The East Carolinian, January 18, 1983






Stye i�uBt (EutBlMnn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 SoJiT
Tuesday, January 18, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Martin Luther King
Groups Honor Civil Rights Leader
Photo By DAVE WILLIAMS
Students joined together last week to honor the birth of civil rights leader Martin Luther King. A march, follow-
ed by a program in Wright Auditorium, was conducted to honor king on the 54th anniversary of his birth.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wriicr
Several hundred ECU students,
faculty and staff took part in a pro-
gram Friday to honor the 54th birth-
day of the late civil rights leader.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
The program, which included a
cross campus memorial march and a
service in Wright Auditorium, was
co-sponsored by the ECU Student
Chapters of the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Col-
ored People and the Society Of
United Liberal Students.
King, who is recognized for this
nonviolent leadership in the civil
rights movement of the 1950s and
1960s, was gunned down by an
assassin in Memphis, Tenn in
1968. Memorial services for King
were conducted throughout the
country during the weekend.
SOULS and NAACP had called
Volpe To Head A cademic Affairs Office
By GREG HIDEOUT
NfT� r dilor
Chancellor John M. Howell an-
nounced Friday the appointment of
Dr. Angelo A. Volpe as acting vice
chancellor for academic affairs, suc-
ceeding Dr. Robert H. Maier who
resigned Jan. 10. Replacing Volpe
as dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences will be Dr. Eugene Ryan,
who at present is chairman of the
philosophv department.
Volpe, 44, has been dean of the
C ollege ot Arts and Sciences for 2i
years. He came to ECU in 1977 as
professor and chairperson of the
Department of Chemistry.
His new duties as the university's
chief academic officer will give him
administrative oversight over all
academic departments, programs
and personnel in the College ot Arts
and Sciences, General College, con-
tinuing education and all profes-
sional schools except the medical
school. The office also oversees ad-
missions and registration.
Volpe called his new job
"challenging" and said, although
there are a great many areas of
responsibility, he finds the post en-
joyable thus far.
The new vice chancellor's first
decision was the appointing of
philosophy chairman Ryan to
assume his old post. Ryan has been
a member of the ECU faculty since
1968. when he came here from Ox-
ford University. He became the
chairman of the philosophy depart-
ment in 1979.
Ryan said he was very happy to
have the opportunity to work with
the various department chairmen.
He said he should be naming an ac-
ting chairman of the philosophy
department within the next two
days.
Howell said he named Volpe to
the acting vice chancellorship, in the
largest part, because of the ex-
perience he has in academic ad-
ministration. "He has had a very
successful experience as chemistry
chair and dean. He has a good
academic background and is a well
respected teacher.
Howell said a search committee
would be named sometime this week
to begin the proceeds of finding a
permanent vice chancellor. He said
the search would be limited to peo-
ple already on campus.
Both Volpe's and Ryan's appoint-
ments are effective immediately.
on ECU students to skip classes if
necessary to join in the celebration.
Shortly before noon dozens of
students began gathering in front of
the student supply store waiting for
the march to begin.
Several members of the Alpha Phi
Alpha fraternity, of which King
himself was a brother, opened the
program by asking the large group
to share in a moment of silence in
honor of King. Alpha Phi Alpha
President Danny Scott then led the
group on a ten-minute march
around the campus mall.
Scott carried a framed portrait of
King during the march while other
students carried a large banner. The
marchers sang the well known civil
rights hymn "We Shall Overcome"
as they walked in the near-freezing
temperatures. The march concluded
at Wright Auditorium.
Donovan Phillips, chairman of
the political action committee of the
Pitt County chapter of the NAACP
and the first speaker of the pro-
gram, opened by thanking those
present for holding the only birth-
day celebration for King in the area.
Phillips called King the "greatest
messenger of peace" since Jesus
Christ and Mahatma Ghandi.
"There is no sane reason why Dr.
King's birthday is not a national
holiday he added.
Phillips also praised King as "one
of the greatest men of this century.
Dr. Angelo Volpe
TKE Fraternity House Closed By Fire
The Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity
house has been condemned in-
definitely by Greenille City of-
ficials as a result of a third-floor at-
tic fire two weeks ago. There is still
no final conclusions on how the ear-
ly morning fire began.
Both assistant to the chancellor
Col. Charles R. Blake and Associate
Dean of Judiciary James B. Mallory
have been meeting regularly with
TKE fraternity members to lend
their assistance to the 15 displaced
students and their other brothers.
According to Blake, a contractor
who inspected the house's damage
on Monday will help the TKE's in
planning a renovation project which
could possibly make it livable within
30 to 60 days.
Blake said he hopes the first floor
of the house will be available sooner
so the group can use it for meetings
and other business projects.
Mallory said he feels that the attic-
area, which received the most direct
fire damage, can be sealed off, leav-
ing TKE members with only the first
and second floors for living space.
Previously there were four
students residing in the attic.
Mallory added that it would be
necessary to first remove all the elec-
trical wiring from the attic area
before it was sealed off.
Blake said the insurance policy on
the house only covered liability and
that "the fire insurance had lapsed
back in the fall Blake said that
"too much dispersion of respon-
sibility" was the key reason for the
error which resulted in the fire
policy's not being renewed.
TKE members are hoping to get
major financial support from their
alumni members to begin the
rebuilding effort which could cost
between $25,000 and $30,000.
The international headquarters of
TKE, which is located in In-
dianapolis, Ind is planning to send
Job Search In Winter Can Pay Off
With Paycheck For Grads In Spring
By MILLIE WHITE
Why put off until tomorrow what
you can do today? Seniors who put
off looking for a job just might find
themselves jobless in May.
"The time to start looking is
now stresses Furney K. James,
director of ECU's Career Planning
and Placement Center, located in
the Bloxton House between Greene
Hall and Mendenhall Student
Center.
Seniors and graduate students are
urged to come by the office and
register. According to James, "Now
is the time students should be get-
ting registered and looking for jobs
whether they graduate in the spring
semester or the summer sessions.
First Night Of 'Pirate Walk'
Is Sucessful But Not Busy
At exactly 6:41 p.m. last night
Tyler dorm resident Cindy
Pendergraph logged the first offical
telephone call to the Pirate Walk of-
fice requesting an escort to her 7
p.m. class in the Science Complex.
Seconds later, the Pirate Walk
telephone operator called escort
Chuck Wingo in Scott dorm and
gave him the first assignment of the
new service. Wingo promptly met
Pendergraph and walked with her to
the class.
discouraged. "So far everything's
running pretty smooth he said.
"We didn't want to be swamped the
first night Sumrell said he ex-
pected to have 20 to 25 escort re-
quests before the service stopped at
midnight.
"I think it's going really well
added Pirate Walk Assistant Direc-
tor Tommy Robbins. "I'm pleased
with the first evening
"It's a credit to our campus that
we're willing to help not just the
Wingo was one of 18 escorts who girls, but anyone around here who
were on duty for the first night of th
new escort service, which has been
in the planning stages for months.
By 9 p.m. only six more escort re-
quests had been made, but Pirate
Walk Director Paul Sumrell wasn't
doesn't feel safe
the escort.
said Wingo after
Anyone needing an escort
between 7 and 12 p.m. is asked to
call 757-6616.
"By registering we mean develop-
ing a set of credentials which in-
cludes a resume (data sheet) and
references from professors or from
people you know To register, a
student must go to the office, pick
up a packet and complete the
enclosed forms.
After registering, a job guide of
reported openings is sent to those
students registered. Registrants may
sign up for interviews which run
continuously until the end of April.
Among the companies who will
be conducting interviews are
Sunolo, a paper manufacturer, and
Central Carolina Banks. Teaching
positions are also available.
How much does all of this cost?
"It is a free service to all seniors and
graduate students until one year
after graduation James said. He
added that a service for alumni is
also provided. "We keep their
credentials file active for a year
James said. "The only basic charge
we have for alumni is a $7.00 per
year charge one year after gradua-
tion
"We don't really place students in
jobs continued James, "they
place themselves. According to
James, his office serves as a base for
information � resumes, creden-
See JOB, Page 3
representatives to Greenville this
week to survey the damage and
make recommendations to the local
chapter. Blake said the visit of the
TKE officials would have several
purposes, including advising the
chapter and helping them with their
overall business and financial situa-
tion.
Much of the repairs involved in
the proposed renovation project will
be in the west end of the attic area,
said Blake. "The west end will have
to be done from scratch he added.
He also added that new studding
and shingling of the whole roof
would be necessary. Much of the
clean-up throughout the rest of the
house will be conducted by the
fraternity members themselves.
Both the first and second floors of
the house received some water and
smoke damage.
Blake said the cause of the blaze is
still "not precisely known" and that
it could have been the result of faul-
ty wiring or possibly ignited by a
cigarette.
Blake, who is also the faculty ad-
visor to the TKE fraternity, noted
that the fire has "really made people
pull together" and that the spirit of
TKE members is strong. "They're
fully committed he said.
He had a great mind, he was a great
orator and most of all he was a great
humanitarian
Phillips, who gave an address
during last year's campus program
in honor of King, told the audience
that despite what some people were
saying to the contrary, "things have
gotten worse" for black people liv-
ing in America. "This country is
trying to rebuild and regroup itself
on the backs of the weak Phillips
added.
Phillips challenged the students to
make a new committment to the
human race and their country
"This country needs a new direc-
tion Phillips said. "You have to
make a committment to direct ac-
tion � you have to become an in-
tricate part of the system
The keynote speaker, Eddie
Wayne Lawrence, gave a rendition
of King's famous "I Have a
Dream"
delivered
28. 1963.
Speaking on King, Lawrence said
"his mold of living was rare and his
method of protest was rare. He
touched many lives.
"Dr. King was an activist, but his
activism was rooted deeply in (his)
moral commitments and (his) rela-
tionship with the Lord Jesus Chnst
He stressed urgency, the importance
See MI Page 3
speech, which King
in Washington on Aug.
Added Security Officers
May Face New Training
B LISA RYAN
ECU Director of Public Safety
Joseph Calder has announced a
planned SO percent increase in the
campus security force. Candidates
for the several new positions are
now being interviewed and may be
subject to new pre-service training
requirements currently under con-
sideration by the N.C. Criminal
Justice Education and Training
Standards Commission.
At present, an officer may be
hired, receive temporary certifica-
tion and be placed on active duty
without having received any train-
ing. The Standards Commission re-
quires that the 240-hour basic train-
ing be completed within the first
year of employment.
Standards Commission chairman
Wade Barker told reporters
Wednesday that this basic training
need never be updated.
Among the several options which
the Standards Commission is con-
sidering are: requiring completion
of the 240-hour basic course before
a candidate may be sworn in, or re-
quiring completion of a 44-hour
mini-course before active duty-
placement.
Calder, who attended one of the
five state-wide hearings on the sub-
ject at Greenville City Hall, suggests
two further options. The candidate
might be required to complete the
240-hour course on his own before
being hired, or he may be given a
16-hour precourse.
Calder feels that "too much em-
phasis is given to firearms; I per-
sonally do not like to emphasize
weapons training What he would
like to see is "stress on the laws of
search and seizure, the laws of arrest
and the laws of liability
Calder predicted the 240-hour
pre-service training requirement wilj
be passed in modified from. His ma-
jor objection to the proposed
regulation is that it is not feasible.
Small police departments, without
sufficient personnel to cover
absences, would be hurt by the pro-
gram.
Calder said his 23-person force is
the 93rd largest of 404 police depart-
ments in North Carolina.
A summation of the discussion of
security officer training may be
found in the job listing published by
the ECU personnel department. In
order to apply for the job of security
officer, "applicants must have com-
pleted high school or equivalent and
must be able to meet ail standards in
the area of background investiga-
tion and enforcement knowledge as
directed in the N.C Law Enforce-
ment Training Standards
While in the future these stan-
dards may include completion of a
substantial training course, they are
at present essentially non-existant.
The new ECU officers will be
assigned to the recently opened
Brody Building at Pitt Memorial
Hospital, which houses the ECU
School of Medicine.
According to Calder, the universi-
ty will take over the duties in March.
The medical school budget will
cover the cost of the security
change, and the campus security-
budget will not be affected, Calder
said.
tv CtDV WALL
Campus police vechicles shouldn't sit idle very often after the Department of Public Safety hires additional
officers and takes on the responsibility of security operations at the new Brody medical building.
?
'V'
'





