The East Carolinian, January 11, 1983






�Jk
(Earnltttian
Serving the East Carolina campus community
since 1925
Vol.57 No.30
Tuesday, January 11, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Early Morning Fire Damages Fraternity House
Fire caused major damage at the Tau Kappa eJSSS "��
,h?hn ' "rr"18, ,eai"8 lin'e more ,han burn� " in man" La of
�he house. The structure had to be condemned because of the damage
A fire in the attic o the Tau Kap-
pa Epsilon fraternity house on
Tenth Street caused an estimated
$50,000 in damages and has tem-
porarily forced the location of the
15 male students living at the house.
No one was injured.
The cause of the tire, which
started at approximately 5 a.m.
Saturday, is unknown, but accor-
ding to TKE President Michael
Dinga a cigarette butt may have ig-
nited the blaze. "It's possible that a
cigarette butt may have caused the
blaze, but no one knows tor sure
Dinga said. An investigation by the
Greenville Fire Department is still
pending.
The fire was contained to the
main section of the attic where four
students shared two bedrooms. "The
fire began nearest he room of
students TJ. Bentha; and Butch
Ray. Both lost all their belongings.
"I was asleep B ithal said,
"but 1 just woke up tor some
reason, and 1 saw my room full of
smoke. 1 was in there tor a long
time
When Benthal got out of bed. he
discovered the flames in a living
area that separates the two
bedrooms. "I got up, saw the
flames and ran out of the room he
said. Benthal then started yelling to
everyone else in the house that there
was a fire in the attic.
"I ran back in and tossed a couple
of beers on it (the fire), that's all I
had Benthal said. "It was uncon-
trollable He said that although
the house was not equipped with fire
extinguishers, there were two smoke
alarms which functioned properly
and alerted many of the others.
"We lost everything; all our
clothes, our television, our
refrigerator, our stereo � I mean
everything Ray said. "We
couldn't salvage anything, except
tor the clothes on our backs
Ray noted that he became aware
of an unusual smell similar to plastic
before the fire was discovered. He
telt the fire may have been caused
by electrical failure.
Both Benthal and Ray praised the
Greenville Fire Department for the
job they did in extinguishing the
blaze. "They did the best they
could Benthal said. "They
responded quickly He added that
firemen chopped holes in the roof to
control the fire and keep it from
spreading. "They saved what thev
could added Ray.
"The Greenville Fire Department
did an excellent job containing the
fire and putting it out Dinga
said. He noted that the quick
response of the fire department kept
the tire contained to the attic living
area and that damage to the other
floors of the structure was mostly a
result of water damage.
Dinga also had strong words ot
praise for Associate Dean of Stu-
dent Life James Mailory who arriv-
ed on the scene of the tire at 5:30
a.m. and stayed for several hours
assisting the residents. The TKFs
said Mailory was very helpful and
supportive.
Mailory, who is also the faculty
advisor to the Inter-Haternity
Council, immediately made ar-
rangements with ECU housekeeping
assistant James Wooten to provide
extra dorm rooms for the displaced
TKE brothers.
"We wanted to make sure thev
had a place to stay Mailory told
The East Carolinian.
According to Mailory, this is the
second fraternity house fire that has
occurred since he has been at ECL
He said that about 10 years ago a
furnace explosion in the Phi Kappa
Phi house completely destroyed the
building. "All that was left was rub-
ble Mailory said. No one was hurt
in that fire either and the building
has now been rebuilt.
Mailory also had strong words of
praise for the Greenville Fire
Department. "They did a really
beautiful job; they were really pro-
fessional
MaJlor) and assistant to the
chancellor Charles R. Blake both
met with the IKE brothers on Mon-
day to provide whatever support
they could. "We don't want them to
get too discouraged Mailory said.
"We want them to stay together "
Many other groups and in-
dividuals came to the aid ot the I KL
brothers when they received the
news ot the tire. Ray thanked the
women living at the Alpha Phi
house, located across the street from
the TKE house, tor allowing the
men to use their phone and wash up.
At present, the Alpha Phi's are
coordinating a message service so
family members can keep in touch
with members ot the fraternity
"We kind of understand what
they're going through, because we
live in a big house too said AJphi
Phi's Panhellenic Representative
Tern Reeves. "We're trying to be
good Samaritans
"The Catholic Newman Center
has helped us out a whole lot Ray
said. According to Catholic Campus
Minister Sister Helen Shondell. so-
meone from the TKE house, which
is next door to the Newman Center,
knocked on her door shortly after 5
a.m. requesting a tire extinguisher
A short time later, Sister Shonddl
See URL, Page 6
3 Student Houses Burglarized
Robbery Losses In Thousands
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Mat: �run
Two ECU fraternity houses and
another house occupied bv seven
students were burglarized during the
Christmas holiday break even
though robberies were down in com-
parison to last year.
The Phi Kappa Tau fraternity
house located at 409 Elizabeth St.
was hit the worst with losses
estimated at over $5,000 from two
separate burglaries within three
days.
According to former Phi Kappa
Tau President Bobby Pierce, who
recently moved out of the fraternity
house, the burglars broke a hole in a
door that was in a secluded section
of the house and proceeded to ran-
sack the rooms of the 20 students
who live there. The earlier burglary
was not as serious and only one
room was robbed.
Pierce, who is also the executive
council president of the Inter-
Fraternity Council, said the frater-
nity brothers "were pretty disap-
pointed" with what they described
as inadequate police surveillance of
their home.
Pierce noted that the police were
informed in advance by fraternity
brother Mark V instead that the
house would be vacant during the
semester break. We made a special
request to the police to watch over
the house, Pierce said. "They
assured us thai they would watch
over the house as best they could
Pierce added that his group
makes ths request whenever they
know in advance that the house will
be empty.
"All we can do is put locks on the
doors Pierce said. "We can't af-
ford anv kir.d ol sophisticated alarm
system
The Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity
house, which is located directly
across the street from the Phi Kappa
Tau house, at 500 East Elizabeth St.
was also burglarized during the
break.
The door of the Lamda Chi house
was broken down, said Lambda Chi
President John Greer. who added
that the Greenville Police were
cooperative.
"They didn't get much Greer
said. He said most of the residents
had taken their valuables home with
them or they were locked up.
The third major burglary took
place at 707 E. 3rd St. where
numerous items valued at over
51,000 were taken. According to
one resident, Wanda Shatter, the
thefts were partially responsible for
two other women moving out of the
house.
"Two girls moved out right after
ih� burglary Shatter said. One,
who had her television set and
kerosene heater stolen, said she
could not afford a new heater and
moved back home with her parents.
Other items stolen included two
other heaters, one of them kerosene,
a clock radio and a large cassette
player.
The burglers gained entrance
through a side door which led to the
kitchen. "They snipped off the
handles and opened the door
Shaffer said. "They also left all the
lights on She said the house was
left in disarray from the robbery
with drawers and belongings out of
place.
Shaffer said that the police came
and took several pictures and finger-
print samples, but it is unknown if
there are any leads at this time.
Shaffer said that two new people
have moved into the house and that
they have all purchased and install-
ed several dead bolt locks.
According to Greenville Chief of
Police Glenn Cannon, break-ins
Just An Average Crowd
.��fT
LAY
A near sellout crowd of 5700 packed into the ECU mens' basketball game to make the eighth largest crowd in
ECL history. The Pirates came away with a 43-41 victory. See SPORTS, page 10.
were down considerably from last
year. "We had less this year than we
had last year at this time Cannon
told The East Carolinian. He had no
exact figures on the number of
break-in incidents.
Cannon attributed much of the
reduction in break-ins to what he
referred to as the "attack squad a
new unit of the Greenville Police
Department which is "flexible" and
can be assigned to concentrate on
specific problems in the city.
New Frontiers A vailable
For ECU Scuba Divers
Groups Plan Tribute On King's Birthday
A birthday tribute to the late Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr a leader of
the struggle tor civil rights in the
1960s, will be sponsored by ECU'S
two largest minority organizations
Friday.
The ECU chapter of the National
Association for the Advancement of
Colored People and the Society of
United Liberal Students will jointly
sponsor a series of events to coin-
cide with the 54th anniversary of
��to .y CMAP OU�LaV
Students marched last year in honor of Martin Luther King's birthday. Tributes and activities are planned again
this year on campus in honor of the civil rights leader.
King's birth, who was assassinated
in 1968 in Memphis, Tenn.
Participants are being asked to
gather in front of the ECU Student
Supply Store at noon Friday for an
introduction and service in honor of
King. The group plans to march in
tribute to King and then gather in
Wright Auditorium to hear various
presentations and a performance by
the ECU Gospel Choir. A silent
tribute remembering King will also
be conducted.
According to SOULS President
Barbara Battle, the keynote speech
will be presented by the Rev. Eddie
Wayne Lawrence a graduate of
Hampton Institute. Battle described
Lawrence as a dynamic speaker who
knew the true meaning of King's
work.
Battle said it was important to
celebrate King's birthday "because
in remembering his birth, it let's us
know what he stood for Accor-
ding to Battle, King represented
leadership, equality and the practice
of nonviolence.
"In doing it ail, he practiced in a
nonviolent way Battle said. "In
the struggle that we still have for
equality, we should remember the
See, TRIBUTES, Page 3
By GREG R1DEOL T
Smi Editor
Some people say that space is the
final frontier, but there's a group of
people at Minges pool who think
otherwise. To them there is a place
right here on Earth that satisfies all
their exploring desires. The place is
the ocean; the people are ECU's
scuba divers.
Director of Aquatics Ray Scharf
said each semester his basic scuba
diving course is filled with over 50
students. So, to keep his former
pupils interested and to give them
the opportunity to use the skills he
and the other instructors at Minges
have taught them, the aquatics pro-
gram sponsors trips to "dive spots"
around the world.
"Since I have taught scuba we
have certified 213 students Scharf
said. "We are trying to make ECU a AutO Accident
major center for aquatics .
The trip this semester will be to Near LdentOFl, N.C.
the Bimini Islands in the Bahamas.
ECU student George S.
Underkofler died in an auto acci-
dent Sunday near his home town of
Edenton, N.C. Underkofler, 22,
was a senior in industrial
technology.
According to Highway Patrol Of-
ficer Joel Siles investigating the acci-
dent, Underkofler was alone travel-
ing north on N.C. State road
32His car ran off the road and
struck a bridge rail end Siles said.
Underkofler's 1975 Ford fell into
Queen Anne Creek, a mile south of
Edenton.
Underkofler's funeral will be held
Wednesday at 10 a.m. in St. Ann's
Catholic Church in Edenton.
Among the other courses taught are
Iifesaving, swimming, and various
water sports.
"There are programs here at ECL"
that require a student to be able to
scuba dive Sharf explained. "We
give them the opportunity
Scharf, who has been a certified
instructor since 1972, said diving is
not a hard skill to learn and is not
physically demanding, but it is a
sport that is very safety conscious.
"We take every precaution
Scharf said he hopes all his
former students will take part in the
different trips offered. He says it is
an opportunity you might not have
again, and diving to Mr. Scharf is
out of this world.
ECL Student Dies
It will take place during spring
break and cost $540. Scharf believes
this to be an excellent deal.
Sharf has taken ECU divers to
places such as Jamaica and Mexico
in the past. He says any certified
diver at ECU is welcome on the
trips. The diving venture includes
everything; all the student has to do
is get to Jacksonville, Fla.
Part of Scharf s goal includes
establishing an advanced scuba
course at ECU. The curriculum of
the course is in the process of being
approved and is expected to be
taught in the fall of '83.
Scuba, scharf says, is only part of
the overall aquatics program.

