The East Carolinian, January 13, 1983






She
(Earnlttttan
Serving the Fast Carolina campus comm
unity since 1925
Vol.57 No.31
I uesday, January 13. 1983
Greenville, .(
12 PaKes
Vice Chancellor Maier Resigns; Volpe Fills In
"W B GREG RIDEOl 1 more eailll;ihlc rtlPlhH nf Hetprmin. Ur.ur.JIi � , �
Dr. Robert Maier
Steps Down From Post
By (,RK, RIDEOl I
News diior
Dr. Robert H. Maier, vice
chancellor tor academic attairs,
resigned Monday to accept a
research position with the Depart-
ment ol Surgerv in the ECU School
ot Medicine. Dr. Angelo Volpe, cut
renth dean ot the College ot Arts
and Science, will till the post until
an acting vice chancellor is named.
I ndei Maier's leadership, the of-
fice ot academic attairs' ac-
complishments include the hiring ot
various new deans, the approval ot
a graduate program in nursing and a
more equitable method of determin-
ing salaries.
Maier is especially proud of the
academic lecture series he initiated
on campus last year when Dean
Rusk gave a series of talks over a
three day period. 1 his year's guest
speaker will be Ralph Nader.
Chancellor John M. Howell said
he wished Maier well in his new
position and pointed to the impor-
tance ot his new work.
Volpe said his stay in the chiet
academic post will only he until an
acting vice chancellor is named. He
said the decision will be made bv
Howell and will be approved bv the
I Nc Board of Governors. After the
acting vice chancellor is named, a
search committee will be appointed
to tind a permanent replacement for
Maier.
Maier replaced Howell in UTS as
the chiel academic officer ot the
Iniversuv. He had previously been
a professor ot science and en-
vironmental change and o pubhs
and enviormental administaration
at theniversity of Wisconsin at
Green Ha v.
Maier. whose new title will be
professor ot experimental surgerv.
has an extensive background in soil
Anheuser-Busch Accused
chemistry. He graduated from the
University ot Miami with a double
major in botantv and shemistrv in
1951, and received his masters and
Ph.D. from the I niversitv ot Il-
linois in plant and soil chemistry in
1952 and 1954.
1 he former administrator's work
at the medical school will include
the researching of the influence ol
trace elements on the human bodv.
Maier explained that after 15
ears as an administrator at E� I
and the I niversitv of Wisconsin, it
was time for a change in dutv. He
said overseeing the functions ol an
academic
day was 1
�PP
1 he res.
Maier in the scientific
planning
Aftei M uei
torate. he S
to the Army
classified -
In 5 66, �
fellows in acaden
chosen by th v
Education and as
I NC -Chape! Hill I orl
fice ol the presid
System.
Students Protest Discrimination
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Stall Wmrr
Several members of the Alph Phi
Alpha fraternity were soliciting stu-
dent support yesterday tor a nation
wide boycott ol Anheuser-Busch,
the makers ol Budweiser and
Michelob beer.
The protesters, who gathered at
the Student Supply Store, contend
that Anheuser-Busch is practicing
discriminatory policies m the hiring
of blacks and in the sale ol
distributorships to blacks.
According to Alpha-Phi-Alpha
treasurer Gregory Chalmes, dn ECU
senior in business, the tour-month
old boycott was initiated by the
C hicago-based grtuip. People
I nited to Serve Humanity.
"PI SH is a national human
rights organization that is concerned
about educational, economic and
political eqmtv imparity said
PUSH'S press spokcsn.au ic Rev.
Frank E. W'atkins. He added thev
support research, education,
negotiation and direct action as
viable tactics tor their justice work.
PUSH claims that the entire
beverage industry, not just
Anheuser-Busch, is practicing
discriminatory policies against
blacks by continuing a policy ot
"restraint ot private trade
Statistics released by PUSH claim
that the beverage industry (beer,
wine, spirits and soft drinks) con-
trols 12,600 franchises, ot which on-
ly eleven are black-owned.
PI SH claimed thev focused their
boycott campaign on Anheuser-
Busch because blacks account 'or
approximately 10 percent ol the
Anheuser-Busch's beer market oi
about $4() million in annual
revenues for the company "Before
we aie finished, everyone in the
beverage industrv will be asked to
negotiate a trade agreement said
the chairman and national president
Ol PI SH lesse Jackson.
Jackson said Anheuser-Busch is
remaining firm in its refusal to
adopt many aspects ot the PUSH
"fair share" proposal I he tan
share proposal, states that com
panics should have the same percen-
tage ot blacks employed thai do
business wifh the company
PI SH would like to see blacks a,
c�un� for JO percent of tiU
AnheuseBusch employees ai
managerial and administrative levels
as well as in the area of distributor
ships. "We wanted to make people
aware of the problem Chalmers
said. "They're discriminating
against blacks
The Alpha's set up a table at the
Student Supply Store and asked
students to sign the petition suppor-
ting the bin cot t.
"Help PISH take on Busch -
support the PUSH boycott ot
Anheuser-Busch products stated a
sign the group was displaying.
Chalmers pointed out that of the
950 distributorships that are con-
trolled bv Anheuser-Buseh in the
I nited States onlv three are
operated bv blacks; two of those
have been acquired since the beginn-
ing of the boycott.
Chalmers said that black officials
across the country have supported
the boycott bv introducing and pass-
ing legislation that states their agree-
ment with the PUSH action.
'I here's been a lack of
knowledge about the boycott said
Alpha Phi Alpha member Shawn
I aney, an industrial technology stu-
dent "We're informing the people
about what is going on. I hey
(Anheuser-Busch) have been pretty
slack as far as advancing blacks m
theii organization and giving blacks
distributorships of their products
Hosier Vi.i, general manager of
Sellers, s Beei anu 'A mc Company,
the official distributor of Anheuser-
Busch products in Greenville,
disagreed strongly with the PUSH
position, claiming that the purchase
of distributorships was strictly bas-
ed on ability to buy. Via denied that
any discrimination against blacks
was taking place.
"We're employing blacks Via
told 1 he Last Carolinian. "1 don't
see any discriminatory actions at
See BEER. Page 6
S.PP0AT -v

4nh,� ?�l h A'Pha tnllTnlmrn,bers J�in ilh a Pl SH m�emen� in� the hiring pra
Anheuser-Busch eompanv. which they claim are discriminator
�elk �- l t the
ECU Trustees Approve Plan
To Award Honorary Degrees
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Singing In The Rain?
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
There has been so much rain in Greenville lately that even (,ene Kelly might change his tune. Nevertheless,
classes, and thus students, must go on.
Youth Contraceptive Rules Suggested
For Federal Family Planning Clinics
Bv MIKEHAMER
S!jt W lr
In his last act before resigning as
Secretary of Health and Human
Services Richard Schweiker Monday
recommended a rule requiring fami-
ly planning clinics supported by
federal funds to notify parents of
minors who receive prescription
contraceptive drugs or devices.
Dr. Nash Love, ECU professor in
the Department of Child Develop-
ment and Eamily Relations express-
ed his opposition to the rule.
"Technically, I feel that kids
should be able to talk to their
parents Love said. "But it will
keep kids from getting appropriate
information. I really teel n will have-
bad consequences.
"I would like to think that kids
and parents would discuss all crucial
matters, including sexual matters.
This rule will create more sexual
problems and unwanted pregnancies
� it will not stop teen-age sexual
behavior. That has been proven by
studies
In his statement Monday,
Schweiker said, "This department
has a deep responsibility to protect
the health and safety of minor
adolescents who are given prescrip-
tion birth control drugs and devices
paid for with taxpayer dollars
Schweiker cited the 1981 budget
act in which Congress encouraged
parental participation in a
teenager's use of family-planning
services that receive federal funds.
"While this rule does not man-
date family participation, its great
benefit is that it will provide an op-
portunity lor family involvement
where parents were previously kept
in the dark he said.
Mr. Johann Bleicher, principal of
Agnes Eullilore Community School
in Greenville, said, "I think that ob-
viously the intent is to insure paren-
tal involvement in the sexual choices
See RULES, Page 3
suff Mnlrt
The ECU Board of Trustees has
approved suggested procedures for
granting honorary degrees to
"recognize people who have made
important contributions to East
Carolina Univesit) or to education
in general The measure has also
been approved by the Board oi
Governors of the University o
North Carolina system.
"The university has not con-
sidered ottering honorary doc-
torates in the past Howell told
The East Carolinianand now is
the appropriate time to do it
Howell noted that since ECl is at
present ottering academic doctoral
degrees, it is appropriate to offer the
honorary doctorates
"We're aware that we are now an
institution of sufficient status and it
(an ECU honorary degree) amounts
to something important Howell
said.
Action by the Board of Trustees
came by approval ot the executive
committee to a Nov. 23-letter that
outlined procedures from Howell.
Trustee C. Ralph Kinsey of
Charlotte headed an ad hoc commit-
tee which studied the matter. Kinsey
reported for the executive commit-
tee to the full board Dec 4.
According to Howell. a seven-
member panel to be chaired by the
dean of ECU's graduate school will
be given the authority to receive
recommendations and to make
nominations to the chancellor of
possible recipients of the new
degree.
The six other members of the
Honorary Degree Committee will
include one faculty member selected
by the ECU Graduate Council, two
faculty members selected by the
Faculty Senate amd three trustees
selected by the Chairperson of the
Board ot Trustees.
"They (the Honorary Degree
Committee) will simply receive
nominations and make recommen-
dations to me Howell saidThen
I'll submit that to the Board of
Trustees for their final approval
There will be two types of
honorary degrees awarded by ECU.
One will be a Doctor of Letters
(Litt. D.) and the other a Doctor of
Science (D.Sci.) In the case of
"exceptional circumstances" a
more specialized degree could be
awarded or a different honorary or
memorial distinction can be
designated by the Board of
Trustees.
The final guidelines for the
honorary degree proposal notes that
"eminent achievement in scholar-
ship, public affairs, service to the
university, service to the state or na-
tion or in activities recognized as
significant in the educational
world will constitute the primary
basis for an honorarv degree
The awarding of hone
degrees will be limited to thr
year, except as otherwise
mended by the Board or rrustees
Recipients of the degi
any members of the Board
Trustees, the Board ot Go
the University of North Carolina
any ot its constituent ins
Members ot the faculty, stall or ad
ministration ot the I nivers
North Carolina arc a
Foreign Students
Mid-Year Enrollment Hits Record High
B DARRYLBROWN
Miani Ne�N rditor
Thirty new foreign students
enrolled at ECL this semester, the
largest mid-year enrollment ever,
according to Lucy Wright, advisor
to foreign students at ECU.
"We usually have a drop in
foreign students at spring
semester Wright said, noting that
the university's overall enrollment
normally declines in January. This
term, however, foreign student
enrollment increased from 93 last
semester, even though some foreign
students did leave in December.
A delegation of 14 students trom
Malasia make up the largest group
from any one country at one time.
Other new arrivals come from wide-
ly varying nations including Saudi
Arabia, Kuwait, Malawi, Kenya,
England. Thailand, Norway and
Ghana. ECU has foreign students
from over 35 different nations
around the world.
"We get most foreign students by
word of mouth Wright said,
noting that ECU has no special pro-
grams to recruit students from out-
side the United States.
According to Wright, the
academic offerings of the campus
attract many overseas students.
"Most came because of a particular
academic program The Malasian
delegation, she said, came to study
in the city planning curriculum of
the geography department.
"Most study in
:echr.ologv. especial � dents sup-
ported by their govei l
Wright said. About halt
students attending ECl Fi
countries are supported bv th
governments The ECL derv
ments ot computer scienc
business make ECl attractive to
manv developing nations " think
the needs in particular counti es .
the programs we have to offei bring
students here she said.
Wright cited ECL 's low foreign
student population as an advantage
tor the visitors. "Tt is a good situa-
tion tor them she said, noting
many have never been to the I nited
States before. ECL has a foreign
student enrollment ot less than one
percent, below the average ot : ts
percent tor American universities
While ECl has no spe
language program that teaches
English to foreign students. Wright
says "A lot come with very good
English. They would surprise you
Many hae studied t-nghsh since
elementary school in their native
countries.
ECU owns an International
House at 306 E. 9th St which, in
addition to housing 10 students,
holds activities for all ECU pupils
and gives American students a
chance to meet people from various
backgrounds. Wright encouraged
all students to take advantage of the
opprotunity.
T
A