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 18,1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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would like to lave an item prmted
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please type it on an announcement
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Carolinian m care of the produc
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and sugges' m1 vou do not rely
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e jead; H'tor announcements
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TIMirwMY paper No an
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joaoi'i's will t�e p' nted
Tr. space is available to an
ampi s urganiia' Ofs anc depart
ments
ECU LAW
SOCIETY
ECU Lin society will meet at
1 00 'O Room 248 or Mendenhali
Stude Center. Thursday
January ?0 1983 FinaiU plans
for tnp to Washington D C
SAB CALENDAR
PLANNING
There will be a student Athletic
Board Mee'ing Tuesday January
18 at ' 00 in Room 247 of
VendenhaH Ah members are urg
ed 0 attend as we are going to
plan our calendar for the res' of
�he school year Also we would
like tc invite any interested person
ome and see wha' SAB is all
abou'
PSI CHI
Ps Ch OHet 1 scholarships tor
s'udenrs whose studies are in
Psychology Appi ca'ions can be
p �ed up a' 'he Psychology office
Room 105 and a' 'he Psi Chi
. brarv tas' cav applications
� be accepted s Apr.i 1 1983
PS'Chi w I hold ts its' meeting
On Thursday January : '983 at
7 00 p m in Room 109 Spegh'
Topic will be 'ocused on going to
Q'aduate school in Psychology
TIMS S open o a" eres'ec pec
p'e Aftft back Ps Ch.
members'
IRS
The nterra'Ona! Sr u 0 e n t s
Assocta'ton wMi iotd its tirsl
�e-jjting op bauaav Januarv 22
a fe nterria'0"ai Mouse 306
Eas �T !�reet a' 5 0C c n A
-trr!ters ae encouraoea To come
ac mteresea I'Ki'v iduais
weicome Ae will discuss
v tes to- lilts semes'er
GOGREEK!
There are ONLY two mghfs left
in SPING RUSH 13! So. it you
mused Monday nights tes'ivities
be sure to go out tonight and party
with the Greeks at ECU I
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers Pledges and Little
Sister of the Kappa Sigma
Fraternity would like to invite the
students ot ECU to come by
tonight tor SPRING RUSH
83 Tonights event is the Original
Las Vegas Playboy Bunny
night and it is a party you would
not want to miss!
are
he ac
PARKS AND
RECREATION
The PCR It will meet ton,gh
at 7 00 m Mendenhall Room 244
Officers will be appointed and new
business discussed All PRC Ma
iors are asked to attend
USCHAMBEROP
COMMERCE
The U S Chamber of Commerce
has internships available tor a
variety of maiors They are
located In Washington. DC All in
ternships are non paid Contact
the Co op Office
ONE DAY
COMPUTER
PROGRAMS
The SWaH Computer
Revolution Saturday. February
26 1983 Word Processing
Saturday March 5 1983
Pre requisite The Small Com
puter Revolution or equivalent in
'roducfion to Programming in
BASIC Saturday March 26. 1983
Pre requisite The Small Com
puter Revolution or equivalent
Contact the Division ot Continuing
Education 757 6143
BASIC SAILING
Two classroom sessions and
three weekend afternoons on 19 26
toot baots on the Pamiico River
jom in the Fun Registration is
limited to 16. so register early
Meets Thursday April 7. 21
7 30 9 30 p m Saturday. April 9
16 23 1 30 4 30 p m Contact the
Division of Continuing Education
757 6143
COMMUNICATE
Learn to develop assertive com
munication skills Ten others what
you want, feel and believe Asser
'iveness can open new doors tor
you Assertive Communication
Tuesoay Marcr. 15 April 5
t 00 9 30 p m ContaC the D'vi
Sion ot Continuing Education
757 6143
INVESTMENT
PHI SIGMA PI
Ph, Sigma P Va'ionai �onor
fraterhi'y wii' hold IIS mon'hiy
easiness meeting on Wednesday
anuary 19 1983 at 5 00 p m n
Uawi i30 AH brothers please
ake pians 0 a'erd 'he meeting
DANCE
Fox'rC. Rhumba D'soo Wai'7
ana Bop the basics and WveVr
variations Beginning Ballroom
Dancing Fnda. tepruary 18
April 29 1983 from J 00 8 00 0 m
intermediate Baii'OOm Dancing
fnoay February 18 April 29
1983 'rorn 8 00 9 00 P m ContaC
� he Division of Continuing Eouca
� ,n TS �143
STRATEGIES
Basic Commodity Hedging
Tuesday and Thursday February
15 24 ' 00 9 00 p m investing in
�he 80 s Wednesday Februart 23
April 6 6 30 9 10 p m T nese
courses will provide valuable In
forma'ior. tor those who have little
on no experince m investing Con
tac' 'he Division or Continuing
Education 757 6143
MARK TWAIN
IN PERSON
Mark Twain In Person wnl be
ar the Kinston Airpor Theatre
Stallmgj Field Rouse Rd
January 28 and 29 Shows begm at
8 15pm Student tickets are 83 m
advance For moere information
contact Leigh Riggs at 527 2517
Kmston Ar's Council
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed for Art Depart
rnent self help positions are
available tor nude modeling at
85 02 per hour PLease see the
following teachers Ray Elmore.
Tran Gordley. Davy Davenport.
WesCrawley Betsy Ross, Michael
Voors
COUNSELING
A program tor increasing Lear
nmg Efficiency will be offered by
the Counseling Center this Spring
Dr George Weigand will teach the
classes on Monday and Wednes
day at 100 PM beginning
January 17 and Dr lone Ryan will
teach the class on Tuesday and
Thursday at 1 00 P M beginning
January 18 Both groups will meet
m 305 Wright Annex The classes
are available to an students At
tendance is voluntary no formal
registration is required
BOWLING
The 1983 spring semester
Mendenhall Student Center Mixed
Doubles Bowling Leagues will
begin the second week ot classes
All ECU students interested m
bowling on a mixed league must
sign up on the bulletin board on the
bottom floor of Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Each team must con
sist of 2 men and 2 women The
cost is 82 25 per person each night
Awards will be given to the top
male and female bowler and to the
winning team The organization
meeting for the Tuesday night
league will be held Tuesday. Jan
18 at 5 00 pm in the Bowling
Center P.jy will begin directly
following these meetings For fur
ther info call Linda Barkand, MSC
Cratfs and Recreation Director at
757 6611 ext 260 or the Bowling
Center at 757 6611 ext 267
SPOLETO FESTIVAL
The Spoieto Festival in
Charleston SC .s seeking qualified
students to serve as apprentices
for the Festival held May 20 June
5 There is a variety ot positions
available Application deadline is
Feb 1 Contact the Co op office
313 Raw
NC GOVERNMENT
INTERNSHIPS
A variety 0 obs are available
Pay is 83 75 per hour tor full time
positions Beginning June I
August 5 Students must have
tin-shed their sophmore year ano
have a 2 5 GPA Graduate
students are also eligible to apply
Application deadline is February
7 Contact the Co op office
SCUBA
Basic NAui or PADi Scuba Cer
titication Section 1 Tuesday anc
thursday. March 15 April 7
7 00 10 00 p m Section ; 1 Tues
day and Thursday April 12 Ma�
5, ; 00 10 00 p m These courses
are designed to introduce begm
ners to SCUBA diving with basic
instruction in the fundamental
skills and safety procedures
Register early' Contact the Div
sion of Continuing Education
757 6143
HONORS
SIMINAR TOPICS
Faculty members and current
Honors students are reminded of
the opportunity to propose topics
for Honors Seminars tor fall and
spring semesters 1983 84 These
seminars are ideally inter
disciplinary and problem or topic
oriented See pp 87 88 of me
1982 84 catalogue for general
categories Seminars meet once a
week and give 3 s h credit
towards G E requuirements
To be considered, proposals
must be submitted in writing by
January 20, 1983. to Dr David
Sanders. Coordinator ot the
Honors Program, co English
Dept Austin Bldg . Campus For
further information call 757 6548
S. R. A.
Escorts are needed tor the
Escort Service Anyone interested
m being an escort please contact
your dorm director If you are a
dorm resident of it you live oft
campus contact the SGA office
ECUCOLLIGIATE4 H
Attention 4 Hers! The first
meeting of the new year will be
Wed January 19, 1983 at 5 00 m
Room 248 Mendenhall Student
Center New members are
welcome For information call
758 8887 See you there
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at rij�ht or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
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All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
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Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
RHara to THE EAST C'AROUMAN
office by 300 Taesoay before
Wednesday stabHeattoan.
Name
Address.
CityState.
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1� ���
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1 -L.
VLA-�1�M1
NEWSTUDENT
ORIENTATION
PROGRAM
The Office of the Associate Dea"
of Studen' Life located m
Whichard Building Room "710. is
now taking applications for the
New Student Orientation Program
netd in June and July Applicants
should have a good scholastic
average and should no' be piann
ing on attending Summer School
in'erviews of 'he applicants will
begin around 'he middle o' March
CO OP EDUCATION
CO OP internship available with
the Dept ot Agriculture Students
with a background m entomology
bo'any plant pathology,
nematology horticulture, and
related t.eids should apply at 313
Rawl. CO OP office Phone
757 6�79
ECUCIRCLE K
Circle k. win be meeting every
Tuesday night at 7 00 p m in
Room 221 In Mendenhall Student
Center Circle K 'S a coed service
organization which works to im
prove life on our campus and com
munity It you are interested in
helping others are meetings on
T uesoay nights at 7 00
SOLAR SYSTEM
LECTURE
There will be a special
Tele lecture by NASA on Ex
ploration of the Solar System at
the next Science Education Club
Meeting Mr Ray B Goodman ot
NASA Langley Research Center
a' Hampton. Virginia will conduct
'he lecture The meeting will begin
promptly at 4 00 p m Wednesday
January 19 m Flanagan Room 307
All interested persons are
welcome
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
Rush for Sigma Gamma Rho
wii be held this Thursday a' 7 00
in the Coftee House Ail interested
young ladies should atteno
WZMB
The Electric Rainbow Radio
Show returns to WZMB Now on
Fridays from 3 00 p m to 6 00
p m and Saturday from 12 00 mid
mght to 4 00 a m Keith Mitchell
hosts the predommatlly heavy
metal program which also
features album specials Friday's
album special is Sammy Hagar s
new 'Three Lock Box' and will be
played at 4 00p.m. Saturday night
the album special is by Frank
Marino and Mahogany Rush and is
entitled What's Next"
day s album specials i
played at 2 00 a m Tune
iam out. no guts
Satur
be
ano
no glory The
Electric Ra.nbow Raoio Show!
EXERCISE
A-
THON
An exercise a thon to benefit
Cystic Fibrosis will be held at the
Aerobic Workshop locted at 417
Evans Street Mall, on Saturday
January 22 Participants in the
event will begin exercising at 11
a m All funds raised will be used
to help Cystic Fibrosis
A grand pr.ze will be awarded to
the top fundraiser at the exercise
a thon All participants raising S30
or more will receive CF "I did It"
t shirts and all participants who
raise 875 or more will receive
t shirts and a roll tote bag
Funds raised in the CF
Exercise a thon will help support
the Foundation s research, treat
ment and education programs m
NC and nationwide CF is a fatal
lung and digestive disease that
takes the lives ot halt its victims
betore they reach their twenties
CF causes excessive amounts of
thick mucus to clog lungs and in
'ertere wth breathing ano absorp
tion ot food
For more information about
participating m the exercise a
thon. or sponsoring someone.
please contact the Aerobic
Workshop at 757 1608
ECU POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will
hold its first meeting of the new
year this Thursday evening at 8 00
in Mendenhall Room 212 The
Forum is open to anyone who
would like an appreciative bu'
critical audience tor his or her
poetr Those attending are asked
to bring six or eight copies of work
to be read and discussed The
Forum is a studen' organization
also under tne sponsorship of the
English department Fourm
regularly meets on the first or
third Thursday ot each month of
the school year
SIGMATAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta will hold a
meeting on anuary 27 1983 a'
7 00 p m in the Mendenhall Coftee
Shop DR Peter Makuck will give
a reading from his book of poetry
Whrrt �e lic All members are en
couraged to attend, guests are
welcome
ALPHA EPSILON
DELTA
There will be an A E D meeting
Tuesday night at 7 30 p m .
January 18 1983 m F lanagan room
30 7
ENJOY SINGING
Residence Hall Chorus is star
tmg up again tor 1983 Ifyouenioy
singing come join us Monday night
in room 103 Biology All are
welcome No auditions or ex
perience required
CAREER CHOICE
Career by Choice Not Chance A
two part mini series ottered at no
cost by the University Councelmg
Center Series are to be held
January 24 and 25 and February 7
and 8 m Wright Annex Room 305
from 3 00 to 5 00 No advance
registration necessary
AMBASSADORS
This is to remind all Am
bassadors that our meeting on
Wed . January 26 has been
cancelled and m its place our In
ducation Ceremony has been
scheduled This special event will
take place on Thursday January
27. at 6 45 in Mendenhall's mult.
purpose room All Ambassadors
will be enducted and neat dress ll
reaquired A reception at the E Ibc
Room will follow the ceremony
ano all Ambassedors are invited to
attend
PHI KAPPATAU
The Brothers and L'ttle Sisters
ot Phi Kappa Tau would nke to ex
tend on invitation to all ECU
students to our Spring Rush Par
ties. Tuesday and Wednesdar
January 18 and 19 The parties
star' at 9 00 each night Come on
out an meet the Phi Taus!
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan 'o declare
physical education as a maior Our
ing change of maior week for the
Spring Semester should report 80
Minges Coliseum from 1 00 3 X
p m on Wednesday. Feb 9 1983
tor a motor and physical fitness
test Sa'iSfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre
requ'Si'e tor official admittance to
�he physical education maior pre
gram More detailed information
concerning the test is available by
calling 757 6497
Any student with a medical con
dition that would contraindicate
participation m the testing pro
gram should contact Or israe1 at
757 6497 Examples would include
heart murmurs. corvg�nitai'heart
disease, respiratory disease or
significant musculoskeletai pro
blems it you have and Significant
medical conditions please notify
Or Israel even it you plan to be
'ested
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
The Biology Club will sponsor
the Red Cross Bloodmobile Tues
day and Wednesday January 25
and 26 Hours ot collection will be
10 00 a m to 4 00 P m m
Mendenhall room 244
MINI COURSES
Several non credit, mini courses
are now being ottered by the
Department of University Unions
individuals who would like to par
ticipate m a mini course must
register in person at tne
Mendenhall Central Ticket Office
between the hours of 10 00 A M
and 4 00 P M . Monday through
Friday Registration tees will be
accepted through the day prior to
the tirst class meeting
Each mm. course has a ma�
,mum and a minimum enroiimen'
No refunds ot course tees will be
made after the reg s'ra'ion
deadline unless 'he course .s
cancelled
Each registrar' mus' shew
n,s her ECU ID or driver s license
and ECU Act.vit, Card or
Mendenhall Student Center
Membership with the exception of
a spouse or a guest whe must be
registered by the part.cipa ng
card holder
(l(M,(.IM, -00PM � 30 PM
Mondays Jan 31 Feb 7 14, 21
28
mstruc'or Nanc r Spamnour
MSC Multi Purpose Room Fee
810 00
Learn basic dogging s'eps 'c
music that makes you wan' tc
move it's lust pian nard '0 sit
still once you ve learned a tew
s'eps Free style as wen as coupie
dancng wii be taugf Clogging s
a wonderful aerob c e�erc se ano
a tension release mechanism
Unciog your mind and oody anc
en ov 'h.s olk oance
( .l I l(.RPH 1 00 P M 9 00 P M
Wednesdays - Jan 26 Feb 2 9
16 23
mstruc'or Karen Podeszwa
MSC Room 221 Fee $10 00
Students can be expected tc
ccme away from this course with a
working knowledge of 'he
Chancery Italic, the most popular
style of writing Its appeal s oasec
on its usable style 'ha' is graceful
personable, and contemporary
Chancery, once mastered w.u be
the basis on which to tear" �ne
. other styles
For further information can L-n
da Barkand. Crat'S ano Recrea
t.on Director at 757 6611 ext 260 or
the Cen'ral Ticxe' office a' ex'
266
PHI SIGMATAU
There will be an organizational
meeting of the Philosophy Club
tonight. 6 30. m Mendenhall Room
212 General information concern
ing the club, topics tor meetings
this semester and other related
matters will be discussed
Members are expected To attend �
possible and any other interested
parties are urged o a"eno
PHIALPHATHETA
The ECU History Honor Society
will conduct its first meeting of the
Spring semester on Weonesda.
januaray 19 at 2 30 p m nt)
Richard C Todd Phi Alpha Tnefa
room AH members are urged M
a'teno as plans tor inaon. rush.
programs, and social events wnl
oe discussed interested persons
and canpidated tor members- p
are also nyited o a'teno
FACULTY AND
STAFF AEROBICS
Faculty and s'at aeroOic dance
meets a' 12 00 noon Monday
Weonesda. and Fr,oay in
Memorial Gym room 108 There s
nc charge and you oo not need 80
nave any prev ous experience
Come out and ge' yourself in snape
and nave tun whne you re a it
Comae' jo Saunoers at 757 aOOC tor
tur'her information
ALPHA EPSILON
DELTA
mere aril oe a" A E D mee' ng
Tuesday ntoltl a" 7 30 p m
January II 1983 ��- Flanagan room
307 Tne speaker w mD' Duane
E Kratzer on the sudiec' at
Poo.atr.c Med.cne and Surgery of
�he foe- nere arttl a'so be an ex
ecutive mee'ing ano a pledge
meeting a' 1 X Everyone s n
vi ted
ADMISSIONS
PROCEDURES
r-e Division of Socai Work is
new accepting appicaons from
s'uden's in'eres'eo In maior.ng in
Socai Worx or .n Corrections Ap
ol.cants should nave a minimum
2 5 GPA ano nave compie'eo a'
leas' one course m me Division
Applications are available In 'he
Division Office in Allied Health
Building Room 308 or 312 and must
oe submitted no la'er 'han
January IB Personal .n-erv.ews
are aiso required ano appoin
men's shou'd be made as early as
possible ano no la'er tnan
FeDruary 1 For more intorma
t.on contac' 'he DivS'On Offices
a' '57 6961 Ms Marie jeyner
The East C arolinian

