The East Carolinian, January 7, 1983






5
�te
(Huralmiun
Serving the East Carolina campus community
since 1925
Friday, January 7, 1983
Pirate Walk
Escort Service Set To Begin January 17
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff Wnlcr
Pirate Walk, the new campus
escort service, is scheduled to begin
operations on Jan. 17, said Pirate
Walk Director Paul Sumrell. who
also headed the Student Resident
I ite Association's Escort Commit-
tee which developed the ECU pro-
gram.
Sumrell, with assistant director
Tommy Robbins, has put the
finishing touches on the project,
and is now directing his energy
toward publicity and finding ap-
proximately 100 volunteers to act as
escorts for the service.
"We need over 100 escorts to
start out with, just to be sure we
have enough Sumrell said. He ad-
ded that escorts will be allowed to
choose the hours and nights they
wish to work. The "Pirate Walk"
service will be available from 7 p.m.
until midnight on Sunday through
Thursday.
Escort volunteers will be asked to
work only two or three hour shifts.
"Pirate Walk is a campus-wide ser-
vice said I indsey Williams,
publicity chairperson lor SRA. Ac-
cording to Williams any student, in-
cluding those living off campus, is
entitled to use the escort service.
However, off-campus escorts will be
limited to sorority houses and some
areas near the university.
SRA and the Student Govern-
ment Association, under the leader-
ship of president Eric Henderson,
worked jointly on the Pirate Walk
project. The SGA unanimously
voted to give $600 to the project last
month.
Applications for anyone wishing
to be an escort are available during
business hours Monday through Fri-
day at the SGA offices in
Mendenhall Student Center.
The Pirate Walk will be managed
out of Room 224 in Mendenhall.
Lither Sumrell, Robbins or another
volunteer will be working in the of-
fice from two to four each after-
noon for anyone who has questions
regarding the escort service.
Prospective escorts will be in-
dividually screened by Dean
Carolyn Fulghum of the Office of
Residence Life as well as by the head
ol the Judiciary Dean James
Mallory.
Originally, organizers of the ser-
vice had hoped that the police files
of escort applicants would be check-
ed by the campus police, but this
proved to be a lengthy process
which would delay the start of the
service and be too costly. A similiar
escort service at UNC-Chapel Hill
uses the same method of screening
escorters without referring to police
files. Sumrell noted. There have
been no problems with the UNC
program.
"We'll be going to the womens'
dorms and sorority houses to fill
them in about the service Sumrell
told The East Carolinian. Williams
added that 2000 fliers explaining the
service would be distributed in the
next few weeks. Telephone stickers
about the service will also be
distributed. Dean Mallory's office
provided the funds for the printing
of the fliers and stickers.
The Pirate Walk number will be
757-6616. Students wishing to be
escorted should call the number and
an operator would take their name
and location and will then call the
escort person on duty nearest that
person's location. The caller will
know in advance the name of the
escorter assigned to them. All
escorters will carry an "escort
badge" identifying them as an
escorter for Pirate Walk.
The Pirate Walk service and the
positions for volunteer escorters are
open to both women and men.
W'llliams said that women were
welcome to be escorts if tnev feel
they can do it. "I don't see why they
should be discriminated against
she added.
"I'm glad it's time to start "
Sumrell said. "We've done so much
work on the project.
"I hope people will use the ser-
vice added SRA president Tory
Russo, who was one of the Escort
Committee leaders. Both Russo
(758-8431) and Sumrell (758-9470)
are available to speak to anv groups
who would like to learn more about
the Pirate Walk service.
Pirate Walk Ready To Go
Photo By STANLEY LEARV
Paul Sumrell, left, director of Pirate Walk, discusses the new escort service with I i�H w
Ton Russo, president of the SRA. service with Lmdsev Williams, center, and
Holiday News Recap Includes
New Taxes, Mechanical Heart
Mendenhall Director Alexander Wins
Top Honors At National Convention
B GREG RIDfiOUT
Associate Dean ol Activities and
Director of University Unions S.
Rudolph Alexander was awarded
the Fanny Taylor award for his
outstanding contributions as a per-
forming arts administrator at the
Association of College, University
and Community Arts Ad-
ministrators in New York City Dec
19.
The award has been presented an-
nually for the last eight years by the
organization and is a symbol of peer
recognition for the quality and
quanity of work in arts administra-
tion.
In presenting the award,
ACUCAA president Henry Bowers
noted Alexander's achievements.
Among these are: The establishment
of a highly a successful regional
concert series in a non-metropolitan
area, the ensuring of handicapped
student accesibility to Mendenhall
Student Center and the development
of contract riders that have become
standard at ACUCAA workshops.
Alexander said he was very sur-
prised when his name was announc-
ed to receive the award. He believes
his hard work for the organization
and for the university is the reason
he was given the honor.
Alexander graduated from East
Carolina and has been a faculty
member here for 21 years. The
achievements he is the most proud
of include the booking of master
. r, A , Ph0,� � STANLEY LBARY
A View trom Above
Memorial Gym seemed more like the dungeon of the condemned as
drop-add brought chaos to the building.
S. Rudolph Alexander
pianist Arthur Rubinstein, the
presentation of comedian Flip
Wilson's first college appearance
and the development of now stan-
dard contract riders.
Alexander is described by col-
leagues as hardworking and is
especially noted for his ability to
haggle over contracts to the get the
best deal. He describes his obsession
with contracts as a passion. "I want
to get the best possible deal for the
students and the university
Alexander's job includes oversee-
ing the operations of Mendenhall
Student Center, Wright Auditorium
and the Afro-American cultural
center. He said he is proud of what
he and his staff has accomplished,
and urges all students, faculty and
staff to take better advantage of the
diverse offerings of the university
unions' programs.
Vice Chancellor for Student Life
Elmer Meyer, who coordinates all
student activities on campus, said it
was very nice to be notified by the
president of ACUCAA of Alex-
ander's award and attributed it to
Alexander's hard work in the
organization and on campus. Meyer
said he had worked with Fanny
Taylor, for whom the award is nam-
ed, and was doubly pleased in that
respect.
Former winners of the award in-
clude past presidents of ACUCAA
from schools such as the University
of Northern Iowa and the Universi-
ty of Connecticut.
Alexander is also a member of the
International Society of Performing
Arts Administrators, the National
Association of Campus Activities,
and the Association of College
Unions.
Alexander is an advisor to several
student organizations and acts as
chairperson of several university
boards.
f-iom s.aft and M ire Reporx.
For almost three weeks, ECU had been closed and
many of you probably used the time to relax and "drop
out o sight for a while, but despite vour absence the
news of our university, city, state, nation and the world
went on. lo help you catch up on the events of ma.or
significance during this time, we are providing a news
summary divided into three sections: local, state and
national-international.
Stale
rJ2'312 7 "The only good ln,n� about a severe
recession ,s that traffic deaths tend to come down " said
Ut. b.J Campbell, director of the Highway Safety
Research Center at the University of North Carolina
Campbell claimed that the current economic crunch was
the primary reason 1982 had the lowest number of traf-
fic deaths in 20 years in North Carolina. 1,280 people
died on N.C. roads last year compared to 1,497 in 1981.
The 14 percent decline in N.C. mirrored a nationwide
trend which is expected to be about 4,500 deaths lower
than 1981 when 49,268 persons died on America's
roads.
12-29-82 � Economist Paul Zipin, who published an
article in the fall edition of Popular Government
magazine, claims that N.C. residents will pay higher
state individual income taxes than most other
Americans. The average amount of state taxes due is
$335 per person.
1-2-83 � The U.S. Justice Department stated that
"North Carolina has been flagrantly violating the law"
in regards to its segregation policy in Central Prison in
Raleigh. State officials admit to the segregation of some
600 black and white inmates as an effort to reduce ten-
sion in the overcrowded facility. The Justice Depart-
ment is filing suit in the matter.
12-20-82 � An increase of two percent in the federal
excise tax on phone service went into effect on Jan. 1,
1983. It will result in higher phone bills for North
Carolina residents. The national tax, which is used to
support the defense budget, was raised from one to
three percent alter President Reagan signed into law a
bill wh.ch passed Congress last August I he new ,n-
nVl m Woxmiatdj 51 billion in revenue
J.VT?1 C Sen- Jesse Hdms' ho unsuc-
cessful tihbuster attempt with Sen. John East R-N c
delayed the Senate from its Christmas adjournment'
said his actions would not damage his poJ ,on r the
KTot- not:heard s -a - ����
Jff - Cov. James B Hunt savs he .s counting
on a modest increase in state tax revenues m i��o to
provide money tor removing the freeze on Mate
employees salaries. He said upgrading math and
2?�2Kand "ghr,ng drunken d� ��
National and International
12-29-82 � Thousands of Americans across the na-
non turned out in the early morning hours to view a
lunar eclipse that began at 4:50 a.m. EST and totally
obscured the moon by 5:58 a.m. Scientists noted that
the recent eclipse was the darkest in recent memory
because ol an April 4 volcanic eruption in Mexico that
spewed volcanic dust into the atmosphere. There won't
be another lunar eclipse visible in this area until August
16, 1989, although California will see one in 1986.
1-2-83 � Barney Clark, the world's first recipient of a
permanent artificial heart celebrated his first month of
life with his new organ. His artificial heart, which gives
Clark the blood pressure of an 18-vear-old. has con-
tinued to work with almost no complications since it
was implanted Dec. 2 at the University of Utah Medical
Center.
12-27-82 � An animal rights group called "Animal
Liberation Front" broke into a Howard University
Medical School research lab and stole about 30 cats that
were to be used for research. The group claimed in an
interview with the Associated Press, that the Howard
See. INLMPLOYFMFNT, Page 3
New Fund Raising Foundation Set Up
To Support School Of Art Programs
By DARRYL BROWN
A private fund-raising organiza-
tion has been formed for the ECU
School of Art, the first of its kind
for the nationally recognized
department.
In the tradition of the School of
Business, ECU athletics and other
campus departments, the Friends of
Art has been set up to "build a
larger and better School of Art
according to Blanche Monroe, head
of the organization.
The group has announced a
statewide drive for memberships
and funding support to carry out a
broadly based enrichment program
for the art school. Money will be
distributed to three primary areas:
student scholarships, the Gray
gallery and museum and a general
support fund for the school.
A steering committee was set up
for the group last month with
Monroe as chairperson. They will
hold a meeting later this month to
decide on fund-raising methods for
the coming year. The group has
already received a few contributions
from private citizens, students and
alumni. Monroe said no goals had
been set yet for the group's first year
of activities.
The ECU School of Art is the on-
ly art school in North Carolina fully
accredited by the National Associa-
tion of Schools of Art. It has had
some scholarship programs in the
past, but has never had a permanent
support group such as the Friends of
Art.
The organization's first action is
to send out a letter explaining its
purpose and asking for member-
ship, which entitles contributors to a
newsletter and social events at the
school and gallery, among other
things. Monroe said long range
hopes for the group include im-
provement of the art hbrarv and
Gray art gallery.
Police Report Little Crime
During Christmas Holidays
By LISA RYAN
Si.flWnitr
According to Detective Lieute-
nant McAbee of the ECU Depart-
ment of Public Safety, more
larcenies occur during Thanksgiving
break than during the students'
absence at Christmastime. Beginn-
ing Dec. 17, complaints and arrests
markedly decreased. Since most
students left the campus during the
holidays, McAbee indicated that it
was easier for patrolling officers to
spot persons not belonging to the
campus community.
On Dec. 17, Lanny Thomas
Wilson of Aycock dorm was charg-
ed with possession of fireworks.
Joseph H. Riggs of Goldsboro was
ticketed for driving under the in-
fluence and driving without a
license. Campus security was
notified that an act of vandalism
had been committed in a professor's
office m the Jenkins Fine Art
Building. A student of Fletcher
dorm also reported the theft of a
battery from her car.
The security logbook remained
virtually empty until Dec. 22, when
non-student William Moore of
Washington, N.C, and Helen
Rolins of Greenville were banned
from the campus for trespassing in
Scott dorm. William Ross, a resi-
dent of Scott dorm, received a cita-
See, FEW, Page 5






