. 10 and inter-
viewing starts Feb. 15.
Under the new procedure, all ap-
plicants will first participate in a
general group meeting. In addition
to the group meetings, each appli-
cant will sign up for an individual
interview, which will take place
either the last week in February or
the first week in March.
A residence advisor position in-
cludes responsibilities ranging from
administrative to counseling related.
The advisor, who is the leader of 60
to 100 residents on a particular hall,
plays a prominent and influential
role. How well the advisor handles
situations and communicates with
residents and fellow staff usually
determines the cohesiveness of his
or her particular dormitory.
Therefore, a majority of the ap-
plicants chosen for an advisor posi-
tion are those who are genuinely in-
terested in bettering residence life.
"If you're looking for a chance to
have first-hand experience in in-
teracting with fellow students and
staff members, then it's a great job
to have said Robert Weathers, an
advisor in Jones Hall. "You really
develop good working relation
skills
According to Fridley, future
employers recognize that the advisor
position develops certain skills and
leadership qualities. "It is really a
leadership position Fridley said.
"The actual experiences teach the
advisors a lot of skills. What the job
does is maximize their strengths and
minimize their weaknesses
Tim "Fish" Royster, who is a
programming assistant in Aycock
Hall, agrees that an advisor position
catches the eye of many employers.
"I think it plays a big part in getting
a job he said. "With any job, you
will be dealing with people. And
dealing with different kinds of peo-
ple is a main part of our job
The advisor position pays $3.35
an hour, two hours a day. Wiih ex-
perience, an advisor can later apply
for head resident or programming
assistant position � as Royster did.
Despite the monthly paychecks,
Weathers, like most advisors, is
looking for experience. "1 definitely
did it for the intangible benefits,
although the monthly paycheck
comes in handy
To obtain a statistical perspective
of the advisor position, Residence
Student Union Board Names Russo
As Chairman For Rest Of Semester
The Student Union Board of
Directors named Student Resident
Life president Tory Russo as their
new chairman for the remainder of
the 1982-1983 term.
Russo, who recently helped
organize Pirate Walk, ECU's new
student escort service, is replacing
Ron Maxwell. Maxwell had to give
up his seat on the Board earlier last
Announcements
Just The Way It Is
Entertainment
Sports
Classifieds
2
4
6
8
10
Today's AP-wire weather
report was lost in a Alaskan bliz-
zard. So, our staff, being the
fearless weather forecasters they
are, have decided that it might
snow if it isn't dear or doesn't
rain. So it goes
fall when he resigned as President of
the Society of United Liberal
Students. During the interim period
Associate Dean of Activities Rudy
Alexander temporarily performed
the duties of the chair.
"I'm very happy Russo said
after being picked for the post. "It's
a responsibility I'm honored to
receive, and I hope I can fulfill the
task
Russo, who was nominated for
the post, was voted in by the Stu-
dent Union Board last Thursday.
Russo's responsibilities will in-
clude various organizational tasks
for the Board such as setting dates
for board meetings, approving and
signing the minutes of the meetings
and officiating the general business
procedures of meetings. Russo will
also be responsible for calling any
special meetings if the need arises.
Besides his position as SRA Presi-
dent, Russo is no stranger to ex-
tracurricular posts. He has served as
both president and vice president of
his hall and worked on last year's ad
hoc traffic committee, which helped
revise ECU traffic regulations.
The Student Union Board of
Directors is made up of eleven
members who are heads of other
organizations. It acts as an advisory
and policy making board for the
Student Union.
The ten members of the board
besides Russo are Carter Fox, presi-
dent of the Panhellenic Council;
Barbara Battle, new president of
SOULS; Bobby Pierce, president of
the Inter-Fraternity Council; Jesse
Riggs, day student representative;
Gary Williams, graduate student
representative; Vice-Chancellor for
Student Life Dr. Elmer Meyer, ad-
ministration representative; Dr.
Lawrence Hough, faculty represen-
titive; Joe Lewis, Student Union
president; Associate Dean Alex-
ander and SGA president Eric
Henderson. Lewis and Alexander
are both ex-officio members of the
committee.
"I look forward to working with
all the committee members Russo
said. He added that he also looked
forward to working with Student
Union president-elect Regina
Hardee.
Life last year sent questionnaires to
former staff members, who in turn
reflected on their experience as an
advisor, Fridley said. The results of
the questionnaire showed that the
former members were presently
employed in diverse fields. Of the 40
who replied to the questionnaire,
only two were unemployed.
Furthermore, each former
member was asked to list the top
three benefits that he or she obtain-
ed from the job. Sixty-two percent
said the training sessions were most
beneficial; 42 percent said the
friendships obtained were predomi-
nant; 35 percent said the money was
most beneficial; 22 percent enjoyed
the fun involved and 15 percent en-
joyed the recognition the most.
Perhaps the most pertinent fin-
ding of the questionnaire related to
the importance of communication
skills. "Communication skills were
listed by 92 percent of the
respondents as the most valuable
aspect learned while being an ad-
visor Fridley said.
Contrary to some belief, only five
percent experienced a decline in
grades. "The job might at times
alter your studying schedule
Weathers said, "but not to the point
where it affects your grades
By PATRICK O'NUILL
Slift -
Outgoing Student Union Presi-
dent Joe Lewis was full of praise for
the people who have worked under
him for the past year and he was
very pleased with the "great work"
carried out by the Student Union
during his tenure in office.
"I had a great set of people to
work with Lewis said. "And all
my committee chairpersons did an
extraordinary job Lewis, whose
1982-1983 term expires on April 15.
will be replaced b y newly appointed
sophomore Regina Hardee.
Lewis had especially strong words
of praise for Tremaine Waddell who
headed the Minority Arts Commit-
tee. "Tremaine really did a great
job Lewis said. "She was one of
my outstanding chairpersons
Lewis noted that Waddell was
responsible for bringing the Chinese
Opera to ECU.
Lewis also praised Vera Hunt,
head of the Special Concerts Com-
mittee, for doing a fine job. Hunt
introduced the Campus Entertain-
ment Network to ECU. The
1982-1983 Campus Entertainment
Network events included two live
performances brought to ECU via
satellite.
Lewis congratulated Major At-
tractions Committee head Jerry
Dilsaver for the sell-out crowd that
came to see .38 Special during
homecoming week.
He praised his other committee
heads for their fine efforts and pro-
mised more to come in the new two
months of his term. I ewris -aid that
imter this spring (he Special Events
Committee, headed by Cathy Ed-
wards, would be sponsoring
Barefoot on the Mail, which Lewis
claimed would be the biggest event
of the year.
The Travel Committee under the
leadership of Jennifer McQuillan is
presently sponsoring a trip to
Florida during spring break
Other committee heads who
worked during Lewis' term included
Marty Hardtn of the Art Exhibition
Committee, Juliana Fahrbach of the
Films Committee and Kim Fdman-
son, head of the Coffee House
Committee. Lewis thanked all three
for their fine efforts.
Associate Dean of Activities and
Director of University Union- Rud
Alexander praised Lewis. Tt has
been a personal pleasure to work
with Joe, and I look forward to con-
tinuing through the balance of hi-
term of office Alexander said.
"He has done a good job
Alexander added that he con
sidered Joe Lewis a very fine young
man. "I think the Student Union
has really benefited under his
leadership this year. His succe-sor is
going to have her work cut out for
her
Carter Fox, who is president ot
the Panhellenic Council and sat on
the Student Union Board of Direc-
tors with Lewis, also praised him for
his efforts. "I think the Union ran
smoothly under his leadership
Fox said.
Vice Chancellor Volpe Picks Smith
To Head Department Of Philosophy

11 acu niws auniAu
Dr. Janes Leroy Smith
By GREG RIDEOUT
NmMftar
Acting Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs Angelo Volpe
named associate professor James
Leroy Smith acting chairman of the
philosophy department. Smith will
fill the post until a search committee
finds a permanent replacement.
The appointment, announced Fri-
day, is the third in a series of acting
positions named as a result of the
resignation of Dr. Robert Maier
from his post of vice chancellor for
academic affairs. Dr. Eugene Ryan,
who was chairman of the
philosophy department, is now dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Volpe, the current acting vice
chancellor, had previously been the
dean.
Smith, 39, has been a member of
the ECU faculty since 1969. He is a
native of Grove City, Penn and
received his bachelors degree in
philosophy in 1966 from Penn
State. He went on to get his masters
in 1967 from Penn State and his
doctorate from Tulane University in
1969.
Smith, an active member of the
faculty senate, was recommended
for the job by outgoing chairman
Ryan. He has been published in
various scholarly journals and is a
member of a number of profes-
sional societies.
Smith was out of town on Mon-
day and unavailable for comment.
Vice Chancellor Volpe said he
thought Smith was an excellent
choice and called him a "class A in-
dividual
Smith, who teaches the class
"Philosophy of medicine started
the new job on Monday.
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 25, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It vOu or your organization
would itKe to nave an item printed
in the announcement column,
piease type it on an announcement
form ana send it to Th� East
Carolinian in care ot trie produc
�n manaoer
nnouncement terms are
diat4e a the has' Carolinian
office -n the Publications Building
IHycrs and handwritten copy on
odd siied paper cannot oe ac
. epted
There �s no charge tor an
lou'xements but space is -often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee �ha� your announce
men' will run as long as you want
ana suggest mat you do not rely
solely on this column tor publicity
The deadline tor announcements
i3pm Monday tor the Tuesday
paper ana 3pm Weanesdayy tor
� e Thursday paper No an
juncemeois received after these
eadimes wM be printed
This space is available to ad
;ampus organnat.ons and depart
"lents
SGA
SGA currently nas positions'
open tor five Day Representatives
ano Dorm Openings tor Scott (3)
Fletcher (1). Wfiife (1), Garrett
(1). jooes (1). Greene ill. Cle
ment (1) ana Tyler (1) If in
'erested in applying tor any of the
positions applications can be ob
taineo in the SGA office on me se
cond floor ot Wendenhall For adi
ionat information contact Gma
ynch 752 9058 Screening wi
begin January 26 193 at 4 00 pm
in room 247'Menoennali
SKY DIVING
EXHIBITION
Expert sKydivers will speak on
Skydiving The Ultimate Sport
s'ate of the art equiptment will be
on exhibit and demonstrated
Topics will include but are not
limited to ttrst jump instruction,
carachute packing intermediate
Sky diving advanced sky diving
techniques free fall aircraft,
parachuting accidents sky diving
tac�s ana myths Ail questions per
'aming to the sport will be
answered Recent skydiving
movies will be shown Excellent
opportunity to meet some of the
Greenville sky divers ana or take
sky diving instruction Thurs Feb
24, Lobby of Umsfead dorm Free
�o anyone'
SAB
There will be a meeting of the
Student Athletic Board Tuesday
January 25 1983 at 5 30 p m in
Room 212 Jt Mendennan Student
Center Business of importance
� :i be d'scussed icud.ng plans
?or the aoy Pirate Classic basket
bail tournament ,n February
CIRCLE K
C rele K is a club for people who
I are about others and making new
?���ends try Circle K Our meevngs
are on Tuesday evenings in the
Venaennan Student Center, Room
231 at 7:00 p.m
SNOWSKI
REGISTRATION
All persons who plan to su
snowshoe during spring break
shouio register on Tuesday. Feb l
at 4 00 p m in Memorial Gym
Room IDG A V5 deposit will be re
qu.red at this rime Space is
I mited to the first 80 who register
For package prices confact Jo
Saunoers at 757 6000 Memorial
Gym 205
GREENVILLE PEACE
COMMITTEE
The Greenville Peace Commit
tee meets every Friday night at
410 S Elm St GPC consists of peo
pie actively engaged m peace and
lustice work on a local, state, and
naitonai level If you are in
terested in learning more about
the GPC. please can 758 4904 or
come at 4 30 p m (Fridays) for a
dinner meeting
SPEAKER AVAILABLE
Russell Ford will be in Green
ville on February 1. 2 and 3 He's
the first person to be sent to prison
for refusing to register tor the
draft smce the Vietnam war He's
presently out on ban Ford will be
available to speak in ECU classes
on any of the above dr I. He will
be speaking at a public meeting in
Mendenhail's Coffee House at 7 30
PM on Feb 2 For further mfor
mation please call 752 4214 or
758 4904
PUT A LITTLE HEART
IN YOUR SOUL
The twelfth annual walk tor
humanity is coming up this spring
The walk will take place on April
14 beginning at Green Springs
Park Anyone interested m help
ing come to me Hunger Coalition
meetings on Thursday nights at
7 00 p m at the Newman Center.
953 East Tenth Street or call
752 4214
NEWS RELEASE
Sophomores, iuniors and seniors
currently enrolled in a North
Carolina college or North Carolina
residents attending an out of state
college nave until February 11 to
apply tor the Institute of Govern
ment Summer Internship Pro
gram in state government
Twenty three students will be
self fed by an advisory commit
tee to participate in a living
learning internship m North
Carolina state government
directed by the institute of
Government The Institute of
Government interns will work
from May 31 through August 5
Students will work 40 hours each
week In a responsible position m a
state department participate in
evening educational seminars and
be paid approximately S1S0 per
eek
Studens interested in the pro
gram should secure a brochure an
nouncing the program and a State
ot North Carolina application form
from their college or university
placement office or local Job Ser
vice office A brief description of
possible internships are ava'iable
m college placement offices
Studentd interested in the in
stitute ot Government program
should mail an apiication to the in
stitute of Government Knapp
Building 059A The university ot
North Carolina at Chapel HIM,
Chapel Hill North Carolina, 27514
by February 11 1963
Applicants win be accepted
without respect to race sex, color
national origin, religion, or nan
dicap
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our next bi weekly meeting wil
be he'd on Thursday. Jan 27 in the
Menoenhali Stuoen' Center room
244 Members are expected to at
tend We urge persons desiring to
be members of GBP to attend,
however aGPA of30isa
minimum requirement for
membership Come and be a part
DELTAZETA
Delia Ztfa Big Brothers�Be
ready to party Wednesday nighti �
HAPPY HOUR
Delta Zeta Happy Hour at the
Attic with island! Friday,
January 21. 4 00 �30
MEN'S RUGBY
There will be meeting of all
those interested in playing Spring
Rugby Thursday Jan. 27 in
Memorial Gym Room 102. at 5:00
p m Everyone is invited and those
returning players should surely at
tend
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers of Kappa Sigma
would like to congradulate and
welcome the Alpha Upsilon pledge
class into our fraternity The
pledges are Buddy Bundy, Mark
Potto, Mike Sos. Steve Aman.
Greg Johnson, Scott Peroyea.
Dean McCnckard. Mike Geiger
and Paul Peckms so far.
We would also like to remind
everyone that "BAHAMA
MAMA is coming soon!
IPC
Our scheduled meeting tor today
will be held tommorrow in
Mendenhaii 221 at 5 00 Please do
not forget your rosters and dues!
COMMUNICATE IN
SPANISH OR GERMAN
Conversational Spanish, Tues
day. February 15 April 24. 7 8:30
p.m Conversational German.
Tuesday. February 15 April 24,
7 8 30 p m Both courses are open
to both beginners and former
students who want to "brush up"
on the language Contact the Divi
sion ot Continuing Education.
757 4143
UNDERWATER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Tuesday and Thursday.
February 15 24 from 7 10pm Pre
requisite Basic Scuba Certifica
tion from a recognized Scuba oiv
mg association such as NAUI or
PADI This is a course of under
water camera handling and
covers underwater photographic
equipment films, photo techni
ques ano lighting techniques Con
tact Division of Continuing Educe
tion, 757 4143
OFFICIATING
Baseball Softball otficiatmf.
Monday February 21 April 11
from 7 9pm The course Is design
ed to be of mteresl to spectators
players, coaches and school
athletic intramural teachers and
to prepare those interested in iob
opportunities in umpiring Contact
'he Division of Continuing Educa
tion 757 6143
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Servicein the Bloxton House
is ottering the following one hour
sessions to help you prepare your
own resume February 1,
1983 Tuesday 7 00 p m February
: 1983 Wednesday 2 30 p m Those
seniors of graduate students
finishing this year and planning to
register with us are urged to at
tend You may come to the Blox
ton House a any ot the above
times
nsssss - ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
SSSSSSS
Kappa Sigma Pledges
Present
Team
Chugging
Contest
Wed. Jan. 26 9:00 -1:00
Adm. $1.00 45C Cans All Nite
Prizes
1 st $60 or Keg
2nd $30 or Pony keg
3rd $10 or two cases
Sponsored by
Pharo's
Book Barn
Wash House
For Head's Only
Mr. Gattis
Accucopy
420 Pool Club
Overton's Grocery
Famous Pizza
Natilus
U.B.E.
Western Sizzlin
Marathon
H.L.Hodges
West End Laundromat
Record Bar
Pizza inn


Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY!
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning arvd Place
ment Service In the Bloxton House
is offering these one hour sessions
to aid you In developing better In
tervlewing skills for use in your
iob search. January 25.
193 Tuesday 4:00p.m. February
2. 1983 Wednesday 4 00 pm
February 2. 1��3 Wednesday 7 00
p.m. A film and discussion of in
terviewing through the Career
Planning and Placement Service
will be shared.
SPRING BREAK
SKI
Ski Snowshoe West Virginia spr
ing break. Registration and
deposits are due on February I at
4 00 p m in Memorial Gym room
108. Contact Jo Saunders at
757 6000 for information concern
ing the ski packages that art
available
BLOOOMOBILE
The Biology Club will sponsor
the Red Cross Bloodmobile Tues
day ano Wednesday January 25
and 26 Hours of collection will be
10 00 am. to 4:00 p m in
Mendenhaii room 244
ENJOY SINGING
Residence Hall Chorus is star
ting up again for 1963 If you enjoy
singing come iom us Monday night
in room 103 Biology All are
welcome No auditions or ex
penence required
PSI CHI
Psi Chi offer 2 scholarships tor
students whose studies art in
Psychology. Applications can be
picked up at the Psychology office.
Room 105. and at me Psi Chi
Library Last day applications
will be accepted is April l. 1983
NEWSTUDENT
ORIENTATION
PROGRAM
The Office of the Associate Dean
of Student Life, located in
Whichard Building. Room 210. is
now taking applications for the
New Student Orientation Program
held in June and July Applicants
should have a good scholastic
average, and should no' be plann
ing on attending Summer School
Interviews of trie applicants will
oegm around the middle ot March
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta will hold a
meeting on January 27. 1983 at
7 00 p m m tne Mendenhaii Coffee
Shop DR Peter Makuck will giye
a reading from his book of poetry,
Wbrrt wt ��� All members are en
couraged to attend, guests are
welcome
FBI
'700 positions will be available
in the Federal Bureau of In
vestigation later this year, states
Chuck Richards of the North
Carolina Regional office He win
be on campus to talk with majors
from all disciplines interested m
the FBI Three information ses
nons ere being coordinated by the
Career Planning ano Placement
Service and will be held as
follows Jan. 24. 4.00 p m inflswl
IX Accounting Society, jan 25.
10 30 am in Mendenhaii Cot
feehouse All welcome. Jan 25
2 00 p m in Brewster B 301 All
students welcome
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use � separate sheet of paper if
you need more Hoes. There trt 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
7SC per tine or fraction of a line
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lowercase letters.
Rrtara to THE EAST CAROUN1AN
�fflec by 3:9$ Taeatisy before
Wednesday
Name
Address.
CityState.
Nav lines.
.Zip.
.Phone.
� af75� per one S.
.No. insertions.
.enclosed
1 . � � � �. - � � � �� .� m ,
I
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��� ' I ' I 1 i I I 1.1,1 I I, -J I 1 1.1 1 �l 1 I 1 I I I.
SCUBA
Anyone interested in starting a
Scuba Club? Please attend
meetings on January 31 and
February 7 at 5 00 in Room 105 B
Memorial Gym
CAREER CHOICE
Career by Choice Not Chance A
two part mini series offered at no
cost by the University Counceling
Center Series is to be held
February 7 and 8 in Wright Annex
Room 305 from 3 00 to 5 00 No ad
vance registration necessary
AMBASSADORS
This is to remind all Am
bassaoors that our meeting on
Wed . January 2 has been
cancelled and m its place our in
ducatlon Ceremony has been
scheduled This special event will
take place on Thursday, January
27, at 6 45 in Mendenhail's multi
purpose room All Ambassadors
will be enducted and neat dress is
reaquired A reception at the Elbo
Room will follow the ceremony
and all Ambassedors are invited to
attend
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
� ng change of maior week for the
Spring Semester should report to
Mmges Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday. Feb 9, lvSJ
for a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre
requisite for official admittance to
the physical education maior pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the test is available br
calling 757 6497
Any student with a medical con
dition that would conframdicete
participation m the testing pro
gram should contact Dr Israel at
757 6497 Examples would include
heart murmurs, congenital heart
disease, respiratory disease or
significant musculoskeletel pro
blems if you have ano significant
medical conditions please notify
Dr Israel even it you plan to be
tested
RUSH
Gamma Sigma Sigma National
Service Sorority Invites you to
RUSH on January 25 and 26 at 5 30
and 6 00 respectively at
Mendennan Get Involved in your
campus and community. For
more information can 752 8621 or
7588535
NEED A TUTOR
Phi Sigma Pi. National Honor
Fraternity has tutors tor a variety
of General College subiects For
more information, call 752 3072
CO�OP
Representatives from camps
Don Lee, Seafarer, and Cherno
among others are coming to East
Carolina to interview students for
summer jobs They will be at
Mendenhaii. Room 248 on
February 7 Interview appoint
ments must be made at the Coop
ottice. Rawl 313 Phone 757 6979
CO�OP CLUB
There will be a meeting of the
Coop Club on Thursday, January
27. 1983 at 4 00 p m in 313 Rawl
All Co op students and any student
interested in a Cooperative Educa
tion internship should attend
JUNK NEEDED
Are you throwing out any old
furniture, unusual objects, drapes.
etcIf you art. the art school will
pick it up tor you and take it off
your hands free Lamps, chairs,
sofas, stools, anything � does not
have to be in working order (will
be used tor props in art classes)
Call 757 6665 weekdays and ask for
Mr Wes Crawley
COMMITTEES
Applications are still being ac
cepted tor students wishing to
serve on University Committees
for 1982 82 school year Twenty
three 123) students positions are
open Committees with vacancies
art Canvassing & Soliciting on
Campusil). international Studen-
Affairs il). Residence Life (3).
Status of Minorities 12). Status of
Women (3). Student Health Ser
vices (1) Calendar ( Teaching
Effectiveness (2), Continuing
Education (t). Course Drop Ap
peals (I) Credits. (1). General
College (1). Teacher Education
(II. University Libraries (1).
University Curriculum (2) Ap
plications are available a' the
following locations Office of the
Vice Chancellor tor student Life.
204 Whichard, Mendenhaii Stu
dent Center information Desk
SGA Office. Mendennan Student
Center. Office of Intramural
Recreational Services. Memorial
Gym and Residence Hall Oirec
tors' Offices Questions about
University committees ano
memberships may be directed 'o
the Office of me Vice Chancellor
tor Student Life (757 6541)
MARSKTS
SURFNSEA
Winter Sale
All Specially Marked Winter Items
30 off
with Student ID 40 off
Starts Tue Jan. 25 Thru Tue Feb 1
All Women's Bikinis and
bathing suits also arriving
Men s bathing suits also arriving
Sale lasts one week only
- C- ��kC
OIL CHANGE
LUBE AND
FILTER
BUSY
Major Brand Multigrade Oil Up To S Qts.
EXPIRES 13083
� ������� COUPON � tas anan a
! TRANSMISSION
! SERVICE
Includes New Filter
& Fluid Torque Converter
Extra. Most US & Foreign Cars
' EXPIRES 13083
L � - - as - � COUPON
I
! WGOODFYEARl
MaMHaVTIRE CENTERSbMM j
OFFICIAL N.C. INSPECTION STATION
� DOWNTOWN WEST END
m DICKINSON AVE SHOPPING CENTER I
756-9371!
! 7524417
FORGET YOUR CAR!
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ
presents "Prime Time " A weekly
time of fun. fellowship training
and teaching in how to live a vie
torious Christian lire. Thursday 7 9
in Biology building room 103
ft.ft.eV
Escorts are needed for the
Escort Service Anyone Interested
in being an escort please contact
your dorm director If you are a
dorm resident of if you live off
campus contact the SGA office
RESIDENCE
ADVISOR
Applications art now being
taken for Resident Advisor posi
tions in the residence halls Any
student who has at least a 2 2
average, clear ludiclal record
enrolled full time, and has lived r
a residence hail is eligible to app
ly
Information and application
forms may be obtained from any
Residence Director, Area Coor
dinator, or the Residence Lite Of
ftce They should be turned into
the Residence Life Office. 214
Whichard Building
BOOK OF MORMON
En,oy exciting, dynamic m
struction from rhe Boo of S4ormon
Another Tntmmrw of Jnui hru:
which is a non fiction, sacred
nistory of th people of ancient
America from 600 B C to 400 A O
it is a semester long class, tha'
meets in Brewster building, room
203 B every Thursda� night from
6 30 until 8 00 p m There is no
charge, so come ask questions,
ano hear me Gospel as N was
taught by me propne's who lived
m America 2000 years ago'
AMERICAN
ASSOCIATION
OF UNIVERSITY
WOMEN
There will be a meeting of me
branch of American Association of
University women that is organlr
ing in me Greenville area on Tues
day. Jan 25 at 7 30 p m at the
First American Savings Si Loan
community room The program'
will be given by June Parker of
Sheppero Memorial Library
MINI COURSES
Several non credit mini courses
are now being offered by the
Department of University unions
individuals who would like to par
ticipete m a mini course must
register in person at ne
Menoenhali Central Ticket Office
between me hours of to 00 A M
and 100 CM Monaa, "trough
Friday Registration tees will be
accepted through the day prior to
the first class meeting
Each mini course has a mti
imum ano a minimum enrollment
No refunds of course fees win be
maoe after the registration
deadline unless the course is
cancelled
Each registrant must show
hisher ECU ID or drivers license
and ECU Activity Card or
Mendenhaii Student Center
Membership wi'h'ne exception of
a spouse or a guest who must be
registered by 'he parfic pat'ng
card holder
CLOGCIM. T:0f P M -8 30 P M
Mondays � Jan 31. Feb 7 14. 21
28
Instructor Nancr Spamhour
MSC Mul'i Purpose Room Fee
SIC 00
Learn oesic cioggng steps 'c
mus.c tna' makes rex, want �0
move Iff. iust pian nara 88 s
still once you ve 'tamec a few
steps Free strie as we as coupie
dancng yyiit oe augh C'Ogg,ng
a wonoerfj! aerobic exercise anc
a tension release ecensm
Unclog your rr.no ano boo, ano
enioy this folk oence
tALUCRAPHY ' OOP M 9 � P M
Wednesdays � Jan 26. Feb 2. 9
16. 23
nstructor Karen PodaSMM
MSC Room 22' FeetlOOO
S'udents can oe expected t0
come away from IMa course with a
working knowledge 0' t
Chancery italic fre mos" popu'ar
style of writing its appeal s based
on itj usable styie S)tal is grace
personable, and contemporary
Chancery, once mastered will be
the basis on wnicn -o learn me
other styles
For further information can Lin
da Berkend. Crafts ano Recrea
tion Director at 757 6611 exf 260 or
the Central Ticket office at exf
266
SRA
The SRA is navmg a sem
formai Feoruary 26. 1983 Five
dollars a couple See Mouse Coun
Cii vice president for details
The East Carolinian
Srrwrif !e LOrtput LOmrnumt .
urn r 92?
Published every Tuesday a' c
T'o'VJa, durmg te acaoe� I
year ano ever Wednessai aw
.ng tne summer
fr-e Eas' Caro. ar s �- �
t c ai newspaper ct Eas'
Carolina Un.vers 'y Wllll
operated and puOi'Sheo for a"c
by tne s'jden's of Eas' Ca- n
Un.vers �,
Subscription Rate S20yeari
The East Carolinian officer
art located in the Old Soutn
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville N C
PCSrMASTE' Sec �oa'�ss
cnar jes 'ne Eas'C'
Old jOu" Bi 2 "C ECsJ Gree-
v,ne NC 27834
Telephone 757 4)66 634' 6309
SENIOR CLASS
Tne Career Psaaniasj anc p'ece
mer" Serv ce i a se :e
avaabie 8a "vose s'ae-ts whe
are grecua' -g anc ne choose kg
estabish a cede a s r
c 88 m 4 res-e rc �"�-ee e'
ters of reference
The Sen.or C ass OH cers ac
the ECu Amcassaecs b a- fte oe
available or- weonescaF .a"i.a
26.193 iron- '8 X PV kg g
tours of 'he Ca-ee' P ann ng ano
Placemen' Se ce Ml Ufa) � �
House We w ne c -ov �- 5
Seniors Sight- kg jr-ov, , , -i
� acuity anc rtcrr-a' on g,� ac. a
tha' 'S oes gnea 'or .our 5 M 4
sen serv.ee oas'i
This is one of me mos- �s atve
services ofered kg s'jdes ne-e
ar ECU
YDML
voung Hcme Des gner s eague
meets Ja"uarv 25" a' : X - IDe
Veniendingharr -ocm
SOCIAL WORK
To all Social Work Maiors anc
intended maiors. CORSO win
meet January 31. at s 00 m me
Allied Health Bu.lc.no n room 103
NASW
To an Soca Work Ma.ors ana
nfenoed maiors 'he NASW will
mee' January 31. at 4 00 in the
Allied Heaf Bu.idmg n room 103
The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
Weds. Mighty Majors
Thurs. The Chairman of the Board
Fri. The Breeze - The best in Beach
Sat. The Breeze - The best in Beach
Doors open at 6:30
SI off Admission with College I.D.
Bottle of Champagne given to each
50th Customer.
Closed Sundats except for special events
1104 V Memorial Dr
?.cross from (.reenvilte Airport
Pboae "5OOW5 for additional information
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
Jobs
Vmsuai N� tenor
Need a job' I her
seen to be some g
es ope,
tC I I here are
rentlv at least ha
doen high level :
t:ons open :n the !
: ng two
inceilorship
tnships and i
im:erv:t progr I
The re .
Di -
� '
most recent -
' a e chauci
he?d that
Nolan
B PATRJC K n NKII
In pa
view,
' � .
Af-
ro he
COL
w
siat
.
perienct chant .
��
N
her u p
- I -

to be a comm
changed her
� i
na
' ' l
- . .
Nolan
tirst she v.
-eath" ol -
"I av read)
shot, I thoug J
would hate me at
rude '
(hev hated Onngi'v fj
Spanish slang
meani ng N
American.)"
Nolan jJ she j
specifi call)
thought of a i
capitals: p -
L.S. (actualh
MSC Pi
Continued From Pa.
the respoiu
the er.
Student I :
Harciee w
con-
make j.
measure- as �
At preset
dent I n
ed oi e -
t:im. sp�
maior a 11
spec
CO
arts ano art �
During Hai
ministrai
Complete
Ser1
24 hr. I
Jartran Ron:
-1
CouhtI
Fried
2 Veggie;
forJI
Open 11-8-
752-0476 '
Located 7 blocks
'
" If

?
I � ajka
"
I
mm
-r
J





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 25. 1983
.Zip.
Phone.
iiiicition.
.enclosed
r �


'ii


i-J
1

4- �. J1 ! 1i
llfl COURSES
Df to
pi
The Fast Carolinian
v f - tvtr "uesaay ano
h tfvf nQ '? academic
I � ee'v Aearwsaa. nor
� � &4 fTI rner
he East C "a � f he of
"csf.rt � � East
. II . -a Un .es wnM
operated anc publ �"���" � aO
&r the S'u0er�s East Carolina
.es
Subtcriplion Hate i20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Oio South
Building on the campus of ECU
G'een.iile N C
v- - �� address
. . - � n i"
�- ��" � ECU Green
feiephone 7S7 tjM ��t &J09
'PM4�PM
cee "
pi � " P M
SENIOR CLASS
�"e Career p ag a"c Place
en' Ser. ce s a serv ce
a .a a Do "ose s'uoenrs wnc
' jafing and wtw c noose to
' t: s - retftftl as file com
j e'e tti a resjme and three ief
� e'erence
s O" ers and
"�rassaccrs Dian c o
- � Aeanesda. .anuary
.� from � 8 30 pv tc give
� "ie Career P.ann ng and
P scamanf Service in the B'Oi'on
A ne c nost this
s N s" to sno you trie
�� and. " "� rna-on ayaaoie
a' s des gnec tor .our use on a
M - -v,c( DaS'S
s - e of the most va abie
ser. e5 erfc 0 s-joen's nere
YDHL
' eetl i ,ar. r5'r a
�"n "g-a room
Designer's eague
" oc n the
' e�" 260 or
SRA
SOCIAL WORK
To all Social Aork Va,ors and
nlenoed maiors, CORSO will
m�' January 1! �! i OC m ina
AUiec Health Buitamq in room AOS
NASW
" a Sot a Aor� Va.ors and
e"oea majors ne NAS will
-ee- .anuary 3! a' 4 OC in the
A ec �ea �-6- ;omg ,n room 103