1







5e
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community
since 1925
Tuesday, January 11, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
Early Morning
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
"II
i ii. �-
lmmtum)
HM W tS�W $W iw MM ��
Damages Fraternity House
�V
Sa.urdaV mn" Tj�r da,ma8e T3U KaPPa "� ftSSK hoSr
IhJ h� " �rmn' ,ea,nS imle more than burnt rubble in manv areas of
�he house. The structure had to be condemned because of the damage
3 Student Houses Burglarized
A fire in the attic of the Tau Kap-
pa Epsilon fraternity house on
Tenth Street caused an estimated
$50,000 in damages and has tem-
porarily forced the elocation of the
15 male students I'ving at the house.
No one was injured.
The cause t the tire, which
started at approximately 5 a.m.
Saturday, is unknown, but accor-
ding to TKE President Michael
Dinga a cigarette butt may have ig-
nited the blaze. "It's possible that a
cigarette butt may have caused the
blaze, but no one knows fot sure
Dinga said. An investigation by the
Greenville Fire Department is still
pending.
The fire was contained to the
main section of the attic where tour
students shared two bedrooms. 1 he
fire began nearest the room of
students T.J. Benthai and Butch
Ray. Both lost all their belongings.
"I was asleep B- ithal said,
"but I just woke up tor some
reason, and 1 saw my room full of
smoke. 1 was in there tor a lonu
time
When Benthai got out of bed. he
discovered the flames in a living
area that separates the two
bedrooms. "I got up, saw the
flames and ran out oi the room he
said. Benthai then started yelling to
everyone else in the house that there
was a tire in the attic.
" 1 ran back in and tossed a couple
of beers on it (the fire), that's all I
had Benthai said. "It was uncon-
trollable He said that although
the house was not equipped with fire
extinguishers, there were two smoke
alarms which functioned properly
and alerted many of the others.
"We lost everything; all our
clothes, our television, our
refrigerator, our stereo � I mean
everything Ray said. "We
couldn't salvage anything, except
tor the clothes on our backs
Rav noted that he became aware
of an unusual smell similar to plastic
before the fire was discovered. He
telt the fire may have been caused
by electrical failure.
Both Benthai and Ray praised the
Greenville Fire Department for the
job they did in extinguishing the
blaze. "They did the best they
could Benthai said. "They
responded quickly He added that
firemen chopped holes in the roof to
control the tire and keep it from
spreading. "They saved what thev
could added Ray.
"The Greenville Fire Department
did an excellent job containing the
fire and putting it out Dinga
said. He noted that the quick
response of the fire department kept
the fire contained to the attic living
area and that damage to the other
floors of the structure was mostK a
result of water damage.
Dinga also had strong words of
praise for Associate Dean of Stu-
dent Life James Mailory who arm-
ed on the scene of the fire at 5:30
a.m. and stayed for several hours
assisting the residents. The TKEs
said Mailory was very helplul and
supportive.
Mailory, who is also the faculty
advisor to the Inter-Fraternity
Council, immediately made ar-
rangements with ECU housekeeping
assistant James Wooten to provide
extra dorm rooms for the displaced
TKE brothers.
"We wanted to make sure they
had a place to stay Mailory told
The East Carolinian.
According to Mailory, this is the
second fraternity house fire that has
occurred since he has been at ECU
He said that about 10 ears ago a
furnace explosion in the Phi Kappa
Phi house completely destroyed the
building. "Ail that was left was rub-
ble Mailory said. No one was hurt
in that fire either and the building
has now been rebuilt.
Mailory also had strong words ot
praise for the Greenville Fire
Department. "They did a really
beautiful job; they were really pro-
fessional
Mailory and assistant to the
chancellor Charles R. Blake both
met with the TKE brother, on Mon-
day to provide whatever support
they could. "We don't want them to
get too discouraged Mailory said.
"Vve want them to stay together "
Many other groups and in-
dividuals came to the aid ot the I M
brothers when they received the
news of the fire. Ray thanked the
women living at the Alpha Phi
house, located across the street from
the TKE house, for allowing the
men to use their phone and wash up.
At present, the Alpha Phi's are
coordinating a message service so
family members can keep in touch
with members ot the fraternity.
"We kind of understand what
they're going through, because we
he in a big house too said AJphi
Phi's Panhellemc Representative
Fern Reeves. "We're trying to be
good Samaritans
"The Catholic Newman Center
has helped us out a whole lot Ray
said. According to Catholic Campus
Minister Sister Helen Shondell, so-
meone from the TKE house, which
is next door to the Newman Center,
knocked on her door shortly after 5
a.m. requesting a fire extinguisher
A short time later, Sister Shondeii
See FIRE, Page 6
Robbery Losses In Thousands
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Sfaf rtut
Two ECU fraternity houses and
another house occupied bv seven
students were burglarized during the
Christmas holiday break even
though robberies were down in com-
parison to last year.
The Phi Kappa Tau fraternity-
house located at 409 Elizabeth St.
was hit the worst with losses
estimated at over $5,000 from two
separate burglaries within three
days.
According to former Phi Kappa
Tau President Bobby Pierce, who
recently moved out of the fraternity
house, the burglars broke a hole in a
door that was in a secluded section
of the house and proceeded to ran-
sack the rooms of the 20 students
who live there. The earlier burglary-
was not as serious and only one
room was robbed.
Pierce, who is also the executive
council president of the Inter-
Fraternity Council, said the frater-
nity brothers "were pretty disap-
pointed" with what they described
as inadequate police surveillance of
their home.
Pierce noted that the police were
intormed in advance by fraternity
brother Mark Winstead that the
house would be vacant during the
semester break. We made a special
request to the police to watch over
the house. Pierce said. "They
assured us that they would watch
over the house as best they could
Pierce added that his group
makes this request whenever they
know in advance that the house will
be empty.
"All we can do is put locks on the
doors Pierce said. "We can't af-
ford anv kind oi sophisticated alarm
system
The Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity
house, which is located directly
across the street from the Phi Kappa
Tau house, at 500 East Elizabeth St.
was also burglarized during the
break.
The door ot the Lamda Chi house
was broken down, said Lambda Chi
President John Greer, who added
that the Greenville Police were
cooperative.
"They didn't get much Greer
said. He said most of the residents
had taken their valuables home with
them or they were lockeu up.
The third major burglary took
place at 707 E. 3rd St. where
numerous items valued at over
51,000 were taken. According to
one resident, Wanda Shatter, the
thefts were partially responsible lor
two other women moving out ot the
house.
"Jwo girls moved out right atier
th� burglary Shatter said. One,
who had her television set and
kerosene heater stolen, said she
could not afford a new heater and
moved back home with her parents.
Other items stolen included two
other heaters, one of them kerosene,
a clock radio and a large cassette
player.
The burglers gained entrance
through a side door which led to the
kitchen. "They snipped off the
handles and opened the door
Shaffer said. "They also left all the
lights on She said the house was
left in disarray from the robbery
with drawers and belongings out of
place.
Shaffer said that the police came
and took several pictures and finger-
print samples, but it is unknown if
there are any leads at this time.
Shaffer said that two new people
have moved into the house and that
they have all purchased and install-
ed several dead bolt locks.
According to Greenville Chief of
Police Glenn Cannon, break-ins
Just An Average Crowd
.�rfT,
A near sellout crowd of 5700 packed into the ECU mens' basketball game to make the eighth largest crowd in
ECU history. The Pirates came away with a 43-41 victory. See SPORTS, page 10.
were down considerably from last
year. "We had less this year than we
had last year at this time Cannon
told The East Carolinian. He had no
exact figures on the number of
break-in incidents.
Cannon attributed much of the
reduction in break-ins to what he
referred to as the "attack squad a
new unit of the Greenville Police
Department which is "flexible" and
can be assigned to concentrate on
specific problems in the city.
New Frontiers A vailable
For ECU Scuba Divers
Groups Plan Tribute On King's Birthday
A birthday tribute to the late Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr a leader of
the struggle for civil rights in the
1960s, will be sponsored by ECU'S
two largest minority organizations
Friday.
The ECU chapter of the National
Association for the Advancement of
Colored People and the Society of
United Liberal Students will jointly
sponsor a series of events to coin-
cide with the 54th anniversary of
PMtO �v CMAP OUHLIY
Students marched last year in honor of Martin Luther King's birthday. Tributes and activities are planned again
this year on campus in honor of the civil rights leader.
King's birth, who was assassinated
in 1968 in Memphis, Tenn.
Participants are being asked to
gather in front of the ECU Student
Supply Store at noon Friday for an
introduction and service in honor of
King. The group plans to march in
tribute to King and then gather in
Wright Auditorium to hear various
presentations and a performance by
the ECU Gospel Choir. A silent
tribute remembering King will also
be conducted.
According to SOULS President
Barbara Battle, the keynote speech
will be presented by the Rev. Eddie
Wayne Lawrence a graduate of
Hampton Institute. Battle described
Lawrence as a dynamic speaker who
knew the true meaning of King's
work.
Battle said it was important to
celebrate King's birthday "because
in remembering his birth, it let's us
know what he stood for Accor-
ding to Battle, King represented
leadership, equality and the practice
of nonviolence.
"In doing it all, he practiced in a
nonviolent way Battle said. "In
the struggle that we still have for
equality, we should remember the
See, TRIBUTES, Page 3
By GREG R1DEOL T
Nr�� Editor
Some people say that space is the
final frontier, but there's a group of
people at Minges pool who think
otherwise. To them there is a place
right here on Earth that satisfies all
their exploring desires. The place is
the ocean; the people are ECU's
scuba divers.
Director of Aquatics Ray Scharf
said each semester his basic scuba
diving course is filled with over 50
students. So, to keep his former
pupils interested and to give them
the opportunity to use the skills he
and the other instructors at Minges
have taught them, the aquatics pro-
gram sponsors trips to "dive spots"
around the world.
"Since I have taught scuba we
have certified 213 students Scharf
said. "We are trying to make ECU a
major center for aquatics
The trip this semester will be to
the Bimini Islands in the Bahamas.
It will take place during spring
break and cost $540. Scharf believes
this to be an excellent deal.
Sharf has taken ECU divers to
places such as Jamaica and Mexico
in the past. He says any certified
diver at ECU is welcome on the
trips. The diving venture includes
everything; all the student has to do
is get to Jacksonville, Fla.
Part of Scharf s goal includes
establishing an advanced scuba
course at ECU. The curriculum of
the course is in the process of being
approved and is expected to be
taught in the fall of '83.
Scuba, scharf says, is only part of
the overall aquatics program.
Among the other courses taught are
lifesaving. swimming, and various
water sports.
"There are programs here at ECU
that require a student to be able to
scuba dive Sharf explained. "We
give them the opportunity
Scharf, who has been a certified
instructor since 1972, said diving is
not a hard skill to learn and is not
physically demanding, but it is a
sport that is very safety conscious.
"We take every precaution
Scharf said he hopes all his
former students will take part in the
different trips offered. He says it is
an opportunity you might not have
again, and diving to Mr. Scharf is
out of this world.
ECU Student Dies
In Auto Accident
Near Edenton, N.C.
ECU student George S.
Underkofler died in an auto acci-
dent Sunday near his home town of
Edenton, N.C. Underkofler, 22,
was a senior in industrial
technology.
According to Highway Patrol Of-
ficer Joel Siles investigating the acci-
dent, Underkofler was alone travel-
ing north on N.C. State road
32His car ran off the road and
struck a bridge rail end Siles said.
Underkofler's 1975 Ford fell into
Queen Anne Creek, a mile south of
Edenton.
Underkofler's funeral will be held
Wednesday at 10 a.m. in St. Ann's
Catholic Church in Edenton.
1
llll IW.II Hill IIUPI tCU .11







THE HAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 11,1983
A
j

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This space s available to all
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ments
STUDENT UNION
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Committee s sponsoring
�he perfect 'rip tor 1983 Spring
Break An � NT I HE WE bh. of tun
and excitement a' D'Sney World
n For' Lauoerciair Just think
only $179 for the whole week of
Spring B'ean - Flori da it in
terestea contact 'he central
Ticket Office a' MbC SPACE IS
LIMITED so can now at 757 6611
Ext 226
BAPTIST CHURCH
7 here is a bus rou'e tor students
who wsh to attend Sjnoay service
at Sycamore Mill Baptist Church
'he fus leases the curc and
qor -� � amp s �� m w sin
S' b, v " r f lem -g anj other
oor-ns a' '0 JO am swing ng back
on 5th going fo am carripus m
back of dorms anc swinging by
Belk D rn It .eaves anc goes
� � SS s � oorms on south
Side (Of campus' o later than
10 SO am arriving at church at
U 00
EPISCOPAL
SERVICE
�� nH ' t sopai service of
HOI Inmur n aimbe
(flf'S. - �, evenng
January" � ' apei ofs;
( �rch. 406J
��e- �� Iron1 If
Dorm'Tneser.ewiiibea'531
P m yyifh 'he bpscopai Chaplain
"e KevB "adder celebra'ing
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY' Do you enioy trienaly
fellowship good fr.enas ana food
ana a chance to be yourself n this
rat race environment at ECU
Then come iom us at the Baptist
Student union where we have dm
nees on Tuesdays at s 30 tor only
S,I5 PAUSE on Thursdays at
00 Jp a'lovv js tc -ake a break
afler an aimos' fulfilling week
ana lots of people �ske ��
eniov others Call S2 446 t you
ave an, ques'irrs Bob C �de
campus m msfer

Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T Shirts Sleeping Bags
Backpacks Camping Equip
men! Steel Toed Shoes Dishes
ane Over too Different New and
Used Item; Cowboy Boots
ARMY-NAVY
STORE
I SOI
Evans
ABORTIONS
1-24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALLTOLLFREE
1-800-321-0575
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
s AD's
SHOE KIP UK
113Grande Ave.
758-1228
.GETA
�FREE PUFF
� We rt the Pufl Pittoi " Speedy
Hindi BeauMui and H-lprul
and m make sute you ha�e no
i hassles it Foto Eipiess �ach
lime you bmg in a disc or toll ol
colot prnil dim tot processing,
Uke one ol us home FREE
� And enter the monthly coloring
� contests lo win out big brother
Ian i SuperPufl Coloring B
sheets and contest rules are I
available al each location
�fotoexpress �
217 E. 10th St.
Beside Hardee's Downtown
ALL CAMPUS
PARTY
The Brothers. Pledges and the
Little Sisters of Kappa Sigma
fraternity would like to welcome
back the Students of ECU We
hope that each one of you had a
Great Holiday season We will be
having an all campus party Satur
day night (BYOB) before during
and after downtown Floyd, let's
have a keg this afternoon
EXERCISE
-A-
THON
An exercise a thon to benefit
Cystic Fibrosis will be held at the
Aerobic Workshop locted at 417
Evans Street Mall, on Saturday
January 22 Participants in the
event will begin exercising at 11
a m Ail tunas raised will be used
to help Cystic Fibrosis
A grand prize will be awarded to
'he top fundraiser at me exercise
a tnon All participants raising 130
or more will receive CF I did It"
t shirts and all participants who
rase J75 or more will receive
t shirts and a roil tote bag
Funds raised in the CF
Exercise a tnon will help support
the Foundation s research treat
ment and education programs in
NC and nationwide CF is a fatal
lung and digestive disease that
'akes 'he lives of half its victims
before they reach their hjventies
CF causes excessive amounts of
thick mucus to clog lungs ano m
'ertere with breathing ana absorp
tion of food
For more information about
participating m the exercise a
thon. or sponsoring someone,
piease contact the Aerobic
Workshop at 757 16C8
BOWLING
The 1983 spring semester
Mendenhall Student Center Mixed
Doubles Bowling Leagues will
begin the second week of classes
All ECU students interested m
bowling on a mixed league must
sign up on the bulletin board on the
bottom Moor of Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Each team must con
sist ot 2 men and 2 women The
cost is S2 25 per person each night
Awards will be given to the top
male and female bowler and to the
winning team The Organizational
meeting tor the Monday night
league will be held Monday. Jan
17 at 5 00 pm in the Bowling
Center The organization meeting
tor the Tuesday night league will
be held Tuesday, Jan 18 a' 5 00
pm in the Bowling Center Play
will begin directly following these
meetings For further info call
Linda Barkand, MSC Crafts and
Recreation Director at 757 6611
ext 260 or the Bowling Center at
757 6611 ext 267
BINGO
The Department of university
Unions is sponsoring another
Bingo Ice Cream party ro be held
at 7 00 pm on Tuesday, Jan 11.
1983 In the Mendenhall Student
Center Multi Purpose Room All
ECU students, faculty staff ano
their dependents are welcome Aa
mission is 25 cents per person The
prizes this month will include
crafts and recreational passes.
tickets to Artists Series events,
lectures and concerts Enioy the
delicious ice cream ano iom in on
the fun ot Bingo Bring a friend'
MARK TWAIN
IN PERSON
Mark Twain in Person will be
a' the Kmston Airport Theatre
Stalhngs Field Rouse Ro
January 28 and 29 Snows begm a'
8 15pm Student tickets are 13 in
advance For moare information
contact Leigh Riggs at 527 2517
Kmston Arts Council
SPOLETO FESTIVAL
The Spoieto Festival in
Charleston, SC is seek ng qualified
s'uden's to serve as apprentices
for the Festival heia May 2C June
5 There is a variety of positions
available Application deadline is
Feb l Contaci the Coop office
313 Rawi
NC GOVERNMENT
INTERNSHIPS
A variety ot iOds are available
Pay is S3 75 per hour tor full time
positions Beginning June 1
Augus' 5 Students must nave
finished their sophmore year ana
nave a25 GPA Graouate
students are also eligible to apply
Application deadline is February
7 Contact the Co op office
ZETA BETA TAU
There will be a meeting Tuesday
night at 7 00 m the Coffee House at
Menaennaii Student Center All
members should 'ry to attend
SNOWSKI
Those skiers who want to 'ake
Snowskiing tor credit during Spr
mg Semester should add PHVE
1000 or PHYE 1150 or PHYE 1151
during Drop Aad On Campus
classes in conditioning precede a
spring break trip Snowshoe. WV
for the finest skiing in the south
Contact Jo Saunaers at 757 6000 tor
further information about 'he ski
program ana ski tor creait or go
non creait
ONE DAY
COMPUTER
PROGRAMS
The SMan Computer
Revolution Saturday. February
26. 1983 Word Processing
Saturday Marcn 5. 1983
Pre requisite The Small Com
puter Revolution or equivalent in
troduction to Programming in
BASIC, Saturday March 26. 1983
Prerequisite The Small Com
puter Revolution or equivalent
Contact the Division of Continuing
Education, 757 6143
BASIC SAILING
Two classroom sessions and
three weekend afternoons on 19 26
toot baots on the Pamlico River
Join m the Fun Registration is
limited to 16, so register early.
Meets Thursday. April 7 21
7 30 9 30 p m . Saturday. April 9.
16, 23, 1 30 a 30 p m Contact the
Division ot Continuing Education.
757 6143
COMMUNICATE
Learn to develop assertive com
munication skills Tell others what
you want, feel, and believe Asser
tiveness can open new doors tor
you Assertive Communication
Tuesday March 15 April 5,
7 00 9 30 p m Contac! the Divi
sion of Continuing Education.
757 6143
INVESTMENT
STRATEGIES
Basic Commodity Hedging
Tuesday and Thursday, February
15 24, 7 00 9 00 p m investing in
the 80 s Wednesday. February 23
April � 6 30 9 10 p m These
courses will provide valuable in
formation tor those who nave little
on no expennce in investing Con
tact the Division or Continuing
Education. 757 6143
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Camera I Tuesday, feoruarv
22 March 29. 7 00 9 00 p m Tne
Dance Factory Tuesday.
February 22 May 3. 5 30 6 30
pm Gudar Tuesday, February
22 April 19. 6 30 7 45 p m Clogg
.ng Wednesday, February 23
April 6 8 00 10 00 p m Speed
Reading Thursday. February 24
April 21 7 00 9 00 p m Yoga
Tuesday ana Thursday March 15
April 7 6 30 7 30 p m Contact the
Division ot Continuing Education,
757 6143
DANCE
i- �'r.i Hhumba. Disco. Waitz
and Bop the basics and their
variations Beginning Ballroom
Dancing Fnoay February 18
April 29 1983 from 7 00 8 00 p m
Intermeaiate Ballroom Dancing
Friday February 18 April 29,
1983 from 8 00 9 00 p m Contact
'he Division of Continuing Educa
tion, 757 6143
SCUBA
Basic NAUI or PADl Scuba Cer
titication Section i Tuesday ana
thursaay March 15 April 7
7 00 10 00 p m Section II Tues
day ana Thursday, Apr.i 12 May
5, 7 00 10 00 p m These courses
are designed to introduce begin
ners to SCUBA diving with basic
instruction m the fundamental
skills and safety procedures
Register early ' Con'aC the Divi
Sion ot Continuing Education.
757 6143
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more Noes. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line hi word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75C per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Rrtam to THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office by 3:00 Tuesday before
WedacMiay pabMcattoas
Name
Address.
CityState.
Np. lines
.Zip.
.Phone.
at 75C per line $.
, No. insertions.
.enclosed
I i i J T " I "1 T T ' T T T I ' "1f T t T T
, , mi. , J�� i�- ��1 � �-1�� ii�I
,r �. . ,� i11� i�i i�� �i � �
. , �� i�� j� i� �11 �i
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i1
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1 s� 1 I I .� i LJ 1.1.1 M 1 I 1.1 I 1 I � I l J i 1 i I l i
COUNSELING
A program tor increasing Lear
nmg Efficiency will be ottered by
the Counseling Center this Spring
Dr George Weigand will teach the
classes on Monday ana Weanes
day at 1 00 P M beginning
January 17 and Dr lone Ryan will
teach the class on Tuesday ana
Thursday at 1 00 P M beomning
January 18 Both groups will mee'
in 305 Wright Annex. The classes
are available to all students At
tendance is voluntary no formal
registration is required
COUNSELING
CENTER
The Counseling Center will be
giving the Strong Campbell In
'erest inventory Tuesday.
January is from 4 5 PM in 305
Wr.ght Annex This is available to
all students No formal registra
tion is required
GAMMA BETA PHI
Our first meeting of the Spring
semester will be held on Thurs
day. Jan 13th ,n Rm 244 MSC
Members, we are urging you to In
vite your friends who may wish to
iom and who posses G P A s ot 3 0
or better Membership applica
lions will be provided at all ot the
biweekly meetings
PHI SIGMA PI
Phi Sigma Pi is hosting a dance
contest for Cerebral Palsy on
January 14 1983 at Papa Katz
from 8 00 1 00 There will De two
categories tree style and shag
with $100 00 going to each first
place, second ano third place
prizes will also be awarded John
Moore will be spinning the tunes
For further into contact Kim at
355 6727
NAACP
There will be a Martin Luther
King Bir'hday Celebration begmn
mg m front of the bookstore at
12 00 noon on Friday. Jan 14 1983
There will first be a silent tribute
and then a march proceeding to
Wright Auditorium where the ser
vices will take place Aisoarecep
tion will be held immediately
afterwards Everyone please a'
'end Sponsored bgy NAACP and
SOULS
NAACP
T here win be a NAACP meeting
Thursday, January 13 at 5 00 in
Mendenhall. Room 248 AM
members please a"ena This is a
very important meeting
204 5th St
iAppte jocofcds
GOLDEN EARRING
MEN AT WORK
OZZIEOSBOURNE
SPINNERS
CONFUCTION
LEDZEPPLIN
FOREIGNER
RICK SPRINGFIELD
DONNIE IRIS
LINDA RONSTADT
PLASMATICS
JESSE COLIN YOUNG
PHOTOS - BUTTONS - PHOTOS -
BUTTONS - PHOTOS - BUTTONS
GREATEST CONCERT ROCK N' ROLL
STARS & MOVIE GREATS.
COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS & BUTTONS
Now on Sale.
Dates: Mon Jan.lO-Fri Jan.14
1 lace: MSC � 1st Floor Newspaper Lounge
Sponsored By: Mendenhall Student Center
Adam & the Ants
Pat Benatar Eddie Money
Beatles Genesis
Clash '
, J
Springsteen
Lep Zepplin
Police
-��-
'i
; ,