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 7, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to nave an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type it on an announcement
form ana send it to The East
Carolinian in care of 'he produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at tne East Carolinian
ortice in the Publications Building
Flyers and handwritten copy on
odd sized paper cannot be ac
cepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you want
and suggest that you do not rely
solely on this column for publicity
T he deadline tor announcements
s3pm Monday tor the Tuesday
paper and 3pm Wednesdayy for
the Thursday paper No an
"Ouncements received at'er tnese
deadlines will be printed
This space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
HONORS
SIMINAR TOPICS
f-acuity members ana current
Hon?r s'udents are reminded ot
e opportunity to propose topics
tor Honors Seminars tor fan and
spring semesters 1983 84 These
seminars are ideally nter
disciplinary and problem cr 'OP'C
oriented See pp 87 88 of the
W82 84 catalogue tor general
categories Seminars meet once a
week ano give 3 s n cred'
'owards G E requirements
To be considered proposals
must be submitted in writing by
January 20 1983 to Dr David
Sancers Coordinator of the
Honors Program, c 0 English
Dept Austin Blog Campus For
fur'her information call 757 6548
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers, Pledges and the
Little Sisters would like to
welcome back the Students of
ECU We hope that each one of you
had a Gret Holiday and That we
nave a GREAT Spring Semester
Plans are underway tor the Big
gest and Best Spring Rush to hit
ECU Plan on attending. RUSH 83
Floyd, let's have a keg this after
noon
COMMUNICATE
Learn to develop assertive com
munication skills Tell others what
you want, feel and believe Asser
t.veness can open new doors tor
you Assertive Communication
Tuesday March 15 April 5.
7 00 9 30 p m Contact the Divi
Sion of Continuing Education
757 6143
INVESTMENT
STRATEGIES
Basic Commodity Hedging
Tuesday and Thursday February
15 24. 7 00 9 00 p m Investing in
'he 80 s Wednesday. February 23
April 6. 6 30 9 10 p m These
courses will provide valuable m
formation for those who nave little
on no expermce m investing Con
tac' 'he Division or Continuing
Education 757 6143
PHARMACY COLLEGE
ADMISSION TEST
The Pharmacy College Aamis
sion Tes' will be offered a' ECU on
Saturday. February 5. 1983 Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pieted and mailed 'o the
Psychological Corporation, 304
East 45th S're New York, NY
10017 to arrive by January 8, 1983
Applications blanks are also
available at the Testing Center,
Speight Building. Room 105. ECU
STUDENT UNION
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Committee is sponsoring
the perfect trip tor 1983 Spring
Break An ENTIRE WEEK of fun
and excitement at Disney World
n Fort Lauderdale Just think,
only $179 tor the whole week of
Spring Break in Florida If in
terested, contact the Central
Ticket Office at MSC SPACE IS
LIMITED so call now at 757 6611
Ext 226
DANCE
Foxtrot. Rhumba. Disco, Waltz
and Bop the basics and their
variations Beginning Ballroom
Dancing Friday February 18
April 29 1983 from 7 00 8 00 p m
intermediate Ballroom Dancing
Friday February 18 April 29
1983 trom 8 00 9 00 p m Contact
the Division ot Continuing Educa
tion 757 6143
SCUBA
Basic NAUl or padi Scuba Cer
titication Section I Tuesday and
thursday March 15 April 7
7 00 10 00 p m Section 11 Tues
day and Thursday, April 12 May
5, 7 00 10 00 p m These courses
are designed 'o introduce begin
ners 'o SCUBA diving with basic
instruction in the fundamental
skills and safety procedures
Register early Contact the Divi
sion of Continuing Education,
757 6143
UNDERWATER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Tuesday and Thursday,
February 15 24 from 7 10 p m. Pre
requisite Basic Scuba Certifica
Tion from a recognized Scuba div
mg association such as NAUl or
PADI This is a course ot under
water camera handling and
covers underwater photographic
equipment, films, photo techni
ques and lighting techniques Con
tact Division ot Continuing Educa
Tion, 757 6143
ACTING CLASS
Acting class meets Monday
February 14 March 21 trom 7 9
p m Beginning Acting I will ac
quamT you wilh basic acting
techniques reflective ot 'he
method approach instructor is
S'eve Finnan a tomer member of
'he ECU Department of Drama
and Speech, who has directed off
broadway productions In New
York Contact Division ot Contmu
mg Education, 757 6143
ONE DAY
COMPUTER
PROGRAMS
The SMall Computer
Revolution Saturday, February
26, 1983 Word Processing
Saturday, March 5, 1983
Pre requisite The Small Com
pu'er Revolution or equivalent In
'roduction to Programming in
BASIC, Saturday, March 26. 1983
Pre requisite The Small Com
puter Revolution or equivalent
Contact the Division ot Continuing
Education, 757 6143
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc-
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
-All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75 per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Retain to THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office by 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday fwbikatioa.
Name.
! Address.
CityState.
Np. lines
.Zip.
.Phone.
. at 75� per line S.
.No. insertions.
.enclosed

���

-Ji i
����i�


!



.

Pirate Pride
Photo By STANLEY LEARY
This student gets ready for the new semester with an Kast Carolina license plate and a few engine repairs.
EXERCISE
-A-
THON
An exercise a ihon to benetif
Cystic Fibrosu will be held at The
Aerobic Workshop locTed aT 417
Evans STreeT Man. on Saiurday
January 22. Pariicipanrs in The
event will begin exercising aT 11
am All funds raised will be used
to help Cystic Fibrosis.
A grand prize will be awarded To
The Top fundraiser at The exercise
a Thon. All participants raising S30
or more will receive CF "I did If"
t shirts and all participants who
raise $75 or more will receive
t shirts and a roll tote bag
Funds raised In The CF
Exercise a rhon will help support
the Foundation's research, ireai
meni and educaTion programs in
NC and nationwide CF is a fatal
lung and digestive disease that
takes the lives ot half its viciims
before they reach their twenties
CF causes excessive amounts of
thick mucus to clog lungs and In
terfere with breathing and absorp
tion of food
For more information about
participating in the exercise a
thon, or sponsor,ng someone.
please contact the Aerobic
Workshop at 757 1608
MARK TWAIN
IN PERSON
Mark Twain ft Person will oe
at tne Kmston A rport Theatre
Staiiings F.eid Rouse Rd
January 28 ano 29 snows begin a'
� 15pm Student tickets are S3 Ml
advance For moare information
comae' Leign R.ggs at 527 2517.
Kinston Arts Council
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS
Camera I Tuesday, February
22 March 29, 7 00 9 00 p m The
Dance Factory Tuesday
February 22 May 3. 5 30 6 30
Sum. ,Gj4ur TjflavFebruary
� Aprin��30 5pTi 'Clogg
ing Wednesday, February JJW.
April 6 8 00 10 00 p m -�PWJ,
Reading Thursday February I4-
April 21 7 00 9 00 p m Yoga
Tuesday and Thursday March 15
April 7 6 30 7 30 p m Contact the
Division of Continuing Education,
757 6143
SPOLETO FESTIVAL
The Spoieto FesTival In
Charleslon, SC is seeking qualified
siudenTs to serve as appreniices
tor The Festival held May 20 June
5 There is a variety of positions
available Application deadline is
Feb 1 Contact the Co op office,
313 Rawl
NCGOVERNMENT
INTERNSHIPS
A variety of iobs are available
Pay is S3 75 per hour for full Time
positions Beginning June 1
Augusi 5 Siudenis must nave
finished their sopnmore year and
have a 2 5 GPA Graduate
students are also eligible to apply
Application deadline is February
7 Contact the Co op office
US CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE
T he U S Chamber ot Commerce
has internships available tor a
variety of maiors They are
located m Washington. DC All in
ternships are non paid Contact
'he Co cp Ott'ce
NATIONAL PARK
CONCESSIONS,INC.
Sj' mat Park Concessions. Inc
offers employment opportunities
tor seasonal employees for tne
per oo of approximately June t
through Labor Day to be con
S'dered Ts s a condition of tne
empioymen' A variety of pos
�ions are avaaoie Apply at tne
Co op Office
STUDIES
A Two part mini series will be of
lered at no cost by The UniversiTy
Counseling Cenier. on How To Sue
I in College an�s��ii Have Fun,
pr. Monday Jan�VJ17i AfOthfr
series. How To ��� eV a�Mi�e�y
will be ottered on Tuesday.
January 18 BoTh sessions will be
conducTed trom 3pmtlH4pmin
305 Wright Annex. 757 6661 No ad
vance registration necessary
The Shoe Outlet
Located next to Evans Seafood
on West 9th St.
Brand name shoes
at
Bass discount prices
TopSider
Converse
Florsheim
to mention a few.
Leiden togen
�Ftebtauiant
c
Daily
Luncheon
and Dinner
Special
Sat. & Sun.
Luncheon
Buffet
12-3 p.m.
all you can eat
5.25
children under A FREE
Open
7 Days
Hours:
MonThurs.
11:30 a.m9:30 p.m.
Fri.
11:30a.m10:00 p.m.
Sat.
12:00-10:00 p.m.
Sun.
12:00-9:00 p.m.
756-3844
Carolina East Center
TAKEOUT
Look for us in our new location
o&
Tuesday � Pizza Buffet
2.79
all you can eat 5-9
LADIES
NITE
Ladies' Admitted Free
FREE DRAFT for the ladies
� Bruce Frye
Monday � Pizza & Pasta
2.79
all you can eat 5-9
M�tOI ???�?� ?����?�
rmsst1 �
$15�� OFF ANY
COMPLETE PAIR OF
EYE GLASSES
Present coupon for discount. Not good
with other advertised specials.
COUPON
I
I
J
This Christmas why not give a GIFT CERTIFICATE
� In the amount you choose, from THE OPTICAL
Sunday Nite
Lasagna Special
2.99
all you can eat 5-9
Friday
Happy Hour
4-7
s28.95
SINGLE VISION
Frame & Lenses
PALAt E?
S
44.95
BIFOCALS
Frame ISt Lenses
95
SACSCtiatLOMS
SOFT s
CONTACTS
INC1UDES M DAY GUARANTEE
AND CARE KIT
99
OPTICAL
PALACE
Phonp
75d-4204
?
W 703 Greenville Blvrl "Across Fiom Pitt Plaza. Ne�t To ERA Realty)
Gary M. Harris licensed Optician Open 9:30 am. to 6 p. ro Mon Fri g
SNOW SKI SPRING
BREAK
Add PHYE 1150 or PHYE IHt.
to ski Snowsnoe air ng Spring
Break Contact jo Saunoers a'
757 6000 room 205 Memorial Gym
or go by non credit
LEARNING
DIDABILITY
II you have a learning didabiiity
and or dyslexia and you are will
mg to talk about it call 757 3205
Dr Penny will use 'nis intorma
tion for an article m a professional
lournai Confidentiality assured
Please call evenings or weekends
BIOLOGY CLUB
MEETING
Biology Club meeting to be held
Monday. January 10 In BN102 at
7 30 p m Mrs Deborah Eazes
from the National Red Cross will
be trie featured speaker
SNOWSKI
Tnose skiers who want �o take
Snowskring for credit during Spr
ng Semester should add PHYE
1000 or PHYE 1150 or PHYE 1151
during Drop Add On Campus
classes .n condition ng precede a
spr.ng break trip Snowsnoe WV
for the finest sfci.ng in the sou
Conrac' jo Saunoers a' 75? 6000 tor
further ihforrra' on aoou' Vha s
program and sk for credi or go
no" credit
COMMUNICATE IN
SPANISHOR GERMAN
Coriversa'ionai Spa" sr Tues
day February 15 Apr 1 26 71 30
p m Conversatonai German
Tuesday February 15 Apr 26
' 8 30 p m Bo'h courses are ope"
'0 both begmners and former
students who wan' to brush up
on the language Contact me Dvi
sion of Continuing Education,
757 6143
AMBASSADORS
Welcome back Ambassadors
Ml wn: have our jr�i General
Meetirtpet lf��W��M�i�y,
jav if UVriti Segfrtat taws
MSC Muiiti purpose room. Plans
will be discussed tor our induction
cremony is scheduled for Thurs
day. Jan 27 We'll plan on seeing
you
OFFICIATING
Baseball Softball ��
Monday February 21 Apr II
from 7 9pm T he course is design
ed 'o be of .merest to spectators.
players, coaches, and school
athletic mtramurai teachers and
to prepare those nteresteo m 10b
opportunities in umpiring Contact
the Division of Continuing Educa
tion. 757 6143
START BEST
God wants us 'o enioy our life
here on earth (Ecciesias'es
V 7 10) When you really unoers
fand the Bible.(which ,s God �
heart to us) you will be able ti
build your heart and mind to tn�
point that you can enioy you'
everydav life Uohn 10 10.
Timothy 6 17) Come Oi ana set
what you think Saturday jan
�tn. at 2007 East F,fth Street at
3 30 Also. Monday Jan 10th. at
7.3) p m m Room 242 MSC
BASIC SAILING
Two classroom sessions ana
three weekend afternoons on 1� 26
foot baots on tne Pami.cc River
Join in the Fun Registration is
i.mifed to !6 so register eart
Meets Thursday Apr 1 7, 21
7 30 v 30 p m , Saturday Apr 1 9
16 23 1 30 4 30 p f Contjc' 'he
Division of continuing Education
757 6143
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Ca'nci c Nwa' Cen'e'
would nke '0 .nv "e everyone to
lOif n with us tor ceieOra'mg
Mass every Sunday in ne B oiogy
Lecture Mai star'ng a' I 30 ano
every Wednesday a' 5 00 a' Urn
Ca'noi c Newma Ceer loca'ed
down ar 'he bc"om o College H II
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enioy friendly
fellowship, good friends and food
and a chance to be yourself in this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come iom us at the Bap' s'
Student union where we nave din
ners�n Tuesdays at S:X tor only
M �5 PAUSE on TRwsaays at
70S to anew us NMMi a break
after an almost fulfilling week,
and lots of people iust like you who
enjoy others Call 752 4646 if you
nave any questions Boo Clyde
campus minister
r
The East Carolinian
Wrwii- . 'ir idi.i. ii'ii: 1
"� r vM
Published every Tjesaa ana
Thursday durmg tne academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the Summer
The East Carolinian is the of
t.ciai newspaper of Eas"
Carolina University, owned
pera'ea. and publ'Sheo tor and
by the students of Eas' Carolina
Univers
Subscription Rate 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville. N C
PCSrMASTE'� Send address
- arges to Tne Eas' Caronn.a-
Old joutr Buiid.ng ECU G-een
v.lie NC 27834
Telephone 7S7 6364.4367 430�
S R. A.
Escorts are neeoeJ (or .�e
Escort Serv.ce An,one imeres'ea
n bemg an esccr' pease comae
ycur oorm o.rector If you are a
dorm resident of f you live oft
campus comae the SGA office
BAPTIST CHURCH
There is a bus route tor students
who wish to artertd Sunday service
at Sycamore Hill Baptist Church
The bus leaves the church ana
goes mto the campus from w Stfl
St by CoTon Fleming and o'her
dorms a1 10 40 am swinging back
on 5t going to mam. campus n
back Of dorms and swng.ng By
Beik Dorm it leaves ano goes
across campus 0 dorms on Sou'n
S'de iof campus) no later than
10 50 am. arriving a' church at
H 00
EPISCOPAL
SERVICE
A Student Episcopal service of
Holy Cemm union mill ae
celebrated on Tuesaav even no
January J1. r the cnapr of 3
Paul's Episcopal Church, 4O6 4tn
Street (one block trom Garre't
Dorm) The service will be a' 5 30
p m with the Episcopa' Chaplain
the Rev B11 Hadden celebrating
Balloons
Over
eenville
We have a large selection
of balloon bouquets
available for
all occasions.
Call Mrs. Tabor
752-3815
Stud�n,S
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x
I
"t
t
Un
(i,
cats were subjectec
jectv No arrests m
12-27-92
Kepresentime-elecj
battle against catf
University l.ombarl
largely credited vJ
moon mission )
12-20-92 - The
listed 418 chen
making them ehgit
billion super: ,md p
1-2-83 Hou
D-Tex called
Demo
In Wa
WASHING
it.PI)
Soul hen 1
Democi
likely to b
ty leadership anc
ith the admii
m the �
Ciramrn
Thursd i
Gramm.
Democrat I
part leadei j
int: President K j
� n
not being i
to the p rest if
House Buv
tee.
He responde I
hand sla .
trom the Hoe and
nouncing
tor the
election
Republican.
Rep. Dan Dai I
D-Va ano:
called "boll
said be believes
conservative S .1
Democrat
less likely
e
It will have
(ettect) on some
ceJrf
� i �
m
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THF ST . I