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 13.1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organuation
wouia like to have an ,tem printed
m the announcement column.
Dease type if on an announcement
form ano send if to Trie East
Carolinian m care of trie proouc
'ion ma-iager
Announcement forms are
d�ai:abie at me East Carolinian
fttice m tne Publications Building
Myers and handwritten copy or
� od sued paper cannot be ac
epted
There ,s no darge tor an
nou'Kements. but space .s often
hmi'ed Therefore we cannot
guarantee 'ria' yuur announce
men- will run as l0rig as y0(J wanT
anc sugges' tnaf you ac not rely
s . - an ffij column tor publicity
�� deadline or announcements
�s 3 p m Monday for me Tuesday
� � ftnti i p -Ti Aeonesdayy tor
Thursday vaoer No an
unce s recc ico after 'nese
leadlines n be v ea
rtiis space is amiable to all
"T - 'jan.za' "s ano oepari
ALL CAMPUS
PARTY
The Brothers. Pledges and the
Little Sisters ot Kappa Sigma
fraternity would like to invite the
students of ECU to an ALL CAM
PUS PARTY Saturday night
iBYOB) before, during, and after
downtown We would also like to
invite each of you to SPRING
RUSH 83, which begins on Monday
night For more information call
752 5543
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi 'S nos'mg a dance
contest tor Cerebral Palsy on
January 14. I9g3 a, Papa Ka
trom 8 00 l 00 There will be 'wo
categories tree s'yie ano shag
nritn jioo oo going to each first
Place second ana third place
pews win also oe awarded John
Moore m oe spinning The tunes
F � turtner into von'act k.m at
355 ��
BOWLING
Si1
e IVS3 spr.rg semester
Menoe-nau S'uden' Center Mmed
Btes Bowimg Leagues wmi
begm e secono week of classes
htU students interested m
oownng on a mmed league must
Sig" up on the buiie'n board on the
t �� m Moor ot Menaeraii Stu
neni Centef Eacfi 'eam must con
. 'nen arc 2 women The
I 5; :s pe' perso- each mgnt
Us a be g.ven lo 'he top
and female bom er and o the
team cO'gj" ijiirnji
1CJ � - re Monday n.gnt
M be neio Monday Jan
5 00 pm n me Bowi.ng
? orga� :a' on meeng
"e ' jesofl. nigftl league will
ne,a Tescay Jan '8 a' 5 00
Bw g Center Play
r-i'a n d 'e � following tese
ieei gs F � turtner ,nt0 can
'V.a Barnano MSC Crafts and
�e. ea- m D"eor a' 'i7 66ll
�' " e Bow nq cc"ter a'
W v I ex- 26"
'�'
DEVELOPMENT
PERSONAL
PROGRAMS
Camera i Tuesday. February
22 March r� 7 00 � 00 p m The
Dance Factory Tuesday.
February 22 May 3. 5 X 6 30
P m Guitar Tuesday. February
22 April 19 6 30745pm Clogg
mg Wednesday February 23
April 6 8 00 10 00 p m Speed
Reading Thursday February 24
Apr.i 21 7 00 9 00 p m Yoga
Tuesday and Thursday March 15
April 7 6 30 7 30 p m Contact the
Division of Continuing Education.
757 6143
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
The ECU Sign Language Club
will hold its regular bimonthly
covered dish supper ana meeting
on Sunday. Jan lath at the
Mendenhali Student Center Mum
Purpose Room Tne supper will
begin at 6 00 pm with a short
business meeting ano captionea
film to follow The meal and
meeting are open t0 any interested
student, faculty member or a
member of the community You do
hi neea to know Sign Language to
at'eno but students who are 'ak
ng sign language classes or who
have taken them m the past are
encouraged to attend The purpose
of me SLC is to allow sign
language students and hearing im
apired students and community
leaders to socialize and develop
communication skills We hope to
see you there
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed tor Art Depart
ment self help positions are
available for nude modeling at
J5 02 per hour PLease see the
toiiowmg �eac-ers Ray Elmore.
Tran Goroiey Davy Davenport
WesCrawiey Be'sy Ross. Mchaei
Voors
SNOWSKI
" se skers �hc wa' 'o take
Arsk rQ lor cec ' 0or ng spr
-q Sr-ps-e' s- u c ado PHVE
P��E l'50 or PHVE 1151
King Or:o Aao On Campus
asses n cdnd on q precede a
spr ng brea� �' C fts" WV
� ' � t.nes' sknig in ne south
I J SdLders a-757 6000 tor
�. rtl er information abou' the ski
. � gran c ski tor credi' or go
n .red
INVESTMENT
STRATEGIES
Bavc commodity Hedging
'uesaay ana Thursday. February
15 24, 7 00 � 00 p.m. investing m
me 8C s Wednesday. February 23
i 6309 10 pm These
rses a provide valuable in
� r . jp tor mose wnc have ii'tie
K eipernce in -vest ng Con
e D'v.S'On or Continuing
Educat.on. 757 6U3
RUGBY
There will be an organizational
meeting Monday January 17th a'
4 00 for an women interested m
piay ng Rugby m,s semes'er
Plans tor me upcoming season and
rnf Spring tournament will be
oiscusseo The meeting will be
held m Memorial Gym Room 104
No experience is required so come
find out what rugby is an about
COUNSELING
A program tor Increasing Lear
n.ng Efficiency will be ottered by
me Counseling Center this Spring
Dr George Aeigano win teach the
classes on Monday and Wednes
day at 1 00 P M beginning
January 17 and Dr ioneRvanwiii
teach the class on Tuesday and
Thursday at 1 00 P M beginning
January 18 Bom groups win meet
in 305 Wrigh Annex The classes
are available tc an students At
tenoance is voluntary nc forma:
fegis'ra'ion is required
STUDENT UNION
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Committee is sponsoring
'ne perfect trip tor )9M Spring
Break An ENTIRE WEEK of fun
ano excitement at Disney World
n Fort Lauderdale. Just think,
only 179 tor fhe whole week ot
Spring Break in Florida. If in
terested, contact the Central
Ticket Office at MSC SPACE IS
LIMITED SO call now at 757 Mil,
Ext 226
BAPTIST CHURCH
There is a bus route for students
who wish to attend Sunday service
at Sycamore Hill Baptist Church.
The bus leaves the church and
goes into the campus from w 5th
St by Cotton. Fleming, and other
dorms at 10:40 am, swinging back
on 5tn. going lo main campus in
back of dorms and swinging by
Belk Dorm it leaves and goes
across campus to dorms on South
Side (of campus) no later fnan
10 50 am, arriving at church at
11 00
EPISCOPAL
SERVICE
a Student Episcopal service ot
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday evening,
January 11, in the chapel of St
Paul's Episcopal Church, 406 4th
Street tone block trom Garrett
Dorm) The service will be at 5 30
pm with the Episcopal Chaplain,
the Rev Bill Hadden, celebrating
EXERCISE
-A-
THON
An exercise a thon to benefit
Cystic Fibrosis will be held at the
Aerobic Workshop locted at 417
Evans Street Mall, on Saturday
January 22 Participants in the
event win begin exercising at 11
am All funds raised will be used
to help Cystic Fibrosis
A grand prize will be awarded to
the top fundraiser at the exercise
a thon All participants raising $30
or more will receive CF i did If"
t shirts and ail participants who
raise 175 or more will receive
' shirts and a roll tote bag
Funds raised m the CF
Exercise a thon will help support
the Foundation s research, treat
ment and education programs in
NC and nationwide CF is a fatal
lung and digestive disease that
takes the lives of half its victims
before they reach their twenties
CF causes excessive amounts of
thick mucus to clog lungs and m
'erfere with breathing and absorp
tion of food
For more information about
participating m the exercise a
thon, or sponsoring someone,
piease contact the Aerobic
Workshop at 757 1608
NC GOVERNMENT
INTERNSHIPS
A variety of jobs are available
Pay is S3 75 per hour for full time
positions Beginning June 1
August 5. Students must have
finished their sophmore year and
have a 2 5 GPA. Graduate
students are also eligible to apply
Application deadline is February
7. Contact the Co op office
US CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
The US Chamber ot Commerce
has internships available tor a
variety of maiors They are
located in Washington, DC All in
ternships are non paid Contact
the Co op Office
NATIONAL PARK
CONCESSIONS,fNC
National Park Concessions. Inc
otters employment opportunities
for seasonal employees tor the
period of approximately June 1
through Labor Day to be con
Sidered This is a condition of the
employment A variety ot posi
tions are available Apply at the
Co op Office
r
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75� per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return lo THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office by 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday pabaicatioas.
Name
Address
CityState.
Np. lines
.Zip.
. Phone.
. at 75� per line S.
.No. insertions.
.enclosed
?
Ra
H I r r I
said to
studerr
aeratr �
Car
MARK TWAIN
IN PERSON
Mark Twain in Person will be
at trte Kinston Airport Theatre.
Stallmgs Field, Rouse Rd,
January 2� and 79 Shows begin at
8 15pm Student tickets are S3 in
advance For moare information
contact Leigh Riggs at 527 2517
Kmston Arts Council
SPOLETO FESTIVAL
The Spoieto Festival m
Charleston, SC is seeking qualified
students to serve as apprentices
tor the Festival held May 20 June
5 There is a variety of positions
available Application deadline is
Feb 1 Contact the Co op office
313 Rawl
STUDIES
A two part mini series will be ot
fered at no cost by the University
Counseling Center, on How to Sue
ceed m College and Still Have Fun,
on Monday January 17 Another
series. How to Avoid Test Anxiety
will be offered on Tuesday
January is Both sessions will be
conducted from 3 pm till 4pm in
305 Wright Annex, 757 6661 No ad
vance registration necessary
ACTING CLASS
Acting class meets Monday
February 14 March 21 from 7 9
P m. Beginning Acting I will ac
quamt you with basic acting
techniques reflective of the
"method" approach Instructor is
Steve Fmnan, a tomer member ot
'he ECU Department ot Drama
and Speech, who has directed off
broadway productions in New
York Contact Division of Contmu
mg Education, 757 6143
COMMUNICATE IN
SPANISH OR GERMAN
Conversational Spanish, Tues
day, February 15 April 26, 7 30
pm Conversational German
Tuesday. February 15 April 26.
7 � 30 p m Both courses are open
to both beginners and former
students who want to brush up'
on the language Contact the Divi
Sion of Continuing Education
757 6U3
UNDERWATER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Tuesday and Thursday
February 15 24 from 7 10pm Pre
requisite Basic Scuba Cert,f)Ca
tion trom a recognized Scuba div
mg association sucn as NAUl or
padi This is a course of under
water camera handling and
covers underwater photographic
equipment, films, photo techm
ques and lighting techniques Con
tact Division of Continuing Educa
'ion. 757 6143
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our first meeting of the Spring
semester will be held on Thurs
Oey. j�n 13m .n am 24 MSC
Members, we are urging you to in
vite your tnenos who may wish to
10m and wno posses G P A s ot 3 0
or better Membership appiica
tions will be provided a' an ot the
biweekly meetings
OFFICIATING
Baseball Sottjail officiating,
Monday. February 21 April 11
from 7 9 p m The course is design
ed to be ot interest to spectators,
players, coaches, and school
athletic intramural teachers and
to prepare those interested in 10b
opportunities in umpiring Contact
the Division of Continuing Educa
tion, 757 6143.
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxion House
is offering these one hour sessions
lo aid you in developing better in
terviewing skills tor use in your
10b search January 17.
1983 Monday 2 00 p m January 25.
1983 Tuesday 4 OOp m February
2. 1983 Wednesday 4 00 p m
February 7, 1983 Wednesday 7 00
P m A film and discussion of m
'erviewing through the Career
Planning ano Placement Service
will be shared
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Services tne 6io�'on House
is ottering the follow.ng one nour
sessions to help yoc prepare your
own resume January 18
1993 Tuesday 2 00 p m January
24. 1983 Monday 4 00 P m
February 1 1983 Tuesday 7 00
p m February 2, 1983 Wednesday
2 30 p m Those seniors of
graduates'udents finishing tn.s
year and planning to register with
us are urged to attend You may
come to 'ne Bioxton House at any
of the above times
FACULTY AND
STAFF AEROBICS
Faculty ano statt aerobic dance
meets a' 12 00 noon Monday
Wednesday and Friday in
Memorial Gym room 108 There is
no charge ano you do not need to
have any previous experience
Come out ano get yourself n shape
and rtave tun while you re at it
Contact jo Saunoers at 75? 4000 for
further information
ENJOY SINGING
Residence Man Chorus s star
t.ng up again tor 1983 ityouenioy
Singing come 10m us Monday night
in room 103 Biology All are
welcome No auditions or ex
penence required11
SPRING BREAK
SKI
Ski Snowshoe West Virginia spr
mg break Registration and
deposits are due on February 1 a'
4 00pm m Memorial Gym room
108 Contact Jo Saunders at
757 6000 for information concern
mg fhe ski packages that are
available
PHYE MAJORS
CLUB
Physical Education Club
meetings will be held at 'he tonow
mg times ano dates January 13 a'
4 00. January 18 a' 5 15. and
January 20 at 4 00
WOMEN'S HEALTH
DEPEND ON s on that s aae easier l,
fhewometi crfthef-ieminoCenter Counselors are
-�� 3 �3 e 3cv and night to support and under-
5Tar 3 you. our safety comfort ana privacy ore
Jssureaby rhecar gstafof the emmg Center
SERVICES � �uesaav - Saturday Abortion Ap-
po ntments � is & 2na T- mestef Aoortions up tc
B Weeks � Free -egnancy TeS's � very Early
� rear ancv rests � All Inc usrve fees � insurance
- :epted � CALL 781-5550 DAY or night �
o 2?"? THE FLEMING
� 3 a9�!CENTER
ONE DAY
COMPUTER
PROGRAMS
The SMan Computer
Revolution Saturday. February
26. 1983 Word Processing
Saturday. Marcrt 5. 1983
Pre requisite The Small Com
puter Revolution or equivalent In
troduc'ion to Programming in
BASIC. Sa'ur-ay Marc 26. 1983
Pre requisite The Sman Com
pu'er Revolution or equivalent
Contact the Division of Contmu.ng
Education. 757 6143
BASIC SAILING
Two classroom sessions and
three weekend afternoons on 19 26
foot baots on tne Pami'co R.ver
jom m the Fun Registration is
limited to 16. so register early
Mee's Thursday Aprn 7. 21
7 30 9 30 p m . Saturday April 9.
16 23 l 30 4 30 p m Contact tne
Division of Continuing Education.
757 6143
COMMUNICATE
Learn to develop asser'ive com
munication skills Ten others what
you want teel ano believe Asser
tiveness can open new doors tor
you Assertive Communication
Tuesday March 15 April 5
7 00 9 30 p m Contact the D'v.
Sion ot Continuing Education.
757 6143
DANCE
Foxtro Rhumba, Disco Aaitz.
ano Bop the basics and their
varia'ions Beginning Bovroom
Dancing Friday f-eoruary 18
April 2v. 1983 from 7 00 8 00 p m
intermediate Ballroom Dane ng
Friday 1-eOruary 18 April 79.
1983 from 8 00 9 00 p m Contact
e Division of Continuing Eouca
tion 757 6143
WZMB
The Electric Rainbow Radio
Show returns to WZMB Now on
Fridays from 00 pm to 6 00
p m and Saturday trom 12 00 mid
night to 4 00 a m Kei'n Mitchell
hosts the predominatily riea1
metal program which also
features album specials Friday s
album special is Sammy Hagar s
new "Three Lock Box" and will be
played at 4 00 p m Saturday night
the album special is by Frank
Marino and MariOQany Rush and is
entitled "Whafs Next" Sa'ur
day's album specials will be
played at 2 00 a m Tune m and
urn ou no guts no glory. The
Electric Rambow Radio Show
ILO
The international Language
Organuation welcomes an tacui
ty. staff, and students back to
ECU The ILO will nave its first
meeting on January 19 at 3 00 The
meeting will be held in BC 305 An
old mempers are encouraged fo
attend this meeng Discussions
for tne springs activities win be
held Any interested people are
welcome to attend You do net
rate to be a Foreign Language
maior or minor to atte-d
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
Tne Catholic Newman Center
would nke to invite everyone tc
iom m with us tor celebrating
Mass every Sunday in the Bioiogy
Lecture Han starting a' 12 30 ano
every Wednesday at 5 00 at tne
Cafhoi.c Newman Cemer located
down a1 tne bottom of Ccuege Hni
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY' Do you fioi tr.enoiy
'enowship good trienqs and food
and a chance 'o be yourself in HUt
rat race environment at ECU'
Then come iom us a- mej Bao'is'
Student union where we nave om
ners or Tuesdays a' 5 30 for Ml .
SI 75 PAUSE on Thursday a'
7 00 to anew us to taxe a oreax
after an aimos HrtMltng wee
ano io's-t peopie i.s' xeyxwn:
enioy ethers Can 752 4646 H you
nave a-v questions Boo Civde
CJfpui rvVer
KARATE CLUB
Thexara'ec'LCwi-ciast.rs-
mee'mg of 'he new year januar�
13 at 7 00 p m An cio and new
memoers are invi'eo o a"enc
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
The Biology Club will spc s r
'he Red Cross Biooamoone Tues
day ano Wednesday January 25
and 26 Hours o� collection anil oe
10 00 a m to 4 00 p m
Menoenr a' room 244
MEN'SRUGBY
Practices wni oe 'un Tuesday
thru Thursday a' 4 00 p m ben.no
'ne Ained Heal" Buiio-ng starting
Tuesday Januar, 18 Ever,
invited o come ou and iOir
ECU s wildest and mos'
'erest ng spor's dud
ALPHA EPSILON
DELTA
There anil Der.EO meeting
Tuesday mgni a' 30 c m
January is 1983 in F aaga- -
30: T-� speaker w,i, oe D' D.a
E Kra'zer on -e Sub ec � jf
Poda'r.c Med c ne a-c S3t �
the foot There mi atsc oe j- e�
ecut.ve mee' ng dr5 a Cieogt
meeng a' 7 Ox"
vi'ed
SCUBA
Basic NAUl or padi Scuba Ce-
nt.cat,on sec, � ruewyanc
'hursday Va' I Ap-
7 00 io 00 o - Sextton
day ano 'i-o'vj. Apt
fc 7 oo ��: x pm
are designer I . �, e ag�
ners to SCUBA liy wtfh has c
instruction -
sk.ns ano sav. procedures
Reg ster early . � D
s.o- ot cont -5 Ea
757 6143
HONORS
SIMINAR TOPICS
Faci. '� mempers a jrrenl
Honors s'uoenrs are 'e� -ao : �
� opportun �, � propose tof
for Honors f.m �a,s ,a ana
spr -c, se�es'ers 1983 S4 Tnese
sem ar are an .
Otsctp -a ac c, c e �
or en ted See pp 87 88 � "
1982 84 catalogue tcr general
categories Seminars mee- once a
weex and g.ve 3 s h credit
'Owaros G E requj r-ementj
To oe cons oerea proposals
must oe sutxn rted n nrr tmg d�
sauari 20 1983 lc Dr Da. 0
S a " a vr � Coordinator of
Honors Program c O English
Dep" is' - �5g Caps F '
tuhe' rrformai - a "S" 6548
The Hast Carolinian
Srrt . ��
oe�i �.
Pubi sned every Tjesc
Thursday during 'he acd'
tear arr eter, Aecnesro.
ng tne summer
'ne Eas' Car � .
al newspaper � -
-
� -ed ao put
- students � r0
Subscription Rate J20 rear �
The East Caronn.ar
are located m the Old
Bui'dmq on the campus o' ECU
Greenv.Ue N C
F
1
�' at es � l he E �
Old ou Build ng EC
. � NC 27134
Telephone t$-fc3M e
S R A
'
rt a f.v.
art a
� � . ye Off
a m
NAACP
� � f. e a Mart

front of ksfore a'
� - � � � � . �-
mere w first be a s ent fr buff
i - � . . � - � .�-
A' a- � htoriurr .erz e ser
� . ce a sc a recec
be new mmed a-e .
'� Aifros E . - . e a'
'er-o Spcnsorec r . - ;
L
SURF CLUB
� rv �ee 3 m the sc "�
semes'er a ; Thursday
January '3 a � 7: M s
lenhall Dfi-vS'MM
men Pians for a possoie contest
� za dur.ng spring prean w
oe o.scussed Anyone nteres'eo
, - ng me club is weicome
NAACP
a oe a NAACP -ee- '3
�if .aa -3 a- i X -
Me"aean Dec� 248 a
members cease ae"c T" s s 3
. � � . mportajni -ee- -g
Bx PAFKIi
ONEH
Joea
of the r �
mem ol P
hav
Rules
Betwel
( ontmued From I
ot the
�- . : -

H .
pai
the ad
that the.
receive
force commui
'Th lc
tantasv tha
-
tion. Our rv .
� highh
-�-� ad
cam
lIIIIIIIIlllllll!IHIi,
I
� � a
� ��.
Middle Eastern
Belly Dancing
A Creative and Fun Way to Exercise
TUES. EVENING - Jaa. IS Beginners
WED. MORNING - Jaa. 19 - Beginners
THURS. EVENING - Jan. 20 - Advanced
TO REGISTER CALL DONNA WHITLEY
752-0928
N.C. ACADEMY of DANfF apts
mmmmmmmmmmmmmm
The ALAMO
All You Can Eat
Seafood Bonanza
Friday-Saturday and Sunday
4:00p.m. -to closing