Puons"eo ever� Tuesoa? and
Tnursoay during 'he aca"e
year arc ever, Weonescia. Out
,ng the Summer
The Eas' Car - �- s m� '
t.oai newspaper of Eas'
Carot ra U" �ers '� a �
opera'ed. and P0 s"eo I I -
by ,He students of Eas' - '�
University
Subscription Rate 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus ot ECvJ
Greenville. N C
pre 'VASTER � " " '
car ges 'o The fed' � C �' " �
Old outr Bv - � - F
. NC 834
, Telephone '5? �J� �J7 �J0�
New
B Al MM.lNMv
hCL ar,
(. arotiiia state I nj
hae ap;
,ment ;
tor the estal
an Arrm ROT
M.L. Ki
( (iniinut-d From Pji;t 1
o! now 1 n
urgen�
:e that ev n
the time v- - the
time u

Ar:
I aw re:
star
the
ma
I
" We I �
cheese, w�
and :t we
can bu cheese
In closing 1
,
n
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Camera jesda. Fecrua
22 March 29 7 00 9 00 p m Tin
Dance t-ac'z't Tuesca?
February 22 Va. 3 5 30 6 X
pm Gu 'ar Tuesday '��'�
22 Apr. 19 6 3C " 45 c m Clogg
ng Weqnesaa, Fee.a 23
Apr t 8 X 'C X C Speed
Reao.ng "lursdi, FfD'jJ'r :�
Apr 2' � X I X p Yoga
Tjesda, and j'sca. Majrct i
c- ' 6 X ' x c m cc ntact me
D . s �i ol Com - ng Ed
757 6143
PHYE MAJORS
CLUB
PnyS'Cai Educa'ion C
�ee' ngs w se -e c a' "e ' �
-g � mes and da'es .aary IB a"
5 15 and .anuary 20 a' 4 X
ILO
The Intajf isattowajl agjage
Organiza'ion welcomes an 'ecu:
'y s'att ano s'uden's back 'o
ECU The 'LO w.n have is firs'
mee'ing on January !9at3 X The
mee'mg wnl oe held - BC XS. Aii
old memtjers are encouraged �e
a"e-o mis mee'ng D scusatens
tor 'he spr.ngs activities will be
neio Any mteres'eo, oeooie are
welcome 'o a'teno vou oc nc'
nave to be a Foreign anguage
JU
GRA
Are you a eoltej
trying to estabh
If so ZALES
account tor coin
Ob necessary I
Stop by our cj
out an apppiic�
show vou our
fashion rings.
Come �n arn
needs
ma,or or
teno
Treat the crew
and we'll treat you
Located 1 mile past
Hasting's Ford on
10th St. extension
N
Tuesday, Wednesday
& Thursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
for Slaw35& extra
ft
V
y
.

X
Th� Oiamoi
CAROLI
$BC�3KVVVXXVVVVXVV'�
a
�-
No Coupon Necessary

Every
Monday
&
Tuesday
Night
757-1955
Every Monday and Tuesday night, every week
of the year, order any large 2 or more toppmg
pizza tor the crew, ask tor the "Family Night Special"
and we'll treat you to your own small pizza with the same
number of toppings FREE, and delivered free in our
service zone, in 30 minutes or less.

Or pick up two pizzas in 15 minutes
Two pizzas for the price of one Now that s a treat you can t beat!
When it comeso f pizza, pta comes to vou
Not good with any other special
'c�
123 E. 5th Str.
TueS. all you can eat 5-9
� Pizza and Pasta 2.99
Ladies Nitewith
Steve Brian
Ladies7 Admitted Free
FREE DRAFT for the ladies
Wed. � Salad Bar Special 2.15
all you can eat 5-9
Thurs. � Spaghetti Special s2.49
all you can eat 5-9
i
Gentleman:
There is a new fraternity on campus. The Epsilon
Kappa colony of Zeta Beta Tau fraternity is the most
recently organized Greek organization on the campus
of East Carolina. Currently, we are twenty-two
members strong and will be a major fraternity on our
campus in the near future.
This is not only a chance to become a charter
member of a national social fraternity, but an oppor-
tunity to be a member of the fastest growing ZBT col-
ony in the nation. We, the brothers at Epsilon Kappa
colony, extend an open invitation to all interested men
to experience the friendship and brotherhood of Zeta
Beta Tau Maternity life.
We will be holding our rush in the Coffeehouse on
the bottom floor at Mendenhall, on Monday, Tues-
day, and Wednesday nights from 7:00 p.m. to 11:00
p.m. Come by and meet the brothers of ZBT and see
how we make the difference. The Brothers at Epsilon
Kappa Colony of Zeta Beta
Tau Fraternity.
PET
VILLAGE
511 S. EVANS
756-9222
I
A Special
Welcome Back
15 Discount on all
stock thru Jan.21
for ECU Students with I.D.
�, ��"V I
rt

A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 18, 1983
Phone.
.frwlosed
1 1
1 i 1 1 1
I 1 . 1
t
. . I
fill �!� . 1 1 - 1 1 .




IG A A
I be rastarolinian
THETA
EROBiCS


TIM Eas' Carolinian offices
a-e -ocafed m the Old South
q on �he campus ot ECU
-
57 6 3e� 6 3e" �iO
.OS
iissions
Iedures
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
- ; �� �. � i �
- - � af .
Sp n :iogg
� .
� - � � . �
- - - g �� a�. ; 4
� � -
. - - �. -3. v . � �
� i �
-
PHYE MAJORS
CLUB
- t benefaat e a
� idate � ar, - �
- - � . it 4 OC
ILO
-�ea- c-a -a-gage
: �' ' M mt a 'ai
and s' js ca �
-ee g o- -a-
I i- I x - nc
o- r e 3 n BC SOS
� a'e ejL'agec ro
"e "g O sc i!c
I's activities � Bi
��-�� vj Deer I I
treat you
IM Sp-c
t beat'
ecial
e Back
ount on all
iru Jan.21
Idents with I.D
New Extension Program Offers Army ROTC
B M MA(,1NNKS
Mill Vi nltt
ECU and North
Carolina State Univer-
sity have approved a
cross enrollment plan
for the establishment of
an Armv ROTC exten-
sion center on the hCU
campus.
The program will
begin operating in the
tall ot 1983, according
to Colonel F.W.
"Chip" Wanner, chair-
man of the Department
of Miiitarv Sciences at
NCSU. The program
will cover freshman
through junior level
classes in military
sciences, expanding in
1984-1985 to cover the
full four years.
"We have obtained
authority for a minor in
military science
Wanner reported.
"This will consist of
twenty-eight credit
hours, twelve of which
are cognate courses in
other areas such as
writing, psychology,
military history,
M.L. King Honored at ECU
Continued From Page 1
ot now. I must embrace
this urgency and con-
clude that yes, now i
the time. Now is the
time to appeal to the
conscience of
America
I awrence received a
standing ovation from
the audience when he
made a reference to the
federal governments
cheese subsidizing pro-
gram for the needy
We don't want
cheese, we want jobs
and it we get jobs we
can buy cheese
In closing Lawrence
told the audience that
they can't afford the
luxury of thinking they
have arrived. "All men
do not remain
equalRacism is simp-
lv wearing a mask
Both Battle and
Rowe recognized many
of the individuals who
had worked on the pro-
gram. Battle thanked
the speakers, and Rowe
thanked Vice
Chancellor for Student
Life Elmer Meyer for
attending.
The ECU Gospel
Choir closed the pro-
gram by performing
the black anthem.
Job Search Starts Now
Continued Krom Page 1
tials, recommendations
� that is sent to pro-
spective employers at
the student's request.
"We help employers
set up interviews and
aid students as they ex-
possibilities added
James, "which is very
important since most
are simply not aware of
the variety of careers
available
In addition, the of-
fice holds Job Search
Assistance Workshops.
The next workshop.
dealing with resume
preparation, will be
held Tuesday, Jan. 18
at 2 p.m. in the Career
Planning Room of the
Bloxton House.
Another workshop
on interviewing skills,
will be held at the Blox-
ton House on Jan. 25
piore alternate job
�Avvvvvvwoaiaj
JUNIORSSENIORS
&
GRADUATE STUDENTS
management and
political science
Wanner indicated
that ECU would receive
three military personnel
� two officers and an
NCO
(non-commissioned of-
ficer) to teach classes in
the Military Science
department. Students
receive all military texts
and equipment free of
cost.
The Department of
Military Science will be
under the School of
Technology. The initial
office will be located in
room 324 of Erwin Hail
and is due to open Feb.
2.
"The office will be
open at least on
Wednesdays Wanner
said. "We will be
recruiting this spring
"We're looking at
three groups of
students Colonel
Wanner reported.
"We're looking
mmarily at incoming.
and current freshmen,
so that they'll sign up
for the introductory
courses this fall. We're
also interested in ex-
isting sophomores and
all students who have
two years of school
left. This could even be
students who plan to go
to graduate school, ac-
cording to Wanner.
The third group is
students who are
veterans or in the
reserves. These
students are eligible to
go directly into the ad-
vanced program
The ROTC will also
be looking for students
interested in going to
summer training camp
at Fort Knox, Ky.
Wanner said this train-
ing program would
allow the students in-
volved to go directly in-
to the advanced train-
ing program. Student
expenses would be paid
for the trip and the
students would receive
a S500 stipend. Ad-
vanced ROTC cadets
receive tax free $100
monthly
"Also, we are going
to be interviewing this
spring for two and
three year scholar-
Wanner indicated
that the general
response from students
and faculty regarding
an Army ROTC unit on
campus has been
favorable.
Students interestsed
in obtaining more in-
formation about the
Army ROTC program
can call 757-6967 after
Feb. 2.
Are you a college junior, senior or grad student
trying to establish credit?
If so ZALES is now offering a special charge
account for college (you) students-no credit or
job necessary to qualify.
Stop by our Carolina East Mall store and fill
out an appplication, while you're there let us
show you our wide selection of diamond and
fashion rings, watches, and 14k gold jewelry.
Come in and see us for all your gift giving
needs
The Oiamo
CAROLINA EAST MALL
Lambda Chi Alpha
January 17,18,19
9:00 p.m.
500 Elizabeth St.
For Info, or Rides call 752-5325
T Shirti, Sloping Bait
Backpacka. Camptno. Etui
m.nt. Stool Too ��.��, Diihot.
and Over 7M DfM.ro�t N�w ��)
Uud M�m. Cowboy toon,
� 1 a .j .
ARMY-NAVY
STORE iST
ABORTIONS
I 34 wa.fc torminaIIwit
App'ts. Mad 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-M0-321-0S7S
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
� )
r
SAAD's
Mint KhPMK
113 Grand Av.
7$a-m�
ships Wanner said.
The ALAMO
Restaurant & Nightclub
Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
We would like to extend
a welcome to all ECU students by
giving discounts at the door with college
ID's. Discounts of $1.00 will be honored
on Thurs Fri Sat & Sun. nights
when we have live entertainment.
Admission is FREE on D.J. nights.
The ALAMO offers the best in
Mexican-American food & features
on many nights a fine buffet.
Weds. � The Embers
Doors open al 4:30
Band plass from 7-11:00 p.m.
I adies free Admission till 7:00
Free hors d'ouerves
Thurs. � 9-1:00 p.m. The Embers
Doors open at 6:30
SI off dmismn with College I.D.
Bottle of Champagne gisen to each
50th C ustomer.
Fri. � Music Upon Request
6.30-1:00 p.m.
HAPP HOI R ALL NIGHT
Sat. � 5 Degrees South
Doors open at 6:30
Band starts at 9:00
MM
mxfim
ftf
Closed Sundass except for special events
IIIMIMlMIWIHa
1104 N MrmonaJ lr
rrou from t�ca�iU� irpuri
Pnoor 1ST-OOOS lo additional information