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THE EAST CAtOLINIAN
JANUARY 7, 1913
Phone.
.enclosed
11�i
I 1


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4


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.
If I asiarolinian
Si i Ni
ECU
�3C�
S R A
TIST CHURCH
t a bus rout tor students
'r a"ec St"Oj� serv ce
lor� h Bap'is' Cure"
n leave "e ciurcn aria
I! carnpuj irom W 5"
: �"i $v� -g rtg tJacn
a n campus n
torms snd w �g"ig ov
' eavej ana goes
' Tis 0" S ou" ri
a'e- a"
EPISCOPAL
SERVICE
tuae�' Epscopa service of
Comm on w,w o�
j'eo on Tuesca eve g.
v � - � -ape' c St
.v jpj - . - - 40 4 � -
� � � 5a"f
- � � . . be a' 5:30
" e � bd d �
m
:za
Unemployment Is Sore Spot In Holiday News
Continued From Page 1
cats were subjected to unnecessary pain in research pro-
jects. No arrests have been made.
12-27-82 � Former Apollo 13 astronaut and
Representitive-elect from Colorado Jack Swigert lost his
battle against cancer in Washington's Georgetown
University Lombard. Cancer Institute. Swigert 51 was
largely credited with piloting the ill-fated Apollo 13
moon mission safely back to earth.
2-20-&? � The Environmental Protection Agency
listed 418 chemical waste dumps as "serious threats
rnakmg them eligible for clean-up funds under the $l6
billion superfund program.
1-2-83 � House Majority Leader Jim Wright,
D-Tex called the nation's 10.8 percent unemployment
"priority number one He called on the new Congress
to pass legislation that would help to create job retrain-
ing programs for people in mid-career who suddenly
find themselves out of work.
12-21-82 � Renewed violence in strife-torn Northern
Ireland made this Christmas season a particularly dif-
ficult one for many families who have lost loved ones in
the continuing guerrilla violence which has claimed
2,250 people since 1969. The religious struggle has been
going on between Protestant and Catholic groups for
over 60 years.
12-20-82 � United States Ambassador to the United
Nations Jeane Kirkpatrick said that the U.N. often does
more to hinder world peace than promote it in an inter-
view in U.S. News and World Report. "The U.N. can't
or doesn't � do much in the way of promoting inter-
national peace Kirkpatrick said.
12-20-82 � Once again the reopening of the un-
damaged Three-Mile Island nuclear plant in Penn-
sylvania has been delayed. The Nuclear Regulatory
Commission said it is concerned about reports that the
remaining operational reactor might not withstand an
earthquake.
Local
12-19-82 � S. Rudolph Alexander, associate dean of
activities and director of the ECU Student Union
received the Fanny Taylor Award from the Association
ot College, University and Community Arts Ad-
ministrators for his outstanding contributions as a per-
forming arts administrator.
12-31-82 � The weather throughout the nation was
inconsistent and unpredictable, but Greenville closed
out December with numerous days of above average
temperatures. Temperatures neared 80 degrees in
Greenville on several occassions before Christmas.
1-3-83 � Dorothy P. Jenkins, R.N MSN, a
graduate of ECU'S Bachelor of Science nursing pro
gram and former ECU clinical instructor, was recently
named Chief of Nursing Services at the Ann Arboi
Veterans Administration Medical Center in Michigan.
12-21-82 � ECU established a new branch of ROTC
on the campus. The new Army Reserve Officers Train-
ing program will operate as an extension of the N.C.
State Program and will be administered by the depart-
ment of military sciences at North Carolina State
Univeresitv.
Democratic 'Boll Weevils' Likely To Face Trouble
In Wake Of Rep. Gramm's 'Slap On The Hand1
WASHINGTON
(UPI) Some
Southern "boll weevil"
Democrats will be less
likely to buck their par-
ty leadership and vote
with the administration
in the wake of the Phil
Gramm affair, one
congressman said
Thursday.
Gramm. a Texas
Democrat who angered
party leaders by back-
ing President Reagan's
economic programs,
was punished this week
by not being re-elected
to the prestigious
House Budget Commit-
tee.
He responded to the
hand slap by resigning
from the House and an-
nouncing he will run
for the seat in a special
election as a
Republican.
Rep. Dan Daniel,
D-V'a another so-
called "boll weevil
said be believes other
conservative Southern
Democrats may now be
less likely to support
the administration.
"It will have some
(effect) on some of
them he said.
Daniel conceded he
has been pressured,
though not directly, to
more consistently vote
with the Democrats.
"As far as pressure
on me, there's been
some, but only by in-
ference he said. "I
support a philosophy. I
would vote the same
way irregardless of who
was president
Rep. Earl Hutto,
D-Fla elaborated on
the pressure on the
"boll weevils
"I have not had my
arm twisted he said.
"But you automatically
feel some pressure if
you're unable to go
along with your own
party
Hutto said House
leaders understand that
many Democrats hail
from very conservative
districts.
"They recognize that
and know we have to
stay in tune with the
people he said.
Rep. Tom Bevill,
D-Aia said Gramm
would not have been
denied his committee
seat had he not worked
openly for Republican
causes.
"I think his only
mistake was he sat in
on strategy sessions
with Democrats and
then sat in on the
strategy sessions with
the Republicans he
said. "That's what
angered most of the
members.
"I would not be
comfortable with the
Republican party
said Bevill, "Phil is
Rep. Bill Hefner,
D-N.C, echoed Hutto
in saying Southern con-
servatives have not
been pressured by their
more liberal party
members.
"The leadership has
never said 'toe the line
" he said. "They don't
have a litmus test
However, Gramm's
conduct forced party
leaders to take action
against him, Hefner
said.
"He made it a prac-
tice to work constantly
with David
Stockman Hefner
said. "He went along
with everything they
(the administration)
said
"The average boll
weevil is voting for
what he thinks is in the
best interest of his
district said Rep.
Walter Jones, D-S.C.
"I don't think there
will be any effect
Bevill said the
Democratic party has
always had conser-
vative members and
will continue to.
"They are using that
term (boll weevil) in so
many ways he said.
"Less than half of
them vote with the ad-
ministration (on every
issue)
Daniel said he con-
sidered a switch to the
GOP early in his career
when he saw his party
move more toward the
left. Prior to Gramm,
the last Democrat to
switch was South
Carolina's Albert Wat-
son in 1965.
"But after I got more
seniority, I decided I
could best serve the
people in the party that
nominated me Daniel
CdvllfORnid, COnCCPt of Greenville
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1100 CHARLES BLVD.
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till
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2311 S. Evans St. 756-2011
said
Democrats are moving
away from supporting
Hefner said many the president on every
conservative vote
IIIUHlimiimii
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��rtmr-t. �� - mm"�Wlf"
� ii�an.iiMewi�to'i najp
'





oUre last (daraltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller, g rnt. m
Mike Hughes, Managingeduor
WAVERLY MERRITT, Director oj Advertising ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sport, Editor
Scott Lindley, to� Manager Greg Rideout, mmsmm
ALl AFRASHTfcH, Credi: Manager STEVE BACHNER, Entertammtnt Editor
Stephanie Groon, r-tmn Yjmm- Juliana Fahrbach, styteEdnor
JONI GUTHRIE, rffMHfSpriW MlKE DAVIS, Production Manager
Januarv 7, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Desegregation
Consent Decree A Token Effort
An 11-year-old desegregation
dispute between the University of
North Carolina System and the
federal government was supposedly
ended in 1981 with the issuance of a
consent decree designed to balance
the blackwhite populations in the
state's 16 constituent universities.
However, when 1982's figures
were tallied and the enrollment
percentages figured, it became evi-
dent that the state has a lot of work
to do.
"It's quite clear said Raymond
H. Dawson, UNC System vice presi-
dent for academic affairs, "that the
central problem is going to be to in-
crease the total participation of
black students in the university
(system as a whole)
Black enrollment in North
Carolina's 11 predominantly white
campuses increased by .27 percent
in 1982, falling short of the pro-
jected increase by nearly half. Black
enrollment in the system declined
from 21,980 in the fall of 1981 to
21,854 in 1982. However, due to
financial aid cuts and diverse other
economic tensions, general enroll-
ment in the system has declined
from last year, making for the ap-
parent increase.
Current projections by system
representatives appear to agree that
black enrollment in the primarily
white schools should equal or ex-
ceed 10.6 percent of the total by
1986-1987.
By the same token, the consent
decree calls for an increase in the
white population at the state's five
predominantly black institutions.
By 1986, the decree states, white
enrollment at these schools should
increase to 15 percent.
But all figures and percentages
aside, the consent decree seems little
more than an idealistic exercise in
futility, a token attempt to quell a
"decade of injustice" by dealing
with numbers and theoretical
balance.
Not to say that the idea behind
the consent decree isn's admirable.
Desegregation is, indeed, a worthy
cause. However, to think that in-
creasing the concentration of blacks
in white schools and whites in black
schools is the answer in and of itself
is ridiculous.
If equal opportunity were the sole
purpose of the consent decree �
and realistically, it is not � its in-
consistencies could be more easily
overlooked. But in fact, the major
effect the projected plan will have
on the UNC System will be a
decrease in standards � both in ad-
mission and reputation � in years
to come.
Racial superiority, inferiority and
other clouded notions have nothing
to do with this conclusion. The
decrease in standards will not come
simply by admitting whites or
blacks. It will come rather from the
inherent lessening of standards
necessary to institute the new plan.
After all, the same federal
government which would have the
state give "equal opportunity" to
its less fortunate citizens has taken
away the majority of that oppor-
tunity through the termination of so
many financial aid programs. They
fail to realize that racial equality in
higher education will only be realiz-
ed by a cooperative effort between
the states and the federal govern-
ment.
And it stands to reason that if our
admission standards were already
structured to lend equal opportunity
for members of all social and ethnic
backgrounds, then desegregation
wouldn't be such a valid issue in the
state's schools.
And it also stands to reason that
the proposal of such a quota system
will not necessarily lead us down the
road to desegregation; in fact, it is
conceivable, if not obvious, that in
an effort to meet projected racial
quotas, the state will put into prac-
tice a system which will inevitably
keep many more worthy students
out of school. On paper, one form
of segregation will eventually be
"eradicated But, in fact, another
form will just be getting started.
Filling Space
Sometimes A Harrowing Task
A Look At Washington's Ins And Outs
Dealing With Unemployment
In the interests of time, space and
general sympathy, I hereby promise to
keep my column short this time out.
Despite my tendencies toward the verbose,
the trivial and the monotonous, I will
make a consolidated effort to restrain
myself and write a clear, concise and
meaningful message.
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes is the ninth
son oj wandering shepherds Rahim and
Edna Hughes oj Ruptured Sphincter, N. C.
His hobbies include completing search-
a-word puzzles in the dark, eating two
Hungry-Man TV dinners at a time and
watching Rex Humbard re-runs with his
jaithjul dog, Spot.
MIKE HUGHES
Just The Way It Is
For Christmas, he got the new K-Tel
science fiction theme songs album, a sleek
new radio visor, a CanadianEnglish dic-
tionary and a wreckless-driving ticket from
a Georgia highway patrolman.
A 21-year native of the North Carolina
flatlands, he has learned about many of
life's simple pleasures: turnip farming,
bovine hygeine and shooting small birds
from telephone wires with blow darts.
He has traveled to the very ends of the
earth � New York, New Orleans,
Chicago, St. Louis, Spivey 's Corner � but
likes calling North Carolina home since he
lives here.
As a child, he worked in the fields,
harvesting rutabagas and learning authen-
tic backland's jibberish, which has become
a priceless commodity in his later life as a
world-renowned columnist.
As an older child, he made a name for
himself as manager of the girls' rugby team
at Sphincter Junior High.
As an even older child, he went to high
school, took tots of notes and graduated
after only seven years.
He was immediately accepted at East
Carolina University, where he planned to
study auto mechanics and modern dance.
However, a near-fatal unicycle accident in
his freshman year almost cost him his life,
so he changed his major to Lithuanian
Rennaissance Photography, which has suc-
cessfully brought him to the present.
He saw several movies over the
Christmas break but thought the best, by
far, was the television docu-drama The
Harlem Globetrotters Visit Gilligan's
Island.
He once visited the home of teen idol
Slim Whitman in Middleburg, Fla. Unfor-
tunately, Slim wasn't there.
He enjoys reading Shakespeare, humm-
ing along with Beethoven and bowling for
dollars.
And he sometimes suffers from a rare
strain of chronic dyslexia, which makes
coming up with unique, fresh ideas for his
column a near impossibility.
By JACK ANDERSON
and JOE SPEAR
WASHINGTON � President Reagan
came up with a simple solution to the
unemployment problem a few days ago
when he suggested that every employer in
the country just hire one additional
worker. Maybe some employers, he said,
could even hire more than one.
It happens that the nation's biggest
single employer takes its orders from
Reagan. So we checked with several
federal agencies to find out it they've taken
the president's message to heart.
They haven't. They've been laying off
workers, not hiring them. The only excep-
tion we could find was the Labor Depart-
ment, which hired 158 people in
November. But most of these were
replacements who were merely filling
vacancies.
Spokesmen for several agencies said they
thought it was a good idea to hire one addi-
tional worker. But the personnel officers
said they haven't received any instructions
from the White House to that effect.
We did find one Reagan stalwart who
has apparently taken the president at his
word. Attorney General William French
Smith wants to hire a new employee. Smith
would like a new assistant cook � a "sous
chef as they say in his circle.
According to the attorney general's help
wanted notice, the new sous chef will not
only have to cut salad and stir soup: He
must also know how to set the table pro-
perly for the attorney general's guests and
serve the food without spilling it in the laps
of the mighty.
The job won't be all glamour. The new
man in the kitchen must also be proficient
at washing dishes and, says the help-
wanted notice, he must have "the ability to
use sanitary food handling procedures
The job will pay $6 or $7 an hour � con-
siderably higher than the minimum wage.
The new sous chet will share the kitchen
with three other employees who are
already employed to provide tasty lun-
cheons for the attorney gerral.
Of course, thev 're all paid for by the tax-
payers. But we should give the attorney
general a little credit. In his small way. he's
helpng to solve the unemployment pro-
blem.
POSITIONS WANTED: As each Con-
gress fades into history, it leaves behind a
few more ex-members who don't want to
go back to the boondocks. The legislators
who were left stranded by the last election
are no exceptions, but some of them are
having trouble finding work in
Washington.
Veteran Se. Howard Cannon, D-Nev is
still searching for a suitable position. "It's
rough out there said an aide. "Even ex-
senators are feeling the job crunch
Some of the Republican losers are get-
ting help from the White House. Rep. fcd
Derwinski, R-lll for example, served for
many years on the FOreign Affairs Com-
mittee. Recently, the administration found
a spot for him on the State Department.
Former Rep. Eugene Atkinson, R-Pa
is an ex-Democrat who repudiated his par-
ty and joined the Republicans. This turned
out to be poor political judgment, and he
was retired by the voters. But the day after
the election, he received a call from the
White House offering to help him find a
new job.
A few former lawmakers have followed-
the traditional path and have accepted or
considered positions that will allow them
to peddle their influence. A few examples:
� Rep. Gary I ee, R NY. used to serve
on a House transportation subcommittee.
He has been ottered a job with IC In-
dustries. One o its subsidiaries is the Il-
linois Central Gult Railroad.
� Rep. John Rousselot, R-Calit has
had some offers from Washington lobby-
ing tirms that specialize in regulatory mat-
ters.
� Rep. Tom Railsback. R-Ill has
snapped a job handling government rela-
tions tor the Motion Picture Association.
So Sen. Cannon should not tret. He will
undoubtedly find a client somewhere who
can use his connections. As a former
member o1 the Senate Armed Services
Committee, he knows which strings to pull
to get defense contracts. In fact, he has
been talking to some defense contractors
about emplovment.
HEADLINES AND FOOTNOTES: All
of the congressmen who retired or lost
their bids for re-election were given the op-
portunity to take home moment os of their
days in Washington. The former members
are allowed to purchase the desks and
chairs from their Washington office as well
as the furniture and equipment from their
district offices. It os all made available to
them at bargain-basement prices
� Fgyptian President Hosni Mubarak
has taken steps to ensure that he doesn't
meet the same fate as his predecessor, an-
war Sadat. Since Sadat's assassination,
presidential security has been tightened in
Egypt. Mubarak's guards are receiving
special anti-terrorist and security traininc
from the British. Whv the British? It seems
Mubarak didn't appreciate the way Sadat's
CTA-trained body guards fled when he wa-
shot.
Cop �
I m!tJ Icitijtr SyatKMe, lac
HE SMS TOES NO ROOM BUT IF WERE M NEEDY,
WE CAN TRY THE STABLE IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR,
Bubb,
In P'
AFTON. N.C
� State engineer
large pocket of g
has formed und
liner at the PC B u
poses no threat
facility's satetv
vent pipe has be
stalled so the ga
escape
Bill Meyei
engineer with
state's "solid
Hazardous Waste!
sion, said there
holes in :ne liner
The ga
of routine dc
lion of vegetation
soil, Meer said
pipe was p.jec
landfill to a. �
to escape, ru:
occurred because
cent soil erosioi
said
Meyei said
layer of soii �
on the landl
even amoun
pressure t�
which would
them thro
ra
weather ha - � i
topsoil tc J
covering the
liner and .
gas buildup
Engineer
ed a one-inch I
in the 10-to
wide bulge i
poranly release I
until tops
replaced.
There's I
Few Crj
Report
Continued Irom
tion tor careK
reckless dn.n
Dec.30, non-
James A VK
GreenviUe as
wilth trcspa-
Mfngres C'otisei
McAbee :at
the recently ij
blue light s
system has kep:
officers oc j
responding to
WOMEN'S I
CAJJE YOU
DEPEND Of
�-?
a I ��
liana tou � :
ss -
SEBVCES �
cc1 1 �
i Mmme �
eg - a
-ccer �
iiauBt
Q1G -
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 7. 1983 5