Saturday
11:00 AM
10:00 PM 2S
Alaskan
Crab Legs
lLb.Baked
Potato.Salad
$a99
Restaurant & Nightclub
j Greenville's newest nightspot & eatery.
We would like to extend
a welcome to all ECU students by
giving discounts at the door with college
ID's. Discounts of $1.00 will be honored
on Thurs Fri Sat & Sun. nights
when we have live entertainment.
Admission is FREE on D. J. nights.
The ALAMO offers the best in
Mexican-American food & features
on many nights a fine bu ffet.

luimimmiim.Hiiiiitniiiiiiiiiii
Mai
Bi
Fri!
Thurs. �
Bt
&�
Sunday ' U WMI U r O.t.
m Oyster Bar P
Friday & 7,0�- Gncm St. Clatt� Saerhlto.
S�tn,d,u Cl��"�nil JfrCottattftaiatial
75X-0090
Hoppy Hour - 4:30-1:00p.m. with DJ. - Reduced Bereroge Prices
Durtet � $4.95
Fri. - Hoppy Hour - 430-l .00 p.m.
Introducing to this area the bond � "DR. GROOVE"
Ploying 60's Music - $1.00 off admission with ECU I D
Sot. - "DR. GROOVE" - $1.00 off admission
with ECU I.D. Buffet - $4.95
Sun. - Hoppy Hour All Night - D.J.
1104 North Memorial Drive Across from Greenville Airport
Phone 757-0005 for additional information
Coming next Wed. Jan. 19, & Thurs Jon 20
THE EMBERS
tl
bo
An
Ev
free
A

i
r





Og fcASTCARQLINIAN JANUARY n .osi 3
Phone.
.enclosed
�r�i�r�r
TOT
i���

it
� M-t-
. . -J�u
1 i i
i 1
m
r
I he r aslarolinian
� - � I t a s �
S � � :iea
-� Eas' Carol-na
ICI p'ion Rate JJOyearly
'� Ea�t Carolinian oftices
oiawa m the Old South
nq on the campus of ECU
4 C
� � Sena aaarev,
� i I Carolinian
' r c ECU Green
-p�onf fJ7 �(� 6367 309
S R A
eeoea tor rne
� 'eres'eci
' ' "� " - ���� co'ac
' �Ov are a
' ' �Ou ve ott
J l e iGA ott ce
NAACP
Be a Mar'in Lutner
�� Ceief ra'ion (jefltnn
� "e sooKstore a"
a- U 1983
� ' it be a s lam r bu?e
a marcn proceeamg to
' r am wnpre fne ser
� O'sce Aisoarecep
M Hew rrmeo.a'eiy
� � � � r p ease a'
M r. NAACP anc
SURF CLUB
. � e spring
a dp 'lursdat
� a ?C pm n
Pim nwst 6� paid by
� � a doss Die contes'
w spring preak wHi
sussea Anyone nterest�3 in
g "e cluO is welcome
NAACP
trt a saacp T-pf�g
-vca, Ja"ary 13 at 5 00 in
�Joo-n 248 A
-ase a"e"a Tn.s is a
. - tni -ee- g
i
rerage Prices
ort
By STEVE DEAR
M.aWriier
A program which is
said to help raise
students grade point
averages by one quality
point is once again be-
ing offered. The pro-
gram, called
"Increasing Learning
Efficiency is being
offered free of charge
to all interested
Weeks
students by the
Counseling Center.
The program will aid
students who wish to
learn the most efficeint
ways of organizing time
schedules, better
reading skills, how to
take and prepare for
tests and how to take
better notes.
"Essentially the pro-
gram teaches students
how to be good
students said Dr.
Phyllis McAllister of
the Counseling Center.
According to
McAllister, the pro-
gram has existed since
1962 when it was
Car Towing Rules To Be Enforced
By PATRICK
By PATRICK
ON El LI
Slaff Wntrr
Joe Calder, director
of the ECU Depart-
ment of Public Safety,
has issued an early
semester warning to
ECU student, faculty
and staff to abide by
the university's policies
regarding vehicle
registration and park-
ing on university pro-
Rules Won't Force Talk
Between Parents, Youth
Perty. director's office, "all
"The towing policy unregistered vehicles
regarding unregistered will be towed
vehicles is stricltly en- "I hate to give these
forced in the vicinity of towing companies any
the residence halls money Calder said
read a memo from the "All we do is give them
students concerning il-
legally parked cars. "A
ticket on a vehicle
doesn't give people a
parking place Calder
said. "Students up
there really resent il-
started by Dr. George
Weigand.
Last year 202
students participated in
the program.
A study conducted
by the Counseling
Center several years
ago revealed that
regular students who
participated in the pro-
gram raised their
GPA's by about one
grade point.
The program will
consist of two classes
per week for a period
of about seven weeks.
It will be offered again
in the middle of the
-o��� vwviv noii icucru
tne business, we don't legally parked cars "
malr� on�, �� i
semester.
Two different classes
will beheld for the pro-
gram .Tr. Weigand will
teach the classes on
Mondays and
Wednesdays at 1 p.m.
beginning next Mon-
day. Dr. lone Rvan will
teach the classes on
Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 1 p.m.
Both groups will
meet in Wright Annex
room 305.
Students who cannot
attend the regular
classes may be helped
on an individual basis.
Also, small groups
wishing to have their
own classes conducted
at different times may
do so, according to
McAllister.
The Counseling
Center is also offering
several other programs
for students. A two
part mini-series entitled
"How to Succeed in
College and Still Have
Fun" and "How to
Avoid Test Anxiety"
will be held on Monday
and Tuesday respec-
tively next week. Both
sessions will be con-
ducted from 3 to 4 p.m.
in 305 W right Annex.
Also, a two pan
mini-series entitled
"Career by Choice not
Chance" will be ot-
tered from 3 to 5 p.m.
The first session will
hold classes on Jan. 24
and Feb. 7 and the se-
cond session will hold
classes on Jan. 25 and
Feb. 8. The Sirong-
Cambell Vocational In-
terest Inventory will be
administered in the first
meeting of both ses-
sions.
No advanced
registration i necessarv
for any ot the pro
grams.
Continued From Page 1
of their children. I sup-
port the notion. We
would wish that parents
would be involved.
However, where
parents are not already
communicating with
the adolescents bv the
age of 13 or 14, the fact
that they couldn't
receive birth control
prescriptions would not
force communication.
"The key issue is the
fantasy that you can
legislate communica-
tion. Our fear is that if
an adolescent makes a
choice to have sex, then
it is highly unlikely that
if an adolescent girl
cannot get prescription
The memo from
Calder's office said
visitors are not
authorized to park in
the vicinity of the
residence halls over
birth control devices,
this will stop her. This
rule will actually in-
crease the chances of
unwanted pregnan-
cies
The parental
notification require-
ment would not apply
to the giving of birth
control information,
counseling or non-
prescription contracep-
tives to minors, nor
would it apply to the
dispensing of drugs to
treat sexually transmit
ted disease.
Under the proposed
rules, family planning
agencies receiving
federal funds under Ti-
tle Ten of the Public
Health Service Act
make any money when
a vehicle is towed and
impounded
Calder said he
wanted to remind the
students what the !ldin
wou,d be requlred t0 ZZZZTi CZ �� ��.
notify a parent or guar- inc �. "� P��ing per-
dian within ten days "Dunn the fir.f � mUSt T1"1 a
after a minor receive couple" of weeks' rcoce " "
prescription contracep- school some students
live or device. tend to forget the
Notification would regulations Calder
have to be made said. Many students
through certified mail the director added, are
or in some other form not even aware of the
that could be vehicle policies,
documented.
Dr. Norma Lewis, a , Wen the vcnicle ,s
towed or impounded, it
will cost the driver $20
during the day and $25
at night. Additional
fees ranging from $2 to
$10 will also be assesed.
N N V V
V X V X X NX X X
X NXXXXXXXX
XXX X X X x vS"
registered nurse and a
private counselor with
Family and
Psychological Services
in Greenville, said
about the rule, "I think
it's counterproductive
for those adolescents
who confidentiality
won't be able to be
respected.
FINE
FOODS
Calder noted that the
College Hill area was
frequently congested
and was the source of
many complaints from
t�� many complaints trom

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If you're interested in finding out more, see the Navy
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Book Store. If you can't make it, send your resume or transcripts
1 t0: MCCS HELS0M SKINNER
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
Or call 1-800-662-7231
t93iiiiii3iiitiiitiiiiifiiitiiiiiiiiiititiiitffifiiijfiiii�ifiiiitfuntil�iiiiti�)iiiiiisfiiiiiiifMitfiiiiitiiiiiitMiitiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiciitMiififiiffiiffsittiiiiifiiiitiiiffffi
for a
Barbecue Chicken
and
2 vegetables and bread
,o,1.99
expires Jan. 21
Open 11-8 � 7 days a week
752-0476 512 E. 14th St.
Loc�td 2 block wit of guys dorms.
Announces new hours.
MonSat. n,ft
Ejjectne Monday, Jan 17 l � �Wa. m.
�16 oz. Drafti Q "�
! 25C f 9:00p.m.
j v with coupon I
Good thru Sat. 15th. I
Try our 31 item salad bar along with our
fabulous soups, chili, fresh ground ham-
burgers, hot dogs.
Happyhour 3:00-8:00 p.m.
MonSat.
Located in Georgetown Shoppes
Across from the highrise dorms.
' V VV.XNVS.NVVVV
��������������Ml
MKaMmimiiMm
1LUI1 �fl1tT
R U S H
KAPPA SIGMA
Martin Luther King Jr
Birthday Celebration
Friday, January 14,1983
in Wright Auditorium
12:00 Until
there will be a silent tribute &
march beginning in front of the
bookstore at 12:00 the proceeding
to Wright Auditorium.
A reception will be held in the lobby
of Wright after the program.
Everyone please attend. Admission
free. Sponsored by NAACP & SOULS
KAPPA
SIGMA
THE MOST
WANTED
MAN IN THE
COUNTRY
The Brothers, Pledges & Little Sisters
of Kappa Sigma cordially invite you
to 1983 Spring Rush(beside Darryl's)
MONDAY
New Years Eve Party
TUESDAY
Orig. Las Vegas Playboy Bunny Night
Parties Begin at 8:00-for information & rides call 752-5543
'In Pursuit of Excellence'
� �
i mto a
�mm i ��mi
"m�� � it.





.Phone.
.enclosed
� , 1. �1




.


1
�s1�,1
I hi- hast Carolinian
, Mm acaae
� v Aecnsaa� d
Fas' Carol a
oscr 'piion Rate �J0 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
jcateo in the Ok) Soul
t iq on the campus ot ECU
. I He N C
B � � ECU Greer-
Telephone 'S?�J6� 636' 630�
S R A.
f-eoc tor "ie
� � � . - t '�"estea
' pieas contac
� rov are a
NAACP
a M I Majrtm . u'er
� t CeieSra'iO" oeflinn
� '��� b j�s'cre a'
- - � -i. a- M 1983
� -s- rx- rt s e �r Du'e
� � . e�c ig to
� ' ' � ere 'ie ser
� 'a�e place Aisoarecep
rye "eio mmecJ'aTe'y
� . tnt cease a'
xmvoreo Dy NiACP and
SURF CLUB
M ' - " 'Ke SP' ni
A � � � nursday.
a- r.OC c �
� �� Hj s' oe paid ty
� r a pess Die contest
M Jur.ig sprang Break will
ss�c nyom erest�ain
he c'ut s weicorne
NAACP
� �, - P r-rp,ng
. ajt 5 00 �"
28 A'1
�M p �ase aera Tn.s 'S a
meet
jveroge Prices
rport
20
I-STCAROLINIAN JANLARV 13. 1983
Raise Your GPA In Seven Weeks Or Less?
By STEVE DEAR
8MB Writer
A program which is
said to help raise
students grade point
averages by one quality
point is once again be-
ing offered. The pro-
gram, called
"Increasing Learning
Efficiency is being
offered free of charge
to all interested
students by the
Counseling Center.
The program will aid
students who wish to
learn the most efficeint
ways of organizing time
schedules. better
reading skills, how to
take and prepare for
tests and how to take
better notes.
"Essentially the pro-
gram teaches students
how to be good
students said Dr.
Phyllis McAllister of
the Counseling Center.
According to
McAllister, the pro-
gram has existed since
1962 when it was
Car Towing Rules To Be Enforced
By PATRICK
ON El LI
Slaff wnlci
Joe Calder, director
ot the ECU Depart-
ment of Public Safety,
has issued an early
semester warning to
ECU student, faculty
and staff to abide by
the university's policies
regarding vehicle
registration and park-
ing on university pro-
Rules Won't Force Talk
Between Parents, Youth
Continued From Page 1
of their children. I sup-
port the notion. We
would wish that parents
would be involved.
However, where
parents are not already
communicating with
the adolescents by the
age of 13 or 14, the fact
that they couldn't
receive birth control
prescriptions would not
force communication.
"The key issue is the
fantasy that you can
legislate communica-
tion. Our fear is that if
an adolescent makes a
choice to have sex, then
it is highly unlikely that
if an adolescent eirl
birth control devices,
this will stop her. This
rule will actually in-
crease the chances of
unwanted pregnan-
cies
The parental
notification require-
ment would not apply
to the giving of birth
control information,
counseling or non-
prescription contracep-
tives to minors, nor
would it apply to the
dispensing of drugs to
treat sexually transmit-
ted disease.
Under the proposed
rules, family planning
agencies receiving
federal funds under Ti-
tle Ten of the Public
Health Service Act
perty. director's office, "all
"The towing policy unregistered vehicles
regarding unregistered will be towed
vehicles is stricltly en- "I hate to give these
forced in the vicinity of towing companies any
the residence halls money Calder said,
read a memo from the "All we do is give them
the business, we don't
make any money when
a vehicle is towed and
impounded
Calder said he
wanted to remind the
students what the
policy is now, just as
the semester is beginn-
ing.
"During the first
couple of weeks of
school some students
tend to forget the
would regulations Calder
made said. Many students,
would be required to
notify a parent or guar-
dian within ten days
after a minor received a
prescription contracep-
tive or device.
Notification
have to be
through certified mail the director added, are
or in some other form not even aware of the
that could be vehicle policies.
students concerning il-
legally parked cars. "A
ticket on a vehicle
doesn't give people a
parking place Calder
said. "Students up
there really resent il-
legally parked cars
The memo from
Calder's office said
visitors are not
authorized to park in
the vicinity of the
residence halls over-
night. Visitors desiring
overnight parking per-
mits must request a
special pass from the
traffic office.
started by Dr. George
Weigand.
Last year 202
students participated in
the program.
A study conducted
by the Counseling
Center several years
ago revealed that
regular students who
participated in the pro-
gram raised their
GPA's by about one
grade point.
The program will
consist of two classes
per week for a period
of about seven weeks.
It will be offered again
in the middle of the
semester.
Two different classes
will beheld for the pro-
gram.T)r. Weigand will
teach the classes on
Mondays and
Wednesdays at I p.m.
beginning next Mon-
day. Dr. lone Ryan will
teach the classes on
Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 1 p.m.
Both groups will
meet in Wright Annex
room 305.
Students who cannot
attend the regular
classes may be helped
on an individual basis.
Also, small groups
wishing to have their
own classes conducted
at ditterent times may
do so, according to
McAllister.
The Counseling
Center is also ottering
several other programs
lor students. A two
part mini-series entitled
"How to Succeed in
College and Still Have
Fun" and "How to
Avoid Test Anxiety"
will be held on Monday
and Tuesday respec-
tively next week. Both
sessions will be con-
ducted trom 3 to 4 p.m.
in 305 Wrieht Annex.
Also, a two part
mini-series entitled
"Career by Choice no:
Chance" will be of-
fered from 3 to 5 p.m.
The first session wiii
hold classes on Jan 2-X
and Feb. 7 and the se-
cond session will hold
classes on Jan. 25 and
Feb. 8. The Strong-
Cambell Vocational In-
terest Inventory will be
administered in the first
meeting of both ses-
sions.
No advanced
registration is necessau
for any ot the pro
grams.
x v v � X � � V V s N V w vYC
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STUDENT UNION
USTCMOUNA UWVBKinr
c&rsP

documented.
Dr. Norma Lewis, a
registered nurse and a
private counselor with
Family and
Psychological Services
in Greenville, said
about the rule, "1 think
it's counterproductive
for those adolescents
who confidentiality
won't be able to be
respected. "
When the vehicle is
towed or impounded, it
will cost the driver $20
during the day and $25
at night. Additional
fees ranging from $2 to
$10 will also beassesed.
Calder noted that the
College Hill area was
frequently congested
and was the source of
many complaints from
cannot get prescription
iiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiitiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiaiiiiitiiiiiif iiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiitffiiiiiiiiiittafMfififfliiiiMfliiiitfitiuiiiiiMiaiMifiiitiiiiiiitiiitftttiuttiiiitif
JUNIORS AND SENIORS
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If you are a natrt, physics, chemistry or engineering major with a
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Or call 1-800-662-7231
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RUSH
KAPPA SIGMA
Martin Luther King Jr
Birthday Celebration
Friday, January 14, 1983
KAPPA
SIGMA
in Wright Auditorium
12:00 Until
there will be a silent tribute &
march beginning in front of the
bookstore at 12:00 the proceeding
to Wright Auditorium.
A reception will be held in the lobby
of Wright after the program.
Everyone please attend. Admission
free. Sponsored by NAACP & SOULS
THE MOST
WANTED
MAN IN THE
COUNTRY
The Brothers, Pledges & Little Sisters
of Kappa Sigma cordially invite you
to 1983 Spring Rush(beside Darryl's)
MONDAY
New Years Eve Party
TUESDAY
Orig. Las Vegas Playboy Bunny Night
Parties Begin ot 8:00-for information & rides call 752-5543
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�lii�"�





QHje iEaat (Earfllttuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, (�� vanag�
MlKfc Hl'tiHES, Uanaitiny tduor
WAVERI Ml RRITT, i . ,j Mmi,
Scott Lindi ey. � .�,
Al I AFRASHTEH, l Mmaget
Stephanii Groon, i ��.MM�,
Cl At 1 HORN ION. r�i�w S�m
Cindy Pieasants, sporU�dor
Greg Hideout, mmc
Steve Bachner, puofuumiueh
Juliana Fahrbach, �&��
Todd Evans, nwht�m Manattr
lanuan 13, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Dr. M.L.King
A Legacy OJ Spirit
It one takes the time to look
closely at history, he will notice that
despite our multitudinous volumes
of "great men and women only a
select few have affected changes
that can be deemed truly mean-
ingful, truly historic.
In spite of our misguided 20th-
century conception ot greatness, in
which we errantly equivocate the
term with the oval office, few, it
any, o our nation's leaders have
changed the course of events with
the same zeal and lasting implica-
tions as the late, great Martin
Luther King Jr.
Throughout the Sixties, King
championed the cause of racial
equality. Both his work and his
legac) of justice remain unparallel-
ed.
Unlike so many ot today's
"leaders tor whom world renown
seems, at times, the ultimate goal,
King did not aspire to greatness. His
civil concerns and battles transcend-
ed such seltish desires.
Perhaps it is all too easy tor us to
forget the days ot "whites only'
bathrooms, restaurants and water
fountains. Perhaps the days of forc-
ed low-income jobs are among those
we would all like to forget. But if in
forgetting about those days of
flagrant civil rights violations we
should torget the men and women
who affected these tremendous
changes, then surely we have forgot-
ten too much.
We do not maintain, as our pur-
pose, to bestow idealistic praise on a
"dreamer Nor do we call for a na-
tional holiday commemorating
King's birthday. Despite the ob-
vious validity of both of these, we
find our purpose more in calling to
mind the tremendous strides achiev-
ed during King's "reign
Although he devoted his life to
speeding the cause of racial equali-
ty, much of King's work was not
realized until after his tragic death
in 1968. His was, indeed, an incredi-
ble legacy a legacy of followers
and a legacy of spirit.
King fought with unmatched
strength, yet he never once raised a
hand in battle. His was a non-
violent fight, a peaceful war, waged
on the unseeing eyes, unhearing ears
and unfeeling hearts of a nation
deeply engrained in segregation and
bigotry.
Jan. 16 marks the 54th anniver-
sary o the birth of this great man.
Unfortunately, he is not
remembered in the same fashion as
many of this nation's finest leaders.
Nevertheless, through the tremen-
dous strides he inspired during his
lifetime, the spirit of his anniversary
remains a commemorative day in
the hearts of those he worked so
hard to free.
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PointCounterpoint
Reagan Sounds 'Death Knell9
By PAT O'NEILL
Last Friday's decision by the Reagan ad-
ministration to lift a five-year embargo on
arms sales to strife-torn Guatemala was an
insult to the American people and a death
knell to the Guatemalan people.
The administration claims that the
Guatemalan government has "taken
steps" to end the human rights abuses that
prompted President Carter to cut off
military aid in 1978.
Unfortunately, among human rights
groups and many United States leaders,
there is little or no agreement with these of-
ficial administration claims.
In a November report issued by the Na-
tional Council of Churches, the
Guatemalan government was accused of
"gross and consistent violations of human
rights It also claimed that the
Guatemalan army carries out
extrajudicial killings of men it identifies
as supporters of the guerrillas, using hood-
ed informers frequently in the presence of
families and neighbors of the victims
The internationally respected human
rights organization and recipient of the
1977 Nobel Peace Prize, Amnesty Interna-
tional, claims similar horrors. Al says that
the Guatemalan army under the new
government of Gen. Efrain Rios Montt has
killed more than 2,500 Indians and guer-
rillas since it came into power last March.
Rios Montt is a born-again Christian
who claims his rise to power was through
divine appointment. "We have no
scorched-earth policy he said recently.
"We have a policy of scorched com-
munists
"More accurately reports the News
and Observer, "it is a policy of killing In-
dian peasants
Gail Phares, coordinator of the Carolina
lnterfaith Task Force on Central America
(CITCA), said in this paper's Jan. 7 issue:
"Certainly the findings of the National
Council of Churches, Amnesty interna-
tional, America's Watch and the Organiza-
tion of American States Human Rights
Commission all indicate that the
Guatemalan government is carrying out a
systematic mass murder of Indian people
that makes the Beirut massacre in Lebanon
pale
Reagan, on the other hand, claims thai
Rios Montt has gotten a "bum rap" and is
convinced that the Guatemalan leader is
dedicated to progressing toward
democracy.
hither Reagan is a liar, or he doesn't
read � the American and Guatemalan
people are the ones getting the bum rap.
He's turning U.S. tax dollars into blood
money and supporting the slaughter ot the
Indian people.
What it comes don to is that the I S.
will militarily support an nation which
claims to be working against communism
regardless ot how its government treats its
own people.
Perhaps the News and Observer said it
best in its editorial of Jan. 11: "tor the
Reagan administration to believe that con-
ditions in Guatemala have been transform-
ed overnight is preposterous. I ndxMpi
Montt's boot, the'peasants have' bern
reduced to struggling for survival. It is
their plight, not the general's anti-
communism, that should bring aid from
America
Arms Embargo Lift A Blessing
By KEITH BRITTAIN
The current goal of the Reagan ad-
ministration is to preserve democracy in
Central America. Democracy in this region
is threatened by an ever-growing menace to
freedom: the Soviet Union.
Guatemala, hi Salvador and Honduras
are literally fighting for their survival
against the Marxist countries of Nicaragua
and Cuba, the training grounds for com-
munist guerrillas.
The Soviet Union's latest vie for Central
America is a classic example of their motus
operendi for subjugation. Cuban radio
belts forth great tales of human rights
violations in these countries. No one can
deny that there have been human rights
violations to a certain extent. Presidents
Montt of Guatemala and Magana of El
Salvador have taken steps to end these ac-
tions. The greatest and most flagrant ex-
amples of human rights violations,
though, are perpetrated by the communist
guerrillas.
Recently in El Salvador, four com-
munist rebels dressed, of course, like
Salvadoran National Guardsmen, killed
four civilians and wounded three others.
Last November, 200 civilians were kidnap-
ped to be "re-educated
The current Soviet imperialism is Cen-
tral America is accompanied by well-
planned propaganda. The pro-Soviet
groups are taught to invent great accounts
of human rights violations by the anti-
communist governments. These
democracies are also unjustly assaulted by
peace groups and other anti-American
organizations.
The Carolina lnterfaith Task Force on
Central America follows Cuba and
Nicaragua in condemning the anti-Soviet
countries. One should notice that "human
rights" groups, such as CITCA, only
criticize pro-U.S. countries such as El
Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. They
are never appalled by Marxist countries
like Nicaragua.
Communist rebels took over the country
in 1979. They were promised reforms and
free elections. The elections have now been
"put off" until 1986. In 1986, the elections
will be "put off" again. Soviet tyranny has
no room for free elections.
Central America is being slowly engulf-
ed by the Soviet menace. The Reagan ad-
ministration is supplying weapons to
democracies to fend off the fetid cancer
that is trying to strangle the people. Com-
munists have even infiltrated the Catholic
Church in Guatemala. Hundreds have left
Catholicism to join the Evangelist Church.
Sister Helen Shondell is the local
spokesperson against U.S. military in-
volvement in Central America. Do these
leftists realize this would result in Soviet
domination of Central America? Maybe
so.
The national security of the United
States can only be maintained by a free
Central America. This huge land mass
would serve as a launching pad for a Soviet
invasion of the U.S.
President Cordova of Honduras is
assisting Washington in preventing the
flow of arms from Nicaragua to El
Salvadoran rebels. Cordova recently
stated, "through a mutual effort, Hon-
duras and the United States will thwart and
eventually stop the torturing and killings
by the communist guerrillas
The White House is concerned about the
people of the war-torn region. In hi
Salvador, for example, farmers' crops are
regularly burned by the rebels. Leftist and
communist sympathizers in the American
news media would have us believe that the
people welcome the guerrillas. This is, to
say the least, an untruth. The rebels do not
bring reform; they bring only death and
destruction. It is simply not safe to wander
the streets at night for fear of rebel attacks.
Thank God we have a president who is
determined to halt and destroy the Soviet
"liberation" of Central America. These
countries need American military arms to
fight for their freedom. Peace can be
achieved with Russia by only one means �
a superior U.S. military. The Soviets
understand force only, and force is what it
will take to drive the Godless, communist
hordes from our southern neighbor. Let us
never allow Central America to be sub-
jugated in the grandiose tradition of
Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary.
NCAA Academic Revisions Necessary To
Put 'College' Back Into Collegiate Sports
By MIKE HUGHES
Nearly 100 presidents of NCAA Divi-
sion I schools are meeting this week in San
Diego to discuss academic requirements
and achievement among today's collegiate
athletes. Thus far, two academic resolu-
tions, or proposals, have been passed,
despite opposition from the leaders of a
few predominantly black institutions.
Under one adopted measure, prospec-
tive college athletes must graduate high
school with a 2.0 grade-point average on a
four-point scale in a core curriculum of 11
basic academic courses (including English,
mathematics and science). In addition, this
"Proposal 48" sets forth a minimum SAT
combined score of 700 for incoming
freshman athletes.
Also adopted was Motion 56, which
basically calls for studentathletes to show
"satisfactory progress" in academics while
attending college.
As simple as these resolutions may seem,
Proposal 48 has already created a tremen-
dous uproar in an otherwise sedate con-
ference. Apparently, the leaders of several
schools feel their sports programs
somehow rise above academia and are
somewhat threatened by an upgrade in
academic standards. Also apparent is that
they have forgotten the primary role of an
institution of higher learning.
Personally, I'm glad the presidents
voted in the changes. The NCAA's
priorities have long been in need of major
revisions (actually reversions). And if
Division-I sports action suffers as a result,
then perhaps it was never meant to reach
the level of professionalism we've all
grown accustomed to.
Granted, playing sports while attending
college is, to say the least, difficult,
especially today, when scholarship com-
petition is so fierce. But the lax regulations
that have governed the NCAA's admission
and retention standards in recent years are,
at best, a mere sham.
Unlike the unfounded fears of the select
few at the conference, the NCAA's new
regulations governing college athlete
recruitment arc a necessary first step in the
realization of academic superiority in the
nation's institutions of higher learning. It's
high time they put the "college" back into
intercollegiate sports.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN MNUARV II. M3
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and force is what it
jodless. communist
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ind Hungarv.
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suffers as a result,
per meant to reach
nalism we've all
s vvhile attending
I 'east, difficult,
scholarship com-
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NCAA's admission
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By EMILY CASEY
Suit H n 1, f
The hast Carolinian
received an outstanding
service award, and five
tCU students were
Newspaper
awarded scholarships
at a meeting of the
Mental Health Associa-
tion of Pitt County
Tuesday.
"Throughout the
year The hast Caroli-
nian has written articles
which have promoted
mental health
awareness in the com-
munity, " said Ex-
ecutive Director Brenda
Gray. The newspaper,
by its reporting, has
helped to "break down
the stigma that is attat-
ched to mental health"
ECU Clinical
Psychology student
Laurel Hill, a nurse and
mother of three
children, was the reci-
pient of the $500-David
Gun Guru From Durham Arrested
ROANOKh, Va
(UPI) - a 64-year-old
self-proclaimed faith
healer and exorcist who
asked his Hock to bring
him guns as an offering
has been indicted on
federal firearms
charges.
Gus Mickens Jr a
retired tobacco worker
from Durham, N.C
printed handbills call-
ing himself "Chief
Bishop of the House of
Bethlehem Wearing
headbands, beads and
robes, he held prayer
services in his house �
casting out demons, lif-
ting spells and healing
the sick.
"That's why the peo-
ple come to me,
because I heal them
Mickens told United
Press International in a
telephone interview.
"If some people believe
they have evil demons
in them, you can pray
with them and that's
something that a doctor
cannot do
Mickens said people
wanted to pay him for
his services, and he in-
vited them to bring him
gifts.
"I'm a preacher, but
I love guns he said.
"I did ask them to br-
ing me guns
A U.S. District
Court grand jury in
Roanoke indicted
Mickens Wednesday on
26 counts of procuring
and transporting
weapons across state
lines without a license.
Assistant U.S. At-
torney Tom Bondurant
said that between 1977
and 1979 Mickens ask-
ed six members of his
flock from the Dan-
ville, Va area to buy
and bring him han-
dguns, specifying the
brand and caliber, for
payment of many of
these exorcisms
Mickens would fire
the weapons across a
running stream to
frighten away evil
spirits, Bondurant said,
then throw the weapon
�.�.
into the water to con-
clude the ceremony.
At least one of the
guns resurfaced in New
York state, where it
was used in a crime.
"That's a long way
upstream Bondurant
noted.
Mickens said he
didn't know how the
gun reached New York,
though he said he had
given away some
weapons and others
had been stolen. He
denied that he used
guns in his rituals.
Although he is only
charged with firearms
violations, Bondurant
said members of
Mickens' church have
W. Hardec Scholarship
Award. She is describ-
ed by Dr. Rosina C.
Lao, the chairperson in
the psychology depart-
ment, as an outstan-
ding student who has
been interested in men-
tal health for many
years.
Four other ECU
women students from
the nursing and music
therapy departments
won awards of $250
under the Hardee
scholarship. Dr. Ruth
Boxbegger, director of
the music therapy pro-
gram, presented two of
the awards to students
Vanessa Parker and
Celeste Heath. Boxbeg-
ger remarked that both
Parker.a senior, and
Heath, a junior, were
excellent students who
are very active. She said
both women took part
m volunteer work and
m the pro-
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Downtown
acknowledged paying
him for his services in
cash, jewelry and even
cattle. Some gave him
thousands of dollars,
Bondurant said.
Mickens poured oint-
ments on his followers
as "a special bath" to
heal them and chanted
incantations to remove
evil spells, Bondurant
said.
One of Micken's
former followers, who
asked not to be iden-
tified, said, "At first I
thought it was helping,
then I stopped going
he would ask us to give
him our rings
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g Clarence Seay; Bass
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excelled
gram.
Emiiie Henning,
dean of the school of
nursing, presented
graduate students
Elizabeth Sauter and
Yvonne Smith with
$250 Hardee scholar
ships. Both women
have shown "great pro-
mise" in the communi-
ty mental health nurs-
ing graduate program,
said Dr. Dixie Koljeski,
director of the pro-
gram. "Both are in-
terested in community
mental health and will
surely make positive
contributions in the
region
Gray specifically
noted four stories that
appeared in The East
Carolinian in 1982, as
being helpful and infor-
mative on the mental
health issue.
Gray mentioned that
the most recent
coverage gave the Men-
tal Health Association
was on their Operation
Santa Claus program in
December.The outstan-
ding service award was
presented to The East
Carolinian "in recogni-
tion of its outstanding
volunteer leadership in
the behalf of the men-
tally ill
"We were honored
and delighted to receive
the Mental Health
Association's achieve
ment award said The
East Carolinian general
manager Fielding
Miller. "Our editors,
writers and other
employees work very
hard to both report the
news and provide a ser
vice to ECU and the
Greenville communi-
ty
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I BREAKFAST BAR OFFERINGS!
1 Sigji" E99� � Homemade Buttermilk B.scu.ts � Bacon
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5H0NEY&
MONDAY-FRIDAY
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SATURDAY-SUNDAY
4 HOLIDAYS
6:00 AM -2 00 P M
Kappa Alpha
500 E. 11th St.
Call 758 8999
To all interested men
January 13, 1983
You have probably been at East Carolina long enough to notice that
the fraternities here are very diverse in their organization and
membership. Although we won't argue the fact that fraternities
aren't for everybody, the ones at ECU do offer something for a varie
ty of seriously interested students. With rush starting next week, all
the fraternaties will be making a concentrated effort to induce you to
pledge at their house rather than any other. This letter is to offer a lit
tie guidance and to tell you what to look out for.
The most important thing is to visit every house. Don't make the
mistake of deciding to pledge at the first house you go to. Be sure to
meet as many of the members of the fraternity as possible. Too often,
a guy pledges a fraternity after meeting only a few people. Be sure to
see if you like ALL of them because ALL of them will be your f raterni
ty brothers. Another cosideration is the fraternity house itself, is it
reasonably clean and in good repair? is there room for you to park?
Is the house close enough to campus? Would you be ashamed to take
your parents there? These things are important because there's a
strong chance that you'll live there one day.
Even though these above considerations are important, many
rushees simply join the fraternity which they think is best, it is up to
you to decide which is best for you. Kappa Alpha offers the interested
college man membership in one of the country's oldest most
prestigous fraternities. Since 1865, KA has been among the leaders on
campuses throught the United States.
Kappa Alpha Order is the oldest fraternity at ECU and has con
sistently enjoyed the popularity of being one of the school's finest
organizations. Since September 26, 1958, KA has maintained the
highest or been among the highest standards in scholarship, service
to the community and charitable organizations, intramural sports
competition, and social stature with the other fraternities and the
sororities. Our records spek for themselves.
Every fraternity will tell you that theirs is best, if you're planning
on joining a good fraternity, be sure of what you're getting. We at
Kappa Alpha are sure that you will make a careful evaluation of the
various aspects of fraternity life before making a decision. Come by
during rush and let us tell and show you why we think KA stands out
from the rest and is wortff your consideration.
i The Brothers of Gamma Rho
Chapter of Kappa Alpha Order
RUSH MON-WED 8:30