LAMO
t & Nightclub
est nightspot & eatery.
Miht Majors
lairman of the Board
re - The best in Beach
Ize - The best in Beach
h open at 6: W
sinn mlhollegr II).
impanni' given '� each
Ihuslomer
I 104 S Mrmnrial i)r
Across from (.reensille irpon
tsenls phunr 757 aSSi for addiiional inliirmalion
V X X X
ids
Located 1 mile post
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
, Wednesday
hursday
CORN
RIMP
is or Baked Potato,
may be substituted
35& extra
Jobs Abound At ECU
By DARRYL BROWN
VuUual NCM tdilor
Need a job? There
seem to be some good
opprotunities open at
ECU. There are cur-
rently at least half a
dozen high level posi-
tions open in the ECU
faculty and administra-
tion including two vice
chancellorships, two
deanships and direc-
tors' positions for two
university programs.
The resignation of
Dr. Robert Maier from
the office of academic
affairs left open the
most recent position
for a vice chancellor to
head that office. Dr.
Angelo Volpe is cur-
rently acting in that
position until a perma-
nent replacement is
chosen.
Dr. Moore, acting
vice chancellor for in-
stitutional planning
and development, is
filling in the other va-
cant vice chancellor's
office until a job search
by the university selects
a permanent employee
to replace Moore.
Jobs searches for
such university posi-
tions are conducted on
the national level,
though current ECU
employees are eligible
for the openings. Also,
persons acting in a
position sometimes
takeover the job per-
manently, as did
Chancellor John
Howell when he was
named acting
chancellor upon the
resignation of Dr.
Thomas Brewer from
that office.
Dean James Bearden
resigned last semester
as the head of the
School of Business,
leaving that deanship
open. He is currently
serving in that position
until a replacement is
selected. The position
of dean is also unfilled
in the School of
Technology, and a
search has been in pro-
gress for that opening.
The university Ualso
looking for a new direc-
tor for Joyner Library,
a position under the
academic affairs office.
Another newly-created
director's position may
be in jeopardy due to
the current tight state
budget, but the univer-
sity is tentatively plann-
ing to hire a half-time
paid director for the
ECU Honors Program,
an area currently head-
ed by its coordinator
without pay.
There are always
searches for various
faculty and staff posi-
tions going on in a large
university at any given
time. Volpe noted,
"With an institution as
large as ours, it is not
unusual" to have
several job openings
throughout the univer-
sity at any given time.
So, if you are star-
ting to get the job
panics with graduation
just around the corner,
you may consider ap-
plying right here at
ECU. You will pro-
bably be up against
some tough competion,
however, so don't
count your paychecks
before they're cashed.
Nolan Discusses Nicaraguan Trip
By PATRICK O'NEILI
suff Untrr
In part I oj this inter-
view. ECU an-
thropology graduate
Kern Nolan discussed
aspects oj her two trips
to the central American
country oj Costa Rica.
Xow she discusses her
side trip to Nicaragua
and how that ex-
perience changed her
life,
Nolan embarked on
her trip to Nicaragua
with great fear and ap-
prehension. Initially
she believed Nicaragua
to be a communist na-
tion, but once there she
changed her opinion,
"it's really a capitalist
nation with a mixture
of both capitalism and
socialism Nolan said.
Nolan said that at
first she was "scared to
death" of going there.
"I was ready to be
shot; J thought they
would hate me and he
rude to me. I thought
they haled Cinngos (a
Spanish slang term
meaning North
American.)"
Nolan said she feared
specifically being
thought of as a
capitalist pig from the
U.S. (actually Nolan is
a Canadian citizen.)
She thought that people
who disliked the U.S.
government would also
dislike her. "I figured
nobody would serve me
in restaurants
"But this (fear) only
lasted for about the
first four hours she
continued, I
discovered that 1 didn't
have to be affraid to be
there
"People were so nice
to me right away that I
knew nothing bad was
going to happen
Nolan said.
Eventually she and
her West German
traveling companion
found their way to the
home of who they
describe, as "a casual
friend of a casual
friend
"The person we were
supposed to meet
wasn't even there, but
they (his family) told us
we could stay with
them as long as we
wanted said Nolan,
"and they didn't even
know us. The son (they
were supposed to meet)
was out of the coun-
try
The family ended up
giving both of the
women a bedroom to
use for a month at no
charge "They didn't
expect us to pay. They
treated us like family,
and we did what we
could
Soon Nolan started
to study some of the
history of Nicaragua
and learned about the
regime of Anastasio
Somoza and his na-
tional guard. after
several months of in-
tensive fighting with
Sandanista revolu-
tionaries, the govern-
ment of somoza was
overthrown. "The
Nicaraguan people had
every right to hate
Somoza and whoever
put him in power �
which was us Nolan
said. "They're (the
Nicaraguan people) ter-
rified of Reagan and of
the people Reagan
represents
According to Nolan,
the Nicaraguan people
only distrusted and
feared the United
States government, but
not U.S. citizens.
"They realize that the
majority of the (U.S.)
people have nothing to
do with the situation
During the course of
her studies, Nolan met
many people with many
different insights into
the situation in
Nicaragua. "The U.S.
was totally against the
new government, and I
wanted to be patriotic
and support my coun-
try's actions Nolan
said. "However, after
being there just one
month, it was obvious
to me that the
Nicaraguan people
have been victimized
repeatedly and are only
now finding a solution
to the bloodshed and
oppression which has
lasted so many years
According to Nolan,
the major problem in
Nicaragua is poverty,
not Communism. She
quoted 1975 statistics
that showed that
Nicaragua had a 22 per-
cent rate of unemploy-
ment with 73.9 percent
of the homes in
Nicaragua falling
below minimum health
and safety standards �
She also noted that the
average life expectancy
was only 49.9 years. "It
was inevitable that peo-
ple would revolt
The new Nicaraguan
government, The San-
dinistan Front of
Naitonal Liberation
was headed by Carlos
Fonseca, who over-
threw the Somoza
dicatorship.
Nolan also claims
that U.S. alienation of
the new Nicaraguan
government is actually
causing the country "to
lean even more toward
the Russian side in
order to get products it
needs
Nolan believes that
similar situations are
developing throughout
central America and
that often U.S. aid �
especially military aid
� is responsible for
many countries em-
bracing Communism
and the deaths of many
innocent people.
"Now, when I hear
about sending arms to a
Latin American coun-
try, I know where they
are going and I know
why Nolan con-
tinued. "I know that
these arms might be us-
ed by people I met
against others I know
MSC President Chosen
Continued From Page 1
the responsibility tor
the expenditure of all
Student Union funds.
Hardee will appoint
committee heads and
make decisions regar-
ding policies and
measures as well.
At present, the Stu-
dent Union is compris-
ed ot eight committees:
film, special events,
major attractions,
special concerts, travel,
coffeehouse, minority
arts and art exhibition.
During Hardee's ad-
ministration all com-
mittee chairpersons will
be required to re-apply
if they wish to remain
in their positions.
The Student Union is
the principal program-
ming organization,
responsible for pro-
viding a balanced pro-
gram of social, recrea-
tional and cultural pro-
grams for the entire
university community.
In one of her first
acts as president
Hardee plans to send
letters to the leaders of
all campus organiza-
tions asking them to
discuss with their
members the work of
the Student Union.
Hardee hopes this ef-
fort will encourage
more students to
become involved in
Student Union commit-
tee work.
Hardee noted that
two of her major goals
in her new post would
be to increase student
involvement in Student
Union committees and
give more publicity to
their programs.
PILOT TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES
FLY NAVY
The Navy presently has several openings
for the nost exciting and challenging
job in the world - NAVY PILOT. If you
qualify, we will guarantee you a seat in
the most prestigious flight school
anywhere. At the completion of training
you will fly the Navy's high performance
aircraft.
Qualifications Are:
Bachelors degree
Less than 28 12 years old
2020 uncorrected vision
Excellent health
U.S. Citizen
If you think you can qualify and would
like to earn a starting salary of
$18,000 with $28,000 in four years,
send a letter of qualifications to:
NCCS NELSON SKINNER
1001 Navtho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
Or call 1-800-662-7231
Complete Automotive
Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jartran Rentals Available
2704 E. 10th St.
7S8 1033
Buck's
Gulf
CouHTRV COOKIMC
Fried Chicken
&
2 Veggies & Bread
for 1.99
Open 11-8 � 7 days a week
752-0476 512 E. 14th St.
Located 2 blocks west ot guy's dorms.
DANCE
The East Carolina Playhouse
THEATRE
McGinnis Theatre
January 27-29, 8:15 p.m.
ECU Students: '2.50 Public: 4.00 Call 757-6390
ADVERTISED
ITEM POliCv
'Ss �? �dvfsd pMCe " e�h A4P s�� �pt� mSSJUSm
PWCESEFFECTTVETHRU WED. Sat Jan 2VAPIN
CrrEMS OFFERED FOR SALE MOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAJL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd. "
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville,N.C.
U.S.D.A.
INSPECTED FRESH
Box-Q-Chicken
39
Limit
Four
lb.
FLORIDA GROWN
SWEET JUICY
A4P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
Chuck Roast
128
lb. I
Bone
In
SAVE 61'
xiSJftfiy-
Temple Oranges
00
sm2js�1
CALIFORNIA
GROWN FIRM
Fresh Broccoli
88c
large
14
size
M
GOOO THRU SAT, JAN. 29 AT A&P
L-J?ltHT.2f!LvrH COUPON AND 7-so order S&A�
CEIE
SUPER SAVER COUPON
PURE CANE
SAVE 60C ON
You Pay Only
A&P Sugar
U�,WV
c
CEB
SUPER SAVER COUPON
REGULAR
SAVE 4t ON
Eight O'clock See
GOOD THRU SAT. JAN. 29 AT A&P.
UmT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 SO ORDER
You Pay Only
159
1-lb
bag
647
SUPER SAVER COUPON
SAVE 27C ON
J
rCEB
rCT
ASSORTED - SOFT PRINT
Northern Tissue
GOOO THRU SAT, JAN. 29 AT AAR
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7.50 ORDER
4 roll
You Pay Only
�8�
SUPER SAVER COUPON
SAVE 20 ON
CLASSIC CO��� - EXTRA THICK A ZESTY
Ragu Spaghetti Sauce
D-s rCEB
You Pay
Only
15'i ox
75C
650
GOOO THRU SAT JAN. � AT AAP
LUST ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER
' I
I I
I I
I I
I I
ii
SUPER SAVER COUPON
;
SAVE 20 ON
THIN SPAGHETTI � VERMfCELLi � REG SPAGHETTI
Mueller Noodles
You Pay
Only
16 oz
pkg.
5
651
GOOO THRU SAT. JAN 29 AT AAP
UMTT OHE WTTH COUPON ANC I SC ORO�R
(ES
SUPER SAVER COUPON
SAVE 20 ON
LUCKY LEAF
TV(Et
Apple
You Pay
Only
'i gal
Juice
149
649
GOOO THRU SAT, JAN. 29 AT AAP
UUrT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 JO ORDER
I

I I
I I
SUPER SAVER COUPON
i
SAVE 10 ON
POST TOAST1ES
Com Flakes
You Pay
Only
12 oz.
pkg.
59c
655
GOOO THRU SAT JAN 29 AT AAP
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON ANO I SC ORDER
SUPER SAVER COUPON
Oil
Water
SAVE 10 ON
STAR KIST
Chunk Light Tuna
79
rCEff
SUPER SAVER COUPON
iV
You Pay
Only
6'oz.
can
GOOD THRU SAT. JAN. 29 AT AAP
uarr one with coupon and 7 so order.
I
I
I
I
i I
I I
,1 Cr
SAVE 20 ON
JIM DANDY
Quick
You Pay
Only
21b
pkg
55C
654
GOOO THRU SAT JAN 29 AT AAP
uarr one with coupon ano 7 so order
SUPER SAVER COUPON
�r
SAVE 10 ON
BUTTER � DEVILS FOOD � LEMON � YELLOW j
Pillsbury Phis Cake Mix I
I
You Pay
Only
18'joz
pkg.
77C
652
GOOO THRU SAT, JAN 2 AT AAP
uarr one with coupon and t so order
r
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

SUPER SAVER COUPON
SAVE 10 ON
READY-TO-SPREAD

Pillsbury Frostings
T5
Fudge
Strawberry
�Vanilla
161 2 OZ.
can
653
GOOO THRU SAT. JAN 29 AT AAP
uarr one with coupon and so order
n
SUPER SAVER COUPON
SAVE 20 ON
AAP FROZEN
Broccoli Spears
49"
r� rCVS
SUPER SAVER COUPON
I
You Pay
Only
10 oz.
pkg.
GOOO THRU SAT JAN. 29 AT AAP
uarr one with coupon and tao order
I
91
660 I
SAVE 10 ON
AAP FROZEN CHOPPED OR
Leaf Spinich
o-
You Pay
Only
10 oz.
P9
279C
GOOO THRU SAT, JAN. IS AT AAP
uarr one with coupon and t so order
SUPER SAVER COUPON
D
SAVE 10 ON
AAP FROZEN
Sliced Strawberries
You Pay
Only
10 oz.
10
69
661
GOOO THRU SAT , JAN 29 AT AAP
uarr one with coupon and 7 so
�I ��

Il
11.
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SAVE 10 ON
y OFF LABEL
��
Ajax Cleanser
1c�? CF 657
GOOD THRU SAT. JAN 29 AT AAP
uarr one with coupon and t so order
You Pay
On
4
A
A