ent
s N ised serve
imittee.
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s is the II-
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It, R-Ill has
nment rela-
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� here who
s a former
I Services
gs to pull
he has
rfense contractors
:001 NOUS: All
tio retired or lost
pn were given the op-
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e former meaHers
desks and
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their
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receiving
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i�
'CTOR,
Bubble Appears
In PCB Site
AFTON, N.C. (UPI)
� State engineers say a
large pocket of gas that
has formed under the
liner at the PCB landfill
poses no threat to the
facility's safety, and a
vent pipe has been in-
stalled so the gases can
escape.
Bill Meyer, an
engineer with the
state's Solid and
Hazardous Waste Divi-
sion, said there are no
holes in the liner.
The gas is the result
of routine decomposi-
tion of vegetation in the
soil, Meyer said. A vent
pipe was placed in the
landfill to allow the gas
to escape, but a buildup
occurred because of re-
cent soil erosion, he
said.
Meyer said a top
layer of soil was placed
on the landfill to apply
even amounts of
pressure to the gases,
which would force
them through the cen-
tral vent pipe. But rainy
weather has caused the
topsoil to erode, un-
covering the plastic
liner and allowing the
gas buildup.
Engineers have plac-
ed a one-inch vent pipe
in the 10-to 15-foot-
wide bulge to tem-
porarily release the gas
until topsoil can be
replaced.
There's really not
much pressure, Meyer
said, adding the liner
was so thin it would
bulge under a fair
amount of pressure.
Uniform pressure on
the liner will not be
possible until drier
weather occurs and
contractors can replace
the topsoil.
Henry Rooker, a
member of Warren
County Citizens Con-
cerned About PCB,
called the additional
pipe a "cover-up, a
cosmetic treatment" to
pacify the people who
look at the landfill.
When capping the
landfill, contractors
put a layer of red clay
over the liner.
The dirt doesn't have
any consistency, and
it's coming apart a
cubic yard at a time,
Rooker said.
"This has been one
of our complaints all
along Rooker said.
"We've said the soil is
just not suited for this
kind of thing. It looks
to me that the project is
under way as a
failure
People opposed to
the landfill
demonstrated while the
state hauled PCB-
contaimined dirt to the
site during September
and October. More
than 500 arrests were
made during those
demonstrations.
Few Crime Incidents
Reported By Security
Continued From Page 1
tion for careless and
reckless driving. On
Dec.30, non-student
James A. Wilson of
Greenville was charged
wilth trespassing at
MVnges Coliseum.
McAbee stated that
the recently installed
blue light security
system has kept campus
officers occupied in
responding to calls. He
reports occasional
misuse, but maintains
that the system is a
worthwhile venture.
Students returning to
campus are encouraged
to report missing
belongings or suspected
break-ins. Campus
security may not be
able to immediately
solve the problem, but
investigations begun
now may later prove
productive.
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABORTION: a difficult deo-
DEPEND ON. sion that's rnade easier by
?he women of the Fleming Center Counselors are
available day and night to support and under-
stand you Your safety comfort and privacy are
assured by the caring staff of the Fleming Center
SERVICES: � Tuesday - Saturday Abortion Ap-
pointments � 1st & 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � free Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY OB NIGHT �
Healthcare.counseling tuc ci cuiii
ana education for w THE FLEMING
men of all ages CENTER
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
ills 09 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, �nd Problem Pregnan-
cy Counseling. For further inlor
matton call I32-0SJS (Toll Free
Number �oo 22i 251) between �
A.M. and S P.M. Weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
tl7 West Morgan St.
Rate.gn, N. C.
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intervention,
24 HOUR SERVICE
758HELP
312 E 10th Street
Greenville, N.C 27834
A

HAIR GALLERY
Welcome Back
Students & Staff
23d Greenville Blvd.
(Behind Tipton Annex)
355-2076
January Special
Haircuts 5� re. $7.50
Mon � Tees. �W�d. �ALL MOMTM
Bring ECU ID. tor special.
FOOD TOWN
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Saturday, January 8, 1983
USPA Clulee Biff Round Whole
10-12 Lb. Avo
Sliced Free
USOA Choice Bet. Round
Sirloin Tip
Roast
USDA Choice Botf Round Bo�tltu .
Rump Roastu 268
USPA Cetiet B.tf Route Full Cm
Round
Steak
Holly Farm 6r A
Chicken Breastlk. �f�
0.1 1 20 U. Ba
White
Potatoes
2 Liter
S Liter - Cm.lit Barjeeey
RUee. Better Vie Rim
Almaden
Mountain
Pat. if 11 - It 0t. Cm,
014
Milwaukee
t. �? 4 -11 0i. Cm
11 Ounce
.
Why Pay -1 29
Quart
4.5 0i-LI. Class Tata la Oil
Way Pay M.29
�y�ty't.0f
48 Oueet
4100
IS Oi. LivtrMtttf lit 4 CftiikM Cat Fiii
Puss N' Boots
Hilt SiIIm � ��M �.l
Food Town Oil t� jl Orange Juice
4f00
.K0tfHT�
Macaroni & Cheese
s100
IU. fwtTm
MarisriM Quarters
289