�� 4 ��. � .n v v





I EAS1 C A KOI INI AS
JANUARY 13. 198
Green Alters Senate Set Up
RALEIGH, NX.
(UP1) � With the
General Assembly's
opening day. It. Gov.
James C. Green made
revisions in the Senate
committee structure.
Green reduced the
size of some commit-
tees Wednesday and
placed them under
"umbrella commit-
tees
"It's very much like
what they do in Con-
gress Green said. As
an example, he said the
Constitutional Amend-
ments Committee will
be part of the Senate
Judiciary 11 Commit-
tee.
Constitutional issues
must pass the commit-
tee and the full
judiciary panel before
they can be sent to the
full Senate. Green said,
so the Constitutional
Amendments panel
should not be con-
sidered a subcommit-
tee.
Green announced all
of his committee ap-
pointments during the
opening session of the
Senate, while House
Speaker Liston
Beer Company Accused
Of Racial Discrimination
Continued From Page 1
all He also pointed
out Anheuser-Busch is
a member oi the Na-
tional Association for
the Advancement of
Colored People, and at
the national level,
Anheuser-Busch gives
money to black com-
munities. Via did admit
that blacks do in tact
own only three out ol
the 960 distributorships
in the I'nited S:aes,
but he repeatedthat's
based on ability to buy,
not because oi race
Via said an
Anheuser-Busch
distributorship usually
costs between one
million and two million
dollars. P.SH claims
that out of 250 top
positions in ten of the
company's breweries,
PUSH was unable to
identity even three
blacks.
PISH claims blacks
constitute more than
twice the company's
margin of profit. They
are at present ready to
release a list which
would identify 100
blacks who were in-
terested and financially
capable of owning an
Anheuser-Busch
distributorship.
Chalmers claims that
black people are
"always getting the
short end of the stick
and that all the Alphas
want is for companies
like Anheuser-Busch to
be fair to blacks. The
Alphas are encouraging
students to not use the
products of any com-
panies who have been
unwilling to work with
the PUSH fair share ef-
forts. They plan to con-
tinue their efforts
throughout the week at
the Student Supply
Store.
Ramsey, D-Madison,
named six House com-
mittees, including the
major money commit-
tees.
Sen. Harold Har-
dison, D-l.enoir, was
appointed chairman of
the Senate Appropria-
tions Committee, while
Sen. Robert Jordan,
D-Montgomery, and
Sen. Elton Edwards,
D-Guilford, were nam-
ed co-chairman of the
Base Budget Commit-
tee.
Jordan was Base
Budget Committee
chairman in the 1981
session; Edwards, a
close political ally of
Green's, returned to
the Legislature this year
after an absence of
about 10 years.
Ramsey reappointed
his Appropriations and
Base Budget chairmen
from the 1981 session.
Rep. William Watkins,
D-Granville, and Rep.
Allen Adams, D-Wake.
The Base Budget
committees are respon-
sible for screening re-
quests to continue fun-
ding for existing state
programs, while the
Appropriations com-
mittees consider money
requests for new or ex-
panded programs.
Green also named
co-chairman for the
five committees ex-
pected to face heavy
workloads this session.
In addition to the Base
Budget Committee,
they are the Finance,
Local Government,
State Government and
Ways and Means com-
mutes.
The major commit-
tee chairmanships an-
nounced by Green
were:
Appropriations:
Harold Hardison,
D-Lenoir; Banking:
James Edwards,
D-Caldwell; Base
Budget: Robert Jor-
dan, D-Montgomery,
and Elton Edwards,
D-Guilford; Educa-
tion: James Speed,
D-Franklin; Finance.
Marshall Rauch,
D-Gaston, and Conrad
Duncan,
D-Rockingham; Higher
Education: Lura Tally,
D-Cumberland; in-
surance: Cecil Jenkins,
DCabarrus; Judiciary
I: Julian Allsbrook,
D-Halifax; Judiciary
II: R.C. Soles,
D-Columbus; Constitu-
tional Amendments:
Helen Marvin,
D-Gaston; Judiciary
III, Henson Barnes,
D-W'ayne; Law En-
forcement andCriminal
Justice: Anthony
Rand.
Do You Frequent
The
Library?
He
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IERGENT
td III
THE EAST I AROL1N1AN
Style
JANUARY 13. 1983 Page 7
Heated Debate Reveals
Ideological Extremism
By ERNEST L. CONNER
Msffttriirr
"The liberal cause on campus isn't really liberal. It's
more ultra-liberal
"I think conservatives are a dying, fading cause
Thank God
These are basically two sides of the political spectrum
on campus that express their beliefs through the media
� the conservative orientation and the liberal orienta-
tion. The majority of ECU students probably find
themselves somewhere between these two points, but
they often see the two sides presented in The East
Carolinian and other media on campus.
Patrick O'Neill, a staff writer for The East Caroli-
nian, normally espouses the liberal view through his ar-
ticles and opinion columns. O'Neill finds a frequent
critic of his articles in Dennis Kilcoyne, president of the
College Republican Club on campus and author of fre-
quent letters to the editor of The East Carolinian.
The two have differing opinions on practically every
topic, including the cause represented by each other.
Kilcoyne doesn't feel either cause is to active on campus
because of the tremendous amount of student apathy.
But he states, the liberal cause isn't really liberal, it is
more ultra-liberal. "This is obvious Kilcoyne ex-
plains, 'from the liberal opinion makers and the issues
they are always talking about � nuclear freeze and
American imperialism
O'Neill claims the conservative cause on campus is a
dying cause. "1 also feel it's generally a non-cause,
because, basically it has so little visable or vocal
representation here at ECU said O'Neill. "It appears
to me he added, "that, save a few individuals, the
conservatives are generally an apathetic lot.
"For a campus where a person with a political views
of John East came out of. it appears surprising to me,
that the conervative voice is so silent O'Neill said.
"It's almost to the point where there isn't one
Their differing opinions only start with thte causes.
On the Reagan administration's cutting of social pro-
blems, while building up the defense, Kilcoyne sees this
as having positive effects on the country.
"The real problem for the last 40 years has been the
liberal economics Democrats practiced. It was good
because it brought immediate short-term results. People
would be happy and say Til vote for the guy because he
helped me But the long-term problem turned out to
hurt the nation.
"Supply side economics were not always politically
attractive because the short-term effects were so bad.
Supply side economics are troubling us now, but in the
long run, I honestly believe, it will help the country
O'Neill says there are many inefficiencies in the
operation of some United States social programs, but
adds, "this is absolutely nothing compared to the multi-
billion dollar waste that is in the present defense
budget
O'Neill can't talk about the economic problems of the
United States without expading in to the danger and
cost of nuclear weapons and the U.S. war machine.
"Reagan is trying to convince us that if we buld up our
nuclear capabilities, which are already at insane levels,
we will actually be more secure. This kind of mentality
is like saying more death is needed for life. The Reagan
Administration is willing to sacrifice the lives of millions
of people, here at home, and throughout the world, so
the U.S. can build more bombs
Kilcoyne defends the defense build up saying that "in
the past, the actual percent of the budget taken up by
defense was higher. Under Kennedy it ws 49 percent. It
will peak with Reagan at 23 percent.
Kilcoyne also feels strongly that the buildup is
something that had to be done for a long time. "We
unilaterally froze our nuclear weapons, back during the
Johnson administration. Our's declined while the
Soviet's built up. This is a major threat to world peace
and stability because of Soviet imperialism
O'Neill and Kilcoyne, who are both Catholic, but
with differing philosophies toward their religion, would
also take different approaches in solving America's cur-
rent economic and social problems. Kilcoyne, a native
of Greenville thinks the economical problem is difficult,
but that we need to stick to supply side economics for a
long time and let the market place handle the problem.
"It's been proben to be the best in the past. I believe it
will do it again explains Kilcoyne.
The 26-year-old O'Neill would ideally like to see the
Pentagon abolished to lower the national debt. But
See DEBATE, Page 8
N.C. Dance Theatre 'Sparkling, Forceful, Talented'
Members of the North Carolina Dance Theatre (above) perform to Keith Emerson's Piano Concerto
Wi. The company will perform at 8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre on Wednesday. Jan. 19. The have been
called "equally comfortable in ballet and modern dance sparkling forceful full of assurance
talented as all get out For ticket information, call the Central Ticket Office in Mender.hall Stu-
dent Center at 757-6611, ext. 266. The performance is part of the '83 Theatre Arts Series
Fighting For A Cause
"Xp&hjpp,
Mayer's Monumental Threat Not Mad
Going Down That 'Rocky'Road
Going off to training camp, Rocky (Sylvester Stallone) and
Adrian (Talia Shire) bid a tender farewell to their son, Rocky II
(Ian Fried), as Paulie (Burt Young) and Apollo Creed (Carl
Weathers) look on in Rocky III. The film will be shown in the
Hendrix Theatre this Thursday at 7 p.m. only, and this Friday
and Saturday at 5, 7 and 9 p.m. Admission is by student ID and
activity card or MSC membership for faculty and staff. The
movie is sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee.
This is the first of two parts.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Sun Writer
"Everyone agrees that it is wrong to
make threats with a ton of TNT �
yet as we stand here today there is 3
ton of TNT pointed at the heads of
every child, women and man on the
earth
The same week that (Norman)
Mayer made his insane threat just
across this little patch of ground the
public servants in Congress
authorized a Pentagon budget of
$233 billion. Do we really need to
ask ourselves which is the greater �
that is, the more profound insani-
ty
(A quote read at the Washington
Monument on December 29 by a
group of peace activists who were
holding a memorial service for Nor-
man Mayer.)
"He gave me a purpose to live
said William Thomas speaking
about his personal friend Norman
Mayer who was shot to death last
month by federal police on the
grounds of the Washington monu-
ment after he had told police and
the news media that the truck he had
parked near the base of the structure
was filled with explosives.
Mayer had told the news media
that he was going to blow-up the
monument as a protest against the
nuclear arms race. Instead Mayer
was shot to death while presumably
attempting to flee the scene. No
dynamite was ever found.
Most of the press coverage of the
Washington Monument incident
depicted Mayer as a sick man who
just went too far. But to Thomas,
Mayer was not insane at all, but
rather a quite sane friend whom
Thomas had a great admiration and
respect for.
Shortly after his death, Thomas
wrote a letter to the Washington
Post responding to a story they ran
about Mayer on their front page.
Thomas wrote "Which is greater:
Man or Masonary?" on the top of
the letter. "While many consider
Norman to have been, at lest, eccen-
tric, at this late date it is interesting
to note how few clearly see the ab-
surdity of society mirrowed in Nor-
man's 'irrational' action Thomas
commented in his letter.
Thomas, like Mayer, sees the ef-
fort to end the current nuclear arms
race as the "Number one priority"
of the world. Mayer had similar
words printed on a sign which was
attached to the truck he drove to the
monument.
Thomas presently lives in well
constructed wooden box located
right smack in front of the White
House. Each day he displays a series
of signs decrying the nuclear arms
race while dozens of tourists stop to
take pictures and ask him questions.
He has been doing this for the last
18 months except for the several oc-
cassions he has been arrested and
charged with camping without a
permit.
Norman Mayer spent many hours
and many days with Thomas outside
the White House before he was kill-
ed. "He used to come here everyday
and spend several hours talking to
me Thomas told the East Caroli-
nian, "I understood Norman.
Nobody else would pay any atten-
tion to him
Thomas, who keeps multiple
copies of Mayer's writings, claims
him as a man who saw an evil and
tried his best to respond to it.
In his writings Mayer wrote "stop
looking for governments to resolve
our nuclear weapons pro-
blems Universal survivial is not
the chief goal of any government.
Yet universal survval is the chief
problem of the nuclear age
Mayer went on to write that
"only the individual can create a
climate in which probable nuclear
holocaust can be resolved He
(perhaps an indication f what pro-
mpted Mayer to his final action)
also spoke of the need for each in-
dividual to "speak to the problem
from hisher own point of view
Mayer also authored a paper titl-
ed "Norman's ten laws of reality"
which Thomas now quotes from
often.
Thomas recalled the day when
Mayer told him that he had an idea
which he would tell him about
shortly. A few days passed in which
Mayer made no other remarks
about his "idea But finally,
Mayer decided he was ready to share
his plan with Thomas He told me
he was going to get a ton of
dynamite and take out one of the
sacred icons Thomas said quoting
the conservation that followed. "I
told him that Nuclear Weapons
were a product of violence
Thomas also warned Mayer that
innocent people could be killed by
such an act, but at first Mayer
believed that some sacrifice of
human life would be acceptable.
Newman Gives Strong
Performance In Drama
Paul Newman recently won a major stock car race,
driving a 280ZX for the Datsun factory team. A top-
ranked world class amateur race driver, the victory was
unusual only in one respect: several days earlier,
Newman had broken his leg while joggiug and was com-
peting in the race with a cast on his foot � which had to
be taped to the gas pedal. Hobbling to the winner's cir-
cle, he quipped, "I've gotta give up those dangerous
sports like jogging
Five-time Academy Award nominee, skilled
athlete, longtime crusader for human rights and nuclear
disarmament, actor-director-producer Paul Newman
has no intention of giving up jogging or anything else.
Commitment and determination have marked the rise of
this son of a Cleveland sporting goods merchant from
his modest midwest origins to his status as one of the
world's best known and most respected actors. And the
opportunity to convey the heart and soul of a man
similarly driven and determined was what drew him to
the role of Frank Galvin in 20th Century Fox's The Ver-
dict (now in its fourth week at Greenville's Plaza
Cinema).
A ZanuckBrown Production, directed by Sidney
Lumet and co-starring Charlotte Rampiing, Jack
Warden and James Mason, The Verdict is a story of one
man's redemption and its impact on the lives of those
who, willingly or not, become a part of that process.
Frank Galvin is an embittered, ambulance-chasing
Boston attorney whose once-promising career is now
scrapping the bottom of the barrel and whose once
idealistic view of the world is now only a blur from the
bottom of a bottle.
"It's a very interesting character for me Newman
expalins, "because unlike Cool Hand Luke, Butch
Cassidy or some of the others who were the cool col-
lected types, he's frightened. He's living on the edge and
he's panicked. There are people who really do find their
lives in a shambles and decide they don't like it. Some
just continue to degenerate and some, like Galvin, can
pick themselves up.
"I rather hope that the audience will come away from
this having seen or partially experienced the emotional
progression that the character goes through the actor
comments.
Sidney Lumet directing veteran actor Paul Newman to possibly his best performance in sew film The Verdict.
2





