The East Carolinian, January 20, 1983







4
T
�he iEaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.J5-
Thursday, January 20, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Campus Supply Funds Frozen
By DARRY L BROWN
A tight state budget has hit ECU
in the form of a curtailment of
general supply purchases until fur-
ther notice, according to Vice
Chancellor for Business Affairs C.
G. Moore.
A memorandum from Moore ad-
dressed to all deans, directors and
department heads Jan. 13 states
that, effective immediately, "all
purchases made from state-
appropriated funds be limited to
emergencies or justified essential
needs
The order calls the condition of
state funds for university accounts
payable "extremely critical and
apparently strengthens a curtail-
ment of spending from Dec. 1,
directed from Moore's office, to the
university.
Requests for funds from the
university must now be accom-
panied by written justifications of
need, a policy not normally
necessary for such everday items as
paper and copy machine
maintenance.
The tightening of the university's
budget comes at the time when Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr and the General
Assembly are foreseeing one of the
tightest state budgets in recent
history, and the lifting of a salary
freeze for state teachers is still
uncertain.
Dr. William Bloodworth, chair-
man of the Department of English,
says his department is experiencing
only some inconviences at present,
but more serious problems could
arise if the freeze continues.
"If (the curtailment) continues,
we're going to be hurting Blood-
worth said. He cited copy machines
and the duplication of faculty
manuscripts or classroom handouts
as areas that are hurt by the lack of
funds.
In the School of Business, chair-
man of the marketing department
Dr. Edward Wheatley noted a
similar situation in his department.
"We're going to be all right for
now Wheatley said. "We're hop-
ing it's a short-term situation. The
amount of curtailment is something
we can live with as long as it doesn't
get worse
Wheatley cited a departmental
brochure, handouts to students and
the maintenance of copy machines
as projects that will have to be
postponed. "Direct communication
to majors" in the department from
the faculty may be curtailed as
printed matter will be in shorter sup-
ply, according to Wheatley.
The Executive Committee of the
chemistry department noted at their
Friday meeting "that all funds have
been frozen by the university except
for needs absolutey vital" and made
adjustments in the budget, such as
transfer of funds from one area to
another to cover shortfalls.
"What's occurring in the
chemistry department is occuring all
over campus said chairman of the
committee Wayne Ayers, referring
to the transfer of funds within the
departmental budget as some areas
run low.
No date has been given for the
end of the freeze by the office of
business affairs.
Economy Pushes Up Spring Enrollment
�"� f T w m i r- �� a �r ill fir tit tll� rtuninnimi r f Ii.t I' Ul. L � i . i � .
B STEVE DEAR
Slaff Wnirr
The nation's economy is a con-
tributing factor to ECU's record
enrollment of 12,415 students this
spring, according to Dr. Susan J.
McDaniel, acting director of admis-
sions.
According to Registrar J. Gilbert
Moore, 1983 spring semester
registration surpassed last spring's
total by 83 students. ECU had
12,332 students last spring.
Moore said there was a slight in-
crease in the number of pre-
registered students. A total of
10,774 students had pre-registered
prior to the beginning ot registra
tion on Jan. 5.
McDaniel credited the higher-
than-anticipated enrollment to "the
superb efforts of the faculty toward
retention of successful students
McDaniel also cited a higher
number of re-admitted students
which could be attributed to the na-
tion's economy.
This spring semester enrollment
exceeded pre-registration estimates.
Because of retention efforts and on
the basis ot activity and traffic in
the university admissions office,
McDaniel had predicted a spring
enrollment of 12,36). which was
slightly higher than last year.
Medical school enrollment for
1982-83 now stands at 199 com-
pared to 172 for 1981-82.
According to Mrs. Dianna Mar-
ris, associate director of institu-
tional research, enrollment during
1967-68, the first year of ECU's
university status, was 9,360. That
figure rose to 10,286 in 1974.
ECU is currently the third largest
public university in North Carolina.
N.C. State replaced UNC-Chapel
Hill as the most populated public
university in the state last year.
According to Marris, this
semester's male-to-female ratio is
very similar to last semester's, when
56 percent of the student population
was female.
The average age of the
undergraduate and graduate student
population is "gradually going up
according to Marris. In 1976, 46
percent of the entire ECU popula-
tion were over 21; in 1982, 53 per-
cent were over 21.
Unlike the current trend at many
universities, ECU's black student
population is also increasing, accor-
ding to Marris. In 1974, four per-
cent of the population was black.
Last year 10.1 percent were black
This year 10.3 percent of the enroll
ment is black.
�� B, CIMOV WALL
The curtailment of expenditures for campus supplies used b all depart-
ments hopes to conserve what is still left on the shelves before spending
money for more. Funding shortages on campus are evidence of a statewide
revenue pinch.
Two Students Arrested
For November Break-Ins
Legislature Likely To Postpone Funds
Budget Dims Hopes For ECU Building
By DARRY L BROWN
One of the tightest state budgets
in recent years makes it unlikely that
the N.C. General Assembly will ap-
propriate funds for the proposed
new arts and sciences building on
the ECU campus, according to
Charles R. Blake, assistant to the
chancellor at ECU.
A funding request for the propos-
ed building, controversial on cam-
pus because of its suggested location
behind Rawl which some groups
claim is one of the last remaining
undeveloped areas on campus, has
been submitted to the state
legislature, which appropriates all
money for projects on public
university campuses.
The building proposal is included
in an overall budget request by the
University of North Carolina system
for the upcoming biennium. The
legislature makes out the state
budget every two years.
Blake did not express much hope
that the $13.5 million needed for the
project could be approved in the
current economic conditions.
"It's unlikely that a capital im-
provement project of that
magnitutude will be possible to
fund Blake said. "It would be
unusual for capital improvement
projects, other than small ones, to
be approved in the tight budget
situation
Chairman of the English depart-
ment Dr. William Bloodworth,
whose department would move into
the new facility and be provided of-
fice space for faculty who are cur-
rently sharing rooms, was more
Pirate Walk Endorsed By All
New Escort Service Praised
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SMI Wrtlcr
Monday marked the beginning of
ECU's new escort service, Pirate
Walk. Now that the service is in
operation, The East Carolinian ask-
ed students their opinions on the
service, and if they planned to use it.
Al Smith � Sophomore, Business
� " think it's a good idea,
especially Jor the girls. They
shouldn 't have to stay home because
they think it's unsaje to walk alone
on campus
Laura McClellan � Freshman,
Medical Technology � "I plan to
use the service. Many times I have to
go to the library by myself. Last
semester, there was some guy who
would stand out in the woods near
my dorm (White) and he frightened
a lot of people
Gail Goodrich � Freshman,
General College � " definitely
plan to use the escort service. I think
it's a great idea. IJ I go to see some
friends on the hill, there's a lot of
dark spots where I'd like to be
escorted
Mark Brown � Sophomore,
Business � "I don't plan to
volunteer, and I don't plan to use
the service, but I highly recommend
it to girls who have to walk around
late at night on or off campus
Photos BY STANLEY LEAHY
hopeful, but still unsure what the
legislature's decision would be.
"I don't know what their
priorities are going to be � my
guess is even in these hard economic
times, the state is going to build
some buildings Bloodworth add-
ed he did not know how the
legislators will perceive the need for
the building, especially in propor-
tion to other demands on the state
revenue.
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr has call-
ed the current budget crunch one of
the tightest in modern history, and
many state lawmakers are predicting
lower revenues for the year than
earlier expected.
Blake noted that due to the
unclear economic picture, the state
may not be able to allocate funding
for the building in the first half of
the 1983-85 budget, but money for
the new ECU classroom facility in
the second year of the budget was a
possibility.
By STEVE DEAR
staff Writer
Two ECU students have been
charged with three felonies in con-
nection with the Nov. 14 and Nov.
21 break-ins and property thefts in
Minges Coliseum and Scales Field
House.
Jerry Allen Hcdrick. a senior, and
freshman Berate Vanbenthem. both
residents of Scott dormatory, were
charged on Monday and indicted on
Tuesday with the November rob-
beries of five ECU staff offices, in-
cluding the offices of head football
coach Ed Emory and the Pirate
Club.
Public Safety Investigators Lt.
Gene McAbee and Capt. Earl Wig-
gins were on a routine patrol outside
Scott dorm last week when they
noticed a Domino's pizza sign hang-
ing in Vanbenthem's dorm room.
While questioning Vanbenthem's
roommate about that and several
other signs, they noticed a pair of
golden scissors and a letter opener
that fit the description of the stolen
articles.
After Vanbenthem arrived, he
and the officers went to Hedrick's
room and were questioned by the
officers. A short while later, accor-
ding to the public safety depart-
ment, they confessed to the crimes.
The total value of the stolen items
is said to be in the thousands Many
office supplies, appliances, and
miscellaneous items were stolen
from the offices of the Pirate Club,
assistant professor Gay Blockcr's
office and athletic director ti.cn
karr's office. All the items are said
to have been recovered.
Also stolen was a computer ter-
minal vaJued at $750. When the two
students reportedly could not
operate the terminal it was
deposited in a nearby garbage
dumpster. The terminal is said to be
inoperable.
Both Hedrick and Vanbenthem
deny having stolen nearly $3,000
dolars worth of jewlery from Ed
Emory's offices. They also deny
stealing other items from some of
the same offices they allegedly
entered. Wiggins said that those
items have not been recovered and
that they may have been stolen in
other crimes.
Both students could face a max-
imum sentence of five years.
Although, they may be placed on
probation, be given a fine and or
have to perform a community ser-
vice, according to Wiggins.
Wiggins said the department of
Campus Security has been "very
lucky" with recovering stolen items
this vear.
'How Do You Like Them Apples?'
Machine Of The Year Hits Campus
Goodrich
Brown
(COLLEGE PRESS SERVICE) � Iowa State junior
John Sutton is finishing his last papers of the term, hun-
ched over his Apple II Plus microcomputer. Conspiring
with a word processing program, he scans his work by
touching a few more keys, rearranges a few sentences
and makes some minor last-minute changes.
And when he prepares to turn the homework in, he
doesn't put his papers into plastic report covers or pull
on boots to trudge through the snow to his instructors'
offices.
Instead, he simply tells the computer to send his
papers to the university's main computer. In the morn-
ing, his teachers will ask the main computer for Sutton's
work, and then grade it. Electronically.
At Idaho State, music majors compose and analyze
songs on microcomputers. Art students "paint" with
special computer graphics tablets that allow them to
create video art projects.
At Carnegie-Mellon University, aspiring poets and
playwrights consult computer programs to help them
with English.
By next fall, you won't be able to enroll at Carnegie-
Mellon unless you agree to buy your own IBM Personal
Computer.
The long-anticipated campus computer revolution, in
other words, has finally begun to reach students.
Computers have been nosing into college libraries and
offices for years now, and have been increasingly
available to students on many campuses. But just last
spring. Harvard students still caught administrators
unaware when they lugged word processsors into class
to take finals. Harvard administrators, like counter-
parts around the country, had to scramble to draw up
ways of regulating student personal computer use,
which is quickly outstripping the centralized computer
centers becoming common at Harvard.
Indeed, with falling microcomputer costs, more and
better software available, and lighter, more-streamlined
hardware on the market, 1983 promises to be the year in
which micros will begin to change substantially the way
students go to college.
"At the risk of being trite, the personal computer will
become as much a part of life as the telephone, if not
more so predicts Bruce Schimming, IBM's education
industry administrator.
Students are already using computer work stations
and their own units to play remote games, carry on elec-
tronic conversations, send jokes and even arrange dates
as well as do their work in new ways.
Iowa State's Sutton does his homework on the
microcomputer his fraternity � Delta Tau Delta � pur-
chased for its members to use for personal as well as
fraternity business.
"We use it for just about anything you can imagine
Sutton boasts. "By spending eight hours of work at the
computer, I save 40 hours of study time. And when it
comes to doing budget and financial reports for the
fraternity, I can do in 20 minutes what used to take days
to do manually
Like many other microcomputers. Delta Tau Delta's
is connected through regular telephone lines to the
university's main computer, as well as to other national
See APPLES, Page 3
t-t-
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THE fc AST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 20,1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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would like to nave an item printed
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please type it on an announcement
term and send t to The East
Carolinian m care ot me produc
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office m the Pubi't at'Ons Building
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cepted
There 'S no i large tor an
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limited Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you wan'
aid suggest mat you do not relv
solely on this column tor publicity
Tne deadime for announcements
is 3 p m Monday tor the Tuesday
trtper anci 3pm VYednesoayy for
t'e Thursdv paper No an
runceme"ts reie ved after these
oeadlmes w�ll be prmteo
This space s available to all
campus rgarwa' ens ano depart
ments
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta will hold a
meeting on January 27, 1983 a'
' 00pm m the Vendenhaii Coffee
Shop DR Peter Makuck will give
a reading from n,s book of poetr,
hrr �e wt- All members are en
c our aged t0 attend, guests are
welcome
RESIDENCE
ADVISOR
Applications are now being
taken for Resident Advisor posi
lions m the residence halls Any
student who has at least a 2 2
average clear iudicai record
enrolled fun time ana has lived in
a residence na'i is eligible to app
fy
information and application
torms may be obtamea from any
Residence Director Area Coor
onator, or the Residence Lite Ot
t'ce They should be turned into
the Resiaerxe i�e Oft'ce. 214
hichard Building
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
Rush for Sigma Gamma Rho
will be held lf�i� Thursday at 7 00
m the Coffee House An interested
v-urtg ladies should attend
LEARNING
DISABILITY
� Ou have a learning disability
and or dyslexia ad ou are win
mq to talk about it can 757 3205
P' Penny will use 'his mforma
ton for an ar'icie in a professional
lOurnal Confiaen'iahty assured
P'ease can evenings or weekends
CAREER CHOICE
Career by Choice Not Chance A
two part mini series offered at no
cost by the Un.versify Councehng
Center Series are to be held
January 24 and 25 and February 7
and 8 m Aright Anne� Room 305
from 3 00 to 5 00 No advance
registration necessary
ECU CIRCLE K
Circle K Mtftll oe mee' ng every
Tuesday night at 7 30 p m in
Room 221 in Menoennaii S'udent
Center Circle K is a coed service
organization which works to im
prove life on our campus and com
- unify if you are interested in
helping others are meetings on
Tuesday nights a' 7 00
ONE DAY
COMPUTER
PROGRAMS
The SrWall Computer
Revolution Saturday. February
24. 1983 Word Processing
Saturday, March 5. 1983
Pre requisite The Small Com
puter Revolution or equivalent in
troduction to Programming M
BASIC. Saturday March 26. 1983
Pre requisite The Small Com
puter Revolution or equivalent
Contact the Division of Continuing
Education. 757 613
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
vVant to be a part ot Leadership,
Friendship and Service' Do you
also want to xiaiize and nave
fun' APO is tne National. Coed
Service Fraternity Come and iom
us tor APO s Spring Rush See ad
later m today s paper
S. R. A.
Escorts are needed for the
Escort Service Anyone interested
in being an escort please contact
your dorm director If you are a
dorm resident ot it you live oft
campus contact tne SGA office
US CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
TheU S Chamber ot Commerce
has internships available tor a
variety ol majors They are
located m Washington DC All m
ternshtps are non paid Contact
the Co op Office
SPRING BREAK
SKI
Sk. Snowshoe West Virginia spr
mg break Registration and
deposits are due on February 1 at
4 00 p m in Memorial Gym room
108 Contact jo Saunders at
757 6000 tor information concern
.ng the ski packages that are
available
FACULTY AND
STAFF AEROBICS
Faculty ano s'aff aerobic dance
mee's a' 12 00 noon Monday,
Wednesday ano Friday in
Memorial Gym room 108 There is
no charge and you de not need tc
nave any previous exper.ence
Come out ano get yourself in sr-ape
and have fun while you re at it
ContaC Jo Sauncers a' 757 600C tor
further information
CO�OP
Represen'a'ives from ramps
Don Lee Seafarer, ano Cnerno
among others arecorrng tc Eas'
Carolina to interview s'udents for
summer ,obs Tney will be a'
Menoenhan Room 248
cnFebruary 7 m'erv.ew appo.nt
ments mus' be rnaae a' UK Cc op
Office Raw' 3U Pnone 757 e
AMBASSADORS
This is to remind an Am
bassadors that our meeting on
Wed January 26 has been
cancelled and in its place our in
ducation Ceremony has been
scheduled This special even win
ake place on Thursday January
27 at 6 4i n Menpennali s mul'i
purpose room All Amoassaoors
will be enoue'ed and neat aress is
reaqured A reception at tne E Ibo
Room wilt follow the ceremony
and an Ambasseoors are mvifeo ro
attend
BLOOD MOBILE
The Biology Club will sponsor
the Red Cross Blooomobile Tues
day and Wednesday January 25
and 26 Hours ot collection will be
10 00 am to 4 00 p m in
Mendenhall room 244
CO�OP CLUB
Tnere will be a meeting of the
Co op Club on Thursday. January
27 1983 at 4 00 p m in 313 Rawl
All Co op students and any student
interested in a Cooperative Educa
tion internship should attend
NEW STUDENT
ORIENTATION
PROGRAM
The Office of the Associate Dean
of Student Life, located in
Whichard Building, Room 210. is
now taking applications for the
New Student Orientation Program
held in June and July Applicants
should have a good scholastic
average, and should not be piann
mg on attending Summer School
interviews of the applicants will
begin around the middle ot March
ASPA
January 19. American Society of
Personnel Aqmimis'rators will
meet in Rawls. room 207 a' 3 00
p m This is an important meeting
tor charter memoers io find out
where and when initiation will be
held individuals wno want to iom
or obtain more information come
ano participate
PHYE MAJORS
AH students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior our
.ng change ot maior week for the
Spring Semester should report to
Mmges Coliseum from 1 00 3 00
p m on Wednesday Feb 9 1983
tor a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre
requisite tor official admittance to
tne physical education maior pro
gram More detailed information
concerning the test is available by
calling 757 6497
Any student with a medical con
dition that would contramdicate
participation in the testing pro
gram should contact Dr Israel at
757 649- Examples would include
heart murmurs, congenital heart
disease respiratory disease or
significant muscuioskeletal pro
biems If you nave ana significant
medical conditions please notify
Dr Israel even if you plan to be
tested
ECU LAW
SOCIETY
ECU Law Society will meet at
7 00 in Room 241 or Mendennall
Student Center, Thursday
January 20. 1983 Finalize plans
for trip ro Washington, DC
CO-OP EDUCATION
CO OP internship available with
the Dept of Agriculture Students
with a background m entomology,
botany. plant pathology,
nematology, horticulture, ana
related fields should apply at 313
Rawl, COOP office Phone
757 6979
COMMUNICATE
Learn to develop assertive com
munication skills Tell others what
you want feel and believe Asser
tiveness can open new doors tor
you Assertive Communication
Tuesday March 15 April S.
7 00 9 30 p m Contact the Divl
sion of Continuing Education.
757 6143
CLASSIFIED ADS
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use a separate sheet of paper if
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tuation mark and word space
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doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
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reserve the right to reject any ad.
'All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75C per tine or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Rrt.ni to THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office by 3:00 Teesday before
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Np. lines
.Zip.
.Phone.
.at 75c per line S.
.No. insertions.
enclosed
f��

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ECU POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poe'ry Forum will
hold its first meeting of tne new
,ear this Thursday evening a' 8 00
in Menoenhan Room 212 The
Forum is ooen to anyone who
would nke an appreciative bu'
crittca' audience tor his or ner
poetry Those attending are asked
'o bring s� or eigh' copies of work
o be read and discussed The
f- orum is a student organisation
also unoer rne sponsorship of tne
Engi sh aepar'ment Fourm
regularly meets on 'he first or
'hiro Thursday of each month of
the school year
BASIC SAILING
Two classroom sessions and
three weekend afternoons on 19 26
toot baots on the Pamnco River
join in the Fun Regis'ration is
i.mited to 16. so register early
Mee's Thursday. April 7. 21.
7 30 9 30 p m , Saturday April 9
16 23 1 30 4 30 P m Contact the
Division of Continuing Education,
757 6143
JUNK NEEDED
Are you throwing out any old
furniture, unusual obiects drapes
etc if you are the art school will
pick it up tor you ano take it off
your hands tree Lamps chairs
solas stools, anytnmg - ooes not
nave to be in working order (will
be used tor props m art classes)
Call 757 665 weekdays and ask for
Mr Wes Crawley
DANCE
Foxtrot. Rhumba Disco Wal'l
and Bop the bas.es and their
variations Beginning Ballroom
Dancing Friday. February 18
April 29. 1983 trom 7 00 8 00 p m
intermediate Ballroom Dancing
Friday February 18 April 29.
1983 from 8 00 9 00 p m ContaC
the Division of Continuing Educa
tion. 757 6143
IRA
The International Students
Association will hold its first
mee'ing on Saturday. January 22.
at the international House. 306
East 9th Street, at 5 00 p m All
members are encouraged to come
ano interested individuals are
welcome We will discuss the ac
tivities for this semester
RESUME
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning ano Place
ment Service in the Bic�ton Mouse
is ottering tne following one hour
sessions to help you prepare your
own resume Tuesday. Jan is at
2 00 p m Monday. Jan 24 at 4 00
p m , Tuesday. Feb i at 7 00
p m ' Wednesday Feb 2 at 2 30
p m Those seniors or graouate
s'udents finishing tn,s year and
planning to register with us are
urged '0 a'tend V ou may come to
tne BiOKton House at any of tne
above times
PSI CHI
Psi Chi offer 2 scholarships tor
students whose studies are in
Psychology Applica'ions can be
picked up at the Psychology office.
Room 105 ano at the Psi Chi
Library Last day applications
will be accepted is April 1, 1983
Pst Chi wilt hold its first mee'ing
on Thursday January 27 1983 a'
7 30 p m m Room 129 Speight
Topic win be tocuseo on going to
graduate school in Psychology
This is open to an interested peo
pie Welcome back Psi Chi
members'
PHYE MAJORS
CLUB
Physical Education Club
meetings will be held at the follow
mg times and dates January 18 at
5 15. and January 20 at 4 00
NATIONAL PARK
CONCESSIONS INC
National Park Concessions, inc
otters employment opportunities
tor seasonal employees tor the
period of approximately June 1
through Labor Day to be con
sidered This is a condition ot tne
employment A variety of posi
tions are available Apply at the
Co op Office
BIOLOGY
ECU Biology Club meeting will
be held Monday January 24 1983
at 7 30pm mroomBN!02 Nancy
Fninow from the Cooperative
Education office on campus will
be the featured speaker The talk
will include current ioO oppor
tunities available through the
Coop office An interested persons
welcome
SCUBA
Basic NAUi or PADi Scuba Cer
titication Section i Tuesday anc
'hursday March 15 April 7
7 00 10 00 p m Section n Tues
day and Thursday April 12 Ma.
5, 7 00 10 00 p m These courses
are designed to introduce begin
ners to SCUBA d'ving ith basic
instruction in the tundarnen'a1
skills and safe'y procedures
Register early ! Contact'he Divi
Sion of Continuing Education,
757 6143
HONORS
SIMINAR TOPICS
Faculty members ano current
Honors students are reminded of
'he opportunity to propose 'opics
tor Honors Seminars tor tan and
spring semesters 1983 84 These
seminars are ideally inter
disciplinary ano problem or topic
oriented See pp 87 88 of the
1982 84 catalogue for general
categories Seminars meet once a
week and give 3 sn credit
towards G E requuiremen's
To be considered proposals
must be submitted in writing D
January 20 1983 '0 Or Dana
Sanders. Coordinator of the
Honors Program c. 0 English
Dep' Austin Bldg Campus For
further information call 757 6548
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Camera I Tuesday February
22 March 29 7 00 9 00 p m The
Dance Factory Tuesday.
February 27 May 3 5 30 30
p m Guitar Tuesday February
22 April 19, 6 30 7 45 p m Ciogg
� ng Wednesday February 23
April 6 8 00 10 00 p m Speed
Reading Thursday February 24
Apr.i 21 7 009 00 p m Yoga
Tuesday and Thursday. March 15
April 7 6 30 7 30 p m Contact the
Division of Continuing Education.
757 6143
WZMB
The Eiectnc Rainbow Radio
Show runs 3 pm to 6 pm Friday
and 12 midnight to 4 am Saturday
mghts Album specials are aired
4pm and 2am respectively Fr,oay
the album will be by the rock
group "Saxon' ana is entitled
The Eagle Has Landed Satur
day will feature a tribute to ' Led
Zeppelin' including tracking of
the soundtrack to "The Song Re
mams The Same Tune in tc
WZMB and play it loud
INTERVIEWING
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Serv.ce m the Bio�ton House
is offering tnese one hour sessions
to aid you in developing De"er in
terviewmg skills tor use in your
10b search The workshops a'Mon
day. Jan 17at2 00pm Tuesday
Jan 25 at 4 00 p m Wednesday
Feo 2 a' 4 00 p m . Wednescay
Feb 2 a' 7 00 p m
A mm ana d'SCussion of inter
viewing through 'he Career Piann
mg and Placemen' Service will be
shared
FBI
700 positions win be available
m the Federal Bureau of in
ves'igation later this year, states
Chuck Richards of 'he North
Carolina Regional office He wn
De on campus to talk with maiors
from an disciplines interested m
the F-Bi Three information ses
sions are being coordinated by tne
Career Planning and Piacemenr
Service and will be held as
follows Jan 24,4 00 pm in Rawl
130 Accounting Society Jan 25,
10 30 a m in Mendennall Cot
teenouse An welcome jan 25
! 00 pm ;n Brews'er B 30! All
students welcome
NEEDATUTOR
Phi Sigma Pi. National Honor
Fraternity has tutors for a variety
of General College Jubiects For
more information can 752 3022
MINI COURSES
Several non credit, mini courses
are now being offered By the
Department of university unions
individuals who would nke to par
ticipate in a mini course must
register In person at the
Mendenhall Central Ticket Office
between 'he hours of 10 00 A M
and 4 00 P M . Monday through
Friday Registration tees win be
accepted through the day prior to
the firs'class meeting
Each mini course has a max
� mum and a minimum enrollment
No refunds of course tees will be
made atter the registration
deadline unless the course s
cancelled
Each registrant mus' show
n s. her ECU ID or drivers license
and ECU Activity Card or
Mendenhau Student center
Membership, with the exception of
a spouse or a guest who mus' be
registered by the par'iopang
card holder
CLIXK.INO -���? m Jjjar m
Mondays � Jan 31 Fet 7. 14. 21.
28
Instructor Nancy Spamnour
MSC Mult. Purpose Room Fee
S10 00
Learn basic ciogg.ng s'eps "o
music 'hat makes you want tc
move it's iust plain hard to S't
still once you ve learned a tew
steps Free s'yie as wen as coup'e
oancmg will be taught Coggng s
a wonderful aerobic exercise ana
a tension release mechanism
unclog your mind and body and
enioy tr,stolk dance
t fUJUGKAPsn 7 to r m � �o p m
Wednesdays � Jan 26 Fee 2 9.
16 23
�nsh-uc'of Karen Pociesiwa
MSC Room 221 FeeSlOOC
Students can be expee'ed 'o
come away from this course with a
working knowledge ot the
Chancery italic me most popular
style of writing I fs appeal is based
on its usable s'yie that is graceful
personable, and confemporer y
Chancery once mas'ered will be
the bass on which to learn the
otner styles
For further information can Lin
da Barkano, Crat's and Recrea
tion Director at 757 6611 ex 260 or
'he Central Ticke' office a' ex-
266
AMERICAN
ASSOCIATION
OF UNIVERSITY
WOMEN
There wni be a meet'ng of It
branch of American Association o
Uhiversi'r Women �"a- sorganil
� ng m "e Greenvie a'ea jr 'ues
day. jan is a' MO c " a" IHa
First American Savings 1 LOS
community room The prog'an-
wni be given oy ju�� Pa'�' o
Snepparo Memor.ai Lram
SENIOR CLASS
The Career Piannng anq Pace
ment Service s a service
ava.iabie to those s'uoen's -c
are gradua' ng and who choose tc
establish a credent.ais fie co"
pie'e with a resume ano 'hree e
ters Of reference
The Sen.or Class Ott.cers and
the ECU Amoassaoors pian to be
avanaoie on. Wednesday janua'i
26.1983 trom 7 g 30 PM tc a .e
tours of the Career P'a ng ano
Placement Serv ce in In Biox'on
House We win heip "ij- I
Seniors Night' to snow you 'he
facility ano ntcmation available
tha' is designed for your use on a
seit service bass
This is one ot me mos valuable
services ottered 'o students trf
at ECU
HISTORY MAJORS
pn. Alpha The presen'Dr
Robert &owe wm an niormawe
diScuS'On ano 5i.de presen'acm
entitled. Beh.nd 'he Japanese
Mystique Some mages anaCc �
men's T ne prese'a' zn m " be
Monday j�n 24 at 7 30 p m
Spe.gh 129 gr- 'eresne's
will be served m "he Rc"a'd C
Tod! room otiow.ng 'e prog'a
Eve'rne s -� MM a"end
SCUBA
Ae eres'ec - s'ar'ng a
Scuta C'jb1 p.ease a"�-c
meengs on januarr 3 arc
February ' a' i X m Room 105 B
Memorial Gtm
NC GOVERNMENT
INTERNSHIPS
a variety of totos are avaabe
Pay s S3 75 per hour tor ui' � me
positons Beginning June 1
Augus 5 Students mus' nave
finished 'heir sophmore �ear ard
nave a 2 5 GPA Gradua'e
s'uden's are aiso engib'e 'c appw
Appi ca on deac i� s Fecruar�
7 Con'ac" me Cc op o� ce
The Last C arolinian
UKl - '
PjO i"�Off'i tuesoa. a-c
sea. djr"g t aci�G c
eg' ac e.m Weones-1 �
ng 'ne Mfnftttt
TH Eas' Car jtin �' Of
-esc�ner .� Eas-
. . nversilf -y
�ce-at re pub sec � - an
Oy me s'joen-s c Eas' Ca- . n
e" '�
Subscription Bate UC �ea- �
The East Carolinian otnees
are located m the Old Sou'f
Bu'idmg on the campus ot ECU
Greenville N C
POSTMASTI � - ' acid'ess
c-Vges 10 Tfi
C'd jOo" Buii -g ECL Green
. M NC 27834
Telephone 757 834 �3�- �J0
BOOK OF MORMON
E n, enc ling Crna-
slrucifonfromTnaWwi � II -
twttnex rnunift' n' Jru -
" is a non tic'ion sac-ec
t sr, o' � people a-
Amerca from 600 B C to 400 A D
� s a seesr 'ong c'ass Itii
n-ee's n Brews'e' 6u -cng 'oc�
2C3 8 every "h.jrsca- n,gh- .r0-
6 30 linltl 8 00 P m There s no
c-a'ge si ce�e asx sues- sns
ano hear the Gospei as II .as
�augh' Or 'he proc-e .r
f e' ca 2O0C years age
RUSH
Can-9 S g�a Sigma Na' ta
Ser. ce Sore '� -ves .ov.
u.Snr .a"jar � 25 a-c 26 a 5 3C
a-c 6 00 'espec� . e � a'
vr:t"t te' nvovec m �
;a"c.s �"c � '
�ore � � a' � a V.
-5 8S35
INVESTMENT
STRATEGIES
Bas v Commodity Hedging
Tuesday and T"ursda� Feorjar.
5 24 " 00 9 00 p m nves" "S "
�ne 80 s Wednesday February 23
Aprn 6. 6 X 9 10 p m These
courses
tc-maionl
on no expernce Hi .nves'mg Con
'ac In D v.son or Continuing
Education. 75T 6143
nill provid vaiyj�Jje-
i lar those nntitkayt ilrlse
ECU
i A A i
rs.�. is
Nite
All cans 45C
til 11:00 p.m.
70C till :00 a.m.
Adm. 1.00
Come Early
8 �
I