uUje East (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mil LtR. gw mmw
Mikl Hughes, ��m�.�
V V Rl V MERRITT. 0km Mwumi
St. Ol I L INDl LY. hum Mu-�fr
�l I AhKASHlbH, CMtttaw
Si i PHANIE CiROON. CrndtUta Mvwtn
Cl THORNTON, rc��s��w�v�w
Cindy Pi easants, sport &&
Greg Rideout, mm trf��r
Steve Bachner. emmwm�sw
Juliana Fahrbach, sqewm�
lOnn EVANS, Production funaKer
January IS. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Social Security
Pari Ignores System's Worst Ills
1 he National Commission on
Social Security Reform finally
reached a tentative compromise
Saturday night, arriving at a
$169-bilIion bailout for the ailing
old-age pension program.
And as far as many of
Washington's leaders are concern-
ed, the neu plan is a veritable God-
send.
But while they revel in their self-
proclaimed preliminary successes, it
may be necessary for the rest of us
to assess the situation with clear
heads.
First o all, some elements of the
a Social Security plan may throw
r necessary light on the problems at
hand. They include:
� n increase in payroll tax to
en percent for individuals.
� delay in increases in cost-of-
living benefits for old-age pen-
iioners for six months.
� Bringing all newly hired federal
workers and employees of non-
profit groups into the system.
� Changing the basis for com-
puting cost-of-living benefit in-
creases.
What all this boils down to, plain
and simple, is that today's workers
will be expected to carry the brunt
of the Social Security tab, while,
chances are, we will never see any of
those benefits ourselves.
Social Security, in its present
form, probably won't last another
10 years � much less 40. Since the
mid-Seventies, Congress has dealt
with specific political compromises,
leaving Social Security's long-range
structural problems unsolved and
untouched. As Dr. William C.
Hsiao, Harvard University pro-
fessor of economics and former
congressional consultant, said of
the new plan: "It is just a Band-Aid
that will last a few years
In the first place, it should be
remembered that Social Security
was never intended to be used as a
sole means of financial support for
the aged. From its inception, it was
intended as conjunctive benefit pro-
gram. But as with so many other
federally-funded programs, Social
Security lends itself to a growing
dependence, a dependence which it
is not adequately equipped to han-
dle.
This should not be misconstrued
as a denial of the needs of
America's elderly, needs which have
become even more evident in recent
months with the nation's worsening
economic situation. But in its pre-
sent form, Social Security works on-
ly to compound the economic ills of
the elderly by increasing their
dependence on a pension plan which
remains, at best, shaky.
It's time for Congress to put aside
the petty arguments and specific
agreements that have governed (and
subsequently plagued) the Social
Security system since its inception
and consider the problems, incon-
sistencies and validity of the system
as a whole.
r
Campus Forum
Traditional American' Not 'Right'
Thanks to Frnest Conner for his pro-
fessionally competent and fair report on
the ideological differences between The
Fast Carolinian's Patrick O'Neill and
me ("Heated Debate Reveals Ideological
Fxtremism" 1-13).
One small correction: I am a native of
Missoula, Montana, not Greenville, as
stated in the article.
On to more important things. The
unidentified writer of the caption to the
article (Entertainment Editor Steve
Bachner) says the exchange between
O'Neill and me "Reveals Ideological Ex-
tremism" on campus, an assessment
readily admitted by O'Neill, who places
himself on the far left politically and
says, with a "you're-one-too" argu-
ment, that I'm on the far right.
He is correct in placing himself on the
extreme left, but I deny emphatically be-
ing on the extreme right. An anology
will prove the point: He calls for the
abolition of the Department of Defense
and a principled renunciation of war, a
policy that would surely lead to the
destruction of the U.S.A. and the end of
our freedoms.
I agree that war is a horror to be
avoided � but not at any cost.
However, his first proposition.
abolishing the Pentagon, is so wildly
radical and unliberal that if I were to
assume a similar position on the right,
I'd have to demand a presumptive
nuclear strike at the U.S.S.R. and an
end to all social services by the govern-
ment. I do not call for either policy.
The views which I espouse are tradi-
tional American ones. The views of Mr
O'Neill are highly irregular and unor-
thodox.
Dennis Michael kilcoyne
Sophomore, Poli. Sci.
Not-So-Great Brittain?
Is he joking, this Keith Brittain? Such
neanderthal thinking (refer to page 4 oj
The East Carolinian, Jan. 13) went out
with Senator McCarthy and the Red
scare, right?
I mean, does anyone know who this
joker is or where he comes from? Is he
what tkey mean when they talk of the
sludge of humanity? He can't be
serious?
I know, he must be a left-winger with
a healthv sense of humor, right? Or
perhaps he's part of a leftist plot to
discredit the arguments of the
militarists; or maybe he is an LSD trcak
with paranoic delusions
That's it; he's an LSD head rime-
warping into the 50s. Right
He's not serious, is he
Somebodv call the white coat- and
cart him awav; such public displavs of
idiocy and heartless, twisted logic make
me afraid to go out atter dark
Jett Rober-or:
Planet Farth. Greenville
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes tetters
expressing all points oj wt Maii or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Buiding, across Jrom Jovner Library.
For purposes oj venjicaiton. ail letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author!). I erre
are limited to rvo iyffeWitten pave.
double-spaced or neatly printed AU let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity.
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Congressmen Voting Against Pay Raise
Find '83 Session Difficult In Washington
. . �ii ii . nnA mnnov fnr thf nrp�ni7�tiO
Bv JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � Many Americans
are understandably outraged that the
House of Representatives voted itself a pay
raise in last year's lame-duck session.
Fditonal writers around the country have
criticized the House members for giving
themselves a healthy boost in salary while
more than 12 million Americans are out of
work.
There were a few courageous con-
gressmen who voted against putting more
money in their own pockets while the
country is in the midst of the worst hard
times since the Great Depression. One of
them was Dale Kildee, a Democrat and
former high-school teacher from Flint,
Mich.
Michigan has the highest unemployment
tate in the country, and Kildee apparently
didn't think it was decent to vote himself a
S9.000 pay raise when so many of his con-
stituents were standing in the unemploy-
ment lines. So he voted against the salary-
boost.
Ihe retribution from colleagues was
swift.
As a fourth-term congressman, Kildee
had served on the Small Business and
Labor and Education Committees, and he
thought he was entitled to move up to a
more influential position. He asked for a
seat on the House Ways and Means Com-
mittee � the panel that handles all tax
legislation. A congressman who serves on
Ways and Means has clout.
Our sources say Kildee was all set to get
the Ways and Means assignment. It was in
the bag. Then he defied the leadership and
voted against the pay raise.
The Democratic leaders were angry at
Kildee because he could have voted for the
salary hike without risk. He was from a
"safe" district and was certain to be re-
elected. So the leaders were counting on
him to vote for the controversial pay raise.
But Kildee voted his conscience, and the
leaders turned down his request for the
Ways and Means assignment. Our sources
say it was pure punishment for his vote
against the pay raise.
LABOR'S HIGH FLIERS: Despite the
economic hard times, some union officials
are living like corporate fatcats, with
money to burn. Some even have private
planes to ferry them around the country.
Take Bill Wynn, for example. He is the
head of the United Food and Commercial
Workers Union. The union bought him a
private plane two-and-a-half years ago. He
needed it, he told our reporters, to reach
small, out-of-the-way towns.
The Teamsters Union has two private
planes � one for President Roy Williams,
the other for Secretary-Treasurer Ray
Schoessling.
A union spokesman said it saves time
and money for the organization's leaders
to fly in private planes rather than com-
mercial airliners.
At least two other union presidents
reportedly have private planes. One is Ed
Hanley of the Hotel and Restaurant
Workers Union. The other is Bob
Georgine of the AFL-CTO building trades
department. This month, when the
weather is coldest in Washington,
Georgine traveled to sunny Florida.
DEBT FUND: You'll find something
new on your income tax forms this year �
a box that will permit you to contribute to
the nation's debt fund. It will give you a
tax-deductible opportunity to help reduce
America's $1.2 trillion debt.
Taxpayers have contributed more than
$5 million to the debt fund over the past 20
years, but this is the first time the Internal
Revenue Service has used an easy, check-
off system.
There is another fund that is used to
reduce the national debt. It's called the
"conscience fund" by insiders, and its
donations come from citizens who feel
guilty at having cheated Uncle Sam at
some point in their lives.
The fund has accepted contributions
since 1811, but only about $4.5 million has
been collected over the years. The gifts to
this fund are not tax-deductible.
INTELLIGENCE DIGEST: We
previously reported that as many as
100,000 Soviet prisoners are being used as
slave labor to build the trans-Siberian
natural gas pipeline. Now we've learned
that many of the prisoners are women.
Sources say that 69 special camps have
been built to house them. The women
work with asbestos and wire wool and
make clothing for the construction
workers.
� Intelligence sources say the CIA and
other spy agencies have increased their use
of private companies to gather informa-
tion. Foreign banks in Australia and in
Hong Kong, for example, are being used to
monitor trade with the Soviet Union and
other communist countries. Some of the
firms have even agreed to place former
spies in their executive ranks.
� CIA Director William Casey recently
held a secret meeting with Turkish officials
to discuss ways of cracking down on
Armenian terrorists who have been stalk-
ing Turkish diplomats around the world.
Copyright. 1983
United Feature Syndicate. Inc.
1RC�FR06S�XCEPNNIVIS(NE�.
I
"bi
or
I
31

I
Year
B PATRICK O'NEILL
An ECU graduate
recently returned to
Greenville after having
spent the last year hv-
ing in the Centra!
American countries of
Costa Rica and
Nicaragua
Kerr. Nolan
graduated in I9i witl
a B A v
thropoiogy S
returned to the I S
h what she a
"new awareness'
how I S. tor.
policy is ci � : and
how u affects the
pie living in Central
America.
Nolan first I
interested in
to Centra
when she hearj ifc
ECUs Costa B
Program I
students the opf v:
tj to live for a sen
in the small Lai i
American nation with a
native family. l a
doing poor
and 1 t
would be a
tunity to lea n
N an said.
Nolan admitted tl
other than kn �
existed, -he k n e w
nothing about (-
Rica or Centra.
America befoi c wi
"1 char � �
anything at:
classes, the g � w i
Student
Gets She
By l)RRU BROVn
Dew e
Hales, a -
major m the Div
of Social ark at
ECVJi nas
as the recipient oi a
N C. Sheriffs' Associa-
tion Scholarship
1982-1983. The SI500
award, begun for the
first time last year and
presented annually, i
given to a crirr.
justice siuaers: r I
scholarship. tuus
need and the studer: -
potential in the field
law enforcement.
Lowest P
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�" �r