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 13, 1983
'Clog NighV Slated Debate Ra�eS
To Aid Palsy Center
By MIKE HAMMER
ECU's Occupational
Therapy Student
Association is holding a
"Learn To Clog Nite"
benefit for Greenville's
United Cerebral Palsy
Center on Tuesday
evening, Jan. 18, at the
Carolina Opry House.
"The Hometown
Boys" will be providing
the music for the even-
ing. The Hometown
Boys play bluegrass,
old-time, and western
swing music and have
played many concerts
and dances in the area
in the past four years.
They recently backed
up bluegrass recording
artist, Mac Wiseman.
Theresa Dulski, a
student in occupational
therapy student
association said that
the group decided to
have this benefit at the
Carolina Opry House
not only to raise money
for a worthy cause but
to have a fun night do-
ing it also.
"As a student Oc-
cupational Therapist, I
have worked here in
Greenville with the
United Cerebral Palsy
Center and have seen
the amazing work that
can be done for the
children said Dulski.
"You can see the ex-
pressions of apprecia-
tion on the faces of the
children
The doors will open
at the Opry House at
7:30 p.m tickets are
$2.
Continued From Page 7
"realistically speak-
ing" the New York
native advocates
"adopting a proposal
of high percentage
reductions in the U.S.
nuclear weapons pro-
gram, thereby freeing
up many billions of
dollars to create jobs in
the civilian sector
This, along with a
creating human needs
programs, would ac-
cording to O'Neill, go a
long way toward solv-
ing America's current
economic problems.
Both O'Neill and Kil-
coyne try various
means to get their posi-
tions across. O'Neill
does this by the nature
of the stories he writes.
Unless assigned a par-
ticular story, O'Neill
normally writes on
topics he is deeply con-
cerned with, such as
nuclear disarmament,
world hunger, minority
rights and etcetera.
This frequently leads to
criticism by his op-
ponents. This criticism
is not confined to KiT-
coyne. Privately, Keith
Britian, a staff writer
for "The East Caroli-
nian" and treasurer of
the College
Republicans on cam-
pus, frequently voices
criticism of O'Neill's
position on many
issues. And during the
last two school elec-
tions, there have been
candidates running for
office on a platform
that calls for O'Neill's
removal from the
paper. However, these
have been candidates
who typically lose.
O'Neill doesn't agree
with this 'Dennis isn't
conservative, he's
ultra-conservative.
He's as far to the right
as I am to the left. In a
sense, he's a radical as
Patrick O'Neill This
O'Neill believes is one
of the reasons, the con-
servative following on
campus isn't larger.
Trxrs 7 RM, Fri & Sat 5,7,9 RM Hencrix Theatre
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sailing and flying clubs. Full medical,
dental, unlimited sick leave, 30 days
annual paid vacation, post grad
education programs and retirement in 20
years!
JOB
?oTitions �rt still available in the
following areas: Management (technical
and non-technical), Engineering,
Nuclear, Teaching, Intelligence,
Aviation Management, Diving, Pilots,
Finance, Personnel Management.
If you're interested in finding out
�ore, see the Navy Officer Programs
Team. They'll be on campus 18-20
January at the Book Store. IT you can't
it, send" your resume or transcripts
3
1
make
to:
kcs kisoji suan
10P1 lavatw Dr.
Raleigh, K 27009
Or call l-aO0-tt-TOl
JtHWtttllHIIMIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIHtHltlllllHIIIIIItllllllltHniHtdOWttlllMMIlM
PRESBYTERIAN
CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Meeting in the Methodist Student Center
501 East Fifth Street
752-7240 Stewart LaNeave
759-0145 Campus Minister
TUESDA Yii at 12:30 p.m. STAtt-FALUL TY LUNCH at MENDENHALL BUFFET
TUESDA YS at 5:30 p.m. PKOGHAM and SUPPER for STUDENTS � $2.00 for meal
We meet Jir st for program at the Methodist Student Center.
Spring Study on Peace. Justice and Ethical Issues
January 11 � Margaux's March 1 -
January 1 � Siechuan Garden March 15
January 25 � Marathon March 22
February 1 � Sweet Carolines March 29
February 8 � Parker's April 5 �
February 15 � Pizza Hut April 12
February 22 � Four Seasons April 19
- Margaux's
� Szechuan Garden
� Marathon
� Sweet Carolines
Parker's
- Four Seasons
- Pizza Hut
WEDNESDAYS front 12:20-1:30 p.m. GRAD. STUDENT LUNCH AT
MEN DEN HA L L SNA CK BA R
We'll gather at one of the round tables.
THURSDA YS from 11:45-1:30 p.m. HOT DOG LUNCH in the GROUND LEVEL of
the METHODIST CENTER, 50C each.
THURSDA YS at 8:00 p.m. FREE MOVIE at METHODIST STUDENT CENTER
January 13 � Heaven Can Wait
January 20 � All The President's Men
January 27 � The Four Seasons
February 3 � Charly
February 10 � Being There
February 17 � Cool Hand Luke
February 24 � Arthur
March 3 � On Golden Pond
March 17 � To Kill a Mockingbird
March 31 � Rollover
April 7 � Whose Life Is It Anyway
April 14 � To Be Announced
April 21 � One Flew Over a Cuckoo's Nest
COME JOIN WITH US �
FELLOWSHIP FOOD DISCUSSION
Attend weakly worship services at First Presbyterian, 14th & Elm Street, or
any of the other area churches.
Plan early to be � part of the fall retreat to Washington, o. C. on March 24-27
to look into how religion influences the American Political Process. We will
be staying at the Pilgrimage next to the Church of the Pilgrims, 2201 P
Street, N. W.
PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY
A NNO UNCESITS
ANNUAL FALL RUSH
Where toGo
WhenYJotrre in a Rush,
'v

I'i Kappa iliilrau-rnitx
803 Hooker Rd.
Come out and party with us by the Lake
JAN. 17-20 � All party'sbegin at 8:30
Come out and feel the excitement!
Ic
is

5
-
Lad)
i
atio
rU Kr S

I i

began Dec
beer, vei
. . -
I
-
-
"h
V
-

I
v �
National (
Law 3
Man Deakter is
the countrv






I HI I XM . Ki M INI X
Sports
AM AK
! � y
Ice-Cold Pirates Scalped By Indians
Bv�v
PI I
�sN Is
�n ai
. j
ouch
1
-
VI - a �'
unfortunate!).
te Wednesday
askt �
I . a I
I ' esn'i
hai this
. almost
the tiisi six
t Bucs held
am 1
16 remaining,
. fOI
ai Ind
si
Bai � Wrij
two, and Bi
pei to keer
behind, 16 -

bd
as
ki Oi I he
Ull w nh
And without both oi then leading
rebounders on the court, the Pirates
lacked the strength needed undei the
basket W&M took advantage and
pulled ahead, 24-19, with 4:24 on
the dock
Sophomore Bruce Peartree and
Wright then joined forces, scoring
the next eight points in two jump-
shots eat h.
Bui W&M's loin I raver, a 6-3
guard, made three baskets to keep
the Indians up, 26 2 right
lollowed by picking up two fouls to
put W&M on the foul line, and
Bi ice Peat tree swished a jumpshot
to make the halftime score, 50 25, in
favoi ol the Indians.
I he Pirates shot 47.8 percenl in
the first period, while the Indians
were 12 tor 24 from the flooi to
give them a 50-percent shooting
average In rebounding, W&M
dominated, grabbing 17 rebounds to
ECL's eight.
With 4,700 spectators cheering
them on, the Pirates came out play-
ing a one defense auA using a full-
courl press as two oi then strategies
to slow down and stop the Indians'
shooting abilities
But b this time, 6-5 forward
Kevin Richardson was jus! getting
warmed up Richardson sank two
baskets ,ir,d along with haver, the
twosome pushed the Indians' lead to
J7 29 with 16:03 remaining
Edwards then picked up his
fourth foul, and freshman David
Harris came ofl the bench to take
his plat e
1 he Indians i. ontinued to build
their lead, with Richardson hitting
two straight jumpshots to give the
Indians a 48 ?3 advantage. Harrison
.ailed a timeout. nd Peartree,
who hasn't been playing well during
the past two weeks, came back out
on the courl and knocked in two
2(i tool jumpshots to revive the
Pirates But Peartree's efforts were
in vam.
W&M coach Bruce Parkhiil called
a timeout with 10:31 left, and the
Indians continued to improve their
lead, much to Harrison's disap-
pointment
"They had two possessions and
two shots and then the go down
and say 'oh hell, its not gonna hap-
pen Harrison said.
I tie Indians wound up on the
freethrow line three times m the next
two minutes, sinking live baskets to
gam a 64 41 lead. ECU was seven
tor 24 from the floor at this point.
and had not scored a single point in
the last three minutes ol plav
Harrison almost cleared his bench
entirely in the final minutes of the
ballgame. Ihe Indians, however,
relied on their starters and scored
consistently to maintain a distant
lead
I rise W
Lady Pirates To Battle
ationalty-Ranked ODU
Hv Kt S KOI ION
-
MMH
TV
ent while ndrui racked up
100th win in a six-yeai coacl
careei
� uno �� 1 his year's team has shown im-
: . la month- provement since the firsi game of
p Nor the yeai
"Oui team performance is con-
oi taking tinually improving; we're still .
' � ; : Domi- positive about thai ndruzzi
fated "Howev ei. 1 feel that in
lei foi us to hold our owi: � st
" ' ' 5-5 the tough competition, we have to
ork harder in every game
-��' "N Dame, has So tar this season, the Lady
tive to: the I aJ. Pirates have been riding on ihe
shoulders Oi senior Center Mary
ip was certainly a Denkler.
experience foi our Denkler, who is averaging 24.6
h we points and 7.8 rebounds per game.
good is thud on the all-time Il scoring
ad list behind Debbie Freeman and
Rosie I homnson
� irpnsed. Her 24.6 scoring average current-
aware oi the y leaves her fourth in the nation in
�mpetition we would scoring.
Sophomore point-guard Loraine
proved ai Fostei is averaging 15.5 points and
are capable oi coming 4.8 assists per outing. Only in her se-
cond vear, Foster is currently 11th
4 n the all-time ECU assist, and
' rial steaU charts.
cason games and turn 5 4 guard Delphine Mabry, the
"Rocky Mount Rocket is thud on
es tor the the team in scoring and rebounding
ach Hit team made even though she is the shortest
: 32 invited to the member oi the squad
x A men'? Ba � Mabry, who is a 1984 Olympic
Championshj tourna- hopeful in track, is considered one
Pbolo B. DAVfl Wll I IAMS
Mar Denkler is now tied for fourth place among women's scorers in
the counfrv.
Ihe Pirates shot 27.8 percent
from the floor to give them an
overall average of 35.6 percent. The
Indians made 16 of 29 shots for a
55.2 percent average in the second
halt, shooting 2.8 percent
game W&M out-rebounded the
Pirates. 39 to 26
Wright led the Bu.s with IK
points, while Peartree pumped in 10
points and Thorn Brown had eigl
Foi the Indians, Traver popped in
13 points, Richardson and Bi
Weiner each had 12. Keith Ciepli �
knocked in II and Mike Strayh
scored 10 points.
Harrison named several fac
which contributed to the Pirates'
conference loss. "We weren't rea
to plav he said. "We knew they
were a very good shooting team, I
we should have been able to s1
them
tioned dnd we :
I osing (ireci
piaving time of Edv
two major fa ;
Han (ireen �-
minimum of three �� ks and
x-rayed today to n :�
doesn't have ai � fi
really a sha Hai
"He was playiru.
of his life right n
Hai i said � � �
going i
said his team
defei e've �
for a
he sa "I
- .
wroi
fensivelv and

1 he Pirate
another coi
Sa ii lay � the I
mond.
And Ha know
will have to do ,i 160-dt �
ind i
conference win. "Th
. i
Ml oi
Ciametinv.
Cagers Face Spiders
I he III men's basketball
now 6-6, will plav their thii :
ference game of the vear Sal
afternoon when the Pirate
north to face the Richmond Spide
The Spiders are led bv 6-4 guard
Tom Bethea with a 11.6 pei
scoring average Belhea. who is
originally from Durham.
Europe this summer with MI
All-Stars.
"Bethea is definitely the catalyst
of our basketball team stated
Dick I arrant, who is ,n his second
year the Spiders' head coach.
"We need consistent performance
from lom in order ro be sue:
ECU's David Harris, Barr Wright and Johnnv Edwards defend against
W &M's of tense
fill
rid 5
I a high It
� � I hen
� �
eima T
e
" W t
confidence -
players now
ally
V e Richnv
-�
I " lo face Haptis; � - x, p

ol the fastesi players in the country
Baseline to baseline, she is t)ie
tastes! that 1 adv Pirate coaches
have e er s
Ihe Lady Pirates will have to be-
at top form this weekend against the
I adv Monarchs. I he main reason is
Anne Donovan, ()l)l 's 6-8 Ail
Amei an
Donovan raging 16 4 points
and l5 7 rebounds pei gan . she is
othered bv a mild muscle
: left calf and it has not
beei d w hethcr or not she
will plav on I riday.
V nh or without Dr.i ,an. the
� ady Moi will have a large
height : ige.
"The height problem will be a
challenge, Inn it has been the same
challenge all vear responded An-
druzzi. "We go there realizing that
we have to execute to the best of our
ability and stop them from doing
the things that they do best
�tter leaving Norfolk, the I adv
Pirates will travel to Charlotte to
face I C harlotte.
�ndrufs goal tor the learn is to
improve every dav tor the rest ol the
season.
"We Aon'i settle tor mediocri-
ty Andruzzi commented. "We
won't use thai as an excuse tor not
performing better and better every
name
Pirate Sluggers To
Seek Playoff Spot
Track Team Vies
By K Mn MKUKS
si.i11 Wrilci
With one meet already behind
them, the 1982-83 ECU men's track
team is pointing toward an extreme-
ly successful season. Ihe men's
team will travel to lohnson City,
Tenn this weekend to compete in
the 1 astman Kodak Invitational.
In December, the Pirates had a
fine showing in I airfax, Ya. at the
Patnol Invitational with tour first
place finishes. freshman
Christopher Brooks jumped 24'9"
to break the school record in the
long jump, and also placed first in
the triple jump Another freshman,
Craig White, lied ECl 's record and
placed I 10 off national qualifying
time in the hurdles with a 7.2.
Head coach Billarson and his
assistant Wayne Miller were able to
recruit one of the top freshman
classes m the country foi this
season
I ast year. North Carolina pro-
duced its finest array of athletes
ever, and ECl! landed 17 of the best
talents in the state. 'These are the
greatest track athletes ever to be
assembled at ECU Carson staled.
Because oi the abundance of
talent within the state, Carson has
decided to expand his team into
field events, former high school
competitors that will long and triple
jump tor the Pirates include
Brooks, Arthur Burkes, Donnel
Sheppard and Clifton King. Carson
signed four of the state's premier
hurdlers also in Anthony White,
Walter Southerland, Rueben Pierce
and Tony Jones. The new Pirate
sprinters include Erskine Evans,
Rodney Blacknall, Jerry Brown and
loseph Dingle.
1 he Pirates return two veterans m
juniors Keith Clarke and Ray
Diekerson. Clarke is expected to
add valuable experience to the mile-
relay team while Diekerson will be
his best at the 800-meters.
Carson believes the Pirates have a
very bright future ahead and is op-
timistic about the upcoming meets.
"I don't want to push the freshmen
too hard at first Carson said, "
but we can expect great things from
them as the season progresses
v

By FDMCKl As
sijff Mnlrr
I-very team wants a shot at winn-
ing that championship title. A d
having made it to last year's c
playoffs, the ECU men's baseball
team wants n more than ever this
season. But ECL head coach Ha.
Baud doesn't expect that task to be
an easy one.
"It's always more difficult to
repeat than it is to win the first year"
Baird said. "Everyone will be
shooting for us. 1 do, though, tee:
that we have a chance to repeat,
although we will be the target tor
most clubs
To have a chance to repeat, Baird
said that several positions which
were vacated by departing seniors
need to be adequately filled, in-
cluding the pitching staff.
"Out pitching is untested said
Baird, whose two top pitchers iast
year. Bill Wilder (Kansas City) and
Scott Patterson (San Diego), were
drafted by professional teams. Also
drafted were second baseman Mike
Sorell (Kansas City) and catcher
Fr�n Fitzgerald (Baltimore), and
Baird needs to fill those positions
also.
"Out strength this year is not in
the pitching staff Baird con-
tinued. "Out success will be
predicated on how well the
new come: s can pic! p
We have unproved ffens
the critical facto- a
we can keep teams from sv
Competition for :
tion ,r. second bast -
man battle betwei
and David Ho
at the end f I
tion. Jack Kurhngs ai
Fulghum will be pus
open positon t! cat
The team be.
week m preparatii ts Mai
opener against irginia i
monwealth. focusing ma
"comprehensive strt
distance running, ind liffert
types of sprim ng ex
said. Techniques and I .
will be worked on a .
Baird also mentioned
method bv which the c
academic system ,p, tremen-
dous emphasis is placed
season practices "Beca is
semester system he said,
are manv games d e seas
with no davs off in between W
don't have much time to pracl
during the season
(Editor's note Coach B
write a column each month tor
legiate Haskethall newspapei
column will be entitled "On I t
Mound
, -
�-� - � s
� S v
ECU Pitcher Chartie Smith
Pki.lo !�. iK N�ll 1 lM�





HI I -M i Kt l IMN
Sports
KM AK I ' y
Ice-Cold Pirates Scalped By Indians
H C ISDN P 1 s ,s
And without both oi theii leading twosome pushed the Indians' lead to
rebounders on the court, the Pirates 37 29 with 16:03 remaining.
lacked the strength needed undei the
basket W&M took advantage and Edwards then puked up Ins
pulled ahead, 24 ll, with 4:24 on fourth foul, and freshman David
the clock. Hams came ofl the bench to take
Sophomore Bruce Peartree and his place.
W right then joined forces, scoring I he Indians continued to build
the next eight points by two jump- 'hen lead, with Richardson hitting
shots each. two straight jumpshots to give the
But W&M's loin "raver, a 6-3 Indiansa483 advantage Harrison
guard, made three baskets to keep called a nine out And Peartree,
the Indians Up. 26-23. Wright who hasn't been playing well during
followed by picking up two fouls to the past two weeks, came back out
put W&M on the foul line, and on the court and knocked in two
Bi ice Peartree swished a jumpshot 20-fooi jumpshots to revive the
to make the halftime score, 30-25, in
fax oi ot the Indians.
I he I'naies shot 4" s perceni in
the tnsi period, while 'he Indians
were 12-foi 24 from the flooi to
e them a 50 percent shooting
average In reboundmg, W&M
dominated, grabbing 1 rebounds to
K I
W ith 4 7ft
h'i k an . �ng will "
' �'� : "�� ' ��" unfortunately,
� at Wednesday
M I
1 � l U li's . a 1.
iig loss , � � .
against f
v M �
ere'll I d time
H
es
:
esn t
it this
Pirates. But Peartree's efforts were
m am
w cVM coach Bruce Parkhill called
a timeout with 10:31 left, and the
Indians continued to improve their
lead, much to Harrison's disap-
pointment.
"They had tvo possessions and
two shots and then they go down
and say 'oh hell, its not gonna hap-
pen Harrison said.
1 he Indians wound up on the
freethrow hue three times in the next
two minutes, sinking five baskets to
gain a 64-41 lead. K I was seven
tor 24 from the floor at this point,
t Bucs
lians 1
14 or, rt mainine.
. �
dei
Wnghl
w .
( v
" tators cheeinig
i ante out play -
ne defense and using a full-
er as two oi their strategies
� A d ' s and p the Indians'
shooting abilities
But by this time. 6-5 forward
�he Kevin Richardson was just getting
ll Uilh warmed up. Richardson sank two
baskets and along with 'raver, the
e u a
Lady Pirates To Battle
Nationally-Ranked ODU
By Kt S BOI ION
ment while ndruzzi racked up her
100th wm in a six-year coat I g
i .fee
� wno 1 his . � -cam has shown im-
' a month rovement sii e the first came oi
i
"(i
be taking tinua � . -e're stil
ranked i mi posil
V d
H �
oad
a scribe i nai e en
NITY
I t I that n
ainst
mpel .�.(.� hav e lo
n cv ei v game. "
x fai this season, the I .niv
have been - iding on i he
shoulders �1 senioi cento Mary
� a Denklei.
Denkler, who is averaging 24 6
e points and 7.8 rebounds: per game,
good is third on the all-time ECl scoring
I list behind Debbie Freeman and
Rosie I hompson.
Her 24.6 scoring average current-
s i. leaves tier fourth in the nation in
would scoring.
Sophomore point-guard Loraine
yeai Foster is averaging I5.5 points and
oming 4.8 assists per outing. Only in hei .
cond year, foster is currently I ltd
4 bej g, on the all-time ECU assists and
- : 13 ol men final steals charts.
�nes and turn 5-4 guard Delphine Mabry, the
"Rock Mount Rocket is third on
he the team in scoring and rebounding
ach Ihs team made even though she is the shortest
I ol 32 invited to the membei ol the squad.
v Women'? Basketball Mabry, who is a Is�s4 Olympic
( hampionship tourna- hopeful in track, is considered one
and had not scored a single point in
the last three minutes ot play
Harrison almost cleared his bench
entirely in the final minutes ot the
ballgame. T'he Indians, however,
relied on their starters and scored
consistently to maintain a distant
lead.
I he Pirates shot 27.8 percent
from the floor to give them an
overall average of 35.6 percent. 1 he
Indians made 16 of 29 shots tor a
55.2 percent average in the second
half, shooting 52.8 percent tor the
game. W&M out-rebounded the
Pirates, 39 to 26.
Wright led the Bucs with IS
points, while Peartree pumped in 10
points and I horn Brown had eight.
Foi the Indians, I raver popped in
13 points, Richardson and Brant
Weinei each had 12. Keith Cieplicki
knocked in 11 and Mike Strayhorn
scored H) points.
Ii
them on defense e wei
turned and we didn't
Losing Green and
plavmg time ol I d ���
two man"
Harrison. Green will b
minimum of three we -
x-rayed today to n �.�
doesn't have any fractu
really a shame IC-
"He was play rig the b t basl
ol his life right now
Harrison said he k
going to be ex!
said his tean i
against the Indians' efft
defense. "We' icticed ai
that defense 'or a long time
he said "I knew
prepared d t know what
wrong with them tonij I l
tensivelv ai
terrible am: tl
The Pirat
another
Saturday the I n
rid.
Harrison named several factors
which contributed to the Pirates'
conference loss. "We weren't ready
to play he said. "We knew they
were a very good shooting team, but
we should have been able to stop
And Harrison knows the P
will have to do a 360-degret
naround in order
conference win. "There aren't
bad teams in this leag
"All of them are g
Gametime is ! 00 p.m
Cagers Face Spiders
I he E( I men's basketball team,
now 6-6, will plav their third t
terence game oi the year Saturday
afternoon when the Pirates tra
north to face the Richmond Spid
I he Spiders are led bv 6-4 g
lorn Bethea with a 11.6 pei came
scoring average. Bethea. who is
originally from Durham.
Europe this summer with the MI
All-Stars.
"Bethea is definitely the catalyst
ol our basketball team stated
Disk I arrant, who is m his second
yeai as the Spiders' head coach
"We need consistent performance
from I om in order to be suc:
K I
WAM
David H
s offense
arris
Harr Wright and Johnn Kdwards defend against
R :hmond ently
Iaced a higl
�. a; fheii
i rech
"We are ni
experienced
"We are now a m :
confidence and exr
plavers now realize thai they
win and that confidence lactoi
i team greatly "
After the Richmoi
: return I �� e � va jaa
I7 t face Baptist al 7:30 p m.
l,i.
eu
Ol
ol the fastest players in the country.
Baseline to baseline, she is Uie
fastest that I adv Pirate coaches
hav e ever set n
I he I adv Pirates will have to be
at top form this weekend against the
I Ad Monarchs. I he main reason is
Anne Donovan. ()I)l 6 ,s i.
Amei ican.
Donovan is a i g 16.4 points
�'� d 15.7 rebounds ; . an . She is
othered by a mild muscle
teai in hei left salt and it lias not
been determined whether or not she
will plav on I iiday.
W ith oi without Don tan, the
I ,id Mon irchs will have a large
height ad antaee
"The height problem will be a
challenge, but it has been the same
challenge all year responded An-
druzzi. "We .o there realizing that
we have to execute to the best ol our
ability and stop them from doing
the things that they do best
After leaving Norfolk, the Lady
Pirates will travel to Charlotte to
face t C harlotte.
ndrufs goal for the team is to
improve every dav tor the rest ot the
season.
"We tvon'i settle for mediocri-
ty Andruzzi commented. "We
won't use that as an excuse tor not
performing better and better every
name
Pirate Sluggers To
Seek Playoff Spot
Track Team Vies
Pfcolo B DAVF Wll I IAMS
Mary Denkler is now tied for fourth place among women's scorers in
the country.
� KWin MEWES
suit �iil,i
With one meet already behind
them, the 1982-83 ECU men's track
team is pointing toward an extreme-
ly successful season. I he men's
team will travel to lolinson City,
Tenn this weekend to compete in
the 1 astman Kodak Invitational.
In December, the Pirates had a
fine showing in lautax, Va. at the
Patriot Invitational with tour first
place finishes Freshman
Christopher Brooks tumped 24'9"
to break the school record in the
long jump, and also placed first in
the triple jump. Another freshman,
Craig White, tied ECU'S record and
placed I K) ofl national qualifying
time in the hurdles with a 7.2.
Head coach Bill (arson and his
assistant Wayne Miller were able to
recruit one ol the top freshman
classes m the country foi this
season
I ast year. North Carolina pro-
duced its finest artay of athletes
ever, and ECl' landed 17 of the best
talents m the state. "These are the
greatest track athletes ever to be
assembled at ECU Carson stated.
Because of the abundance of
talent within the state, Carson has
decided to expand his team into
field events. Former high school
competitors that will long and tuple
jump tor the Pirates include
Brooks, Arthur Burkes, Donnel
Sheppard and Clifton King. Carson
signed tour of the state's premier
hurdlers also in Anthony White,
Walter Southerland, Rueben Pierce
and Tony Jones. The new Pirate
sprinters include Erskine Evans,
Rodney Blacknail, Jerry Brown and
Joseph Dingle.
1 he Pirates return two veterans in
juniors Keith Clarke and Ray
Dick- son. Clarke is expected to
add valuable experience to the mile-
relay team while Dickerson will be
his best at the 800-meters
C arson believes the Pirates have a
very bright future ahead and is op-
timistic about the upcoming meets.
"1 don't want to push the freshmen
too hard at first Carson said, "
but we can expect great things from
them as the season progresses
By ED NIC KL AS
sljff Wnlrr
Every team wants a shot at winn-
ing that championship title. And
having made it to last year's NCAA
playoffs, the LCL men's baseball
team wants it more than ever this
season. But ECL' head coach Hal
Baird doesn't expect that task to be
an easy one.
"It's always more difficult to
repeat than it is to win the first year"
Baird said. "Everyone will be
shooting for us. 1 do, though, feel
that we have a chance to repeat,
although wc will be the target for
most clubs
To have a chance to repeat, Baird
said that several positions which
were vacated by departing seniors
need to be adequately filled, in-
cluding the pitching staff.
"Out pitching is untested said
Baird, whose two top pitchers last
year. Bill Wilder (Kansas City) and
Scott Patterson (San Diego), were
drafted by professional teams. Also
drafted were second baseman Mike
Sorell (Kansas City) and catcher
fran Fitzgerald (Baltimore), and
Baird needs to fill those positions
also.
"Out strength this year is not in
the pitching staff Baird con-
tinued. "Out success will be
predicated on how well the
newcomers can pick up the slack
We have improved offensively, s
the critical factor will be how
we can keep teams from scoring '
Competition tor the starting posi
tion at second base will be i
man battle betwen lorn Sain
and David Horn, who was a sta
at the end of the tail season In a
tion, Jack Kurhngs and Jimbo
Fulghum will be pushing tor the
open positon at catcher.
The team began pract e last
week in preparation foi its March 2
opener against Virginia Con
monwealth. focusing mainly
"comprehensive stretching, long
distance running, and different
types of sprinting exercises Ba
said. Techniques and fundamentals
will be worked on later.
Baird also mentioned that th
method bv which the collegia
academic system is set up. tremen-
dous emphasis is placed or. pre-
season practices. "Because ol
semester system he said, "there
are man games during the season
with no days ofl in between We
don't have much time to practict
during the season
(Editor's note Coach Band will
write a column each month tor C l
legiaie Basketball newspaper 1 he
column will be entitled "On I he
Mound
s
ECU Pitcher Charlie Smith
rtK.lo B, ll Wll 1 UM-





10
IHfc I AS1 i AROl INIAN KM Rt 13. 1 s8
Sneaker Sam Sez
Basketball Rolls Into
ction
Intramural basket-
ball leads the list ot ac-
tixities tor spring
semester, it is one ot
the most popular ac-
tivities ottered as more
than 140 teams par-
ticipated last year. The
high-scoring Joint
1 sight captured the
men's division last
reason, while the Drib-
blers lopped the
women's teams. Both
teams will be back to
defend their titles. En-
try dates are January
I19 with the team
captains' meeting
scheduled tor January
20 ai :iM p.m. in the
Biology building.
Room 103.
Hocke On heels
Intramural Co-Rec
Roller Hocke) will be
rolling into action on
Januarv 24 at Sport-
sworld. Fntnev will be
taker Januarv 17-19.
Defending champs.
The Night Cruiser
will be back to defend
their title. Teams must
consist of five players:
two guys, two girls and
a goalie ot either sex.
Attention Strong
Arms
Welcome back all
you strong arms. It's
time once again for the
Intramural-
Recreational Services
and Budweiser Arm
Wrestling Tournament.
This annual event will
begin Tuesday,
February 1. with the
finals being held at
half time of the Con-
verse Lady Pirate
Classic on February 12
Sign up tor this
powerhouse event will
be January 24-27 at
Memorial Gym 204.
Participants will arm
wrestle within their
respective weight
classe:
Men: 150-under,
151-175, 176-199, 200
I b s. - o v e r. Women:
135-under, 136-over.
Organizations are
welcome to enter or
have a person(s) repre-
sent them in the tourna-
ment. Budweiser will be
providing 1 -shirts to all
participants and
trophies to first and se-
cond place winners. So
start lifting those
weights and doing
those curls for your
chance to be an FCU-
Budweiser strong-arm
champ.
Intramural Officials
Do you have an in
terest in basketball or
roller hockey' In-
tramural basketball
and roller hockey is
starting real soon and
officials are needed for
both ot these sports.
Clinics will be held to
learn the rules,
mechanics and pio
cedures tor officiating
both of these sports.
The basketball clinics
will begin: Thursday,
January 13 at 6:00
p.m and the roller
hockey clinics will
begin Monday,
January 17 at 8:00 p.m.
Both clinics will be held
in Memorial Gym,
Room 102. Bring your
class schedules and
S o c i a I Security
numbers.
Sport Club Council
Meeting
The first meeting of
the second semester for
Sport Club Council will
be held Wednesday.
January 19 at 4:00 p.m.
in Memorial Gym,
room 102. Active
sports clubs the second
semester are: Fnsbee,
lacrosse. Karate,
Rugby-men and
women, Racquetball,
Soccer-women, Surf-
ing. I earn Handball-
m e n a n d women.
Representatives from
these clubs should be
prepared to submit spr-
ing schedules, member-
ship listings and the
Sport Club Manual.
The first meeting of
the second semester for
Sport Club Council will
be held Wednesday,
January 19 at 4:00 p.m.
in Memorial Gym,
toom 102. Active
sports clubs the second
semester are: Fnsbee,
lacrosse. Karate,
Rugby-men and
women, Racquetball,
Soccer-women, Surf-
ing, ream Handball-
men and women.
Representatives from
these clubs should be
prepared to submit spr-
ing schedules, member-
ship listings and the
Sport Club Manual.
Friday Night Action
ECU students want
real Friday night action
and the IRS has got it
Free play for volleyball
and badminton will be
available from 8 to 10
p.m. in Minges Col-
iseum on the following
nights: January 21 and
28; lebruarv li, 18 and
25; and March 4. To
guarantee your team a
spot to play, call
757-6387 and reserve a
court.
Aerobicize
Aerobic Fitness
Classes for the spring
semester will be held in
two six-week sessions.
To register for the first
session, come by Room
204-Memorial Gym
before January 14.
Classes begin January
17 through lebruarv
24.
Self Defense Classes
I.earn to defend
yourself from at-
tackers! Increase flex-
ibility and strength
while learning a prac-
tical skill. The In-
tramural Department is
offering a self defense
class for men and
women. Registration
deadline is January 14
at 5:00 p.m room 204
Memorial Gym.
Classes begin Januarv
17.
ABORTIONS
l 24 week termination.
App'Ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
DULL WORK � HIGH PAY!
tnrul- our advrrMiing rrutrnalt in
nd tnxjnd Kmmi impui 4 r5 hour.
pr wtrk. .bolutrr no �Hllng Choof
sour unn hours mutt be able to wort
without iuperi��on. oir rarninp art-
based upon the amount of matrruli vou
distribute average earnings of our 310
�ampua reps it 16 SK an hour hurther
details provided in -ur lntnx.urtnr
Parkrt
AfWKon Pcrsuip
706 7�? T!l1
Thursday
is
College iNight
All cans 45C
til 11:00 p.m. 70C
til 1:00 Adm. $1.00
� �
��
Come Early
r
Tn�ir3r,
jSSLkjSSmjEZ mTLmmL
RUSH
PHI KAPPA TAU
I WE WANT YOU TO BE A
PHI TAU!
MONDAY-WEDNESDAY
9p.muntil
FOR A RIDE IN THE 'iKT PARTY WAGON'
CALL 752-4379
TTTy�
CAM ;
cth yr
rW
r. �
4
409
Elizabeth
Street
DON'T
FORGET
our
PRE-RUSH
BLAST
tonight 9:00p.m.
1 1 1i�a�i i fas
- s� �- r r r f
TW 990 tow
new balance
January 17 22 is New Balance week aiH L Hodges Co. We are
offering our most recent line of new balance snoes the 990 at an
introductory price ot $83 95icompare elsewhere at Siocn
The 990 is the most sophisticated training shoe ever built It of
fers a perfect combination of protection,comfort and motion con
trol without the slightest inhibition of the foot s natural range of
motion
�o& by new balance
MEN'S
420-546.95
555-$51.95
990-583.95
730-$65.95
660-$53.95 990-583.95
730-565.95
January 17-22
WOMEN'S
280-531.95
420-546.95
460-547.95
555-551.95
660-552.95
H. L. HODGES CO.
210 E. FIFTH ST. GREENVILLE
PET
VILLAGE
511 S. EVANS
756 9222
A Special
Welcome Back
15 Discount on all
stock thru Jan.21
for ECU Students with l.D
Laa
B IOM IH
I
I

