The East Carolinian, December 9, 1982






�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.57 No.28
Thursday, December 9, 1982
Greenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Boudreaux Predicts Financial Aid Problems
B DARRVI BROWN
Director of financial aid Robert
Boudreaux earned yesterda that
students requesting financial
assistance for the next school year
could be facing problems as difficult
or more difficult than the past year.
"It will be another year like we've
just come through but it may be
worse Boudreaux said.
"Financial aid is in a turmoil. I he
Student Incentive Grant may not be
funded next year, but we do hae
hope it will be
He cautioned students to be
prepared for another year of delays
and cutbacks that could make funds
late or unavailable. "Once you get
behind it is almost impossible to
catch up. We may have to get you in
on emergency loans and
deferments Boudreaux said.
Financial aid is on "pins and
needles according to Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer in a report to the Board of
Trustees last week.
Numerous delays, policy changes,
debate and confusion at the federal
level caused long delays in the pro-
cessing of aid applications this year.
The ECU financial aid office suf-
fered a several month long delay as
a result of the problems and there
was a delay in new forms .
Boudreaux made these statements
yesterday at the annual financial aid
meeting held in Hendnx Theatre.
Speaking to a crowd of approx-
imately 200 students, Boudreaux ex-
plained procedures for obtaining
financial assistance for the 82-83
school year.
Financial aid checks for tuiton
and fees are available for the spring
semester today and refunds can be
picked up during drop-add in
January, assuming the federal
government approves the money
before Congress breaks on Dec.
17Boudreaux said.
If funds are not available at the
beginning of next semester,
Boudreaux said, deferments and
emergency loans can be issued for
students to enter school. He feels
that the money will be available on
time.
The financial aid office is using a
new form this year that eliminates
the need for the old ECU form. The
Family Financial Statement will
allow the student to apply for the
Pell Grant, National Direct Student
Loan, work-study, SEOG, and in-
stitutional scholarships for a
minimum $6 fee. The forms, though
issued yesterday, cannot be mailed
in before Jan. 1, Boudreaux said.
For applicants requesting only the
federal funds such as the Pell Grant,
a separate form will be here by the
end of January that requires no ser-
vice charge.
Boudreaux recommended with
some reservations that students get
their applications off as quickly as
possible. He urged students to have
families complete their annual in-
come tax forms so that those figures
can be used in tilling out the aid
aplications. Discrepancies
sometimes cause forms to be return-
ed or delayed. Only a small margin
of error is allowed between the in-
come figures on IRS forms and aid
applications.
Boudreaux also encouraged
students who are declaring
themselves financially independent
to have parents sign their forms
anyway, to insure that the student is
independent, especially it they are
under age 25.
Raise In Drinking Age Makes
Problems On N. Y. Campuses
A recent rise in the minimum
drinking age law from 18 to 19 in
New York has presented difficulties
for State University of New York
officials, and if a similar measure
passes in North Carolina, problems
may arise at ECU,too.
How to segregate students at cam-
pus activities where alcohol is served
and the need to issue special iden-
tification cards to students under 19
have plagued administrators
throughout the state.
The measure to raise North
Carolina's minimum drnking age on
beer and wine products to 19 has
recently been recommended by the
Governor's Task Force on Drunken
Drivers Gov. James B. Hunt Jr in
a letter written last week to the
state's ludges, district attorneys and
lawyers urged them to endorse the
Task Force recommendations to
raise the age.
Response was cold from ECU of-
ficials to the Governor's recommen-
dation to raise the drinking age to
19. "It's useless legislation really
said ECU Director of Public Safety
Joe Calder. "I can't see any way in
the world that police agencies can
enforce it
ECU Associate Dean of Judiciary
James Mallory paraphrased a quote
that recently appeared in The East
Carolinian from ECU professor and
director of the Alcohol Abuse Pro-
gram Dr. Jerry Lotterhos. "If you
can't control it (the consumption of
alcohol) at 18 how can you control it
at 21?"
A rise in the age "definitely
could" present a problem, Mallory
said, especially for downtown
businesses. He said that local
businesses serving alcoholic
beverages often depend on the
validity of ECU student identifica-
tion cards. The IDs are their way of
preventing trouble with the law.
Mallory noted that some special
type of identification card may have
to be introduced if the age change is
enacted.
"I think it will cause a lot of extra
See Officals, Page 3
House Decides Against MX;
ECU Professor Foresees
Passage For Missile Later
B GREG RIDEOLT
The U.S. House Tuesday voted
245-176 to deny President Reagan
the nearly $1 billion he wanted to
start production of the MX missile.
The vote came during a debate on
the $236.6 billion defense ap-
propriations bill. The vote was view-
ed as a defeat for Reagan because of
50 Republican defections.
Herbert Carlton, an assistant pro-
fessor in the political science depart-
ment who teaches a class on na-
tional security policy, said the wide
vote margin was unexpected but it is
not the end of the line for the con-
troversial missile system. The senate
now will consider the appropria-
tions bill and have their say on the
MX and its "dense pack" basing-
plan.
White House press secretary
Larry Speakes said yesterday that
Reagan and his aides believe the
MX, which stands for experimental
missile, will "definitely" have a bet-
ter chance on the senate floor.
Sen. Ernest F. Hollings, DSC,
See PROFESSOR, Page 6
Death Penalty
Student Opinions Vary On Recent Execution
On Tuesday at 12:09 a.m. con-
victed murderer Charlie Brooks
Jr. was executed in Texas with a
lethal injection of drugs to
become the first person executed
in thL manner in the state in 18
ear3.
ECU students were asked
yesterday to respond to the ques-
ion: "What are your feelings on
;apital punishment?" They were
also welcomed to comment on
the P" case.
FAYE MORROW � Accoun-
ting student � "I feet that what
Brooks did was wrongbut I still
don 7 feel that the state has the
right to decide the fate of one of
its citizens
KENDALL KYE � Art stu-
dent � " they're given the
death sentence, it was for a
reason. They deserve to die. "
CYNTHIA BRANTLY -
Computer Science student �
" They didn 7 know if he (Brooks)
pulled the trigger or not �
think thats ridiculous. But, I
think some crimes deserve the
death penalty
WILLIAM HANEY �
History � " would think that
the lethal injection would be
viewed as more
desirablebecause it's less
graphic and less painful. Since
our system is so inequitable its
not fair, but it could work if the
system worked
� SON
These students recentlv held an anything goes' yard sale to raise money for bills, especially next semester's
tuition and books. Considering today's top story, that may be an idea thai will gain in popularity quickly
Panel Clarifies SGA Procedure
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Photos By STANLEY LEARY
A special panel set up to interpret
two basic ECU constitutional ques-
tions has concluded that class of-
ficers can vote in the legislature and
hold the position of speaker. The
questions were raised earlier this fall
by two Student Government
Association officals and has turned
into a protracted controversy. The
panel announced its decisions in a
list of interpretations and recom-
mendations on several SGA issues.
The panel, appointed by Dr.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
student life, met last Thursday to
hear the questions raised by SGA
Speaker Gary Williams and SGA
Attorney General Mike Swaim.
The two SGA officials disagreed
on whether the SGA Constitution
allowed class presidents (officers) to
have a vote in both the Legislature
and the Executive Council and
w hether or not an Executive Council
member who serves in the
Legislature can also hold legislative
office.
After a brief introduction as to
why the panel had been concerned,
Swaim and Williams argued their
cases for 15 minutes. After the
presentations, the panel asked ques-
tions of both sides and each side in
turn asked questions.
In addition to the two constitu-
tional questions, four ancillary
questions related to the first two
were also discussed.
The four ancillary questions ask-
ed for a definition of "legislative of-
fice" according to the SGA Con-
stitution and By-Laws. Other ques-
tions raised were:
� Since a class president enjoys
the power to perform other duties
delegated by the Legislature, may
the Legislature delegate to or elect a
class president to a legislative of-
fice?
� Does the SGA Constitution in-
dicate a separation of powers doc-
trine? If it doesn't, are distinctions
only drawn by implication or ad-
visory opinions and should by-laws
be established to cover such mat-
ters? The SGA Constitution in-
dicates that class presidents are
members of the Executive Council
and ex-officio members of the
Legislature.
Members of the panel were Dr.
Tinsley Yarbrough, Dr. Fred
Regan, Dean James Mallory and
students John Edwards, Ron Max-
well and Derick Collins.
After considerable discussion the
panel agreed on the following inter-
pretations pertaining to the two
basic constitutional questions and
the ancillary questions:
� Class presidents as members of
the Executive Council have a vote in
that council. Class presidents by
their ex-officio status have a vote in
the Legislature.
� Legislative office means an
elected seat in the Legislature. Per-
sons can seek a class presidency and
legislative seat concurrently. SGA
officers are ineligible to seek an elec-
tive legislative seat.
� As ex-officios, class presidents
can be selected to serve on commit-
tees, in the speakership, and in any
other office to which an elected
member can serve.
� The Constitution does indicate a
separation of powers doctrine in Ar-
ticle III, Section 2, and by the form
of the Constitution. Article III deals
sepecifically with the Legislature,
Article IV deals specifically with the
Executive and Article V deals
specifically with the Judicial.
The panel also recommended
that a Constitutional Committee be
appointed to study the Constitution
as to "wordage" and content.
Specifically, the panel recommend-
ed that the certain questions be
studied in depth, and if necessary,
amendments, or new by-laws be
voted on to clarify the Constitution.
The questions to be studied are:
� Should a student be allowed to
run for two offices concurrently? At
the present there" is nothing in the
Constitution which precludes this.
� There is a pressing need to
define Office of the Legislature.
Does it refer to legislative office, or
office within the legislature?
� Should the Speaker of the
Legislature be elected by and from
the elected representatives?
� While it does not appear that a
major conflict has arisen, study
should be given to the duties that
are delegated to the class presidents
bv the Legislature. Should these
duties delegated to the class
presidents by the Legislature be ex-
pressly limited?
"The report has been accepted
and is the final decision on the ques-
tions raised by the panel Meyer
said. "I hope the SGA Legislature
will see fit to take up some of these
questions next semester so that rules
and or by-laws can be considered to
further clarify these matters
SRA To Award Prizes
To Dorms That Cut Bills
By DARRYL BROWN
4uistanl t�� Editor
The SRA yesterday unveiled the
details of their annual energy con-
test. The contest will measure the
average annual energy consumption
of each residence hall.
The contest, in its second year,
will begin Jan. 11 and run until
April 5. This figure will be com-
pared to the dorm's normal weekly
energy usage that is taken from a 30
week survey.
The dormitory that conserves the
most electricity over that time will
receive a cash award of $250. Se-
cond and third place awards of $200
and $150 respectively will also be
given. In addition, any dorm that
cuts its energy bill by five percent or
more will receive a $100 prize. The
money may be used for any purpose
except to purchase alcoholic
beverages.
A special contest will be held bet-
ween Feb. 8 and 22. The residence
hall that reduces its energy con-
sumption the most in that time will
receive $50.
All prize money is being put up by
Housing Operations, from which
the monthly bills are usually paid.
In last year's competiton, Jones
dorm won with an energy savings of
21 percent. Every dorm except Jar-
vis saved at least five percent.
The contest, held for the first time
last year, saved a total of11,000 on
the housing electric bill. Though the
cost of electricity has gone down
slightly since last year, consumption
has increased somewhat. Chairman
of the SRA Energy Conservation
Committee and SRA vice president
Mark Niewald hopes the residence
halls can break last year's total of a
12.7 percent overall reduction in
energy consumption.
The meeting at Greene dorm also
revealed the names of the acting of-
ficers of the new escort service.
Pirate Walk.
Paul Sumrell was selected to serve
as director of the system, and Tom-
my Robbins was appointed as assis-
tant director. Lisa Maness was
chosen to be secretary-treasurer.
They will serve only as acting ad-
ministrators, at least until the Stu-
dent Government Association ap-
proves the constitution of the ser-
vice.



�w
��
I
J





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 9. IV82
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or yoor organization
would like to nave an item printed
in the announcement column,
please type il on an announcement
form and send it to The East
Carolinian m care ot the produc
tion manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office m the Publications Building
Flyers ana handwritten copy on
oda siiea paper cannot be ac
ceo'ea
There s no charge tor an
nouncements but space is often
iim.teo Therefore we cannot
guarantee that your announce
mem will run as long as you want
ana suggest that you oo not rely
solely on this column for publicity
The deadline tor announcements
is 3 p m Wonaay for the Tuesday
pace' aia 3pm Aeanesaayy tor
the Thursaay paper No an
nouncementj received after these
deadines will oe printea
Tn.s space s avanabie to an
campus organizations ana aopar'
men's
KAPPA SIGMA
The Brothers Pledges ana the
Little Sisters ot the Kappa Sigma
Fraternity would like to wish the
entire student body, faculty and
staff a very Joyous ano Merry
Christmas Holiday Season We
would like to also remind everyone
that when we return in Jan to plan
on attending the BIGGEST and
BEST Spring Rush that ECU has
ever seen So get ready to party
with the Kappa Sigmas n the Spr
ng Rush of 1983
STUDENT UNION
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Committee is sponsoring
the perfect trip tor 193 Spring
Break An ENTIRE WEEK ot tun
and excitement at Disney World
n- Fort Lauderdale Just think,
only 1179 for the whole week of
Spring Break in Florida H m
teresfea contact the Central
Ticket Office at MSC SPACE IS
LIMITED so call now at 757 6611
Ext 226
WANTED:
Responsible person to share new 3
bedroom house in Greenville. Call
756 2376, ask tor John. After 5
p.m call 756-8652.
BILLOF
RIGHTS DAY
On Wednesday. December 15. in
the Willis Building on First Street
on the ECU campus, citizens and
professional groups will observe
Bill ot Rights Day The
ceremonies are scheduled to begin
at 7 15 pm
Featured speakers include ECU
Chancellor John M Howell who
will be concerned with "Human
Rights on the international
Stene Dr Gene D Lamer.
Chairman of the North Carolina
Library Association's Intellectual
F reedom Committee and recipient
ot the 1982 Hugn M Hefner First
Amendment Award m Education,
speaking on Intellectual
Freedom update 1982 and
Gene Puckeft editor of The
Biblical Record discussing "The
Separation of Church and State "
The general public is cordially
invited to participate in this an
nuai affair sponsored this year by
the Greenville and Pitt N C Civil
Liberties Union the League ot
Aomen Voters the ECU Depart
merits ot Community Health,
Library Science and Political
Science and Delta Sigma Theta
WZMB
Listen m to WZMB S contem
oorary gospel show every Sunday
morning from 6 to 10 a m
Featured art,sts will be Phill
Keaggy ana the 2nd Chapter ot
Acts ana a Christmas Special on
Light N up Request lines will be
open so that you can call in for
your favorite Gospel groups
SIGN LANGU ,v,E
CLUB
The Sign Language Club will
have it's annual Christmas party
tor members and former member
only at 1206 Cotanche Street, Sun
day. December 12. at 3:00pm Br
mg a side dish tor dinner, the main
entree will be provided Beer and
setups will also be provided
J. F. V.
There will be a seminar on
Saturday. December U, at 7 00
pm at the Holiday Inn, discussing
the benefits of Bigamy in
American Society It will be head
ed by Dr John Vavra from
Lakewood University, N J There
will be a recption to tolow All
female members urged to attend
The East Carolinian
Srnini: the itfmius t ommunn
sine v.V
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the ot
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER Send address
charges to The East Carolinian.
Old joutr Building ECU Green
vill�. NC 27834
Telephone 757 636, 4367. 6309
11 1" "ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
�44"�jrf.u.OF PREGNANCY
M9ABORTIONS FROM 13 16 WEEKS
J ,AT FURTHER EXPENSE
cJ'J�p qnancy Test Birth C i 'd Problem Pregnan ;ing Foi further intor
k "��IM Iffcan 83? "iJ3 i Toil Free
i� � I Mm-s - :� � aOO 221 256S between � A V and 5 P V A � . kdays
'
k 'F ALEIGH AOVEN S
ikMME AL TM ORGiM2 ATION . ' A. s" Mc ' qai St Hrfi-fgh. N C