AOTT AX pledge class
invites you to
Happy Hour
AAon. Nite
Jan. 24th
8:30 to 11:00
PAPA KATZ
$1 admission
25$ Draft
Door Prizes
IfcdG
123 E. 5th Str
752-7483
&SSSSSSSSS5
i
ASSSSSSSSSS
SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSffi
sponsored by
Hodges
Subway
Substation 11
Blue Moon Cate
Tapscott Design
International Foods & Gifts
Pharos
Marsh's
Book Barn
Hearts Deliaht
Apple Records
The Aerobic Workshop
All You Can Eat 5-9
All You Can Eat 5-9
All You Can Eat 5-9
Thurs. Spaghetti Special
Sunday - Lasagna Special
Monday - Pizza & Pasta
Friday Happy Hour 4-7
Dollar Specials
Coming Tuesday Brian Huskey
Watch for our daily Luncheon Specials,
ow have a new head chef serve your needs.
FAMOUS PIZZA
Fast, Friendly Delivery
Hot oven subs,
Spaghetti,
Lasagna
SPECIA L
Lasagna $2.99
with Salad
& Garlic Bread
H.H. 2-Close
Pitcher $2.25
MUG 58C
Mot for Delivery
758-5982 758-5616
! OIL CHANGE
; LUBE AND
I
I
I
L
FILTER
$
10
Major Brand Multigrade Oil Up To 5 Qts.
EXPIRES 1108)
COUPON � - m m �
S TRANSMISSION
! SERVICE
- Includes New Filler
' A Fluid. Torque Converter
I Extra. Most US & Foreign Cars
I
L
28
EXPIRES 1J0S3
� COUPON
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
I
I
I
I
I
:
.i

BUSY ?;
s
PPT
VILLAGE
.8
511 S. EVANS
756-9222
! WGOOOfYEARl J
I ������TIRE CEniTESHHHHm ,
OFFICIAL NC INSPECTION STATION
� DOWNTOWN WEST END1
7� DICKINSON AVE SHOPPING CENTER I
! 752-4417
756-9371!
DON'T
FORGET YOUR CAR!
A Special
Welcome Back
15 Discount on all
stock thru Jan.21
for ECU Students with I.D.
Applel
( onlinurd Iro
computer networks and data
nity members to communici
across campus and acr I
Now, virtual!) eer ulleg
"computer literacy" course
camp computing centers,
micros in dorms, libraries,
houses
Marquette, lor instance,
the school's two main compi
Duke Universii ha j
Computers in residence h;
around campus to given stu
computers
Baylor, North Carolina
linois State, among many
dorm computers.
Students do use thei
Student
Two LC!
announced
participate n next
M �nda'i-
the State Departim
protest in Washingl
D C.
S t u d
Darwin and Glenn
Waughan plan : "
to Washington D C
with a group ot i
i m a t e 1 50 N
Carolinians �
ticipate in the i
demonstrate-
held to opp
I
I
i
.
I
Student
A gr " t.C L
students, under
guidan
the vice chai r 1
!
ner, hae
-� jd p ipt
tne sec od irafi I �
proposed pa
on war. arm am.
peace The documei
WOMEN'S HEAcTH
CARE YOU CAN M
DEPEND ON

� � �
-
SBrVICB �
� - - �


IICM1W

A
rK
j
Al
355 2
Januar
Haircuts 5
nAon � Tues Ar:
Bring E.
236 Greenv
(Behind Tipl
I
Coupon:
Chickei
Pll
2 Veggiei
for!
Open II -8
752-0476
Located 2 Wocfcsj
1
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 20 198?
.Zip.
Phone.
Ii cttioni.
.enclosed
f 'i� "
i
T 1
i i.

.i- �i
- - T;
I
'
L -Ii�L ,� J
IrVtRlCAN
JSOCIATION
DIVERSITY
I' MEN
IIOR CLASS
1 he Fast Carolinian
a. rjnesdav ft
Subscription Rate �20yejriy
�"� tji' Ca-oinun oHices
a' ixa'ed p h� 0I� iouth
rt . . .n 'ht .a-pus o ECU
Telephone S
e3�� .3 �30'
BOOK OF MORMON
,K Y MAJORS
� s " J from
- � . - rn�re t& no
� � M ' as
- . -rt �- a he � �
200 � ears age
RUSH
i �a s ga Na'ionai
r - n. tes ow r
- a- . afK) .6 a' 5 3C
respectively a �
� -� -v. .er r , Mr
- -� H;i or
KMRA
OvERNMENT
Iternsh�ps
INVESTMENT
STRATEGIES
Bas v ComnoCv neag g
noav j"flT"i'�n, February
'14 7 00 9 00 p " nves'ng .n
"e 8C s Wedrtevaav eOruarv
Apr i 6 6 30 9 'C p � nese
�rou-ses �v:ii p�-ov.ae vd.uacit v
� r-atro" 'or os �w�o hav� i(�tia
nnocxM � " "�' "0 Con
ECU
�?
itS5
�52-7483
Cial All You Can Eat 5-9
lecial All You Can Eat 5-9
'asta All You Can Eat 5-9
lappy Hour 4-7
r Specials
lay Brian Huskey
ly Luncheon Specials.
ad chef serve your needs.
Special
me Back
jscount on all
thru Jan.21
udents with I.D.
I
Apples Not Just For The Teacher Anymore
Continued From Panel
computer networks and data bases, allowing the frater-
nity members to communicate with other computers
across campus and across the nation.
Now. virtually every college requires students to take
"computer literacy" courses. Most schools now have
campus computing centers, and many are installing
micros in dorms, libraries, classrooms and fraternity
houses.
Marquette, for instance, is linking dorm computers to
the school's two main computers.
Duke University has installed some 200 IBM Personal
Computers in residence halls and other buildings
around campus to given students "unlimited access to
computers
Baylor, North Carolina State, Notre Dame, and Il-
linois State, among many others, are also installing
dorm computers.
Students do use them. The University of Oregon has
to keep its 15 dorm computer stations open 24-hours-a-
day to meet demand.
But the idea of making computers available only in
certain areas � computer centers, dorm stations or even
in fraternity houses � is fast becoming a thing of the
past.
Instead, observers say, there will soon be a computer
for every student. And colleges will become "wired" so
that personal computers can be plugged in and used vir-
tually everywhere on campus.
"In the last five years the number of computer ter-
minals on campus has gone from under 400 to nearly
1000 says Dartmouth computer center Director
William Arms, "and we expect that to increase to over
4000 within the next five years
Dartmouth, like many other schools, is "getting away
from the idea of clustering computers together, and
moving toward the idea that each individual should
have his or her own computer in their dorm or office
"And when that happens says IBM's Schimming,
"when you suddenly go to a situation where a student
can be sitting at a keyboad of his or her own, not just
spending four hours per week in a computer at the
library or computer center, then you're going to see
some dramatic differences in the way things are done
In a joint experiment with IBM, Carnegie-Mellon is
one of the front-runners in the race to become the na-
tion's first "wired campus CMU freshemn will be re-
quired to buy their own computers next fall at an
estimated cost of $750 per year, in addition to their an-
nual $10,000 tuition.
"By 1985, our goal is to build a network of 7500 per-
sonal computers on campus says CMU spokesman
Don Hale. "Each student will purchase his or her own
computer and take it with them when they leave
Drexel University, too, will require all entering
freshmen to buy their own computers next year.
"A kid who comes to us next year explains Bernard
Sagik, drexel vice president ot academic attairs, "will
graduate in 1988, and will be working in a world that
will be totally involved in information and computer
technology. It would be an injustice to den our
students the opportunity to learn how to use this new
technology
But not everyone is convinced computer Itteracv
should be ranked with reading, writing and arithmetic
as one of education's basic aims.
"I just don't think it's necessarv tor evervbod
need to know how to assemble and program a com
puter says Robert kelman. Colorado States com-
puter science chief. "You don't have to know how a
television set works to turn it on and watch a pro, m
and you don't have to know how to program a com-
puter to keep recipes and balance vour checkbook or.
one
Students To Take Part In Demonstration
Two ECU students
announced plans to
participate in next
Monday's "Blockade
the State Department"
protest in Washington
DC.
Students Suzanne
Darwin and Glenn
Maughan plan to travel
to Washington D.C.
with a group of approx-
i m a t e 1 y 50 North
Carolinians to par-
ticipate in the national
demonstration being
held to oppose further
U.S. military aid to
Central America.
Monday is the
deadline for which
President Reagan must
certify for the third
time that human-rights
conditions in El
Salvador are improv-
ing. Congress requires
Reagan to support his
request for further
military aid to the
strife-torn Central
American nation every
six months before it is
given.
Both Darwin and
Maughan expect to be
arrested for their parts
in the blockade at-
tempt. "By our actions
we are sending a
message to the govern-
ment of the United
States said Maughan,
an Intermediate Educa-
tion student. "We are
saying 'No' to the lie of
certification and 'No'
to U.S. war moves in
Central America
"I believe that we
don't need to send
more arms to El
Salvador to allow them
to kill themselves
Darwin said, a junior in
English. "There's a
statement in physical
numbers. When other
people see all of us in-
volved at this level and
willing to be arrested,
they may realize that
there is something go-
ing on that they need to
think about for
themselves
"Through my ac-
tions I'm saying to the
governemnt that I'm no
longer in agreement
with their policies
Maughan said. "The
situation in all of Cen-
tral America is at such
a critical level at this
time that everyone
needs to become more
involved and aware of
the situation
The national protest
is being sponsored by
the New York based
Committee in Solidari-
ty with the People of El
Salvador and locally by
the Carolina Coalition
for Justice in Central
America.
"I'm not going up
there to be arrested
Maughan said. "I'm
going up there to make
a statement. I don't
consider this civi
disobedience, I con-
sider this to be my duty
as a citizen of this
country
ICYttC
90S
We Repair All Makes
530 Cotanche St.
Greenville 757-3616
SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE
Student Group Studies Peace Document
A group of ECU
students, under the
guidance of assistant to
the vice chancellor for
student life John Gard-
ner, have formed a
study group to examine
the second draft of a
proposed pastoral letter
on war, armaments and
peace. The document is
from the National Con-
ference of Catholic
Bishops ad hoc com-
mittee on war and
peace.
The group, which
meets on Tuesday even-
ings at 7:30 in the
Catholic Newman
Center is open to
anyone, on or off cam-
ABORTIONS UP
lO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
HtS 00 Pregnancy Tnl. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
ajj OS35 (Toll Free Number
aoo 271 2Sa) between � A M
and i P M Weekdays
RALEIGHS WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 Wesl Morgan St
Raleigh N C
pus, interested in par-
ticipating
"The document calls
for study by all
Catholics and others
Gardner said. "It iden-
tifies the threat of
nuclear war and the
arms race as the
supreme crisis of our
time, and I agree with
that premise
Gardner stressed that
the study group is not a
lecture; it's a group
participation and
discussion and study.
SHOOT BIU.IARD&-
ft
We Are Now Open 11:00 a.m.
to 900 p.m.
ams
FINE
FOODS
X3
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABORTION: a difficult deo-
DEPEND ON. sionthat smaaeeasie'&v
� xnet '�'��� eming Center Counseiorsare
j jtote da and night to support and under-
stand you vour safety comfort dnd privacy are
assured Dv tnecarng staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES � 'uesdav Saturday AporTion Ap-
pointments � 1st & 2nd Trimester Aportions up to
18 Weeks � P,ee Pregnancy Tests � Very Eariv
Pregnancy Tests � nc usi.e fees � insurance
Accepted � CAU 761-5550 DAY OR NIGHT �
Health care counseling THE FLEMING
CENTER
and educa'on tor r
merofaiQes
A
rL
HAIR GALLERY
WEEKLY PttZES Ftf? Ml6WSO6
ON VIDEO P1N6AU- GAMES
MOW OPEN SUNDAYS WOO-
158-9090
Unbeatable Friday Happy Hour
4:00-7:00 p.m. 25C 16 oz. draught
All Day Saturday Ladies Day
Wine cooler sl .00 Glass of Wine � 75C
Every Mon Thurs.
All Domestic Beer To Take Out
�2.75 per 6 pac. sales tax
We feature a 31 item salad bar
along with fabulous soups, chili
fresh ground hamburgers and hotdogs
and other special sandwiches.
Located in Georgetown snoppes
Across From tne Highrise Dorms.
For Take Out Call 752-4761
420 COTVKHE ST. ACROSS FtfOM ELBO
355-2076
January Special
Haircuts 5 reg. $7.50
Mon. � Tues. � Wed. � ALL MONTH
Bring ECU I.D. for special.
236 Greenville Blvd.
(Behind Tipton Annex)
blancmange (blamanj')
1. a pink, molded, jellylike dessert
from England, a favorite of
children. 2. a colorful
dance-rfeck band frorti England, a
favorite of MTV viewers across
America. 3. a twelve-inch single
well be happy to.pfay foryou in
the store, whether you cah'say
the name or not.
fa&