�tjc East (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, dm va�nr
Mike Hughes. Managing tdnor
WAVERL Y MERRITT. flw,�,�; MmM ClNDY PLEASANTS, sport, Ed.tor
Scott Lindley. mm mmw Greg Rideout, �&�
Ali Afrashteh. o�fei v�a�,r Steve Bachner, Emerta emot
Stephanie Grcxjn. cmkmm ihmm Juliana Fahrbach, s(t��or
Clay Thornton. r�-��-u$����� Todd Evans, production mmj�
Januar 25. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Tylenol Crisis
Staging A Worthwhile Comeback
Before last fall, the brand name
Tylenol brought with it connota-
tions of trusted relief from pain and
tension. And undoubtedly, Johnson
& Johnson, the makers of Tylenol,
enjoyed a tremendously favorable
profit margin from the product. But
then came the "Tylenol crisis
Seven Chicago-area persons died as
a direct result of taking cyanide-
laced Extra Strength Tylenol cap-
sules, and scandalous accusations
went virtually rampant.
Subsequently, the McNeil Con-
sumer Products Company (a sub-
sidiary of Johnson & Johnson) took
it upon itself to remove the product
announcements by the FDA on
tamper-resistant packaging.
James E. Burke, chairman of the
board at Johnson & Johnson admits
that the crisis has damaged the
reputation of his organization, but
he also believes the challenges
awaiting Johnson & Johnson are by
no means insurmountable. "It will
take time Burke admits; "it will
take money, and it will be very dif-
ficult. But we consider it a moral
imperative, as well as good
business, to restore Tylenol to its
preeminent position
Granted, the Johnson & Johnson
Company is not "squeaky clean
from consumer shelves, pending its It has its pros and cons, as does any
own comprehensive investigation in operation of its size. Nevertheless, it
has become evident in recent mon-
ths that the makers of Tylenol do
possess a certain sense of commit-
ment, dependence and responsibili-
ty to the American people.
Sworn critics, who, incidentally,
claim Johnson & Johnson over-
reacted to the "scare have and
will undoubtedly continue to find
fault with something incredibly pet-
ty, like Tylenol's new triple safety-
sealed packages, ignoring the fun-
damental need for and purpose of
its addition. The new package
makes it difficult for the elderly to
open, they say.
Thiarleads to but one logical con-
clusion: If the Johnson & Johnson
Company's handling of the Tylenol
crisis constitutes nothing more than
an "overreaction" in the eyes of a
portion of the American public, one
can only hope that overreacting will
soon become the norm for
American businesses.
Consider This
Finally, an answer to the age-old
question about the various speeds of
things:
According to our specialists, the
average sneeze exits the mouth at
100 mph, the average cough at 60
mph. But the slowest and loudest
form of unnatural exhale, the
average belch, moves at a cool 15
mph. Our specialists obtained these
figures by driving an incredibly fast
car alongside several persons, all of
conjunction with that of the Food
and Drug Administration.
And in the meantime, Johnson &
Johnson (which incidentally was
declared blameless in the incidents)
has reintroduced the product with
one alteration: a new triple safety-
seal, tamper-resistant package,
which not only complies with the
FDA's new packaging regulations
but also sets the standard for such.
Since the crisis began in late
September, Johnson & Johnson has
spent an estimated $120 million on
what boils down to public protec-
tion. With virtually no concern
about costs to the company itself,
the McNeil and Johnson & Johnson
companies have complied in prac-
tically every way possible in a
sincere effort to regain the trust of
the American people.
An estimated one million presen-
tations are expected to be made by
the end of the year in an effort to
reassure and reintroduce the pro-
duct to American consumers and
professionals.
Johnson & Johnson executives
and representatives have made
numerous personal appearances and
have made themselves readily
available for interviews and direct
questioning by the news media.
And since the actual crisis,
members of the Corporate Rela-
tions Department of Johnson &
Johnson have visited more than 160
Congressional offices in
Washington to discuss several
mutual concerns, including voicing whom had ingested a visible blue
support for federal criminal legisla- dye, and some of whom had also in-
tion making product tampering a gested a lot of beer. Now you
felony and endorsing public service know.
Proposals Leave Questions Unanswered
Solving Our Economic Ills
By JAY STONE
Often, one's role in contributing to the
public debate on various issues fills one
with tedium. It's as though voicing one's
opinion is almost a worthless exercise. And
yet, no better way of discovering truth has
yet been devised.
It is in this spirit that I address myself to
the article writen in the Jan. 13 issue of
The East Carolinian by Ernest Connor
presenting the views of Patrick O'Neill and
Dennis Kilcoyne on several issues, most
notably the economy.
Although Misters Kilcoyne and O'Neill
are on opposite sides of the ideological
fence, they both present an interesting and
compelling � though uninformed � view
of economics.
Kilcoyne, on the one hand, seems to feel
that if we "stay the course" of high
defense spending and sporadic tax rebates,
the economy will improve, and inflation
will dissipate.
First, it seems obvious that rrigh military
spending is contributing to the federal
deficit, despite large cuts in federal spen-
ding for social programs. Without tax in-
creases to offset this phenomenon, infla-
tion is inevitable. The government, or
rather the Federal Reserve Board, is at-
tempting to combat inflation with high in-
terest rates at the present time; however,
this policy has the effect of contributing to
the recession at hand by stifling borrowing
and, hence, economic growth.
The Federal Reserve Board, moreover,
cannot simply lower the prime lending rate
arbitrarily for any period of time because
of the global economic crisis that has left
many countries (Mexico, Brazil and
Poland, e.g.) owing U.S. banks billions of
dollars. The banks need a sustained period
of high return on their investments so they
can regain their economic stability.
Tax cuts will not stimulate the economy
sufficiently because of the combined fac-
tors of consumer skittishness about new in-
vestments due to high unemployment and
the overall dismal economic picture, cor-
porate capital flight out of the United
States and to less-developed countries
where labor and land are inexpensive, and
to competition from foreign products.
Unemployment and small business
bankruptcy suits are at their highest levels
since the Depression. One third of all in-
dustrial capacity in the country is standing
idle, and some of the banks in New York
are talking about the possibility of
economic collapse if Brazil fails to pay
back its loans.
Clearly, staying the course spells
disaster.
Mr. O'Neill, on the other hand, seems to
feel that merely by diverting public funds
from the military to a federally sponsored
public works program, we will be able to
resuscitate our dying economy. This view
contains a bit more of the truth in it than
docs Mr. Kilcoyne's. Nevertheless, it is in-
sufficiently developed.
O'Neill is correct that military spending
does, indeed, contribute to unemployment
and inflation. The same amount of money
spent almost anywhere else would create
significantly more jobs. And since the
military budget goes largely toward pro-
ducing a non-consumer good, consequent-
ly, the federal deficit increases, and we get
inflation.
Yet, merely creating a public works pro-
gram will not significantly improve the
economy. For instance, if workers improve
highways, bridges and railroads, no pro-
duct is being produced. No service is being
rendered to bring a return on the initial in-
vestment. Although workers will have
more money to spend (more than
unemployment compensation, which
would help businesses to a small extent), a
public works program would not generate
economic growth, and the government
deficit would remain constant.
Certainly, in a period ot severe
economic recession, a public works pro-
gram is necessary to ease the impact ol
hard times on the poor, but, by and large,
it is desirable for the private sector to pro-
vide jobs, since it is generally more effi-
cient and able to generate revenue.
Moreover, the tactic of shifting military
expenditures into a massive public works
program would not address the primary
issues which are causing the present
economic crisis in the United States, a
global recession and the transition to a
post-industrial society; also, dependence
on fossil fuel imports plays a small part.
Therefore, reducing military spending is
a vital part in a sound plan for economic
recovery, since it will generate needed
revenue for investment, but putting all of
this money into a public works program
will not save us. In addition, strategic
nuclear weapons and their delivery systems
account for only 15 percent of military ex-
penditures. So. eliminating this cost could
not generate the revenue needed to give
jobs to all the unemployed.
Due to limitations on space. I cannot
elaborate on the kind of programs that
should be implemented to bring us out of
the current crisis. 1 will simply reter
readers to Lester C. Thurow's The Zero
Sum Society and Derek Shearer and Mar-
tin Carnoy's Economic Democracy as well
as Barry Bluestone and Bennet Harrison's
The Deindustrialization oj America for a
plan that will work. In addition, perhaps I
can address myself to solutions at a later
date.
Abortion Issue Exemplifies Ignorance
By PAT O'NEILL
Saturday was "Right to Life" day, and
as has happened in past years, thousands
of people converged on Washington,
D.C for the annual "March for Life" to
protest abortion and to lobby their Con-
gressional delegates to support a constitu-
Colloquial Carolinians: Accents, Mannerisms
Enough To Make Any Outsider Get 'Eeyul'
Not really being from 'round these
parts, I get a big kick out of the "Down
East" accent. I don't know what it is, but I
find myself somehow fascinated with
North Carolina's unique language and
culture.
But it sure takes a while to get used to it.
Hell, up until last year, I'd always thought
the word "ill" (pronounced, of course,
"eeyul") referred to the state or condition
of having a fever, the flu, or maybe herpes.
But not around here. Unlike people all
over the world, folks around here who
have the flu are said to be "seeick not ill.
Ailments can't make a person "eeyul
Only things like roommates, teachers, fat
people and scratched Slim Whitman
albums can make a North Carolinian
"eeyul
Verbal mannerisms also play a major
role in "Down East" communication. You
know, it's like some people 'round here,
you know urn they cain't, you know,
even, uh complete an entar saintence
you know, without um, some sort of
you know, like verbal um, main-
nerism. You know? And like, um it's
real hard, you know, like trying to um,
understand 'em sometimes. I don't know,
you know; it's, you know like,
Mike Hughes
Just The M ay It Is
frustratin Like sometimes, uh you
cain't, you know, even understand 'em.
You know what I mean?
People around here don't say hello to
one another either. In fact, it's been my ex-
perience that only two greetings are accep-
table. So, I guess if you can't say "Hey,
man or "What's up, Elmo?" there's no
use even opening your mouth. Lord
knows, you don't want 'em t'git "eeyul"
at yuh.
Needless to say, all this confusion has
given me an incredibly intelligent idea.
Thus, I have begun work on my next over-
whelming yet brilliant task: the first North
CarolinaEnglish dictionary, "complete
with spailin puncturation, grayammer,
'how t'say its' and word meanin's
Unfortunately, I've already run into a
few problems namely, definitions and
syllabication: Take the word "hail for
example. Now, in English, hail is either an
ice-ball or an exclamation of salutation or
greeting. You know, like, "Hail, hail, the
gang's all here or "It's hailin' out,
maw
In North Carolina, on the other hand,
"hail" has several meanings and uses
(depending, of course, on word choice and
emphasis) and is frequently used in ex-
clamations, such as "What the hail?" or
"It's rainin' like hail, maw
And whereas the standard American dic-
tionary bequeaths but one syllable to the
word, North Carolinians pronounce it with
two sometimes three � e.g "Hayull,
maw, I done run outta Rayud-Mayun agin.
How's 'bout you rollin' me up a
cigarayette, so's I kin watch the
bawlgame?" I mean to tell you, this is a
major undertaking.
But oh wail, I don' mind. I figger
somebody's gotta learn you fokes how
t'tawk an' spail rite.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is an
evangelist's apprentice from Mount Sinus,
N.C where he plays the autoharp, zither
and washtub base in a local rock band.
tional amendment making abortion illegal.
Jan. 22 was the 10th anniversary of the
1973 Supreme Court decision in Rowe v.
Wade, which gave "free choice" on the
abortion question to women. Anti-
abortionists claim that since that
monumental decision, more than 10
million babies have been "killed" by abor-
tion in the U.S.
Whether you happen to agree or
disagree with the high Court's summation
isn't really the issue. There's really no such
thing as a pro-abortionist. People are
either anti-abortion or pro-choice. And
most people would prefer not to be con-
fronted with the problem. Abortion is
nobody's favorite subject.
From my perspective, being a male, I
just don't feel like I can stand in judgment
of a woman who decides to get an abor-
tion. It's her decision.
The strongest proponents of both sides
each claim to be pro-life. Those opposed to
abortion speak of the "innocent" life of
the unborn, while pro-choicers mention
the life of a mother, pregnant with an un-
wanted child. Those for choice also speak
of the potentially miserable life for the
child who is brought into the world un-
wanted and unloved.
But before I go on further, I'd like to
make it clear that this editorial comment is
not about abortion per se, but rather life
itself. When we as a human race begin to
see the value of all human life � not only
aborted human life � then we'll be on the
right track.
First of all, I am forced to question the
anti-abortionists on several points. In my
opinion, all life is innocent, not just the
unborn. I also wonder how it has ever hap-
pened that people opposed to abortion cor-
nered the market on the term "pro-life
Pro-life is a pretty broad term. When I
think of it, I think of many things, like
capital punishment, hunger, poverty,
war not only abortion.
It also really bothers me that people who
oppose abortion can turn around and give
their political support to the likes ot Presi-
dent Reagan and Jesse Helms � only
because they're opposed to abortion. What
about their other positions on life issues?
True, in the last 10 years perhaps 10
million abortions have been carried out.
but in terms of starvation on our planet,
the abortion issue pales. Every year, close
to 20 million people die as a direct result of
a lack of food. Approximately three
quarters of these starvation deaths are
children. Aren't they innocent too?
In Central America, thousands of peo-
ple must face the double death threat of
starvation and murder. Continued U.S.
military aid to countries such as El
Salvador and Guatemala is used only to
terrorize and kill innocent people. These
deadly policies are both strongly endorsed
by Reagan and Helms. Is that pro-life?
Often, we hear comments from other
leaders about fighting a nuclear war.
Words like "limited, protracted" and
"winable" are not unusual when they're
discussing nuclear war � a war that would
probably kill millions of civilians as well as
military personnel. Aren't civilians inno-
cent?
Personally, 1 find it very hard to
publically demonstrate for the pre-choice
position. Abortion has become too easy,
too acceptable. It has been reduced to
nothing more than another means of birth
control. It's a tragedy.
On the other hand, I feel that the posi-
tion of these so-called "right-to-lifers"
(those only opposed to abortion) is even
more tragic. Because they are such a strong
lobbying group, they may, in fact, make
abortion illegal again. But in the process,
millions of other innocent people will die
because of the policies being supported by
anti-abortion politicians. Of course, we
could have a nuclear war. Then abortion
really wouldn't matter anyway.
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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, omwiKKf
Mlkfc HUGHES, Managing tttiior
Waveriy Merritt, o,rrctoroi - r - �. Cindy Pleasants, ytinew.
Scott Lindley. ��� mn� Greg Rideout, ,��,��
ALI AFRASHTEH. Crea Managrr STEVE BACHNER, tnltrtammenl �duor
Stephanie Groon. cm irmun Juliana Fahrbach, n,w,��w
Clay Thornton, m&������ Todd Evans, produci.cn Onager
Januar 25. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Tylenol Crisis
Staging A Worthwhile Comeback
Before last fall, the brand name
Tylenol brought with it connota-
tions of trusted relief from pain and
tension. And undoubtedly, Johnson
& Johnson, the makers of Tylenol,
enjoyed a tremendously favorable
profit margin from the product. But
then came the "Tylenol crisis
Seven Chicago-area persons died as
a direct result of taking cyanide-
laced Extra Strength Tylenol cap-
sules, and scandalous accusations
went virtually rampant.
Subsequently, the McNeil Con-
sumer Products Company (a sub-
sidiary of Johnson & Johnson) took
it upon itself to remove the product
announcements by the FDA on
tamper-resistant packaging.
James E. Burke, chairman of the
board at Johnson & Johnson admits
that the crisis has damaged the
reputation of his organization, but
he also believes the challenges
awaiting Johnson & Johnson are by
no means insurmountable. "It will
take time Burke admits; "it will
take money, and it will be very dif-
ficult. But we consider it a moral
imperative, as well as good
business, to restore Tylenol to its
preeminent position
Granted, the Johnson & Johnson
Company is not "squeaky clean
from consumer shelves, pending its It has its pros and cons, as does any
own comprehensive investigation in operation of its size. Nevertheless, it
conjunction with that of the Food
and Drug Administration.
And in the meantime, Johnson &
Johnson (which incidentally was
declared blameless in the incidents)
has reintroduced the product with
one alteration: a new triple safety-
seal, tamper-resistant package,
which not only complies with the
FDA's new packaging regulations
but also sets the standard for such.
Since the crisis began in late
September, Johnson & Johnson has
spent an estimated $120 million on
what boils down to public protec-
tion. With virtually no concern
about costs to the company itself,
the McNeil and Johnson & Johnson
companies have complied in prac-
tically every way possible in a
sincere effort to regain the trust of
the American people.
An estimated one million presen-
tations are expected to be made by
the end of the year in an effort to
reassure and reintroduce the pro-
duct to American consumers and
professionals.
Johnson & Johnson executives
and representatives have made
has become evident in recent mon-
ths that the makers of Tylenol do
possess a certain sense of commit-
ment, dependence and responsibili-
ty to the American people.
Sworn critics, who, incidentally,
claim Johnson & Johnson over-
reacted to the "scare have and
will undoubtedly continue to find
fault with something incredibly pet-
ty, like Tylenol's new triple safety-
sealed packages, ignoring the fun-
damental need for and purpose of
its addition. The new package
makes it difficult for the elderly to
open, they say.
Thisrleads to but one logical con-
clusion: If the Johnson & Johnson
Company's handling of the Tylenol
crisis constitutes nothing more than
an "overreaction" in the eyes of a
portion of the American public, one
can only hope that overreacting will
soon become the norm for
American businesses.
Consider This
Finally, an answer to the age-old
question about the various speeds of
numerous personal appearances and things:
have made themselves readily
available for interviews and direct
questioning by the news media.
And since the actual crisis,
members of the Corporate Rela-
tions Department of Johnson &
Johnson have visited more than 160
Congressional offices in
Washington to discuss several
According to our specialists, the
average sneeze exits the mouth at
100 mph, the average cough at 60
mph. But the slowest and loudest
form of unnatural exhale, the
average belch, moves at a cool 15
mph. Our specialists obtained these
figures by driving an incredibly fast
car alongside several persons, all of
mutual concerns, including voicing whom had ingested a visible blue
support for federal criminal legisla- dye, and some of whom had also in-
tion making product tampering a gested a lot of beer. Now you
felony and endorsing public service know.
Proposals Leave Questions Unanswered
Solving Our Economic Ills
By JAY STONE
Often, one's role in contributing to the
public debate on various issues fills one
with tedium. It's as though voicing one's
opinion is almost a worthless exercise. And
yet, no better way of discovering truth has
yet been devised.
It is in this spirit that I address myself to
the article writen in the Jan. 13 issue of
The East Carolinian by Ernest Connor
presenting the views of Patrick O'Neill and
Dennis Kilcoyne on several issues, most
notably the economy.
Although Misters Kilcoyne and O'Neill
are on opposite sides of the ideological
fence, they both present an interesting and
compelling � though uninformed � view
of economics.
Kilcoyne, on the one hand, seems to feel
that if we "stay the course" of high
defense spending and sporadic tax rebates,
the economy will improve, and inflation
will dissipate.
First, it seems obvious that high military
spending is contributing to the federal
deficit, despite large cuts in federal spen-
ding for social programs. Without tax in-
creases to offset this phenomenon, infla-
tion is inevitable. The government, or
rather the Federal Reserve Board, is at-
tempting to combat inflation with high in-
terest rates at the present time; however,
this policy has the effect of contributing to
the recession at hand by stifling borrowing
and, hence, economic growth.
The Federal Reserve Board, moreover,
cannot simply lower the prime lending rate
arbitrarily for any period of time because
of the global economic crisis that has left
many countries (Mexico, Brazil and
Poland, e.g.) owing U.S. banks billions of
dollars. The banks need a sustained period
of high return on their investments so they
can regain their economic stability.
Tax cuts will not stimulate the economy
sufficiently because of the combined fac-
tors of consumer skittishness about new in-
vestments due to high unemployment and
the overall dismal economic picture, cor
poratc capital flight out of the United
States and to less-developed countries
where labor and land are inexpensive, and
to competition from foreign products.
Unemployment and small business
bankruptcy suits are at their highest levels
since the Depression. One third of all in-
dustrial capacity in the country is standing
idle, and some of the banks in New York
are talking about the possibility of
economic collapse if Brazil fails to pay
back its loans.
Clearly, staying the course spells
disaster.
Mr. O'Neill, on the other hand, seems to
feel that merely by diverting public funds
from the military to a federally sponsored
public works program, we will be able to
resuscitate our dying economy. This view
contains a bit more of the truth in it than
does Mr. Kilcoyne's. Nevertheless, it is in-
sufficiently developed.
O'Neill is correct that military spending
does, indeed, contribute to unemployment
and inflation. The same amount of money
spent almost anywhere else would create
significantly more jobs. And since the
military budget goes largely toward pro-
ducing a non-consumer good, consequent-
ly, the federal deficit increases, and we get
inflation.
Yet, merely creating a public works pro-
gram will not significantly improve the
economy. For instance, if workers improve
highways, bridges and railroads, no pro-
duct is being produced. No service is being
rendered to bring a return on the initial in-
vestment. Although workers will have
more money to spend (more than
unemployment compensation, which
would help businesses to a small extent�. a
public works program would not generate
economic growth, and the government
deficit would remain constant.
Certainly, in a period ot severe
economic recession, a public work pro-
gram is necessary to ease the impact of
hard times on the poor, but, by and large,
it is desirable for the private sector to pro-
vide jobs, since it is generally more effi-
cient and able to generate revenue
Moreover, the tactic of shifting militarv
expenditures into a massive public works
program would not address the pnmarv
issues which are causing the present
economic crisis in the United States: a
global recession and the transition to a
post-industrial society; also, dependence
on fossil fuel imports plays a small part.
Therefore, reducing military spending is
a vital pan in a sound plan for economic
recovery, since it will generate needed
revenue for investment, but putting all of
this money into a public works program
will not save us. In addition, strategic
nuclear weapons and their dehverv sstems
account for only 15 percent of military ex-
penditures. So, eliminating this cost could
not generate the revenue needed to give
jobs to all the unemployed.
Due to limitations on space. I cannot
elaborate on the kind of program that
should be implemented to bring us out of
the current crisis. 1 will simplv reter
readers to Lester C. Thurow's The Zero
Sum Society and Derek Shearer and Mar
tin Carnoy's Economic Democracy as well
as Barry Bluestone and Bennet Harrison's
The Deindust realization of America for a
plan that will work. In addition, perhaps I
can address myself to solutions at a later
date.
Abortion Issue Exemplifies Ignorance
By PAT O'NEILL
Saturday was "Right to Life" day, and
as has happened in past years, thousands
of people converged on Washington,
D.C for the annual "March for Life" to
protest abortion and to lobby their Con-
gressional delegates to support a constitu-
Colloquial Carolinians: Accents, Mannerisms
Enough To Make Any Outsider Get 'Eeyul'
Not really being from 'round these
parts, 1 get a big kick out of the "Down
East" accent. I don't know what it is, but I
find myself somehow fascinated with
North Carolina's unique language and
culture.
But it sure takes a while to get used to it.
Hell, up until last year, I'd always thought
the word "ill" (pronounced, of course,
"eeyul") referred to the state or condition
of having a fever, the flu, or maybe herpes.
But not around here. Unlike people all
over the world, folks around here who
have the flu are said to be "seeick not ill.
Ailments can't make a person "eeyul
Only things like roommates, teachers, fat
people and scratched Slim Whitman
albums can make a North Carolinian
"eeyul
Verbal mannerisms also play a major
role in "Down East" communication. You
know, it's like some people 'round here,
you know urn they cain't, you know,
even, uh complete an entar saintence
you know, without um, some sort of
you know, like verbal um, main-
nerism. You know? And like, um it's
real hard, you know, like trying to um,
understand 'em sometimes. I don't know,
you know; it's, you know like,
Mike Hughes
Jusi The Hay It Is
frustratin Like sometimes, uh you
cain't, you know, even understand 'em.
You know what I mean?
People around here don't say hello to
one another either. In fact, it's been my ex-
perience that only two greetings are accep-
table. So, I guess if you can't say "Hey,
man or "What's up, Elmo?" there's no
use even opening your mouth. Lord
knows, you don't want 'em t'git "eeyul"
at yuh.
Needless to say, all this confusion has
given me an incredibly intelligent idea.
Thus, I have begun work on my next over-
whelming yet brilliant task: the first North
CarolinaEnglish dictionary, "complete
with spailin puncturation, grayammer,
'how t'say its' and word meanin's
Unfortunately, I've already run into a
few problems namely, definitions and
syllabication: Take the word "hail for
example. Now, in English, hail is either an
ice-ball or an exclamation of salutation or
greeting. You know, like, "Hail, hail, the
gang's all here or "It's hailin' out,
maw
In North Carolina, on the other hand,
"hail" has several meanings and uses
(depending, of course, on word choice and
emphasis) and is frequently used in ex-
clamations, such as "What the hail?" or
"It's rainin' like hail, maw
And whereas the standard American dic-
tionary bequeaths but one syllable to the
word, North Carolinians pronounce it with
two sometimes three � e.g "Hayull,
maw, I done run outta Rayud-Mayun agin.
How's 'bout you rollin' me up a
cigarayette, so's I kin watch the
bawlgame?" I mean to tell you, this is a
major undertaking.
But oh wail, I don' mind. I figger
somebody's gotta learn you fokes how
t'tawk an' spail rite.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is an
evangelist's apprentice from Mount Sinus,
N.C where he plays the autoharp, zither
and washtub base in a local rock band.
tional amendment making abortion illegal.
Jan. 22 was the 10th anniversary of the
1973 Supreme Court decision in Rowe v.
Wade, which gave "free choice" on the
abortion question to women. Anti-
abortionists claim that since that
monumental decision, more than 10
million babies hi � been "killed" by abor-
tion in the U.S.
Whether you happen to agree or
disagree with the high Court's summation
isn't really the issue. There's really no such
thing as a pro-abortionist. People are
either anti-abortion or pro-choice. And
most people would prefer not to be con-
fronted with the problem. Abortion is
nobody's favorite subject.
From my perspective, being a male, I
just don't feel like I can stand in judgment
of a woman who decides to get an abor-
tion. It's her decision.
The strongest proponents of both sides
each claim to be pro-life. Those opposed to
abortion speak of the "innocent" life of
the unborn, while pro-choicers mention
the life of a mother, pregnant with an un-
wanted child. Those for choice also speak
of the potentially miserable life for the
child who is brought into the world un-
wanted and unloved.
But before I go on further, I'd like to
make it clear that this editorial comment is
not about abortion per se, but rather life
itself. When we as a human race begin to
see the value of all human life � not only
aborted human life � then we'll be on the
right track.
First of all, 1 am forced to question the
anti-abortionists on several points. In my
opinion, all life is innocent, not just the
unborn. I also wonder how it has ever hap-
pened that people opposed to abortion cor-
nered the market on the term "pro-life
Pro-life is a pretty broad term. When I
think of it, I think of many things, like
capital punishment, hunger, poverty,
war not only abortion.
It also really bothers me that people who
oppose abortion can turn around and give
their political support to the likes of Presi-
dent Reagan and Jesse Helms � onlv
because they're opposed to abortion. What
about their other positions on life issues?
True, in the last 10 years perhaps 10
million abortions have been carried out.
but in terms of starvation on our planet,
the abortion issue pales. Even, vear. close
to 20 million people die as a direct result of
a lack of food. Approximately three
quarters of these starvation deaths are
children. Aren't they innocent too?
In Central America, thousands of peo-
ple must face the double death threat of
starvation and murder. Continued U.S.
military aid to countries such as El
Salvador and Guatemala is used only to
terrorize and kill innocent people. These
deadly policies are both strongly endorsed
by Reagan and Helms. Is that pro-life?
Often, we hear comments from other
leaders about fighting a nuclear war.
Words like "limited, protracted" and
"winable" are not unusual when they're
discussing nuclear war � a war that would
probably kill millions of civilians as well as
military personnel. Aren't civilians inno-
cent?
Personally, I find it very hard to
publically demonstrate for the pre-choice
position. Abortion has become too easy,
too acceptable. It has been reduced to
nothing more than another means of birth
control. It's a tragedy.
On the other hand, I feel that the posi-
tion of thete so-called "right-to-lifers"
(those only opposed to abortion) is even
more tragic. Because they arc such a strong
lobbying group, they may, in fact, make
abortion illegal again. But in the process,
millions of other innocent people will die
because of the policies being supported by
anti-abortion politicians. Of course, we
could have a nuclear war. Then abortion
really wouldn't matter anyway.