ATTENTION
BSN CLASS OF
'83
The Air
special �
BSNs.
you can
Force has a
program for
If selected.
enter active
IJ i ;
duty soon after cjradu-
ation without waiting
for the results of your
State Boards. To quali-
fy vou must hav? an
overall 3.0 CPA.
After commissioning,
you'll attend a five-
month internship at a
major Air f-orce facility.
It's an excellent way to
prepare for the wide
range of experiences
you'll have as an Air
Force nurse officer.
For more information,
contact:
AIM HIGH
'���
o-
W'
accessories
earrings, belt
buckles, and
strips
by. . .
1imi di N
cumber buns,
sashes, floppy
boH-s by
Kennetti Gordon
wallets, scarfs,
pins, socks
J.G. Hook
also new
arrivals
horn Pendleton,
Cricketeer
also introducing
a new perfume
� Gauloise

CyHEBER
"FORBES
tVANS MALL
DC'WNTOWN GREENVILLE
j Should
s Get All Hie
Good Stuff?
Kccunl Bar lias (mmmI Muff M ircu. lVicv.
8.99 SA 902 Ihick
3.99
I 902 Ihick '
Thru Ikcmltcr 2�imL
ttiK SA
SNt'
Record Bar
KK'DKDS
HI
liti Itiii & � u.liiui iUtfit Mill
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right or
use a separate sheet of paper if
you need more lines. There are 33
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to reject any ad.
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75c per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return to THE EAST CAROLINIAN
office by 3:00 Tuesday before
Wednesday publication.
Name
Address.
City Stale.
No. lines �
Zip.
Phone.
at 75c per line $.
.No insertions.
.enclosed
PHYE
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
mg cnange of maior week tor the
Fall Semester, snould report to
Minges Coliseum from 12 00 2 00
p m on Thursday. December 9.
for a motor and physical fitness
test Satisfactory performance on
this test is required as a pre
requisite for official admittance ot
the program
Any student with a medical con
dition that would contramdicate
participation in the testing pro
gram should contact Dr Israel at
757 6497 For more information
call the above number
BAPTIST STUDENT
UNION
HEY! Do you enioy friendly
fellowship, good friends ana food,
and a dance to be yourself m this
"rat race" environment at ECU?
Then come 10m us at the Baptist
Student union where we have dm
ners on Tuesdays at 5 30 tor only
SI 75 PAUSE on Thursdays at
7 00 to allow us to take a break
after an almost fulfilling week
and lots ot people iusi like you who
enioy others Call 752 4644 if you
nave any questions Bob Clyde
campus minister
FALLGRADUATES
Remember to pick up your cap
and gown from the Student Supply
Store. East Carolina University
before leaving school
These keepsake gowns are yours
to keep, providing the graduation
tee has been paid For those
receiving the Masters Degree the
fee pays tor your cap ana gown
but there is an extra tee ot Sll 75
tor your hood
CATHOLIC
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center
would like to invite everyone "a
10m m with us tor celebrating
Mass every Sunaay m tne Biology
Lecture Hall starting at 12 30 anc
every Weanesaa af 5 00 at the
Catholic Newman Cenier located
down at tne bottom ot College M� 11
BAPTIST CHURCH
There is a bus 'du'e to' stude
who w.sh to a"eno Sunaa� w �
a' Sycamore h II Bae s-
Tne bus leaves tne enwrc -
goes into 'he campus from A in
St ti Cotton Fleming arn
dorms a1 10 40 am swing g za �
on 5th, going M "a 5"pi-
back of dorms ana s ng .
Belk Dor 11 leaves ana goes
across campus W dorms on
Side -of campus "c late'
' 10 50 am arriving a"
II 00
'Greenville's
Finest Bakery"
ovr
t

.0�
Wl�
ca(
815 Dickinson Ave.
Downtown
Greenville
752-5251
lnsfc-V-Sxtj SUVxfc ASS -as.
1 i ?t7iri5'i7tj�a'ir
BONANZA
tl
U.B.E
Use the coupons you get when
you sell your textbooks for
VrfUSrl to purchase UBE Sportswear
20 OFF
: -
U.B.E.
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Use the coupons you get
when you sell your textbooks
for CASH fo
purchase any
item in the Book Bam
��
for
10 OFF
Do your Christmas Shopping
before you go home
Bonanza ends Fri Dec. 17th
Groux
( harik Brooks Jr .
the sixti person to be
' Jted m the last five
�v pronounced
r'i. after mid-
after receiving a
al injection. He was
Offical
t niinued rrom Page 1
ork 1 aid Dr
; M e � e �
�or for
� I he kind
r c e m e n t and
m-
ent
and difl
Meyei

:he one
al E l : �
. . �
door-to-d
?rm To.

Fridav &
1 -10:0
Youi Choi
Trout
Floundeq
Shrimp
Clam Mi
Abram
Seaf
11-00 AM
fOPM
FftfayA
S�tmrdv
11:00 AM-
10 00 PM -J

f
I
r
m -
�3T� I









1 eI1C
1 1ixioscd.

i






1
L. .
if ! Ill

IHE EAST CAROLINIAN DFrFMRFB Q l982
BAPTIST CHURCH
. - . 'e � stooen's
a - lay service
� � e H B s- Curcn
, .�. v �� e urti ana
pus hroni W sin
- ,� m ng ana OTher
4. � � . '�i-nQ Dack
� " . dnpus in
mo swinging tv
raves ana goes
mi en South
5'er than
, " curcn a'
eat
u Pizza
� Honest!
te-CCSC-S-
, fa
Groups Speak Out Against Texas Execution
Charlie Hr,L . I. ik. r uii. . i �
Charlie Brooks Jr
he sixth person to be
executed in the last five
years, was pronounced
dead shortly after mid-
night after receiving a
lethal injection. He was
the first black to be put
to death since the early
1960s.
In North Carolina,
groups of people op-
posed to capital punish-
ment held vigils in three
separate locations.
"We vigiled at the
governor's mansion
because we have a
death penalty law in
our state and whenever
anyone is executed
anywhere in the coun
try, it brings us that
much closer to an ex-
ecution here said the
Rev. Tony Clarke-
Sayer, director of
North Carolinians
Against the Death punishment in the case
Penalty, a group which of first degree murder
is attempting to abolish
capital punishment in
N.C.
Gov. James B. Hunt
Jr. is in favor of capital
Officals Doubtful Of Raised Age
Continued From Page 1
work for us said Dr.
timer Meyer, vice
chancellor for for stu-
dent life. "The kind of
enforcement and
monitoring that is in-
volved would present
new and difficult pro-
blems
Meyer recommended
that there be tougher
enforcement of
drunken driving laws
and that education pro-
grams, such as the one
at ECU, be stressed to
the students.
"We're not going to
go door-to-door to
search dorm rooms and
check people's ages
Mallory said. "If a per-
son drinks in the
privacy of their own
room and doesn't make
any noise, we're not go-
ing to bother them
Mallory said a rise in
the age limit would pre-
sent serious problems
to campus fraternities
and sororities who hold
parties and events
where alcohol is served.
"They would have to
be much more
careful he added.
"It splits the cam-
pus Meyer said. "It's
almost impossible to
keep 18-year-olds away
from events where
19-year-olds are con-
suming alcohol. We'd
have to revise a lot of
policies
Calder said it would
be impossible to
segregate under-aged
students from certain
events. "Are we going
to have a policeman at
the end of the line (at a
fraternity rush) to in-
sure that they're 19, 20
or 21 to get a free
beer?"
Calder challenged
anyone to check all the
ages of people consum-
ing alcohol in
downtown Greenville
on any night. "You'd
find many 16-year-old
high school kids who
were drinking beer he
said. "It's almost im-
possible to enforce
nowif you're looking
at it from a campus
police perspective
"There's nothing
pro-active we can do
about it Calder ex-
plained. "Anything we
can do would be reac-
tive. Law enforcement
is going to have to be
done at the end of the
retailer � not us
Calder said some ac-
tion needed to be taken
to reduce the number
of DUI's, but he didn't
think raising the drink-
ing age was the answer.
"The amount of DUI's
we're getting is
ridiculous he said.
Calder said that an
under-age person who
drinks is committing a
victimless crime, as far
as the drinking is con-
cerned, but that if a
person then drives a car
or commits some other
crime � it's no longer
victimless.
Meyer encouraged
students who were con-
cerned about the possi-
ble raising of the drink-
ing age to get together
with the SGA and stu-
dent leaders and start
thinking of possible
ways of relieving the
problem and recom-
mend to government
officials an alternative
to raising the age.
Brooks was the first
person to be executed
in Texas in over 18
years. Approximately
1,102 people are on
death row in the U.S.
Texas, with 171 in-
mates on death row,
leads the nation.
Brooks was executed
shortly after the U.S.
Supreme Court refused
to hear any appeals on
his case and all his
other avenues of ap-
peals were exhausted.
"The real issue is the
way the courts have
responded Clarke-
Sayer told The East
Carolinian in a
telephone interview.
"The courts will no
longer hesitate to allow
executions to pro-
ceed He added that
there's less and less of a
tendancy to wait and
that executions are
becoming "easier" as a
result of current greater
public acceptance of
the death sentence
People who are given
the death penalty have
the automatic right of
appeal to the Supreme
Court. In North
Carolina, the sentence
is given in certain
murder and rape cases.
Texas officials said
that the execution of
Brooks did not signal
an acceleration in the
rate of executions in the
state. Clarke-Sayer
disagreed and said he
felt we'd be seeing "a
lot more repeats"
among the six states
that have carried out
executions in the past
five years.
Clarke-Sayer said the
imposition of the death
penalty is often ar-
bitrary and
discriminatory. Clarke-
Sayer also said that
racism exists when
handling the death
penalty, and he doesn't
see that trend ending.
According to Brent
Hackney, a spokesman
for Gov. Hunt, the
governor had nothing
to say about Brooks'
execution or the
Raleigh vigil. "It's not
his (Hunt's) policy to
comment on criminal
cases outside North
Carolina Hackney
said. He did restate the
fact that Hunt "does
favor" the present
North Carolina death
penalty law.
Fifteen Inducted In
National Fraternity
Alpha Phi Omega
O'NEILL
Suft Writer
By PATRICK
tional chairman, Floyd
Thomas, APO sec-
The ECU Chapter of tional representative
the Alpha Phi Omega and the brothers of I p-
National Co-ed service
fraternity held their an-
nual initiation
ceremonies last Thurs-
day evening in the
Vanlandingham room
of the home economics
building.
Fifteen students were
inducted during a
ceremony performed
by Bob Harris, APO's
national representative.
Bob Daly, APO sec
silon Nu Chapter from
UNC-Wilmington were
also on hand for the
ceremonies. Dr. Elmer
Meyer was present
representing ECU.
According to Pam
Rogerson, APO's re-
cent service projects in-
clude their volunteer ef-
forts with The Great
American Smoke-Out
and the March of
Dimes.
�.� 0.� �� MViump duu Lwy, rvj sec- uimes.
Iiimiiimiimniiiiimimimi
IS YOUR CAR READY FOR
THAT BIG TRIP HOME?
WE CAN GET YOU THERE!
��r
i
SERVIC
onK?Tpoint
I Brake Safety
U�50ChCCk
Comp�,e
AU9nment
itcii
$3�8J
4-CY"inier
T$f.95 ,
16 and S cylinder
1 sUgfrtlynig
VJSrC
: ;t f- i
���
Coggins Car Care yf
756-5244
�� SCIIVlCf NATIONAL i
SbTIRE CENTER
nuiittiieiftitf liitflititff tintteiiif iiitiii nititiiiiitiiiiiftiMiifiJtiiiifiitifJiiisiffietiff) i tt � 11 ifti f 3 f I f f c 41 a f f it 11 � t f t�i i f if I f c 11 fit t� i f f if 11 ititti t if ti if I�� j iiif f f �! f f tf tf a litiif mi t t f f Bf t f f f f ecu if �f ttf ������ �f t�a
iSfc
Your Choice of Any or All
Super Lunch Specials
11-2:00 p.m.
Your Choice of MOU Fn.
Trout Deviled Crabs
Flounder Crab Cakes j
and 2 Vegetables
(M to Choose From)
�att
Shrimp Oysters
Clam Strips
3
IncludesBeverage & Tax
Abram's
�jwn
QSILK BAR
NOW OPEN
STEAMED
OYSTERS
$7.75
peck y
Barbecue
"t�R�0�u
Welcome
11:00 AM-
9:00 PM
Friday
Oyster Bar ?
710N. Craw St. Maa�WaCate
Specialist
Cater: AaytMng
11:00 AM-
10:00 PM c�
EPX 1590YS
MMKHrf-SeMkir
RING
Reg. Price '99.97
SALE PRICE
GU2-BW1
Size 7
White or Yellow
GOLDMOTHCtS
RING
Reg. Price'53.00 (W
BOPf.
DOX 121818
1� ROM CHAIN-II" SAOT7
Reg Pnce "79 97$U PRICE �"
00X121820
14 ROM CHAIN 20" $707
Reg Pnce '89 97SAU PttCI ' �
DOX 121824
I4K ROM CHAIN 24" QQ91
Reg Pr.ce "109 97SAU MtlCI
DOX 121830
14K ROM CHAIN 30" $14097
Reg Pnce" 129 97SAU PRICE �Wf
3
JBX I4SJ
1 SIRM0 BRA10EP
iD IWJ1
14K BRAIDED CHAIN
16"
Reo Price 32.97
SAU MICE �
SALE PRICE
$4497
ts
dox w
06X 1452
3 DIAMOND LADIES' RING
Req139.50
SAU
$g997
DOX 7093
LEAF EARRINGS
Reg. M197
SAU
00X72172
14K
qn
WD� 40"4P
WDX40S4S
SAPPHIRE & DIAMOND RING,6)
Reg. '64.97
39�
FVX DM384
RUBY & DIAMOND RING
Reg. 64.97
SAU
$399S
fVX-W384
CROSS STUDS
Reg. Ml-97 $097
sau rr
FLOATING HEART
Reg. Price '1.97
SAU PRICE
59
0OX777B60
FLOATING HEART
Reg. Price'7.97
SAU PIKE
.91
J. D. DAWSON COMPANY
SHOWROOMS AND WARM0USI
A 102E.MSt. Mill. 10 St.
?f MRWM.NC 27110 fte-iMt.MClTiy
(fit) 043-2121 (fit) 7S2-14M
HmMrKIKM) jtjpjw Mt-fctt &" W
"GRAWIAT1 GEMOtOGIST AVARAR4I TO ASSIST W�� "
PRICES GOOD THRU PWCB 9000 THRU SATURDAY, NOVEMRB IF
SAT DEC. 11.19�2 FOE MAIL ORDERS CAU 14003 2111 TOIL FREE
1
�� .�.��.
Si�
�jt i





.