Coupon:
Chicken Pastry
Plus
2 Veggies & Bread
for H.99
Open 11-8 �7 days a week
752-0476 512 E. 14th St.
Located 2 blocks west H 9�Y'�
Join Mickey and
Minney for fun and
excitement in
Disney WorldFt.
Lauderdale during
Spring Break
(March 4 - March
13, 1983). Applica-
tions are being ac-
cepted now until
February 1, 1983.
For more informa-
tion call the Central
��.
i
I





I
�tc �ast (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mili i r. (����.�,����.�
Mikj Hughes, im�rw"
WAVERLY MFRRI n . Dm rr ���� ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sjm td.wr
SCOTT LlNDlEY. Aee� !���� GREG RlDEOUT. Nm Etftor
�l I AFRASHTEH � W STEVE BACHNER, hmtriammtni tdnor
Stephanie Groon. tw ,�� Juliana Fahrbach, so��
(-I . v Thornton j - , . Todd Evans, production Manager
Januarv 20, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Choking Out Education
As legislators in Raleigh continue
to tighten the belt on state funds,
the students and faculties at North
Carolina's 16 constituent univer-
sities will now be feeling the pinch
more than ever.
One such pinch was the introduc-
tion on Jan. 13 of a restructuring of
university supply purchasing. In a
memorandum to all deans, directors
and department heads, Vice
Chancellor for Business Affairs C.
G. Moore announced that until fur-
ther notice all purchases made
from state-appropriated funds must
be limited to emergencies of
justified essential needs
This new order not only applies to
the rare luxuries involved in the
school's operation, luxuries like
guest speakers, symposia, etc. It
also puts restrictions on several
elements of education which have
become veritable bare necessities,
like paper, stencils and copy-
machine maintenance.
What the order, or rather, the
"tightened" state budget, poses is
not a mere inconvenience for
students and faculty but a genuine
threat to tried-and-truc teaching
patterns and methodologies.
The order marks the end � at
least for now � of such teaching
aids as explicatory handouts and
selective parallel readings (at least
those in mimeograph form), two of
the best monotony breakers and
educational tools at a professor's
disposal.
At the present time, the primary
area affected by the restrictive order
has been office supplies; hence, the
temporary curtailing of classroom
handouts. However, since Gov.
Hunt and other key North Carolina
officials agree this will be one of the
tightest state budgets in recent
history, it is inconceivable that we
have seen the worst.
Not to question the intentions of
Dr. Moore in issuing the order �
his was only a subsequent action of
the state budget reassessment and
the pending state teachers' pay-
freeze issue. But when colleges and
universities are forced to function
without these necessities, an angry
finger must be pointed in some
direction.
Perhaps, just perhaps, the same
state legislature which conveniently
boasts of its "superior" constituent
university system should reassess its
priorities when doling out the funds
to maintain it as such.
The Perils Of Copying
To all those students and faculty
members who think photocopying
copyrighted material is legal andor
safe, a warning:
Over the holidays, the Associa-
tion of American Publishers, a New
York-based publishers group, filed
suit against New York University,
10 of its faculty and a nearby copy
center as part of "an ongoing
crackdown" on colleges that allow
students and staff to photocopy
copyrighted articles, manuscripts
and other published works.
According to present copyright
laws, which were amended by Con-
gress in 1976 to specifically protect
materials against unauthorized
photocopying, instructors can only
make copies of copyrighted material
under certain extenuating cir-
cumstances:
The copied material must be
brief; there must be clear evidence
that the instructor did not have time
to secure permission from the
publisher before copying the
material, and "most importantly,
the copying shall not be used to
create or replace purchasing the
book or materials copied
In the NYU case, which is by no
means unique to that institution,
reports indicate that professors were
having chapters of certain books
photocopied regularly, often on a
semester-by-semester basis, "with
the clear intent of copying the
materials rather than purchasing
them from the publishers
The suit, as well as a promise by
the AAP to begin a full-scale in-
vestigation of campus libraries and
copy centers throught the country,
have already prompted many major
colleges and universities to institute
policy changes with regards to copy-
ing practices.
At Ohio State, for example, the
university's own copy center now
requires instructors and students to
produce letters of approval from
publishers before they are allowed
to copy any copyrighted material.
However, several institutions
throughout the country are main-
taining their own favorable inter-
pretations of current copyright
legislation, despite the AAP's
previous court record of successful-
ly challenging at least 10 large com-
panies and independent copy
centers nationwide.
AAP spokeswoman Carol Risher
admitted that NYU, by no means
the worst offender of copyright
laws, is the first university to be
sued by the association. But, she ad-
ded, by the same token, it won't be
the last.
Afte
SH� PlWfr START GlOWM UMMimi
WE FLEW 0V�R A TOXIC WASTE PUMP
Citywide Response 'Overwhelming'
All To Save A Life
B PA I O'NEILL
No, this isn't another editorial about
nuclear weapons, military spending or the
Department of War. It's not about world
hunger or the injustice of prison either.
But it is about people � the good people
� who were told a tragic storv about
human suffering last week and opted to
take action.
The plight ot Douglas Moore, a
10-month-old Greenville child who is
stricken with leukemia, came to light last
week when ECU Catholic Chaplain Rev
Jerry Sherba asked his parishioners at St.
Gabriel's and the students at ECU's Sun-
day service to give whatever they could to
help defray the child's medical expenses.
At first, doctors thought Douglas' case
was hopeless. They gave him very little
time to live. But after checking the blood-
type and chromosome structure of the
Moore's other child, Latasha. it was
discovered that she met the requirements
to donate bone marrow to her younger
brother. Doctors say that if successful, this
operation increases Douglas' chances tor
survival from 20 to 80 percent.
Latasha is 22 months old; the operation
is highly specialized and very painful. A
long needle must be inserted in the
backbones o the young children to per-
form the bone marrow transplant. The on-
ly open hospital equipped to handle the
delicate operation is in Florida. The Moore
family is destitute.
Although Douglas Moore Sr. is
employed by the military, his insurance
benefits do not cover the high cost of the
operation, since his son would have to re-
main hospitalized for several months.
Sherba's appeal touched the hearts of all
who heard it.frhe response was incredible.
More than $1,000 was collected at St.
Gabriel's, and on campus, students (who
had no prior knowledge of the collection)
donated a total of S363. "I'm just over-
whelmed Sherba responded.
Throughout the Greenille communitv,
the need was heard and the response was
made. A local motel manager made ar-
rangements tor the Moore familj to stav
free in a Florida motel. The schoolchildren
of St. Gabriel's, where the Moore oldest
child attends first grade, promised to i
more than $1,000 by going door to door,
and the Greenville Ministerial Association
also vowed its support.
The Moore tamily is now is Honda.
Douglas' operation is scheduled tor Satur-
day, and the concerned who remain in
Greenville wait and hope.
"The Gospel calls us to action, and we
have responded Sherba commented.
�'My faith in people's sensitivitv to others'
needs has been fortified once again
It's nice to hear good news" tor i
change. It's nice to hear about people �'
ing people. It's nice to have our faith in
one another fortified. Yes. nowadays, we
hear a lot of sad stories about a lot of un-
necessary suffering. 1 only hope that all 0
us will embrace the jo and beauty ot the
story of Douglas Moore and that we are
able to apply this vision ot hope to all our
life's work.
A JAMESWATT
UNPEYELOPEP
WILDERNESS
AREA
���$
My
I was watching my favorite one-two
punch on TV (The Ernest Angley Hour
and The Charlie Harrison Show) last Sun-
day morning, trying to get inspired one
way or the other about something
anything, when it occurred to me: I've
never really written a column about the
issues I feel strongest about. Sure, I've
covered a lot of big, timely topics (Ronco
technology, Cathy Rigby's brilliant acting
career, Slim Whitman's latest musical ven-
tures, etc.), but never really anything that
could be considered a life-and-death topic.
Well, I did a lot of soul searching, con-
templated the relative importance of a few
controversial issues, popped another onion
bagel into the toaster oven and came up
with this a comprehensive listing of the
really big issues my pet peeves:
First of all, let's get the ball rolling with
a topic that bugs me like nothing else:
cliches. I hate cliches; I've always hated
cliches, and I'll hate them forever and a
day. They're so contrived so
phoney so cliched. I guess I've got a chip
on my shoulder or something, but they
really get me hot under the collar.
Mike Hughes
Just The Way It Is
One that really burns me up is when
some self-proclaimed weatherman passes
by on the way to class and boasts his
superior intellect by cursing the chilly air.
�'It's cold as hell quoth he, as if reveal-
ing some unparalleled brain power.
"Cold as hell?" I rather doubt it.
And worse yet, cliches can be painful
too. But don't just take my word for it;
just try to "tickle the fancy" of a buxom
blonde with a 220-pound boyfriend. 1
guarantee you'll never find it.
Or how about, "A bird in the hand is
worth two in the bush Well, 1 don't
know about you, but personally, I
wouldn't hold a damn pigeon for all the
tea in China. Who knows what he may
have just eaten.
But whereas some cliches are just plain
dumb, some others are just plain stupid.
For instance, I was walking with my friend
Ned the other day, when a beautiful red-
head coed strutted by in the same pair of
jeans she'd probably worn as a child.
"Whew Ned exclaims, "did you see
that? She was pretty as sh
And that's just the tip of the iceberg.
Casual and uniquely collegiate scatalogical
references and comparisons have virtually
become the staple of 20th-century
vocabulary. Everything we see nowadays is
hot as, cold as, big as, small as, tall as,
short as, fat as, thin as, dark as, light as,
drunk as, sober as, flat as, developed as,
well-developed as, well-endowed as, soft
as, loud as, low as, high or stoned as
caca. (Aw c'mon. A lot of peoples' parents
read this!)
Not only can one "cut the caca. He
can also be full of it, shoot it or smoke it
with friends or beat it out of enemies. He
can sing like it, talk like it and play basket-
ball, football or jai alai like it.
One can put up with "just about
enough" of it, be fed up with it, up to his
head in it or losing it. Students often cry it
out because they have "too much" of it to
do and can't go downtown. Teachers can
only take so much of it from students
because they've heard it all before.
And then there's food. Food, of course,
can smell like it, look like it, feel like it
and, depending on where it is you like to
eat, taste like it.
Old cars frequently run like it. Old bums

�fOHMMMMM
�nm
frequently smell like it, and old cafeteria
chefs can't seem to cook worth it
Personally, I never knew the word was
so complex, that there was so much to it,
so to speak. I mean, to me, it's alwas
meant one thing, something to avoid get-
ting on my shoes.
But just as my Mom always told me.
nothing can ever be all that bad. "Jeb
she always told me (We had 14 kids, and
she forgot our names from time to time),
"nothing can ever be all that bad And 1
suppose she was right. I suppose even
cliches have a place in our society. After
all, without them, 500 American sport -
scasters would be out of business.
Que sera sera.
Editor's NoterWDceHMghl&7o senior
Jrom OutoJ Town. N.C is editor emeritus
of Mooa Pie Quarter-ly, a local vending
machine catalogue. He is intrigued by
challenges but rarely meets them. (Rejer to
the above.)
mm
it
- I
I
Rv P1RI( r
O'NCU I
. � � -
Sdturdav ma'Ks the
10th anniversary ol the
Supreme Court r
making abortu
in the Lmtec
Despite the court
ing on the , k
Rowe Wade
issue rema-ins con-
troversial
In North (.
people on both
the issue are geai nji
Campus
Reaction from E I
students to abortion on
the 10th annivc
its legalization - :
troversial
Ruth raj
graduate studen-
seven monr
said she is not mo-
opposed to a- -
"I don't disagree �
abortion. I'd
people have an u-
tion than an unwa
child
S an War,
graduate
agreed ��
advocate
Wahi said
Helms' �
j . .
! believe
tor women
"The n
sion lying
whv,
. to define wli
when it bej
1 ayloi ask
SH
BETA
with
Suni
PI
Entry ton
C
ALL ENTRA?
DOORS
1st
2nd
3rd
� m
I