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANLARY25. 198?
FORM MY
RE-ELECTION '
COMMITTEE
�111
n ic Ills
mone to spend (more than
iloyment compensation, which
nesses to a small extent), a
ks program would not generate
� growth, and the government
a tld remain constant
ainly, in a period of severe
Wnic recession, a public works pro-
necessar to ease the impact of
j mes on the poor, but, b and large,
t able tor the pmale sector to pro-
vince it generally more effi-
� i generate revenue.
�reover, the tactic ot shitting military
ji .res into a massie public works
not address the primary
h are causing the present
in the I nited States: a
recession and the transition to a
dustrial society; also, dependence
I fuel imports plays a small part.
�erefore, reducing military spending is
tal part in a sound plan tor economic
ivcTy. smce it w generate needed
cnue tor investment, but putting all of
money into a public works program
r save us !n addition, strategic
( weapons and their deliverv sstems
� - nly 15 percent of military e-
ciituro So, eliminating this cost could
gent te revenue needed to give
� c unemploved.
imitations on space. 1 cannot
iorate on the kind ot programs that
I be implemented to bring us out of
rent crisis. 1 will simply refer
ester Thurow"s The Zero
j Society and Derek Shearer and Mar-
It arnoy - Economic Democracy as well
Jarrv Bluestone and Bennet Harrison's
Deindusirialization of America tor a
t that will work. In addition, perhaps I
address mvselt to solutions at a later
le
Ignorance
also really bothers me that people who
pose abortion can turn around and give
:ir political support to the likes ot Presi-
lt Reagan and Jesse Helms � onlv
;ause they're opposed to abortion. What
lout their other positions on life issues?
Ilrue. in the last 10 vears perhaps 10
flhon abortions have been carried out.
It in terms ot starvation on our planet.
e abortion issue pales. Ever ear, close
20 million people die as a direct result of
lack of food. Approximately three
tarters ot these starvation deaths are
iildren Aren't they innocent too?
In Centra! America, thousands of peo-
je must ta:e the double death threat of
lar-ation and murder. Continued U.S.
lihtary aid to countries such as El
iivador and Guatemala is used only to
Jrronze and kill innocent people. These
radly policies are both strongly endorsed
y Reagan and Helms. Is that pro-life?
Often, we hear comments from other
aders about fighting a nuclear war.
'ords like "limited, protracted" and
jwinable" are not unjsual when they're
jiscussing nuclear war � a war that would
Irobably kill millions of civilians as well as
ulitary personnel. Aren't civilians inno-
lent?
Personally. I find it very hard to
bublically demonstrate for the pre-choice
kosition. Abortion has become too easy,
oo acceptable. It has been reduced to
�thing more than another means of birth
Control. lt'c a tragedy.
On the other hand, I feel that the posi-
tion of these so-called "right-to-lifers"
(those only opposed to abortion) is even
lore tragic. Because they are such a strong
chbying group, they may, in fact, make
iDortion illegal again. But in the process,
illions of other innocent people will die
-cause of the policies being supported by
iti-abortion politicians. Of course, we
:ould have a nuclear war. Then abortion
really wouldn't matter anyway.
ECU Students Generous With 'Gift Of Life'
ECU N�v�j Bureau
Hospital patients
needing blood are get-
ting it, thanks in part to
the generosity of ECU
students who supply
nearly half of the total
amount of blood con-
tributed to the Red
Cross in Pitt County.
"We rely heavily on
the students at ECU (to
fill quotas for the coun-
ty) says Ruth Taylor,
executive secretary for
the Pitt County chapter
of the American Red
Cross.
"The attitude of the
students towards com-
Local Students Arrested
At Washington Prostest
Two East Carolina
students, Suzanne Dar-
win and Glenn
Maughan, and East
Carolinian writer
Patrick O'Neill were
arrested outside the
U.S. State Department
in Washington, D.C
Monday morning.
Darwin, Maughan
and O'Neill were charg-
ed with obstructing a
public entrance and fin-
ed $50 each. A total of
180 persons were ar-
rested in the demonsra-
tion.
Each of the persons
arrested was wearing
the name of a person
allegedly murdered or
missing in El Salvador,
Guatemala, Honduras
or Nicaragua.
Other ECU students
were also present at the
demonstration. They
were Mary Ryder, Jay
Stone and Ray Hud-
son. They were part of
a total group of 350 to
400 protestors, of
which approximately
50 were from North
Carolina. Among those
North Carolinians pre-
sent was the Rev.
Henry Atkins from
Greensboro. He had
spent time in refugee
camps in El Salvador.
CTSPES, the Com-
mittee in Solidarity
with the People of El
Salvador, organized the
demonstration. In a
statement on the
reasons for the
demonstration,
CTSPES said, "While
Reagan presents this
facade of concern for
human rights to North
America, the people of
Central American see a
very different face of
U.S. policy � genocide
in Guatemala, not-so-
covcrt war in
Nicaragua, intensive
militarization of Hon-
duras, scorched-earth
counter-insurgency in
El Salvador
ing in and giving a pint
of blood is just tremen-
dous she said.
In the 1981-1982
year, 3,700 pints of
blood were donated in
the county. Of that
amount nearly 1,800
pints wre given during
drives conducted on the
ECU campus.
The county's goal for
1982-1983 is 4,400 pints
with a total of seven
visits planned for the
ECU campus. The next
campus visit by Red
Cross workers and
volunteers is scheduled
for Jan. 25-26 in
Mendenhall Student
Center. Taylor says
more than 250 pints are
needed.
An ECU-sponsored
blood drive is a
cooperative effort in-
volving both campus
and community
organizations, accor-
ding to Dr. Donald
Bailey, ECU's dean of
the General College
and the campus blood
drive coordinator.
He noted that
maintenance workers
begin early on the
blood drive days help-
ing to set up tables and
equipment at the sites
where blood is given
Later, campus security
moves in to insure that
there is adequate park-
ing for those coming to
give blood.
Another important
group, says Bailey, is
the Greenville Service
League. The league is a
volunteer organization
that assists the Red
Cross in registering
donors. They also pro-
vide refreshments such
as sandwiches and
juices to those giving
blood.
Departments and
clubs on campus spon-
sor the individual blood
drives. It is their par-
ticipation that con-
tributes much to the
success of the drive,
says Bailey, as they are
directly involved with
promoting the event on
campus and also assist
as volunteer workers.
"The Air Force
ROTC has sponsored
many of the major
blood drives for about
as long as 1 can
remember he said.
Bailey said the big-
gest drive came a few
years ago when the
AFROTC collected
nearly 1,000 pints of
blood in three days.
That blood drive was
held in Wright
Auditorium.
This year the
AFROTC sponsored
the blood drive in the
fall. The ECU Biology
Club will sponsor the
Red Cross visit on Jan.
25-26, and a third ma-
jor drive will be held
later in the spr-
ing. Dormitories in the
residential areas of
campus are also being
used as sites to attract
blood donors. ECU's
goal for the year is
2,200 pints.
"The blood drives at
ECU involve a total
campus commitment
and it couldn't be done
without this commit-
ment Bailey said.
Deborah Eaves. a
consultant for
Tidewater Blood Ser-
vice, a collection and
distribution center in
Greenville, says the
blood collected during
a blood drive is brought
back to the center in
Greenville to be
separated into its
various components.
The blood is then car-
ried to Norfolk where it
is typed and tested and
finally returned to
Greenville to be
distributed to hospitals
in Eastern North
Carolina. Pitt
Memorial is the
region's biggest user.
"The type most
needed is "O" and
"B specifically "O"
negative Eaves said,
explaining that "O"
negative is a universal
donor. It is always in
demand for treating ac-
cident victims in cases
where blood must be
administered quickly.
Donors with the "O"
negative type comprise
about six percent of the
population.
"The months of
December, January,
July and August are the
months when there is
usually a shortage of
blood. These are the
months when people
usually get colds and
other illnesses she
said.
"The students at
ECU play a most im-
portant role in supply-
ing the blood that is
needed in Pitt Counts
and throughout this
region. We count on
them for their help and
they always come
through for us Eaves
said.
State Rep. Bundy Dies In Raleigh
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff W mrr
Pitt County State
Rep. Sam Bundv was
buried Friday. Bundv.
who was recently re-
elected to the State
House for the sixth
time, died of a heart at-
tack suffered while
eating breakfast in a
Raleigh hotel. He was
76 years old.
Bundy. a resident of
Farmvilie. was current-
ly serving as a member
of the Advisory Budget
Commission. A retired
school teacher and ad-
ministrator. Bundy also
sat on a study commis-
sion for state textbooks
And on the commission
for the teacheTS and
state employees retire-
ment system.
"We were together a
long time said Bun-
dy's colleague in the
State House Rep. Ed
Warren. "He was like a
father to me. and I'll
miss him immensely
Warren told The
East Carolinian that
Bundy was a "fine
Christian" and
"indeed a leader in our
state as well as a
respected legislator. He
brought happiness to
those he associated
with through the
years
Warren said Bundy
and he worked very
closelv not only in the
legislature, but also
during their years
together in Pitt Countv
education. Both were
school principals at the
same time. "His con-
cern for the welfare of
others will always be
remembered by
many Warren said.
"He has been a great
asset to me in the
General Asembly and
in my district
Bundy spent over 50
years of his life work-
ing in public sevice. He
retired from his school
administrator post in
1970 when he first ran
for the NC State
House. He had also
served on the board of
trustees of Mount Olive
College for the last ten
years.
Bundy is survived by
his wife, Mrs. Bettie
Spencer Bundy and his
two sons. James Henry
Bundy and Sam D.
Bundy, Jr both of
Raleigh, and three
grandchildren.
Democratic leaders
in the area have in-
dicated several names,
including that of
former ECU
Chancellor Dr. Leo
Jenkins, as possible
replacements for Bun-
dy's seat.
A four-member com-
mittee comprised of
two members from
both Pitt and Greene
Countries, which are
part of Bundy's
district, will recom-
mend a successor for
Bundy. After approval
of the Committee's
choice by the State par-
ty, the final appoint-
ment will be made by
Gov. Jim Hunt.
The other two com-
mittee members are
Richard Price and
Lionel Moore both of
Greene County. The
committee is planning
to meet in the near
future to consider their
options and make final
consideration.
Join Mickey and
Minney for fun and
excitement in
Disney WorldFt.
Lauderdale during
Spring Break
(March 4 - March
13, 1983). Applica-
tions are being ac-
cepted now until
February 1, 1983.
For more informa-
tion call the Central
Ticket Office,
757-6611, Ext. 266.
fo
VJC
(
r ALPHA PHI
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PAPA KATZ
8:00-1:00
$1.00 admission 25 draft
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j