?
QUfc iEaat (Earnlmfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Fielding Miller. got.
Mike Hughes, Managmitd�or
WAVERLY MERRITT, anew of Mntaiq
Robert Ricks, bmmcb unnt�
AL 1 AFRASHTEH, Crtdu Uwtrr
STEPHAMfc GROOM, Ctf�toMM vfjnu.f
Chip Gideons, r�cw s�
Cindy Pleasants, spo� �d�or
Greg Rideout, mmw
Steve Bachner, ����,� ��o-
Juliana Fahrbach, styntwm
MlKE DAVIS, Production Manager
December 9. 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Ultimate Irony
Death In The 20th Century
Over the course of the past few
days, we have been witness to one of
the ultimate ironies of our time. We
may not yet recognize it as such;
nevertheless, in a roundabout way,
these two unrelated events seem to
exemplify some of the vast incon-
sistencies at work in the 20th-
century "way of life
Only a few short days after
Barney B. Clark, a retired dentist,
became the first human being to
receive a permanent artificial heart
to sustain his life, the state of Texas
injected a lethal dose of sodium
Pentothal into the veins of Charlie
Brooks Jr. to kill him.
Of course, to say that these two
events illustrate the "ultimate
irony" in and of themselves would
not only stretch credibility; it would
be simply wrong. The inconsisten-
cies stem not from the final actions
themselves but from the attitudes
and actions which surround and
lead up to separate cases.
The purpose of this editorial is
not necessarily to condone or con-
demn the death penalty or advanced
medical technology per se. But to ig-
nore either or both issues in relation
to one another is to ignore the very
heart of 20th-century thinking.
When one considers of the scores
of channels, the millions of dollars
invested in research and technology,
involved in the inception, construc-
tion and implantation of an ar-
tificial heart (and similar life-
sustaining organs), one can't help
but wonder if the eventual goal of
science is anything less than immor-
tality itself.
Sure, improving the quality of life
(whether or not "quality" entails
longevity) is a noble task. And those
men and women who have
dedicated their lives to the research
and development of medical
technology certainly deserve credit
and appreciation.
But whereas Clark is, indeed,
alive, he faces a "lifetime tethered
by hoses to air compressors which
will restrict even the simplest activi-
ty. The "quality" of the remainder
of his life must, at least, be ques-
tionable, even to modern medical
science's firmest trustees.
On the other end of the spectrum,
however, we see thousands upon
thousands of dollars poured into
obligatory court appeals and seem-
ingly endless days of dreadful
waiting The end result: execu-
tion.
Charlie Brooks was found guilty
of murder, and under a 1974
Supreme Court ruling, his execution
was perfectly constitutional.
However, the constitutional im-
plications are not really at issue
here.
At stake are the moral ramifica-
tions, the ethical implications, the
unanswered questions � all of
which must be considered in the
case of this ultimate irony.
MERRY
CHRISTMAS
From The Staff Of The East Carolinian
m&G&s&G&&
9
&
y
gl
kf
9
y
9
m
S
9
9
w
-T�. -Sl " lfc i "Si -T& Xfc Xf
Making New Year's Resolutions
Kindly Bind Me
i-Campus Forum
Ah, the end of the year approaeheth
fatht (pardon my lithp). The Christmas
season is upon us, and New Year's is just
around the bend. So, once again, it's time
to start thinking about New Year's
resolutions.
Now, I personally have never really been
much into "turning over a new leaf" vear
after year. Generally speaking, I'm a pro-
ponent of the status quo. I like things just
the way they are.
Nevertheless, this year, I've vowed to
make an extra effort to control, if not ter-
minate, my various vices. I, therefore,
make my resolutions public in hopes that I
may gain your aid and support. It will
surely be a trying time but together
we can make it.
And Now For Something Completely Different
1 read with great interest a recent letter
in the Campus Forum regarding an East
Carolinian staff member, Patrick O'Neill.
I would like to submit one opinion only:
regardless of Mr. O'Neill's political per-
suasions and somewhat outspoken convic-
tions, I personally appreciate any oppor-
tunity to hear a different side of a multi-
fold issue. Charles Shavitz's petty attack,
in my estimation, was a far more narrow-
minded and negative dissertation than the
O'Neill viewpoints I have read in the past.
Paige Highsmith
Freshman, Poli. Sci.
It appears that even after all the publici-
ty given to the dangers of nuclear arms,
there are still people who treat the whole
arms problem lightly. The ideas expressed
by Charles Shavitz's letter in the Dec. 2
issue of The East Carolinian demonstrates
this attitude. To blatantly accuse a con-
cerned person such as Patrick O'Neill of
being a "whining rebel" simply because he
understands the genuine risks involved in a
nuclear war and wants to inform the public
about them shows a lack of understanding
in the matter. It is difficult these days to
find a person well informed or concerned
enough about nuclear war to take the time
to write about or discuss it. When this very
real fear of the partial or complete destruc-
tion of our world is expressed, we should
be relieved that there are a few diehards
around; the majority of us just do not
care, which is why our government can get
away with so much. I'm grateful that such
"whiners" exist, because without them,
the mad arms race and the blind Russian
and North American policies of im-
perialism would continue unchecked. I im-
agine that Lech Walesa was a whiner in
Brezhnev's opinion; that Susan B. An-
thony was considered a whiner by the con-
servatives in the early 1900s; that Martin
Luther King was seen as a whiner by the
KKK, and that Somoza, the murderous
Nicaraguan dictator, placed Carlos
Fonseca in the same category.
Mr. Shavitz says that he would prefer to
"die than to kneel to a Godless, com-
munist ruler Fine, that's his choice. Un-
fortunately, in a nuclear war, most of us
would have no choice of living or dying. It
is beyond my comprehension how anyone
could prefer the possible destruction of all
humanity over a change in political
philosophy. We are all victims of the pro-
paganda which teaches us from infancy
that all communists do is oppress and deny
basic freedoms, instigate terrorist activities
in order to undermine democratic govern-
ments and eat small children for breakfast.
They are also victims of their own pro-
paganda, which teaches them that
capitalists exploit ail workers, suppress
underdeveloped countries through im-
perialism and have lost our sense of
humanity in the greedy quest for the
almighty dollar. They learn to hate us, and
we learn to hate them. For what?
The U.S. is already more advanced
militarily than the U.S.S.R. Russia is in-
creasing its arms in order to keep up with
us. Our arms potential is unlimited; so is
theirs. The present stalemate will continue
indefinitely, changing only in the higher
level of destruction possible should we
enter a war. Brezhnev promised before he
died that the U.S.S.R. would not be the
first to use nuclear arms. Reagan has never
made such a promise. Now, Brezhnev's
successors may change that policy. Have
we waited too long for an agreement to
reduce nuclear arms?
According to Washington, nuclear
weapons are necessary to defend the U.S.
against Soviet aggression. However, the
U.S. has never been actually threatened
militarily by the Soviet Union. Strangely
enough, in 1917, just after the Russian
revolution, 7,000 North American troops
arrived in Siberia as part of a counter
revolutionary force trying to overthrow the
new government. This direct military in-
tervention failed but was followed by an
economic blockade. It was 1933 before the
U.S. recognized the U.S.S.R. as a nation.
The governments of each of our power-
ful nations push the arms race to the limit
due to this so-called need to protect our
freedom and way of life, but we must not
forget that building arms and the military
is big business. A lot of rich get richer from
the arms race. Although we consider
ourselves a democratic nation and claim
that the government represents us, there
can be no denying that politics is often bas-
ed on economics. Economics is the basis of
capitalism, and it's to save our system that
such a strong defense has been created.
The rich and powerful rule, and they con-
vince us of the urgent need to expand our
military prowess in order to protect our
freedom and their dollars.
I'm a little confused about Mr. Shavitz's
statement that Pat O'Neill is "just yellow
enough to welcome his comrades fromt he
U.S.S.R. to our shores with open arms if
it would avoid a nuclear attack Please
consider that sentence carefully. I believe
the foolishness of it is self-evident. A
nuclear attack must be avoided at all costs,
even if it means we must learn to cooperate
with a people and a political system we
have been taught to fear and hate.
Kerri Nolan
It was gratifying to see the story
covering the memorial service for the four
American women killed in El Salvador two
years ago. However, the service was in-
tended to do more than honor their
dedicated service and courage. Their
deaths are in vain if we who remember
them do not do all in our power to affect a
change in U.S. policy toward Central
America. This would then stop the efforts
of our government to subvert the new
government of Nicaragua.
After his trip to Guatamala, President
Reagan claimed that General Rios Montt is
"totally dedicated to democracy in
Guatemala despite the fact that the mass
murders of the Indian population of that
country are being carried out by his troops.
Because of these human rights violations,
we must urge Congress not to certify
Guatemala for aid. Honduras desperately
needs development aid for water, food,
medical care and roads, but we continue to
give more and more military aid to this
poorest of nations. We must urge our
leaders at every level to stop military aid to
El Salvador, where government forces con-
tinue to kill entire villages of peasants, in-
cluding women, children and old men �
an estimated 35,000 to date. In short, we
best honor these women by acting on
behalf of the poor whom they sought to
serve.
Sisten Helen Shondell
Catholic Campus Minister
Your recent editorial "Herman Talk
Reinforces Anti-Russian Sentiment" by
non-student Patrick O'Neill requires com-
ment.
Victor Herman, who was an officially
sponsored speaker on campus, is an
American citizen, who, as a teenager, was
taken to the Soviet Union, where he even-
tually spent 45 years in slave labor camps,
prisons and internal exile before repatria-
tion to the U.S. in 1976. He is anti-
Communist, not anti-Russian, as the
editorial caption suggests. In fact, the
writer himself contradicts the title when he
notes that Herman "had wonderful praises
for the Russian people
The author is indifferent toward truths
about the U.S.S.R but he is ambiguous
toward generous words spoken about the
U.S. For instance, he is more upset by Her-
man's contention, made without reserva-
tions, that the U.S with its individual
freedoms, is an infinitely better place than
the U.S.S.R. The writer tries to close the
gap between the speaker's evaluation of
the two countries by using the rhetorical
trick of the pseudo-concession. That is, he
mentions a few good things about the U.S.
but then shows where his heart really lies
when, with gusto, he lists imagined faults
about the U.S. Next, he admits something
� but not too much � by saying that be-
ing in a Soviet prison is "disgusting as if
it were merely unsanitary. Herman,
however, had shown that the slave labor
camps were places of death, with officially
approved torture and high mortality rates.
He concludes by saying that Herman
does not know what he is talking about
because, being out of the U.S. for so many
years, he could not have learned how bad
the U.S. is. On this score, the author has
no need to worry; in the U.S.S.R people
can read in their government-controlled
and censored media selections from the
same anti-American diatribes that occur in
some of our media, including college
newspapers.
Shall students believe Herman or the
editorialist? Herman knows of what he
speaks; he has dwelt as many years in the
U.S. as the editoriallist has, and in addi-
tion, he has lived through the horrors of
the Communist system. I'll put my money
on the words of Herman.
Dennis Kilcoyne
Sophomore, Poli. Sci.
Anvwav. tiei c goes
� First oi all, a c sensible, praci
proposition: hereby be n re
thoughttul ol m fc � i an rhus I pro-
mise not to straddle -ma. lead i ad
animals. Squirrel and possum vkera
damage tire tread wear and make tor an
unsightly me tor future passers b)
� During this next ear. 1 vow no
park my car in handicapped -pae- and
limp to class.
Mike Hughe
Jusi The M a li h
� I'll try not to pick my nose in church.
class, at the dentist's office or over the
vegetables at the grocery store.
� Only two episodes oi The I ove ttoai
and three peanut-butter, salami and
mayonnaise sandwiches per day.
� 1 hereby vow not to telephone
paranoid little old ladies at 3 a.m. with m
double-cheese pizza order.
� I hereby resolve not to miss an episode
of Little House on the Prairie unless I have
something better to do.
� I hereby resolve not to attend anymore
funerals, weddings or gynecology conven-
tions dressed as Papa Smurf, Boxcar Willie
or June Cleaver.
� I will no longer put cigar butt ashes.
tabasco sauce or Beechnut drool in the ket-
chup dispenser at Hardy's, nor will I con-
sciously disguise my voice in the drive thru
at Wendy's so I can get a Fun Meal.
� I hereby resolve not to criticize anyone
� regardless of race, creed or color �
unless I really don't like him.
� I hereby vow to look at life from a new
perspective, to attend at least one block
show, buy a 40-pound ghetto blaster and
talk to at least one fat person per day.
� I hereby resolve to buy only American-
made cars, unless, of course, I can get a
better deal on an import.
� Henceforth, I will use a No. 2 pencil
when composing poetry on the walls of
Austin's third-floor bathrooms.
� I will be nicer to co-workers, friends
and small dogs.
� 1 firmly resolve never again to lie to the
manager of the 264 Playhouse that I need a
complimentary ticket to review JYjw
phomaniac Nurse, Desert Lust or Sheila,
Gladys and What the Parrot Saw for the
paper.
� And finally, I hereby vow never again
to burp over the phone, never to spit on
ants, never to hide a frozen oyster dinner
under a stack of Cap'n Crunch boxes at
Krogers, and always to tell the truth
Editor's Note: Mike Hughes, a senior
foreign-exchange student from Pago Pago,
works at a local pet hospital, where he
preps dogs for surgery and supervises all
breeding activities.
�p rv
f
MMM
� ' vs. �� 4 ?�
Go
� Mii
Piiit
B
� MII I
ABORTION
App ts VUO� � D�
CALL TOLL FR
PAPERBA'
maga: nI
BUY TRADE
wm rS Mm.
E3!
24 hour To
I Haul
Availal
THI
M ishin
I Evans Si
Q
nun
ATTII
BRI
THi
CHRi:
AV
FRI . Dl
3rd m
�K )l
iis
!