THE EAST( AROl INIAS.
IANI AK 20, l�S
i at until
MP�,
ife
ncl:
iMSWATT
iHWYELQPED
ILDERUESS
�'�
Cliche
md ld .atetena
t k nev �� � r j was
�-�.� a j o much to it,
me, it's always
mething to aoid get-
n m .
just a mj Mom alwa told me,
. ai evci he all that bad. "Jeb
told me (Wc had U kids, and
ur names from time to time).
I iing can eer be all that bad And I
vise she was right I suppose even
Ir es have a place in our society. After
vsithout them. 500 American sport-
sters would be out ot business.
)ue sera sera.
Iditor's Note fike Hughes, a senior
OutoJ Town, V.C is editor emeritus
Moon Pie Quiirter-K. a local vending
:hine catalogue. He is intrigued by
I ct'v but rarely meets them. Refer to
above.)
After Ten Years, Disagreement Still Heated
Rv PATRICK
O'NEILL
Slall V.mer
Saturday marks the
10th anniversary of the
Supreme Court ruling
making abortion legal
in the United States.
Despite the court's rul-
ing on the issue in
Rowe vs. Wade, the
issue remains con
troversial.
In North Carolina,
people on both sides of
the issue are gearing up
for week of varying
demonstrations. Sun-
day approximately 100
people turned out in
Raleigh at a special
worship service com-
memorating the
Supereme Court's deci-
sion.
"1 personally believe
abortion is morally
wrong and sinful said
Ms. Motlalepula
Chabaku to the Raleigh
church group. "But
there come times when
women have to have it,
and they should be able
to get safe medical and
surgical practices to
have it Chabaku is an
interdenominational
minister from South
Africa who teaches
women's studies at
Greensboro's Bennett
College. The afternoon
worship service was
sponsored by the
Religious Coalition for
Abortion Rights.
Outside the church,
fifteen people stood
silently in protest
holding anti-aboriton
placards. "Over 10
million abortions since
1973 Praise be to
God stated one of the
placards.
In Greenville the
response to the abor-
tion issue was no less
controversial. "It is
regrettable and shock-
ing that a worship ser-
vice, attended by ap-
proximately 100 pro-
abortionists to com-
memorate the Supreme
Court decision, was
held in Raleigh said
Greenville resident
Mildred Murphy.
Murphy is eastern
coordinator for North
Carolina Right to Life,
an anti-abortion
organization that con-
ducts educational and
political activities on
the abortion issue. "It
(the worship service) is
not a terribly upsetting
event. The upsetting
event was the legaliza-
tion of the killing of
unborn children by
seven justices of the
Supreme Court in
1973
Murphy said the con-
sequences of that deci-
sion resulted in the kill-
ing of over ten million
unborn children and
"the errosion of all the
values America is sup-
posed to stand for
"I think the women
(who are pro-choice)
are not celebrating the
use of abortion said
Fredrica Jacobson,
president of the
Women's Political
Caucas, "but (they) are
relieved that abortion
has been ruled legal,
and they have the
choice to govern their
own bodies
"Abortion has
always been and always
will be Jacobson
said. "Nobody ap
proves of abortion, but
until we do something
to orevent pregnancv,
then it's an absolute
necessity that women
have a choice
Jacobson also feels
abortion is an issue
w here men are
legislating what women
can do with their
bodies. "This is whv
women are working so
hard to get political
representation in their
state legislat ures
Jacobson said "We
must elect people who
represent women as
well as men
"I haven't round anv
pro-choice women in
that area Murphv
said. She added that
there is a "tremendous
need" tor more educa
tion on the abortion
issue
Campus Debates A bortion
Reaction from ECU
students to abortion on
the 10th anniversary of
its legalization was con-
troversial.
Ruth Taylor, a
graduate student who is
seven months pregnant
said she is not morally
opposed to abortion.
"1 don't disagree with
abortion, I'd rather
people have an abor-
tion than an unwanted
child
Susan Wahl, also a
graduate student,
agreed with Taylor. "I
advocate abortion
Wahl said. "Jesse
Helms' fight (to outlaw
abortions) is ridiculous
1 believe in free-choice
tor women
"The medical protes
sion is slaving out ot n,
so why is Congress try -
ing to define what lite is
or when it begins
Iavlor asked.
"I'm against abor-
tion said Mary Linda
Grant ham, an
undergraduate at fcCU.
"I do not believe in
taking someone else's
life and that's what
abortion is Gran-
tham recommended
that women plan ahead
if they don't want to
get pregnant. Gran-
tham also said she
favored adoption as an
alternative for mothers
who didn't want to
keep their babies.
"All I've got to say is
I'm pro-choice said
LCI political science
sophomore Jay Dunn.
"Since abortion is safe
and legal, I feel like a
woman who desires to
"I'm tor it said
business junior John
McCall. "I think peo-
ple should have the
right to make a choice
ot whether thev want to
have a child or not
"I think abortion is
acceptible only in a case
where the mother's or
child's life is in
danger said Dawn
Williams, a sophomore
in nursing. "Just to
have one for conve-
nience is wrong. Life is
too serious to play with
like a toy and that's
what I think abortion
is
"I am a Catholic and
my upbringing has in-
fluenced my feelings
about abortion said
freshmen psychology
student Laurie Beck.
"Morally I'm opposed
(to abortion) because
it's the taking of
another human life
"If people would use
birth control properly
the problem could be
solved added
Jack Crouch.
Another business
student, freshman
Susan Barret said it
depended on the cir-
cumstances whether she
herself would have an
abortion. "If people
want to have abortions,
that's their right
"I feel like it's the
person's choice said
Michelle Werhan, a
freshmen in general
college. "It's their own
body. I feel like it's (the
abonton question)
basically men who are
making a law and don't
have to go through
this added Wer-
chan. "I feel like if
men were put in the
position of making that
choice themselves,
perhaps this would not
be such a complicated
issue said accounting
junior Tom Alligood.
SHAG CONTEST
by
BETA LITTLE SISTERS
with John Moore as Emcee
Sunday January 23 at
PAPPA KATZ
$5.00 entry fee
Entry forms available at PAPPA KATZ
CONTEST STARTS AT 8:00
ALL ENTRANTS SHOULD BE READY AT 7:30
DOORS OPEN AT 7:00 W25 DRAFT
$1.00 ADMISSION
$50 plus dinner for 2 at
Four Seasons
H.L Hodges Gift Certificate
Dinner for 2 at Pharo's
- 2 Playmate Coolers
2 Budweiser Lights
Dinner for 2 at Subway
PAPPA KATZ IS A PRIVATE CLUB
FOR MEMBERS AND GUESTS
p$i.(
A1st Prize
P
A2nd Prize -
K3rd Prize
ASponsored by: Aeruoofry
TPour lm� HL HodfM Pham'i
Zrlfrw fttn i Win.
KINGS ISLAND
KINGS DOMINION
CAROWINDS
CANADA S WONDERLAND
East Carolina University
Aj Fletche-Mj? B'�ir)ing Recital Hall
Tuesday. Feb"jarv i 3 00-6 00 PM
University of North Carolina
Greensboro
Eihot University Center
Alexander and Philips Rooms
rhursdaj 'ora � r or. " oopm
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists � Technicians
Variety Performers � S180 250week
. �. nn �v
'tems and Prices
Effective Wed Jan 19
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each o these advertised items s re-
quired to be r��ciiy available for
sale m each Kroger Sav on except
as specifically noted m this ad it we
do run out of an item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable
item when available reflecting the
same savings or a ramchecK whicn
will entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
price within 30 days
MAYBELLINE
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BEEF OR MEAT (
Wieners
- �





!
THl IrASTC AROl 1NIAN
Style
JANUARY 20. 1983
Page 6
A Happy Way Of Life
Campus Nun Keeps Ministry Hopping
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Stall �nirr
"After his trip to Guatamala,
President Reagan claimed the
General Rios Montt is 'totally
dedicated to democracy in
Guatemala despite the fact that the
mass murders of the Indian popula-
tion of that country are being car-
ried out by his troops. Because of
these human rights violations, we
must urge Congress not to certify
Guatemala for aid for water, food,
medical care and roads, but we con-
tinue to give more and more military-
aid to this poorest of nations. We
must urge our leaders at every level
to stop military aid to El Salvador
The above comments, which ap-
peared in a letter-to-the-editor to
The East Carolinian on December 9
were not made by a political science,
history or sociology professor. Nor
were they written by one of our
political representatives in
Washington D.C. No, they're also
not the words of a communist
subversive, but rather they are the
words of Sister Helen Shondell, the
always well dressed, attractive
woman in her 40's who just happens
to be Campus Minister to ECU'S ap-
proximately 1500 Catholic students.
Who is this woman"1 And why
does she seem to get her name in
print and her face on the television
news speaking about subjects rang-
ing from United States policy in
Central America to the counseling
of women and men who have lost a
spouse to divorce or death? And
how come people call her Sister
Happy? She is a Catholic nun born
and raised in Toledo, Ohio who
joined the Immaculate Heart of
Mary (IHM) Convent.
In 1976, Sister Happy came to
Greenville to work in pastoral
ministry in Greenville's two
Catholic Churches, St. Peter's and
St. Gabriel's. She also did some
work with ECU students. Eventual-
ly her interest in Campus Ministry
grew and now Sister Happy is the
full time person, authorized by the
Catholic Diocese of Raleigh, doing
Catholic (and often non-Catholic)
Campus ministry at ECU.
Some of Sister Happy's direct
work with the students includes
operating a ministry out of the
Catholic Newman Center on 10th
street. Students come to the
Newman Center every Wednesday
evening for Catholic Mass, a
meeting and a supper with people
who participate in the activities of
the Newman Club. ECU student
Mary Rider is the Club's President.
Father Girard Sherba, ECU's
Catholic Chaplain and the pastor of
St. Gabriels's Church, comes on
Wednesdays to say the Mass which
is usually heard by 40 to 50 students.
On the wall of the Chapel. Happy
has hung several posters and pic-
tures that exemplify the areas ol
ministry she feels are important.
One poster is red, black and white
and written in Spanish. On it are
drawn the face of five Catholic
Churchwomen � four of them
nuns- who were killed in El
Salvador's violence. "The mis-
sionary martyrs of El
Salvadorproclaim the words on
the poster. Another picture is of
Martin Luther King and still
another is a colorful poster bearing
a loaf of bread and a fish put out by
"Bread for the World a Christian
citizens lobby group that is trying to
stop the spread of world hunger.
Obviously one of Happy's messages
to her students is of the importance
of peace and social justice. The
Newman Club also gets together for
other meetings and social events.
Some students come together for
what is called "sharing a time
when they can discuss their lives as
they relate to each other and God.
Others organize trips to local nurs-
ing homes to visit their residents,
while still others get together to
discuss social issues or perhaps an
upcoming demonstration.
On Sunday Happy and Sherba
hold a Mass in the biology building
for about 200 people. The Newman
Club music group, under the
guidance of FCU student Mickey
Skidmore, provides a nice touch.
Anyone who visits the Newman
Center on any evening shouldn't be
surprised if several meetings are go-
ing on simultaneously in different
rooms There may also be a few
students doing homework in the
dining room while several other may
be watching TV in the living room.
It's also not unusual to walk in on a
heated discussion that may last for
hours. Most of the time Sister Hap-
py is not too far away from any of
it.
Happy also provides individual
and group counseling to all who re-
quest it. She counsels students on
subjects ranging from roommate
and scholastic problems, to advising
women students who get pregnant,
to men who can't decide whether or
not to register for the military draft.
Justifying her work in the area of
peace and social justice is no pro-
blem. Happy claims it's all just a
part of her faith as a Christian.
"The Judeo-christian heritage that
is found in the scriptures, especially
the Gospels, calls us to do the works
of justice Happy says, "So
because there are many situations
where there is no justice, our (all
campus ministers) work in campus
ministry helps us to be people who
point out injustices and it helps
other people to see unjust systems
and unjust institutions
Happy also points out that as a
campus minister she's in the perfect
position to do justice work because
she has no authortanan strings at-
tached to her work. "I think cam-
pus ministry, because it is not direct-
ly tied into the university, has the
opportunity to stand in criticism of
existing power structures
Shondell saidWe recieve no
university support, no state support
and no support from big business.
We're not beholden to anybody
Her work with the ECU students
is not where Happy's work stops.
Catholic Campus Minister Sister Helen 'Happy' Shondell
When asked what she hopes the
mark of success in her work will be,
Happy replies that she hones "that
people have a deeper conviction that
they are loved and Unable
Recently Sister Happy celebrated
her Twenty-fifth Jubilee as a nun
The theme of her jubilee was "His
oc will endure � God's love is
taithtul The many people who
have met, loved, and worked with
Sister Helen Shondell also know
something else � "Sister Happy's
love will endure for them
Held
By MlkKHAMKR
NUff Unlrr
This Saturday evening, January
22, WNCT-TV, Channel 9 will
telecast this area's first Telethon for
United Cerebral Palsy. The telethon
is being called "Celebrate with the
StarsI It will be held at the Green-
ville Moose Lodge from 11p.m
Saturday to 7p.m Sunday, and the
public is invited to attend the event.
Two stars, Frank Runyeon, who
portravs Steve Andropoulous on As
The it orld Turns and Margaret
Colin, who portrays Margo Mon-
tgomery on the same program, will
be hosting the local telethon. John
Ritter, who plays Jack on Three's
( ompany will be the national hosts
on CBS. The national telethon will
be telecast for 40 minutes out of
every hour and the local telethon
will be telecast for the remaining 20
minutes.
Seventy-five percent of the
amount collected from the telethon
will go to the United Cerebral Plasy
Developmental Center located on
Greenville Blvd. in Greenville. The
remaining twenty-live percent goes
to the National United Cerebral
Palsy Association.
Barbara Thurber, director of the
United Cerebral Palsy Center in
Greenville, said this week that the
money received from the telethon
will be used to buy adaptive equip-
ment for the children at the center
� tricycles, chairs, toilets, prone
standers and walkers. It will also be
used for speech therapy, physical
therapy, occupational therapy,
school supplies and teachers'
salaries.
The local UCP Center is the
largest in the state and it is growing.
They have children from one to six
years old coming from Pitt. Greene.
Lenoir, Edgecombe and Beaufort
counties. Ms. Thurber stated that
the goal of the UCP Center is to
prepare the physically handicapped
to enter the public school system.
Thurber spoke about the value of
ECU students to the center1 really
don't know what we'd do without
the ECU studentsshe said "We
consider the experience that the
ECU students provide at the center
to be extremely valuable. A lot of
the students are volunteers and they
come to monitor the nap rooms
Various groups around campus
have been staging benefits for
United Cerebral Palsy in the past
week. The National Honor Coed
Fraternity, Phi Sigma Pi. raised
over $500 at a dance contest at Papa
Katz this past Saturday night.
Januarv 14 Ricky Creech, an ECU
student who has cerebral palsy and
is in a wheelchair won third place in
the tree style competition.
Volunteers from campus and
from the community will be mann-
ing the phones for the telethon Ms.
Nita Raspberry is coordination
Cinema Society Gets Show
Rolling For Spring Semester
After a temporary lull in the fall of 1982, the Cinema
Society of Greenville is once more bringing classic,
rarely-shown American and foreign films to eastern
North Carolina. The spring lineup includes comedy,
drama, and romance from a variety of national
cinemas.
As before, the films will be shown in Hendrix Theatre
Poetry Forum
Meeting Soon
All
Lazar Gosman Conducts Soviet Orchestra
The East Carolina University Unions Artists Series Committee has announced that the Chamber
Orchestra ORPHEUS has cancelled its Southeastern tonr, including its performance Feb. 7 here a
ECU Replacing ORPHEUS is the highly-acclaimed Soviet Emigre Orchestra, an excellent
chamber orchestra, under the direction of Lazar Gosman. The ensemble is comprised of the finest
or recently-arrived Soviet Emigre musicians from the Moscow and Leningrad Philharmonic and
Chamber Orchestras.
By MIKE HAMER
Staff �rti�
The ECU Poetry Forum will hold its first meeting of
the year this evening at 8p.m. in Mendenhall 212. The
Forum is open to anyone who would like an ap-
preciative but critical audience for hisher poetry.
Those attending are asked to bring 6-8 copies of work to
be read and discussed.
The Poetry Forum is a student organization which is
also under the sponsorship of the English Department.
The Poetry Forum meets on the first and third Thursday
of each month of the school year. Students do not have
to read to attend the meeting.
According to Dr. Peter Makuck, who is moderator ot
the forum, the purpose of the meeting is to provide a
forum for criticism and discussion, as well as apprecia-
tion of local poetry. Anyone is invited and persons do
no have to read to attend the meeting. Speaking of the
forum Makuck said earlier this week'There is room in
the forum for beginning writers. We've had people who
have just come in off the street. I think they have to find
it helpful. For beginners, the forum is longer on en-
couragement. "Don BaU, a poet and graduate student at
ECU had this to say about the Poetry ForumThe
forum gives me a chance to display a working poem and
I generally get some very good criticism about it. It gives
the writer a chance to see what others are doing and
there are several really good writers in Greenville.
Sometimes you bounce off other poet's techniques and
sometimes you get instructed. It's also a lot of funI
would encourage young wtiters to listen and to see what
it's likeBall saidits a very professional at-
mosphere
(Mendenhall Student Center) on the ECU campus
films will start at 7 p.m. on Sundays.
The features for the spring are as follows:
January 23 The N orld oj Apu (India. 1959). Directed
by Satyajit Ray.
Ray is the most tamous and celebrated of Indian
directors. This film concludes the trilogy describing the
life of APU, who, after achieving manhood, has decid-
ed to become a writer. But his life takes an unexpected
turn when he is invited to the wedding of a friend's
cousin and he finds himself taking the place of the
bridegroom (who has had a nervous breakdown just
before the ceremony) so the bride-to-be will not be
doomed to spinsterhood and the family disgraced. The
consequences of the unexpected liason result in some of
the most emotionally moving scenes ever made, with a
score composed and played by Ravi Shankar.
February 6 Lgetsu (Japan, 1953). Directed by Kenl
Miaoguchi.
Along with Kurosawa, Ozu. and Ichikawa,
Mizoguchi is one of the giants of Japanese cinema. With
his characteristic dream-like images, he retells the 16th
century legend of two men, a potter and a farmer, who
leave their families and journey to the city to fulfill their
greatest desires. The potter dreams of wealth while the
farmer wants to become a samurai and attain military
glory. Both achieve their goals but find that their lives
have changed in unforeseen ways, ewswetk announc-
ed, "the genius of the film rests on the superb
photography which transforms the acting, the story,
and the background into a flow of insistently haunting
images; it is difficult to remember where reality stops
and hallucination begins Winner of the Silver Lion
Award at the Venice Film Festival.
February 20 The Cranes Are Flying (Russia. 1957).
Directed by Mikhail Kalatoiov.
One of the most highly acclaimed Soviet films of all
time. The Cranes Are tiying won the Grand Prize for
Best Picture and the Gold Palm for best Director and
Best Actress at the Cannes Film Festival. Set during
World War II, the film is a tragic story of the shattering
of youthful ambitions and love by war. The lovers,
Veronica and Boris, are certain they will marry and live
happily ever after. But Boris volunteers for the Army,
See CINEMA, Page 7
: � � M
t
The Indl
A rms
Mayer
Strong
i
Bv PX1RI
gre i
' I
thev d
men I eer met I
imr
and thoughtful
talk- plavej a role in hi
no; to u-e violence
man . I
a TSS. - id in an.
Botl V
on n
W i
cult
tc May �
tha: l
or wii!
can sootieho�
structive wea
- .
mas .
- he refus