n
J. Geils L
�. -v '
Skynyrd
Tom Petty
LJj
ourney
Rolling Stones Van Halen
Rush the Who
Springfield And Hundreds More.
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
The ECU Sign Language Club
will hold its regular bimonthly
covered dish supper and meeting
on Sunday, Jan 16th at the
Mendenhall Student Center Multi
Purpose Room The supper will
begin at 6 00 pm with a short
business meeting ano captioneo
film to follow The meal and
meeting are open to any interested
student, faculty member or a
member of the community You do
not need to know Sign Language to
attend, but students who are tak
,ng sign language classes or who
have taken them m the past are
encouraged to attend The purpose
of the SLC is to allow Sign
language students and hearing im
apired students and community
leaders to socialize and develop
communication skills We nope to
see you there
MODELS NEEDED
Models needed for Art Depart
ment seif help positions are
available tor nude model.ng at
S5 02 per hour PLease see the
following teachers Ray Elmore
Tran Gordley. Davy Davenport
WesCrawley. Be'sy Ross Michael
Voors
RUGBY
. There will be an organizational
meeting Monday. January 17fh at
4 00 tor an women interes'ec in
playing Rugby this semester
Plans tor 'he upcoming season ana
the Spring tournament will be
discussea T"e meeting will be
heia in Memorial Gym, Room 104
No experience s requ'reo so come
find out what rugby is an abou
SURFCLUB
The first meeting of the spr ng
semester win oe Thursday
January 13 at 7 00 pm 'n
Mendenhall Dues must De paid by
then Plans tor a possible contest
In Fioriaa during spring breafMv II
P� 3i�cuss�o Anyone Inlre4i in
lOimng the club is welcome
USCHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
The U S Chamber of Commerce
has internships available tor a
variety of maiors They are
located m Washington. DC All in
ternships are non paid Contact
the Co op Office
NATIONAL PARK
CONCESSIONS,INC.
National Park Concessions, inc
offers employment opportunities
tor seasonal employees tor the
period of approximately June l
through Labor Day to be con
sdered This is a condition of the
employment A variety ot posi
tions are available Apply at the
Co op Office
STUDIES
A two part mm, series will be of
fered at no cost by the university
Counseling Center on How to Sue
ceea in College ana Still Have Fun
on Monday January 17 Another
series, how to Avoid Tes' Ax-e'v
will be ottered 0�l Tuesday
January 18 Both sess�s a De
conaue'ea from 3 p m inupm in
305 Wnght Annex 757 6661 N M
vance registration necessary
LEARNING
DISABILITY
it you nave a iearn;ng csac
and or a.siex a a-c ton a-� a
ing to talk abou' it can 757 3205
Dr Penn, �n �s ft v �norms
tion Icr a" a?" if - a profess ruj
lOurnai Conf ae at "f assured
Piease cai evf gs ' ��fos
ACTING CLASS
Ac'ing cass -ee's Moncav
February 14 MaKCfl ft
pm Beginning Acting : a ?
quaint you w'r basic adng
techniques retieC've ot the
� method approach instructor t
S'eve F .nnan. a tomer meroer of
the ECU Dpare .f Warna
ana Speech � ras a re, -ec BH
oroaowa? D'oou I rs n New
York Ccn-ac' D vs n if Cont -
ng Eauca'on 757 6143
COMMUNICATE IN
SPANISHOR GERMAN
Conversational Span.sn Tues
day, feoruary 15 Apr i 26 7 8 30
p m Conversational German
Tuesday February 15 Apr,i 26
7 8 30 p m Both courses are open
to both beginners anc former
students who wan' o brush up
on the language Contact the D'Vi
Sion of Cont.nu'hg Education
757 6143
UNDERWATER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Tuesday ana trscj,
February 15 24 from 7 10pm P'e
requisite Basc Scuba Ce �
ton from a recognized Scuba �
ing association Such as NAUI or
PADi Tr.s is a course of unjer
wa'e' camera hanonng and
covers underwater pneograpr c
eau'pnen' f m onoto 'eenn,
ques ana iignpg 'ecr- ques Cor
tact Division of Con- nu ng Educa
'ion 757 6143
OFFICIATING
Baseca Sot'ba" Official
Vo-aat Fecua'r -p-
trom 7 v c rr. - e course 'S oesg-
eo to be of r"erev tc spectators
players coaces ana -
� au'a 'eacners ao
�: prepare 'nose '�'e'es'ec n
�� -ifs mumpiring Contact
e D � s��:�" if Cr Ruing I
tion. 757 ��43
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
� � ��� N. � -
. " 'ike '� - evervor t
� It jS � ' lOM
Mass ever, Sunday - � .
L� ' -�- r-ia s'a" . v . X ac
every Aeonesda. a- i 0t a- e
. tt ; Newma" CfV - � �
� ��Dct'0 Df Cpgp �
S. R. A.
Escorts are needed tor 'he
tsc " Service Anyone nteresiea
n oeng an escor' piease con'ac-
JOrai 'es 3e M � ,ou 1 ve oft
ar-pus a ' e SvA - ce
The Kaslarolinian
Srr imjr I He, a� , - �
Puo re: every Tux
hursc- .
tear a-c �.�r, Ane-
ig tne sun- �
The Eas' Ca- rim
c i 1 ne wsp a pi
C�� �. nec
ipera't-
C, �f s �� � .
Subscription Rate siCyean,
The Est Carotiniar
are loca'ed r 'ne Old Sou
Buiidirq on 'he tiifpys o' EC.
Greenville H C
- - .
e East Can
� -�
� . s: 834
Telephone �� SM 4i ,K.
HONORS
SIMINAR TOPICS
Facu -�
Honors !�;�- .
the oppor �.
tor Hoi
SP' ng se- �
seminars a
� � -
or e-ec . .
I�i2 61 . .
a'�yv.r -s - - .
we� - .

tors

Dep-
AMBASSADORS
�'
Meet
-a- .
v 1 s. n I
Cou
�ASHI
(LP1) - The H
Court Mon
an appea.
Creen Berc' h
Mac Donah:
his murcte'
for the
wife and
daughters in '
If a tlH I
Ma.I; � ,
before the
Court in -
clear mr.
stemminf
Trl
( ontmued h�
a in
LC 1
Jen- J .
tha
:
' ' '
-
K
cciefc ai
bin-
same rea
celcbrai
Ch-
"The
th:r.
-
M
e
lb(f�d)iy)V
PITT PLAZA
'
Y:v-xX;jXv
:�fvyxovx-vixv
UP TO
STOREWIDE SEMI-ANNUAL
CLEARANCE
�SUITS
�SPORTCOATS
�DRESS-SHIRTS
�SPORTSHIRTS
�DRESS SLACKS
�SPORT SLACKS
�SWEATERS
�NECKWEAR
�OUTERWEAR
�LEVI'S
�ACCESSORIES
�SHOES
bt?�d)y
OPEN NIGHTLY TILL 9:00 it