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oMen Corn
tl-Oi. � Uttf'i
Uneheon Meat
1 �l, 41.II ruk
Edon Joiiet Tissue
15 0 it
it Ken-L
Ration
KciiL
DOG
FOOD
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Why Pay 2 77
Del Monte
Catsup Jlp"
whr Pi,
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1 HI I s c K()1 NIAN
Style
I AM XWi 7 is
t'atr 6
Old M
Of W
'Phenomenal The Word For
Disney World's Epcot Center
B MIKE HUGHES
Managing Idiini
Anyone who has traveled to
Disney World at some time in the
past probably doesn't need to be
told it's a wonderful place to spend
a vacation. But it you haven't been
fortunate enough to have ventured
to the park since October 1982,
you've seen ony halt oi what Disney
World has to otter.
Completed last fail, the new Wall
Disney World Epcot Center
represents the ultimate in Disney-
lmagineered entertainment. It is an
entertainment experience dedicated
to humankind's most precious
resource � its imagination
Spanning 260 acres � an area
twice as large as its predecessor, the
Magic kingdom � the new Epcot
Center presents two distinct dimen-
sions ot entertainment and culture:
the world of the future, featuring
21st-century glimpses at energy, mo-
tion, agriculture, space travel and
futuristic lifestyles, and the World
Showcase, a uniquely stylistic look
at various cultures from abroad.
Dubbed as WDW's
"billion-dollar baby Epcot
(Experimental Prototype Communi-
ty of Tomorrow) prods the unex-
plored realms of future living
despite maintaining the overall con-
cept oi entertainment and tun so
uniquely Disney.
A glistening geosphere, Spaceship
Earth (which, incidentally,
resembles an oversized solar golf
ball), provides for a breathtaking
entrance into the center. Inside the
dome, exhibits and a journey into
time retrace the evolution and im-
portance ot communications in the
survival oi mankind from ancient
Cro-Magnon times to the era oi
pace age technology.
1 he Universe of Energy takes
visitors on an imaginative and
adventurous trek into the forgotten
days of brontosaurs, pteradons and
stegasaurs, delving into the
emergence of energy in its many
forms and the challenges and
demands facing "modern man
Hardly a stone's throw away, the
World of Motion provides an amus-
ing look at man's age-old quest for
movement and freedom, tracing the
emergence ot his diverse modes of
transportation � from the evolu-
tion of the beast-of-burden, the
wheel, the automobile and other
20th century "necessities" to the
lasers, robots and microcomputers,
whose full impact has yet to be
realized.
Disney's Journey Into Imagina-
tion introduces the Dreamfinder, a
tourguide, host and timeless en-
trepreneur who explores the very
N.C. Dance Theatre 'Sparkling, Forceful, Talented
The North Carolina Dance Thealre perform Atlegro Brillante (above) to music by Tchaikovsky. The
companv will perform at 8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre on Wednesday, January 19. Thej have been call-
ed "euuallv comfortable in ballet and modern dance sparkling forceful full of assurance
talented as all net out for ticket information, call the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student
(enter at 757-6611. ct. 266. I he performance is part of the 'X3 ECU I heatre Arts Series.
limits of imagination and cons-
cience. His is a world of elfish
dragons, cartoon symphonies and a
"conglomeration of gadgets, giz-
moes and doo-dahs Commencing
with the thrill of a simple birthday
part as seen through the wondrous
eyes of a child, the tour extends into
the realms of video art, laser im-
agery and exotic backgrounds, con-
cluding with a sense-tickling 3-D im-
aginative film in the Magic Eye
Theater.
And no look at the future would
be complete without at least a
glimpse at agriculture and nutrition
for the 21st century. The Land, a
six-acre structure set amid a tremen-
dous array of gardens, greenhouses
and other prototype growing en-
vironments, creates a "veritable
cornucopia" of creative ideas about
meeting the unending task of
feeding the world. Experimental
hybrid plants, selective breeding in
plants and animals and many other
state-of-the-art farming techniques
are explored on a boat tour which
takes the visitor through the chang-
ing climates oi the very ends of the
earth.
Rounding out the roster of
buildings and exhibits in Euture
World is CommuniCore, forming
the gateway to the Epcot Center.
Situated at the hub ot Future
World, CommuniCore provides a
"colorful collage ot todav's reality
and tomorrow's dreams Its ex-
hibits, displavs and shows provide
an experience both educational and
relaxed.
But as is the hallmark oi the
Disney industry, Epcot (enter is bv
no means devoid ot future plans In
tact, construction has alreadv begun
on Horizons, an interesting look at
family life in the 21st century, and
The Living Seas, an adventurous
travel through surrealistic scenes in
a six-million gallon coral reef.
And that's only half of the fcpcot
Center. The World Showcase places
a virtual lifetime of travel at the
visitor's fingertips. In the at-
mosphere of a self-proclaimed per-
manent world's fair sit Canada, the
United Kingdom, France, Japan,
Germany, Italy, China and Mexico
� each unique in its look at culture
and lifestyle.
Disney Empire Still Growing Strong
Michael r hi heck's "Mumbu Dumbo" (above) is just another example of
the Disnev influence in njr daily routine. W.D.Ws newest attraction,
the Epcotenter, is distinct!) and traditiunalh Disney.
�nJ ncstied amoi
chateau and castles -
the World Showcase, the Vmerican
Adventure, a patriotic flashback in
time.
And despite its inherent
similarities to a world's fair, the
World Showcase is not laden with
mere exhibits and artifacts. Small
cities have replaced the traditional
wojld's fair warehouses, providine
the visitor with an encompassing
sense ot �"being thei
Shops, restaurants, pubs, live and
cinematic performances and at
chitectural prototypes combine to
lend the World Showcase its unique-
ly reahsti phere
future " Js new
e World Showcase
�- well, with additions scheduled tor
late 1983, including exhibits, tours
and shows irom Israel. Equatorial
Africa and Spain.
But in an to attempt break such a
bad habit of long-windedness, suf-
fice it to say the Epcot Center pro-
1 ides tun and enrerUjiwrient for juds
ol all ages So, it b some stroVe�of
luck vou should tind yourself in cen-
Elonda with � dod torbid �
nothing do, "vou owe it to
vo to take it in.
CITCA Concerned About Central America
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Mill Wntrr
From the bosom of Latin America a cry goes up to
heaven. This is the cry of the people suffering and
demanding justice, freedom, respect for the most
elementary rights of persons and people. Puehla docu-
ment
Gail Phares is the Coordinator oi CITCA, (the
Carolina Intertaith Task Force on Central America).
Although the group is less than a year old, its impact on
United States policy in Central America has been for-
midable. Most of CITCA's early successes can be at-
tributed to the total dedication and long hours ot work
put in by Phares, who is a former Central American
missionary. Her efforts, along with those of Assistant
Coordinator Joe Moran, have brought much attention
to the tragic situation in Central America.
"CITCA is an attempt by the churches to respond to
the calls for help from the missionaries and the poor
people ot Central America Phares told the East
Carolinian. "Our main focus is educational outreach to
North Carolina Churches. We help and support these
churches in their developent of action projects
Response to the CITCA adgenda has been very
positive and broad. Already 12 North Carolina cities
have formed local CITCA task forces. Most of the ma-
jor N.C. church leaders have endorsed the work of CIT-
CA and its steering committee is made up of long time
leaders of the pea :e and social justice efforts in North
Carolina.
CITCA has also sponsored a skills training course to
help train people who wish to do educational outreach
regarding Central America. They have also sponsored
visits by Central American citizens to the United States
to speak about the situation in their countries.
Often the focus ot CITCA has run directly opposite
the position of both the State Department and the
Reagan Administration. "For the Reagan Administra-
tion to speak about democracy when they are funding
extremely repressive anti-democratic governments in
both Salvador and Guatemala and by (the) large scale
funding of the military in Honduras is just
outrageous Phares said.
Moran recently led a delegation from the National
Council of Churches (NCC) to Guatemala to investigate
the reports of large scale killings oi Indian people there.
I he tinding.s ol this NCC tact finding group verified
that the reports were indeed correct and called on the
United States and other governments to stop sending aid
to Guatemala.
"Certainly the findings of the National Council ot
Churches, Amnesty International, America's Watch
and the Organization of American States Human Rights
Commission all indicate that the Guatemalan govern-
ment is carrying out a systematic mass murder of In-
dian people that makes the Beirut masaere in Lebanon
pale Phares said.
Phares has been to ECU. She spoke to a number of
student groups and classes and helped organize the work
of the ECU Committee on El Salvador, which held
several events on ECU's campus last year protesting
United States aid to that country.
Currently CITCA is sponsoring a "Peace with Justice
Campaign The goal of the campaign is to alert the US
public to the dangers posed by escalating US interven-
tion in Central America.
According to Phares, the campaign also hopes to
"mobilize the broadest possible spectrum of public sup-
port to halt such intervention and to promote peace with
justice in the region
In April, CITCA will be spnsonng another fact fin-
ding and educational trip to Nicaragua. Approximately
30 people, mostly from North Carolina, will be travel-
ing to Nicaragua to investigate the impact of United
States policy on Central American countries and what
Phares calls "the growing regionalization of the war in
Central America
The group will also be visiting and speaking with the
many Guatemalan and Salvadoran refugees now living
in Guatemala. The 30 member group will include
religious representatives from at least 10 denominations
from all across the state.
Phares claims that CITCA's work is basically to
educate people on the human rights situation in Central
America, with special emphasis on the roles of the
church and of the U.S. government.
Phares listed five areas in which CITCA works in an
educational role:
� "We train church staff and personnel to be able to
give presentations to churches, seminaries, colleges and
other organizations featuring films, speakers, discus-
sion and literature
� "We send out monthly mailings containing news
information, feature stones and action suggestions
� "We organize public lectures and seminars with
Central American Church and human rights leaders
� "We communicate frequently with government of-
ficials and church leaders from North Carolina via
document mailings, letters, phone converstaions and
visits
� "We educate the general public via radio, T . and
the newspapers
Phares noted that CITCA also responds to crisis
situations in Central America via "worship services for
Central America martvers; marches, vigils and rallies;
letter-writing, phone calling and petition signing cam-
paigns; as well as sending CITCA members on in-
vestigative deiegatii Central America
CIK also assists the poor people oi Central
American bv their fund-raising efforts to provide food,
clothing, and medical aid. They also seek legal
assistance tor Central American refugees who live in
local areas m North Carolina.
Phares made a special appeal to students to become
involved in CITCA's work. Most oi the people being
killed in both Guatemala and El Salvador are students
and young people Phares said "and there's a special
appeal to students to help educate their companions and
also elected officials urging that they exercise their
authority and take responsibility to bring an end to the
United States' dangerous course in Central America
Craft Center Offers Courses
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a variety of
crafts workshops for spring
semester, 1983. These are now
available for enrollment.
The workshops are free to all
members of the Mendenhall Student
Center Crafts Center. Each member
may enroll in one workshop. The
cost of the Crafts Center member-
ship is $10 per semester which in-
cludes the use ot the facilities, tool
checkout, use of library materials,
and aid of experienced supervisors.
All students, faculty and staff,
their spouses and dependents who
are Mendenhall Student Center
members may join the Crafts
Center. Dependents must be at least
See CRAFTS, Page 7
Heavenly Vision
Changed N. C.
Man's Outlook
POPLAR BRANCH, N.C. (UP1)
� William C. Owens woke up from
a vision years ago, a dream in which
he said someone � maybe God �
told him he should take up wood-
carving.
"It was something that the Lord
just gave to me Owens said.
Fifteen years later, the sprightly-
black artist � a sort of roadside
folk art philosopher to his
customers � still purveys crafts and
commentary from a ramshackle
wood shed along a wide spot in the
North Carolina road.
By his own reckoning, Owens
estimates he has carved more than
1,500 pieces since that nocturnal vi-
sion a decade and a half ago. People
have pulled into his driveway and
carted off vanloads of wooden
hand-painted objects, from soaring
birds to preacher men, airplanes to
bikini-clad women.
He has marketed his objects by
placing a simple handlettered
"crafts" sign in his front yard, and
then luring customers in by
decorating the lawn with a mix of
whirligigs and windmills, and, of
late, religious scenes.
Through the years peoole travel-
See OLD MAN, Page 7
Smith Singers Nearly Upon Us
Yes, its the Gregg Smith Singers back once again for another ex-
travaganza! The group that has captivated audiences for more
than 25 years with their "stereo" sty lings will perform contem-
porary and not-so-contemporary music along with ail their
greatest hits on Monday, January 17, at 8 p.m. in Fiendrix
Theatre. For ticket information, call the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student C enter at 757-6611, ext. 266. The perfor-
mance is part of the '83 ECU Artists Series.
� minute
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�' another t ample of
5 newest attraction.
Disne
new
� Showcase
: ilcd for
v 'bits, fours
Israel, hquatonal
n.
to attempt break such a
iong-wmdedness, suf-
the trxiot Center pro-
nn em for luds
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rsef in cen-
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e it to
n in-
itrai
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e m
become
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s and
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an end to the
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Jfnces for more
Irform contem-
l�h all their
P �n Hendrix
ickei Offke in
Tne perfor-
Old Man Engages In One
Of World's Oldest Trades
THE EAST CAROl INI AN
JAM. -k 1 I9�3
Continued From Page 6
mg through Currituck County on
their way to the Outer Banks of
North Carolina have stopped to
gawk at the unusual scene and to
barter with the man behind the in-
ventions.
Owens said they camp out under
the tree outside his workshop, talk-
ing his ear off or talking him out of
some object he might not want to
sell and keeping him away from his
work.
If he likes them, he invites them
back; it he doesn't, Owens said he
shows them "the end of the road
"1 started something when 1
started this business he said. Tve
met some great characters
Women have taken to dropping
by � "by the carloads he said
One lady spent the greater part of an
afternoon recently trying to buy
Daniel and the Lion a two-
dimensional figure that stands in his
yard as part of an ongoing Biblical
scene.
Born in Poplar Branch, Owens
lett at 16 to pursue work as first a
tarmer, and then a civil servant,
betore finally returning to his home
in 1941 to take up sign painting.
"I was always lucky about getting
a job he said . "I never worried
about it and 1 always came out on
the winning side
. Sign painting was lucrative, he
said.but it wasn't really my call-
ing so he began speculating about
what to do next.If his dream wasn't
enough to persuade the farmer turn-
ed civil servant turned sign painter
to take up knife and wood and em-
bark on a new career, a conversa-
tion with his wife did.
The same morning he awoke from
that apparently prophetic dream,
key Owens � out of the blue �
suggested he try his hand at carving.
Owens said he prospered best dur-
ing the bicentennial year, the vear he
"went big That was the year he
took a bus to New York and par-
ticipated in an art show called
"Joyfui Harvest � Folk Art from
Across the Land
He walked away with the first
prize in that show, and to prove that
"I've always been a little crazy he
carried his trophy and a sealed
envelope attached to it all the way
back on the bus, never bothering to
open the envelope.
"I was up and down on the bus,
just leaving that trophy and
envelope out on the seat for anyone
to take he said. When he finally
got around to opening the envelope,
somewhere around Norfolk he
found inside a $1,000 bill.
In the years hence, he has made a
name for himself � at least among
devotees of regional crafts � and
more money than he cares to tell
Icey about, but then, he noted,
"What have you got after you got
money?"
"1 could have made more money,
but shucks, I had mv mind on other
things he said.
Local folks aren't quite sure what
to make of the out-of-state visitors
Owens receives regularly, and he
said the local preacher has, on more
than one occasion, chided him
about tending to business on Sun-
days instead of church.
"They don't know how to take
me. I say that's fine, because I'm
not asleep like so many people get to
be
"You have to have a goal in life.
A man has to have something to
work toward he said. "You're
supposed to learn something today
you didn't know yesterday
He has had offers to teach at the
local high school and at the com-
munity college in nearby Elizabeth
City, but he turns them down. He
would rather hold forth in the door-
way of his workshop, while occa-
sionally grumbling about the need
to get back to his carving.
"You know, President Reagan
said the other day how expensive
education is. He didn't stop to think
how expensive ignorance would
be Owens said. "Now, you meet
an ignorant man and there you've
got something
Craft Center Courses Offered
�����������������
� l
INTERFRATERNITY
COUNCIL
THE FIRST MEETING
WILL BE HELD NEXT
TUESDAY, JANUARY
11th, at 5:00 in
Mendenhall221
at 5:00
We Perform
MIR A CLESH!
COPIES
�Automatic front & bock copies
�Automatic collation
�Automatic Xerox reductions
PRINTING
�Fine quality stationery
�Business cards
�Brochures, promotional aids
�Commercial art & design
TYPING ���o"ce
�Word processing capabilities!
�Computerized typesetting
�Professional resumes
Two locations to better serve you
Downtown:
(Next to ECU)
In the Georgetown Shops
7U-2400
9 7MF
9-2 Sat.
Pitt Plaza:
Next to Record Bar
754-8550
9-9 MF
9-4 Sat.
Continued From Page 6
18 years old to be eligi-
ble to join.
Crafts Center
memberships are
available during regular
operating hours, 3 p.m.
until 10 p.m Monday
through Friday, and 12
noon until 5 p.m. on
Saturday. The
workshops are included
in the semester fee, but
personal supplies must
be purchased by the
participant.
Should the Crafts
Center furnish supplies
for a workshop, a
materials fee will be
charged. Additional in-
formation about
specific materials will
be available on the
sign-up sheets in the
Crafts Center.
No refunds will be
made after the
workshop registration
deadline unless a
workshop is cancelled.
All persons interested
in taking advantage of
these workshops must
register at the Crafts
Center by the Saturday
prior to the first
meeting of the
workshop.
If you have any fur-
ther questions concern-
ing curriculum,
materials or fees, call
Linda Barkand, Crafts
and Recreation Direc-
tor at 757-6611, ext.
260. After 5 p.m call
ext. 271.
Following is a list o(
available workshops:
Floor Loom
Weaving
Thursdays � Jan. 27
Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24 (five
sessions) 6 p.m. - 9
p.m. Instructor:
Susan Wyre-Rhodes
This course, designed
lor a beginner, will in-
clude the basic techni-
ques of weaving. The
project for this five-
week class will consist
of a two color pattern
sampler. The student
will be instructed how
to warp and dress a
four-harness, counter-
balanced floor loom.
Ail the basic fun-
damentals will be
covered including warp
and yardage calcula-
tion, pattern drafting,
problem solving and
finishing techniques.
� Pottery
Mondays � Jan. 24
31, Feb. 7, 14, 21 (five
sessions) 6 p.m. - 9
p.m. Instructor: Paul
Hamilton
This workshop will
provide basic instruc-
tion in clay through the
teaching of wheel
throwing and hand
building techniques.
Using a potter's wheel,
participants will learn
the fundamentals of
wheel throwing with in-
struction including
types of clay, clav
preparation, centering,
opening, forming a
cylinder, and lifting
trom the wheel. Also,
glazing and firing pro-
cesses will be covered.
Participants can expect
to have completed
ceramic pieces bv the
end of the worshop.
� Basketry
Wednesdays � Jan
26, Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23
(five sessions) 6
P-m. - 9
P-m. Instructor:
Mary Ann Hutto
In this beginner's
workshop, the student
will be shown how to
construct baskets using
two different methods:
weaving and twining.
Covering handles,
manipulating shapes,
and developing a per-
sonal approach to
basketry will be ex-
plored.
� Photography
Tuesdays � Feb. 1, 8,
15, 22, March 1 (five
sessions; to be held in
room 247, MSC; class
on Feb. 15 will be held
in room 238) 7
p.m. - 10
p.m. Instructor:
Peter Podeszwa
This course is an in-
troduction for begin-
ners to the operation of
a 35mm single-lens
reflex camera and to
some basic
photographic techni-
ques.
Metering, depth of
tield, shutter speed,
aperature control,
tilters, electronic flash,
and types of film will
be discussed. Par-
ticipants will be re-
quired to shoot film
and have it processed
tor review during class
time. Also, Par-
ticipants must have a
35mm SLR or a twin-
lens reflex camera to
use during the course.
� Jewelry Making
Wednesdavs � March
16, 23, 30, April 6, 13
(five sessions) 6
p.m. - 9
p.m. Instructor: Paul
Hamilton
In this five week
course, basic fabrica-
tion and metal techni-
ques will be introduced
The student will work
on various metals such
as low priced copper
and brass as well as
silver. Participants can
expect to make func-
tional jewelry pieces
such as rings, pins and
bracelets.
� Darkroom
Techniques
Mondays � Jan. 31.
Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28 (five
sessions) 6:30
p.m. - 9:30
p.m. Instructor: Joe
Champagne
This workshop will
provide instruction in
developing black &
white film, contact
printing, enlarging
techniques, use ot
filters, types of paper
and some basic
photographic techni-
ques. Participants must
nave a 35mm or
double-lens camera to
use during the duration
ot the workshop.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Responsible working �omm or student �anied to
share ne� tcmnhouse in i.reeiuille �tth working
mother and child. Split rent & utility, t all I inda at
757-6611. ext. 260; after 5:30 p.m caH 756-458
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
(HZTBICVM
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Welcomes Back
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Grtermtte