In his
May h open:
cerned So.
to take action
i t
a!
He goes oi
d sobedience a
m a nuck � H
he nee I
mem His list fia j
world tha: 5
destruct
M.i
will live or die bv -
i. C
this earth seems
inc ent:
a thouf
human, species
that conscious mt
. stuped, dUil w
IB al! n.
doomsday
In his post let
S coad 1 aw ol R
mutable force end ess
and situations . ' - - -1,
I homav goes
change. Of a: I i
S vietv ble� him away
Society does
T U'lmam'v were a
ie Persons, pernajj
Moninc them.
1
ECU D
on all pi
eyegi






Page t
V,

l� r Heltn Happ" Nhondell
�! her jubilee was "His
dure � God's love is
1 he man people who
ivcd, and worked with
-Nhondell also know
"Sister Happy's
. aure tor them
Held
orre to monitor the nap rooms
Various groups around campus
have been staging benefits for
ted Cerebral Palsy in the past
week The Vinona! Honor Coed
Fraternity, Phi Sigma Pi. raised
s�ii a: .1 dance contest at Papa
rhi past Saturday night.
lanuary i4 Kick Creech, an ECU
ij- cerebral palsy and
hair won th'rd place in
npetmon.
cerv trom campus and
. rnmunity will be mann-
er tor the telethon. Ms
Kapberrv is coordination
Show
Imester
lent Center) on the ECU campus. All
p.m. on Sundays.
lor the spring are as follows:
n nrld of pu (India, 1959). Directed
lamous and celebrated of Indian
concludes the trilogy describing the
lo. after achieving manhood, has dead-
wnter But his lite takes an unexpected
mited to the wedding of a friend's
I' Is himself taking the place of the
Jo has had a nerous breakdown just
ris so the bride-to-be will not be
kterhood and the family disgraced. The
the unexpected liason result in some of
Inallv mowng scenes ever made, with a
and placed b Ravi Shankar.
?tsu (Japan. 1953). Directed by Kenji
Kurosawa, Ozu, and Ichikawa,
ot the giants ot Japanese cinema. With
c dream-like images, he retells the 16th
t two men, a potter and a farmer, who
ies and journey to the city to fulfill their
I he potter dreams of wealth while the
become a samurai and attain military
feve their goals but find that their lives
unforeseen ways. Sewsweek announc-
is of the film rests on the superb
licit transforms the acting, the story,
�und into a flow of insistently haunting
fricult to remember where reality stops
n begins Winner of the Silver Lion
?nice Film Festival.
� (. ranes Are Hying (Russia, 1957).
(hail kalatoiov.
ost highly acclaimed Soviet films of all
H Are Hying won the Grand Prize for
the Gold Palm for best Director and
the Cannes Film Festival. Set during
he film is a tragic story of the shattering
ibitions and love by war. The lovers,
ris, are certain they will marry and live
ler But Boris volunteers for the Army,
sw CINEMA, Page 7

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 20. 1983
Cinema Society Has Full Slate
The Indian girl from The World Of Apu.
Continued From Page 6
and Veronica, in despair, is seduced by Boris'
cousin. Kalatozov directed Cranes in the kind of
visually extravagant style that had been pro-
hibited by the Stalinist dogma since the silent era.
Considered a turning point in Soviet Cinema, it
recalls the content and film language of the best
of Eisenstein.
March 27 Harold Lloyd Double Feature � Hot
Haferi924) and Safety Lastl923)
Harold Lloyd is considered by many critics to
be the premiere silent film comedian, rivalled on-
ly by Chaplin and Keaton. His films were not
widely available for years, but now a whole new
audience is rediscovering the hilarious world of
Lloyd. His screen person is a typical young
American � full of ambition and ingenuity �
who embroils himself in outlandish situations, in
Hot Water, Harold takes a live turkey on a
trolley ride. Then he takes his in-laws for an
equally hysterical ride in his new car.
In Safety last, he goes to the big city to make
his fortune. Among his misadventures is the
famous, precariuos and hilarious sequence of
Lloyd hanging from the clock � "the funniest
HlltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllitllllllllllllllllllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHHIHUH�ltltflltttt�nMtHtllftlttlWP
comic sequence on film Sneak Previews. As a
special bonus feature, we will also screen the
short, An Interview wth Harold Lloyd (1962),
Lloyd's last interview, in which he speaks of his
screen days, the dangerous stunts he always per-
formed himself, and contemporary comedy. This
rare work is highlighted by his favorite clips from
his movies.
April 25 Sundays and Cybele (France 1962).
Directed by Serege Bourguigon.
Hardy Kruger and Patricia Gozzi give remark-
ble performances in this widely-acclaimed film
that won the Academy Award for Best Foreign
Film. Kruger is Pierre, a pilot during the Indo-
china war who is burdened with guilt over the
death of a little girl due to his plane crash. In
spite of the efforts of Madeleine, a nurse who
cares for him, Pierre has made little pro-
gress until he encounters a little girl whose
father is going to leave her at a girl's school with
ever coming back to see her. A friendship
develops between the shattered Pierre and the
unhappy Cybele. But the friendship is doomed
by those who don't understand. Bosley Crowther
of the New York Times called it "A cinematic
miraclemasterpiecesheer magic and Ar-
cher Winsten declared it "a jewel ot priceless
worth among French films
Attendance at all films is by subscription only
(due to arrangement with distributors). The cost
of a membership to attend all five films is ten
dollars. For further information, contact Glen
Brewster or Alex Albright at the English Depart-
ment ot ECU (757-6412 or 757-6041).
Arms Protestor
Mayer Shared
Strong Views
This is the second oj two parts.
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Sl�fl Wnlrr
Thomas also warned Mayer that innocent
people could be killed by such an act, but at first
Mayer believed that some sacrifice of human life
would be acceptable if it helped prevent the
greater evil of the nuclear arms race.
Thomas counseled Mayer to drop the plan and
they discussed it frequently during their White
House vigils Norman was one of the wisest
men 1 ever met Thomas said adding that Mayer
believed "wisdom and honesty" to be the most
important aspects of one's character.
Thomas believed that Mayer listened carefully
and thoughtfully to his suggetsions. "I think our
talks played a role in his (Mayer's) final decision
not to use violence said Thomas. Of course,
many people connote the threat to use v lolence as
a 1ftbnV'act in ahfc of itself, but Thomas did feel
that perhaps Mayer at least scraped his dynamite
plans because of their conversations.
Both Mayer and Thomas had similar opinions
on many aspects of the nuclear arms race.
"We are several diverse civilizaitons of many
cultures on the brink of genocide and suicide
wrote Mayer. "Anyone that takes exception to
that statement, is just plain ignorant of the facts
or willing to gamble that flawed, bumbling men
can somehow manage 30,000 megatons of totally
destructive weaponry. Historically the odds are
against that gamble
Thomas comments in similar fashion when he
says he refuses "to be part of a system that's go-
ing to protect itself at the expense of all life on
earth Anyone who meets Thomas can attest to
his honesty, his life's witness is indicative of his
refusal to compromise on his beliefs.
In his article titled "Anyone for a Boston Tea
Party Mayer opens by saying that "the Con-
cerned Sovereign Citizen has a fundamental right
to take action to relieve the constant stress im-
posed on him by a culture, a civilization, a
growth situation, that threatens all life
He goes on to discuss his belief that civil
disobedience is acceptabe and necessary to pre-
vent a nuclear war From a moral point of view
he need not be concerned about law or govern-
ment. His justification is his desire to live in a
world that is not steadily creeping into self-
destruction
Mayer ends the article with a warning: "We
will live or die by the results of our willful actions
or miscalculations. Conscious intelligent life on
this earth seems to be an aberration amongst liv-
ing organisms and entities. It appears, in making
a thoughtful, broad, over-view analysis of the
human species one has no choice but to deduce
that conscious intelligent life can also be very,
very stupid, and self-destructive. As an act of
sanity, ban all nuclear weapons or have a nice
doomsday
In his post letter, Thomas quotes Norman's
Second Law of Reality: "Change is the only im-
mutable force endlessly continuous. All things,
and situations consistently alter and rearrange
Thomas goes on to say, "Norman demanded
change, or at least the opportunity to discuss it,
Society blew him away.
Society doesn't like change.
If Humanity were capable of recognizing their
Wise Persons, perhaps Humanity would stop
stoning them.
15
ECU DISCOUNT
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Park View Commons
Across from Doctors Park
Open? 5:30
Mon. Fri.
752-1446
'OE