THE EASTC AROl INIAN
Entertainment
iam xjo : is-m
. �
Beatty's Epic
i'Reds' Here
This Weekend
Warren Beam's epic film about politico John Reed. Neds, will be shown this weekend in Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre.
By CORNELL MED LOCK
stiff Wnlrr
This Friday and Saturday, the
Student Union Films Committee
will present Warren Beatty's
magnificent epic about the lite ol
legendary left-wing politician John
Reed, Reds.
Due to the length ol the film, it
will be shown twice only on cah
night at 4:30 and K: 15 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student C enter's Hen-
drix Theatre Admission to the film
is by ID and activity card tor
students and MSC membership tor
faculty and stall
A labor ot love tor Warren B
ty, Reds is his masterpiece, a
sweeeping romantic epic written on
the canvas of historv Reds is the
story of John Reed (Beany), a
dashing young man from Portland
who becomes embroiled in the
American left-wing politics ol the
1910s, Louise Brvant (Diane
Keaton), pursuing recognition
writer and freedom as .1 woman.
and the turbulent love affair they
shared.
Reds explores a controversial
period ol historv including the
emergence ol the American Com-
munist Party It was a time in our
history when many people were
reexamining established social and
intellectual values a- well as alter-
native political philosophies
Impressivel) set against the
background ot the world at war and
a Russia torn by revolution. Red
the story ol a man and a woman
whose emotions and racial idea
mted their time Reds boasts a
superlative .as! ol supporting per-
formers
Maureen Stapleton as the I i
talking anarchist Emma Ooldman.
I Nicholson as writer fcugene
O'Neill who has a brief, emotional
� Hrvant. and writer lerzv
Kosinsl i BoNhevik official.
Director Beatty also interspt-
remarkable interviews with i
aged contemporaries of Reec
�it including Henry Miller. Will
n iranl ai d George Jesse! wh
set lEATTY'S, Pat 1
Dance Theatre's Program Had Very Few Flaws
By I)ARR I BROWN
WriM Sr�. Jil�r
It there is going to he toe-dancing, I ant it to be here
tin Sorth Carolina)!
� N.C. State Legislator, c. 14.
Such was the lett-handed welcome the School ol the
Arts and its professional affiliates received from state
officials upon their inception in 19fv4. You've come a
long way, baby.
The rave reviews of the N.C. Dance Theatre, the
s'ate's only major dance companv and an affiliate of
NCSA, have been repeated on ever) poster and program
to the point ol exhaustion. High acclaim in 1 ondon,
Spoleto. New York and elsewhere confirm the talent ol
this homegrown treasure
Nutured out of the dance department at NCSA and
considered bv many to be one ol the most impressive
small companies in America. Dance Iheatre is never
theless first and foremost tor Carolinians; last year the)
performed more than twice as often within North
Carolina as they, did outside the state
One ol the troupe's strong points is supposed to be its
equal confidence in classical ballet and modern dance.
Programs usually include works from contemporary
choreographers ol ballet, modern and jazz, as well as
time honored standbys ol the most antiquated and
classical sort. Such was the case, tor better or worse, at
NCDT's performance Wednesday night at LCI's
McGinnis Theatre.
Ballet, as opposed to modern dance, has the distinct
disadvantage of having a history to preserve W hile the
works of Martha Graham may seem ancient to some
avant-guarde artists today, they are neverthless of our
time.
Classical ballet, on the other hand, retains a reper-
toire going back to the early 19th century. These durable
classics are kept alive by many dance companies today,
sometimes in vibrant restagings (such as American
Ballet Theatre's production of la Bayadere two years
ago, or Balanchine's sleek staging of the Christmas
favorite. The uteraker).
Other times, far too often, tired ballets with no
relavence other than historical are cranked up on the
stage one more time in the name ot nostalgia or tradi-
tion or who knows what else. Such, unfortunately, was
the case tor the opening piece of NCDT's performance
Wednesday night. Sapott U I III The danish ballet
dates back to 1841 and is the work ot Denmark's pride,
August Bournonville.
The NCSA faculty has always had a fondness for the
Danish stvle. fast and light, and keep it alive in school
productions as well as in the company. Unforunately,
the NCDT version is frightfully stale, retaining the
original's steps and appearance more than the spirit and
exhuherance.
The piece reeks of stale romanticism, demoted to a
silly "happy peasant" ballet with cartoon costumes and
stilted staging. I he stage is a museum rather than a liv-
ing area when the piece is performed. One would have
hoped tor more imagination in the staging of the piece,
especially with such a young, vibrant company as the
Dance 1 heatre.
Alter a laborious start with apoti, however, the
companv redeemed itself in the next piece, the highlight
ot the evening and one ol the modern dance's best con-
temporary works.
One was hardly ready tor the aburpt transition to
Reset tings, an avant-garde creation of Senta Driver.
Such abruptness, however, is a trademark of NCDT,
"equally comfortable in ballet or modern dance
Driver created the work less than two years ago in
Durham, N.C, for the American Dance Festival. She
ranks along with Twyla T harp as one of the most in-
novative, dazzling modern choreographers of the day;
her work suits Dance Theatre almost perfectly.
The dance exists most ot the time without music;
sounds from the dancers provide most of the audio.
Resettings runs the gamut of emotions, frequently
humorous, sometimes tranquil, more than once silently
captivating or almost mystical in mood. It could pro-
bably be interpreted as an abstract study of human in-
terrelations � one to one, in groups, with modern socie-
ty. Such a view, though, is probably going too far and is
certainly unnecessary.
Resettings is a dance about movement and visual im-
ages � dance at its purest and finest. It can and should
MTV's Mystique
Video-Music Comes Of Age
By JANET MASLIN
New ��rfc lime News Sen ire
NfcW YORK. � Television used to be something you
merely watched, and radio was something you listened
to. That was before MTV, or Music Television, a fusion
of the two that arguably amounts to the most innovative
cable programming around. It is available as a basic ser-
vice on numerous cable systems nationwide, with 9
million subscribers.
MTV is Top-40 radio in two dimensions. A song is no
longer strictly a song: now it's a "video with a three
or four minute screen presentation accompanying a hit
single.
MTV offers 24 hours of this, punctuated with occa-
sional concerts, rock movies and music news. The im-
pact of all this on television programming may prove to
be even more significant than its effects on the music in-
dustry, and those have been overwhelming.
Not since silent films gave way to talkies has such
substantial change been forced upon performing artists
so quickly.
What goes into a video? Almost anything, especially
in these pioneer days of the 18-month-old MTV. The
less innovative the musical group, the more likely it is
simply to turn up in frayed bellbottom jeans and play
ponderously into the camera, offering the kind of post-
Woodstock heavy-metal headache that bogs down
MTV's occasional tedious segments.
At the other end of the spectrum, there are groups
that use the video format brilliantly as an opportunity to
enhance their music. There are even new bands that owe
their record sales almost entirely to the beneficial effects
of MTV.
And so Men at Work, the new Australian group, is
seen jumping kangaroo-style across a sandy beach, and
playing with a stuffed koala in a swing.
Fleetwood Mac goes dancing in the rain to the tune of
"Gypsy which has been expensively mounted as a
black-and-white 30s movie fantasy.
The Rolling Stones, with fabulous nonchalance,
saunter their way through street and barroom scenes
miming "Waiting for a Friend
And Billy Joel, wearing a fedora, sits playing his
guitar while "Allentown" unfolds against a series of
open-ended sets, which change constantly, depicting
smalltown post-World War II Americana.
All of these videos are at least as memorable visually
as they are musically, and all of them help broaden the
images of the performers that they showcase.
The customary elements of television advertisements
are standard fare for MTV's trendier but less im-
aginative spots: the beautiful but mean-looking models,
the fast cars and dark settings, the air of conflict or
histrionic gloom.
A lot of these are hopelessly lame, but occasionally as
with the video for Pat Benatar's "Shadows of the
See MTV'S, Page 7
be enjoyed as such.
The company fit the work well. All performances
were strong and the group worked very well as an
ensemble, a prerequisite for the piece, especially without
music. The unity ot the dancers could be telt from the
audience, a necessity when complex teamwotk is re-
quired and dancers must depend upon one another
If one male dancer need be sighted as standing out. it
should be Ralph Hewitt. One of the company's senior
members, Hewitt possesses a more competent acting
ability and confident stage presence, if not dance techni-
que, than any man in the troupe.
The evening ended pleasantly if not spectacularly with
A Night in the Tropics, a mistv, sensuous, spanish-
flavored tribute. Avoiding the tacky costumes so easily
adopted for such a dance, the company's production ol
this latin melodrama was fairly fresh and enjoyable tor
such a dangerously cliched theme.
A tango, guaracha and congo were pulled ofl with
taste and talent in a steamy hae encompassing the
stage note must be given to Dai uidTerriLynn
Wright enchanting, delightful perl
mances in two p.i i, a- well a to the ei m-
panv for a credible acting I dance perfor-
mance, using the cl graj .gh to no: take
it loo seriously but stil - in enjoyable performance
ftct a rather pedantic start, the evening's show was
more than enjoyable, showing a corps ol dancers strong
m dance technique One would hope that NCDT would
not try go beyond their limits and preserve the classics
of a long ballet tradition, a job suited for larger, ncher
companies, but rather focus on works suited for their
small but talented troupe with an opportunity to main-
tain a proeress;e. innovative, eclectic repertoire.
croup with such a strong grounding in both ballet
and modern dance has the chance to bring a much more
innovative program to its audience, such as it did with
the dazzling Reserrinfs. to leave the preservation of the
past to other companies, less imaginative productions
and : tpe
Soprano Jordan- Williams Performing Soon
The '82-83 ECU Black Arts Festival opens on Sunday. Jan. 30 with a concert by
lyric-spinto soprano, Willie Jordan-Williams. Ms. Williams, a native of New Bern,
studied voice with Dr. Aldrich Adkins and Oscar Henry. At present she is studying
with Elaine Bonazzi, mezzo-soprano of New York City. She has performed as guest
soloist at colleges throughout the country as well as a number of major concert halls.
Her concert here will be a salute to Black composers. The concert will be held in
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student (enter and will begin at 3 p.m. Tickets are
priced at $1 each. The festival is sponsored hy the Department of University Unions.
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's Epic
Here
eekend
is explores a controversial
o! histor including the
emergence of the American Com-
list Party. Ii was a time in our
: when m?n people were
examining established social and
al aiues a well as alter-
liticaJ philosophies.
ssivel -et against the
ind of the world at war and
orn h revolution. Reds is
on ol a man and a woman
emotions and racial ideas ig-
their time. Reds boasts a
ative cast oi supporting per
r : tee
A 11 V ' s
In
Stapleton as the fast-
marchisl 1-mma Cioldman,
k cholson as writer Eugene
-e:ll who has a brief, emotional
ut with Brant. and writer Jerzy
k as .1 Bolshevik official.
)i Beam also interspersed
� ible interviews with now-
ntemporaries ot Reed and
luding Herm Miller. Will
I teorge Jessel who re-
S� M I r'S, Page 7
v Flaws
I a and I ern Lynn
rig, delightful pcrfor-
. ell as to the entire com-
olid dance perfor-
enough to not take
� a hie performance.
evening's show was
g .1 corps ol dancers strong
; hope that NCDT would
eii Limits and preserve the classics
lUet tradition, a ob suited for larger, richer
aiher focus on works suited for their
laiemed troupe wuh an opportunity to main-
� e eclectic repertoire
s rounding in both ballet
bring a much more
ke, such as it did with
the reservation of the
ginative productions
e
�� sii
'rforming Soon
iv. Jan. 30 with a concert by
hams, a native of New Bern.
Iry. At present she is studying
y. She has performed as guest
lumber of major concert halls.
The concert will be held in
111 begin at 3 p.m. Tickets are
irtment of I niversitv Unions.
THF EASTCAROI IWIAW JAM ARY H, t9JQ '
Alpha-Omega Players Return For 'Private Lives'
Nancy Woods and Richard Carlo star in Private
I ives. Noel Coward's wittiest buffoonery and tne
next Dinner Theatre Production to be presented Feb.
15-18. The plav is again to be acted by the Alpha-
Omega Players, a highly-talented touring company
which has been seen recently in Same Time, Next
Year and Chapter Two. The four-day run begins
Tuesday. Feb. 15 with a dessert performance at 7:15
p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Auditorium
244. The next three nights are dinner performances
beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the same location. Tickets
are available now at the Central Ticket Office, MSC.
Tickets for the dessert performance are $4 for
students and $6 for faculty and staff. There are no
public tickets available for this performance. Tickets
for the dinner performance are $8.50 for students
and $12.50 for faculty, staff and the public.
MTV's Time Has Come
Beatty 's Epic
'Reds9 Here
For Weekend
Continued From Page 6
count revealing memories of the people and the
time.
A monumental motion picture, Reds has
become an instant classic. With its larger-than-
life performances, superb production and blend
of swirling, intense relationships, Reds stands
with Lawrence of Arabia and Citizen Kane as
one of the greatest motion picture achievements
of all time.
Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert
says Reds "provides glorious romanticism, sur-
prising intelligence and a consistent wit. It is the
thinking man's Dr. Zhivago.
"The love story stars Warren Beatty and Diane
Keaton who are immediately engaging and then
grow into solid, plausible people on the screen.
Keaton is a particular surprise. She is just what
she needs to be: plucky, healthy, exasperated,
loyal and funny.
"Beatty, as John Reed, also surprises. There is
in Warren Beatty's screen persona a persistent
irony, a way of kidding his own seriousness, that
takes the edge off a potentially pretentious
character and makes him into one of God's
fools.
"Beatty plays Reed but does not beatify him.
He permits the silliness and boyishness to coexist
with the self-conscious historical mission. The
whole movie finally comes down to the fact that
the characters matter to us. Beatty gives us peo-
ple. And they are seen here with such warmth
and affection that we sense new dimensions not
onlv in Beatty and Keaton, but especially in Jack
1
Fri & Sat 4:30, 8:15 PM
Hendrix Theatre, MSC
ATTIC ATTTIC
752-7303
I
I
L
Continued From Page 6
Night the com-
ponents are woven into
enough of a story to
give them a little novel-
t , however
preposterous.
In this one, the
pouty-looking Miss
Benatar is seen donning
a white silk scarf, hop-
ping onto an airplane
and leading a successful
spying raid against
Nazis, all in about three
minutes time.
It can't be easy for
the average rock per-
Last Who Date
A Disappointment,
But 'Who Cares9
By 1AVI1 MAC lARl-ANt
Kiilltng Moor
"It's not the last concert said
Roger Daltrey in apparent con-
tradiction of the hype that had
been sweeping Toronto for
weeks. "It's the last concert of
the farewell tour Whatever that
meant, exactly, the fact remained
that Toronto had been chosen for
the Who's tinal bow on their
three-month North American sw-
ing, and Toronto wondered why.
The availability of English beer
and a music scene "slightly more
effervescent" than that south ot
the 49th parallel were two of the
reasons cited by the band. A
bedraggled Fete Townshend
pointed out to the local press that
Maple I eat Gardens was familiar
territory and that the 14,3(K)-seat
arena was of appropriate size for
the bang-up two-concert exit. An
extremely attractive exchange
rate for American production
dollars and easy satellite access to
Canadian markets and U.S. pay-
TV systems were not to be sniffed
at either. "There were financial
and technical advantages to do-
ing it here admitted
Townshend.
No ordinary two-night stand,
the Toronto concerts were a fit-
tingly businesslike conclusion to
a tour that was, thanks largely to
the corporate sponsorship of
Schlitz, already well in the black.
It was, the tirst time they had
turned such an impressive profit.
As icing on the cake. Twentieth
Century-Fox acquired worldwide
video distribution rights for the
last Toronto show for what a
company official described as "a
modest percentage of the $40
million to $50 million the tour
would gross
Seventy-five U.S. pay-per-view
systems and a 21-station Cana-
dian network (hastily strung
together by Toronto's City TV
and sponsored, in part, by
Molson's beer) carried the broad-
cast, "impacting" a potential
viewing audience estimated at 6.5
million. HBO picked up distribu-
tion rights for subsequent U.S.
pay TV broadcasts. Fox expects
to release home-video cassettes
by March or April, and
worldwide TV syndication is in
the works. "The buzzword these
days is windows said City TV
producer John Martin, "and this
concert has gone through more
windows than anything ever
has
Not nearly as many as had
been hoped, though. In the after-
math of the December 17th show,
it turned out that the pay-per-
view transmission in the U.S. had
been something of a flop. Twen-
tieth Century-Fox estimated that
out of a potential audience of 2.5
million, only a million people
tuned in. And in Los Angeles,
Oak communications' On TV
cable system reported that only
about 12 percent of its
subscribers had opted to watch
the concert � compared to 25
percent for last year's Rolling
Stones concert. The reason, ac-
cording to Richard Whitman,
vice-president and general
manager of On TV, was that,
despite all the hoopla, "the Who
concert was not a major event
Still, the crowds were up for
the shows on both nights,
although the band didn't seem
concerned about spontaneity: the
song blocking and between-tune
patter were virtually the same on
both nights. Unpredictability, a
quality with which the Who
established their reputation in the
Sixties, was apparently not a
priority anymore. But, as the kids
who roamed up Young Street
after the last concert shouted,
"Who cares?"
former to move from
the stage and the recor-
ding studio into this
sort of thing.
MTV's format is ex-
actly that of AM radio,
right down to the
CTearasil commercials;
yet, its demands are en-
tirely different. The
musician is suddenly
expected to develop a
lot more personality
than he or she may
have been prepared to
project. A group must
at least be able to lip-
synch with a little con-
viction, though an
astonishing number of
MTV's performers
can't manage this.
Robert Pittman, who
oversees MTV for the
Warner Amex Satellite
Entertainment Co
says the service was
originally expected to
be watched intermit-
tently by a less-than-
fully-attentive viewer.
Surprisingly, it ap-
pears to hold an au-
dience's attention very
well: MTV's marketing
research indicates that
weekday viewers, who
are mostly in the 12 to
34 age range, stay tun-
ed for an hour at a
time, and watch the
programming in small
groups. They also tend
to discuss the videos
with their friends.
The beauty of the
MTV format is that it
can appeal to a narrow
audience, concen-
trating on a particular
group in a manner that
would have been im-
possible in the precable
age. Television has
never had this kind of
impact before, and
television will never be
the same.
Nicholson.
"As for Beatty, Reds is his bravura turn. He
got the idea, nurtured it for a decade, found the
financing, wrote most of the script, produced
and directed and starred and still found enough
artistic detachment to make his Reed into a flaw-
ed, fascinating enigma instead of a boring ar-
chetvpal hero.
"I liked this movie. I felt a real fondness for it.
It is quite a subject to spring on the capitalist
Hollywood movie system, and maybe only Beat-
ty could have raised $35 million to make a movie
about a man who hated millionaires
WED
ARMED
� ANGEL ;
(Former Members
of Jesse Bolt)
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For Students
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CONTACTS
WCJ-UOCS � DAY GtiMUKTH
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The
0 OPTICAL II PALACE
703 Greenville Blvd lAcross From Pin Plaia Nesl To ERA Realty)
G.rvM Harris Licensed Optician Open 9 30 a m to 6 p m Mon Frl
Ik
jj? LUNCH BUFFET
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EVENING BUFFET
Mon.8. Tues. 5-8pm 2"
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RIBS AND CHICKEN
OPEN 24 HOURS DRIVE THRU WINDOW
Happy Hour Friday, Jan. 28
� 4:00 to 7:30 at the Attic
Tuesday - Pizza and Pasta $2.99 aiiyou can Eat 5-9
Ladies Nite with Brian Huskey
Ladies admitted Free Free Drajtjor Ladies
Wednesday - Salad Bar $2.15 ait you can Eat 5-9
Thursday - Spaghetti Special $2.49 all you can Eat 5-9
Coming Friday and Saturday
Lahnn & Lofton
Watch For Our Daily Luncheon Specials
We now have a new head chef to better serve your needs
10 Discount
beginning Feb. 1 st
on all
dinners & biscuits
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
1