i- .v.i � .� ' -







THE I-AST CAROLINIAN
Hokies Down Pirates
Despite Late Surge
Sports
JANUARY 7, 1983 Page 8
By KEN HOI H)
In a game ol sharply contrasting
halves, the Virginia Tech Hokies
defeated the ECU Pirates 84-72
Tuesday night.
In the first half, the Hokies built
up an 18 point lead on a driving
layup by Reggie Steppe with 2:17
left.
After the two teams traded
dunks, Pirate point guard Tony
Robinson hit a jumper from the free
throw line to make the score 42-26
at haiftime.
The 9,216 partisan Hokie fans
seemed ready to sit back and watch
a blowout in the second half, but
were quickly brought to the edge of
their seats by a furious ECU com-
eback.
With 16 minutes left in the game,
the Pirates were trailing 57-36. But
during the next 12 minutes, ECU
outscored the Hokies 30-10 to cut
the margin to one point.
The Pirates had a chance to take
the lead but Johnny fcdwards had
two straight shots blocked in the
middle and Bobby Beecher made a
three-point plav thai proved to be
the decisive play.
Six straight free throws by
Virginia Tech in the last 13 seconds
stretched the final margin to 12.
The Pirates were led by Johnny
Edwards, who finished with 27
points and 11 rebounds. Through
nine games, the husky freshman is
averaging 18.8 points and 8.6 re-
bounds per game.
Forwards Charles Green and
Barry Wright finished with 17 and
14 points, respectively. Reserve for-
ward Thorn Brown provided a key
spark in the second half rally as he
hit four long jumpers and finished
with eight points.
The Hokies were led by Beecher,
who finished with 25 points and 11
rebounds. Steppe, who was playing
in place of injured guard Dell
Curry, chipped in 24 points and six
assists.
After the game, ECU coach
Charlie Harrison singled out
Beecher's performance. "We didn't
know he (Beecher) was that good
stated Harrison. "We tried fronting
him and everything else, but nothing
worked
Tuesday night's game was the
10th meeting between the Pirates,
members of the ECAC-South con-
ference, and the Hokies, who are
members of the Metro Conference.
Tech now holds a 9-1 advantage in
the series, which began in 1962.
East Carolina is off to one of its
best starts ever in field goal
shooting. The Pirates are currently
shooting 50.4 per-cent from the
field.
Harrison is pleased with the pro-
gress of the Pirates, but admits they
still have a long way to go.
"Our biggest problem so far has
been a lack of consistency Har-
rison said. "But we have started to
exploit all of our options instead of
just taking the first opportunity
ECU faces its third consecutive
team from the state of Virginia
Saturday night, hosting James
Madison University at 7:30 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum.
Andruzzi: 'We Got Raped'
Ladies Fall
By CINDY PLEASANTS
"We got raped Those were the
words of head basketball coach
Cathy Andruzzi after the Lady
Pirates lost to Cincinatti Thursda
night, 73-60.
According to the head coach, the
officiating was unbelievable.
"There was nothing we could do
she said. "They just hacked us to
death. The officials just took us out
completely
Andruzzi, who received three
technicals and was finally ejected
from the game with
said she could not
watch her players
shoved around. "I
anything like it
:24 remaining,
stand by and
be constantly
've never seen
she said. "We
PMOTO COURTESY OF DAILY REFLECTOR
Johnnv Edwards shows off his slamming stvle against New Hampshire.
played a helluva game, but they
(Cincinatti) were all over
everybody
The Pirates were trailing by two
points at haiftime, 30-28. But the se-
cond period was filled with nothing
but one foul call after another An-
druzzi received her first technical
with 11:08 remaining, and only a
couple of minutes elapsed betore
Andruzzi again got a technical foul.
At 'he beginning of the second
naif. The Pirates executed the ball
on oftense by combining Denkler's
inside strength with loster's outside
shooting ability. Denkler was nine-
for-18 from the floor to lead the
Bucs with 22 points, while Foster
pumped in 14. Freshman Sylvia
Bragg had 10 points. Darlene
Chanev pumped in six and Karen
Truske and Han Hooks each had
lour pointv
Senior all-America Mar Denkler
was having difficulty inside because
of Cincinatn's constant fouling.
Andruzzi said, but the center still
managed to be a major threat
throughout the entire game.
The Pirates shot 47.5 percent
Irom the floor, while Cincinatti had
a 45.8 shooting percentage.
"We were taking good shots An-
druzzi said, "but we didn't shoot
well from the line We're still verv
young
The Cincinatti game was the last
of four games on the road for the
Ladv Pirates, who suffered los
against Notre Dame and Western
Kentucky
Andruzzi said the Lady Rats need
to develop the physical strengl
is essential when plaving sucl I
tedious road schedule
But the lack ot phvsica. stresf
was not the major problem Andruz-
zi encountered during the four-gai
stretch. "Being on the road, wc
not gonna get the calls ne sa J
"The only fair game we have id
was at Notre Dame and that's
because we had Big Ten officials "
Overall, Andruzzi said the Ladv
Pirates" defensee game - ov-
ed during the road trip. -
front court game ha- : �
prove "We can't keep ref) Of
Loraine and Mary all the time
said. "The player- are ana ha
to take some ol the pressure fl
them
The Ladv Bucs. who return r
with a 5 5 record, will travel
Dominion on Jan. 14.
Emory With
By CINDY PLEASANTS
spoil Ktu.r
After leading the Pirates to a 7-4
season, head football coach Ed
Emory now has the task of replacing
one defensive coordinator and two
assistant coaches.
Norm Parker, who served as
ECU's deiensivc coordinatoi for the
past three seasons, announced on
Dec 2 that he would be Oining
the new coaching stall at Michigan
Stale University as a linebacker
coach.
On rhursday afternoon, Emory
confirmed that defensive end coach
Jim Holland and Jim Bengaia, the
defensive back coach, had officially
resigned. The two coaches were
three-year veterans at ECU, and
Emory praised the two coaches for
the contributions they have made to
the program.
"We wish both the best as they
leave us for other professional in-
terests he said. "Holland helped
develop a virtually non-existent
strength program to the fine one we
have today, while Bengaia helped
recruit outstanding players like Jeff
Heath and Ricky Nichols
Emory said he has already inter-
viewed four or five coaches for the
defensive coordinator position, in-
cluding Indiana's Ron Cordini.
Emory will also meet with Tom
Throckmorton this weekend, who is
presently the defensive coordinator
at VMI. "I'm hoping to come up
with a decision sometime next
week he said.
Emory has received numerous
phone calls concerning the position
opening, and has been pleased with
the caliber of coaches who have
responded. "In the past, there
would be a lot of high school
coaches calling he said, "but
because of the caliber of our pro-
gram and knowing what kind of
schools we're playing, we're hearing
from coaches who are very well-
experienced
Emory has been contacted from
schools like Ole Mississippi, Univer-
sity of Kansas, University of South
Carolina, Missouri, Duke, Penn
State, Wyoming and Temple. Manv
head coaches have called to make
recommendations, Emory added.
Since ECU is concentrating on
becoming a first-rate Division-I
competitor, the need lor quality
coaches is essential. "Our coaching
sire is below other Division-
schools he said, "but we have a
lot to otter here � nice climate, a
good location and a great, great
challenge
Emory said he is looking for
coaches who are "over-achievers
"I'm looking for a strange breed
he said. "He has to be a super in-
telligent coach with a great
knowledge of the x-andrp's. He
must have past successand be a very
aggressive individual
Along with these qualities, Emory
said he wants a coach who can sell
his program. "He almost has to
have a split personality he said.
"A great x and o man must be able
to be a super recruiter. He's got to
be a salesman
Loyalty is another asset that
Emory holds in high esteem. "We
want a guy who has been loyal to his
other programs he said. "He has
to have a good track record of being
loyal
There's no doubt that Coach
Emory will be facing the toughest
schedule of his career next season,
and will be needing the best person-
nel available. The Pirates are ten-
tatively scheduled to play Florida
State, N.C. State. Miami. Fla
Southwestern Louisiana. L'nivesity
of Florida, Southern Mississippi.
Missouri. William & Mary. East
Tennessee State and Temple.
Wichita State may also be included
on next year's agenda, according to
one source. Seven of the games will
be played on the road, with four
home contests
"I don't think that any football
coach has had a toucher schedule
than this one Emory said, "and I
think the experts will agree after the
schedule is officially released
Emory, meanwhile, is busily
recruiting all over the country.
"We've got to bring in good
athletes he said. "We have a good
possibility of getting the top
Bucs To Host Hazardous Dukes
quarterback in North Carolina arc
the top quarterback in New Jersey
he said. "We're recruiting up and
down the East Coast, and have
gone as tar west as California
Emory said that most freshmen
are concerned about whether
they will get a lot of playing f.me.
but he explained that it would be a
possible to put treshmen in aga.r-
teams hke Florida state. "Thej d
get their heads torn off he said.
"Thev have to sam experience
first
And Emory is hoping that his
prospects will choose ECL as the
school where they want to gain that
experience. The head coach : expec-
ting 30 recruits to visit ECU this
weekend.
"We'll probably have the most
prestigious athletes than have ever
been on this campus here he said.
By CINDY PLEASANTS
spun, Kdilor
The Pirates will face James
Madison University this Saturday
night at Minges Coliseum, their se-
cond ECAC-Souih opponent this
season.
Last year, the Pirates were
defeated twice by JMU. The Dukes
went on to become the ECAC-South
regular season champs and advance
to the -econd round of the NCAA
Eastern Regional for the second
straight season. After a 55-48 win
over Ohio Slate, JMU fell in a 52-50
decision to top-ranked and eventual
national champion Nonh Carolina.
James Madison, however, has run
into a little trouble this season. Now
4-5, the Dukes have lost several
close-scoring games, including
losses to Louisiana Tech (62-61) ,
Fairleigh Dickinson (65-62) and
Iowa, (47-45).
Four ol the close games have been
dropped in tournaments, an unusual
start for the JMU squad. The
Dukes, incidently, have never had a
losing season in its history.
Head Coach Charlie Harrison
isn't expecting the bout to be an
easy one, and in order to come away
with a win, the Pirates will have to
improve on their primary weakness
� consistency.
"It's the same old thing for us
Harrison said, "the lack of con-
sistency
According to Harrison, the first
half offense much improve. "The
last two games the ball just has not
gone in the hole for us
As tar as Ireethrow shooting,
consistency is also badly needed.
The Bucs average has plundered in
the last three games, with the team
percentage now at 67.4 percent. "In
the last two bail games, Harrison
said, "we could have won by
freethrow shooting, but we simply
are not making the shots, especially
one-and ones
East Carolina is continuing to