0
THE EAST CAROI IN1AN
1)11 MHr K 4 982
A
g
g

9
I
a
i
s
3
9
i
a
i
i
sensible, practical
fcsolve to bo more
nan. Thus 1 pro-
all dead roadside
possum Mcera
and make tor an
le passers b.
:ar, 1 vo not to
tpped spaces and
Hughes
H si h
nose in church,
fice or over the
ly store.
lot The love Boat
liter, salami and
per day.
Inot to telephone
s at 3 a.m. Mth my
ler.
t to miss an episode
'rairie unies I have
It to attend anymore
tynecology conven-
Imurt, Boxcar Willie
ut cigar butt ashes,
jnut drool in the ket-
ly's. nor will 1 con-
)ice in the drive thru
:t a Fun Meal.
)t to criticize anyone
creed or color �
ke him
k at life from a new
at least one block
ghetto blaster and
person per day.
buy only American-
course, I can get a
rt.
ll use a No. 2 pencil
try on the wails of
ithrooms.
co-workers, friends
Y er again to lie to the
ivhouse that 1 need a
to review ym-
tsert Lust or Sheila,
Parrot Saw for the
teby vow never again
ine, never to spit on
frozen oyster dinner
)'n Crunch boxes at
to tell the truth
Hughes, a senior
entjrom Pago Pago,
hospital, where he
rv and supervises all
Government To Collect Loans From
t'NEIUByFA,KKK
SMWita
According to
statements releasd bv
education secretary
Terrel H Bell and
Senator Charles Percy.
Rill the government
has plans to garnishee
the wages and persions
ot nearly 47,000 cur-
rent and retired federal
workers if they do not
repay almost $68
million in deliquent stu-
dent loans.
Bell and Percy said
that a government com-
puter search found
46,860 current and
retired civilian and
military employees are
in default on 50,393
loans used for educa-
tion.
Bell added that the
workers come from
across the government
salary scale and some
owe more than one
loan.
"It's really a slap in
the face to every tax
payer in this country
Percy told a news con-
ference. He described
some debtors as
"deadbeats
ECU students cur-
rently have the best
record in North
Carolina for repaying
student loans.
"Students at ECU have
had a remarkable
record in repaying
studnet loass said
Robert Boudreaux,
director of the Finan-
cial Aid Office at ECU.
"We are currently
number one in the
state Percy, whose
debt collection bill sign-
ed in October will
enable the government
to withhold federal
workers' pay to collect
the debts, estimated
Pair Publish Poetry Book
that over 37,000 federal
employees have
defaulted on their
loans.
The figures turned
up in a computer scan
of 10 million federal
personel records
against files on
defaulters on federally
insured student loans,
guaranteed student
loans and National
Direct and Defense Stu-
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
An ECU professor
and student lue team-
ed together to publish a
book of poetry which
they promoted last
week during an
autograph session at
the Book Barn of
Greenville.
Dr. Jerry F. lot-
terhos, protessor and
ABORTIONS
I 24 w�k tt inj lions
App'ts. Matte 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 057S
director of the ECU
Alcohol Abuse Pro-
gram, and Jody Lynn
Praskac, a student in
the School of Art,
teamed up on the
publication of a book
Of poetry titled People
Tunes.
Lotterhos wrote Peo-
ple Tunes while
Praskac did com-
plimentary illustrations
for the publication.
The book, which is be-
Gl Cdmoutiaged Fatigues and
T Shirts Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks Camp'ng Equip
mem steel Toed Shoes Dishes
and Over 700 Different New and
Used Items Cowboy Boots
136 95
ARMY-NAVY
STORE 50sr
ing published by
Woodsmoke Publica-
tions, is Lotterhos' first
published book of
poetry.
People Tunes is
"beautifully il-
lustrated" by Praskac,
said Lotterhos. He said
her works "reflect the
scenery of the North
Atlantic seashore and
the Northern New
Jersey landscape
around her home in
Rumson, N.J
dent Loans.
Boudreux said that at
the state level, North
Carolina has already
started doing this type
ol collection pro-
cedure. Boudreux said
the names of state
employees who are
delinquent on their
loans are given to the
North Carolina Inter-
nal Revenue Service
and if that person is
eligible for a refund on
their state income
taxes, the money will be
withheld and forward-
ed to the original
lender.
Boudreaux said that
ECU students and
former students have
an aggregate total of
approximately six per-
cent in default rates
that dates back to 1958
and that according to
Jefferson Florist
Fridays Special
DAISIES TIED
WITH JELLYBELLYS
$650
1720 Ui I itih Sired
Near Hospital
752-6195
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd.
756 3023 �24 HRS.
24 hour Towing Service
I Haul Rentals
Available
THE
757 1608
WORKSHOP
I
J
"The Tun
H ay to
Fitness"
M ishing You A Merry Christmas
and Happy New Year"
RIGHT
BROTHERS
BIKE SHOP
207 B East 5th St.
Open 11-7
6 days a week
752-6181
He carry
Univega, kabuki,
Columbia and HMX
bikes. ALL at
very modest prices.
We also offer
Parts & Service
"if we don "t have it
we'llgei it
Pilot Training
Opportunities
FLY NAVY
The Navy presently has several openings
for the most exciting and challenging
job in the world - NAVY PILOT. If you
qualify, we will guarantee yoi; a seat in
the most prestigious flight school
anywhere. At the completion of training
you will fly the Navy's high performance
aircraft.
Qualifications Are:
Bachelors degree
Less than 28 12 years old
2020 uncorrected vision
Excellent health
U.S. Citizen
If you think you can qualify and would
like to earn a starting salary of
$18,000 with $28,000 in four years,
send a letter of qualifications to:
NAVY PILOT PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
or call
1-800-662-7231
the N.C. Higher
Education Assistance
Authority that is the
best percentage among
all state universities.
On the federal level.
Bell reported that his
department wrote
defaulters Monday,
ordering them to work
out repayment ar-
rangements. On Feb. 1,
the department plans to
send heads of govern-
ment agencies the
names of defaulting
employees who do not
comply.
Agency heads will
begin collection pro-
cedures and defaulters
who don't respond
within 60 days could
have 15 percent of net
wages or pensions
withheld until the un-
paid balance is col-
lected.
123 E. 5th Sir.
752-7483
THURSDAY
SPAGHETTI SPECIAL � $2.49 all you can eat � 5 9
FRIDAY � Happy Hour 4-7 with dollar specials
FRIDAY ANDSATURDAY NITE
LAHN & LOFTON
SUNDAY
LASAGNA SPECIAL � $2.99 all you can eat � 5-9
MONDAY
PIZZA & PASTA � $2.79 all you can eat � 5 9
TUESDAY � Ladies' Nite with BRUCE FRYE
-mi
JflJ .T5V3
HOODED
417 Evans St. Mall
PS Thanks lor the better curves
rwwrn. PBQ MMMMMMMMM
ATTIC ATTIC
752-7303
THURS.&FRI.
BR1CE STREET
THURS DEC. 9th
CHRISTMAS PARTY
SAT.
CONTROL
GROUP
swEraiRis
I
15
o
ECU DISCOUNT
on all prescription
eyeglasses
315 Park View Commons
Across from Doctors Park
Open 9-5:30
Mon- Frl.
752-1444
plicians
$9.50
WITH THIS COUPON
OFFER GOOD
DECEMBER 9-24TH
REG. $11.50
TJ
Bonds
Hodges
218 ARLINGTON
OPEN 9 6:00
756-6001
SPORTING GOODS
GREENVILLE, N.C
210 E. FIFTH ST
OPEN 10-5:30
752-4156
$250FF14K
GOLD RING
Dec. 9, 10
Thurs Fri.
9-4
Student Supply Store Lobby
yffiORVED
X COLLEGE RING?;

-���





THE EAST CAROLINIAN DEC fcMBhR 9, 1982
13oy Am
I QOft�X
Let 5 s, vno�vi 3.50,
Pout "Town
o
TVv Ther
STv4�T On�
TRY THE
STUDENT UNION
o �
Professor Predicts MX Passage
�� �
'
,
t ontinued From Page 1
is leading the tight
against the weapon in
the senate and believes
he has enough otes to
block passage of the
amendment.
Carlton said the MX
u o u 1 d survive the
senate. He explained
that once the two ver-
sions of the total
defence appropriations
bill is passed through
both chambers of Con-
gress, it will then go to
a conference commit-
tee. Here, Carlton says,
is where the Pentagon
has been lobbying the
m o s t. T h e y have
known all along the bill
would go to conference
and have focused on
key senators and con-
gressmen, such as John
lower and Henry
Jackson.
Carlton expects the
final version of the bill.
which will be debated
on behind closed doors,
to include the basing
plan, with little altering
of the origianl plan.
Ihe bill then goes
before a joint session of
congress, where it will
be under a "gag
order "No amend-
ments to the final bill
will be allowed
Carlton said. "A
member will have to
vote 'yes' or 'no
Congressmen will
undoubtedly, Carlton
believes, think twice
about voting against
defense. A defeat of the
final bill would mean a
cut-off of money to all
areas of defense.
The amendment ap-
proved by the house
eliminated $988 million
for missile production
but kept intact $2.5
billion for research and
development.
Reagan believes the
field of 100 MXs �
which he calls the
"peacekeeper" � is
badly needed for a
defense build-up to
negotiate arms control
with the Soviet Union.
Much of the opposition
is centered around the
controverial dense pack
deployment idea, which
is supposed to keep the
missiles safe during a
Soviet attack.
One house opponent
said the plan depends
on a theory that can't
even be proved on a
blackboard; supporters
retort by saying that
Soviets don't know if it
will work either.
Carlton personally
believes that the United
States does not need the
missile, even though
their are good
arguments on both
sides. "The money
could be better used
elsewhere, either within
the Defense Depart-
ment or in other pro-
grams
A spokesperson for
the Air Force ROTC on
campus said they sup-
port the missile plan
and regard it as
necessary for the na-
tion's defense.
QUALITY
SHOE REPAIR

S
s)
sum Kl-I� UK
?sb im
CHEMISTRYPHYSICS
MATHENGINEERING
MAJORS
TIM i��0"� operator o nucl��r i-�ctor� � cwrroarly
mm wit itrotta sciaca backgrounds U.S. Crtttaan �"ir 27
ot ��� with 3 I GA or bortvr t�c�l��l tiojllh, p�1 p��Mil
and �lawctoa' vm t� salary in raw f�rt. Mvctaar aajajlHtaal �-
��can wilt k cftail by a�tir� aawctrMM WHiaianl aatf
�no.i�e�rm� SnxI'iiumiW
NAVY
Nuclear Program Officer
1001 Mavaho Or.
Raleigh. NC 27609
or call 1 ��0-442-7M1
WOMEN'S HEALTH
CARE YOU CAN ABOtmON: a difficult deo-
DEPEND ON. sionthat'srnadeeasiefdy
the women of I he Fleming Center Counselors are
available dav and night to support ana under-
! stana vou Your safety comfort and privacy are
i assured Dy the caring staff of the Fleming ente-
SERVICES: � Tuesaay - Saturaay Abortion
� pointments � 1 st & 2na Trimester Abortions up t
18 Weeks � Free Pregnancy tests � Very Early
j Pregnancy Tests � All Inclusive Fees � Insurance
j Accepted � CALL 781-5550 DAY Oft NIGHT �
! Healthcare cc tnnotng yup pifMING
ana educatior. 'or wo- rCklTCD
men of 3 ages CcNTcK
GRADUATING
SENIORS
The key to tinding your first
ob is an affective resume
Stay one step ahead ot
other graduates
RESUME WRITING
KIT
� Model Resumes
" Cover Letter
' Negotiating Salary
Resume as tool
Send: S3.00 lo:
Resume, POB 4025-C
Wua�4agtoa. NC
Local and
Out of Town
Newspapers
Full line of Magazines,
Paperbacks & Greeting Cards
Central Book
&News
Greenville Sq. Shopping Ctr.
Open 7 days a Week
9:30-9:30
756-7177
NOT
THE USUALin
Christmas china, teddy
bears, candles, teddy
DviirS?, greeting cards, teddy bears, gift wrap,
tedd bears, swings. tedd bears, decorations, teddy bears,
bab Rifts. tedd hears Located in the 600�roup of
The Gazebo Arl,n9,on B,va shops
Hours: MonFri. 10a.m9p.m.
55S�S& sat. 10a.m. -6p.m.
A SHOP FOR ALL SEASONS
204 5th St.
focolid�
$8.98 LIST on SALE for $5.99 include:
Foreigner
Lionel Richie
Lynyrd Skynrd
Poco
Led Zepplin
Michael Jackson
John Cougar
Supertramp
ishing everyone
a very happy and
musical Merry Christmas
Come on down and pick up an
album for a friend or
treat yourself
�mm�
Rod Stewart - LIVE Oxxie Osbourne - LIVE List $11.98
2 Record Set List $11.98 2 Record Set SaleS8.99
Sale S8.99 and many other unadvertised sPe5Jaj-
oococoocwoeooooooooeorjcwaooonoooooooooooocioooooccinno
The staff S. management would
like to take this opportunity to thank
each of our customers for their
patronage this semester, we would
like to wish each Ed student a hap-
py holiday season.
We would also like t(t thank all the
sponsors of our 9th Annual
Christmas Tarty. Thanks to you, it
was our 9th success.
H e will be closed Dec. 20-30 for
remodeling � repairs to better serve
our client el.
Merry Christmas
& A Happy New Year
New Year's Special.
from the Attic, the Elbo and ECU Athletics.
Attend the January 8 basketball game
ECU vs. James Madison
and Use Your Ticket Stub For
�FREE ADMISSION at the Attic and a
discount on your first beverage �
�FREE FIRST BEVERAGE at the Elbo
7:30 Tip Off
Watch the Pirates attack, j
f
i

"
E
B
� �
,M � �, -
,�� ��rrv
Th,
poer
Cart
the-
pii
When
-

H
Tech
� a
our � . -
be
1
One
. N
Men j
Keer -
find
Fot
service r;
� �
W
B P
"We ti
nor I
for this
otr I
merc I
freedom,
on om
righteou
tempe
God. anc
these thinj
Burrough.
(Society o
The aH
side the ii
from Quj
counseling
center tod
of Fayettel
the larger
Quake
19, is tl
counselil
Washingtj
Georgia,
beyond ji
in their
Program
jeune �
Marine bt
other mi Ul
ther worl