Sam
Com
� �
"NEW YEAR
NEW YOU"
POUNDS
IN 40 DAYS.
"Losing weight at Nutri System is
easy! Delicious, convenient, meals
perfectl) suited to a students bus
lifestyle No Calorie counting or
measuring Medical supervision
and professional friendl) support
help you lose weight rapidl) and
safely. What have you got to lose
Call now for a free-no obliga-
tionConsultation
355-2470
310 ARLINGTON Bl I)
nutri system
wetght loss rrvedieaJ centers
Ov�f 6O0 Canlafs In North America
As (people vary so does an individual s waight loss
No Drugs, Injections Behavior Education
� Nutritionally Sound � Aerobic Classes

Dei
Prescl
� � - .
accepted a r
Te
i
v. -
s

You Could Win
$200 Monday
X
,f, f.
,
-L h
� (kl-
I!
ECU vs. Baptist College
7:30-Jan.l7-Minges Coliseum
At halftime three lucky fans will
participate in the WITN-FM
'Money Scramble In 30-seconds, those
three will get to pick up as much of
$200 as possible, scatterd all over
the playing court. Be a winner
with ECU basket ball
Watch the Pirates attack
p
6(1
WE
Oiri
� , f





;
ial
Back
t on all
an.21
swith I.D
Jhavior Education
jrobic Classes
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 13. IMS
11
Lady Tracksters In Kodak Classifieds
By TOM THORNTON
Staff Writer
The ECU women's
track team will be
travelling to Johnson
City, Tenn. this Friday
to compete in the
Eastman Kodak Invita-
tional track meet.
Other teams competing
will be: Tennessee,
Tennessee State,
Florida, Florida State,
North Carolina, Ken-
tucky and Georgia
The ECU team,
coached by Pat
McGuigan, is coming
off of a lengthy
Christmas vacation,
and the coach is a little
skeptical about this
meet. "We've only had
about three days of
practice since coming
back from the
Christmas vacation
layoff McGuigan
said. "We usually prac-
tice about two hours a
day but we haven't
made any special
preparation for this
meet
The women's
chances of winning are
not good. "We'll be
running against the best
athletes in the world
and we're just not in
good shape
McGuigan commented.
"I haven't seen any of
the other teams com-
pete, so I'm really not
sure what we're up
against
Besides college track
teams, there will be
several of the world's
top individuals com-
peting at the Kodak In-
vitaitonaJ. McGuigan,
however, expects her
team to perform
respectively. "We
should do all right in-
dividually
PERSONAL Mga&tfg&jagg
MOJ� Minn J.I. with
AS.A.P. Lovt J.W.
�0 MO
NOONY: I) your not too busy
toniaht. lofj go out tor ko craam
P.S. I lovt you. TUNAHEAD
ART: Wall, tomorrow's m t.�
o�yl I tot a copy of mo boa roport
today. io i we dooui't have to oo
� M m� way to Griffon empty
hanoooj HERB
ROOMMATE
WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED tor
Ooorflotowfi apt, to pay 11 rant
ana" utilities. available in
modiattly. Call 7M-as groat
location i!
NIIO A ROOMMATE:
3 two room apt. I milat trom cam
put in par month pus ona-ttiird
utilitits. call Margarot or Sunn
FOR SALE
OR SALS: REFRIGERATOR,
portod in Oorm rooms tKCOlloat
cawd tatntict tap op cn ;sa-47�.
NICER CRAY AND WHITE RAN
NIT PUR JACKET FOR SALE MS
CALL 7Sa-�M.
FREE Tna Fttytical iavcatian
Maiort Club is tponsarmg an ECU
tuna raising apppg. A �onarton of
�! can win you a i yoar fro
momborviip to tti� nautilus, also,
you may win a froo mowth's
lossons to Sroonvillos AcMtmy
at martial Arts plus many mart
pruts. Orawing will at now Jan
H at p m
sant to win
WE BUY u�E
STRUMINTS
�S-a�n
O MUSICAL IN
CALL 7
757 IIU
Sampson Scores 33 As Wahoos
Come Back To Beat Wolfpack
NEEDED: MALE ROOMMATE
to share 4 oadroom house en
Biltmore st Hall block from cam-
pus Rtnt us 00 plus onofourth
Utilitits. 7S7-I440.
HOUSE TO SHARE NEAR ECU
Private entrits, oaths. I1JS in
eludes all utilitits. Call 7 53 2is
� 5
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI) � Ralph Samp-
son scored 33 points
Wednesday to key a
long Virginia comeback
and pull the second-
ranked Cavaliers to an
88-80 Atlantic Coast
Conference victory
over 19th-rated North
Carolina State.
Sampson accounted
for five of the final 10
points for Virginia,
now 12-1 overall and
undefeated after three
ACC games. Rick
Carlisle added 14
points, including two
free throws down the
stretch, and fellow
guard Othell Wilson
contributed 12.
Dereck Whittenburg
paced North Carolina
State, 7-3 overall and
1-1 in the ACC, with 27
points ' all in the first
half, with 21 of them
on three-point baskets.
Thurl Bailey followed
with 25 points.
The lead changed
hands nine times during
the first 10 minutes of
the game, but North
Carolina State then
scored 10 unanswered
points and with less
than 3:30 remaining in
the half the Wolfpack
was in front, 50-34.
Virginia pulled to a
54-48 haJftime deficit,
and opened the second
half with baskets by
Carlisle and Sampson.
The Wolfpack attack
suffered a crimpling
blow with 15:24 re-
maining when Whitten-
burg hurt his ankle and
left the game for good.
North Carolina State
managed to stay in
front by as many as
seven points but never
Prescott Resigns
Spencer Prescott, the
East Carolina Universi-
ty running back coach
the last two years, has
accepted a positiJtrtrT
that same capacity at
Temple University,
head coach Ed Emory
announced Wednes-
day.
Prescott is the fifth
ECU football coach to
resign this year along
with defensive coor-
dinator Norm Parker,
defensive coaches Jim
Holland and Jim
Bengala and assistant
Tim Mingey.
Taffc Attractions
TMt LAIGIST PtOOUClR Ol LTvt SHOWS
'OH TMIAU fAtMS
KINGS ISLAND
KINGS DOMINION
CAROWINDS
CANADA'S WONDERLAND
East Carolina University
A J Fletcher Music Building, Recital Hail
Tuesday. February 1. 3 00-6 00 PM
University of North Carolina
Greensboro
Elliot University Center
Alexander and Phillips Rooms
Thursday. February 3. 2 00-5 00 PM
Singers � Dancers � Instrumentalists � Technicians
Variety Performers � $180-250week
One 'Oun� ir.p �� I, �,i. a. pa ,o h� �.lom,� ��j.eng o.�t 2SC MM lc l�� pm
-Cc'act l�� Sftos Cj'owvos So. ,�0e'& ct�ue c x??4
eCop�gii 198 T4li AM'KIOAS El�
�-?�! DDt iUMTflV C.�r.ni OH 4V19
regained its offensive
rhythm.
Cavalier guard Ricky
Stokes finally turned
the game around with
5:47 remaining when he
scored on a fast break,
and hit the ensuing free
throw to put Virginia
ahead 78-76.
Ernie Myers tied the
game when Sampson
was called for goal ten-
ding 10 seconds later,
but the All-America
center redeemed
himself half a minute
later by scoring on a
dunk to give Virginia a
lead it never lost.
ROOMATE WANTED M7 � month
plus ona-ttiird utilities Private
room 7M-S044
NEED A FEMALE ROOMATE
� mediately Furnished 3-BDRM
apt a tew blocks from campus All
you need is a bed Monthly rent:
�:40 to be shared equally. Call
Oorn Moyo at gSjMS.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 2 bedroom
apartment Rent si27 so. Conve-
nient tor ECU and Pitt students.
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE, experience quality work.
IBM Selectrk typewriter. Call
Lame Sfcive 7SI-SM1 or GAIL
JOYNER rBt-iett
WANTED
WANTED: HANDCRAFT and
POTTERY items tor resale on
commission basis only. Land and
Sea OUttet. Greenville Square
Snooping Ph. 7S4-4770 Open 11-4
Ml
0 DANCE CONTEST 0
P4MC� � to o ,��, , enaie.
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor
, Co-ed Fraternity hosts a
� CEREBRAL PALSY DANCE CONTEST
j Shag & Free style .
MISC.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1983
at PAPA KATZ from 8:00 - 100
JOHN MOORE, DISC JOCKEY
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Do you have
an interest in photography r II you
would like to work at taking
special event pictures and have
own transportation. PHOTO
SPECIALTIES is now Nr.no Call
tor appointment: 7S2-4717. Inter
views start Monday 117.
Leiden taoon
Daily
Luncheon
and Dinner
Special
Sat. & Sun.
Luncheon
Buffet
12-3 p.m.
all you can eat
$5.25
children under � FREE
Open
7 Days
Hours:
MonThurs.
11:30a.m9:30 p.m.
Fri.
11:30a.m10:00 p.m.
Sat.
12:00-10:00 p.m.
Sun.
12:00-9:00 p.m.
756-3844
Carolina East Center
f TAKEOUT
Look for us in our new location
123E.5thStr
752-7483
Thursday-Spaghetti Special Friday-Happy Hour 4-7
$2.49-all you can eat 5-9 Fri. & Sat. Nite
Second Wind
formerly members of Sidewinder
Sunday-Lasogno Special Monday-Pizza & Pasta
$2.99-all you can eat 5-9 $2.99-all you can eat 5-9
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T-shirts, Sleeping tags.
Backpacks, Camping Equip-
ment, steel Toed Shoes. Dishes
and Over 700 Oillerent New and
Used items. Cowboy Boots.
13.tf.
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
1S01 S. Evans
Street
1st Prize - $100 percouple
P�' ClllJOft
2nd Prize - 1 Keg per couple
parcafagory
3rd Prize - 1 Dinner for two at Pharo's
i'OillOU
Si . c �� (ma.
Petrel 31 r .��
Par category
FOR MORE INFORMATION, call 355-9727
Treat the crew
)
L.
1
and we'll treat you
Every
Monday
&
Tuesday
Night
No Coupon Necessary
757-1955
Even Monday night, even week of the year
order any large 2 or more topping pizza for the crew
ask for the "Family Night Special" and
we ll treat vou to vour own small pizza
with the same number of toppings FREE,
and delivered free in our service zone
in 30 minutes or less.
Or pick up two pizzas in 15 minutes.
Two pizzas for the price of one now that s a treat you can t beat'
When it comes to A Pizza, pta comes to you.
Not good witn any other special
East Carolina University's
STUDENT UNION
ge
ack.
umimnmimimiiiiimiHiMr
Ace
Pool Room
758-9090
OPEN SUNDAY
HAPPY HOUR
SUNFRI. 5-7
RatesPlayer
15 Minutes � 30C
30 Minutes � 60C
60 Minutes $1.20
WEEKL Y PRICES FOR
VIDEO HIGH SCORES
420 Cotanche
Dirocfly across from the Elbe.
SPECIAL
One Week Only Jan. 10th-17th
7mm 14K Gold BeadsHom
GUARANTEE
Aii goid-colo'
Gold Beads of
Love
are certified to be
14 KARAT GOLD
and are fashioned under
Strict quality control for
superb style and finish
Only
1.69
-
.

ORANGEBURG SC
1 We are the only jewelers in the Greenville area who supply �
J such a guarantee on all 14K gold beads. U
J.D. Dawson Company
,K.C.
a Km Hoot Men -Sat traVt:
.lawalari (larwuluit
IE IMnSI.Mh.OTi.NC
�tt-Htt
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1983-84 Term
Any Full-time student can apply,
applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk.
Deadline: January 14,1983

A
A
t. j
-�w�"i�.a mi waiimiaattiiaj





Monday, Jan. 17-
Wednesday, Jan. 19
1983 SPRING
FRATERNITY RUSH
RUSH
KAPPA
SIGMA
k-U'K-v sk-M Ft�ici
1 - p-fvC1
encourages 1
rll j "� n i
Kappa Alpha
soot lHhSi
Call 7S8 8VW
, .
, ���� trtr� �.
I . . �
PHI TAU!

. . . mere
)'� itS f
MONDAY
Nen Y ears Eve Part
TUESDAY
Original I a egas Playbo) Runn Night
Parties Begin at 8:00 for information &
Rides call 752-5543
tfie men tf
SifrtaJVu
tmHrruouto
attend
rDus,
'
- � -�
. I
- . . � ' " �
� . � gm "
met. " '
Jflt1 fstti
RUSH MONWED 830
THE PHI KAPPA TAU FRATERNITY
THE FRATERNITY THAT BRINGS YOU:
CHILL THRILL
PRE-RUSH BLAST
?SPRING FLING
MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 9:00-until
"COME SEE WHAT MAKES US BEST"
�See our ad on page 10!
PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY
ANNOUNCES ITS
ANNUAL FALL RUSH
1501 CohmiK Jr. 7SS-7610
Monday-Wednesday 9:00 p.m
Sigma Tau Gamma
The dream was conceived at the beginning of the fall semester
1977. A group ot 34 hCU students joined together to form a
brotherhood. The Delta Alpha chapter of Sigma Tau Gamma is
composed of men and little sisters who believe that an individual's
uniqueness should not be restricted by an organization. Our
members are encouraged to have their own lifestyles and not to fit
into any stereotype. We are a social fraternity that enjoys an at-
mosphere unique from others. Please visit Sigma Tau Gamma at
508 W. Fifth St. Give us a call at 757-0127 for directions to our
house. Sigma Tau Gamma CARES!
ZBT
ZETA BETA TAU
MONDAY �
MENDENHALL � 8:00
TUESDAY �
COFFEE HOUSE � 8:00
WEDNESDAY �
COFFEE HOUSE � 8:00
COME MEET THE MEN
OF ZBT
50S E. 5th St. 752-2941 752-6502
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Fraternity
Sigma Phi Epsilon is a national fraternity with
undergraduate chapters across the U.S. The Sig Eps here
at East Carolina exist for the same reason that all other
Sig Ep chapters do . . . building close friendships, promo-
tion, academic excellence, and enriching your college ex-
perience. Please come by and visit.
JANUARY 17, 18, 19 9:00
RUSH
BETA THETA PI
FRATERNITY
Lambda Chi Alpha Rush
Monday: 9:00 "Revolving Rooms"
Tuesday: 9:00
Wednesday: 9:00
The Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity would like to ex-
tend an invitation to you to come by and meet the
brothers. As ECU'S oldest fraternity, Lambda Chi is
rich in tradition and the "Choppers" take pride in be-
ing leaders on campus and in the community.
ALPHA
SIGMA
PHI
Fraternity
SPRING RUSH
1983
January 17,18,19
422 W. Fifth
752-1073
MONDAY: "ROCK THE TOWN PARTY"
TUESDAY: "CASINO NIGHT"
WEDNESDAY: "PINK LADY PARTY"
ALL PARTIES BEGIN AT 9:00 P.M.
603 E. 9th Street (Behind Joyner Library)
757-1366
TKE
LAMBDA PSI
CHAPTER
DUE TO HOUSE RENOVATIONS,
THE MEN OF TAU KAPPA EPSILON
will be holding Spring Rush at
a later date to be announced.
Our house will still be open,
so feel free to come down and
meet the brothers!
951 E. 10th St.
(bottom of
College Hill!)
fl
i





Title
The East Carolinian, January 13, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 13, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.240
Location of Original
University Archives
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