shoot over the 50 percent mark from
the floor, which is unlike showings
in past years. The top man in scor-
ing and rebounding for the Pirates
has been freshman standout Johnny
Edwards. Edwards leads the squad
in shooting at 58.7 percent from the
floor, and is averaging 8.7 re-
bounds. The Charlotte native has
pulled down the most rebounds in
seven of nine ballgames and has the
most steals with 14.
Sophomore forward Barry
Wright continues strong defensive
play, with five steals to his credit
against Virginia Tech. Wright, a
player Harrison describes as always
giving 110 percent, is third on the
team in scoring with 12.3 points per
game and averages 3.4 rebounds per
contest.
Rebounding has been one of Har-
rison's biggest concerns because of
the team's size, but ECU's op-
ponents have only combined for 13
more rebounds than ECU in nine
games.
The Pirates will begins a six-game
stretch in 12 days with the James
Madison contest Saturday. Three of
the Bucs next four opponents are
are important conference match-
ups. James Madison, William &
Mary and Richmond are all favored
to be very strong in the league this
year.
On Monday, the Pirates will play
Campbell University in Fayet-
teville's Cumberland County
Auditorium. Gametime is 7:30 p.m.
The ECU men's baseball team
began spring practice today. The
Pirates first game is scheduled for
March 3 against Atlantic Christian
College.
� ��
Defensive end Jody Schulz and
offensive tackle Tom Carnes were
both selected as first draft choices
by the Washington Federals, a
member of the USFL.
The Men's Indoor Track team will
travel to Richmond, Va this Satur-
day to participate at the Chesterfield
Invitational.
�� ft� 6AKV PATTCRSOM
Coach Andruzzi and the Lady Pirates will return home soon for a much needed rest.
Lady Pirates Finding Life Tough On The Road
By KEN BOLTON
Assistant Spots Editor
During the recent holiday break,
the ECU Lady Pirates won one
game and lost two as they continued
their long winter road trip.
On Dec. 30, the Lady Pirates
played their first game in 19 davs as
they travelled to South Bend, lnd.
to face the University of Notre
Dame. The Fighting Irish earned a
52-50 victory over the Lady Pirates.
Notre Dame led the entire game
until a Darlene Chaney basket tied
the score at 44-all with 5:17 left. The
Lady Pirates took the lead on a
Loraine Foster steal, but two
straight baskets by Mary Beth
Scheuth sealed the win.
The Lady Pirates were led in scor-
ing by Mary Denkler and Foster
with points apiece. Darlene Chaney
chipped in eight points and eight re-
bounds.
"It was a very disappointing
loss ECU coach Cathy Andruzzi
said. "No question Notre Dame is a
very good team. Both teams played
well offensively, but we were hurt in
the first half w hen we could not play
the type of offensive game we need-
ed to play
After leaving South Bend, the
Lady Pirates headed for Bowling
Green, Ky. to play Western Ken-
tucky.
The Lady Pirates suffered their
fourth loss in five road games at the
hands of WKU, 76-44.
ECU had a distinct height disad-
vantage in the game, as shown by
the 43-24 rebounding difference.
"We went into the game knowing
their strength and we just didn't do
it. Very often this year we're going
to come up against bigger teams
Andruzzi said. "We must face that
fact
ECU had one of its worst
shooting nights of the season (30.9
per-cent) as they scored on just 13 of
their 73 possessions.
The Lady Pirates ended their two-
game losing streak Tuesday night
with a 79-55 victory over Belmont
College.
ECU led from the start and was
led by Denkler's 31 points. Foster
contributed with 14 points and nine
assists.
The Lady Pirates' full-court
pressure defense caused a number of
Belmont turnovers and ECU was
able to break away a number of
nmes for fast break lavups wuh
Foster getting many of her assists on
$Zl to De.ph.ne Mabrv on
Volleyball Coach Resigns
Second-year Volleyball Coach
Lynn Davidson has reportedlv
resigned her post.
When contacted, Davidson said
she had turned m her resignation
Davidson served as an assistant
under former ECU coach Al.ta
Dillon before taking over the head
post in 1980.
During her first season, David-
son's team posted an U-23 record
This year, the Pirate tMmV
�th a 26-15 maVk he S 25�
an ECU team. bcsl � for
Davidson was an ail-stat.
at N.C. State and !L, ��
softbal. for tworf �Sh!ctl n
captain of the junior va� t5 co"
ball team white � S y bl$ke-
r
Pirati
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I HI J AMAKOI IMAS
JAM ARV 7, 198
'
I Raped'
Tail
i
t 1
Task
Jersey
up ana
M
IM � �AE�so
Road
Resign
s
Pirates Drop Opener To USL,
Finish Third In Bayou Classic
pleasant! aN,M
sports Miittr
1 he Pirates travelled
11 ouisiana Dec. P-18
to participate in the
Bayou Classic, ECU
finished thud after a
consolation game vic-
tor) over Grambling
State, 64-61
In the tlist round.
the Pirates were
defeated 83-55 h
Southwestern I oui-
siana, an NCAA tour-
nament participant last
year.
"We did something
thai East Carolina has
not done in a long time
in a tournament, win a
game Harrison said.
"We did not execute
well against SV oui-
siana and we lost our
composure. But to get a
split gives us another
victor) on the road,
again something ECl
has not had main ot
On "uesday, Dec.
28, ECU gave the
oungsters a holiday
treat by topping the
scrappy New Hamp-
shire Wildcats. 2-64.
With hundreds ot
children on hand for
ECU's "Youth Night
more than 3500 spec-
tators filed in to Minges
t. oliseum to watch the
Pirates put on a gala
performance
1 he Wildcats made a
ahant attempt to come
back late in the second
half, cutting the lead to
only two points with
less than three minutes
remaining. 1 he Pirates,
however, kept their
heads above water
when guard Ions
Robinson sank two
freethrows to give the
Buc a 65 M lead.
I andi ng o n t he
free thro u
fresh ma n
. .
E d w a r d s
0 n t
line,
Curt
Johnny
: : j
forward
il each iced
ws to put
up, l-h4.
5 he peskv
Barrj Wrigl
two freethi
the Pirates
and shake
N ildcats off.
Edwards, who is now
averaging 18.8 points
and 8.7 rebounds per
game, finished with 18
points, grabbed 11 re-
bounds and had three
assists.
I he Pirates shot a lit-
tle better from the floor
than the Wildcats, win-
ding up with a 48.3 per-
cent shooting average
to New Hampshire's
46.4 percent, from the
treethrow line, both
teams shot above 60
percent.
New Hampshire then
left for Duke to play-
one of 1? games on the
road. "Any person in
their right mind
wouldn't want to in-
herit their schedule
Harrison said.
The head coach
definitely felt that the
Pirates had their hands
full with the Wildcats.
"Eastern teams are
always very
methodical he said.
"They try to pick you
apart
Now 4-3, the Bucs
headed for Fairfax,
a to play their first
ECAC-South con-
terenee game against
George Mason Univer-
sity.
After coming from
behind by as much as
13 points and tying the
score on three occa-
sions, the Pirates fell to
GMU, 69-68.
Trailing by a single
point with 13 seconds
remaining, GMU's
John Niehoft didn't
succumb to the
pressure and knocked
in two freethrows of a
one-and-one to give the
Patriots a 69-66 lead.
Junior Mike Fox scored
as the horn sounded to
pull the Pirates to
within one.
GMl junior point
guard Andv Bolden,
who was playing his
last game ol the year
due to academic in-
eligibility, made his
presence known during
his season finale.
Bolden trapped up a
game-high 21 points.
He hit seven of ten field
goals and seven of nine
freethrows to surpass
his 10.6 average.
The game was con-
stantly being inter-
rupted by foul calls,
with ECU'S Charles
Green, Barry Wright
and Thorn Brown each
having three fouls in
the first half.
The Bucs had trouble
moving the offense in
the first half, and had
scored only two points
in the first 6:17 of the
game.
With less than five
minutes remaining in
the first half, the
Pirates were down,
23-30.
Sophomore guard
Bruce Peartree then
went in for a layup but
was called for charging
after he came down on
a GMU player. Pear-
tree's basket was ruled
no good, and Harrison
got his first technical of
the year.
"I didn't deserve the
technical said Har-
rison. "1 asked him
why it didn't count and
he said, 'You're yelling
at me and gave me a
technical. I could have
probably gotten a cou-
ple of more if I'd
wanted to
The Patriots went on
to gain their biggest
lead of the night, 34-23.
Peartree's jumpshot
left the Pirates behind,
25-34, at the half.
The second half was
filled with more foul
trouble for the Pirates,
with Green sitting out
during most of the
period before fouling
out. Peartree, who was
five-for-16 for the
night, also fouled out.
The Patriots went up
by 13 in the second
half, but the Pirates
fought back and
outscored GMU, 22-9,
during the next eight
minutes of play.
Peartree popped in
seven points, while
Green pumped in nine,
and Edwards added six
during the rally.
The Bucs tied the
score three times, but a
Bolden jumper and two
freethrows gave the
Patriots the lead once
again. With 4:43 re-
maining, GMU led
59-51.
ECU's Edwards and
Green rallied to go
ahead, but GMU sank
three of four
freethrows in the final
three minutes to stay
out in front.
Bolden was the
Patriots' leading scorer
Mitchell's Hair Styling Salon
Welcome Back
Students
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center
Phone 756-2950 or 756-4042
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
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AT BARRE,ltd.
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Come to us for
all your
Dancewear needs
Beginning classes
we have what you need.
422 ARLINGTON BLVD.
GREENVILLE, N.C.
(919) 756-6670
with 21 points and
Carlos Yates finished
with 20. Yates, the
ECAC-South's leading
scorer and the eighth
leading scorer in the
NCAA, has a 26.6
average, but the Bucs
contained the 6-5 for-
ward. And Harrison
was pleased with how
well his team kept
Yates down. Although
the sophomore scored
20 points, ten of those
were scored from the
treethrow line.
For the Pirates, Ed-
wards finished with 17,
Green had 16, and
Peartree and Wright
each had 11.
Overall, ECU had
ten more field goals
than GMU, but the dif-
ference came at the
treethrow line. I he
Bucs were eight for 15,
while the Patriots made
27 of 30 freethrows.
From the floor, the
Pirates shot 51 percent
for the game, but only
had a 40-percent
average in the first
period.
"We missed so many
easy shots Harrison
said, "but the kids
showed a lot of
character. They kept
coming back, coming
back, coming back.
They never quit. They
just have to get more
consistency throughout
the course of the
ballgame
ECU's WOmen's Track Team nill travel to Johnson City
"�Wto kv DAVE WILLIAMS
Tenn Jan. 14 to take part in ihe Eastman Kodak JTif fj�I
ALBUMS
BOOKS
RECORD
108 EAST Sfh ST
RENTAL 48 Hours
COST: $2 SO per LP
DEPOSIT: Required
OTHER COST Late Return or Damage
JUST
FOR YOU
January 7-8-10-11-12
Everything in our store is " Q �q off
BRING YOUR ECU ID
and we'll give you - ECU - 20 �
75 o savings on garments
SHOE TABLE
ONE pair-l 5 � TWO pairs -25 � THREE poirs-30
H. L. HODGES CO
210 E. FIFTH ST. GREENVILLE
ECU, This Is For You
T;
From the Attic, the Elbo and ECU Athletics
Attend Saturday (tomorrow) night's basketball game
i
7-
K
l
w
t

ECU vs. James Madison
and Use Your Ticket Stub For
�FREE ADMISSION atthe Attic and a
discount on your first beverage.
�FREE FIRST BEVERAGE atthe ElbO.
Watch the Pirates attack.