ON

x-i
vn
apers
y
L
;ame.
on
ack.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
IX ' t MM K V. ivx:
Page
English Professor Published
By MIKE HAMKR
Staff Wfttct
C roas Ihr Tar Rivrr Bridgr
-�d wh tht bounduin of hrart
nd lung. mihr and faihrr. south
And �hrrr I hrgan in ihr North
This stanza from Peter Makuck's
poem "Put County, North
Carolina" alludes to some of the
themes found in Dr. Makuck's just-
published volume of poems entitled
H here He I ive.
I found Makuck's volume to be
warm in tone and full of
reminiscences that were easily
shared. Though the book is about
place � about 'where we live it is
also full of family, � full of words
that made me wish 1 had enough
skill to write as much to my own
family.
In 'To The Snow-walker
Makuck writes about his 68 year old
father who decided that he would
visit his wife who was ill and in the
hospital. He decided that he
wouldn't let the fact that the roads
were snowed under stop him, and so
he walked the 10 mile round trip tor
three consecutive davs:
? mill, Mr lold til thai .kilt ,pacr
H grt brni On fool, imo a xrourgr
Of wind, hr hikrd toward la hospital
rlvt mlln �a. Mom anvtsilrd
lor datt.
Where We I.ive has been publish-
ed by BOA Publications. BOA
specializes in poetry and publishes
well-established and new poets. Dr.
Makuck has been very happy with
BOA. "The editor at BOA is
himself a poet Dr. Makuck said
on Tuesday, "and we spent a couple
of days together in choosing poems
for this volume Makuck stated
that it would be virtually impossible
to get as much help from a major
publisher.
The Foreward to W here We Live
was written by pulitzer Prize-
winning poet, Louis Simpson, who
says of this volume, "The poetry is
in the building, the use of language,
intimate, exact, colorful. Each
poem has its own reality, its own
unexpected and moving truth
Dr. Makuck received his BA from
St. Francis College and a Ph. D.
from Kent State University. In
1974-1975 he was a Fulbright Lec-
turer on modern American poetry at
Tar River Poetry Editor
Successful With First
Collection Of Poetry
Universite de Savoie, in France, and
he has been teaching here at ECU's
Writing Program since 1976.
Where We Live is Dr. Makuck's
first collection of poetry. In 1981 he
published Breaking and Entering, a
collection of short stories. Three of
the short stories from that collection
received honorable mention in Best
Short Stories of '76, '80 and '81.
Makuck is also the editor of Tar
River Poetry, which is published
twice yearly by East Carolina
i
i
N. C. Dance Theatre Coming In January
The North Carolina Dance Theatre, dubbed "equally comfortable in ballet and modern dance will
perform at Hendrix Theatre on January 19, 1983. For ticket information, call 757-6611, ext. 266.
University.
Makuck began writing peotry as
an undergraduate and had a few
poems and stones published then.
He taught French to high school
students after college and did not
begin writing again until he began
working on his Ph. D. at Kent State
University when he was 29 years
old. Makuck and his wife were pre-
sent at the Kent State Killings in
1970, and one of the poems in this
volume, "The Commons is a
reflection on that experience.
Makuck told me on Tuesday that
he never took a creative writing
course. "Reading contemporary
poetry and fiction- have kept me
writing he said, "I never felt a
need to be around other writers
H here We Live is available at the
ECU Bookstore. I think it's a good
collection. Here's a poem from the
book:
Southern Snow
It Irarufurim thr ,trrrl and ard.
Rrnd u h bring rare Mill ,uff �nh ,lrrp.
' �alrh our inn jump off ihr porrh. disappear
Mmml with no mtmnn of wrt ool. aaaM
Down ihr nrtk Ihr furnarr ,htvrn on.
Mr di�o imo a drift, rollv liughv with a fnrnd
lor� akja ii.othing tnim Mill burn liar an angrl
Wr are �alkrfs again Morning , purr rrturrrclion
Office rlovd �r hrlp our rwighhon dig iiul
Nr lalk And �Hh no can in blur thr ,trrrl
Our liMraing nimn us further ihan r�rr
lomght morr BBana And ,lowl, Bn unhrarahlr
Mnrms A garagr mo in wilh Ihr �righi
Mil a.rrl' pollrd hand lurn, brink pkclum
tl ib� "�lv iiok Uua h�prmd before. r29.
rord Model A � all aaoaadral high, iiaanamlol.
Mr in frdoraa rlowa and poar with iioaam
caching a? how to lir with thb whllracu
Two m.irr da, Mas Ihrir laughlrr realli driighr
Wrrk, from aow. at the rnd of tliff ralnl, da.
Wild crablrrr prlah. as a kind of rrrngr
Will rill the air. whiltn ihr vigorous grau
And ihost lost momrni, will burn again. Iikr vnow
Dr Peter Makuck
Spring Free Flicks
Include Blockbusters
The Student Union Filmsom-
mittee recently released a -print:
semester lineup ol tree campus films
that includes the already, classic
Raiders of the lost rk and epic
historical tale Reds
The complete list, in
chronological order, includes Slur
Trek II: I lie Wrath r Khan
(January 6-8), 1900 (January 12).
Rocky III (Januarv 13-15), Das
Boot (Januarv 19). liesi I idle
M horehouse in Texas (January
20-22), Texas hainsan- Massacre
(Januarv 21, 22), Reds (Januarv 28.
29), Black Orpheus (February 2).
The World According To Carp
(February 4, 5). Rohin and
MarionThe Adventures of Rohin
Hood (February 9). Blade Runner
(February 11. 12), Diva (February
16). Poltergeist (February 17-19),
Mghtshift (February 25. 26). Evil
I nder the Sun Death on the
Site And Then There Here Sone
(February 2), Mad Max Road
Warrior (March 2). Oblomov
(March 16). Iron (March 17-19),
Picnic ' Hanging Rock (March
18-19). Diner (March 25, 26).
Satyricon Juliet of the Spirits (April
(S). Richard Pry or I ive on the
Sunset Strip (April 7-9), I ictor I t. -
tona (April 14-16), Quadrophenm
(April 15, 16) Mephisto (April 20).
My Tavorire Year (April 21-23).
Lotita Pretty Poison (April 2").
Raiders of the Tost Ark (April
28-30).
Ho, Ho; The Technological Age Effects Santa
By DAVID NORRIS
staff Wnirr
Techn.ogy, as everybody knows, is moving forward
at a re cntless pace. It is affecting nearly every aspect of
our nves, and Christmas is no exception. Children once
jreamed of finding electric trains or Barbie dolls under
the Christmas tree; now their dreams are more likely to
he ol home computers or rolls of quarters to take to
video game arcades.
One might wonder how this new revolution in
technology has affected things at Santa's workshop at
the North Pole. Santa Claus, who faces the two-edged
problem of givng presents to billions of people and
keeping the elf unemployment rate down, will probably
find today's technology very helpful.
For instance, think about the enormous intelligence
service run bv the North Pole. Santa Clause has to know
which boys and girls have been good (and will get home
computers and quarters) and which little brats have
been bad (and will get shoeboxes full of ashes.) That's a
task of surveillance that even the CIA, the FBI and the
KGB together couldn't begin to handle.
The answer to this problem is a computerized system
of television monitors, complete with satellite hookups.
(This system replaced an outmoded set up using a magic
mirror.) Once, logbooks were compiled listing the good
and bad deeds of the world's children, taking up untold
elf-hours of labor and filling up warehouses full of
papers. Now, this information is stored on microchips,
taking up only a fraction of the space.
The kinds of toys wanted by the children of today
have required sweeping changes in Santa's workshop.
Elves who once built hand-crafted toys have now been
re-trained to produce new high-tech toys like hand-
crafted video game cartridges. Many were laid off after
being replaced by machines, adding to the chronic pro
blem of elf unemployment.
Santa still keeps Rudolph and his reindeer hitched to
his sleigh, but they now enjoy a free ride prov ided bv die
addition of new supersonic jet engines. Alter all, it you
have to visit hundreds of milions of homes in one night,
you need all the speed you can get. Santa also had
a"Stealth" device installed in the sleigh after a harrow
ing run-in with two Mig fighter planes over Kiev a cou-
ple of years ago. (I'd hate to think about what those two
Russian pilots got for Christmas.)
Somehow, Santa Claus still manages to put billions ot
presents inside his sleigh. (I wish he could help me pack
when I move � I bet he could fit a carload of clothes,
furniture and other odds and ends into a cigar box.)
It's still traditional for children to leave some sort of
snack near the chimney for Santa, but remember that
Mrs cl � pui him on a sal' free lo calorie die'
I asi year, he �a- given millions ot cookies and glasses
ot milk, and it takes a while to work ott thai many
:aloi ies
By the way, don't despair it you live in a house
without a chimney. Since watching Star Trek Santa
developed a transporter machine so he can beam
down" from the sleigh This represents a great
breakthrough for Santa, who is really ted up with cen-
turies of jumping down dirty, narrow chimneys, to sav
nothing about climbing back up dirty, narrow
chimneys.
Finally, it is hoped that Santa Claus can make his gift-
ordering system more efficient. I recall manv times as a
Nee SANTA. Page 9
-4
We Are For True Freedom"
��4
Quaker Values Still Do Exist
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Wriirr
"We are not for names, nor man,
nor titles of Government, nor are we
for this party nor against the
otherbut we are for justice and
mercy and truth and peace and true
freedom, that these may be exalted
on our nation, and that goodness,
righteousness, meekness,
temperance, peace and unity with
God, and with one another, that
these things may abound Edward
Burrough, a 17th Century Quaker
(Society of Friends)
The above words appear along
side the letter head on stationary
from Quaker House, a military
counseling and peace education
center located smack in the middle
of Fayetteville, home of Fort Bragg,
the largest Army base in the world.
Quaker house, established in
1969, is the only full-time military
counseling center between
Washington, DC and Atlanta
Georgia. Its scope extends far
beyond just the person who works
in their Camp Lejeune Outreach
Program. They include Camp Le-
jeune � the world's second largest
Marine base � along with the many
other military bases in the area for
their work.
The story of the inception of
Quaker House is both one of suc-
cessful struggle to establish the
center and one of tragedy.
In the spring of 1969 a Fort Bragg
GI, Dean Holland, hitch-hiked to
the Chapel Hill Friends Meeting for
assistance in establishing some type
of peace center in the Fort Bragg
area. Soon, other Friends groups
from Raleigh, Durham and
Greensboro joined Chapel Hill and
Quaker House was born. Holland,
who recieved his discharge from the
Army as a conscientious objector �
the first "co" discharge ever
granted at Fort Bragg � soon took
over the duties of running Quaker
House. Holland was killed only a
few months later in a tragic New
Year's Eve automobile accident.
Since Hollands death several in-
dividuals and families have each
given several years out of their lives
in order to continue the efforts
begun when Holland hitch-hiked to
Chapel Hill.
Quaker House quickly became
the focal point for peace efforts and
opposition to United States involve-
ment in Vietnam in the Fayetteville
area. Anti-war rallies and marches
originated from Quaker House, and
its very existence became a con-
troversial subject locally. Three
days after a large anti-war
demonstration in May of 1970,
following telephone threats, the
Quaker House was firebombed. No
one was hurt, but the building was
destroyed. As a result, for several
months the meetings for worship
were held on the front lawn of the
burned out building. The present
Quaker House building was ac-
quired that September.
By the end of U.S. involvement in
Vietnam, the role of Quaker House
had changed from a focal point for
"massive anti-war activity" to a
witness for Quaker love, simplicity,
and non violence.
"Quaker House is an outgrowth
of the Society of Friends Peace
Testimony said Present Quaker
House director Bob Gosney. He
noted that Quakers, a traditional
peace church, inlcude non-
participation in wars, equality of all
people, and simplicity of lifestyles in
their peace testimony. "We try to
reflect those things in the work that
we do Gosney told the East
Carolinian.
Today Quaker House remains a
witness for individual rights, peace,
and human dignity. "Our program
can be divided into two main areas:
military counseling and peace
education Gosney said.
"Military counseling deals with
people having problems related to
their being in the military Gosney
continued "in some cases we just
provide information from a non-
military source. In other cases we
work closely with the person involv-
ed, giving information, counseling,
and support to them
Gosney also noted that they also
do work with the family members of
clients. "People come to us with all
sorts of problems, such as
discharges, conscientious objection,
getting their rights and making com-
plaints, Gosney said. They also help
people with procedures, personal
problems in ajusting to military life,
and they make referrals to civilian
lawyers and doctors.
"We often work with people
whose problems have resulted in
their leaving the military in an
unauthorized way (Absence without
leave AWOL or Unauthorized
Leave UL), Gosney said. "Most of
our work is with active duty per-
sonel, particularly at Fort Bragg and
Camp Lejeune he continued
"although we have worked with
See OFFERED, Page 8
IABm �
jjmW g
js
Mi
OP
s i -wf�
�r9
�i
?
m&
� ��
Soviet Orchestra Replaces Orpheus
The internationally acclaimed Soviet Emigre Orchestra,
under the leadership of I aar Gosman (pictured above), will
perform on February 10, 1983, replacing cancelled chamber
orchestra Orpheus, originally scheduled for February 7 in
Hendrix Theatre.
1
I
:
If





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 9, 1982
Counseling Offered
Continued From Page 7
people from every branch of the
military through out the world He
noted that often other military
counselors will make referals to
Quaker House from U.S. bases in
many parts of the world.
Mac Legerton is the part time
staff person who works primarily in
the Camp Lejeune area.He is also
the official Prison Visitation and
Support visitor for those who are
confined in the Camp Lejeune Brig.
Prison visitation and support is
another aspect of the work of
Quaker House.
Both Gosney and Legerton have
religous education in their
backgrounds. Gosney is a recent
graduate of the Earlham School of
Religion in Richmond, Indiana. He
received a masters of ministry
degree with an emphasis in social
ministry. Legerton is a graduate of
Union Theological Seminary in New
York City and is a licensed pastor in
the United Church of Christ. He is
also on the staff of Robeson County
Clergy and Laity Concerned, an
inter-religious organization working
on justice and peace concerns.
Gosney's interest in the military
and peace concerns follows from his
time as a conscientius objector serv-
ing in alternative service from 1969
to 1971. He also taught mentally
retarded children in public schools.
He resides at Quaker House with his
wife Barbara nad their daughter
Gwendy. In addition to the regular
work of military counseling and
other peace concerns, Bob has been
involved in the area of draft
registration and the question of
military service. He is particularly
concerned that young people be
given the opportunity to assess how
their emerging values relate to the
question of their participation in the
military. "When we counsel an in-
dividual, we counsel them x a per-
son Gosney said, "we don't try to
make all our councilees(sic) into
conscientius objectors. We consel
them in their area of difficulty
Legerton was in ROTC during his
college years. After having to carry
his weapon in a Christmas parade,
he requested and was granted
disenrollment from ROTC in light
of conflicts between his conscience
nad military training. He is par-
ticularly concerned about the need
he sees for a "more visible commit-
ment and witness " to peace with
justice from our religious com-
munities.
"Our peace education program is
harder to define Gosney said.
"We try to be a presence for peace
in the community. Much of our
energy now is involved in suppor-
ting a Fayetteville Area Nuclear
Freeze Campaign
Quaker House is providing staff
time, literature, and office resources
to the Campaign. As an existing
"peace agency Quaker House is
helping to provide the base from
which the Freeze Campaign is
building.
Another aspect of their peace
educational work is draft counsel-
ing. "We are not very active in this
area at this time, but we do have the
resources to become involved in a
more active way Gosney said
"Our draft counseling program
seeks to move beyond giving infor-
mation to potential registrants and
is centered around questions of
values and conscience formation
that are brought by the potentional
registrant to the situation
Gosney noted that much of
Quaker Houses' Peace Education
Program results from our just
"being here They provide
resources to the community that are
not available locally from other
places. "Because of my seminary, I
am concerned to work with the
religious communities in the area
Gosney said. "By being here, I have
been available to attend, work with,
and speak to the local Ministerial
Association, and to serve as a
resource person for a Presbytry
Peacemaking Task force for the
Presbyterian Churches in the area
On several occasions Gosney has
spoken at forums and meetings on
such peace related topics as nuclear
arms and disarmament, the draft,
the concept of peace, and others.
Gosney said he's making an attempt
to have the peace education pro-
gram respond to the community
with peacemaking skills and
resources that Quaker House can
provide.
Quaker HOuse also publishes a
quarterly newsletter to keep its
members informed of their actions.
Their recent fail edition ran a story
titled "Recruitment and Retention
in Bad Times" which pointed out
that because of the difficult
economic times, that military
enlistments were on the rise. "With
the national unemployment rate ap-
proaching ten percent and oppor-
tunities for education and training
becoming fewer, the military ap-
pears to be the only way to go for
many people the article reported.
The story also pointed out that re-
enlistments were also up because of
the economy. "Many re-enlist
because they feel they have no
choice continued the article. "As
one Special Forces sargeant put it: 'I
guess I could work pumping gas or
being a mercenary, but that's about
it. I've talked guys out of getting out
by asking them how a dumb infan-
try soldier is going to get a job when
people with Ph. Ds can't find
work
Recently Quaker House began a
new aspect of their military counsel-
ing program. They received a grant
to write and publish a series of
short, easy to read booklets on a
variety of topics that they have
found to be useful for peole who are
both consider,ng enlistment or are
already on active duty. The booklets
should be ready some time this spr-
ing.
Anyone wishing to get in touch
with Quaker House or be included
on their mailing list can write:
Quaker House, 223 Hillside Ave.
T
HANDMADE
FILMS
Presents
TIME
BANDITS
they didn't
make history,
1981 TWfc HANDMADE FILM PARTNERSHIP 4 HANDMADE FILMS VY
ALLRICHTSRESERVED Thru fAVCO EMBASSyIpiCTURES
ThursFriSat
Hendrix Theatre
!�
-
mm
123 E. 5th Str.
HAIR GALLERY
752-7483
TUESDAY �
PIZZA BUFFET � $2.79 all you can eat � 5-9
LADIES'NITE with
BRUCE FRYE
Ladies' Admitted FREE � Free draft for the ladies.
WEDNESDAY �
SALAD BAR SPECIAL � $2.15 all you can eat � 5-9
EXAM JAMS NITELY � 10-1
with Happy Hour Prices
Bring your SRA card and get l FREE draft.
236 Greenville Blvd.
(Behind Tipon Annex)
335-2076
Holiday Special
Haircuts
$C00
Reg. $7.50







