THfcEASTCAKOl ISIAS
JAM.ARV IS, !Wi
Mot 'Right'
irguments oi the
. - in ! SD freak
LSD head time-
-
i
and
�ublic displays of
listed make
Jet: Roberson
. Greenville
Forum Rules
in welcomes i th r-
' . t'w Mail (,r
� . i Hd South
� i � ' � .
all letters
ttu nan i. major and
address, phone number
-� etters
� � . t.
oaced or '�
� �( vity,
ai-
UST YEAR IN ENSLANP,
. HrN� KILLED
(37 ECPLt
a. WERE
!
�1 'A
o Oil
V
r, m wiNs$,iYtaoi,
LVBWE1
Year In Central America Teaches, Enlightens
By PATRICK O'NEILL ment, the political
systems, nothing
Nolan also con-
sidered herself to be
"basically apolitical"
before she embarked
on her trip. But now,
besides getting A's in
all her subsequent
Spanish courses, Nolan
has become actively in-
volved in trying to
educate her friends, or
anyone else, about the
impact of U.S. involve-
ment with Central
American govern-
ments, particularly in
the case of Nicaragua.
"1 didn't know it
(the events happening
in Central America) af-
fected me Nolan
said. "I knew it was im-
portant, but I didn't
care
Now Nolan has a dif-
ferent opinion. After
becoming fluent in
Spanish and getting her
degree, Nolan decided
to return to Costa Rica
to live. She wanted to
study more and have a
chance to really learn
about Central America.
Because of her poor
Spanish and her school
requirements, Nolan
felt that she hadn't
learned or experienced
very much during the
first 31: months she
spent in Co�ta Rica
with 14 other students.
On her return trip she
vowed to learn and ex-
plore.
An ECU graduate
recently returned to
Greenville after having
spent the last year liv-
ing in the Central
American countries of
Costa Rica and
Nicaragua.
Kerri Nolan, 23,
graduated in 1981 with
a B.A. in An-
thropology. She has
returned to the U.S.
with what she calls a
"new awareness' of
how U.S. foreign
policy is conducted and
how it affects the peo-
ple living in Central
America.
Nolan first became
interested in traveling
to Central America
when she heard about
ECU'S Costa Rican
Program which give
students the opportuni-
ty to live for a semester
in the small Latin
American nation with a
native family. "I was
doing poorly in Spanish
and I figured this
would be a good oppor-
tunity to learn it
Nolan said.
Nolan admitted that
other than knowing it
existed, she knew
nothing about Costa
Rica or Central
America before she
left. "I didn't know
anything about it, the
classes, the govern-
She quickly made
many friends with peo-
ple on all levels of the
political spectrum. She
also began to realize the
complexity of the pro-
blems in this section of
the world which is well-
known for its violence
and revolutions.
"Nothing happened
for the first six mon-
ths Nolan said, com-
menting on her return
trip and her subsequent
political awakening.
She returned to stay
with the same upper-
middle class Costa
Rican family she
boarded with during
her first trip.
A few months later,
after moving into her
own home, Nolan met
a neighbor who
everyone said was a
communist. "I believed
it because I didn't
know what a com-
munist was � I had
never met a com-
munist
"He would always
talk to me about
human rights and I
would never unders-
tand him Nolan said.
"I always kept think-
ing 'you're a com-
munist and whatever
you're telling me is
wrong
Later, Nolan met
another young woman
from West Germany
who was traveling in
Costa Rica. Soon the
usually was the key fac-
tor in which she based
many of her conclu-
sions. "She (the West
German) was a
capitalist with some
very liberal views
Nolan noted. "But I
was just strictly by the
book capitalist
Even her discussion
with the other two was
not sufficient to sway
many of her deep
rooted opinions. "I
was hard core Nolan
added.
But soon Nolan
began to realize that it
was getting more dif-
ficult for her to defend
her beliefs. "It was
harder for me to justify
myself than it was for
them so I decided the
only way to find out the
truth was to do
research and then to go
to the nearest sup-
posedly non-capitalist
country 1 could find to
settle the argument
Nolan began to read
any propoganda (not
considered a dirt ord
in Central America) she
could get her hands on
and soon she and her
West German compa-
nion made plans to
travel to near-by
Nicaragua in hopes ol
learning more about u
government and peo-
ple.
In Part II oj this in-
terxiew, Ketn .
discusses what she cat
ed her "wonderful ex
perieme" in Nicaragua
and hu the expenenn
changed her lije.
Kerri Nolan
three of them were hav-
ing heavy discussions
about why there was so
much injustice in the
world and what could
be done about it. "He
was the left, she was the
Wwfo By CINDY WALL
center and 1 was the
right said Nolan
describing the political
positions of each of
them.
She admits that her
American upbringing
UltlKHUHtHHIllllll
ATTIC ATTIC
Student In Social Work
Gets Sheriffs Scholarship
752-7303
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B DARRYL BROWN
Dewey Thomas
Hales, a corrections
major in the Division
of Social Work at
ECU, has been selected
as the recipient of a
N.C. Sheriffs' Associa-
tion Scholarship for
1982-1983. The $1500
award, begun for the
first time last year and
presented annually, is
given to a criminal
justice student based on
scholarship, financial
need and the student's
potential in the field of
law enforcement.
Ward, who works as
an officer with the
ECU Department of
Public Safety, is
specializing in law en-
forcement. He plans to
work in North Carolina
after graduation next
year at the state or local
level but hopes to go on
to graduate school
first. In commenting on
the scholarship. Ward
could only say, "It was
fantastic
The award for ECU
undergraduates was
divided among three
students last year, two
of whom have since
gone on to place at the
top of their class in
police academies. Ward
is the first person to
receive the full scholar-
ship alone.
ECU's Division of
Social Work is one of a
few schools across the
state that receive an
award from the
Sheriff's Association
each year.
I
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1
GLISSON
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I
A
� d� ����
-





I HI Vl � K t IM-XN
I M AR1 IX. 1983
THl

A
Week
B PATRH K O'NEll I
sit M h
Ihe ECU Campus
Ministers sure sponsor-
ing an ecumenical pro
ject, which will la-t lor
eighl days beginning
tonight, titled the
"Week of Prayei foi
C hristian I nt
1 he event, whch was
trt begun in 1908, has
become a worldwide
obsersane condi cted
foi the purpose of
enhancing peace and
unity among all
religions, par'ularly
Christian.
��Millions of Chris-
nans throughout the
world will observe the
Week ot Prayer tor
Christian l nity said
ECU Catholic C ampus
minister Sister Helen
Shondell "During this
week we pra that the
Church on earth may
enjov peace and uni-
ty
"I think it just stands
on its force said the
leader of the Lutheran
Student Association the
Rev. Graham Nahouse.
"Getting together for
prayer can't be bad
Nahouse said that
the arious religions
have been hampered
for centuries by the
Mass. Judge Sentences
Resister of Registration
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Convicted draft
registration resister Id
H asbrouck ol
Wellesley, Mass. was
sentenced Fridaj to a
six-month suspended
jail sentence, two years
supervised probation
and was ordered to per-
form 1000 hours ol
community Service
Hasbrough, 2?. was
convicted on Dec. 15 ol
the failure to register
felony charge. I he
Hirv. in the Boston
federal courl ol Judge
David Nelson, took on-
ly 15 minutes delibera-
tion time to come to its
decision.
ccording to Will
Doherty, a friend of
Hasbrouck who was
resent at the
he trial, the
prosecution had sug
gested a two year
prison term for
Hasbrouck. but
Nelson, apparently
thinking the suggestion
uas too harsh, issued
the less severe penally.
The decision ended
five months ol legal
battles for Hasbrouck
who is presently on a
camping trip in Florida
and couldn't be reach-
ed for comment.
Hasbrouck. who
claims to be an anar-
chist, believes that
draft registration is a
failure, and if inacted,
a draft would be used
to enlist men to fight an
interventionist or
nuclear war which he
opposes on pacifist
grounds
��It's (diatt registra-
tion) dangerous and it's
anti-democratic and it's
being used as an excuse
toward other efforts of
greater social control
Hasbrouck said in a
pre-sentencing state-
ment. "We're probably
not going to live out
our natural lifetimes
because of the nuclear
weaponry of the United
States government
Hasbrouck, one of
13 other men thus far
indicted for refusing to
register, was open and
vocal from the beginn-
ing about his plans not
to comply.
He fully expected to
be convicted and
possibly serve jail time
tor his actions. "It's
the people who
registered who have the
most at risk
Hasbrouck said.
misperceptions they
have of each other. "1
think it's good for us to
understand that other
religious people pray to
the same God that we
do � and He listens.
And contrary to what
we've heard in the press
lately, God listens to all
prayers
As a result of the Se-
cond Vatican Council,
all Christians today are
able to pray for unity
during a common
observance called the
"Week of Prayer for
Christian Unity
which is held every
January 18-25
throughout the world.
The theme for 1983 oc-
tave is "Jesus Christ �
Life of the World
The Rev. William
Hadden, campus
chaplain for the
Episcopalian student
group, Canterbury,
said that today we're
finding "a lessening of
ecumenical coopera-
tion" among churches
because they seem to be
more self-serving and
self-centered in their
goals.
"There's a growing
conservatism, a sort of
protecting-my-doctrine
so to speak Hadden
said. He emphasized
the importance of the
Week of Prayer
because of the sym-
bolism of bringing the
churches together. "I
feel that we have made
great strides in the area
of social concerns, but
I feel these concerns
can be more strongly
expressed in a greater
unity
"As never before the
world needs peace and
unity, and what better
place to start than
among Christians
Shondell said. "So it is
important that the
ECU Campus Ministry
Association cooperate
in this effort and invite
the campus community
to join in this time of
prayer
The Week of Prayer
program will be hosted
by a different campus
ministry group on each
of the five evenings that
services will be held.
Tonights program
wil be co-hosted by the
Lutherans and the
Episcopalians at St.
Paul's Episcopal
Church on East Fourth
Street beginning at 5:30
p.m.
The program con-
tinues on Wednesday
evening with the Rev.
Dan Earnhardt leading
the service at the
Methodist Student
Center on 5th St. Ear-
nhardt is the ECU
Methodist Campus
minister. Their pro-
gram begins at 6:30
p.m.
On Thursday the ser-
vice will be hosted by
the Baptists at the Bap-
tist Student Center on
10th Street. The Rev.
Robert Clyde is ECU's
Baptist Campus
minister. The Baptist
program will begin at 7
p.m.
After a weekend of
regular church services
the Week of Prayer
program will begin
again on Monday, Jan.
24 at 8 p.m. at the
Catholic Newman
Center on 10th Street.
The final evening
program will be hosted
by the Presbyterians
and their campus
minister the Rev.
Stewart LaNeave. The
final program will also
be held at the
Methodist Student
Center beginning at
5:30 p.m.
Each group will
decide on their own
topic lor the evening
and all ECU students,
faculty and staff are
welcomed to attend any
of the five programs.
"My own experience
of working with the
other campus ministries
over the past 6 years
has been such a joy and
such an encouragement
to my faith Shondell
said, "that 1 would like
other Christians to
have this experience
-i
� -s
n
4
tr?
CORRECTION
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JANUARY 18. 1983 Page"
Attenborough's 'Gandhi
Fulfillment Of Dream
By BARBARA CROSSETTE
N� ork Ttmtt Newi Scrvlc
NEW YORK � For 20 years, Richard Attenborough
has been a man with an obsession: to make a movie
about the life of Mahatma Gandhi � and to prove in
the process there remains a place for the big
biographical film.
The hope at last has become a reality in Gandhi, more
than three hours long and costing $22 million to make.
(It will open Jan. 21 at Raleigh's Mission Valley Cinema
and Feb. 18 at Greenville's Buccaneer Theatre.)
Gandhi is the story of a complex man, a wise and wily
politician who maneuvered India to independence from
imperial Britain while living the non-violent, austere,
communal life that was his impossible vision for ail In-
dian society. It is a film that moves chronologically,
episodically, from an unknown young lawyer's catalytic
collision with racial and cultural bigotry in turn-of-the-
century South Africa to the 1948 assassination in a
Delhi garden of the man the world had come to know as
the Mahatma � the "Great Soul
The story of Gandhi is also the story of more than
half a century in the history of India � vast,
tumultuous, squalid, glorious, seductive India. These
are stories so close to the national nerve that no Indian
Director Richard Attenborough with his choice for the title role in Gandhi, dedicated English actor Ben Kingsley.
Working For A Living
A ctor Kingsley Prepares Parts Intensely
feature filmmaker has tried to tell them, and been given
Indian government backing as Attenborough was � to
attempt the task.
"No man can write a real life of Gandhi wrote
Jawaharial Nehru, India's first prime minister, "unless
he is as big as Gandhi
Attenborough concedes that "of course it's a cheek
it's an impudence to tell 50, 60, 70 years of history in
three hours. And the temptations of filming in India are
simply dreadful meaning the temptation to linger over
the touristic vistas that appear as backdrop at every turn
in that physically spectacular countrv "The onl kind
of epics that work he said, "are intimate epics
Attenborough believes that the careful weighing and
sifting of the voluminous material available on the life
of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, plus the equally
painstaking choices and occasional amalgamation ol
historical characters � "We cheat like mad' he said �
have given him the right mix for the kind of film he
wanted to make. He calls his Gandhi a "human
biography There are politics in the film, because Gan-
dhi was a master politician, but there is no psychology,
no analysis.
See ATTENBOROUGH. Page 8
B LESLIE BENNETTS
M V YORK � Two years ago.
Ben Kingsley, an actor with the
Royal Shakespeare Company, was
playing Mr. Squeers in the original
London production ol Sicholas
kkleby.
"It was killingly hard work and
burned up a lot of an actor's brain
cells Kingsley recalled. "So my
wife started putting books in front
ol me in order to relax me and ease
rn blasted mind. One of the books
was a biograph) of Gandhi
Six days later, deeply immersed in
the life of the Indian leader Mohan-
das K. Gandhi, Kingsley received a
call from Richard Attenborough,
the actor and director, who had
been trying for almost 20 years to
start a movie about Gandhi. For
nearly that long, Attenborough had
also been searching for the right ac-
tor to play Gandhi, with little suc-
cess. Would Kingsley be interested
and available for a screen test?
He was indeed. "And from the
moment Ben came on the screen, he
was absolutely mesmeric said At-
tenborough, who produced and
directed the film. "There was no
question he was the one
Although Kingsley has been ac-
claimed in Britain for roles ranging
from Hamlet to the title part in
Brecht's Baal, the 38-year-old actor
is virtually unknown in the United
States. That should change with
Gandhi, an epic biography that
traces the life of the Mahatma from
his arrival in South Africa as a
young lawyer in 1893, through his
crucial role in the birth of modern
India, to his assassination in 1948 at
the age of 79.
The cast also includes John
Gielgud, Candice Bergen, Martin
Sheen, Athol Fugard, Trevor
Howard, John Mills and the Indian
stage actress Rohini Hattangadhi as
Gandhi's wife, among scores of
others. But it is Kingsley who pro-
vides the magnetic center.
Attenborough's search tor the
perfect Gandhi was long and
frustrating, but when he finally
found Kingsley, his choice seemed
eerily appropriate. Although born
and raised in England, Kingsley is
halt Indian: his mother was an
English model and his father, a
physician, was Indian. Kingsley's
tamilv has not lived in India for
three generations: his paternal
grandfather, a spice trader, left In-
dia to settle in Zanzibar, where
Kingsley's father lived until going to
England at the age of 14.
Despite what Kingsley calls "a
thoroughly English upbringing" in
Manchester, he was born Krishna
Bhanji (he changed his name as a
young man beginning his theatrical
career) and bears a striking
resemblance to Gandhi. When he
began to research the life of Gandhi,
Kingsley learned that his own family
had even come from the same vilage
as the Indian leader.
"There are certain historical
figures and moments that I have
personally always found over-
whelming Kingsley said. "Martin
Luther King Jrs famous speech,
for example, and old newsreel films
of Gandhi. That kind of documen-
tary evidence feeds me as an actor,
and I have always collected them.
"Gandhi was one of my source
figures: a prototype human being.
He was an utterly remarkable man,
and his intellect, his energy and his
integrity � a combination that was
constantly apparent
But the prospect of actually
recreating Gandhi on film was
daunting. "My reaction was similar
to my reaction when 1 got the part
of Hamlet Kingsley said. "It's an
awesome responsibility, and the
weight ot it sort ol lands between
your shoulder blades and bends
you
He prepared tor the role
"methodically and scientifically
he said, reading biographies, screen-
ing newsreel footage and poring
over "every photograph I could get
my hands on. All you can do is just
look at them and hope something
goes in" � Kingsley tapped his
head � "that when the time comes
will govern how you place yourself
anl J.yr. ,bod. Qf coursethe,
more 0 learn the more you realize
how impossible the task seems
In his quest for authenticity,
Kingsley not only shaved his head
and lost 20 pounds on Gandhi's
vegetarian diet, but he also studied
yoga, began to meditate and learned
to spin cotton thread on a wooden
wheel, as Gandhi had done while
holding conversations.
For Kingsley, such training is the
catalyst for an alchemy even he does
not understand. "When I have
totally immersed myself in the
mechanical, logical preparation of a
part, if I and my craft are totally
bonded and fully exploited,
something else in me is awakened
and begins to inform my work he
explained.
"The preparation is entirely
systematic, practical and scientific,
but when 1 play the role, whether it
is Hamlet or Gandhi, some other
kind of information comes to the
forefront, a certan energy is releas-
ed. There is some essence in me that
adheres itself to the work. I can't
tell you what it is � I can't tell you
what the heart of my mystery is �
because I don't know; all I know is
that it is the product of extremely
hard work
Kingsley discovered his gifts as an
actor rather late; he grew up expec-
ting to become a doctor, like his
father. But by the time he graduated
from high school, he said "I had
realized medicine was not right for
me, and had to radically rethink
what to do with my energies
Aimless, he joined an amateur
dramatic society, found that he was
"transported" by the thrill of au-
dience response and went on to a
job with a children's theater com-
pany in London. His progress was
swift: after brief stints with two
other repertory companies, Kingsley
joined the Rpyal Shakespeare com-
pany in 19fff.
Whatever his arena, Kingsley
seems at peace with his choice of
life's work. "I think I've recognized
my function he said softly. "Until
one recognizes one's function, one
is denied an essential ingredient in
life. A lot of people are not given an
opportunity to recognize their func-
tions; their choices can be too
limited.
"But I'm a storyteller. I recognize
the need to tell people stories
New York Society of Film Critics choice for Best Actor. Ben kingsle
Sculpture Show, Coretta King
On Tap For Black Arts Week
Snl Soorano Willie Jordan-Williams will perform in Hendrix Theatre in conjunction with Black Arts Week.
The Art Gallery of Mendenhall Student Center will be
displaying "A Collection of African Sculpture" Jan. 30
� Feb. 13 as a part of the Black Arts Festival Week.
The show is a division of more than 3,500 art and craft
items of Africa which comprise the North Carolina
Agricultural and Technical State University Heritage
Center's collection.
Director and Curator of the Heritage Center, Mrs.
Mattye Reed, will be the special guest speaker at the
Area Soprano
To Sing Soon
Spinto Soprano Willie Jordan-Williams will appear in
concert in Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
on Sunday, Jan. 30 at 3 p.m. The concert is under the
sponsorship of the ECU Student Union Minority Arts
Committee and is the first event of the annual Black
Arts Festival.
Ms. Jordan-Williams is a native of New Bern and
presently resides in Raleigh. She did her undergraduate
studies at Virginia State College and graduate studies at
Eastern Michigan Unviersity. Ms. Jordan-Williams
studies voice with Drs. Aldrich Ad kins and Oscar M.
Henry. At present she is studying with Elaine Benazzi,
mezzo-soprano of New York.
The artist has performed as guest soloist, recitalist
and opera soloist at colleges and universities throughout
the country. She was a participant in the Opera Studio
for the 1980 Summer Vocal Institute, American In-
stitute of Musical Studies, Graz, Austria. The ex-
perience included major performances in Deutschland-
sberg, and the AIMS Artist Recital series of Graz. Ms.
Jordan-Williams was "heartily acclaimed" by Austrian
music critics for her renditions of "Tosca" from Puc-
cini's Tosca, and negro spirituals.
Recently the artist was instrumental in organizing
People for the Arts, a statewide organization devoted to
promoting the awareness of the cultural arts at the
grassroots level. The organization has members in some
40 communities throughout the state. Annually a con-
cert is held ih Memorial Auditorium by the organiza-
tion.
show's reception, 6:30 P.M Wednesday, Feb 2 Mrs.
Reed will discuss the show, and the relationship ol
sculpture and African life, as well as field questions
about the show. Admission to the Gallery and reception
is free.
Many of the show's sculptures are pieces from rites of
birth, puberty, marriage and death. Traditional African
sculptures are useful objects which meet the spiritual,
ritual, ceremonial and atilitanan needs of the group.
While aesthetic merit may be a part of the sculptural in-
tegrity, it is almost always will have a more significant
purpose.
Indeed, aethetic appeal may not be desired at all when
representing nalivoient spirit. It is not alwaxs an ap-
preciation of aesthetics in African sculpture, but rather
the skill and validity in each piece's portrayal.
The Mendenhall Student Center Art Gallery is located
in the second floor lobby and is open Monday � Thurs-
day, 8:30 a.m. � 11 p.m Friday, 8:30 a.m. � 12 a.m
Saturday, 12 p.m. � 12 a.m and Sunday 1 p.m. � 11
p.m.
Coretta Scott King, wife of the late civil rights activist
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr will appear at ECU in
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center, on Mon-
day, Jan. 31 at 8 p.m. Her appearance is under the
sponsorship of the Department of University Unions
Lecture Series Committee and is being held in conjunc-
tion with the Black Arts Festival. The subject of the lec-
ture will be "The Living Legacy Of Martin Luther King,
Jr
Since the death of her husband, Coretta King has car-
ried on the work he began toward social, political and
economic justice. She sees economic justice as the key to
human rights.
Much of her work involves the King Center for Non-
violent Social Change, an organization she found in
1969 and serves as chief executive officer. The Center is
a living memorial to the late Dr. King, preserving the
legacy of what the Human Rights Movement ac-
complished under his leadership, while at the same time
serving as a focal point for continuing the nonviolent
campaign for social, political and economic justice
throughout the world.
Tickets for the lecture are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office and are priced at $2.50 for ECU students,
$3.50 for ECU faculty and staff, and $5 for the public.
Tickets may be purchased in groups of 20 or more for
$3.50 each. Ail tickets at the door will be $5.
� .��
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Attenhor
VM XK1!
AUenborough A lance Thfatrf Resenting A
rv. j January Anniversary Concert
Man Obsessed
( ontiniii'il r rom I'at'
�:h anniei Petrus van Muyden vill
ol lil . t! I ; Carolina Dana presenting a version of Act II oi The
I ht i nt a concert on utcracker and the p.iN de deux
lai 2"? 28 and 2�- ai N 1" p m in I'rom eorsaire Othei pieces in
"I work as an a works he said, "to in McGmni i vhich features a oncert by V eeks and Pertalion
�ns. to � m ebration ol will be to music by Copland, Vivaldi
i � ry you are putting hef .
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pus ' ostume designs b Patrice lc
Oti Henr ol the andei will be particular!) unique
ptoi lom and extravagant, and lighting
Mr A thi designed b David Downing will I
v � utilize the computerized lighting
- ontrol system recently installed in
i ia va v; I- McCiinnis I heati e
el tickets are available foi $4 ai
tc( iinnis 1 fieatre Box Offict I
I S eelcai amed 10 a.m 4
S7-6390 toi
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week days, oi
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The most talked about
movie in Germany is now one of
the most talked
w ye MUIH.W �A MASTERp,ECE excitinf
atXHlt mOVieS that it is irresistible it ranks
l Hridet I
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"One of the best pictures of the
year. A brilliant, thrilling picture,
not to be missed
- jmn now ��m iuj�. a am tv
" 'Das Boot' has thrills aplenty.
- KK IIAU I Ml H lint Mjihx
" A totally gripping
experience .Not only by far the
best submarine movie ever made,
but one of the screen's most
powerAjlJodictments of the sheer
hmac'ofwar
- W HAH) l�r�MAN Vmhuv Vmxr
An extraordinary- adventure
tale similar in its mood to
'All Quiet On The Western Front'
all the earmarks of a classic
KKNMDMHM
"A MASTERPIECE so exciting
that it is irresistibleit ranks
with the great war films, like
All Quiet On The Western Front
and 'Bridge On The River Kwai
- AM IIIKVIISMIN S� Vvk IN
"I greatly enjoyed 'Das Boot
It's a fearfully exciting movie
"Action-packed, tension-filled
and thoroughly absorbing.
I'nlike any (ierman film we've seen
before � a grand old fashioned.
adventure movie
- fnt UM 111 H�m M �jllxri Kuriul
The other udc of World War II.