10
I HE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 7, 1983

Schulz Adds To Collection
A CC Officials Like Rules
Defensive end Jody
Schulz added to his
post-season laurels on
Sundas, Dec. 13 as
fcCL held its 1982 foot-
ball awards banquet.
Earlier, Schulz had
been chosen to play in
the Blue-Gray game
and the Japan Bowl,
along with a third-team
AP All-America honor.
At the annual ban-
quet, Schulz received
the Janet Overton
Outstanding Senior
Award. He also was
named the Most
Valuable Defensive
Player, permanent
defensive captain, and
co-winner of the Purple
Pirate Award for
defensive play.
Clint Harris, who
was lst-team Ail-South
and AP honorable
mention All-America,
shared the Purple
Pirate Award with
Schulz. He was . Iso
named the Big Play
Champ as well as Most
Outstanding Defensive
Back.
Offensive guard
Terry Long, who was
on the same post-
season teams as Harris,
was picked as the
Outstanding Blocker in
the offensive line, while
center John Floyd was
named Most Valuable
Offensive Player.
Offensive tackle
John Robertson receiv-
ed the E.E. Rawl
Award for character,
scholarship and athletic
ability. Defensive back
Smokey Norris received
the Swindell Memorial
Award for team before
self, dedication and
leadership.
Linebacker Kevin
Banks was named
Tackle Champion and
shared the Outstanding
Newcomer Award with
defensive end Curtis
Wyatt.
Freshman
placekicker Jeff Heath,
who finished 14th in
the final NCAA
statistics for kickers,
was named Outstan-
ding Freshman
Specialist and Most
Outstanding Specialty
Team Player.
Running back Tony
Baker received the
award as the Outstan-
ding Offensive
Freshman, while
linebacker Larry Berry
was named Outstan-
ding Defensive
Freshman.
Fullback Earnest
Byner was named the
Most Outstanding Of-
fensive Back, and was
named permanent of-
fensive captain for
1982.
Quarterback Kevin
Ingram was named the
Most Improved Offen-
sive Player while defen-
sive back Steve
Hamilton won the
Most Improved Defen-
sive Player.
Snapper Whitley
Wilkerson was named
permanent specialty
team captain, while
punter Jeff Bolch took
honors with the
Academic Achievement
Award. Linebacker
Amos T witty was
presented the Pirate
Comeback Award.
Robert Fuller and
Brian Herndon shared
the Rick Bankston Of-
fensive Scout Team
award, while Chris
Santa Cruz took the
Bankston Defensive
Scout Team award.
In an address to the
players, Emory praised
the entire team, saying
that "You all are win-
ners
"People throughout
the country realize the
great job vou did ad-
ded Emory. "This was
one of the most suc-
cessful teams in the
country
All of the awards
that were given out
were the result of
voting done by
members of the team,
not by the coaches or
the press.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI) �
After they catch their breath and
break some old habits, the 43
Atlantic Coast Conference
basketball officials think they're
going to hke the new rules and
the game's fast pace.
"It's basically a more en-
joyable and easier game to of-
ficiate than the game where the
ball is being held and every
possession is worth a million
dollars and every call is so closely
criticized said Fred Barakat,
ACC supervisor of basketball of-
ficials in an interview Thursday.
"Every one of those calls (in slow
down games) becomes a verv
pressurized call.
He said the response from of
ficials has been very positive.
"I think after they (the of-
ficials) get acclimated and get
more experience doing it
everyone is going to enjoy it he
said.
The ACC is using a 30-second
shot clock and a 19-foot three
point field goal in all league
games and some non-conference
games. So far in 13 games it's
tended to speed up the action,
sometimes at a torrid pace.
"Conditioning this year for the
official is as important as it is for
the team Barakat said in
evaluating the official's perfor-
mance after 13 games with the ex-
perimental rules
Classifieds
MOUSE TO SHARE NEAR ECU
Private entrin baths tijs m
eluding an hMMNm Call lU-MII
I 5
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CHEAP! Call ?i� ?7�4 Mt tor
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WANTED NURSERY ATTEN
DAMT lor aerobics oorkshop
downtown is M i M Tn one
da or an available m . �
TO THE GIRL WHO KEEPS
LEAVING NOTES ON MY CAR
� n your last tan letter ,ou
misspelled s'up.d Ttvere are nc
R i ,n ,t Please "�� a�am
FOR A GOOD Time cant���i.me
ady at ?$3 IJ12
PHOTO COURTESY OF DAILY REI
Senior Jody Schulz at the 1982 football awards banquet with Chancellor H.mell and
Coach hmon.
New A labama Coach Trying To Break Molds
All AM A (I PI;
Rav Perkins says
although he utilizes
some ol the things that
were instilled in him by-
Bear Bryant during his
playing days at
Alabama, he never tries
to put himself in
Bryant's shoes while
making a coaching
decision.
"Coach Bryant,
(Miami's) Don Shula,
and the other coaches
I've been associated
with all had an in-
fluence on me said
Perkins, the former
New York Giants coach
who is succeeding
Brvant at Alabama.
"But. I don't, in a
given situation, ask
myself "What would
Coach Bryant do' and
try to do it.
"I think about it,
look at all aspects, and
try to make the best
decision I can based on
my own judgment
Perkins, who played
for Bryant in the mid
'60s, said the biggest
thing he learned from
the winningest coach in
college football was
discipline.
"He taught me that
to have the maximum
of success as an in-
dividual you have to
have individual
discipline. And, to have
maximum success as a
team you have to have
team discipline
Perkins said his
philosophy of life and
coaching come from
the same mold, a mold
Bryant help to form.
"Each individual
deserves the chance to
do what they would like
to do and, when thev
get that chance, to
make the most of it. To
give the best they have
so if it doesn't work for
them, they can go on to
something else with the
feeling they gave it their
best shot
Perkins, whose only
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coaching experience on
the college level was a
year as an assistant at
Mississippi State, said
he had no preconceived
ideas about what being
a head coach would be
like when he took over
the Giants.
"I really enjoy most
aspects of being a head
coach he said. "The
only aspect I didn't like
while coaching the
Giants was making
cuts, having to tell
young men they
weren't good enough to
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
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t 3 t S
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While no coach likes
to leave on a losing
note, the Giants going
4-5 during the strike-
shortened NFL season
anJ thus being
eliminated from the
Playoffs was to
Perkins' advantage in
his new job at
Alabama.
It remains to be seen
whether Alabama
under Perkins, can
regain the edge it held
for so long.
Georgia's Vince
ABORTIONS
'�24 week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800-321-0575
Doolej doubts any
coach will again
dominate the region the
way Bryant did.
"We have been mov-
ing in the direction of
better balance for
several years now
said Dooley. "I don't
think his leaving will
have an affect on the
league.
NEW YEAR?
NEW HAIR
f Start the new year off right
with a quality perm at a low price1
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hBACKSTAGE HAIR STUDIO��j I
�y ft�s n
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call
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WORKSHOP
Boyd's
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3 Hairstylists
Melvin Boyd
Mel H. Boyd Jr.
Danny R. Boyd
1008 S.Evans St.
758-4056
Call for
j appointment.
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407 Evans On The Mall
Downtown Greenville
(99i'5�45: Mlkl ROBINsot
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As a bonus, get six valuable coupons for delicious
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 7, 1983
7

Tkt
Schulz Adds To Collection
ACC Officials Like Rules
Defensive end Jody
Schulz added to his
post-season laurels on
Sunday, Dec. 13 as
ECU held its 1982 foot-
ball awards banquet.
Earlier, Schulz had
been chosen to play in
the Blue-Gray game
and the Japan Bowl,
along with a third-team
AP All-America honor.
At the annual ban-
quet, Schulz received
the Janet Overton
Outstanding Senior
Award. He also was
named the Most
Valuable Defensive
Plaver, permanent
defensive captain, and
co-winner of the Purple
Pirate Award for
defensive play.
Clint Harris, who
was lst-team All-South
and AP honorable
mention All-America,
shared the Purple
Pirate Award with
Schulz. He was also
named the Big Play
Champ as well as Most
Outstanding Defensive
Back.
Offensive guard
Terry Long, who was
on the same post-
season teams as Harris,
as picked as the
Outstanding Blocker in
the offensive line, while
center John Floyd was
named Most Valuable
Offensive Player.
Offensive tackle
John Robertson receiv-
ed the E.E. Rawl
Award for character,
scholarship and athletic
ability. Defensive back
Smokey Norris received
the Swindell Memorial
Award for team before
self, dedication and
leadership.
Linebacker Kevin
Banks was named
Tackle Champion and
shared the Outstanding
Newcomer Award with
defensive end Curtis
Wyatt.
Freshman
placekicker Jeff Heath,
who finished 14th in
the final NCAA
statistics for kickers,
was named Outstan-
ding Freshman
Specialist and Most
Outstanding Specialty
Team Player.
Running back Tony
Baker received the
award as the Outstan-
ding Offensive
Freshman, while
linebacker Larry Berry
was named Outstan-
ding Defensive
Freshman.
Fullback Earnest
Byner was named the
Most Outstanding Of-
fensive Back, and was
named permanent of-
fensive captain for
1982.
Quarterback Kevin
Ingram was named the
Most Improved Offen-
sive Player while defen-
sive back Steve
Hamilton won the
Most Improved Defen-
sive Player.
Snapper Whitley
Wilkerson was named
permanent specialty
team captain, while
punter Jeff Bolch took
honors with the
Academic Achievement
Award. Linebacker
Amos Twitty was
presented the Pirate
Comeback Award.
Robert Fuller and
Brian Herndon shared
the Rick Bankston Of-
fensive Scout Team
award, while Chris
Santa Cruz took the
Bankston Defensive
Scout Team award.
In an address to the
players, Emory praised
the entire team, saying
that "You all are win-
ners
"People throughout
the country realize the
great job vou did ad-
ded Emory. "This was
one of the most suc-
cessful teams in the
country
All of the awards
that were given out
were the result of
voting done by
members of the team,
not by the coaches or
the press.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (UPI) -
After they catch their breath and
break some old habits, the 43
Atlantic Coast Conference
basketball officials think they're
going to like the new rules and
the game's fast pace.
"It's basically a more en-
joyable and easier game to of-
ficiate than the game where the
ball is being held and every
possession is worth a million
dollars and every call is so closely
criticized said Fred Barakat,
ACC supervisor ot basketball of-
ficials in an interview Thursdav.
"Every one of those calls (in slow
down games) becomes a very
pressurized call.
He said the response from of-
ficials has been very positive.
"I think after they (the of-
ficials) get acclimated and get
more experience doing it
everyone is going to enjoy it he
said.
The ACC is using a 30-second
shot clock and a 19-foot three
point field goal in all league
games and some non-conterence
games. So far in 13 games it's
tended to speed up the action,
sometimes at a torrid pace.
"Conditioning this year for the
official is as important as it is for
the team Barakat said in
evaluating the official's perfor-
mance after 13 games with the ex-
perimental rules.
Classifieds
HOUSE TO SHARE NEAR ECU
Private enir.ei fritfij $125 ia
eluding an utilities Call m-MIJ
? 5
DORM LOFT BED FOR SALE
CHEAP- Call 7S f7�4 aik tor
David
WANTED NURSERY ATTEN
DANT lor aerobics �ork$nop
downtown � is io 4S M Tn one
dav or aM available '57 ki
TO THE GIRL WHO KEEPS
LEAVING NOTES ON MY CAR
In your last (an letter ,o�
misspelled s'up a There art no
� R s m it Please 'r, again
FOR A GOOD time call ttse time
ady at 7S2 I21J
PHOTO COURTESY OF DAILY REFLECTOR
Senior Jody Schulz at the 1982 football awards banquet with Chancellor Howell and
New Alabama Coach Trying To Break Molds
ATI ANITA il'Dli ii t j
M 1 AM A (LP1
R a Perkins says
although he utilizes
some of the things that
were instilled in him by-
Bear Bryant during his
plav ing da s at
Alabama, he never tries
to put himself in
Brvant's shoes while
making a coaching
decision.
"Coach Bryant,
(Miami's) Don Shula,
and the other coaches
I've been associated
with all had an in-
fluence on me said
Perkins, the former
New York Giants coach
who is succeeding
Bryant at Alabama.
"But. I don't, in a
given situation, ask
myself 'What would
Coach Bryant do' and
try to do it.
"I think about it,
look at all aspects, and
try to make the best
decision I can based on
my own judgment
Perkins, who played
for Bryant in the mid
'60s, said the biggest
thing he learned from
the winningest coach in
college football was
discipline.
"He taught me that
to have the maximum
of success as an in-
dividual you have to
have individual
discipline. And, to have
maximum success as a
team you have to have
team discipline
Perkins said his
philosophy of life and
coaching come from
the same moid, a mold
Bryant help to form.
"Each individual
deserves the chance to
do what they would like
to do and, when thev
get that chance, to
make the most of it. To
give the best they have
so if it doesn't work for
them, they can go on to
something else with the
feeling they gave it their
best shot
Perkins, whose only
coaching experience on
the college level was a
year as an assistant at
Mississippi State, said
he had no preconceived
ideas about what being
a head coach would be
like when he took over
the Giants.
"I really enjoy most
aspects of being a head
coach he said. "The
only aspect I didn't like
while coaching the
Giants was making
cuts, having to tell
young men they
weren't good enough to
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR
SAAD'S
MIOI R-�K
113 Grande Ave
758-1228
Gigantic Ski Sale In Progress
Izod Sweater $15.95
Gordon tulp
Golf, Ski and Tennis Shop
Located at Greenville Country Club, off Memorial Dr.
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues and
T-$llirts, Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks, Camping Equip
ment. Steel Toed Shoes, Dishes
and Over 700 Different New and
Used Items Cowboy Boots
S 3 I 5
ARMY-NAVY
STORE 'S0,s,reEe,ans
play tor us
hile no coach likes
to leave on a losing
note, the Giants going
4-5 during the strike-
shortened NFL season
and thus being
eliminated from the
Playoffs was to
Perkins' advantage in
bis new job at
Alabama.
It remains to be seen
whether Alabama.
under Perkins, can
regain the edge it held
for so Jong.
Georgia's Vince
ABORTIONS
I -f week terminations
App'ts. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800-321 0575
Dooley doubts anv
coach will again
dominate the region the
way Bryant did.
"We have been mov-
ing in the direction of
better balance for
several years now
said Dooley. "I don't
think his leaving will
have an affect on the
league.
NEW YEAR?
NEW HAIR
Start the new year off right
with a quality perrh at a low price!
PERMANENT SPECIAL 3250
From January 10-31,1983 r�9-0
BACKSTAGE HAIR STUQtO I
-y vs 7f
CYSTIC
FIBROSIS
EXERCISE-
A-THON
SATURDAY,
JANUARY 22,
11 a.m3 p.m.
for details
call
757-1608
THE
AEROBICS
WORKSHOP
Boyd 's
Hairstyle
3 Hairstylists 1008 S. Evans St
Melvin Boyd
Mel H. Boyd Jr.
Danny R. Boyd
758-4056
I
GET A
� FREE PUFF! �
X !
WemthePuflPjtroT" Speedy
m Handy Beautiful and Helpful
and at make sure you have no
hassles at Foto Eipress Each
time you bring in a disc 01 toll ol
color pnnl Mm lor processing,
take one ot us home FREE
� And enter the monthly coloring
� contests to �m our big brother
an 8 SuperPutl Coloring
sheets and contest rules are
available at each location
217 E. 10th St.
Beside Hardee's -�wntown
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COUHTRV COOKIMI
Bring this ad
for a
FRIED CHICKEN
DINNER
2 vegetables and bread
M.99
for
Expires 116
Open H-8 � 7 davs a week
752-0476 512 E. 14th St.
Cash paid for
Diamonds and Gold
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
407 Evans On The Mall
Downtown Greenville
919�75�0452 MIKr KOBINMIN
YOUR FULL
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 7, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 07, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.238
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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