pucians
Little Sister Rush
Monday 24th of January
Tuesday 25th Of January
iWHERE: Mendenhall Coffeehouse!
lllllllllllMlinillHIMIIIIIIIItlHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHtlllllllllllllllllllllflllllllllllllll
Ol C��MM Fatig.es ane)
T-Sfcirts. SUtpmt ��fi.
�ackpacks C.mpmg E�uie-
mcni Stael Tee SIMM. DIlNi
an Ovtf it Different Oee� mmt
use item, bstn ln'i,
ARMY-NAVY
STORE -Mr
IF YOU ARE HAVING PROBLEMS WITH DRUGS OR ALCOHOL �
WE CAN HELP � "STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS"
CAMPUS ALCOHOLS DRUG CENTER � 757 73
IN RECENT MONTHS. THE ARRESTS OP COLLEGE STUDENTS
INVOLVED IN DRUG RELATED INCIDENTS HAS INCREASED
DRAMATICALLY Br ause of our concern ana in our quest tor
RESPONSIBILITY, we would like it known to all the student the new
drug laws now in effect These are the laws and hence will be enforced!
- minimum
minimum prison sentence o 7
1. Possession ot SO lbs and less than 100 lbs. of maniuana
prison sentence ol 5 years
2 Possession of 100 lbs and less than 3.000 lbs. of maniuana
years.
). Possession of J OOC lbs and less than 10,000 lbs of maniuana � minimum prison sentence of U
years
4 Possession ol 10.000 or more lbs. ol maniuana � minimum prison sentence of 35 years along
wit fines.
S. Possession with, or intention to sell 70 grams or less ol cocaine � presumptive sentence of 1-10
years along with lines.
i Possession with or intention to sell 2 grams or more, but less than NO grams of cocaine �
presumptive sentence of 7 years along with fines.
7. Possession of 1.000, but less than S.000 dosage units of mettiaqualone (qvalutfes) � 7 year art
sentence along with a $35 0OC dollar line.
I. Possession ot 5.000. but less than icooe dosage units of mettiaqualone (quaiudes) � 14 year
prison sentence along witn a ISO.000 dollar fine.
t. Possession of 4 grams, but leu than 14 grams of opium � 14 year prison sentence, along with a
svo.ooo dollar fine.
ABORTIONS
134 week terminations
App'ts. Mad 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 BOO-371 0575
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
We hove the hoc
tl i price that9 right
forVOU
At H.L Hodge students receive a 10 dis-
count on everything in the store � ot anytime
� with the presentation of a student ID
But to celebrate New Balance Week at H. L.
Hodges -
Bring in your ECU ID. and you will receive a
20 discount on ony New Balance shoe in
stock.
Men's R�g- Sale Women'sReg. Sale
420 S46.95 $37.56 2803. 95 $25.56
460 $47.95 $38.36
555 $51.95 $41-56
660 553 95 $43.16
730 $65 95 $52.76
990 $83.95 $67.16
'(ladies' aerobic shoes)
420 95 537.56
0 S47 95 $38.36
555S5195 $41.56
60 $52 95 $42.36
Offer good TuesWedThursFriSat.
January 18-22
new batance Iff
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
PRESENTS IN CONCERT
The South's Hottest Honky Ton Jeers
SUPER GRIT
COWBOY BAND
lit A BfciaU B�n�f It (
tFojr
MEAL DEAL!
United Cerebal Palsey
Thursday, January 20
n
The Reno Brothers
rggiTm�mUsOf
UrsUiiilii 1C1 ugHi
For Further Information Call
758-3943
You know PTA delivers great
hot pizza. But did you know that
with every pizza PTA delivers cold
Cokes too7 Free 14-ouncers.
Its the Meal Deal.
Savings for real.
When it comes to pizza,
PTA comes to you. t 1 j d7zb
Transit
Authority
At P. T.A. We Give YOU the Deal!
Ok
I
� '
in ii � ��





MI KMt kil IM s's
Sports
Snea
Pirates Bring Back Winning Spirit'
u iiin i'mMM
ivei the game I dwards made anoti

M
1
I si shai p shooiei (iame �cl m ra i
Haw made a three l S played nan ahead. 12-11, their fii
a and ed in tw Ie1 igamsf tl Bucs game
jumpsh t tl thinj Ha nson was surprised l l nevei bi ki ia
. A � " tx itient the fit minutes ot the half
! � vhen Robin on dro in I
.e seen man V i 11 d :� ��� ��
i : � 60 minute; loi quite a pumped in three point the
t-XL wl ites a 24-20 advant t
Of I Ha aid USC's Hawthoi I witl
the were not I
in and a I i Bu � I 24 22
ked at the I �' :
i d, I first Bucs �
-
ink two I
.
I
A .1 p
fc-C I
46 ; Ahile I V( :

I he Head oaeh said the IJ rati
nd some place i hea
I
s s - �
H
� . � V
S I
rs Edward
: � '� ' md H
Ian
e Pirat
� �
. . 1 Lnivei ' �
H o -

Lady Pirates Secure
On-The-Road Win
'
fi,
i
H
Edwards Fills Role
As ECU'sTeam Leader
K
Km
I in l.ad Rats huddle before pre-gami action
l a. S
Buccaneers Head For Classic
Nike-Carolu
kicks
I f I � � . t he Gi
I �� � v- A
w standing 5-
ist sutl
� .
tda
eigl
Bu 1 ' �
U �
1.2 - ' '
� . : 5 -1 1 t" i
i
! 2 4 ; md 2.6
c ruard V" in now
ing ; '
( k rani
�� "
. � i erage ol 45
I .
In scoring 11 �
Build i 10 in ti.
in
i
B
In fad B
h
in ODI
: 12-2 reci rd, (
LCI A in
ri-ra n I
eek, na Build

ling to A �tant Sp rt I:
� � mati I) Norm
At" :� 27 26
� � � it halftimi
�� � � md pel "
:�� 12 of ?3 h(its t
i�erage
I a net Harris, G rg
md el
. the
I time tl "ted
than I I ti 6-
soph re 1
19.6 point md 12.9
i � Han was nam
it Ml-A

� � . Hai i � Georgia
p an '2 lunioienter Rhon
11 h illi �wa avei iging 1f 4 points
9 5 rebounds, 1 isa )'( onnor, a
6 1 treshman who is now pumping
Cinch Pleasants
1 intk Inside
i : "Wc- ha -v on
v
ivei 'link they 'Te in high
the can sv ore at w ill,
but at evel, in general, offense
doesn't come this ea
" I tl nl oui players have
important e
is
1 he head k oac I
teach the Bulldog l inderstand,
Reilh b
has been
� � nse Reilh said.
Southai � ilina will und'
be the other dominant u: in the
ne I he w il take on Mei
I edd Hear - following the
1I C i
1 ad i.HikMK ks are now
7-4, with mai ginal wins ovet (
State. lemson and sn . I S
beal Penn State this week, 66-63,
g i�i n g t i . .
. .iie
Leading
art
McAlistei
is avera
pun I
idinj
with 7.5 and 5- II Sei
I lyn Johnson is now a � ei �.
1 2 4 point and ft.1 rel
Mei cer is now 8 6 ovei
Georgia pre
the 1 edd Beai �
seniors Nona i eathei s, K.
I rne and Emma Mumpher
I he I c I t reorgia gan
6 p.m and South. Carolina will
meet Mercei at 8 p m. (n Saturday,
the consolation game will stari
p m and the t hampionship game
will be played at 7 p.m.
W
Vand
��1
t ' �
SBA
�feJ
Y h
H
�V :
ling
ndy I andt i
now I ourth yea i
. � : i 76-36 i
first NCAA
,i:nen' la I e ison.
i St at� u

� i andei has i ompletel) tui i
this program around Reillv
I. ha ikei it from a mediocre
pi igi in i! d ma le it ini onal
powei
I he Pirates, who are known tor
being a stronf
being taken too lightly b I andei
"We know that 1(1 is going to
ome in there and scrap loi fort
minutes he said, and it we don't
do '� � ! aren't ready to play,
then that spells trouble tor us
e will have to find a way to
. Denklei (Mary I dow
Presently, I andei i yinj to gel
the Bulldogs' offensive game ba k
,n ordei aftet a relapse against I en
nessee "I think thine have gone
eas tor us on offense
Football Staff Stresses Academic Performance
B KIN KOI ION
�n important function ol an ol
lege football slafi is to stress
academics as well as athletics I he
I c l program is no exception
I in coaches, alone with Athletic
cademic Coordinatoi Robert
lallo, work towatd success in the
classroom as well as on the football
field
1 he academic gameplan includes
tie hmen orientation programs,
studs sessions, tutor programs and
academic awards An academic
playbook is also made available to
the football players at ECl . one ol
the tew schools in the country to of
fei this guideline.
"We stress the pursuit ol both
athletics and academies head
coach Ed Lmoi said "We want to
ere every player the opportunity to
graduate from ECl
1 he desire for better academic
performance has spread throughout
the country. On Jan 11. in a con
vention ol the N( A and the CI
( American Council on Education), a
proposal was passed that toughened
admission requirements foi athletes
I he by-law, which was known as
Proposal No. 48. calls tor a core
curriculum of math. English, social
and physical sciences, along with a
minimum SA 1 score ol 700.
lallo doesn't anticipate any pro
blems with the new regulations "1
don't think they ill seriously hurt
ECU he said
I his year's Pirate football squad
had six members ruled academically
ineligible tor the spring semestei
Ihev will be able to return tor the
grades a
It's hai I enough I
entering
lifest
footb �
da 's ageni
1 he 1982 U 1
freshmei
Pirau � �
"Our 1
best perl
that I've been here
I allo "(Kerall, we a t
shape than in the past
s tor the sis members who
ha e to mis- spi ing pra I
knows that the loss will hi felt
�� l hai hurl us a great d �
Emory stated "We had at east 2( I
sea's ol experience 'here ou nevei
anticipate losing kids that are still
i
I he r� .
For H

A






r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 20. 1983
rit'

l
0

PWO 6v STANLEY LC�V
t hi�. thretpoint pla against
ills Role
earn Leader
d s altei l)a;v
Vfter high school. Edwards
� two seasons at Laurin-
ere he averaged
d 16 rebounds. In his
ne, he played quarter-
i . I r the 1 igei football team.
fans are certainly glad
lecided to attend ECU,
en to be the leader
ght's I SC contest.
!i) points in a
pan in the second
iling tl ictory for the
He m . i effective on the
i, w here he was pit-
USCs hij 'ring
Jimn I line into
- and

� ip center
hold
ci goals
-
. � post in
ffensive scheme.
he pay-
l h Charlie Har-
ar, L.duards was
ike the 15-tooter
. eases vvere otfer-
-
)oi
nfidencehas
imulated to the point
: hesitate to take
In the USC
ur shots from
ng range.
-hen I've been going to the
been putting three
me hdwards respond-
on starting to move to
more
I dward" continues his pro-
E L tans will have a lot of
ng basketball action to
l in the future.
b-formance
eligible
en Emory credited reeenuy-departed
the offensive coordinator Larry Beekish
kn with his work towards scholastic
?r achievement.
"Beckijh has done a great job
he said. "He and the assistant
coaches meet everyday and hold a
staff meeting discussing academic
progress
The requirements, which were
designed to toughen eligibility as
well as challenge the athletes, do not
concern Tallo a great deal.
the
ted
tter
r
l"
20
ver
till
As he puts it, "The reason that
athletes are successful is because
they are competitive, and if they
find out that they have to reach cer-
tain goals, they will be willing to
work towards them

Sneaker Sam Sez
Team Captains'
Meetings
The team captains'
meetings for upcoming
activities include:
Basketball-January 20,
7:00 p.m Biology
Building 103; Roller
Hockey-January 20,
4:00 p.m 102
Memorial Gym. The
captains of all teams
entered are required to
attend their respective
meetings.
Arm Wrestling
Receive a T-shirt and
have some fun by enter -
ing in the In-
tramural Bud weiser
Arm Wrestling Tourna-
ment. Sign up for this
powerhouse event at
204 Memorial Gym.
New Weight Equip-
ment
The weight room in
Memorial Gym has a
new look. This past
week several new peices
of Universal weight
equipment were install-
ed giving the avid lifter
an opportunity for a
more thorough
workout. Memorial
Gym weight room
hours are: Monday �
Thursday, 9 a.m6
p.m and Saturday �
Sunday, 1 p.m5 p.m.
Personal Defense
Class
The Intramural
Department is offering
a self-defense class for
men and women.
Registration deadline is
January 21 at 5:00 p.m.
Sign up in Room 204,
Memorial Gym.
Tennis
Show
Know
Shoe Talk
what's going
on in the world of in-
tramurals by listening
to the Tennis Shoe Talk
Show, which is aired
every Tuesday and
Thursday at 2:30 on
WZMB, 91.3 on your
FM dial.
Horseback Riding
The Outdoor Recrea-
tion Center is sponser-
ing horseback riding
trips to Jarman Stables.
Reservations and
payments for the
Thursday afternoon
trips
p.m.
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
are due by 3:00 o
each Thursaday. 0
�ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo�
Treat the crew and we'll treat you
Rates are $5.00 per g
hour. Transportation is 0
provided with the shut- o
tie leaving Memorial O
Gym at 3:30 p.m. g
sharp. For more infor- o
mation or reservations O
call or stop by the In- q
tramural Recreational c
Services Outdoor O
Recreation Center (113) �
Memorial Gym. Phone q
757-6911. Hours are O
Monday and Friday, 1 �
p.m5 p.m and Tues-
day, Wednesday, and
Thursday, 2 p.m4
p.m.
Miller Sparks Virginia
To Victory Over Hokies
RICHMOND, Va.
(UPI) - Reserve for-
ward Jimmy Miller
scored 15 of his 18
points in the second
half Wednesday night
to power sixth-ranked
Virginia to an easy
74-64 victory over
intra-state rival
Virginia Tech at the
Richmond Coliseum.
The Cavaliers, 14-2
and coming off Satur-
day's loss to North
Carolina, were ex-
pected to have dif-
ficulties with the
Hokies, 14-2.
But the Cavaliers
raced to a 37-26
halftime lead behind 9
first-half points from
both Ralph Sampson
and Rick Carlisle. The
Hokies, who defeated
then No. 1 Memphis
State 10 days ago, were
paced by freshman Dell
Curry with 17 points
and Perry Young with
15.
Virginia trailed 20-18
at 9:49 to play in the
first half on three con-
sectuive baskets by
Perry Young, Curry
and Al Young.
But VPI went
scoreless for the next 54
minutes and Virginia
ripped off 12 points -
seven by guard Ricky
Stokes - to lead 30-20
with 5:11 left in the
half.
Sampson scored 12
points for the game as
he was used sparingly
and sat out most of the
second half as Virginia
stretched its 11-point,
37-26 halftime lead to
18 at 61-43.
Tech freshman Bob
by Beecher scored t
points, but was saddle
with early foul troubl
and picked up hi
fourth with 18 minute
remaining in the game.
With both Sampson
and Beecher out, Miller
worked himself free in-
side the Tech defense
for easy bank shots and
12-foot jumpers. Dur-
ing a five-minute run.
Miller scored nine
points and capped his
evening by giving the
Cavaliers their last
21-point lead at 74-53
with 3:48 remaining.
With the victory,
Virginia extended its
domination over in-
state teams to 28
straight victories.
tth st.
MISSING PERSONS
BOBSEGER
STRAY CATS
BRUCE SPRINGSTEIN
DIRE STRAITS
MEN AT WORK
LED ZEPPELIN
OEOROE TMOROOOOO
4pp& ecoltctfi
$8.98 List mI priced rt
$5.99
NEIL YOUNG
BILLY SQUIRE
RICK SPRINGFIELD
LINDA RONSTADT
and many more
unaxivertised specials.
PILOT 1MIIII
�Twmics
fit mrt
O
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Every
Monday
&
Tuesday
Night
No Coupon Necessary
757-1955
Every Monday and Tuesday night, every week
of the year, order any large 2 ex more topping
pizza for the crew, ask for the "Family Night Special"
and we'll treat you to your own small pizza with the same
number of toppings. FREE, and delivered tree in our
service zone, I" 30 minutes or less
Or pick up two pizzas in 15 minutes
Two pizzas for the price of one Now that s a treat you can t beat!
When it comesro f pizza, pta comes to vou
Notgood with any other special
O
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King Chosen
Th� N��y pr�ntly h� Itufi' Ofll�1�9�
for the ant tc!tln$ �nd c��l lofll"
Job in X� world - �AVT HIQT. II you
qualify. �� will 9u�rnt�� you st�t In
tht �OJt pr�tl9iou� fl9"t �cl�oo!
�yvhrc. �t th� coaplftloa of training
you mil fly tut IUvy'1 nig ptrfor�"C�
�lrcrjft.
0�Mftct1�M r�
B�cn�lors dey,rt�
IM tnn 2b IJ ywrs old
MJ0 gncorr�ct�fl �U1on
lutilmt MiUk
U.S. Cttlion
If you thin, you c�n qualify vc �oula
li�t to trn t Harting ulary of
S18.000 �1tn in.OOD- In four yri.
st tn� H��y lfflctr Prjgrcas Tt��.
Thy'll b or ctapul 18-W JjBHQ �
't �QO St Of I. If you can't W � It .
tend your r35�l or traoicnpti to:
res cism ami
1001 toaH Dr.
t�l�1t. K Z7�Ot
or uii i-mo-mi-roi
CHARLOTTE,
N.C. (UPI) - Winfred
King, the 6-foot-10
center who sparked
East Tennessee State to
wins over Appalachian
State and Davidson,
was named Southern
Conference player-of-
the-week Wednesday.
King, who became
eligible for play in mid-
December, was selected
for the honor by a
panel of the Southern
Conference Sports
Media Association.
King powered East
Tennessee to a 78-58
win over Appalachian
State and a 67-66 win
over Davidson last
week. He scored 36
points while shooting
52 percent from the
floor, grabbed 27 re-
bounds and con-
tributed four blocks in
the two wins.
The victories moved
East Tennessee's league
mark to 3-1 and its
overall record to 9-3.
Leaders
Friendship &G
RUSH
n
P fi - p�
I e' � r h 2
�rPCSe.
?0 T
mega
AlpkaPh, 0
Motiona I ,Co-ed,Se r vi ce
Fraternifu
ATTIC ATTIC
Thursday Night
Ladies Light Night with
Bill Blue
Ladies'free Till 10:30
50- Bev. Till 11:00
&oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo$
FOSDICK'S 1890 SEAFOOD
NIGHTLY SPECIALS
Monday Large Shrimp Dinner
(fried or boiled)
french fries, slaw$5.95
Tuesday Choice of: Shrimp
Flounder
Oysters
with baked potato and salad$5.50
Wednesday Large Flounder Dinner
(fried or broiled)
french fries, slaw$5.95
Thursday 12 lb. Steamed Shrimp
french fries, slaw$6.50
Ffl, In Concert
MCA Recording Artist
Catholic Girls
Sat.
Avalanche
All ECU Dorm Students
free with Proper l.D.
Sun.
The Brains
i