� for men
sS
� rV
CH
3 U
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"o s
O fs.
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.Phone.
.enclosed
1 1
t
- -
4-
-i-
I
1�t���t�
4
i 1 I i i 1 I
1 he Eastarolinian
- � � ' � -�' � oay and
- � a-aoemic
n Cm -Me ot
" P�P � East
' n ownea,
� B sKec �or arxs
� 'I �� Carolina
son Rate KO yearly
"� En' Car0nian offices
are located in r,e Old South
-�a on -h tampus of ECU
G'eenmie H C
Seofl aaaressl
T"e Eras' Carol,nian
' CU Green
Teteoione
'5' �364. �J7 430,
HONORS
SIMINAR TOPICS
-oers ano current
' ;3 are remmoea ot
'� C CrDCose top.cj
ars �or tail ana
rs i�83 84 Tnes,
oeaiiy .nter
" ' T � tOP,c
sc 8' gg ot ne
several
M - -�e- once a
s cre3T
W0u "ementj
" coposais
� ' - ' ng 0y
N Dr Dav-o
�" - r��to� of the
English
�!i Campus For
TSt oSs
AMBASSADORS
A" m� 5ac. AmDassaoors
- -ave our f rs. Genera.
' �� or- Aeonesda,
"� seg - at 5 00 .n tn�
'�" ' Ourpose room Plans
sa tor our mouction
"� S tCftSdUMM for Tiurs
� -a- � a. p,an or. see.ng
f
AL
SSL MacDonald
UPI) - The s� ' �"ders, which he k
II�OyN!ANiANyAJly
�1, 1983
WAshINgto
ri .7 The SuPrc�
Court Monday rejected
appeal by former
Green Beret Dr. Jeffrey
MacDonald to review
his murder conviction
'or the siayings of his
wife and two young
daughters in 1970
It was the third time
MacDonald has come
before the Supreme
Court m his quest to
clear himself of charges
stemming from the
murders, which
claims were committed
by drug-crazed hippies.
M�nday's decision
'eaves his conviction
standing.
Last March, the high
court reinstated the
conviction and Mac-
Donald returned to a
federal prison to serve
three life sentences.
The justices struck
down a ruling that
found MacDonald was
denied a speedy trial
because five years
elapsed between the
time of his arrest by the
Army in 1970 and his
indictment by a federal
grand jury in 1975 He
was stationed at Fort
Bragg, N.C at the
time of the siayings
MacDonald said four
people burst into his
duplex and stabbed his
wife Colleen, and
daughters, Kristen and
Kimberly, to death in
tne early morning
hours of Feb. 17, 1970.
He sufffered stab
wounds, including one
that collapsed his right
lung.
He was convicted in
1979 in federal court.
MacDonald asked
the justices to review an
Aug. 16, 1982, ruling
by the U.S. 4th Circuit
Court of Appeals there
was insufficient
evidence to support his
claim that hippies com-
mitted the murders.
PHI KAPPATAU
PRE-RUSH
BLAST
Co�,inued From Page 1 things, especially ,n his
way in which he did ar?HVcr?lent. 'eadershio
it a and struggle for civil
ECU-NAArP d r'gh,s for aU America"
den,� JacRowe Sd' teel
th.s ,s the second ve 'mp�rtam to com'
that the event has hln memorate a great man
2S2�?! B.u,ee�Tged all
Rowe said ' sl"denls to Participate
Rowe noted ih- a" Sk,p c,asses �f
celebration of Km, l� remember
b-th is heldTh eybado116
same reason there are in1 - , � par"
celebrations for George iL h Said
Washington or � Pe that pro"
ressors won't count it
Honor King
pressure to attend
classes and that for an
event as important as
this she hoped they
could be excused.
Rowe said that the
Alpha Phi Alpha
fraternity would be
helping with the pro-
gram and organizeing
the silent tribute. She
said King was a brother
m Alpha Phi Alpha.
Both Rowe and Bat-
tle are in favor of mak-
ing the birthday of
King a national holi-
day, but currently no
action has been taken
at the congressional
level.
Christopher Columbus
They all did great
things for this coun-
try said Rowe. "And
I think Martin Luther
King did many great
against students who
don't attend their
classes to participate in
the celebration
Battle said many
students often feel
-PtAZASHOPPING CENTER
752-7303
3 BAND
WE WANT M JO BE A
PHI TAU
THIS WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
409 ELIZABETH ST. 752"0469
&fwi
TO 1st 100 PEOPLE
BANDS START 9:00 P.M.
THURS �
X-RAVES
g�BS5 y.GHT migmt
DON'T FORGET
RUSilli
MONTUESWED.
JAN. 17-19
9:00 p.muntil
t-�A f
WZMB IS BACK! ! Wednesday
JANUARY 12,1983
BE SURE TO TUNE INTO NEWS 91-MonFri 755A 9.55 ll.tt io.c� , KK A er , mm
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Stie �afit Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Mil ler, cmmmiMmm
Mike Hughes, mimt rmr
Waverly MERRITT. mm o, i .
Scott Lindley, r imfi. gj
ALI AFRASHTEH, o Mm��
Stephanie Groon, n- w irimimi
JONI GUTHRIE. r�Mo(Sinw
Cindy Pleasants, su caw
Greg Rideout, ne
Steve Bachner, & tduor
Juliana Fahrbach. $,?!&��
Mike Davis, production itr
January 11, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
N.C. Prisons
Reluctant To Try Alternatives
The fact that North Carolina's
prisons are extremely overcrowded
comes as no surprise to anyone. In-
deed, according to the latest figures
released by the justice department,
the state has the third-highest in-
carceration rate in the country,
making it fifth in prison population,
behind Texas, California, New
York and Florida. It's no surprise.
What does come as a slight sur-
prise � although it probably
shouldn't � is the "lockem-up"
attitude that continues to prevail in
North Carolina and throughout the
South, even in this "age of
rehabilitation
For instance, in a recent interview
with the News and Observer, state
Sen. Henson P. Barnes (former
chairman of a Senate Judiciary
Committee) said of the state's
prison system: "I think the public
does not feel that too many people
have been incarcerated or have
stayed too long in prison. The
general mood of the public is to put
them in jail and leave them there
And tor the most part, Barnes is
right. The general attitude toward
convicted criminals in the state is,
indeed, reminiscent of infamous
Medieval conceptions on how to
deal with rampant recitivism. After
all, it's an eye for an eye right?
Unfortunately, it is, at the same
time, just that simple and just that
complicated. North Carolina's
prisons are overcrowded for a
number of reasons. First of all, the
state has a stricter criminal code
than most, allowing for those per-
sons convicted of misdemeanors to
be jailed alongside convicted felons.
Secondly, the state has spent $110
million in the past seven years on
prison facilities, providing for
greater and greater overcrowding
each year.
However, as of last month, supp-
ly had not kept up with demand. On
Dec. 1, the state's prisons, which
are designed to hold 14,838 inmates,
had an overflow of 2,510. And
despite the projected openings of
three facilities this year, officials
predict that overcrowding in North
Carolina's prisons will reach or top
15 percent by June.
Some members of the state Senate
are currently pushing for additional
funds to be allocated for the con-
struction and maintenance of new
prison facilities. However, most
state officials consider it highly
unlikely that sufficient monies will
be allocated anytime in the near
future to combat the overcrowding
problem.
Furthermore, the Citizens Com-
mission on Alternatives to In-
carceration (appointed by Gov.
Hunt) recently recommended to the
governor that a greater emphasis be
placed on alternative punishments
in the future.
The group suggested that no
funds be allocated by the state
legislature for prison construction
until alternative plans can be fully
explored. Among these alternative
plans is one calling for those con-
victed of misdemeanors and non-
violent felonies to serve in com-
munity work programs rather than
in jail cells.
The commission also suggested a
revaluation of the length of various
prison sentences, greater early-
release incentives for inmates, the
institution of a sentencing review
board, an expanded pretrial-release
program and other experimental op-
tions, each of which provides the
state with a viable alternative.
For instance, if the commission's
proposal concerning convicted
misdemeanants were instituted, it
would single-handedly account for a
17-percent decrease in the state's
prison population.
In addition, several counties
around the state (e.g Wake) have
already instituted successful felony
diversion programs, designed to
steer first-time offenders away from
prison.
Unfortunately, despite the ap-
parent benefits of these proposals,
several of the state's legislators
predict that most don't have much
of a chance of passage in this year's
legislature.
In effect, what they're saying is
that North Carolina's prisons will
remain, as they've been in the past,
overcrowded institutions aimed
more at detention than rehabilita-
tion.
To maintain an idealistic position
that criminals will somehow
rehabilitate themselves without any
outside influence runs contrary to
all logic and history. It just won't
happen. Yet maintaining the status
quo in our state's prisons is, in ac-
tuality, a means of achieving the
same end. Rehabilitation programs
are not flawless. They are not the
proverbial "answer" to all of the
state's prison problems. But they
are a viable alternative. It's time for
North Carolina to enter the 20th
century.
Need Some 'Good Advice?'
Editor's Sole: Me are proud to an-
nounce that with this issue. The tost
Carolinian embarks on a new venture. It
has come to our attention that there is a
tremendous need Jor an advisory type col-
umn in the campus and surrounding areas.
It is to this end, then, that we have in-
stituted the following column, titled simply
"Good Advice. " Letters wilt he answered
to the best of my ability, drawing from my
various worldly experiences as a migrant
farmer, plankton fisherman and prize hog
auctioneer.
Naturatly, the success oj this type oj
journalistic venture necessitates the im-
position oj certain rules and regulations.
Unjortunately, these have yet to he deter-
mined. But be advised, when they are
determined, no exceptions will be made for
whatever reason � except, of course, in
extentuating circumstances and like or
similar instances.
Say, for instance, we get j letter from
someone who just doesn't know the rules
and regulations. Welt, we can't really
punish a person for that, can we.
Or maybe that person knows the rules
and regulations but really needs some good
advice on a taboo topic. Maybe he or she is
contemplating suicide, trans)ering to
Carolina or worse. Here again, I can
make an exception.
Good Advice
With Stan Landers
Or say you're a g'rl, a voluptious
blonde. Jor instance, and you just don't
like to play by the rules. Hell, rules never
seem to apply to you anyway, so don't
worry about it.
Only a Jew other exceptions will be
made, so please, please adhere to the rules
and refutations.
All letters will be answered in print, ex-
cept for those about Jetishes Jor small
animals, those which are boring, verbose,
too intellectual to be understood or those
which do not conjorm to the above rules
and regulations.
The writers of said tetters will be duly
flogged and their rule-breaking missives
will be cast into the pit of eternal damna-
tion, where they will probably be read by
our janitor.
Please type all letters. Or, ij you want
to, you can use a pen or pencil. Crayons
will not be considered acceptible, except
maybe for brown crayons. Green crayons
and highlighters may be used Jor em-
phasizing key words, tike "pregnant
"gay" or "Jlea collar. " Brat lie letters will
not he answered.
All tetters to this column must be signed
by initials only. Either use your initials or
those oj someone else. Especially ij your
initials spell some sort of undesirable
word, like t A. r. or S.O B.
All letter, will be edited for brevity,
clarity, libel and too man) big words.
Misspelled profanity and petty personal at-
tacks will not be allowed, unless they add
some spice to the thrust of the letter or are
reasonably humorous.
All letters should be mailed to: STAlS
LAWERS c o The East Carolinian, and
should include a photograph oj the author
as a small child.
NOW THAT ANOTHER
TEAMSTER BOSS HAS
KEN CONVICTED,
WHO'S �T0
FILL HIS SHOES .
GfflEfcr
V
&&lQWCk)CWN&&2
Reagan's 'Mr. Clean'May Just Need A Shower
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
I nurd tralurr Stndicmlt
WASHINGTON � President Reagan's
new selection for the No. 2 post at the Pen-
tagon is a businessman named Paul
Thayer. He is supposed to be the cleanup
man who will cut out waste in military
spending and put the Detense Depart-
ment's fouled-up weapons programs back
on course.
In corporate circles, Thayer is regarded
as a Renaissance Man. He's as much at
home in the cockpit of a stuntplane as he is
at the head of a boardroom table.
But court records and documents in the
files of the Securities and Exchange Com-
mission paint an entirely different picture
of the Pentagon's "Mr. Clean The
records, reviewed by our reporter Jock
Hatfield, refer to Thayer's tenure as ex-
ecutive director and board chairman of the
LTV Corporation. They show that the
company � under Thayer's leadership �
has been linked repeatedly to charges of
fraud, mismanagement, deception and
violation of federal securities laws.
Thayer himself has never been indicted
for misbehavior. He is technically clean. In
the peculiar phrase once used to describe
CIA Chief William Casey, Thayer may be
"not unfit" to hold an important job in
the government.
It is curious, however, that the White
House apparently had little knowledge of
the shady aspects of Thayer's career before
the nomination was sent to the Senate for
confirmation. The information should
have been turned up in the routine FBI in-
vestigation that all presidential appointees
must undergo.
But, according to White House Deputy
Counsel Richard Hauser, most of Thayer's
previous problems with the government
went undetected. "We were unaware of
any SEC matters involving Mr. Thayer
said Hauser. "We were not aware of any
problem which would bear on Mr.
Thayer's future performance
As a result, the Senate Armed Services
Committee, which "advised and con-
sented" on the nomination, had limited
knowledge of the negative information on
Thayer's background before it passed on
his appointment last month.
Here are some of the items that the
senators might have wanted to investigate:
� In 1973, Thayer was charged with il-
legally "dumping" 2,400 shares of LTV
stock in violation of a written agreement.
The agreement was required by federal
law, which forbids executives from
speculating in their own company's stock.
Thayer was cleared when the court found
that he had sold the stock to pay off
gambling debts and loans, not to cash in
on inside information.
� In 1978, the government charged
LTV and its directors � Thayer was not
mentioned by name � with overvaluing
the inventories of a subsidiary by $26
million. Investors who purchased the stock
sued and won a $7.75 million out-of-court
settlement. SEC investigators recently con-
cluded that LTV's management did not en-
force "the standards of ethics that a pro-
perly managed company should maintain
in its accounting practices
� In 1978, Thayer's conglomerate was
convicted on 48 counts of conspiracy and
fraud in its operation of a subsidiary
business-school chain. It seems that LTV
kept tuition money from students who had
federally insured loans but who dropped
out of the schools. The prepaid money
should have been refunded. LTV was fined
$500,000. The fraudulent practice went on
from 1968 to 1973; Thayer's tenure as ex-
ecutive director of the company began in
1970.
WORST TERRORISTS: According to
internal FBI documents, the Puerto Rican
terrorist group called FALN is the most ac-
tive in the United States. This is the
pusillanimous gang that claimed respon-
sibility for the New Year's Eve bombing of
government buildings in New York City
that wounded three policemen.
States one FBI report: "Puerto Rican
terrorist groups will continue to be the
most frequent perpetrators of terrorist in-
cidents in the U.S. as they have been for
the past five years
During that period, there were more
than 300 incidents of terrorism in the
United States, and the FALN is believed to
have been responsible for more than a
third of them.
However, the FBI may be making head-
way. The group was crippled recently by
the arrests of several of its kev leaders.
HEADLINES AND FOOTNOTES:
Beginning last week, the taxpayers are
footing the bill for the health-care
premiums of top-level Postal Service of-
ficials. The backdoor pay raise, said
spokesmen, was necessary to entice
valuable employees to stay on the job. But
the move has infuriated lower-level postal
workers who still have to pay for their own
insurance.
� A classified CIA report claims that
the Soviet Union's economic woes will
result in decreased arms sales to its allies in
the Western Hemisphere. The Kremlin is
expected to market most of its weapons to
its friends in the Middle East, South Asia
and North Africa. This means that
Russia's allies in Central and South
America will get fewer arms.
In
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' I. 11
,�!
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'reuk:ni: missives
' eternal damna-
babi v he read by
Or, ij v(u want
ncil.rayons
ptible, except
s Cireen crayons
used tor em-
" pregnant, "
i letters wit I
a
�(� signed
w initials or
. 'desirable
� brevity,
words.
� personal at-
tess they add
tetter or are
mailed to: S7A.
im Carolinian, and
raph oj the author
iwer
terrorism in the
M N is believed to
tor more than a
a be making head-
pippled recently by
It its key leaders.
ID FOOTNOTES:
'he taxpayers are
I the health-care
Postal Service of-
lr pay raise, said
:essary to entice
s ay on the job. But
d lower-level postal
o pay for their own
report claims that
jconomic woes will
s sales to its allies in
r�e. The Kremlin is
st of its weapons to
le hast. South Asia
i ms means that
Fentral and South
arms.
Infant Plight
Brings Tears
& Donations
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wrilcr
A group of ECU
students responded to a
request by ECU
Catholic chaplain
Girard Sherba by-
donating $263 to a
special collection to
raise funds for a
10-month-old Green-
ville infant who is suf-
fering from leukemia.
In an emotional plea
given during Sunday's
worship service, Father
Sherba told the story of
Douglas Moore,
thought to have very
little time to live, but
who has since found
hope in the possibility
of a bone marrow
transplant operation
from his 22-month-old
sister, Latasha.
Sherba said Moore's
leukemia, a form of
cancer that effects the
blood cells, was
diagnosed on Nov. 5.
"At that point, they
(doctors) thought there
was no hope Sherba
said.
Since then, doctors
have discovered that
Latasha has the same
blood type and similar
chromosome structure
as her brother and that
a transplant operation
is possible. The nearest
hospital that performs
such an operation is in
Gainsville, Fla. The
family, which is
"destitute according
to Sherba, had to raise
$2000 immediately to
save the child's life.
During a five-minute
plea after the Sundav
service, Sherba appeal-
ed to ECU students to
give whatever they
could. His appeal left
many of the students in
tears and produced a
record collection of
$263.
Sister Helen Shondell
partially credited Sher-
ba's emotional plea for
the generous response.
"It was so touching
everyone was so moved
by it
"I'm just over-
whelmed by the
response of everyone
said Sherba, who col-
lected close to $1500 at
the four services he
conducted on Sunday.
"My faith in people's
sensitivity to other's
needs has been fortified
once again
Sherba noted that the
Moore family was
among a group of thir-
teen local families who
received Christmas
food baskets last
month because they
were poor. They have
two other children
besides Douglas and
Latasha.
Sherba said the
Moore infant has been
in and out of the
hospital since he was
born.
Sherba was especially
pleased that the
students response was
so great so soon after
Christmas. "They saw
a need that was really
definite � that they
could put their hands
on Sherba said.
"People are .mng the
taith that we professed
at Christmas time
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INC.
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March 4 from Miami
$285 per person
double
3 nights aboard s AMER1KANIS
Plus 2 nights FREE at Diplomat Hotel,
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March 7 from Miami
$399 per person
quad
4 nights aboard � DOLPHIN
ii cotsMh St if you like cruising ia the sun
�ravine 7J7-MM CaJI wow-Space Liadted
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY i 1. 1985 5
FOOD TOWN
FOOD LION
� otV;
These prices good thru
Saturday, January5 1985
eJ
New York
Strip
Steaks
S��
Bone In
Chuck
Roast
U. S. 1 20 Lb. Baa
White
Potatoes
tLHar
(�ftTa
Gallo
Chablis, Burgundy,
Rhine & Pink
3 Litre
$59
Phi. if -11 0t. Gam
Budweiser
Beer
Pk .1411 0. Ctat
22 Ounce
Oaart
I
Why Pay M 29

6.SO2. -U. Cliaak Tata la Oil
Way Pay M.29
119 Shuts tare
Scott
Towels
Why Pay 87 ��
f
IM
Wkf P�� '1.09
n$.�
Fresh
Picnics
88 u
4100
1r 0i. - IkarMaat Fieh 1 Chick- Cat Fe4
Puss N' Boots
Half Otllat � Daaala" Patk
3100
Ilk. FiWIm
Orange Juiee Margarine Quarters
�:

- � 11-0. - libhy 1
Luneheofi Meat
4n00
7.15 0 � U.i Ttm
Macaroni & Cheese
289�
17 Ot. - Dal Maala Whel Create Style
h
OiO
1 Hi 4 (til Put
olden Corn Edonjoilet Tissue j
LEWS.
IS 0; Stew
Ken-L
Ration
Why Pay 2 77'
Kenl
ration 4?l
FOOD
49 0; With Softener
� ��
32 Ounce
Del Monte �
Catsup 4v
Why Pay ;1 19
catsup
aMajaaaaahaP
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'







1 HI t AM t. AROI MAN
AM AK 11. IMS?
Map Discovered And Donated
B MIKEHAMER
Sufi i ic
Donald I ennon ,
director oi the
Manuscript Collection
at Easl Carolina
University discovered
an extremely rare map
Oi North Carolina,
published in 1733.
"I spend a great deal
Oi time nosing around
Old attics looking for
old things Lennon
said. "I had been in
contact with t he
C i r a h a m family in
Edenton regarding a
collection dating to the
I870s. 1 discovered I he-
map about half way
through a bunch of
t urn of-the-century
magazines
Neither I en non nor
the family knew the
map was there. "I'd
never heard of the map
before he said, "but
you never know what
you'll find in an attic
Ihe 57 X 45-inch
map is in good condi-
tion. It will be sent to
Registration Resister Visits ECU
Indicted draft
registration resister
Russell F. Ford oi Mid-
dletown, Conn, is plan-
ning to visit ECU'S
campus during the last
week of January to
discuss his motives tor
refusing to register a
well as his legal situa-
tion which is currently
being delayed due to
the ill health of his
judge.
hord, 1. has alread
spent five weeks in
prison tor refusing the
conditions for bail set
by the judge. He will be1
coming to Greenville at
the invitation oi the
Greenville Peace Com-
mittee.
Ford, who was sent
to the federal Correc-
tional Institute in Dan
bury, Conn, in early
August, was the first
person inprisioned for
draft registration
resistance in the I nited
States since the Viet-
nam War.
re GPC will be
planning lord's
itinerary while he is in
Greenville. Students
will be given an oppor-
tunity to meet infor-
mally with Ford to
possibly seek advice
regarding their own
decision on drat:
registration. Ford will
aiso be available to
classes tor those in-
structors who would
like to hae him speak.
Because of his un-
predictable legal situa-
tion, ford's visit could
be cancelled at any time
if his judge sets a date
for the case. It con
victed tor draft
registration refusal
Ford could face up to
five years in federal
prison and a $10,000
tine.
Ford is one oi only
approximately one
doen men who have
been indicted b the
Federal government for
refusal. Like the other
160 men slated tor in-
dictment, Ford was
open and vocal about
his refusal and has
refused to compromise
on his pacifist prin-
ciples.
"I am not willing to
sign m life over to the
govern m en t t h a t
brought us Vietnam,
Watergate and the In
dent submarine lord
wrote in a personal
statement outlining his
refusal. "And I am not
willing to wait until the
nuclear arms race has
reached its logical con-
clusion in a nuclear
holocaust. By then it
would be too late
lord added that
"We need resistance to
militarism now . In part
it is up to young men
such as myself � 18
and 19 and 20 years old
- the men who would
by killing and dying in
the next wars, to serve
notice that we will not
be instruments of such
monstrous practices
Final dates lor
Ford's visit, which ma)
include trips to several
other Faster n North
Carolina cities, have
not been finalized, the
GPC told Ihe Fast
( arolinian.
V Graham Arader in
Pennsylvania where it
will be de-acidified,
cleaned and repaired. It
will then be framed us-
ing filtered plexiglass so
that light won't harm
it.
I he original map will
be back at ECU and
put on public display
sometime in March.
The map was donated
to the ECU Manuscript
Collection bv Mis
Graham.
Ihe map was drawn
bv Id ward Moselev.
who was survey general
around 1710. In 1714,
Moselev was licensed to
practice law and he
became the foremost
lawyer in the province,
becoming commis-
sioner tor the North
Carolina-South
Carolina and North
(arolma-Virginia
boundary lines.
Ihe map provides
detailed information on
the North Carolina
coastal area. Moselev
provides instructions
on the map for ocean-
going vessels wishing to
enter Pamlico Sound
via Ocracoke Inlet. Ac
cording to Lennon, the
map was made onlv 15
e a r s after
Biackbeard's death.
I here is a notation on
the map showing the
location of I hatches
Hole (Biackbeard's
ell on Ocra �ke
Island
A legend on the :
in the western part
the state reads
This coun
abounds with Elks ai .
BuJJaloes at
distance t about I
milesJrom the Seas at
the whole ajjords ph �
t Oj I her, S
Bearer, milk cows ai
Horses Also Turin i
I'ariridv.es an �
oj water fowl, wt �
�' �� ��� � oj S .
The rivers arm Sec
( oasts art t
with Fish oj a: � .
especially Sturm �
I he soil is nature
produ
� - � �
:

itabh Its ' �
I ra a
P ' '�

tar, s'
. Bart
m a p
mint
-
ha � � . � � �
V p to
� �
a m n
Mai . i
Fire Brings Neighbors' Help
Continued From Page 1
made coffee and allow-
ed several oi the men to
use her phone to call
their parents. �� hev
hardlv had anv clothes,
one was wrapped in a
blanket Shondell
said " 1 hev were verv
upsef
K.iv also thanked the
I ambda Chi Alpha
traterntiy, which pro-
vided extra slothes tor
the residents oi the
I Kl house.
Everybody's been
very helpful and sup-
portive added Dmga
"Many other irate:
nities have offered their
assistance
According to Dinga
it still has not been
determined it the in-
surance pohev on the
house will cover the
losses which he said
amounted to $50,000 in
personal property and
structure damage.
Dmga hopes that the
residents living on the
first and second floors
will be able to move
back into the house
within 10 davs. .
building inspector mU
be making a reporl
within a feu days to
determine it the house
is inhabitable and sate
Dmga said the attu
of the IK1 h
would no longei be us
ed foi living quarters
because he felt it was
too dangerous
Dmga noted that
because it was the
beginning o I the
semester, main oi the
students living at the
house had still not
returned tor classes. s(
many who came bask
on Sunday and Mon
da would be finding
out aboul the fire tor
the firs! time. Dmga
v.iid less people were in
the house at the time ot
the blae which mav
have prevented a more
serious danger.
He also thanked the
ECl secuntv depart-
ment, who are current-
ly helping keep an eye
on the house to preveni
'heft and vandalism.
It took l;reih;ers
a i: r i o ; live hours to
inp telv extinguish
the flames.
NEW YEAR?
NEW HAIR
Start the new year off right
with a quality perm at a low price!
PERMANENT SPECIAL3250
From January 10-31, 1983 'eg. 540
�BACKSTAGF HAIR STUDIO-
110 E. 5th Street
-752-9578
��������ti;������lLlLim�.ttVtw

FAMOUS PIZZA
Fast, Friendly Delivery
Hot oven subs.
Spaghetti,
Lasagne
SPECIA1
FREE DRAFT WITH
SMALL PIZZA
2 DRAFTS FREE
WITH LARGE PIZZA
Not for Delivery
758-5982 758-5616
The Shoe Outlet
Located next to Evans Seafood
on West 9th St.
Brand name shoes
at
Bass discount prices
TooSider
aaaaac
Located I mile past
Hasting's Ford on
! 0th St. extension
Tuesday Wednesda
& I hursday
POPCORN
SHRIMP
$295
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted
tor Slaw 3sc -xtra
���iWtimr�m
I
123 E. MhStr.
Tuesday-Pizza - Pasta
$2.99
oil you can eat 5-9
LADIES
NITE
Ladies' Admitted Free
FREE DRAFT for the ladies
Bruce Frye
Wednesday-Salad Bar-Special
$2.15
oil you can eat 5-9
Thursday-Spaghetti Special
$2.49
all you can eat 5-9
Converse
Florsheim
to mention a few.
TUESDAY
NIGHT
IS
COLLEGE
NIGHT
AT
SPORTSWORLD
YOU GET
HAPPY FEET! .
WE'RE HEAVEN ON WHEELS!
PET
VILLAGE
511 S. EVANS
756 9222
r
tSPOBTSWOBLD
104 E. Red Banks Rd.
Located adjacent to Ramada Inn and
Shoney's
756-6000
$1.00
WITH ECU I.D.
6:30-10:00
A Special
Welcome Back
15 Discount on all
stock thru Jan.21
for ECU Students with I.D.
!�





I
Ti
cu
tile, producing plenty
of peaches, plums, ap-
ples, pears and other
delicious fruit and
eatables. Its Chief
Trading produce is
Pitch, Tar, Skins,
Pork, Indian Corn,
c edar, Ship- Timber
and Bark. "
I he map shows
mines in the area of
rarboro. The Tar River
uas named, but Green-
Mile is not shown as
having been settled yet.
photocopy of the
Mosele map is cur-
rently available for ex-
amination in the
Manuscript Collection
until the original copy
returns in March.
hxxi
last t.
za � Pasta
9
eat 5-9
IES
E
itted Free
for the ladies
e Frye
id Bar �Special
15
in eat 5-9
Ihetti Special
149
eat 5-9
M
al
ack
on all
n.21
with I.D.

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
JANUARY II. 1983 Pag� 7
'48 HRS
Packs A Hill
Of A Wallop
By MICHAEL SRAGOW
Rolling siour
48 HRS is faster than a speeding
Bulhtt � and a lot funnier, too.
This intense uproarious cops-and-
robbers yarn about a black con
(Eddie Murphy) and a white cop
(Nick Nolte) who team up for two
days to catch a pair of coldblooded
killers is both the best police thriller
in a decade and a stunning
demonstration of how much style
and, yes, content a git ted director
like Walter Hill can pack into for-
mula melodrama. He gives "street
westerns' a satiric once-over and a
blood transfusion.
The joke behind Clint Eastwood's
Dirty Harry is that he's impossiblv
clean. The much richer joke behind
Nick Nolte's Jack Cates is that,
although he's just as dedicated,
everything about him is dirty, from
his shirts to his fistfights.
Eastwood's movies are constructed
to show how Harry Callahan's one-
man strong-arm tactics are our only
hope for urban safety. But 48 HRS.
is constructed like pop Joseph Con-
rad; Jack Cates isn't always sure of
himself, and we doubt his maverick
methods every step of the way.
When he succeeds, we feel Ike
laughing as well as cheering.
In its own exciting hyperbolic
fashion, this movie is saying that
cops are people, too. i he best ot
them, like the best filmmakers, must
be free to work on instinct. In
Cates' words, "attitude and ex-
perience are what get you through
Nick Nolte combines the
surefooted physical forcefulness of
Steve McQueen with the burly com-
ic blowziness ot Wallace Beery But
the film's satiric sizzle comes from
Cates' uneasy partnership with a
black thief named Reggie Ham-
mond, smoothly played by Eddie
Murphy. Cates expects Hammond
to locate the movie's bad guy, Ganz
(James Remar), who, with a deadly
Indian named Billy Bear (Sonny
Landham), has been shooting up the
streets of San Francisco. Cates spr-
ings Hammond on a forged forty-
eight-hour pass after he's been in
prison for two-and-a-half years.
He's ready for action � in the sex-
ual sense. In most cop movies
there's so little erotic feeling that it
isn't even funny. But 48 HRS. turns
sexual deprevation into dynamite
comedy.
As far as girl-hunting goes,
anything Cates can do, Hammond
can do better. Cates can't even keep
his current romance going (with An-
nette O'Toole) while he's working
on a case. The preening Hammond
looks askance at Cates' messy
macho bluster; it hurts him just to
be seen publicly in the cop's beat-up
Caddy convertible. Their edgy bon-
ding makes an explosive comic im-
pact because of the stellar chemistry
between Nolte at projecting the
emotional complexity behind
redneck charm. And no one on
screen right now communicates as
much visceral giddiness at being
young, gifted, black and beautiful
as Eddie Murphy.
Hill makes full use of Murphy's
humorous, self-satisfied slickness
and his industrial-strength sass. In-
deed, Reggie Hammond is the role
Murphy's been preparing to play
See 48 HRS Page 8
BurtAnd Goldie Come Of Age In Serious Comedy 'Best Friends'
Burt Reynolds and Goldie Hawn star in Diner creator Barry
I evinsons serious comedy about marriage. Best Friends, now
showing at the Plaza Cinema with The Dark Crystal and The
Verdict. Downtown's Park Theatre has The Last American
Hrein. At the Buccaneer Movies is Tootsie. The Toy and Death-
tisted Dragon. The Plitt Theatres have Am Officer and a
Gentleman, E.T 48 Hours (see review at left) and kiss Me
Goodbye. The ever-popular 264 Playhouse is serving up Dusty.
Part II � the film is rated triple X.
Starship Not 'Out Of Control'
ROl I INC, STONE
"I thought maybe I'd wear
something subtle says Grace
Coretta Scott King Due On Campus In January
( oreila Scott King, wife of the late civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr will
appear in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre on Monday, January 31, at 8
p.m. Her appearance is under the sponsorship of the Department of University Unions
Lecture Series Committee and is being held in conjunction with the Black Arts Festival.
The subject of the lecture will be "The Living Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr Tickets
are on sale at the Central Ticket Office at $2.50 for students, $3.50 for faculty and staff,
and $5 for the public. Tickets may be purchased in groups of 20 or more for $3.50 each.
All tickets sold at the door will be $5. For more information concerning the lecture, call
757-6611, ext. 266, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Slick, looking down at the red
miniskirt and shredded lavender
vest that she's covered with enough
sliced, bunched and wrapped
cellophane to store a year's worth of
leftovers. She shrugs, "But that
wouldn't work. It's too late
SUck has put the clothes together
Tor a video the Jefferson Starship is
Filming at a Hollywood sound stage
to accompany "Out of Control a
tune from their new album, Hinds
of Change. She grins sardonically
and says she's resigned herself to be-
ing the Starship's resident batty wild
woman. "Olivia Newton-John went
from pom-pom girl to vixen. I
thought I'd go from black widow
spider to Lee Remick, but it's too
late. Anyway, starting to be Sandra
Dee at age forty is disgusting
So, it's business as usual for Slick
and the Starship, which means
another album of polished, com-
mencal rock sure to excite the
teenage fans and disgust the critics,
and another tour for one of rock's
longest-lived, if most changeable,
aggregations. The group says the ti-
tle Hinds of Change refers, in part,
to the latest batch of personnel
changes, specifically Slick's full-
time re-entry into the band and
drummer Aynsley Dunbar's depar-
ture.
"I had no particular interest in
getting back into the band says
Slick of the time last year when
group ieade ad?rhythm guitarist
Paul Kantner approached her to do
a background vocal on "Stairway to
Cleveland a song on the Modern
Times album. "He said. 'Well, the
part I want you to sing goes, "Fuck
you, we do what we want and I
said, Heyyy! My kind of shit I
went down to the studio, and it went
from there. I sort of sleazed in
Slick did a couple of background
vocals on Modern Times, leaving
most of the singing to Mickey
Thomas, and then joined the band
for a subsequent tour; Hinds of
Change is the first Starship album
since 1978's Earth, on which she'd
been a full participant. But as the
new LP was wrapping up, drummer
Aynsley Dunbar left. "He was sort
of asked to leave says Paul Kant-
ner. "Aynsley went over the line
Top replace him, Thomas recruited
Don Baldwin, a former drummer
for Elvin Bishop.
Currently at work on both a
science-fiction novel and an accom-
panying record, Kantner says he
sees approaching winds of change in
societv, too. "There's chaos in this
country right now, and we're
heading tot a period where drastic
change is inevitable. It could be real
good or it could be Soy lent Green.
but this is not going to be a peaceful
decade
On the new album. kantner has
contributed an anti-government
shout-along called "1 Came Back
from the Jaws o the Dragon
"It's about how the government is a
people tenderizer he says. "You
have catastrophies and wars and
rioting and poisonous Tylenol, and
finally they lower the Pacific Gas
and Electric rate 0.9 cents for the
month of May. and we're all sup-
posed to go, 'Yeah, they did
something for us and become so
happy that we don't send them to
jail
Most of the new songs, though,
are from lead guitarist Craig Cha-
See STARSHIP. Page 9
Black Arts Week
Annual Event Boasts Variety
The 1982-83 Black Arts Festival has been scheduled
for Jan. 30 through Feb. 5. The week long event is coor-
dinated by the Student Union Minority Arts Committee
in conjunction with the Student Union Films Committee
and the Department of University Unions. The theme
for this year's program is "The Black Heritage �
Variations of A Dream: The Reason To Be
The festival opens on Sunday, Jan. 30 with a concert
by lyric-spinto soprano, Willie Jordan-Williams. Ms.
Williams, a native of New Bern, studied voice with Dr.
Aldrich Adkins and Oscar Henry. At present she is stu-
dying with Elaine Bonazzi, mezzo-soprano of New York
City. She has performed as guest soloist at colleges
throughout the country as well as a number of major
concert halls. Her concert here will be a salute to Black
composers. The concert will be held in Hendrix Theatre,
Mendenhall Student Center and will begin at 3p.m.
Tickets are priced at $1 each.
Coretta Scott King, wife of the late civil rights activist
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr will speak in Hendrix
Theatre on Monday, Jan. 31, at 8 p.m. Since the death
of her husband, Mrs. King has carried on the work he
began toward social, political, and economic justice.
Her appearance here is under the sponsorship of the
Department of University Unions' Lecture Series Com-
mittee.
The subject of her lecture will be "The Living Legacy
of Martin Luther King, Jr Tickets for the lecture are
priced at $2.50 for ECU students, $3.50 for ECU facul-
ty and staff, $3.50 for groups of 20 or more, and $5 for
the general public. All tickets sold at the door will be $5.
The festival continues on Tuesday, Feb. 1 with a
talent competition sponsored by the Minority Arts
Committee. The competition will feature music, dance
and drama; it will display talent of students from the en-
tire campus. The program will be held in Hendrix
Theatre at 8 p.m admission is SI.
On Wednesday, Feb. 2 at 6:30 p.m. Mattye Reed.
Director and Curator of the Heritage Center at North
Carolina A'T State University, will conduct a gallery
talk at the opening reception of the African Heritage
Art Exhibit. The exhibit will be on display in the
Mendenhall Gallery from February 1-15. The reception
and gallery talk will take place in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Gallery and there is no admission charge.
At 8 p.m. on Wednesday evening the award-winning
film Black Orpheus will be screened in Hendrix Theatre
Considered one of the most beautiful films ever made, it
retells the legend of Orpheus and Eurydice in a modem
setting. Admission will be by ID and activity card or
MSC membership.
Dr. John Fleming, Professor of Black Church Studies
at Shaw University Divinity School will keynote a pro-
gram which focuses on the Black religious experience.
The program is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 3 at 7:30
p.m. Dr. Fleming will trace the development of the
Black Church and Black Religion in America.
Prior to his presentation the ECU Gospel Choir will
trace the development of Black Church music. There is
no admission charge for the program which will be held
in Hendrix Theatre.
The festival will conclude on Friday, Feb. 5 and
Saturday, Feb. 6, with a performance by Ronald Max-
well and Leah Kendricks in the Coffeehouse.
This talented duo will be featured in a program of
jazz and blues. The show will begin at 9 p.m. each even-
ing. Admission to the coffeehouse which is located on
the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center is $.50.
Tickets for the various events of the festival are on
sale in the Central Ticket Office. The Ticket Office is
open each weekday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For addi-
tional information (or to reserve tickets) call 757-6611,
ext. 266.
MM u;
IHi 'iWWWMMWIia �i I
mnmilNN
'����





cu
tile, producing plenty
of peaches, plums, ap-
ples, pears and other
delicious fruit and
eatables. Its ChieJ
Trading produce is
Pitch. Tar, Skins,
Pork. Indian Corn,
it oar, Ship-Timber
and Bark. "
The map shows
mines in the area of"
Tarboro. The Tar River
was named, but Green-
Mile is not shown as
having been settled yet.
A photocop of the
Moseiev map is cur-
rentlv available for ex-
amination in the
Manuscript Collection
until the original copy
rc:urns in March.
A
Uxxj
last
gone
its
ia � Pasta
eat 5-9
IES
E
Imitted Free
for the ladies
e Frye
id Bar �Special
15
in eat 5-9
Ihetti Special
149
n eat 5-9
ial
ack
on all
.n.21
with I.D.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
JANUARY II. 198)
Page 7
'48 HRS
Packs A Hill
Of A Wallop
By MICHAEL SRAGOW
Rolling Mm
48 HRS is faster than a speeding
Bullitt � and a lot funnier, too.
This intense uproarious cops-and-
robbers yarn about a black con
(Eddie Murphy) and a white cop
(Nick Nolte) who team up for two
days to catch a pair of coldblooded
killers is both the best police thriller
in a decade and a stunning
demonstration of how much style
and, yes, content a gitted director
like Walter Hill can pack into for-
mula melodrama. He gives "street
westerns" a satiric once-over and a
blood transfusion.
The joke behind Clint Eastwood's
Dirty Harry is that he's impossibly
clean. The much richer joke behind
Nick Nolte's Jack Cates is that,
although he's just as dedicated,
everything about him is dirty, from
his shirts to his fist tights.
Eastwood's movies are constructed
to show how Harry Callahan's one-
man strong-arm tactics are our only
hope for urban safety. But 48 HRS.
is constructed like pop Joseph Con-
rad; Jack Cates isn't always sure ol
himself, and we doubt his maverick
methods every ;tep oi the wa
When he succeeds, we feel Ike
laughing as well as cheering.
In its own exciting hyperbolic
fashion, this movie is saying that
cops are people, too. i he best of
them, like the best filmmakers, must
be tree to work on instinct. In
Cates' words, "attitude and ex-
perience are what get you through
Nick Nolte combines the
surefooted physical torcetulness of
Steve McQueen with the burly com-
ic blowmess of Wallace Beer But
the film's satiric sizzle comes from
Cates' uneasy partnership with a
black thief named Reggie Ham-
mond, smoothly played by Eddie
Murphy. Cates expects Hammond
to locate the movie's bad guy, Ganz
(James Remar), who, with a deadly
Indian named Billy Bear (Sonny
Landham), has been shooting up the
streets of San Francisco. Cates spr-
ings Hammond on a forged forty-
eight-hour pass after he's been in
prison for two-and-a-half years.
He's ready for action � in the sex-
ual sense. In most cop movies
there's so little erotic feeling that it
isn't even funny. But 48 HRS. turns
sexual deprevation into dynamite
comedy.
As far as girl-hunting goes,
anything Cates can do, Hammond
can do better. Cates can't even keep
his current romance going (with An-
nette O'Toole) while he's working
on a case. The preening Hammond
looks askance at Cates' messy-
macho bluster; it hurts him just to
be seen publicly in the cop's beat-up
Caddy convertible. Their edgy bon-
ding makes an explosive comic im-
pact because of the stellar chemistry
between Nolte at projecting the
emotional complexity behind
redneck charm. And no one on
screen right now communicates as
much visceral giddiness at being
young, gitted, black and beautiful
as Eddie Murphy.
Hill makes full use of Murphy's
humorous, self-satisfied slickness
and his industrial-strength sass. In-
deed, Reggie Hammond is the role
Murphy's been preparing to play
See 48 HRS Page 8
Burt And Goldie Come Of Age In Serious Comedy 'Best Friends'
Burt Reynolds and Goldie Hawn star in Diner creator Barry
Levinsons serious comedy about marriage, Best tnends, now
showing at the Plaza Cinema with The Dark Crystal and The
Verdict. Downtown's Park Theatre has The Last American
1 irgin. the Buccaneer Movies is Tootsie. The Toy and Death-
tisted Dragon. The Plitt Theatres have An Officer and a
(tentleman, t. T 48 Hours (see review at left) and Kiss Me
Goodbye. The ever-popular 264 Playhouse is serving up Dusty.
Part II � the film is rated triple X.
Starship Not 'Out Of Control'
Rot 1 IV.MOSF
"I thought maybe I'd wear
something subtle says Grace
lRJ
dJerstarlhipIs
Slick, looking down at the red
miniskirt and shredded lavender
vest that she's covered with enough
sliced, bunched and wrapped
cellophane to store a year's worth of
leftovers. She shrugs, "But that
wouldn't work. It's too late
"Jrffetson Starfhip is
filming at a Hollywood sound stage
to accompany "Out of Control a
tune from their new album. Winds
of Change. She grins sardonically
and says she's resigned herself to be-
ing the Starship's resident batty wild
woman. "Olivia Newton-John went
from pom-pom girl to vixen. I
thought I'd go from black widow
spider to Lee Remick, but it's too
late. Anyway, starting to be Sandra
Dee at age forty is disgusting
So, it's business as usual for Slick
and the Starship, which means
another album of polished, com-
merical rock sure to excite the
teenage fans and disgust the critics,
and another tour for one of rock's
longest-lived, if most changeable,
aggregations. The group says the ti-
tle Winds of Change refers, in part,
to the latest batch of personnel
changes, specifically Slick's full-
time re-entry into the band and
drummer Aynsley Dunbar's depar-
ture.
"I had no particular interest in
getting back into the band says
Slick of the time last year when
group Itodtrr aad-rhythm guitarist
Paul Kantner approached her to do
a background vocal on "Stairway to
Cleveland a song on the Modern
Times album. "He said, 'Well, the
part I want you to sing goes. "Fuck
you, we do what we want and I
said, 'Heyyy! My kind of shit! I
went down to the studio, and it went
from there. I sort of sieazed in
Slick did a couple of background
vocals on Modern Times, leaving
most of the singing to Mickey
Thomas, and then joined the band
for a subsequent tour; Winds of
Change is the first Starship album
since 1978's Earth, on which she'd
been a full participant. But as the
new LP was wrapping up, drummer
Aynsley Dunbar left. "He was sort
of asked to leave says Paul Kant-
ner. "Aynsley went over the line
Top replace him, Thomas recruited
Don Baldwin, a former drummer
for Elm Bishop.
Currently at work on both a
science-fiction novel and an accom-
panying record, Kantner says he
sees approaching winds of change in
society, too. "There's chaos in this
country right now, and we're
heading ioi a period where drastic
change is inevitable. It could be real
good or it could be Soylent Green.
but this is not going to be a peaceful
decade
On the new album, Kantner has
contributed an anti-government
shout-along called "I Came Back
from the Jaws of the Dragon
"It's about how the government is a
people tenderizer he says. "You
have catastrophies and wars and
rioting and poisonous Tylenol, and
finally they lower the Pacific Gas
and Electric rate 0.9 cents for the
month of May, and we're all sup-
posed to go, 'Yeah, they did
something for us and become so
happy that we don't send them to
jail
Most of the new songs, though,
are from lead guitarist Craig Cha-
See STARSHIP, Page 9
Black Arts Week
Annual Event Boasts Variety
Coretta Scott King Due On Campus In January
Coretta Scott King, wife of the late civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr will
appear in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre on Monday, January 31, at 8
p.m. Her appearance is under the sponsorship of the Department of University Unions
Lecture Series Committee and is being held in conjunction with the Black Arts Festival.
The subject of the lecture will be "The Living Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr Tickets
are on sale at the Central Ticket Office at $2.50 for students, $3.50 for faculty and staff,
and $5 for the public. Tickets may be purchased in groups of 20 or more for $3.50 each.
All tickets sold at the door will be $5. For more information concerning the lecture, call
757-6611, ext. 266, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
The 1982-83 Black Arts Festival has been scheduled
for Jan. 30 through Feb. 5. The week long event is coor-
dinated by the Student Union Minority Arts Committee
in conjunction with the Student Union Films Committee
and the Department of University Unions. The theme
for this year's program is "The Black Heritage �
Variations of A Dream: The Reason To Be
The festival opens on Sunday, Jan. 30 with a concert
by lyric-spinto soprano, Willie Jordan-Williams. Ms.
Williams, a native of New Bern, studied voice with Dr.
Aldrich Adkins and Oscar Henry. At present she is stu-
dying with Elaine Bonazzi, mezzo-soprano of New York
City. She has performed as guest soloist at colleges
throughout the country as well as a number of major
concert halls. Her concert here will be a salute to Black
composers. The concert will be held in Hendrix Theatre,
Mendenhall Student Center and will begin at 3p.m.
Tickets are priced at $1 each.
Coretta Scott King, wife of the late civil rights activist
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr will speak in Hendrix
Theatre on Monday, Jan. 31, at 8 p.m. Since the death
of her husband, Mrs. King has carried on the work he
began toward social, political, and economic justice.
Her appearance here is under the spooforship of the
Department of University Unions' Lecture Series Com-
mittee.
The subject of her lecture will be "The Living Legacy
of Martin Luther King, Jr Tickets for the lecture arc
priced at $2.50 for ECU students, $3.50 for ECU facul-
ty and staff, 53.50 for groups of 20 or more, and $5 for
the general pifblic. All tickets sold at the door will be $5.
The festival continues on Tuesday, Feb. 1 with a
talent competition sponsored by the Minority Arts
Committee. The competition will feature music, dance
and drama; it will display talent of students from the en-
tire campus. The program will be held in Hendrix
Theatre at 8 p.m admission is $1.
On Wednesday, Feb. 2 at 6:30 p.m. Mattye Reed.
Director and Curator of the Heritage Center at North
Carolina A'T State University, will conduct a gallery
talk at the opening reception of the African Heritage
Art Exhibit. The exhibit will be on display in the
Mendenhall Gallery from February 1-15. The reception
and gallery talk will take place in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Gallery and there is no admission charge.
At 8 p.m. on Wednesday evening the award-winning
film Black Orpheus will be screened in Hendrix Theatre.
Considered one of the most beautiful films ever made, it
retells the legend of Orpheus and Eurydice in a modern
setting. Admission will be by ID and activity card or
MSC membership.
Dr. John Fleming, Professor of Black Church Studies
at Shaw University Divinity School will keynote a pro-
gram which focuses on the Black religious experience.
The program is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 3 at 7:30
p.m. Dr. Fleming will trace the development of the
Black Church and Black Religion in America.
Prior to his presentation the ECU Gospel Choir will
trace the development of Black Church music. There is
no admission charge for the program which will be held
in Hendrix Theatre.
The festival will conclude on Friday, Feb. S and
Saturday, Feb. 6, with a performance by Ronald Max-
well and Leah Kendricks in the Coffeehouse.
This talented duo will be featured in a program of
jazz and blues. The show will begin at 9 p.m. each even-
ing. Admission to the coffeehouse which is located on
the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center is $.50.
Tickets for the various events of the festival arc on
sale in the Central Ticket Office. The Ticket Office is
open each weekday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For addi-
tional information (or to reserve tickets) call 757-6611,
ext. 266.

- �
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- . - - - -
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WPW
�ajBHF






8
I HI I s i Kol IM
M k 11. ; ym
48 HKS. Teams Nolte, Murphy
Continued From Page 7
with all the over-
reaching hucksters he's
etched on Saturday
Nite ive. Nothing
seems to be funnier to
Murph than a style
that misfits a man. I he
sex-starved, prison-
rusty Hammond, dres-
ed to lady-kill in his
1978 Giorgio Armani
suit, is unable, in the
romantic clutch, to ar-
rive at a belter erotic
come-on than, "Its
10:05. B 10:10, I want
to be into some serious
flesh
I his is a Waltei Hill
movie, from the open
ing violent pastorale
a virtuoso getaway se-
quence � to the final
visual joke of our
heroes driving ott into
the dawn instead ot the
sunset I he script went
t hrough m a nv
typewriters, but Hill
and 1 am Gross did the
hulk ot the final tart,
guttv, slangy work,
with assists troin Nolte
and Murphy.)
1 his movie isn't as
lyrical as Southern
Comfort or The long
Kiders, nor as wildly
imaginative as The
H amors, but it has an
even tenser beat and
more blooming humor
and emotionalism than
Hill's other films.
Hill's timing is a
crack at comedy as it is
at action, and he's
wonderfully attentive
to the physical gestures
that reveal character.
There's a brilliant,
quiet moment when
Nolte and Murphy are
accosted by police after
a tight; Murphy keeps
his head down and says
they were doing
"nothing as it he's
been giving that excuse
to ghetto cops all his
life.
Hill is one of the few
directors strong enough
to bring a transforming
vision to genre movies.
The combination of
Hill and Nolte's proven
talents and Murphy's
sparkling debut makes
48 HKS. unique. It's a
cop movie with brains
and heart and a buddy-
buddy movie.
a ROBERT CHARTOFF-IRWIN WINKLER production � 'ROCKY III' SYLVESTER STALLONE -TALIA SHIRE
BURT YOUNG � CARL WEATHERS and BURGESS MEREDITH as Mickey � director of photography
BILL BUTLER. A.S.C. music b, BILL CONTI � produced by IRWIN WINKLER and ROBERT CHARTOFF
written and directed by SYLVESTER STALLONE rjrjr-
United Artists mgm'Tia
PG WBnut 6UCWO SUGGfSHD -�
SOK HATtRUU. MJfr NO W SO'TABti t-OR CHMDAtN

i wttitAmMiwTco
� rat AIIRighl & . �
Thurs 7 PM, Pri & bat 5, 7, 9 PM Hendrix Theatre
Admission By ID & Activity Card Or MSC Membership
Special Film Presentation
Tomorrow Night � 7 PM
Hendrix Theatre, MSC
Student ID & Activity Card
Or MSC Membership
Sponsored By The ECU Student Union Films Committee
MINISTRY
' � � �'� thi Methodist Student Center
i East Fifth Street
Stewart LaNeave
Campus Minister
' sM s ai 12:30 p.m. s U h I At ULTY LUNt Hal Ml MH � I HI hrTT
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00





Starship Not 'Out Of Control
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( on tinned From Page 7
quico and bassist-
kevboardist Pete Sears,
the chief writers in
what the band calls the
New Starship. Accor-
ding to Chaquico, the
group felt it needed to
rid itself of its image as
a "laid-back older San
Francisco band that
played slow songs like
Miracles' it did just
that in 1980, when it
released Freedom at
Point era, which was
recorded without
longtime members
Slick, singer Marty
Balin and drummer
John Barbata, each ot
whom had left the
band.
"We were able to
start over again at point
zero and go for a dif-
ferent sound says
Chaquico. "I don't
mind when critics put
down our new music by
saying it sounds like
Styx or Journey or
Boston or Aerosmith
he adds, defending the
new sound. "Those are
my favorite bands, so
I'm jlaiierecl
Upon its release,
Hinds of Change
began moving up the
charts more rapidly
than had any other re-
cent Starship LP. But is
the lineup of Slick,
Kantner, Thomas,
Chaquico, Baldwin,
Sears and bassist-
keyboardist David
Freiberg finally stable?
Sothing is stable
says Kantner. "hvery
time we organize
anything, something
comes in and messes it
all up. So we're more
into the raft-on-the-
ner approach: We
float down the river.
When we run into a
bog, we push away
from it, and when we
find a nice place, we
stop and take a swim
Even though the Jef-
ferson Starship was
built around the core of
the old Jefferson
Airplane, the other
group members didn't
exactly lay around and
rust after the Airplane
nosedived in 1973.
Marty Balin, who
founded the Airplane
in 1965 with Paul Kant-
ner, also served a
notable stint aboard the
Starship. After testing
the waters by co-
unting and singing one
song, "Caroline on
the Starship's Dragonf-
ly LP, Balm signed on
full-time. His
songwnting contribu-
tions � particularly on
Red Octopus and its
Number-One single,
"Miracles" � gave the
band its first taste of
commercial success,
and Balm's romantic
balladry became an in-
tegral part of the Star-
ship's pre-heavy metal,
mid-Seventies sound.
Nowadays, Balm's
working alone. He just
recorded his second, as
yet untitled solo album
(the first, 198l's Balin,
yielded an AM smash
in "Hearts"). "It
sounds a lot different
from anything else I've
done he says. "My
producer, Val Garay,
said, 'Let's stick to
rock � none of these
self-indulgent
whimperings of yours,
Balm. " The 39-year-
old singer says he's
"still single, living the
free, wild life I've
always led
Spencer Dryden, the
Airplane's jazz-
schooled drummer, hit
the brakes after leaving
the band in 1969. He
moved to Sausalito,
bought a boat, "put the
drums in a closet and
changed my whole life
around he says.
About a year later, he
was inveigled by Jerry
Garcia into checking
out � and then joining
� the good-timey New
Riders of the Purple
Sage, for whom he
worked as a drummer
(and subsequently,
I
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WWCIWUO WCXOtUO
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Two locations to better serve you 1111
Downtown:
(Next to ECU)Pitt Plaza:
In the Georgetown ShopsNext to Record Bar
758-2400756-8550
9 7MF9-9MF
9 2 Sat.9-4 Sat.
manager) until last
year. Today, at 39,
Dryden is a thrice-
married bachelor and
drummer for the
Dinosaurs � a new
band compromised of
old stalwarts from the
San Francisco scene.
Of his former
AirplaneStarship
cohorts, Dryden pro-
fesses to be a fan.
"God, I love everybody
in that band, and I love
their music. It's gone
with the times, of
course � it's gotten a
lot cleaner and more
streamlined since we
used to bash it out
Jorma Kaukonen,
the Airplane's fleet-
fingered, acid-toned
guitarist, gravitated
toward the other end of
the spectrum. He and
Airplane bassist Jack
Cassady (and, for a
spell, Balin) played cof-
feehouse gigs as Hot
Tuna, a smallscale
acoustic blues ensem-
ble, during the later
days of the Airplane.
Hot Tuna had moved
on to electric boogie by
their second album
First Pull Lp, Then
Pull Down) and
augmented by fiddle
player Papa John
Creach, they became a
beloved cult band
through the Seventies.
Since parting ways
with Cassady � whom
he'd known since
childhood, when the
two were neighbors in
Washington, DC.
The refurbished group,
which claims to make
"true American
music was scheduled
to debut in San Fran-
cisco this month.
SUTHtRtANU
GERARD
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Greenville's Best Pizzas Are
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Most delivery pizzas lack in
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CALL 758 6266 Greenville Blvd.
A.tilM, ?.M.V'h IH-I .AM MM- WKXAKIH.WKKXi I. I fail
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It. IV M�M�. AV.VHIM . , ,UMK Al l, . Al 11 K( �� N I 1 All I AM.
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� 'I 1 l- H. X.HHIII, KlMAIIN lKI .11 H- HtKXAkl M I MKII Hi I I
K BISTBICTID ' ���� Kin am
A Special Film Presentation
Tomorrow Night � 7 PM
Hendrix Theatre, MSC
Student ID & Activity Card
Sponsored By The ECU Student Union Films Committee
Copyright 1983
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
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errs ana P-ices
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thru Wed Jan 19 i�83
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il
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irloin Steak
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'b