1HF hAst c koi ishn
Sports
MO 2' IVM
I'ajir x
Bucs Down Rivals In Overtime Win
Ihe E'iratt
Wilmington I
eight minutes
Hxlm PI EASANTS
Foi the Pirates, a win over UNC-
w ilmington is like climbing a moun-
tain
1 lie path upward is a long and
dilticuli task, especially it you keep
failing down. But after having to
scratch and scrape to finally reach
the top, the end accomplishment
becomes even more worthwhile,
even more fulfilling.
I he Bucs achieved such an ac-
complishment Wednesday night.
Playing in their first overtime
situation .til season, the ECU men's
basketball team out-rallied the
Seahawks in the tmat five minutes
to capture their third consecutive
� ory, winning 50-47.
i l � - phomore Bruce Peartree
sank two freethrows with 2:01 re-
maining in overtime to give the
Pirate a 47 45 lead � their first ol
: he game.
Peartree now averaging 10.2
point- pel contest, wound up on the
freethrow line igain with :16 on the
clock, a id iced two more shots to
push the Bucs lead to four, 4SM5
I W's lemv Anderson na-led
a 22 foot jumpshot with eight
seconds left to cut the Pirates' lead
to tw )
ECl standout Johnny fcdwards
was then fouled vuh m seconds re-
maimng and made the front end ot a
une-and-one to seal the victory,
50-47
outscored I Nc �
3 during the last
play.
V one poinl in the second halt.
the Bucs were down hv as much as
points, but fought back to
a it 1 with less than three
�maining Peartree and
I n I � ith hit outside jump
Track Team
Places Well
By RANDY MEWS
Mafl Wnlrr
In. E I men's track team plac-
ed runners in several events this
weekend at the irginia lech lnvita-
tional tracl meel in Blacksburg. a.
Pirate; swept the 55-meter
' �� in McCorkle placing
� t rskine Ivans was se-
id Henry Wiihams
r tied tor third in
� . r ke the Rector ln-
xrena Record in the 55-meter
hurdles but still finished second
overall with a 7.43.
In the 400 meter race, Lddie
Bradley i unshed second in 50.0,
while Reuben Pierce took third with
a time ot 50.6. Wayne Richardson
. ed fourth in the 500 in 1:06.8.
In a spectacular performance, the
n e-relay team of Bradley Pierce,
keith Clarke, and Greg Richardson
won on the last leg ot the race to
take � place in 22.2
I ' I � ell represented in the
d mts with Chris Brooks tak-
. j in the long jump with a
leap ol 2?'il and Clifton King
finishing fifth with 22'H
in ttie tripie lump, Brooks took
ihira with 4811 and Burkes, also
r:n;er. finished fifth with a jump
ol 483"
Coach Bill Carson was extremely
encouraged by his teams perfor-
mance "This meet is just what we
needed, one where we could shine.
It the meet was scored we would
have won
"I he Pirates return to action on
January 28, when they participate in
one ot the most prestigious meets in
the country - the Wanamaker-
Miirose Games in New York City.
shots to put the Pirates only two
points behind, 45-43.
With 1:15 left, Seahawk Frankie
Dickens put up a shot which rolled
around the rim and ECU's ldwards
grabbed the rebound.
Edwards was then fouled and
canned two freethrows to tie the
game. 45-45, with 1:03 left in the se-
cond period 1 he Seahawks held the
ball and tried to get one shot oft but
were unsuccessful.
"The kids hung together said
Head Coach Charlie Harrison.
"For the most part they executed
well, 1'hev saw an opportunity at the-
end and took advantage of it.
"I'm very proud ol them, lhev
played their tails oft and came from
behind in a hostile atmosphere.
"Anytime you can win on the
road and come trom behind to do it
against a good team and a well-
coached team, it's a great win
The Pirates out-rebounded the
Seahawks, 33-21. with most occurr-
ing m the second period ol plav . On
offense I NC-W gave the Bucs quite
a bit ol trouble with their changing
one defenses According to Har-
rison, the team was constantly reset-
ting their offense because ol the
Seahawks' transistions.
�� 1 hey ran a 2-3. a 1-3-1 and a
triangle and two (two players were
guarding Peartree and 1 dwards)
Harrison � ioi seen the
two defense used by a
college team thus far, but added
that the strategy was an effective
one
Overall, the Pirates shot 39 6 per-
cent trom the floor while I N
finished with a 54 5 percent
shooting average Edwards led in
scoring with 21 points. Peartree had
16 point Barry Wright pumped in
seven points and Brown had six.
In the first halt, the Pirates got
oft to a slow start against UNC-W's
tightly-packed one defense, and the
Seahawks went ahead, 6-2, during
the first five minutes of play.
Wilmington's Anderson tired a
jumpshot to make the score, 8-2,
and at this point, the game seemed
to be totally out of control where
the Pirates were concerned. UNC-W
made five successful trips to the
treethrow line to pull ahead, 14-4.
Edwards and Wright then scored
two baskets each to cut UNC-W's
lead to eight. But a technical foul on
the ECU bench and a personal foul
gave the Seahawks an opportunity
to regain a marginal lead. Now 17-8,
the Seahawks stayed ahead, but
ECU's ldwards made a three-point
play with 3:26 remaining to cut
Wilmington's lead to three points,
19-16.
Senior Shawn Williams, who
scored IX points tor the Seahawks,
then made a basket and Dickens
shot as the buzzer sounded to jump
out to a six point lead at the half,
23-17.
In the tirst period, EC! made on-
ly seven ol ll tield goals tor a 36.8
-hooting percentage, while the
Seahawks did slightly better with a
36 8 average
On the treethrow line, the Pirates
made three ol 16 shots Wilm-
ington, on the other hand, made
nine ol 1 3 attempts.
1 he Pirates had seven turnovers,
mosl ol winch occurred in the first
half, and I N W had tour.
1 he Seahawks are now 7 10 and
will v.sit Minges Coliseum on Feb.
26
1 he win pushed the Pirates up in
the win-loss column, now standing
with a 9-8 record.
Photo by OABY PATTERSON
Head coach Charlie Harrison exhorts his players during earlier
game.
ECU
PKo'oovGABT ��TTl�JO�
FCl Bruce Peartree drives to the baskel againstampbell's I arrvannailv m the Pirates' vietorv Saturday
night.
Pirates Outlast Camels
By CIM) PLEAS A NTS
sport rditor
Head Basketball Coach Charlie
Harrison knew the Pirates were fly
ing high alter a much wanted vie
tory over favored South Carolina
last week
But the Pirates kept their cool
against Campbell and won their
eighth game ol the season bv
ousting the Camels, 73-55.
Harrison, however, wasn't too
enthused about the Hues' overall
performance Saturday night "i
wasn't pleased with the wav we
plaved he said. "They've been
high. And after coming ofl a big
win, I knew thev'd be loose I hat's
just the nature ot the game
According to Harrison, the
Pirates played just a little too loose
for him. "It was a strange game
he said. "We got almost anything
we wanted when we executed.
That's when we got lackadaisical.
Instead of jumping on somebody
and putting him out of his misery,
or me out of mine, we got careless
We went through the motions and
that's what upset me.
"There's more to this game than
the w's and l's, but 1 guess winning
is the most important Playing
in front of a home crowd of 2,750
fans, the Pirates made 30-of-51
shots from the floor for a 58.8 per-
cent shooting average. But again,
Harrison was disappointed in his
team's shot selection. "We took
some horrendous shots he said,
"but basketball is a game of
momentum. They're gonna have
spurts, and we're gonna have
spurts. Whoever has the most spurts
wins the game
The Pirates had the most spurts
by far, with four players scoring in
dour tigui lohnny Edwards,
the (1 leading scorer in the
1 c South, maim i
per game av rig n
points and p il cd lowi
nd N Bai ry W
had 12 poinl
Robinson shot 100 pei :ei I 11
flooi to i . 12 I
Brow i a as I ir-foi � i held
1 d
wards in re' � 10
Jumping oul to a 15-6 lead i th
10 nun ite ' plav. the P
never were threatened by theC amels
during the game's entirety
I p. Jl 23, at halftime, the Pirates
came out and gradually pulled
away With 14 5 remaining.
Wright took the ball down the
length ol the court tor a lav up. giv-
ing EC I a 45-29 lead
Kl guards John Williams and
Robinson set the pace earlv in the-
second period with Wright, Brown
and ldwards penetrating in around
the basket
At the 10:00 mark in the second
period, the Bucs were nine-tor-14
trom the floor while the Camels
were six-tor-13.
A slam dunk trom ldwards and a
jumpshot from thepenmeter gave
the Bucs a comfortable lead ot 541
over the Camels.
With Curt Vanderhorsl out with
an injury, 6-1 junior Herbert
Gilchrist had the most playing ac-
tion he's seen all season. Gilchrist
scored two baskets and popped in
three freethrows tor seven points in
the second halt. "Herb practices
awfully hard Harrison said. "He
gives as good an effort as any player
we've ever had
Harrison also complimented
Robinson, another guard, on his
plav against the Camels. "Tony had
the open shot, took it and made il
he said "That

I
Mt I
Forth f-1
- -
ki ther I pump 8 p
R vA II
.
1 he Pirates e: - i
i dwai is per n - me
specialty dunks Pcartrecthen
a lumpshot to give the Pii
71-55 win over C ampbeil
1 he Camels plaved a one deft
against the Pirates Coach Han
described, ' Thai kind ol del
makes you hesitant he said
kids knew they didn't have I
patient as they were against s
Carolina
I he Camels, now 5-10, ha!
fiveol their last six games, includ e
a 64-57 decision against K I two
weeks ago 1 he Pirates evened
record to 8 8, and will embark on a
five-game road trip
I he conference, which cor
William & Marv. Richmond.
George Mason. Navy and James
Madison, is just beginning to heat
up. The Pirates (1-3) are now rank-
ed fourth m the league behind
W,vM (2-0), Richmond (2-0) and
George Mason (1-2) The Pii
have six conference games ren
ing in the regular season, and will go
up against Naw on Jan. 2.
And without forward c h i
Green. Harrison is now tryinj
find the best combination on the
court in order to be prepare fot
those essential games which
ahead.
Lady Pirates Split Pair In USC Invitational
By KEN BOLTO.N
lshtml Sport rditor
The i C L
their
with a
Univei
ol the
In 1
record a
� 71 �
P
1 ady Pirates evened
7-7 Saturday night
victory over Mercer
in the consolation game
ith I arolina Invitational.
ay night's first round, the
ates were defeated by a
Georgia squad, 80-61.
ia eventually won the tourna-
ith i i "2 defeat of the host
ime i cks.
. Mercer game, ECU was led
or Mary Denkler, who scored
ints and grabbed nine re-
I � . Js
Denkler's performance led to her
selection on the All-Tournament
team Other members were: Janet
Harris, Georgia; Evelyn Johnson,
si ro
� teo
men
bv
Marsi McAhster, and Sharon Rivers
� all from south Carolina
The Eady Pirates jumped out to a
quick 8-2 lead over Mercer before
the Teddy Bears rallied to take a
17-14 advantage. ECU came back to
take the lead at halftime, 35-30.
In the second halt, the lead see-
sawed until crucial free throws in
the final minutes sealed the victory
for ECU.
"We were very pleased to win this
one against a team like Mercer
said ECU head coach Cathy An-
druzzi "We saw a well-balanced
team which hit the offensive boards
well
"W hen you play in a consolation
game it all comes from the heart
she added "Our kids really wanted
to win this game
Besides Denkler, the I.ady Pirates
were led by a pair of freshmen �
Sylvia Bragg and Lisa Squirewell.
Bragg scored 16 points and
Squirewell, who was starting her
first game, added 14 points and nine
rebounds.
The Teddy Bears, now 8-8, were
led by Alison Davis (17 points),
Anita Meadows (13 points), and
Emma Humphrey (15 points and 12
rebounds).
In Friday night's first-round
game, the Lady Pirates ran into one
of the best teams in the country
when they faced the Georgia
Bulldogs.
Georgia was ranked 9th in the
country in the latest AP poll, and
are now sporting a 14-2 record.
Their only two losses were to UCLA
and Tennessee.
While averaging over 90 points
per game, the Bulldogs have been
outscoring their opponents by an
average of 18 points per contest.
Georgia was led by sophomore
All-American Janet Harris, who
scored 38 points on 18-for-2l
shooting from the floor. The 6-2
forward tied the Carolina Coliseum
record for most points and broke
the record with her 18 field goals.
"She (Harris) is the best post
player we've come across by far
Andruzzi commented. "She can
shoot from the outside, play the
wing, or post
Denkler was also the leader in the
Georgia game with 28 points.
Delphine Mabry added eight and
Fran Hooks chipped in with eight
points and five assists.
Georgia led 45-33 at the half, and
were only up by seven points with a
little over 11 minutes left.
The game was a paradox of good
field goal shooting and wasted op-
portunites. The I ady Pirates shot 54
per-cent from the field and Georgia
hit 58 percent of their tries.
ECU held an unfavorable advan-
tage in turnovers, 26-18.
"Once again our girls played
against a very good team Andruz-
zi stated. "We knew they ran the
fast break and we knew they were
powerful, but we committed far too
many turnovers and a lot of that is
due to Georgia's defense
The Lady Pirates were un-
doubtedly hurt in this weekend's
tournament by the loss of point-
guard and no. 2 scorer Loraine
Foster.
Foster was hurt during last week's
, UNC-Charlotte game when she
strained liga. .ents in her knee
slipping on a cheerleader's p0n
As a result, the Lad Pirates
forced to rely heaviK on
freshmen - Mabrv. Bragg
Squirewell Of Fc I 132
tournament points, the three
year players contributed 5f
atter
-pon
were
three
and
total
first-
I have certainly been pleased
with the performance of our girls
especially in the past three games "
Andruzzi responded. "After loan
Foster, we did a real good job in ad-
justmg without a point guard "
The Lady Pirates have two games
scheduled for this weekend; Satur-
day, at East Tennessee State (6 00)
avmSUnda at APfalachain State
� J-f.
- I
The Kl swim teams suffere
againsi N( -( harlottc
Pirate C
i
nounccd - iddit
iohu L w .
� rn name I
tan: directoi
club, while Charles
Sha-
student a
"We '
expa
members!)
e s1 a
char'
6 : � o . � 1 - . " .
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ARMY-NAVY
STORE
BORIIOs
App ts Vaat 7 Da. s
CALL TOLL FREE
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QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
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MIDI Kl I' UK
113 Granoe I
Si