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Attenborough
Opened India
To Filmmakers
Continued From Page 8
borough the importance of steering clear of
mythology and sticking close to Gandhi's
humanity. "Nehru was closer to Gandhi than
anyone else Attenborough told a reporter two
years ago in New Delhi, when filming for Gandhi
was about to begin. "Nehru willingly said to me:
�Look, he had all the frailties, all the shortcom-
ings. Give us that. That's the measure, the
greatness of the man "
Attenborough has chosen, however, not to
dwell on some of the more troublesome parts of
Gandhi's life and traits that were, in many ways,
no more than practices born of Indian
asceticism.
"What was interesting is though Gandhi was
trained as a barrister in England, all that was
Western was discarded really relatively quickly
Attenborough said. "Much of it was discarded in
South Africa. He was convinced by the time he
returned to India in 1915 that to attempt to solve
India's problems by incorporating, as he put it,
the unhappinesses of the West, was a fruitless
course to pursue.
'But what I feel he did gain in his two years in
England was a very real affection and respect for
the Inglish people. And a great respect also for
the judiciary and for the concept of government
that applied in England. Indeed, he said at one
tfme that while nothing would move him from his
absolute conviction that satygraha � nonviolent
reliance � was the only way to conduct affairs,
he very much doubted if it would have been suc-
cessful against any other colonial nation
T he approval of Nehru secured, Attenborough
began to read the hundreds of volumes of
biographies and collected works of the Mahat-
ma. "In a year or two there was an awful lot in
mj r'ca brain he said. "The actual fundamen-
tal shape of the movie, and the selection of the
principal highlights of his life were already fixed
in m mind by 1963 or '64. Strangely, although
much of the emphasis, the nuance, the filling out
ha happened since then, the actual story line has
a!was remained the same
For nearly IK years Attenborough peddled his
script � a succession of three scripts, in fact: by
Gerald Hanley, Robert Bolt and finally John
Bnie � to skeptical and ultimately uninterested
film companies and producers.
Attenborough has felt some measure of poetic
justice. "When the film was finished he said,
"we took two hours of it and showed it to all the
mac distributors in Los Angeles. Every single
company that had turned it down over the 20
ears bid :or it
Thus, in making Gandhi, Attenborough
believes he has done more than tell the story of
r7s man ho rovers over modern Indian history.
He has also proved there are other than tradi-
al ays to finance a big motion picture, and
demonvrated that, contrary to Western legend,
possible (and he hopes profitable) to make a
feature tilm in India.
"There hadn't been a movie � except for
Ivory and Merchand � made by a Western com-
pany in India for 20, 30 years Attenborough
"1 was absolutely convinced that film pro-
due on was just as viable in India as it was
anywhere else, and that this would result in a
massive rush into India.
"In fact it has proven to be so. The Raj
(Juanei has gone in; Staying On has gone in; A
Passage to India is going in; (Steven) Spielberg is
going with his next movie. There must be 10 or 12
movies suddenly coming in on schedule and
under budget in India. In my judgement that has
been the real reward, the real value, of Gandhi to
the Indian film industry
What next for Attenborough? More storytell-
ing, it seems. And more biography.
"I am anything but an intellectual he said.
"I am an actor. I work on instinct. I work on
emotion
What he would like to do next is make a lilm
about the American Revolutionary patriot Tom
Paine. But after his experience with the making
of Gandhi and all the activity and excitement sur-
rounding the film's release, he appears to be in
no particular hurry. "It will take a year or so to
see if there is a script there he said. 'I am work-
ing on it
A MASTERPIECE'
The other side
ot World War II.
5 Tomorrow Night - Hendrix Theatre j
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m-