10
I Hi jEASl Ko INIAN
I M AK II. 1983
I HI EAS1 C ROI ISKN
8th-Largest Crowd Attends
Sports
�(
Akt n �� (�
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Fo. 5,700 Pirate tans Saturday
night, the delayed game between
EC I and James Madison I niversity
proved to he well worth the wait.
In a highly intense, emotion-tilled
contest, the Bu;s won their first
conference game of the season
auamst the highly-touted Dukes
43-41
6-7 senioi Charles Green made a
three-point plav with4:21 remaining
to nut the Buc, up, 42-w Freshman
guard Curl Vanderhorst then drew a
charging foul to wind up on the
freethrow line and sank one to give
EC I a 43 lead and seal the vic-
tory
JMU's David Dupont tipped the
bah r the basket with 2:32 left to
cut the Pirates' margin to two.
Retaining possession, the Dukes
hei I the ball tor one final shot.
JfVll guard Derek Meele missed a
ju .per with 15 seconds remaining
an . the Dukes were unable to
i rieve the rebound in time to
5 'ore
'I his was a great, great win tor
i s said Headoach Charlie Har-
non. "We defeated a team that was
' ivored in our league and that's
ays gonna be a good win, but I
' u best is yel to conic- "
I t Pirates were scheduled to
H) p m . but the 1 c ol
routed to treenx ille, V.
s � irohna ai
Hai si :i wasn't too pleased
ej -an'i distinguish
es tie said, "tl
� loesn'i know what then
' k - league sh
a � ti the
� ' before the
Pirates Win Conference Thriller
�-KASAMS . �ZLT X M JIM1V1
to Hai : how e ei
delay was not a factoi
"You can't use that a
Harrison said. "JMl
had to wait jusl as long as we did
Harrison thanked the supporters
who made up the eighth largest
crowd m ECU'S history, for atten
ding the game after having to wait
"We need support like that he
said. "We need to get this place
hopping. Human nature makes you
play better it someone's out there
pulling tor you
At halftime, the Pirates were
leading. 30-22, but the Dukes came
charging out in the second period
and rallied from behind to trail the
Bucs b a point, 32-31
Freshman Johnny Edwards who
was named as the rOU's "Rookie
Ol I he Week" foi the second time
this year, popped in two jumpshots
to keep the trie Pirates ahead 37-31
But JMU's 6-7 junior Keith
Bradley pumped in two freethrows
a lumpshot and a layup to keep
JMl in the game. 39-37.
Another lay-up by Bradley evened
the score up, 39 39, the first tie ol
the contest. Bui Green's three-point
Play assured the Pirates of a perma-
nent lead.
Harrison described the team's
Pfrformance as "not very intelligent
plav. However, he credited the
Pirates for moving the ball inside
Putting pressure on the Dukes and
not taking too mam bad shots
"We wanted to play as aggressive as
we possibly could he said "We
d,dn want to get n a slow-down
type situation '
the Pirate- jumped out to a 10-2
lead in the firsi halt, with Barrv
U� rhom Bi -n and 1 dward
setting the pact
A tel ' Aas .ailed on E I
Assi Barnsi
vv let! in the half, but the Pirates
J ��'��� buili a 20 II lead before
�'��' ' ' iod was ovei
. b?ch oi 'Ml ' starters made a
nasket to pull them up, 19-26
EC I s Green and Vanderhorst then
combined tor tour points to give the
Pirates an eight-point lead at the
halt. c
Edwards and Wright were the
Bucs leading scorers with 10 point
each Cireen pumped in eight Tonv
Robinson scored six points and
Brown had tour. Vanderhorst pop-
ped in three points and Bruce Pear-
tree had two.
Peartree, who is usually a Pirate
starter, has not been playing well,
but Harrison is hoping that will
change. "He's having some trouble
right now he said, "but he's
working. Like the rest of the kids,
he's extremely happy we won
From the floor, the Bucs shot
53.3 percent in the first halt. I heir
average fell, though, in the second
period to 32.4 percent, making only
five of 16 shots. Overall, ECU shot
41.9-percenl and the Dukes wound
up with a 39-percent average.
In treethrow shooting, the Pirates
have vastly improved, swishing 17
ol 21 tor an 81-percent average.
Green grabbed down 14 rebounds
against the Dukes, and Edwards and
W right each had eight.
Now 6-5, the Bucs are tied with
George Mason m the conference
league with a 1-1 record.
EC I next opponent will be
William V. Mary this Wednesday
night m Minges Coliseum at 730
p.m.
UM�S M III si IS 4i
. 2
� .
�! i Hi M IS ,41
I in
P fAMLCV .US-
� irate center t h i
v naries bum yets abo�C the rim on attempted dunk
Pirates Turn Back Campbell
I C I coach Charlie Harrison and assislant Tom Barrk, . k . PIWDb pat'mson
" Barr.se ee.chra.e after Pirate's hi, win over James Madison.
Exiting Coach Cites Problems
By CINDY PLEASANTS
B CINDY PLEASANTS
spun, ta,u�
l(,1 Volleyball Coach Lynn
uavKlson, whorecentl) vended her
gnanon. has cited two factors
hich Jed to her decision
"The mam reason 1 resigned is
auselwam to personally further
als, Davidson said. "1 need
gel a master's degree and a full-
Imc c�aching job. i he second
reason is I can't afford to work here
anymore
ison earns $3,000 per year as
22ime V(Jehall coach, and
as the assistant softball
oach, totalling $4.500 each year
V the present time, Davidson is
Wing down three jobs and has
���� her working schedule to be
e tedious. "It's just too much of
rain she said- "You end up
�v�ng to make sacrifices ��
According to Davidsonshe is not
rtc onl) coach who is ,n that
predicament. "All of the women
caches here are part-time she
said, -except tor women's basket-
ball. I here are coaches ,n the same
situation who can't financial!) af-
ford to work just here
caching volleyball, however
�as not one ol Davidson's
sacrifices, ihe former C State
player led the lady Pira,es to a
Zo-15 season, the best mark ever hv

an ECU team.
But Davidson gave her players all
'he credit. "The kids here are just
great, she said. "Thev (the
Players) don't have extensive
backgrounds in vollevball, but thev
make up for it by hard work It's
like making thoroughbreds out oi
plowhorses
Despite limited resources David-
son has molded a team of a highly
reputable status in a short time. She
served as an assistant under former
ECU volleyball coach Alita Dillon
before taking over the position m
181. Ihe season proved to be one
ol rebuilding, reshaping and
reorganizing. Ihe Pirates finished
with a disappointing 11-23 record
but the hard work paid off this year
Constant sweat and determina-
tion, however, sometimes just aren't
enough - something that has been
very frustrating foi Davidson.
"Things are very limited she
said. "The money, the facilities
Ihe people here in Greenville have
been very good and supportive, but
1 think more could be done by the
athletic department
Because ol basketball practices,
the spikers had approxn itely one-
hour and fifteen minutes to practice
in Minges Coliseum each day and
with the department more'than
$600,000 in debt, athletic programs
vearn !5;PerCen� but cut this
year Dav.dson ,s well-aware of
said' �yh,ere's freeze on she
said, and I'm sure th sn�
department, are doing wha h
can to sort things out. Ws Lt of
le a filter system ot
"For me, I know what we need
and what we get. I reallv think that
he center people ,n the adm.nistra
tion need to get thir J!
When comparing Prn ,
schoob. toS0
considerably more m,�T5 are
cnier UNC-thapel Hill M
-State and the Univesityov
- all ECU opponents 8,ma
But Davidson was n i
�- � ,akes mZ7lZ?t
Bv KFN BOLTON
v" �n Sports rd'inr
I he IC I Pirates played their first
varsits sport in the city of Fayet-
teville Mondav night, and came
away with a 67-54 win over the
Campbell Camels.
I he EC Iampbell series is the
oldest active series for both schools.
Ihe two teams nave been playing
since 1931. the first vear ol ECU
basketball.
In the first halt, the Pirates
gradually built up their lead, mainlv
with a scrapp) defense and "4 per-
cent field goal shooting.
After the Camels tied the score at
N-8, ECU scored three straight
baskets en route to a 12-1 scoring
spree, capped bv a Johnny Edwards
steal and dunk.
A John Williams bank shot at the
buzzer gave the Pirates a 37-21 lead
at halftime.
The Pirates were led in first-halt
scoring bj I nny I dward
Barrv W right with 1 1
Williams came �
tribute six points.
The beginning or the sec. nd hall
played evenly by the two tea
as the Pirates hoi shooting bega
cool do n
Ihe Camels force I .
turnovers Pirates and Cat
bell cut the lead to 14 with J ;
maining.
E I head coach harlie Har-
rison continual!) �
and out as the Pirates be .
P with their ball handling
Campbell refused
cut the lead to 49-35 with 940 left
on Larry Canady's firsi ba -
the game
Canadv came into the game as the
Camels leading scorei and re-
bounder, but was limned hv three
personal fouls in the first fom
minutes ol the game
55-43 v
i
s
�p bv If
- - - .
Harrison was a t
ch dur ng
-
record to 6-5 -�-
over the
ECU was led .
is. with 17 � m
!m �
19 p.
l'e l s "exi s wedi
night at home aga ECAC-So
opponent
1 iametime is 3
Coach Named; Another Departs
U. k'L'V Hi 11 lilt
By KEN BOLTON
,NH(�ni SpucK (dllor
See DAVIDSON, page 12
The ECU football coaching staff
has gained one member and lost
another it was announced over the
weekend.
Phil fclmassian, defensive coor-
dinator at Ferrum College from
1979-present, has been added to the
Pirate staff. Elmassian's exact posi-
tion hasn't been announced, but he
will probably replace Jim Holland
or Jim Bengala, two defensive
coaches who left the ECU squad last
week.
While Emassian will be coming to
ECU, Tim Mingey will be heading
for Miami of Ohio where he will
serve as the defensive coordinator.
Mingey, who served as an assis-
tant at ECU, was made the choice in
an announcement released by the
Miami of Ohio Sports information
Office on Saturday.
Head coach Ed Emory was pleas-
ed for the opportunity that Mingey
has received.
For Mingey, n is a life-long
dream come true to be a defensive
coordinator Emorj commented
1 think this shows the caliber ol
voung coaches we have when a
school with the tradition ol Miami
ot unm hires one away "
The ECU staff will welcome the
addition ol Elmassian, who is the
second Pirate coach from ferrum
College in the last two years I he
last one was John Zernhelt often
sive hue coach.
Pnor to coaching al Ferrum
Elmassian was .� ,
KKKheiu coach ai Richmond
Hiara and Mar, n ,973 he J?
graduate assistan. a: u .
Elmassian played defensive h, k
"J quartet h-ii-l ,t 1 CH,VC pask
h neroack ai Ferrum before
lnng to Wilham and Marv
Umer Er 2? f�r a "I
cmorj said "He
outstandins tea h� . an
He is one 0 thV dnd m'tor
� hes itMher�- -ng
Beck is ft May Join Pro Rank
According to :n ��� �KffAJ
According to an undisclosed
source ECU Offensive Coordinato,
larry Beckish mav be leavmg to
join the USFL Phoenix Wranglers
as their offensive coordinator
The source also revealed that
Runningback Coach Spencer
JPrescott may become an assistani at
temple University.
Before arriving at PCI � 1
�as W,chita State �h ' Beck,sn
anator for Z�-
"�� as an ass.stam a JE�1
for one year. v'Hanova
C

1
V
:
.

V
I
I





J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 1. 1983 11
r
MM ftpM
ECU'S Tony Robinson and Charles Green fend off determined Dukes.
ITTCftSON
wSybackjvhen
M
Back in the olden days people in our community
used Classified advertising to buy and sell transporta-
tion needs. And still today, Classified is a reliable
marketplace for cars, trucks, vans, motorcycles and
other wheel goods.
3. STANLEY LCABT
bell