mmrq
B CMflSTMAS SPECIAL PBC�S
raw NOW Till. CMRfSTKAS
AMAHS 45 BL11CD
� � 70t 11-00 TIL
AtWSSlcH.60
I
com EA0.Y
'We have T-Shirts on sale'

































We Perform
MIRA CLESU!
COPIES
�Automatic front & back copies
�Automatic collation
�Automatic Xerox reductions
PRINTING
�Fine quality stationery
�Business cards
�Brochures, promotional aids
�Commercial art & design
TYPING �s�ance
�Word processing capabilities!
�Computerized typesetting
�Professional resumes
Two locations to better serve you II11
Downtown:
(Next to ECU)Pitt Plaza:
In the Georgetown ShopsNext to Record Bar
758-2400756-8550
9-7 MF9-9 MF
9-2 Sat.9-4 Sat.
mimnmim�iiM�Tinill.Mfri
Tar Landing Seafood
Rest&ur&nt
a 105 Airport Road Greenville, N.C
ALL YOU
CAN EAT
Good on Thursday
Shrimp
Oysters ������!
Flounder K9
TrOUt only
SanfadwhFr.�e�iFriaaorBaka�l��i,Co�aSla. llrtMM
Mntor Sunday thru Thursday UMA.m9MPm
Hd�r�: Fridayand Saturday 11AM toi�� M
105 Airport Rom Qr�nm; N.C
7584)327
r Ha'Nbairtha
an. Sec
own� antoyalbMj
"��'�warn Iron
ssBssssssnBnssssssss
tFadHiMAvalabte 758-0327
Herring, Manag
A
A

f
-
�'
Imp
�i�. ��. i
t
Back
Crowi
Areiht
actty. But b
the first Gr
The Back D
rock a:
what ii oui
the late Jim
perform livel
The con eel
siderable pr(
(in exchange
Attici Aa-
dience I
The t� . r I
to a
rece
from some (
S m
when ct
the
espc
print ol M
was yesterdal
flashec
aud
psy
Ba.K i) �
I
Dor
ihc eai �
: K
which The
onto ttx j
with si
meni Mi
ngei
poetic moni
theatrics and
dience
decent ep.
Vet. in I
mance Hak I
troer:ed
ackno�
presence in
Morrison mai
wa
Me Two 1
S dfter" Thl
1. minute
nor.
p�mt H
from the v
ment
somew
A-
grOUT- !
. � -
Frog Blue S
and ol cou
End 5Mai
terwc
mance
Hakm
ma:
dun

as �.
TAKE
1






1
ES
re
xuxonxq



�acEs
00
Til
ale'
i
v
IC M
:Oy i fine
I' "IC
127
Back Doors Mimic The Doors
Crowd Accepts With Enthusiasm
fHE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 9 i�; 9
B STEVE DEAR
M.lf Hriiti
Are the Doors back? Well, not ex-
actly. But last Iuesda night, with
the tirst Cireemille appearance ot
1 he Back Doors at the Attic, sixties
rock and roll tans received a taste ot
what n would have been like to see
the late Jim Morrison and company
pei form he
1 he concert, which received con
Mderable promotion from VYMB
(in exchange foi a giant from I he
Attic) was a success as far as au-
dience appreciation is concerned.
1 he two seai old group performed
to a packed house and continuously
received yells ot encouragement
from some obvious Doors fanatics.
Some ot those screams came
when certain images were Hashed on
the backdrop behind the band.
especially when a black and white
print ot Morrison, who's birthday
was yesterday, was intermittently
flashed. Throughout the concert the
audience was bombarded with
psvchedehc images. In tact, the
Back Doors used the same unique
visual ettects system used b The
Doors on one ot their last tours in
the earl 70's.
Alter an extended musical in-
duction to the blues classic
" ho )o You I ove? a tune with
which The Doors opened their con-
s, lead singer Jim Hakin walked
onto the stage to begin a perfor-
mce similar to a one-man play
th sixties rock and roll accom-
paniment Morrison, the dead lead
id Ivric isl tor the original
vingc
D " -
presence
M orri soi n ly
wa many urn
I he first time
lown tor his main
wild stage
alogues with his au-
e arrested foi in-
re and obscenity).
lay night's perfor-
seemed to be m-
exteni ot not
e a u d i o ik e' s
1 lot course.
have been the same
I don't know ).
1 saw him make a
d gesture I the audience was
en closing version ot
"I .A. Y oman
T he tirst ot their two sets included
such Doors classics as "Riders on
the Stoi m "I ouch Me "Love
Me Fwo I nne and "I n known
is dier I hex closed the set with a
? minute synthesizei laden rendi-
� lit My Fire" the only
- the show w here lhe sti ayed
�� oi iginal Doors' arrange-
I heir version ot that tune was
- hat disappointing.
v.ct a 4 minute break, the
iroup returned to pla lesser known
ldies-but-goodies such as "Peace
Frog Blue Sunday " land Ho
nd ot course the ominous "The
l-nd 5Maybe "shocking" is a bet-
ter word to describe Hakin's perfor-
mance ot That last song, tor attei
Hakin reappeared tatter one ot his
my briel visits to the backstage
during the concert) through the
ads ot thick white smoke that
was pumped into the stage area, he
was wearing two real, live hards on
his arms! The crowd went wild. 1 he
hards didn't seem to care and
clung, frozen still, to his arms while
he finished the song.
The music, a the total of 15 songs
(plus the encore of "Roadhouse
Blues"), was itselt amazingly ac-
curate with the possible exception of
then drawn out version of "Light
My lire Bob Welch's drumming
was consistently precise. Steve
Bishop's guitar tone and Mark
Hart man's keyboard playing were
almost indistinguishable trom
(original Doors) Robbie Kreiger and
Ra Manareks' innovative com-
bination of slide guitar and electric
organ. Although the Doors did not
incorporate a bassist into their live
performances, Bob Zivney's accom-
paniment on the bass proved to be
an asset in getting the music to
sound like the original recordings.
Concerning Jim Hakin's perfor-
mance, I was rather skeptical ot the
ability of someone to do a "good"
(as oposed to rediculous) imitation
oi Jim Morrison on stage. However.
in mv opinion, Jim Hakin, the
group's founder, did a "good" job
in imitating 'The Lizard King A
times he sounded tired . but all-in-
all he pulled it oft.
So what does the future hold tor
this group of talented imitators?
Well, in Hartman's words, "As
long as people enjoy it, we'll keep
playing. 1 heir music is still alive and
fresh, even though some ot it is 15
vears old Hakin told me atter the
show that the group may record
Doors-oriented material. Also,
Hartman told the audience that they
plan on returning to Cireemille in
the tuture and, judging trom then
applause, they were thrilled.
That's not all, Morrison's sister
and brother-in-law are expected to
ask Hakin to play Morrison in an
upcoming Morrison biography with
the band playing on the soundtrack.
"It all goes well we'll be in the
movies next year Hartman told
me.
1 recommend experiencing 1 he
Back Doors to anyone who likes
1 he Doors or simply anyone who
enjoys exciting, different music
that's1 hank Clod) not the tvpical
"corporate rock" which so often
pollutes radio airways and rock
nightclubs these davs. Watching the
Back Doors was indeed a treat
don't miss them when thev return.
Santa
Continued From Page 7
child when 1 visited Santa at a local
shopping center and plainly told
him what I wanted for Christmas.
But, every Christmas, there would
be a sieable number of the wrong
presents scattered around the den.
(Returning clothes that don't tit.
etc to the North Pole is difficult,
to say the least.) Hopefully, some
more efficient computers can help
him keep his gift orders straightened
out.
ACREAMW
752 5878
K K f 1 l l l 1 l l l
4r Mr



���� IKe3Hk4Slel l le l
Announcing
Happy Hour
15
Discount
Open
12 12
Daily
I AKK A REFRESHING BREAK FROM YOUR STUDIES!
Announcing a 15ro Discount
Between 10 p.m. and midnight only
( ome and sit A relax, or if you need it
fast we 'II have an extra employee to serve you!
GOOD I L C A ON EXAMS
(Discount is good only Dec 9th thru 16th)
758 6264
Rivergjte Shopping Center
Mon Fn 10 t Sat 10 6
We're Here To
Serve You.
For Something
Unique in Gift
Giving w
Hi
dow
eart
NUTURAI F000S GROCtl
Wooden and Silk Boxes
Handmade Baakets
Imported Soapa
Delightful Potpourris
� Silk Sea Sponges
Pottery by Dorie Paul
Lota of Stocking Stuffere
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASSRINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLDS. SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA& CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
,oi RINC
VV �e�V SALES CO.
OF � sl� �0 (-e
401 S. EVANS ST open 9 30 s 30mon,sat.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 7523866
"YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
OPEN24HOURS DR IVE THR U Wl NDOW
Ribs
are
now
available
all
hrs.
SPECIAL:
Rib or Fish Dinner with
fries, slaw or hush puppies
ONLY $2.99 for Ribs
L
1.99 for Fish
Fish
Special
IS
available
on
U-9
OLD FASHIONED HOMEMADE
BREAD PUDDING.
only
25C
1011 Charles Street � 752-1373 1 Block from Campus
Coov' q' 982
K'oge' Sa o"
Quantity R.nnts Rese'efl
None So i fo Deal's
ADvEO-iSEO TEM POuO
Eac o �ese acer �eo 'es s -e
3u'�a 'o t� '��d �� a- � l
e n eac Kroger Sa on e�:er'
as spec � ca�W oted m t.s ma 11 e
do 'u" ooi o an t9rn �e ?"�'
oo you' cO'ce o' a cooa'ao e
em h�r aa lab'e reec "5 the
samp sa gs ?� a -aceco h
e�' I e �Ou to purchase -�
ao�"i��o ilatn a? �� ao��'ij�o
r�"ce ifhin 3C days
600 Greenville Blvd Greenville
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight
Open Sunday 9am to 9 p m
ianiirc.u'jtr4-4Hi'1
T-Jt-m
&ft.�
mm
I I I l : t
. 1 I
FROM THE DELI
ALL WHITE MEAT
Gourmet
Turkey Breast
$300
KROGER
2 Lowfat Milk
SAVE
20e
KROGER FRESH
Orange Juice
99
AUNT JEMIMA
ASSORTED VARIETIES
FROZEN
KROGER
Peanut
Butter
$419
3-02. I
10-Oz.
Box
STOKELY
Fruit
Cocktail
18-oz.
Jar
COST CUTTER
Paper Towels
17-Ct.
Can
Jumbo
Roll
v GOLDEN RIP
Bananas
VAC PAC
COUNTRY BRAND
Sliced Bacon
$1
� � i
sJi

' 1





'