THF EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JANUARY 18. Is�83
Page 10
Pirates Underestimate BC Buccaneers
By MIKK HI IGHES
Managing Milor
It may have been the classical case
of underestimation.
Then again, it may have been the
Pirates' ice-cold 35-percent shooting
from the tloor.
Or maybe the fact that Baptist
College outrebounded ECU 41 to 30
had something to do with it
Nonetheless, the Buccaneers from
Charleston, S.C pulled away from
Minges Coliseum Monday night
with a 64-56 victory oer the
Pirates.
To say the Pirates were unim-
pressive not only understates Mon-
day night's performance; it lends
new meaning U word itself.
Baptist came into the game with
its best start in 10 seasons, 7-4, hav-
ing defeated the likes of
Southeastern Louisiana, Campbell
and Georgia Southern � hardly
what one might call an overwhelm-
ing, big-team schedule. But the
Pirates appeared to have taken the
Bucs' apparent no-name schedule a
bit too lightly. And in the end,
ECL's costly underestimation prov-
ed a decisive factor.
"I don't think they (the players)
believed us when we told them how
well this team could play said air
obviously displeased Charlie Har-
rison after the game.
"Superficially, the effort was
there he added. "But we didn't
play intensely enough We had
chances to get the game going in our
direction, but we never did
Unfortunately, with that single
statement, Harrison hit the prover-
bial nail right on its proverbial head.
After 20 minutes of "lacklustre"
play, ECU pulled to (or rather held
onto) a 28-26 half-time lead, despite
missing on 22 field-goal attempts
and five free throws. Scoring oppor-
tunities certainly presented
themselves, but throughout the first
half, the Pirates were unable to
capitalize on key Baptist errors �
e.g 11 Buccaneer turnovers, 19
missed field goals, etc.
Baptist's Jose Lara dominated the
board game, hauling in eight re-
bounds in the first half alone and
giving the Bucs a tremendous
second-shot advantage. The absence
of senior co-captain Charles Green
(out for a minimum of three weeks
with a separated shoulder) was
definitely felt on both ends of the
court.
Otfensively, the Pirates were
rendered unable to penetrate the
tight Baptist defense, forcing out-
an
"3
��0�� bv OABY PATTERSON
ODU's tret-mentions' center Anne Donovan awaits another inside play
(or. perhaps, a low-flying plane) as Darlene Chaney hangs tough.
Spiders9 Height Downs
Injury-Riddled Pirates
'
By CINDY PLE AS A NTS
Sports t- dilor
WANTED: GIANT FORWARD
NEEDED TO PLAY FOR ECU
PIRATES � RESPOND IM-
MEDIATELY
It would have been nice if Pirate
head basketball coach Charlie Har-
rison could have placed an ad for
such a player before Saturday's
game against the University of Rich-
mond.
The Spiders' had an upper hand
in the height category and used it
to the fullest to outrebound and
muster inside the lane to give them a
resounding victory over the Pirates,
68-56.
The loss of 6-7 forward Charlie
Green (out for a minimum of three
weeks with a separated shoulder)
was all too apparent against the
Spiders.
But Harrison said he was pleased
with what he saw after having to
make a few adjustments. "It's going
to take two or three games for us to
get back into the flow of things with
a new lineup he said, "but I saw
some positive things out there to-
day. I'm not at all discouraged
Leading, 36-31, at the half, the
Spiders pulled ahead, 52-39, in the
first 10:00, but Robinson hit two
jumpshots and Edwards slammed a
dunk to move the Pirates closer.
Peartree then made a lay-up to cut
ECU's lead to four, 57-53.
But 6-6 forward Bill Dooley, 6-10
center Jeff Pehl and 6-4 guard Tom
Bethea muscled inside to put the
Spiders back up, 64-53.
Richmond outrebounded the
Pirates 32-19 and shot 59.1 percent
from the floor. On the freethrow
line, the Monarchs made 16 of 19 at-
tempts while the Pirates were sent to
the freethrow line twice in the se-
cond half.
The Pirates were called for com-
mitting 20 fouls, several of which
were touch calls, while a great deal
of contact was going on inside. Ed-
wards, the second leading scorer in
the EC AC, was constantly being
shoved around � but the officials
didn't seem to notice. "Edwards is a
very strong guy Harrison said,
"and the ball was bouncing around
everywhere over his head. Now you
tell me, was he getting fouled?"
Harrison was also puzzled by how
the officials handled the moving
screen. "What really burns me up
Harrison said, "is that they are let-
ting everybody get away with the
moving screen.
"I teach my kids good defense
and they play good defense, but
they get taken out by these illegal
screen and the officials don't even
look at them. That can really
become a negative factor on
defense. The kids get discouraged
The Pirates used the full court
press and ran a zone defense against
the Spiders, with Edwards and
Barry Wright under the boards. But
Edwards was only able to pull down
six and Wright grabbed four to lead
See PIRATES, Page 11
side shots on practically nine of
every ten ECU possessions.
And the fact is, the Pirates just
weren't hitting.
Not to deny good performances
by sophomore forward Barry
Wright, who finished the game with
17 points and five rebounds, and
freshman center Johnny Edwards,
18 points and 10 rebounds. Certain-
ly, the game did have its highlights.
But in the end, ECU's apparent lack
of aggression under the boards cost
the team a much-needed victory.
Edwards and Wright were the on-
ly Pirates in double figures on the
night. Senior forward Thorn Brown
kicked in with eight points and five
rebounds, w hile Tony Robinson and
Mike Fox added four points each.
For the Buccaneers, Randall
Slawson pumped in 11 points and
pulled down six rebounds. His per-
formance, coupled with 10-point
outings by Jack Avent and Marcus
Beasley, led the Bucs' offensive at-
tack, while forwards Lara and John
Battle each scored nine. Coming off
the bench, junior forward Anthony
Woods added eight key points and
five rebounds to the Baptist effort.
After two well-represented home
games in the past 10 days (including
a turnout of 5,700 against James
Madison on Jan. 8), the crowd of
1,500 was an obvious disappoint-
ment to Harrison and the team.
"The same kids who were patting
'em on the back after the James
Madison game Harrison propos-
ed, "where the hell were they
tonight?" But, as he himself reason-
ed, "Fans will be fans. I want the
fans to support these kids, but I
can't worry about what they think
Despite the tough loss, Harrison
expressed little disappointment in
his players. "We don't have a lot of
depth he explained. "We've all
got limitations, and we have to
make up for them with hard work
The loss to Baptist, which drop-
ped ECU's overall record to 6-8 and
upped the Bucs' seasonal mark to
8-4, mav have proven itself a pivotal
contest for both ball clubs. But, as
Harrison stated emphatically, "One
game is not an entire season
On Wednesday night, the Pirates
play host to the University of South
Carolina Gamecocks. After three
tough losses in a row, a victory
Wednesday would give the Pirates a
much-needed boost as they enter the
brunt of their intense and important
ECAC-South schedule. Ciame time
is 7:30 p.m.
Pnoto By ClNDr WALL
Lady Pirates Fall, 92-52
ECU Guard Mike Fox looks for a rare opening underneath against a tight
Baptist defense.
ODU Coach Disgruntled
B CINDY PIEASANTS
Sport Nili.r
The Lady Pirates basketball team
lost to nationally-ranked Old Domi-
nion University, 92-52, last Friday
night but were accused of having
lost more than just a ballgame by
ODU Coach Marianne Stanley.
"We always expect ECU to come
in here and play a tough game
Stanley said, "but tonight went
beyond that. We expect a Division-I
team to have more class than they
showed tonight. I'm sick and tired
of seeing our kids get beat up
Stanley, who has accumulated a
151-19 record, blamed the ECU
coaching staff for emanating "dirty
play" � a term which appalled
head basketball coach Cathy An-
druzzi.
"Our team has never been accus-
ed of playing dirty Andruzzi said.
"I think our kids did a heliuva job
against them. We didn't let them
have the inside shots and let'em
have the outside shots
ECU All-America Mary Denkler
held ODU's 6-8 center Anne
Donovan to just seven points. The
Monarch All-America senior is
averaging 16.4 points and 15.7 re-
bounds per contest. According to
Stanley, Denkler was intentionally
hacking Donovan throughout the
entire game in order to contain her.
"I'm disappointed that she has
some sour grapes after winning by
40 points Andrui said, "but the
most disturbing thing was the
allegations she made against Mary.
That was totally out ot line and un-
professional. It sounds to me like
she's bitter that we held Anne to
seven points. She should be giving
credit to the players
Andruzzi praised ODU alter wat-
ching the game film, but added that
Denkler was the one being roughed
up. "We tried to box out and they
kept pushing us in she said. "If
anything, Anne was elbowing Mary.
She (Denkler) took 15 shots. Now
you tell me if-hc was fouled PJ
Denkler had no comment concer-
ning Stanley's accusations. "I think
that just shows the true professional
she (Denkler) is Andruzzi said.
The Monarchs. now with a 10-3
record, shot over 50 percent in both
halves, with five players scoring in
double figures.
The Pirates were led by
sophomore Darlene Chaney, who
pumped in 19 points and grabbed 10
rebounds. Guard Loraine Foster
was seven-for-10 from the floor and
three-for-four from the freethrow
line to rack up 17 points. Denkler
followed with nine
Ahead 49-32 at the half, ODU
came out and jumped to a 57-34
lead as the Pirates scored only two
pints in the first three minutes of
play.
ODU's 6-2 forward Medina Dix-
on, senior guard Helen Malone and
5-10 guard Regina Miller combined
to build the Monarchs' lead to 83-45
as the Pirates experience a four-
minute cold spell.
Denkler then fouled out with
seven minutes remaining and Foster
got her filth personal foul with less
than four minutes remaining.
"The toul situation just killed
us Andruzzi said. "It was one of
the worst officiated games we've
had, but the referees didn't lose the
game for us; we did
The head coach commended the
Pirates for denying ODU the inside
game. "The girls did a super job
she said. "ODU was powerful
through all facets ot the game, but
our kids never gave up
The Bucs made only six ol 26
shots in the second half for a
23 -percent average and finished
with a 32.7 percent shooting average
overall.
ODU rallied to a 24-2 lead during
the first eight minutes of the game.
Personal fouls hampered the Lady
Pirates play in the first period, as
Monarch outside shooters 6-1
sophomore Alphelia Jenkins, guard
Pam Elliot and 5-11 senior Beth
Wilkerson boosted the lead out of
the Lady Pirates' reach.
For the Monarchs, Dixon led with
16 points, Jenkins followed with 14,
Malone and Wilkerson each
pumped in 12. Miller scored 10, and
Elliot and Dawn Cullen each had
eight.
The Monarchs outrebounded the
Pirates 53 to 22. and made 40 ol "4
field goals for 54-percent shooting
average.
Now 5-6, the Lady Bucs again
return to the road to play I Nc -
Charlotte Tuesday night. Gametimc
is 7:30 p.m.
IIU lnu�r.
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South Carolina Hits
Minges Wednesday
fey CINDY WALL
Senior forward Thorn Brown extends above the reach of Baptist's Doug
Young (22).
By KEN BOLTON
AlaaUaal Sports I dilor
The University of South Carolina
Gamecocks will invade Minges Col-
iseum tomorrow night in a game
that has always been one of the most
popular on the ECU schedule.
Two of the three largest atten-
dance marks in Minges Coliseum
history were set against South
Carolina. In 1969, when the
Gamecocks were ranked number
one in the nation, 7,500 overflowed
Minges. In 1979, 6,300 put the
crowd within 200 of capacity.
The Gamecocks have won their
last four games, and Five of the last
six, to run their record to 8-3 on the
year. With Georgia State and
Brooklyn College yet to play, it is
likely USC will enter Minges with a
10-3 mark.
USC head coach Bill Foster is a
well-known name in North
Carolina, having coached Duke
University to the finals of the
NCAA tournament.
Foster is in his third season with a
36-28 record, but is not actually
coaching at present. He is recover-
ing from a mild heart attack he suf-
fered early in December.
In the recuperation period, Foster
has given Steve Steinwedel the reins.
Since taking over on Dec. 12,
Steinwedel has coached the
Gamecocks to a 4-1 record.
South Carolina is led by Jimmy
Foster, a very physical inside player.
He leads the club in scoring with
15.5 points per game and 8.6 re-
bounds per contest, while shooting
60.7 per-cent from the floor.
In the ECU-USC series, the
Pirates trail 2-3. ECU has won the
last two outings, 86-84 in 1980 in
Columbia, and 56-55 in 19"9 m
Greenville. South Carolina won the
first three meetings in the series
which began in 1969.
$500.00 is up for grabs tomorrow
night. Pepsi-Cola is sponsoring
"Fill Minges Coliseum Night" with
lots of prizes for luckv ticket
holders. The grand prize for helping
to fill Minges is $500.00.
Gametime is 7:30.
Grid Coaches Resign
First-year ECU offensive coor-
dinator Larry Beck.sh and receiver
coach Rickey Bustle have resigned
the Puate staff to jo.n the Arizona
Wranglers of the United States
Football League.
Beckish just completed his First
S2 ECU after coming from
Wichita State. Bustle joined the
staff i� ,980 when Emorv formed
his first staff.
"We regret losing both of these
��TLr H�oChCS noted Em�
Larry and Rickey have both been
Uwnng their careers. We wish them
both the very best
Beckish will be the Wranglers' of-
cMZ0'�0' Whe Bustk will
coach the receivers.
Pirates
Continued from Page 10
the Bucs.
Despite often being rioul
teanmed inside, Edwards p
18 points, whik Ar.gn: added
and Tony Robinson hi
jumpshots for 11 points.
In the first half, Richmofl
its first five baskets to 12 al
10-2.
Brown then hit a I �
jumpshot to pull the Pir
12-7
On the next play. Wrigl
ball, threw it to Ror
lay-up in and was f
son's three-point -
Spiders lead to two 12
Two consecuf.ve
however, gave Richmi
tunny to retain 1 1 .
Dooley, Pehl and gua
Beckwith moving the
Spiders rallied areaj �
At the hai: Edward
a pass and reiay ed � �
w ho shot from
the score. 36-3
Spider
The Pirates shot 5
the Root in the first
12 of 2" shots in tr
for a 44 4 percent average
the Blu 2 pen
In assists, Wright led
with four, while Peartree had
The Sp.de now 7-7, wen cd b
Pehl and Bethea witl
each. Dooiev added � -
Leeper Se
B RAND. MEWS
Coach Pa:
McGuigan took sin
members of her ECL
women's track team to
Johnson City, Tenn
last Friday to con-
in the Eastman kodak
Invitational track meet
The Lady Pirates ran
against some of the best
athletes in the world,
competing against such
teams as Tennessee.
Tennessee State.
Flonda. Florida State.
North Carolina, ken-
1
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Dav ena
Tere.i
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60-yard dJ
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SXVVSXV.XSVVSVV.V.SV
All cans 45
Free
For ECU
Co,
&S8!�SSSSSsSs3
FAMOUl
Fast, Friem
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& Garlil
H.H.
Pitchei
Sotor
758-5982