. Campbell
a little
Ji ice Pear-
18 uith
Brown
� reach.
ear the
minutes 1
� theii
v- victor)
n fcd-
t, who
illiams
tor
�Mth
Inesday
South
Marv
eparts
offensive
Richmond and
he was
��' Hliam and
nie back
im before
William and Mar,
aed under Lou Holtz '
Vn Phil for a long
d!d "He is an
teacher and motivator.
n th
e premier young
fl t n "
ro Ranks
' just finished his first
and Prescoit has been
f ng staff for two years.
ruing at ECU, Beckish
State's offensive coor-
!hre vears. prescott
ass.stant at Vilfcnova
SF's Bradley Chosen
TAMPA, Fla. (UPI)
University of South
Florida sophomore for-
ward Charlie Bradley
was named Sun Belt
Conference basketball
player of the week
Monday, the second
time he has been so-
named this year.
The 6-foot-5 Bradley
is averaging 31.1 points
a game this season.
During USF's three
games last week,
Bradley scored 87
points, pulled down 16 two free throws with 20
rebounds and had seconds left to insure
seven assists. the Bulls' victory.
He scored 35 points
Saturday night against
Jacksonville, including
Bradley first was
named conference
player of the week Dec.
12.
Classifieds
ROOMMATE
WANTED
eludes all utilities. Call 7S2 215
�i.
ROOMATE WANTED M7 a month
plus one third utilities. Private
room 7M-S044
SERVICES
NEEDED MALE ROOMMATE
to share 4 bedroom house on
Biltmore St. Half block trom cam
pus. Rent MS 00 plus one fourth
utilities. 757 148
HOUSE TO SHARE NEAR ECU
Private entries, baths Si75 in
CYSTIC
FIBROSIS
EXERC1SE-
A-THON
SATURDAY,
JANUARY 22,
11 a.m3 p.m.
for details
call
757-1608
THE
AEROBICS
WORKSHOP
SSSSSSSSSSSS
WANTED
WANTED: HANDCRAFT and
�"OTTERY items for resale on
commission basis only. Land and
Saa outlet. Greenville Square
Shopping Ph. 754-4770 Open 11-�
Miser
SPECIALTIES is now hiring Call
tor appointment: 752717. Inter-
views start Monday 1-17.
FOR SALE
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE experience, quality work.
IBM Selectric typewriter Call
Lame Shive 751 5101 or GAIL
JOYNER 75 10�.
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Do you have
an interest in photography? If you
would like to work at taking
special event pictures and have
own transportation. PHOTO
FOR SALE: 7 3-WAY mini
speakers, car or home 575. 1
Toshiba turntable with cartridge
575. Call WG at 752(72 price
negot.
FOR SALE: REFRIGERATOR,
perfect in dorm rooms; excellent
cond. Sacrifice 50 00 call 7M-4774
LARGE ROOM FOR RENTn
Apt. 5120.00 month, call 757 03
Advertise.
Advertise.
Advertise.
Advertise.
Advertise.
Advertise.
Advertise.
Advertise.
Advertise.
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It pays.
i
� 1
n
,
MitchelVs Hair Styling Salon
�-�
�������� JpWMMMMaaoqaaqfl
alon i
fa offering a student special
$1.00 off haircuts
through Jan. 18, 1983
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
hone 756-2950 or 756-4042
9
FOSDICK'S 1890 SEAFOOD
NIGHTLY SPECIALS
Monday Large Shrimp Dinner
(fried or boiled)
french fries, slaw$5.95
Tuesday Choice of: Shrimp
Flounder
Oysters
with baked potato and salad$5.50
Wednesday Large Flounder Dinner
(fried or broiled)
french fries, slaw$5.95
Thursday 12 lb. Steamed Shrimp
french fries, slaw$6.50
l2frr.
This Coupon Entitles
You To One Trip To
The Salad Bar With
Any Fried Entree.
Not food toward,
nightly ipecials.
2311 S. Evans St. 756-2011
a�aooE�a8�A����
The CO. Tankard Co. of Washington, N. C, Miller Brewing Co. and the
Department of Intramural-Recreational Services of East Carolina Universi-
ty Congradulate all the participants in the 4th Annual MillerECU In-
tramurals Pre-Season Basketball Tournament held December 3-5. A total
of 36 men's teams and 7 women's teams battled for the championship
positions. In the women's bracket the Unstoppables met the Fast Break in
the finals. The score was very close throughout the contest. In the last
minute with the score tied, the Unstoppables scored a quick 5 points on
two strong offensive rebounds by Jan Bethea to win 28 to 23. Vernice Rid-
dick led the Unstoppables with 6 points while Vicki Mclver paced the Fast
Break with II points.
The Rimbenders and the Joint Eight left a trail of men's teams behind as
the Y endured the three day event to meet in the finals. The full-court
pressure and tenacious defense applied by the Joint Eight forced the
Rimbenders into several turnovers. David Battle led Joint Eight to a 54-38
victory by scoring 12 points and Brant Baker scored 12 points for the
losers.
The Miller Brewing Company salutes the tournament champions
UNSTOPPABLES and JOINT EIGHT
Vy
� �
�ghl
UNSTOPPABLES
�wltt,Lt,fctinntt1tnTptmnp
JOINT EIGHT
xx.x.x. vv
3
�� � � iTmnujiy-ryMn����� -�
"� "i��� mmmmmmmmmmmmm
I





14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 11. 1983
Davidson: Money Ultimately Wins Out
Continued From Page 10 �nH , V-FIH,
Continued FrontPage 10
win ballgames,
although finances
ultimately win out.
"Our volleyball team
has the capabilities to
beat teams like N.C.
State she said.
"You're gonna upset
some people, but in the
end, they've
much more
override us
Davidson was of-
fered a full-time
coaching position at
Georgia Tech before
the 1982 season, but
decided to stay on at
ECU � a decision
which she hasn't regret-
ted. "We've had a
good year she said,
"and I've learned a lot
about myself, but I feel
like I need to broaden
my horizons
Davidson said she
will be looking for full-
time coaching positions
in both volleyball and
softball, or may seek to
obtain a master's
degree and serve as an
assistant coach.
Although Davidson
is not quite sure of her
future plans just yet,
she is certain about the
Lady Pirates Volleyball
team. "They're still
very positive she
said, "and will con-
tinue to be. The main
reason they're here is to
go to school, so being a
volleyball player is just
an extra bonus
ECU Sports Information
Needs Students Interested In Sports
Public Relations Work
English Majors, Journalism Minors
Earn On-Hand Experience In
Feature Writing, Release Writing
And Coverage of Athletic Events
Contact Mark Brand At 757-6491
Or The ECU Office Of Public Relations
In Level B Of The Pressbox.
Winter Draft Upcomin
NEW YORK (UPI) -
Leroy Langdon, a
hard-throwing right-
handed pitcher who
reminds scouts of
Milwaukee's Peter
Ladd, is expected to be
selected by the Cincin-
nati Reds Tuesday as
the No. 1 player chosen
m the regular phase of
major league baseball's
18th annual winter
draft of amateur free
agents.
The Reds, who have
the first choice in each
phase of the draft,
refused to say which,
players they would take
but U was known that
for quite some time
they have had their eye
on Langdon, who at-
tends Brevard Com-
munity College in
Cocoa, Fla.
Other plavers ex-
pected to be picked
high in the first round
of the draft's regular
phase are pitcher Glen
Simmons of DeKalb
Central Community
College in Atlanta;
Power-hittjng'
outfielder-first
baseman Javier Ortiz
of Miami Dade South
Junior College in
Miami, Fla and pit-
cher Blame
Deabenderfer from
Louisburg Jc in
Louisburg, N.C.
Those players eligible
for the secondary phase
who are given high
ratings by the scouts in-
clude third baseman
Robert Granstaff of
Golden West JC in
Huntington Beach,
Calif pitcher Alex-
ander Madrid of
Yavapai JC in Mesa,
Ariz pitcher Bradley
Arnsberg of Merced JC
in Merced. Calit pit-
cher Kenneth Patterson
of McLennan Com-
munity College in
Waco, Texas, and pit-
cher Steve Wilborn of
Louisburg JC.
Players eligible for
the regular phase are
generally junior college
players, players who
withdrew from four-
year colleges or
January high school
graduates. Those eligi-
ble for the secondary
phase were drafted
previously but did not
sign.
The draft is schedul-
ed to begin at 12:30
p.m. LST and will be
conducted from the
commissioner's office
by phone hookup with
the 26 teams.
The order ot selec-
tion in the regular
phase is based on the
reverse order of winn-
ing percentage in 1982.
The selection rotation
for the secondary phase
was determined in a
drawing by the two
league presidents.
A record 399 selec-
tions were made in last
year's winter draft.
���-����.iciP.(i�� Ton, RobinsonTYr"
r TredFthecrew
Some of the more
prominent players who
have been chosen in
January are Steve
Kemp, George Hen-
dnck, Tom Seaver,
Chris Chambliss and
Carlton Fisk.
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r EVERY WEDNESDAY
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(ADDRESS HERE)
H
ALL-YOL-CAN-EAT
Every FLOUNDER -
t ridgy DINNER 3.99
757-1955
wmh
Greenville BlvH
Even Monday night every week cf the year
d?wS! lge Inore,opp,ng 0izza for tnecrew
ask for the Family Night Special and
we li treat you to your own small pizza
with the same number of toppings ' free
and delivered free in our service zone
in 30 minutes or less
Or pick up two pizzas in 15 minutes
two p�� for tne price � one now that s a treat vou can t bear
When ,t comes to f p.zza pta comes to you
Not gooj with any other sceoai
Meet the ' 'Girls of
SPECIAL
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7mm 14K Gold Beads S� �Q
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Y
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, such a guarantee on ell 14K gold beads. a
J.D. Dawson Company
as�c ��jssssar� -ar-
From the famed color calendar,
you can meet in person, get their
autograph and make pictures
ECU plays William and Mary
7:30-Minges Coliseum
Also, prizes from all the calendar sponsors
will be given away by ticket draw.
Watch the Pirates attach
S


?
I
��' �
s

spirit �
fimsh
bang
svumr
Kobe.
ed v.ii
formal
HohcU
gram
Bea
26-Jar
A
trie teai
I
worl
two
each j
squ.
ing
s
t H
M
- � . �
(: j
the
"b dd
beir
doJ,
tnec: u
Siia anc
En an
The iC
- � - I
W lute
Ffers wa
senior
visited :ne
our
Wes: V.
Fore J
GRfct
N.C. (LPl
Carolina
freshman
Myers, n
points
Woifpack �
sanies, mt
as :l
� C o
Rookie I
" rthf 1
season.
Myers,
FRIE.
3:30 HI
5:15 till






J
THE EAST CAROL I MAN
JANUARY 11. 1983
13
Win o o��v pattevson
mi's release pass.
FREE
tan t beat
I
U
ary
k.
Swim Team Set To Go
and
Staff Writm
"We are in good
spirits and ready to
finish the season with a
bang said ECU
swimming coach Rick
Kobe, obviously pleas-
ed with his team's per-
formance during the
Holiday Training Pro-
gram n North Palm
Beach, Florida, Dec
26-Jan. 6.
According to Kobe,
the team endured an in-
credible amount of
work, participating in
two 2-hour practices
each day. In all, the
squad amassed 100,000
yards of swimming dur-
ing the training period.
"We surely ac-
complished what we
wanted to Kobe said.
The Florida trip
allowed the team to
work without any
distractions, Kobe said,
and it was nice because
of the pleasant sur-
roundings.
The Pirates stayed in
the Camelot Inn in
North Palm Beach and
used the pool at the
North Palm Beach
Country Club to train.
"We had only one goal
in mind said Kobe,
"and that was to get in
a whole lot of hard
work
A gratifying and
welcome result of the
program was that the
team showed a great
deal of togetherness
while absent from the
friendly confines of
ECU. "I was happy
because the team
became closer and re-
mained in good
health he said.
The trip to Florida
was paid for by the
team members
themselves and provid-
ed their own transpor-
tation.
"They're good
kids said Kobe. "If I
had to describe the trip,
I'd say it was very, very
successful.
Coach Kobe also
took advantage of the
trip to do some
recruiting. "We do a
lot of recruiting in
Florida said Kobe.
"We signed a young
man while we were
there, as a matter of
fact
The team will begin
its new year of competi-
tion on Jan. 15 when
the men (3-2) and
women (2-3) take on
Navy. Villanova will
also compete in the
meet, taking on the
ECU women squad.
Kobe is concerned
about the Navy squad,
which beat the ECU
men's team easily last
year and is one of the
strongest teams in the
East. However, Kobe
also realizes that his
squad has vastly im-
proved since the two
teams met last. "Last
year, Navy's men team
really killed us he
said. "But we always
like to go into a meet
with the thought of
winning, and we always
do
The women's squad
goes into the meet hav-
ing beaten Navy in last
year's meeting. It is
Villanova whom the
Pirates will have to be
prepared for.
"Villanova is better
than Navy Kobe
said. "We will have to
swim even tougher
SEC Hoop S
Mot Women
CHARLESTON,
W.Va. (UPI) - Former
Marshall University
basketball standout
Cjreg White said he was
the object oi a
"bidding war" while
being recruited in high
school, and colleges
tried to lure him with
girls and cash.
In an interview with
The (Charleston) Sun-
da y Gazette-Mail,
White said the incentive
otters were made his
senior year when he
visited the campuses of
his four top choices -
West Virginia, Wake
Forest. Virginia Tech
and Tennessee.
"Everyone started
coming on strong as far
as scholarship and then
if you don't accept
their scholarship, they
would start throwing
extras in. I'm not going
to say directly which
universities were throw-
ing extras in
White said he finally
"took the best offer"
and Mgned with Mar-
shall in Huntington,
where he played guard
from 1977-81 and
broke both Marshall
and Southern Con-
terence assist records.
"There's a lot of
things I got at Marshall
the coaches don't know
about he said. "If
I'm an athlete, if
somebody wants to give
me something, fine.
But it's a sad situation
where you have to give
an athlete cash to get
him to perform on the
basketball court
White said he was ac-
tively sought by 200
colleges during his
senior year at Mullens
High School.
White said colleges
attempting to lure him
with hundreds of
dollars in spending
money and free cars,
stereos, and apart-
ments.
He said a couple of
colleges also had girls
waiting for him when
he visitied their cam-
puses.
"I went to this party,
more like an alumni
gathering, and there's
four beautiful girls sit-
ting there and the coach
walks over to me and
says, 'Which one do
you want0'
"I picked the one I
wanted, and we had a
date that night White
said. "Nothing hap-
pened
White said several of
his friends across the
country who played
college basketball ex-
perienced the same type
of bribery.
"You go to U.K.
(The University of Ken-
tucky), you get a car.
It's no big deal he
said.
A former player at UK
vas given a race horse
as an incentive to sign
with the college, White
said. "He thought it
was great. He's a very
wealthy man now
Myers Top A CC Frosh
GRhhNSBORO,
N.C. (UPI) North
Carolina State
freshman guard Ernie
Myers, who scored 49
points in the
W'oitpack's last three
games, was named
Monday as the Atlantic
Coast Conferece's
Rookie-of-the-Week
for the second time this
season.
Myers, a 6-foot-4,
203-pounder from
Bronx, N.Y scored 22
points in the
Wolfpack's 111-76 win
over Fairleigh-
Dickinson despite play-
ing only 15 minutes. He
led North Carolina
State to a 76-70 win
over Clemson with 25
points in 29 minutes.
Myers' other two
points came in the
Wolfpack's 49-42 loss
to Missouri Sunday.
In the Fairleigh-
Dickinson win, Myers
was eight-for-I3 from
the floor and five-for-
five from the free
throw line. Myers made
10 of 20 from the floor
against Clemson and
was four-for-five from
the free throw line in
the Wolfpack's first
conference victory.
For the season,
Myers is shooting 43.9 per contest,
percent from the floor Myers was selected
and 60.7 percent from by the Atlantic Coast
the free throw line. He Sports Writers Associa-
is averaging 11.9 points tion.
AT BARRE,ltd.
Dancewear Specialty Shop
Come to us for
all your
Dancewear needs
Beginning classes
we have what you need,
422 ARLINGTON BLVD.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
(919) 756-6670
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABOtnON: a difficult deo
DEPEND ON. uon that"s mode easier Dy
the women of the Heming Center Counselors are
available day and night to support and under-
stand you Your safety comfort and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday � Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1 st & 2nd Trimester Aoortions up to
18 Weeks � Free FYegnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
Accepted � CALL 761-&S50 DAY OB NIGHT �
Hearth care, counseling T14C R EMIkir
and education for wo- mc "fJJJJJJ
men of all ages. CENTER
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ttiS.OC PrtfiwiKy TMl Birth
Control, and Problem Pragnan-
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MwaaharMe-221-lSM) batwaan
A.M. mm i P.M. Waafctfays.
RALIIQH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
f 17 Wast Morgan St
RalHatfrV N.C
Freshman Johnn Kdnards watches for his next
�o�o ay STANLEY LEARY
moe.
Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant
105 Airport Road Greenville. N C
758-0327
SHRIMP
DINNER
$3.50
for Tues. & Wed. night
Regular
Moors
Sunday thru Thursday 11:00 A M � 900 P M
Friday and Saturday 11:00 AM to KT00P.M.
Boo Hurting. Manager anshas to invito everyone out to en(oy a tint
Seafood Dinner Hall ha tn the GreanvHie Roetaurant from no
on. So coma by and say Hallo
sssssssssssssssssssssssssscaggggstssss!
Banquet Facilities Available 738-0327
Bob Herring. Manager
SPRING
SCHEDULE
TUESCRAAZY TUES.
Different events each night
ED-HUMP NITE
45C cons oil night
free admission for ECU students.
THURSCollege Night
45C cans till 11:00 P.M.
70C cans till 1:00 A.M. Adm. $1.00
FRIEnd of the Week Party
3:30 till 5:15 all cans 45C
5:15 till 11:00 P.M. all cans 65C
SUNLadies Night
FREE Admission for ladies -
5C Draft while it lasts.
Welcome Back!
Get your
pictures back
today!
Bring your roll of 110, 126,
or 35mm color print roll
film (Full frame, C-41
process only) for
developing and printing to
the 6 hour lab before 10
A.M. Monday thru Friday
Your pictures will be ready
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This coupon
entitles you to
5200 off the
complete
developing and
printing price of
any roll of 110. .
126, or 35mm 1
color print film '
One roll per 1
coupon. May
not be used in
combination
I with any other
I offer No cash
1 value
I Offer expires
� January 15,
1983.
I
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East Carolina University's
STUDENT UNION
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1983-84 Term
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Any Full-time student can apply,
applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk.
Deadline: January 14,1983

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9
14
1 Ht tASTCAROLONIAN
JANUARY II, 1983
AND YOU'LL SAVE AN EXTRA 10 ON ALL
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(ONLY E.C.U. STUDENT I.D.S QUALIFY FOR 10 DISCOUNT)


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mm





Title
The East Carolinian, January 11, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 11, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.239
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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