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
DECEMBER V IV82
Page 10
Wolfpack Hand Pirates Second Loss
By KKN BOLTON
taststant Spora I Jui
The N.C. State Wolfpack, led by
freshman guard Ernie Myers, won a
hard-fought 57-49 decision over the
ECU Pirates Wednesday night.
Myers, who was named to virtual-
ly every prep All-America team this
past year, scored 15 points and
grabbed eight rebounds. His clutch
play down the stretch helped secure
the victory for the Wolfpack.
It took a strong effort by Myers
and the rest of the State squad to
overcome a determined Pirate team.
ECU freshman forward Johnny
Edwards scored ECU'S first 11
points, and at one time was outscor-
ing the entire Wolfpack team, 11-5.
Included in the outpour was a high-
Hying slam dunk after a steal with a
little over four minutes gone.
But N.C. State came storming
back in front of 11,500 very en-
thusiastic fans. Thurl Bailey scored
on two turnaround jumpers in the
lane and Dereck Whittenburg sank a
Photo bf STANLEY LEAKY
ECU'S Johnny Edwards blocks layup attempt by N.C. State's Sidney Lowe
20-foot bomb to even the score at
11-11.
The rest of the first half saw the
lead swing back and forth from one
team to another. A layup and a
dunk by Myers put the Wolfpack up
at halftime, 26-24.
N.C. State coach Jim Valvano
made a few defensive changes at
halftime in an attempt to stop Ed-
wards.
"What we decided to do was not
to front him and allow him to catch
the ball said Valvano. "He's such
a strong player, that even though we
were fronting him with a taller
player (6-11 Thurl Bailey), he did a
really good job of getting position
In the second half, Edwards was
almost ineffective. After going
seven-for-eight in the first 20
minutes, he didn't make a shot in
five attempts in the final 20
ECU head coach Charlie Har-
rison said that Edwards' second-
half play might have had something
to do with his being a freshman.
"Johnny's going to be a really
fine player stated Harrison. "He
lost his concentration a little bit in
the second half, but you've got to
remember that he's just a
freshman
Harrison also credited forward
Charles Green with setting up many
of Edwards' baskets with good
passes.
The Wolfpack used the aggressive
offensive arid defensive play of
Myers, Bailey and point-guard
Sidney Lowe to pull away in the se-
cond half.
Lowe finished with 11 points and
five assists, while Bailey contributed
nine points and six blocked shots.
Dereck Whittenburg, who came into
the game averaging 21 points per
game, only scored 10 as he was four-
for-13 from the field.
For the Pirates, Edwards was sup-
ported by Barry Wright with 15
points; Charles Green, 7 points;
Tony Robinson, four points and six
assists.
Bruce Peartree, who only played
half the game due to foul trouble,
was held to only one field goal and
four total points. Peartree was
averaging 17 points after the first
three games.
After the game, Valvano was
quick to praise the ECU squad.
"They are going to beat a lot of peo-
ple this year; I can assure you of
that he said. "A tremendous
amount of credit has to be given to
coach Harrison for the job he's
done in such a short time
As a team, East Carolina is
shooting one of the highest percen-
tages ever for a Pirate club. Cur-
rently, the Pirates are hitting 53.8
per-cent from the field. The school
record is less than 50 per-cent.
Johnny Edwards (71.7 per-cent) and
Tony Robinson (68.7 per-cent) are
the individual leaders.
Last night's game marked the
14th meeting of ECU and N.C.
State. The Wolfpack has been vic-
torious in all meetings. Last year's
63-53 game was the closest ever until
last night.
The big problem area for Pirate
teams for years has been free throw
shooting. After the exhibition game
and the Duke game, it seemed like
the same story again. But the Pirates
have improved and are now
shooting 72.8 per-cent from the line.
"We had a little talk after those
first two games explained Har-
rison. "A meeting of minds if you
will. I trust we will have to say
nothing more, as really, free throw
shooting is just a mental thing
One factor that hurt the Pirates in
the State game was the loss of
reserve guard Curt Vanderhorst,
who sprained his ankle in Monday's
practice.
Junior John Williams has been
added to ECU's roster. He's a 6-1,
190-pound guard from Easly, S.C.
Originally, Williams went to
Georgia Tech on a basketball grant-
in-aid, then transferred to Piedmont
Junior College and this year to ECU
on a football grant-in-aid.
After the game, Harrison com-
mented on the play of his team so
far. "We knew coming into this
game that we were going to have to
execute said Harrison. "We're
currently doing some good things,
but we just have to be more consis-
tent. We're stilt a step slow defen-
sively
Coming into the game, the
Wolfpack was averaging 101
points per game and ranked 18th in
the country. But they had their
hands full with the Pirates.
"Offensively, they took us out of
everything we wanted to do stated
Valvano. "That was a dynamite,
well-coached, well-disciplined club
we saw out there. 1 will be shocked
it they don't beat a whole lot. ol
folks before this season is over
ECU'S next game is in the Bayou
Classic Dec. 17-18 in Lafayette, LA.
The field includes Southwest Loui-
siana, ECU's first-round opponent
and a NCAA qualifier last year.
Pfwto by STANLEY LEARY
Pirate forward Charles Green maneuvers around Wolfpack center Thurl
Bailey for the basket.
TracksieFs To Her Better Than Ever This Year
JOEL SCALES
When comparing the 1982-83
East Carolina University women's
track team to last year's contingent,
second-year head coach Pat
McGuigan described this year's
group as being more talented, more
experienced and possessing more
depth.
The 1982 track team will get their
season underway this Saturday,
when they travel to the Holiday In-
vitational at George Mason Univer-
sity. Fairtax, Va.
McGuigan acquired some of the
best talent from the state of North
Carolina and in the nation, in-
cluding sprinter Regina Kent from
Jamaica High School in New York.
Kent, who had an amazing list of in-
dividual honors as a prepster, won
the 55-meter dash in the Colgate
Women's Games in 1982. North
Carolina all-stater Delphine Mabry,
possibly the best women's athlete in
the state last year, brings an im-
pressive list of credentials to ECU,
including honorable mention all-
America last season. Unlike last
year, the team will have more depth
and experience to compete in the
"team category" in the "big"
meets.
"I'm very optimistic and 1 think
we're going places says
McGuigan. "1 think people will
recognize that we do have a good
program
McGuigan, whose credentials in-
clude coaching AIAW national
qualifiers, one national champion
and one American record hlder, has
only two returning tracksters in
sophomores Liz Graham and
Davena Cherry. But with an
outstanding field of 12 freshmen,
Coach McGuigan is not complain-
ing.
"They're getting used to sprinting
and the girls are responding well to
my training assureeds McGuigan.
"We'll be doing more weight train-
ing this year since we do have ex-
cellent facilities and personnel
Last year McGuigan had a goal of
at least one team member qualifying
for the nationals. Though they fell
short of that goal, McGuigan feels
she has the talent to qualify not one,
but two relay teams in the 4 X 100
and 4 X 400.
One change in this year's program
will be the addition of competing in
field events. High Point native
Kathy Leeper will be a definite plus
in the long jump and Amy Bowen, a
product of South Stokes, will shot-
put, along with throwing the discus.
"Amy is working real hard and
her best event will be the shot
McGuigan said.
McGuigan is also optimistic
about distance runners Sharon Bar-
ths and Rene Felder. Both will com-
pete in the 1500 and Bartha will also
run the 3000.
Adding depth will be Kim Boyles
(200. 4O0), Carolyn Carr (100,
Relavs), Tricia Fowler (400. 800,
Relays), Teressa Hudson (100. 200.
Relays), Wendy Lower (200. 400),
and Elaine Perry (400, hurdles).
The Lady Pirate schedule is a
challenging one. which teatu res
world-class competition on several
occasions. The biggest indoor meet
competition-wise, unfolds on
January 14 and 15; the Eastman
Kodak Invitational.
"The best in the country will be
there and it will provide good ex-
perience McGuigan said. "1 think
we'll do well and we should be able
to place in a lot of meets. We'll be
much stronger than last vear
ECU Men's Track Team To Compete I Pirates Spend Break On The Road
In George Mason Invite Saturday
ED NICKLAS
Vat! W rilcr
"We have more talent this year
than in any previous year said
ECU track coach Bill Carson, refer-
ring to this season's men's track
team.
The Pirates begin their indoor
schedule Saturday when they travel
to Fairfax, Va. to compete in the
George Mason Invitational.
The 12-team meet will include
such schools as Navy, Maryland,
and Richmond.
The ECU squad, which consists
of 178 freshman, one sophomore,
two juniors and one senior is one of
the youngest but most talented team
that ECU has seen in years. "We
have more depth than we've had in
five or six years commented Car-
son, who is in his 16th year at ECU.
"However, we do have a very, very
young team with few veterans.
"I am optimistic, but it will take
most of the season for them to
mature. We should have a respec-
table team
According to Carson, the new
talent came from a crop of N.C.
high school recruits that were con-
sidered the best in North Carolina
history. Two of the recruits signed
by ECU were high school all-
Americas (See Related Article).
"The athletic program here knew
that last year was one of the best
yars for N.C. high school track
Carson said, "so with some kids
leaving our program for different
reasons last year, we consolidated
our funds for the 1982 season to
recruit the most talented pro-
spects
Among the talented members of
the team are Carleton Bell in the 400
meter, Ray Dickerson in the 500 and
600 meters, Keith Clarke in the 400
meter and Clint Harris in the
55-meter dash.
ECU is in its second year as a
member of the 1C4AS Conference,
which consists of 107 schools and
according to Carson, it is the oldest
and largest conference in the coun-
try
"We've put a whole lot of em-
phasis on the conference Carson
said, "such as trying to do as well as
we can in point scoring. In time, I
think we can crack the top 10 in the
conference
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
Although most students are
anxiously awaiting a cozy,
Christmas holiday vacation at
home, the East Carolina basket-
ball teams will be spending much
of their break on the road.
After this Saturday's home
game against Appalachian State,
the Lady Pirates will head to
Indiana for a bout with the
Fighting Irish on Dec. 30. Notre
Dame is now 2-2. But Head
Coach Cathy Andruzzi is only
taking one game at a time � with
Appalachian now in the
spotlight.
The Mountaineers are led by
5-9, senior guard Kay Hampton,
who is Appalachian's leading
scorer with a 12.4 gamepoint
average. Senior Forward Susan
Cameron will also pose as a
threat to the Pirates. The 6-0
starter is averaging 7.2 points per
game, while her teammate,
sophomore Meana Cusimano is
pumping in 8.8 points per game
and grabbing 8.2 rebounds. Ap-
palachian State lost to N.C.
State, 91-47, last week, but An-
druzzi won't be taking them
lightly.
"They are big and they have
good scoring punch from Kay
Hampton and Susan Cameron
she said. "I think you'll see a
good game Saturday
After a trip to Notre Dame, the
Pirates will pack up and move on
to Western Kentucky to take on
the Lady Toppers. Belmont Col-
lege (Jan. 4) and Cincinatti (Jan.
6) are the next two stops.
Despite a grueling schedule.
the Pirates will certainly have
enough chances to improve over
the break � something Andruzzi
is happy about.
"We have five people playing
different positions because of our
lack of depth, she said. "This
week, and after the break, we'll
look forward to working with the
kids individually. I think you'll
see the bench contribute more
after the holidays
See BUGS, Page 11
Athletes On All-America List
This year's track co-captains: Kevin Clarke and Carlton Bcil.
HORACE McCORMACK
Suff Writer
East Carolina University
freshman Chris Brooks and Nathan
McCorkle were recently named high
school track all-Americas. Brooks
was selected by the High School
Federation checklist and by Track
And Field News. McCorkle was
chosen by the High School Federa-
tion checklist.
Brooks was selected first-team all-
America for his incredible perfor-
mances in the long and triple jump
events. Brooks' 25-foot 9:inch jump
during high school at Raleigh
Broughton was only half an inch off
world record-holder Carl Lewis' na-
tional high school record.
Brooks, a 6-3, 170-pounder, was
also an all-America in the triple
jump. He jumped 50 feet in last
summer's National High School
traack meet, which was only a
quarter of an inch off the National
High School record. Brooks had
also triple jumped 50 feet 6 inches in
the Regional Junior Olympics,
which would have given him the na-
tional record, but the meet was
unofficial.
Although Brooks received his all-
America honors in the field events,
he holds the state record of 47.3 in
the 400 meters nad was a member of
the national record-holding mile-
relay team, anchoring them to a
3:12.0 winning time.
Consequently, Brooks had never
jumped until his senior year at
Broughton. Brooks, who was also a
basketball standout, had no idea
that he would be receiving a track
scholarship.
"I worked hard every season try-
ing to earn a basketball scholarship,
but whenever track season came
around, everyone forgot about me
Sec COACH, Page 11
Cla
PKRS
ro �lte�
I tl p1 KAMI
SAM STAFt-
CONG�TJL1
��� rw
ZLT D t-
a�a
MEit CHBI
taMvas tir w
ne .o'�l down
M
me p� .
are e Ml Drnf
PP" � I
� as m(t O.
mrf Tiimi
pea
ME" 6 DE i
,OV �' .
iac
�OV S �
Ne� � M
�TU N
ttt . r
mf-
wtic �
�ise � A
'�� Bar
Toir
iWptl
an r'
�.C�
M.4 rl r-
� a -ns i o I
dinr" p
l�fr I
mm i
mimof (s �
lyil
iioriom
�. SS Goo
CKfiS'mas l -
s�,SS P
are
Be �
son- -
VfMM -
B j
(ETH Mfc - �
THE S�VEfc'
SIDE OF BE
MORE TMAH
E V EM be:
v IKE
DEAME -��
mane a �
for It
scar neais oM
L s oor �
HA v E,
RE A
G
V
4
k.mr'jjy
� � .r
�4






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
DECEMBER V IS82
Page 10
Wolfpack Hand Pirates Second Loss
B RUN BOLTON
VMsiant Sp-
. UlU'C
Ihe N.C. State Wolfpack, led by
freshman guard Ernie Myers, won a
hard-fought 57-49 decision over the
ECU Pirates Wednesday night.
Myers, who was named to virtual-
ly every prep All-America team this
past year, scored 15 points and
grabbed eight rebounds. His clutch
play down the stretch helped secure
the victory tor the Wolfpack.
It took a strong effort by Myers
and the rest of the State squad to
overcome a determined Pirate team.
ECU freshman forward Johnny
Edwards scored ECU's first 11
points, and at one time was outscor-
ing the entire Wolfpack team, 11-5.
Included in the outpour was a high-
Hying slam dunk after a steal with a
little over four minutes gone.
But N.C. State came storming
back in front of 11,500 very en-
thusiastic fans. Thurl Bailey scored
on two turnaround jumpers in the
lane and Dereck Whittenburg sank a
Photo tn STANLEY LEAHY
ECU'S Johnny Edwards blocks layup attempt by N.C. State's Sidney Lowe
20-foot bomb to even the score at
11-11.
The rest of the first half saw the
lead swing back and forth from one
team to another. A layup and a
dunk by Myers put the Wolfpack up
at halftime, 26-24.
N.C. State coach Jim Valvano
made a few defensive changes at
halftime in an attempt to stop Ed-
wards.
"What we decided to do was not
to front him and allow him to catch
the ball said Valvano. "He's such
a strong player, that even though we
were fronting him with a taller
player (6-11 Thurl Bailey), he did a
really good job of getting position
In the second half, Edwards was
almost ineffective. After going
seven-for-eight in the first 20
minutes, he didn't make a shot in
five attempts in the final 20
ECU head coach Charlie Har-
rison said that Edwards' second-
half play might have had something
to do with his being a freshman.
"Johnny's going to be a really
fine player stated Harrison. "He
lost his concentration a little bit in
the second half, but you've got to
remember that he's just a
freshman
Harrison also credited forward
Charles Green with setting up many
of Edwards' baskets with good
passes.
The Wolfpack used the aggressive
offensive ahd defensive play of
Myers, Bailey and point-guard
Sidney Lowe to pull away in the se-
cond half.
Lowe finished with 11 points and
five assists, while Bailey contributed
nine points and six blocked shots.
Dereck Whittenburg, who came into
the game averaging 21 points per
game, only scored 10 as he was four-
for-13 from the field.
Eor the Pirates, Edwards was sup-
ported by Barry Wright with 15
points; Charles Green, 7 points;
Tony Robinson, four points and six
assists.
Bruce Peartree, who only played
half the game due to foul trouble,
was held to only one field goal and
four total points. Peartree was
averaging 17 points after the first
three games.
After the game, Valvano was
quick to praise the ECU squad.
"They are going to beat a lot of peo-
ple this year; I can assure you of
that he said. "A tremendous
amount of credit has to be given to
coach Harrison for the job he's
done in such a short time
As a team, East Carolina is
shooting one of the highest percen-
tages ever for a Pirate club. Cur-
rently, the Pirates are hitting 53.8
per-cent from the field. The school
record is less than 50 per-cent.
Johnny Edwards (71.7 per-cent) and
Tony Robinson (68.7 per-cent) are
the individual leaders.
Last night's game marked the
14th meeting of ECU and N.C.
State. The Wolfpack has been vic-
torious in all meetings. Last year's
63-53 game was the closest ever until
last night.
The big problem area for Pirate
teams for years has been free throw
shooting. After the exhibition game
and the Duke game, it seemed like
the same story again. But the Pirates
have improved and are now
shooting 72.8 per-cent from the line.
"We had a little talk after those
first two games explained Har-
rison. "A meeting of minds if you
will. I trust we will have to say
nothing more, as really, free throw
shooting is just a mental thing
One factor that hurt the Pirates in
the State game was the loss of
reserve guard Curt Vanderhorst,
who sprained his ankle in Monday's
practice.
Junior John Williams has been
added to ECU's roster. He's a 6-1,
190-pound guard from Easly, S.C.
Originally, Williams went to
Georgia Tech on a basketball grant-
in-aid, then transferred to Piedmont
Junior College and this year to ECU
on a football grant-in-aid.
After the game, Harrison com-
mented on the play of his team so
far. "We knew coming into this
game that we were going to have to
execute said Harrison. "We're
currently doing some good things,
but we just have to be more consis-
tent. We're still a step slow defen-
sively
Coming into the game, the
Wolfpack was averaging 101.5
points per game and ranked 18th in
the country. But they had their
hands full with the Pirates
"Offensively, they took us out of
everything we wanted to do stated
Valvano. "That was a dynamite,
well-coached, well-disciplined club
we aw out there. I will be shocked
it they don't beat a whole lot ol
tulks before this season is over
ECU's next game is in the Bavou
Classic Dec. 17-18 in Lafayette. 1
The field includes Southwest Loui-
siana, ECU's first-round opponent
and a NCAA qualifier last year.
PftOto By STANLEY LEAHY
Pirate forward Charles Green maneuver around Wolfpack center Thurl
Bailey for the basket.
Cla
PIRS
TO �lTtB
� 2 bt m
SAM STiM
CON&S
to1 o 0'e' - .
kft�� rOv COvfrC
ZLT O fe-
mmt
MEBft-
wer-
mt�M i m �
tne -
MX MtuiN - J
�� p��e��t�-J
�PP-
�MM MNMt 0.
m . .
pt�f
Prwtc Pc�
t � -DE
�r f .
�CMJ -
�wc �
�C� re
fOv I
Nt� - .
ATTEN1 �-
� . -
mrr
-
- -