1 HE EAST CAROLINIAN
JAM AIO !�, 1V8
II
neers

JrV
��MMi

sBt WALl
ndernealh against a uh
it led
MIC
rolina Hits
ednesday
vhile shooting
60.7 pei
In the Hi US ieries, the
� HI has won the
B6 84 in 1980 in
ind 56-55 in 1979 in
trotina won the
gs in the series,
which began in 1969
' �� grabs tomorrow
' ia 1 sponsoring
( oliseum Night" with
�or luck ticket
� Helping
I � Minges is $500 00
tmetime is 7 JO
Grid C Ouches Resign
First-year Hi offensive coor-
dinator Larry Betkish and receiver
Rickey Bustle have resigned
the Pirate staff to join the Arizona
Wranglers ol the I mted States
Football I eague.
Bedash just completed his In si
year at HI after coming from
Wichita State Bustle joined the
staff in 1980 when Emory formed
his first staff.
"We regret losing both of these
very fine coaches noted Emor
"Larry and Rickey have both been
named to very fine positions in fur
thenng 'heir careers. We wish them
both the very best
Beckish will be the Wranglers' of-
fensive coordinator while Bustle will
coach the receivers.
Iten-
:um
)uth
'he
bcr
their
last
ith a
irth
uke
he
itn a
tallv
ter
:ins.
12.
the
i my
ver.
unh
re-
Pirates Beaten
Continued From Page 10
the Bucs.
Despite often being double-
teammed inside, Edwards popped in
18 points, while Wright added 13
and Tony Robinson hit several
jumpshots for 11 points.
In the first half, Richmond made
its first five baskets to go ahead,
10-2.
Brown then hit a freethrow and a
jumpshot to pull the Pirates up,
12-7.
On the next play, W right stole the
ball, threw it to Robinson who laid a
iav-up in and was fouled. Robin-
son's three-point play cut the
spiders lead to two, 12-10.
Two consecutive foul calls,
however, gave Richmond the oppor-
tunity to regain a larger lead. With
Dooky, Pehl and guard Greg
Beck with moving the ball, the
spiders rallied ahead, 36-27.
At the half. Edwards intercepted
a pass and relayed the ball to Wright
who shot from the corner to make
the score, 36-31, in favor of the
spiders.
The Pirates shot 50 percent from
:he floor in the first half, and made
12 of 27 shots in the second period
tor a 44 4 percent average. Overall.
the Bucs shot 47.2 percent.
In assists, Wright led the Bucs
Aith four, whne Peartree had three.
I he Spiders, now 7-7, were led by
Pehl and Bethea with 14 points
each Dooley added 11, Beckwith
pumped in eight and John Newman
had nine. Richmond shot 59.1 per-
cent from the floor.
The Pirates dropped to a 1-3
record in the conference and a 6-7
mark overall.
Harrison was quick to point out
that there are problems, but praised
the Pirates for not being quitters.
"They really hustled out there he
said. "They played good defense
and they did the things we wanted
them to do.
"They played their hearts out and
1 hope the people realize this. I hope
they don't give up on them
������
� Rl HMi isn M. tCL M
Records Fall
40
n
40
40
p
10
12
9
2M 1-M
4-20 12
I 2 12
�-l� 0-0
39 1 I
12 0-0
2-2 12
12 04
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U 13
By RANDY MEWS
Staff WrtMr
The ECU men's
track team travelled to
Johnson City, Ten-
nessee Friday and com-
peted against some of
the top teams in the
country.
With only two days
of practice last week
due to the weather, the
Pirates could have
come in expecting the
worst. But head coach
Bill Carson said that
wasn't the case. "We
did better in this meet
than we have in the last
five years
Ray Dickerson and
Nathan McCorkle each
broke school records at
the meet. Dickerson
ran the 600 in 1:10.73
but failed to qualify by
01 of a second.
McCorkle, al
freshman, broke the
ECU record in the 3001
by finishing in 31.2.
"Nathan showed me!
tremendous potential
with his performance
Carson exclaimed.
"I'm extremely en-
couraged about this
team Carson added.
"I had five different
coaches come up to me
and compliment our
squad. We're going to
be good
The Pirates will run
in their second meet of
the new year Friday,
when they travel to
Blacksburg, Va. to par-
ticipate in the Virginia
Tech Invitational.
ft
V.
ams
FINE
FOODS
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13
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r
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13 5
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1 nc l .iJ Pirates ran
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Tennessee.
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a, Florida State,
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tucky and Georgia.
Caths Leeper broke
a school record in the
400 meters with a
59.79, while Patricia
Fowler finished the
event in 64.33.
R e n e e F- e 1 d e r. a
walk-on and one ot the
12 freshmen on the
team, finished the
800-meter race in 2:32.
Three Pirates:
Da vena Cherry,
Teressa Hudson and
Regina Kent made the
semi-finals in the
60-yard dash. Kent
took first in 7.13, a
school record; Cherry
was fourth in 7.49, and
Hudson came in fifth
with a 7.50.
Kent, the only Pirate
to make the finals,
came in third overall at
7.24. "Regina Kent's
performance is a credit
to ECU coach
McGuigan said. "She is
one of the best sprinters
in the country
The Lady tracksters
will travel to
Blacksburg, Va. Friday
to compete in Moving
Comfort Invitational.
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Minges
Coliseum Night
ECU vs. South Carolina
7:30 � Jan. 19 � Minges Coliseum
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� Winiiiii'i mp�n�i
�ftw
i





12
THE EAST CAROI INIAN
JANUARY 18, 1983
I



Falcon Top Position Up In Air Classifieds
ATLANTA (UPI) -
A popular game in
these parts is trying to
guess the identity of the
next head coach of the
Atlanta Falcons.
Trouble is, there's no
answer at the moment
because the people who
are going to select a
successor to Leeman
Bennett " owner Rank in
Smith Sr executive
vice president hddie
LeBaron, and general
manager Tom Braatz
all insist they have no
specific candidate in
mind.
However, Smith nar-
rowed the field when he
indicated he'd prefer
one of the assistant
coaches from one of
the more successful
teams in the National
Football League.
"We do not have
anyone in mind at this
time said Smith, who
added he'd leave the in-
itial search to LeBaron
and Braatz. "But there
are a lot of fine assis-
tant coaches in this
league who will be con-
sidered
While not ruling out
a former NFL head
coach, Smith indicated
he'd rather cast the
Falcons' lot with a
fresh new face. He also
did not rule out hiring a
college coach, but said
he'd rather not
"because college
coaches are strangers to
the pro ranks
Smith hinted the new
coach will probably be
more of a disciplinarian
than Bennett.
"I hope our new
coach has some of the
same qualities as
Leeman said Smith.
"However, there is a
question of whether
Leeman was stern
enough. I can't answer
that. Leeman is low-
keyed, which is a great
asset. But there are
times when you need to
be more of a
disciplinarian
The Falcons first
coach, Norb Hecker,
was a former Green
Bay Packers assistant.
When the Falcons won
only four of their first
31 games, Smith turned
to a retread - former
Minnesota Vikings
Coach Norm Van
Brocklin.
When Smith gave up
on Van Brocklin, he
went a third route - dip-
ping into the Falcons
staff and promoting
defensive coach Marion
Campbell (recently
named head coach of
the Philadelphia
Eagles.).
Smith made it clear
that won't happen this
time. He said all of
Bennett's assistants had
been given their
notices, although some
might be rehired by
whoever takes over as
the new head coach.
When the Falcons
got off to 1-4 start in
'76, Smith gave the job
to then General
Manager Pat Peppier, a
long-time front office
man.
"The move caught
me completely by sur-
prise said Peppier. "I
told Rankin that we
needed a change
because Marion wasn't
getting the job done.
That seemed to anger
Rankin who told me if I
thought I could do bet-
ter, I should be the
coach.
"I replied that
was I replied that
wasn't what I had in
mind but he told me it
was settled, that
Marion was out and I
was in
ROOMMATE
WANTED
NEEDED: MALE ROOMMATE
to share 4 bedroom rtooic w
Biltmoro St. Hal Mock from cam
pus. Rout US.M p4t�s o�o-reurHi
Utilities 7S7 144.
ROOM T E WANTED M7 a month
plus on third utilities Private
room T� S044
NEED A FEMALE ROOMATE
imediately Furnished 1 RDRM
apt a lew Mocks from campus All
you need is a bed Monthly rent
SJ4C to be shared equally Call
Doris Moyo at 7 SI 44S
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 1-bedroom
apartment Rent �U7 M Conve
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Also halt utilities 7S-t��
3 FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED to share Oeorfetewn
Apt Great location to downtown
and campus area For inttriM
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FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
apartment at no cost to her her. ��
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PRIVATE ROOM FOR RENT
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IBM Seiecv.c typewriter Call
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TYPING Term papers thesis
etc Call Kemp Dunn. 75 4713
WANTED
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WE �UY USED MUSICAL IN
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Belly Dancing
A Creative and Fun N ay to Exercise
TUB. EVENING � Jan. IS � ffefriaiaen
WED. MORNING - Jrr. 19 � Beciaam
TOOTS. E ENING � Jib. 20 � Advanced
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NX. ACADEMY of DANCE ARTS
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$5.99
NEIL YOUNG
BILLY SQUIRE
RICK SPRINGFIELD
LINDA RONSTADT
and many more
unadvertis�?d speo
d
The ECU swimmers travel lo Chapel Hill Thursda lo meel the l NC Tarheels.
COFFEEHOUSE I
AUDITIONS
Swimmers Top Navy
B RANDY MEWS
stiff U nlrf
East Carolina's
women's swimming
team won the final
relay of the day to pull
out a 77-72 victory over
the U.S. Naval
Academy Saturday,
highlighting a meet bet-
ween the Pirates. Mid-
shipmen and Villanova.
The 200-meter
freestyle relay team of
James, Van Arnam,
Rogers and George
took first place in
1:57.1, capping a com-
eback in which ECU
rallied from 20 points
down to win the meet
with Navy.
Villanova, which
finished sixth in the
Division-11 Nationals
last year, swam past the
Lady Pirates 101-48.
"They were up for
this meet; they shaved
their legs and their
times low com-
mented ECU coach
Rick Kobe on
Villanova.
ECU had two double
winners in Joanna Mc-
Culley and Nan
George. McCulley won
the 50-breaststroke in
35.97, while taking the
200-breaststroke in
2:52.06.
Nan George won the
50-freestyle in 27.66, a
new Navy pool record,
and also won the
100-freestyle in
1:01.33.
The Pirates swept the
50-butterfly with Nan-
cy James first in 31.40,
Kaky Wilson second in
31.58 and Sharon Holt
third in 32.51.
The Lady Pirates
also made seven na-
tional cut times during
the meet. "The kids did
the best they could
Kobe said. "We work-
ed real hard on our
Florida training trip
and they're not going
to get any rest until
after the regionals and
nationals
East Carolina returns
to action on Thursdav,
travelling to Chapel
Hill to meet the Univer-
sity of North Carolina.
ciioi miam (pwb'ihutus
fir Ml
� � � . -�
'�-�- -w - � -I i
� . . "I .
. guarantee yow a teat �
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0w4l i lic4tioni Are.
Sacltcton trrr
.ni taee M . � .�'
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t ic.l lent led I -
. i . 11 441
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1001 � � Dr.
Balrl ijrt. K . bJ9
Or cat I l-aOO-2-2Jl
Get Your Act Togethei
And Bring it to
The
ICoffeehouse Auditions'
to be held soon.
( Date to be announced
in Thurs. issue.)
.V-rV
KJ
Throckmorton Joins
ECU Football Staff
ECU head coach Ed
Emory announced
yesterday the addition
of Tom Throckmorton
as the new defensive
coordinator, replacing
the departed Norm
Parker.
Throckmorton, a
41-year old native of
Richmond, Va served
as defensive coor-
dinator at Virginia
Military Institute from
1980-82. He was
previously a defensive
coach at Richmond,
and in 1971 was a
defensive coach for
North Carolina State.
CYSTIC
FIBROSIS
EXERCISE-
A-THON
SATURDAY,
JANUARY 22,
11 a.m3 p.m.
for details
coll
757-1608
THE
AEROBICS
WORKSHOP
"We are extremely
happy to have a coach
of the caliber of Tom
Throckmorton join our
staff said Emory.
"He has proven to be
an over achiever in past
coaching situations and
is held in high regard in
the coaching ranks.
He's a very intense per-
son
With the addition of
Throckmorton, Emory
now has one vacancy to
fill on the defensive
staff, having announc-
ed the addition of Phil
Elmassian to the club
last week.
Pizza Lou
Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
Now Being Delivered!
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZA INN has changed
all that!
We sell our delivery
pizzas at Menu Prices!
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
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CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
East Carolina
DANCE
THEATRE
The East Carolina Playhouse
McGinnis Theatre
January 27-29, 8:15 p.m.
ECU Students: '2.50
Public: '4.00
Call 757-6390
GOLDEN RECORDINGS BY THE WHO THE BEATLES
TOM PETTY BILLY JOEL. REO SPEEDWAG0N
ROD STEWART DAN FOGELBERG ALAN PARSONS
DAVID BOWIE HALL AND 0ATES .38 SPECIAL
STEELY DAN OLIVIA NEWTON JOHN WILLIE NELSON
KENNY LOGGINS ELTON JOHN THE KINKS DON MCLEAN
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JOE JACKSON JOHN LENNON AND MANY MORE.
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RECORDS. TAPES 0� A LITTLE BIT MORE
THRU FEBRUAfrf 2ND PITT PLAZA i CABDum EAST MILL
� �
1





Title
The East Carolinian, January 18, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 18, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.241
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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