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 25. 1983
Vjluc 8
Win
� i
&
Photo b GABY ��TTI�WN
ad� in (he Pirates' Mdor alurda
Camels
pa against the Camels. "Tony had
the open shot, took it and made it
lie nd "That's the quality of a true
guar
lard Bruce Peartree. who has
it with a leg injury, finished
Iamels, 6-1 guard Harvey
one jumpshot after
imp in i8 points.
Forwa Roi V� liams added 12
had eight,
ended the game w-th
rming one ot his
lunks Peartree then made
impshot to give the Pirates a
; �" A.n over Campbell.
( amels plaed a one detente
si the Pirates Coach Harrison
� bed, ' That kind ot defense
� es ou hesitant he said. "The
kids knew thev didn't have to be as
patient as thev were against South
C arolina
I he (amels, now 5-10, have lost
five ot their last six games, including
a h4-5" decision against ECU two
week ago The Pirate evened their
record to 8-8. and will embark on a
live-game road trip
I he conference, which consists of
am A Mary, Richmond,
George Mason. Navv and James
Madison, is just beginning to heat
I he Pirates (1-3) are now rank-
the league behind
W&M (2-0), Richmond (2-0) and
George Mason (1-2). The Pirates
have six conference games remam-
nij n the regular season, and will go
again-t Navy on Jan 29.
And without forward Charlie
Cireen. Harrison is now trying to
find the best combination on the
court in order to be prepare for
those essential games which lie
ahead
tional
strained liga. .ents in her knee
slipping on a cheerleader's pon
As a result, the L ady Pirates
forced to rely heavily on
freshmen - Mabrv. Bragg
Squirewell. Of fcCL's 132
tournament points, the three
year players contributed 56.
after
�pon.
were
three
and
total
first-
"I have certainly been pleased
with the performance of our girls,
especially in the past three games
Andruzzi responded. "After losing
Foster, we did a real good job in ad-
justing without a point guard
The Lady Pirates have two games
scheduled for this weekend; Satur-
day, at East Tennessee State (6:00)
and Sunday at Appalachain State
(3:00).
Weekend Statistics
� EC l 73.MpMi SS
act
bright 4
Brown )g
frd��rds )9
Robmvon 26
Peimct 25
Vt Hum.
Met cod 8
Gikhnsl 4
Harris
lotah
mt k m i pi
6 110-4 6
4-6 3-4 10
T-ll 3-4 10
4-4 4-4
4 11 0-0
2-4 0-0
l-l 0-0
2-3 33
0-0 0-0
3 2
I
2
2
3
2 0 I
I I I
0 3 I
1 I 3
0 0 0
12
II
17
12
8
4
:
7
0
200 30-51 13-1� 33 13 16 73
( ampKrii
Williams
. annadt
Nash
Smith
Austin
Spain
Mueller
Parkrr
Whirled
Totals
MP PC IT B A � Pt
40
29
34
39
19
20
:
9
I
200 24 -56
5 11 2 1
J-� 23
39 II
8u
1-4 o-o
2-4 0-0
oo o-o
1-3 (M)
13 0-0
4 0
2 3
4 4
1 4
2 5
2 I
0 0
1 0
0 I
0 12
0 8
79 23 It 10 SS
I t aroHsa 31
I ampberl 23
turnovers � fcast Carolina IT, C'l r
Technical fouls - none
Officials - (. uiko. Rote
Atl � 2.750
42-73
32-SS
r(7�
Mumphery
Os borne
Shamp
Craves
Leathers
Andrews
Meadows
Davis
Jones
Cox
Totals
Eaal Carolina (711
Hooks
Denkler
C'haney
Squirewell
Truske
Mabry
Bragg
Totals
EatfCeroHu
40
19
9
21
22
14
19
19
21
16
MP rC. IT R I A P
6 11
2-4
0-1
1-4
13
0 1
69
8 15
2 2
24
3 5
22
12
1-2
0-0
2 3
13
12
0-1
0-0
0
I
3
I
2 I
15
6
I
3
2
2
13
17
4
200 2� M I 1 20 2� 24 IS 67
40
39
19
36
3
31
32
4 5
9-19
1-4
35
0-0
2-8
713
02
7-7
0-0
8 8
0-0
2 5
4 2
9 2
6 4
9 J
I I
4 4
1 :
14
I)
6
16
200 26-S4 19 14 36 20 9 71
30
3S
37
36
67
71
Turnovers: Mer 20. BCD 22
Technical fouls: none
Officials Anderson. C heps
Attendance: 100
Soccer Tournament To Be
Held In Minges Saturday
East Carolina will
host an indoor soccer
tournament on Satur-
day, January 29 in
Minges Coliseum. The
tournament will start at
8:30 a.m. and continue
throughout the day.
Twelve teams are
scheduled to compete.
ECU will sport three
teams, plus an alumni
team. Other com-
petitors are UNC-
Wilmington, Atlantic
Christian College,
North Carolina
Wesleyan College, Elon
College, Pfeiffer Col-
lege, Campbell Univer-
sity, Duke University
and a Buies Creek Club
Team.
The tournament will
be divided into three
divisions, with four
teams being placed in
each bracket. After
completing round-
robin play, the top two
teams in each division
and two wild card
teams will compete in a
single elimination
event.
For further informa-
tion, contact ECU Soc-
cer Coach Robbie
Church at 757-6236.
� i Ml at4 , U .tU 4U 4U afcU .t
The ECU swim teams suffered dual losses last week against nationally-ranked UNC, but look to splash back this weekend
against UNC-Charlotte.
Pirate Club Announces Additions
The East Carolina
University Educational
Foundation, known as
the Pirate Club, has an-
nounced two additions
to its staff.
John Chandler, Jr
has been named assis-
tant director of the
club, while Charles
Shavitz has been named
student assistant.
"We needed help in
expanding our
membership,
establishing new
chapters in the field
and in making more
contact with current
members said Ex-
ecutive Director
Richard Dupree in an-
nouncing the new addi-
tions to the staff.
"Also, we have com-
pletely revised our by-
laws, rules and regula-
tions, and more help is
needed in putting these
into effect
Chandler, 38, is a
1971 graduate of East
Carolina and formerly
an employee of
Planter's National
Bank. The Weldon
native has a BSBA
degree in business ad-
ministration and ac-
counting.
Shavitz is finishing a
BSBA degree in
business at East
Carolina, having served
as a student ad-
ministrative assistant
for football. The
23-year-old Shavitz is a
native of High Point.
"Both of these men
are fine additions to
our program, con-
tinued Dupree, "as
they are very dedicated
to the University and
our cause here in the
club. Both bleed purple
and sweat gold
Chandler and
Shavitz have already
assumed duties.
Treat the crew and we'll treat you
j
K4
CEP
Every
Monday
&
Tuesday
Night
No Coupon Necessary
757-1955
Every Monday ana Tuesday night, every week
ot the year, order any large 2 or more topping
pizza for the crew, ask for the "Family Night Special"
and we'll treat you to your own small pizza with the same
number of toppings FREE. and delivered iree in our
service zone. ,n 30 minutes or less
Or pick up two pizzas in 15 minutes
Two pizzas for the price of one now that s a treat vou can t beat!
wnen it comes to pizza pta comes to vou
Not good with any other special
I
I
I
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I
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I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
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I
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I
I
I
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I
I
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I
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I
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Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts, Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks. Camping Equip
ment. Steel Toed Shoes, Dishes
and Over 700 Oifferent New and
Used Items. Cowboy Boots.
Slats.
ARMY-NAVY
SOI S Evans
Stt et
STORE
ABORTIONS
ll week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800 321-0575
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABORTION a difficult dea
DEPEND ON. sion that's made easier by
?he women of the t-ienmng Center Counselors are
available day ana night to support and under-
stana you Your safety comfort and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � 'uesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st & 2nd trimester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
Health care counseling rur n cuikir
ano education for wa THE FLEMING
men ot on ages CENTER
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
tit Grtn villa Blvd.
754-3013 �24 MRS.
PLAZA SHELL
24 hour Towing Service
U-Htul Rentals
Available
ZNJIUSt
HJlppQe cjcokds
All $8.98
Garland Jefferys
Duran Duran
su9�rcreek Block Artists
Frankie Miller r C OO
Adam Ant $3.77
Def Leppard
Triumph
Phil Collins
Red Rider
Kate Bush
Stray Cats
Large group of Albums 40 off
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
SIM.00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information call
!32 0535 (Toll Free Number
�00-771 am between � AM
and s P.M Weekdays.
RALEIOHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
? 17 wast Morgan St.
Raleigh . C
T?
Western Steer0
Family
STEAKHOVSE
Banquet & Party
Facilities for 15
to 150 Persons
Take Out Orders
Call 758-8550
3005 E. 10th St Greenville
Open Sun. Thur. 1 lam 9pm
Friday-Saturday 1 lam 10pm
lltCotanche SI .
GreenvMIe 75; 0234
QUIXOTE
TRAVELS,
INC.
SPRING BREAK CRUISE
March 4 from Miami
$285 per person
double
3 nights aboard s AMERIKAMS
Plus 2 Bights FREE at Diplomat Hotel.
Hollywood (on the beach). Ha
March 7 from Miami
$399 per person
quad
4 Rights aboard m DOLPHIN
If ou like cruising in the sun
Call now -Space Limited
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
Phone 758 0327
Popcorn Shrimp
Special
55.99 all day
I
jTues. Wed. andThurs.
� 105 Airport Road Greenville, N.C.
Have You
� da�
Signed up For
"The Great Rat Race"
on Feb. 2 when the Lady
Pirates play Old Dominion
in Minges Coliseum at
7:30 p.m.?
Sponsored by
Signedup For
"The Great Pizza Contest"
on Feb. 5 when the Pirates play
George Mason in Minges Coliseum
at 7:30p.m.?
Sponsored by
X&W JAM. 2� �:o�
APMISSlONrl.OO �
X
&dfgm PIZZA HUT
�call 757-6417 For Information-
Watch the
attack.

i





10
THb EASTC AROl 1NIAN
JANUARY 25. 1983
ECU Swimmers
Sunk By Tough
Tarheel Squad
By EDWARD
MCKLAS
Mill�nm
The ECU men's and
women's swim teams
were beaten convinc-
ingly by a top-notch
University oi North
Carolina squad Thurs-
day. 93-20 and 95-17,
but are looking for-
ward to this weekend as
they take on UNC-
C harlotte at Minges
Aquatic Center for
their first home meet
since Nov. 20.
"We swam as well as
we could said ECU
coach Rick Kobe. "We
worked hard up to the
meet
According to Kobe,
the UNC women's
squad is presently third
in the country and has
five to six girls with
world-class rankings.
In addition, the UNC
men's team is presently
ranked in the top twen-
ty and will "probably
win the ACC
As Kobe put it, the
Tarheels are just too
good. "They were
swimming over our
heads he said.
"We've only beaten
them once in 33 years
Kobe is hoping to
have a better showing
this weekend.
"Charlotte has a pretty
good little team, but if
we beat them and Duke
in the lajt meet, our
men will finish above
.500 and our women at
.500.
In Thursday's meet,
ECU had only one
first-place finish, with
Doug MacMillan
receiving the honors in
the 100 yard butterfly.
Finishing second were
Tracey Hope in the
1000 yard freestyle,
Joanne McCulley in the
100 yard individual
medley and 50 yard
breaststroke, and Scott
Eagle in diving.
Pirates Hurt
By Holidays
B RANDl MEWS
sufl �rlrf
According to
women's head track
coach Pat McGuigan,
an unproductive
Christmas break hurt
the Lady Pirates's
showing this weekend
at the Moving Comfort
Invitational track meet
in Blacksburg, V'a.
"The lack of training
over Christmas break is
starting to show
McCluigan said.
The Pirates com
peted against such
teams as West Virginia,
Virginia Tech, VM1
and Virginia State this
weekend.
ECU's D a v e n a
Cherry, Teressa Hud-
son, and Regina Kent
qualified for the semi-
finals in the 55-meter
dash, all with 7.30.
Kent finished third in
the semis with a 7.19,
and just missed qualify-
ing for the finals.
The team ot Kent.
Cherry, Rene Kelder,
and Kathy I eeper
finished the mile relay
in a respectable 4:14.0.
r-elder also placed fith
in the 1000-meters,
coming in at 3:18.2.
Amy Bowen, the
ECU entrant in the
shotput, made a throw
of 328" but did not
place.
"We have to work
harder because hey are
no longer high school
athletes McGuigan
said. "But with a squad
that consists of twelve
freshmen and two
sophomores, the lady
Pirates can look for-
ward to a promising
future. We have
matured from the
outset of the season
ECU will be in action
again when they par-
ticipate in the
Wolfpack All-Comers
met in UNC-Chapel
Hill on February 5.
Classifieds
WANTED
SERVICES
WANTED HANDCRAFT and
POTTERY items for riult on
commission basis only Land and
Sea outlet Greenville Square
Shopping Ph tsa 4770 Open 11 -a
MS
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Richmond, va
either Thursday Jan 17 or Thurs
day. Fab 3 Leave in me latt
aftarnoon Plaasa call Stave at
75-7U Will pay tor gas
MISC.
WE BUY USED MUSICAL IN
STRUMENTS CALL 7Sa 40 or
7S4W77
LEARN TO FLY Call Joa
7SI �M1.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
NEEDED MALE ROOMMATE
to share 4 bedroom house on
BHtmore St Half block from cam
pus Rent MS 0 plus one fourth
utilities. WJ 1444
ROOMMATE WANTED
US month plus 11 utilities
7 minute walk to campus Private
bedroom! Call M-Of.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE to share 1 bdrm
Townhouse Re"t HJI month plus
half utilities Available now. call
Jamie 7M-4S47
1 FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED TO share Georgetown
Apt For more information, call
rn-m alter s
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 1 bedroom
apartment Rant 1117 M Cenva
n.ent for ECU and Pitt students
Also half utilities. Hq-WIt.
fIeMALE ROOMMATE NEED-
ED: 1 Mocks from ECU Partly
furnished 1 bedroom apt Sent
hum Mm 12 utilities Will com
sitter 1 girls willing to share room
Call 7J�-leel
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE, experience, quality work.
IBM Solactric typewriter Call
Lante Shive 7Si JJOl or GAIL
JOYNER 75-IBM.
TYPING: Term papers, thesis.
etc Call Kempie Ounn. 7S1-4713
10 YEARS TYPING � Reasonable
rates Spelling, punctuation and
grammar corrections, pro
3tread.no. Cindy t am. to t pm
15$ 144.
EXCELLENT TYPIST
Reason�ble rates All papers Call
757 1171 after 4 p.m.
AUDIO ELECTRONICS SER
VICE: Complete audio repair call
after 4pm Mark 751 114
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST GOLD Time watch
Reward offered. Call evenings
TS1-BM.
FOR SALE
NICE GRAY ANO WHITE ���'�
SIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE M5
CALL 7MUN
SALE: e-tt. Muo-groan hie back
couch Good condition 575.
7 St-MB.
171 Cutlass Supreme Good condi
Won �it offer 155-17H
FULL-BLOODED OALMATION
pups I wks Vary healthy and
playtui 1 Mack. 1 liver. Call
7te-tlT or 7S4-074Q.
FOR SALE: If" black and white
TV only I year oM. Excellent con
ditie SJe Call 75B-55B4.
JVC AUTO RETURN TURN
TABLE: L All diamond stylus
cartridge SIS; excellent condi
ram Coll Becky after 5. JRMMB.
WORKBOOKSSTUDY Guides
Used very little IuiLiw stats,
acctg. Seecan Jackie � 104 Mem
Gym'757 4307 after 11:10
M each
Copyright 1983
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
Items and Prices
Effective Wed Jan 26
thru Sat Jan 29 1983
ADVERTISED HEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re
quired to be readily available to'
sale m each Kroger Saw on excec
aa specifically noted in this ad if we
do run out of an item �e will offef
you your choice of a comparabie
item hen available reflecting the
same savings or a ramchec hic
�i!i entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
price within 30 days
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
V2
Kroge
Choco
Milk
GALLON SALE
yhole Milk.
Iilk, 2 Skim
ttermilk. or
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Orange

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CALIFORNIA
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0mfJ L Cate Donuts
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PREMIUM
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A
12-Oz
N.B.
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SUN
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$469
CHICKEN OF THE SEA
IN OIL OP WATER
Chunk Light
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Pkg.
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$049
Lb.
Box
14-Oz.
Pkg.
2
$





Title
The East Carolinian, January 25, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 25, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.243
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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