A
S.
I
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
PRESENTS IN CONCERT
The Souths Hottest Honky Tonkers
SUPER GRIT
COWBOY BAND
In A lydal Benefit Concert For
United Cerebal Palsey
Thursday, January 20
ft
i�
tl
With I
The Reno Brothers
roM The Hills Of VlrftKia'
Ut.1
� �IWBTC
For Further Information Call
758-3943
1

V
t





10
1 HI I M l AROl 1SIAS
I AM Ri 20, 1983
Littleton Hurts Knee
KNOXVILLE,
Term (I PI) Ien-
nessee reserve guard Ed
Littleton has
undergone surger to a
knee he iniured in a
game against I ouisiana
State and will be lost
tor the season, school
officials said Wednes-
day .
I i 111 e t o n . a b - 2
senior who averaged
2.9 points per game and
1.2 rebounds, injured
his left knee in a scram-
ble for a loose ball in
Tennessee's 59-58 ic-
tor at Baton Rouge
Jan.10.
Littleton's season
last ear was ruined
when he was booted ofl
the team tor bad
grades.
He re-entered the
school and made the
Dean's list. He was a
scrappy d e t e n s i e
player in the Yols' first
12 games of this season
and had more playing
time
starters
than some
"He had surgery for
removal of torn car-
tilage and ligaments
school spokesman Bud
Ford said. "The
surgery revealed the
nature of the injury,
and he will not be play-
ing for the rest of the
season. Since he's a
senior that ends it for
him
Mac In tyre Top Coach
Who will survive
and what
will be
left of
them?
� i
ATLANTA (I PI) -
George Maclntyre,
who led Yanderhilt to
its first winning season
in seven years in 1982,
received the Bobbv
Dodd Coach of the
Year award Wednesday
from the American
Sportsmanship Coun-
cil.
Maclntyre is the
seventh coach to win
the Dodd award, given
annually to a coach
who combines winning
m ith a philosophy that
football should be kept
in perspective with col-
lege life in general.
"This shows ander-
bilt is trying to make
strides in the football
world said Macln-
tyre, who guided the
Commodores to an 8-3
record and the Hall ol
Fame Bowl where the)
b wed io ii Force
36-28 in their first bow
game in eight years
Maclntyre, finishing
his fourth vear at
academically tough
Yanderhilt, said he
thought college foot-
ball "has been malign-
ed a bit over the vear 1
think Yanderhilt toot-
ball stands right where
college football
should
"Winning and losing
is very important to the
players and to us as
coaches but it has to he
put into perspective.
It's not the all-fired
most important thing
Maclntyre told a
news conference he en-
dorses recent NC A
rules changes toughen-
ing academic re-
quirements tor football
grants-in-aid.
"It is something that
will not affect Yander-
hilt he said. "But 1
think if is time we did
something to keep a
youngster from coming
to school just to be a
tootball player I think
it demeans a college
education when you
just keep players eligi-
ble to play football.
"At Yanderhilt. we
go right by the houses
of some verv good
players that we can't
even talk to but we
know we will he playing
against in the future
hat 1 hope happens is
that the high school
coaches will see these
10th graders that are
going to be college pro-
spects and that thev will
get them interested in
academics
Maclntyre, stressing
the need to see that
players graduate, was
critical of the new
United States Football
1 eague, which will
dratt players and open
play in the spring
before they finish their
senior years
"I know they have in
their contrasts that it
you make the team they
will give you the money
to go back to school
noted Maclntyre,
"But w hat about the
ones that leave school
but don't make the
team Those are the
ones that I am worried
about. My teeling is
they should wait a year
' work out with weights
and run ' and turn pro
the next January after
they graduate
Maclntyre, who has
doubled his victories
each season in his tour
years at anderbilt,
said that wasn't hard to
do "when you only win
one game the first
vear
Although the Com-
modores were a sur-
prise team last tall,
Maclntyre said the pro-
gram "is established on
solid ground" and he
expects the C'om-
modores to "detinitelv
Classifieds
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SEB
VICE experience qual ty work
IBM Selectnc typewriter Call
Lame Sh.ve 758 5301 or GAIL
JOYNER 754 1042
TYPINr" "fiy papers thesis
etc Call K, unn, 7SJ 4733
to YEARSTYPING -Reasonable
rates Spelling punctuation and
grammar corrections pro
dreading Cindy I a m to 9 p m
J5S 2�68
FOR SALE
NICE GRAY AND WHITE RAN
NIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE 545
CALL 7S� 3�44
SALE 8 ft blue green high back
couch Good condition $75
751 2204
FOR SALE )�74 Toyota Corona
Si 000 miles excellent condition,
new steel belted radials a c AM
FM stereo call 7$J 5717
173 Cutlass Supreme Good condi
tion Best otter JSS 2733
FULL BLOODED DALMATION
pups I wks very healthy and
playful 3 black, I liver Call
7S4 �1�7 or 754 074?
WANTED
WANTED HANDCRAFT and
POTTERY items (or resale on
commission basis only Land and
Sea Outlet, Greenville Square
Shopping Ph 754 4770 Open 11 4
MS
be competitive" in the
Southeastern Con-
ference in coming
years.
"Defensively, we
should be in good
shape next season with
nine starters return-
ing he said. "Our en-
tire offensive line will
be back and it should
be the best offensive
line we've ever had
He said the biggest
problems will be replac-
ing quarterback Whit
Taylor, punter Jim Ar-
nold, receiver Allama
Matthews and fullback
Lrnie Coolsby
"What we have to do
is recruit us a bona fide
running back who can
come in and help us as
a freshman said
Maclntyre. "We will be
recruiting skill posi-
tions this year
Maclntyre joins
Perm State's Joe Pater-
no. who won the award
last vear. Georgia's
Y 1 n c e Doo ley,
Michigan's Bo
Schembechler,
Nebraska's Tom
Osborne, Bngham
Young's Lavell Ed-
wards and Florida
State's Bobby Bowden
as a Dodd awardw in-
ner.
With
Burt & Dolly
this much fun
just couldn 7
be legal!
THE
TEXAS
CHAINSAW MASSACRE
What happened is true.
Now the motion picture that s just a?
real
� ��� -s " Suva's! � � - r.
t�' SuNWI -Avis n .ra'v j'r � s
3cjc� k; Dxtctrt e, 'Ott WOW

� MM r - ��
, w s�- - - �
R
FREE Late Show � Fri & Sat
Hendrix Theatre, MSC
Thurs 7 PM Fri & Sat 5,7,9 PM
Hendrix Theatre, MSC Admission
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Richmond. Va
either Thursday Jan 27 or Thurs
day. Feb 3 Leave in the late
afternoon Please call Steve at
752 �'�4 Will pay for gas
MISC.
WE BUY USED MUSICAL IN
STHUMENTS: CALL 75404 or
7S4W77
LEARN TO FLY. Call Jot
TM-4041.
Ribs
are
now
available
all
hrs.
SPECIAL:
Rib or Fish Dinner with
tries, slaw or hush puppies
ONLY 2.99 for Ribs
$1.99 tor Fish
8olde.
n Q)taam
olelautan
Fish
Special
is
available
on
119
1011 Charles Street � 752 1373 l Block from Campus
Daily
Luncheon
and Dinner
Special
Sat. & Sun.
Luncheon
Buffet
12-3 p.m.
all you can eat
5.25
children under 4 FREE
Open
7 Days
Hours:
Mon. Thurs.
11:30a.m9:30p.m.
Fri.
11:30a.m10:00 p.m.
Sat.
12:00-10:00 p.m.
Sun.
12:00-9:00 p.m.
756-3844
Carolina East Center
TAKEOUT
Look for us in our new location
Z
rattr
It's
the fun
place to eat
LUNCH BUFFET
Daily 1 l-2pm s28'
EVENING BUFFET �r.
Mon.&Tues. 5-8pmS2"
VIDEOGAME CONTEST
every Wed. & Thurs. 7-10pm
prizes for all winners
MrVed.yiThurs. 9:00 Current Movies
"ix. Fri. � Sat. 7-9 rfk
Be
C
ft
PERSONAL
PETEY Georgia is alive and liv
mg in N C Peaches or the Big Ap
pie. who cares' Happy b'day. Go
German Glockenspeil I Love AJ,
DF. JS EMR
TARZAN Happy birthday 5 mon
ths down 18 to go Dinner will be
at t 00 but come earlier for your
present JANE
REX LIKES SEX Just ask TEX
Love LEX
ROOMMATE
WANTED
NEEDED MALE ROOMMATE
to share 4 bedroom house on
Biltmore St Hall block from cam
pus Rent MS 00 plus one fourth
utilities 757 1448
ROOMATE WANTED M7 a month
plus one third utilities Private
room 75 5044
NEED A FEMALE ROOMATE
� mediately Furnished 2 BDRM
apt a few blocks from campus All
you need is a bed Monthly rent
1240 to be shared equally Call
Dons Moyo at 75 444S
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share : bedroom
apartment Rent J1J7 SO Conve
ment tor ECU and Pitt students
Also halt utilities 754 12�
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
apartment at no cost to her her, in
eluding room, meals, etc Call
754 1475 7 lo a m to 00 am or
5 30pm to 1 oo p m daily
PRIVATE ROOM FOR RENT
3 bdr apt Its month HBO.
Showtime Pool 752 0079
ROOMMATE WANTED
SISmonth plus 13 utilities
7 minute walk to campus Private
bedroom! Call 7S1 il�.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE to share 2 bdrm
'ownhouse Rent IDS month plus
half utilities Available now, call
Jamie 7S� 4547
:pendail 11:00am-11 :(N)pm
10th ' Coiatvhe
758-6121
A COFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
Get Your Act Together,
And Bring it to
The
Coffeehouse Auditions
Fri. & Sat.
Feb. 11 &12
'IT-
m
h
ffOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
�MteeaKtto&ai
�v
$�!
,rr
.

BREAKFAST BAR OFFERINGS!
� Freshly Scrambled Eggs � Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits � Bacon
� Country Milk Gravy � Home Fried Potatoes � Southern Style Grits �
Homemade Muffins � Link and Patty Sausage � A Choice of
"Shoneys" Own Special Fruit Toppings � Grated American Cheese �
PLUS The Fruit Bar featuring a variety of fresh fruit and tomatoes
SHONEYS
MONDAY-FRIDAY
6 00 AM 11 00 A.M.
SATURDAY-SUNDAY
HOLIDAYS
6:00 A.M2:00 P.M.
i
Leother Belt Strips
Reg. 3.00 now 2.00
also a group Reg. 2.00
now 150
203 EAST5TH STREET
Tops � Buy one at Reg. price
-get one Free
Pants � Buy one at Reg. price
-get one Free
Skirts � Buy one at Reg. price
-get one Free
Blouses � Buy one at Reg. price
-get one Free
Dresses � V to V2 Suits � !6 to V2
price price

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Title
The East Carolinian, January 20, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 20, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.242
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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