f �
mr
kact .?� ��
v �
DM I -q t �? '
'
MMl i
me �
" Si . i
. I
� 11H
Chf � � -
6e .
-
manor- -
B j
BE v i . -
-�e srtte -
SIDE OF BE
MO�E T
E . E �. -
MM E
DEANE M
-r- I .
tor
scar e
- M
Tracksiefs ToBef Better Than Ever This Year
JOEL SCALES
When comparing the 1982-83
Last Carolina University women's
track team to last year's contingent,
second-year head coach Pat
McGuigan described this year's
group as being more talented, more
experienced and possessing more
depth.
Ihe 1982 track team will get their
season underway this Saturday,
when they travel to the Holiday In-
vitational at George Mason Univer-
sity. Fairfax, Va.
McGuigan acquired some of the
best talent from the state of North
Carolina and in the nation, in-
cluding sprinter Regina Kent from
Jamaica High School in New York
Kent, who had an amazing list of in-
dividual honors as a prepster, won
the 55-meter dash in the Colgate
Women's Games in 1982. North
Carolina all-stater Delphine Mabry,
possibly the best women's athlete in
the state last year, brings an im-
pressive list of credentials to ECU,
including honorable mention all-
America last season. Unlike last
year, the team will have more depth
and experience to compete in the
ECU Men's Track Team
In George Mason Invite
EDNICKLAS
Stafl Unici
"We have more talent this year
than in any previous year said
ECU track coach Bill Carson, refer-
ring to this season's men's track
team.
The Pirates begin their indoor
schedule Saturday when they travel
to Fairfax, Va. to compete in the
George Mason Invitational.
The 12-team meet will include
such schools as Navy, Maryland,
and Richmond.
The ECU squad, which consists
of 178 freshman, one sophomore,
two juniors and one senior is one of
the youngest but most talented team
that ECU has seen in years. "We
have more depth than we've had in
five or six years commented Car-
son, who is in his 16th year at ECU.
"However, we do have a very, very
young team with few veterans.
"I am optimistic, but it will take
most of the season for them to
mature. We should have a respec-
table team
According to Carson, the new
talent came from a crop of N.C.
high school recruits that were con-
sidered the best in North Carolina
history. Two of the recruits signed
by ECU were high school all-
Americas (See Related Article).
"The athletic program here knew
that last year was one of the best
yars for N.C. high school track
Carson said, "so with some kids
leaving our program for different
reasons last year, we consolidated
our funds for the 1982 season to
recruit the most talented pro-
spects
Among the talented members of
the team are Carleton Bell in the 400
meter, Ray Dickerson in the 500 and
600 meters, Keith Clarke in the 400
meter and Clint Harris in the
55-meter dash.
ECU is in its second year as a
"team category" in the "big"
meets.
"I'm very optimistic and I think
we're going places says
McGuigan. "I think people will
recognize that we do have a good
program
McGuigan, whose credentials in-
clude coaching AIAW national
qualifiers, one national champion
and one American record hlder, has
only two returning tracksters in
sophomores Liz Graham and
Davena Cherry. But with an
outstanding field of 12 freshmen,
Coach McGuigan is not complain-
To Compete
Saturday
member of the IC4AS Conference,
which consists of 107 schools and
according to Carson, it is the oldest
and largest conference in the coun-
try
"We've put a whole lot of em-
phasis on the conference Carson
said, "such as trying to do as well as
we can in point scoring. In time, I
think we can crack the top 10 in the
conference
ing.
"They're getting used to sprinting
and the girls are responding well to
my training assureeds McGuigan.
"We'll be doing more weight train-
ing this year since we do have ex-
cellent facilities and personnel
Last year McGuigan had a goal of
at least one team member qualifying
for the nationals. Though they tell
short of that goal, McGuigan feels
she has the talent to qualify not one,
but two relay teams in the 4 X 100
and 4 X 400.
One change in this year's program
will be the addition of competing in
field events. High Point native
Kathy Leeper will be a definite plus
in the long jump and Amy Bowen, a
product of South Stokes, will shot-
put, along with throwing the discus.
"Amy is working real hard and
her best event will be the shot
McGuigan said.
McGuigan is also optimistic
about distance runners Sharon Bar-
ths ana Rene Felder. Both will com-
pete in the 1500 and Bartha will also
run the 3000.
Adding depth will be Kim Boyles
(200, 400), Carolyn Carr (100,
Relays), Tricia Fowler (400, 800.
Relays), Teressa Hudson (100. 200.
Relays). Wendy Lower (200. 400),
and Elaine Perry (400. hurdles).
The Ladv Pirate schedule is a
challenging one. which teat
world-class competition on several
occasions. The biggest indoor meet
competition-wise, unfolds on
January 14 and 15; the Eastman
Kodak Invitational.
"The best in the country will be
there and it will provide good ex-
perience McGuigan said. "I think
we'll do well and we should be able
to place in a lot of meets. We'll be
much stronger than last vear
Pirates Spend Break On The Road
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports Editor
Although most students are
anxiously awaiting a cozy,
Christmas holiday vacation at
home, the East Carolina basket-
ball teams will be spending much
of their break on the road.
After this Saturday's home
game against Appalachian State,
the Lady Pirates will head to
Indiana for a bout with the
Fighting Irish on Dec. 30. Notre
Dame is now 2-2. But Head
Coach Cathy Andruzzi is only
taking one game at a time � with
Appalachian now in the
spotlight.
The Mountaineers are led by
5-9, senior guard Kay Hampton,
who is Appalachian's leading
scorer with a 12.4 gamepoint
average. Senior Forward Susan
Cameron will also pose as a
threat to the Pirates. The 6-0
starter is averaging 7.2 points per
game, while her teammate,
sophomore Meana Cusimano is
pumping in 8.8 points per game
and grabbing 8.2 rebounds. Ap-
palachian State lost to N.C.
State, 91-47, last week, but An-
druzzi won't be taking them
lightly.
"They are big and they have
good scoring punch from Kay
ilampton and Susan Cameron
she said. "I think you'll see a
good game Saturday
After a trip to Notre Dame, the
Pirates will pack up and move on
to Western Kentuckv to take on
the Lady Toppers. Belmont Col-
lege (Jan. 4) and Cincinatti (Jan.
6) are the next two stops.
Despite a grueling schedule,
the Pirates will certainly have
enough chances to improve over
the break � something Andruzzi
is happy about.
"We have five people playing
different positions because o our
lack of depth, she said. "This
week, and after the break, we'll
look forward to working with the
kids individually. I think you'll
see the bench contribute more
after the holidays
See Bl'CS. Page 11
Athletes On All-America List
This year's track co-captains:
Kevin Clarke and Carlton BeM.
HORACE McCORMACK
Suf f Writer
East Carolina University
freshman Chris Brooks and Nathan
McCorkle were recently named high
school track all-Americas. Brooks
was selected by the High School
Federation checklist and by Track
And Field News. McCorkle was
chosen by the High School Federa-
tion checklist.
Brooks was selected first-team all-
America for his incredible perfor-
mances in the long and triple jump
events. Brooks' 25-foot 9:inch jump
during high school at Raleigh
Broughton was only half an inch off
world record-holder Carl Lewis' na-
tional high school record.
Brooks, a 6-3, 170-pounder, was
also an all-America in the triple
jump. He jumped 50 feet in last
summer's National High School
traack meet, which was only a
quarter of an inch off the National
High School record. Brooks had
also triple jumped 50 feet 6 inches in
the Regional Junior Olympics,
which would have given him the na-
tional record, but the meet was
unofficial.
Although Brooks received his all-
America honors in the field events,
he holds the state record of 47.3 in
the 400 meters nad was a member of
the national record-holding mile-
relay team, anchoring them to a
3:12.0 winning time.
Consequently, Brooks had never
jumped until his senior year at
Broughton. Brooks, who was also a
basketball standout, had no idea
that he would be receiving a track
scholarship.
"I worked hard every season try-
ing to earn a basketball scholarship,
but whenever track season came
around, everyone forgot about me
See COACH, Page 11
V

4
C H V ���






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 9, 1982
11
ss
ad their
v .v out ol
' stated
a dynamite,
ted club
1 s il be shocked
e lot of
ic Bayou
ifayette, I A
A Kt I oui-
pponent
iasl ear.
io�o fty STANLEY LEAKY
ilfpack center Thurl
ear
' . 200,
1 " . 400),
hurdle).
lulc a
ich fea ires
several
� meet
inl Ids on
. i dvtman
� will be
' - g od e-
"I think
lould be able
ets. We'll be
Road
:k up and
ltuck) '
�ers. Belrr
id Cii
twos
uei:
ple playing
h T h
liIv I thi
. Page 1
List
tate record oi 47.3 m
inad was a member of
record-holding mile-
pchonng them to a
time.
�. Brooks had never
his senior year at
tooks, who was also a
ndout, had no idea
be receiving a track
bard every season try-
lasketball scholarship,
I track season came
lone forgot about me
KCH, Page 11
Classifieds
Coach Has Eye For Talent
PERSONAL
YO WALTER: Looking forward to
a M p� scandal on the uth.
Beware of the palace Love the
SAM STAFF
CONGRATULATIONS' It took a
lot of determination, but the brats
knew you could do it! Way to go!
ZLT D Bailey USAF Knock em
dead!
MERRY CHRISTMAS! AND I
mean it � the House of Represen
tatives "blew" Reagan's doors off
and voted down the "mega-death '
MX missile How dare he call it
the "peacekeeper He's mad. but
we're not "Dense pack" was an
appropriately named proposal It
was made by a pack of very dense
men Thanks H of R tor a more
peaceful Christmas season. The
Prince of Peace" will be pleased
HEY RIDE A. HEY DUEL -
Merry Christmas to the both of
you What can I say? You're the
two most wonderful women on the
face of this earth I really do love
you se more than I can say Happy
New Year too! Peace. Paddy
ATTENTION TO CC REC maiors
We ve come a long way
memories, terrific times Steven
wholesome smile, cute Angi. best
wishes WALT, Pat hung in
mere, Gary you can call me LL.
Tom you've got it Steve nat'l
volleyball tourns? Trish tennis
anytime Luke keep rollem up
welcome to the tarn Howy my side
kick Jeff darling Love ya thanks
Mit its been real. Deb the world's
waiting, Al be happy explore. Bion
dinner promises? Noah Paul still
lam and still wondering. Chuck
that accent. Kirk treasured
memories. Karen ha ha he. Mega
miss ya a lot our new days are new
horuons. futures are near many
wishes God bless ya Merry
Christmas LUCINDA
MISS P Thanks tor being what
you are in so many ways
beautiful You really are
something special And you
wonder why I cant sleep at night'
B.J
BETH MERRY CHRISTMAS TO
THE SWEETEST GIRL THIS
SIDE OF BETHEL I LOVE YOU
MORc THAN PBR VITALIS OR
EVEN PO MAN PLUGS
MIKE
DEANE ANO LISA You two
make a great couple Best wishes
for the future Deane I hope the
scar heals betore the big flay
Lisa, don't let htm drink Jim
Beam from a coffee mug. He can't
handle it MIKE
WALLY Gee. it's Christmas. I
sure hope Eddie and Lumpy bring
over their bong tor New Year's.
The BE AV
ROOMMATE
WANTED
SKI VERMONT: FIVE�DAY ski
vacation to Smuggler Notch. VT.
Jan. 2 7 Package deal for SISa.SO
includes 5 day ski pass, slopwside
condos and college bash partie.
For further info contact BETH or
LISA at 7S4 �573 or 7S7 3tl�.
FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted
to share large house near campus.
Call 3SS 057 after 5 00 p m.
ROOMMATE WANTED t Or 2
preferably female I block off cam
pus 7Se 4tl7
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE:
Non smoker serious student. S
blks from campus SSO plus
utilities Call between 41 or
V:30 11 757 204
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL Typist wants to
type at home Reasonable rates
75 J��0
PROFESSIONAL Typing service
experience quality work, IBM
typewriter Call Lame Shive
758 5301 or Gail Joiner 75 102
TYPING TERM papers, resumes,
thesis etc Call 752 733
ENGLISH TUTOR: HELP with
writing, re writing and editing
papers Also proofreading and typ
mg Call 757 0207 after 5.
WANTED
PROCESS MAIL AT HOME!
530 00 per hundred No experience.
Part- or lull time Start im-
mediately Details, send self
addressed, stamped envelope.
Haiku Distributors. 115 Waipalani
Rd . Haiku. HI ��7M
HELP WANTED Assistant buyer
position open for assistant ladies'
sportswear buyer Must have good
feel for fashion and the ability to
handle heavy paperwork in an ex
pedient manner Experience in
retail preferred Good salary and
opportunity for advancement
Send resume to P O. Box 197.
Greenville. NX 27134
JOIN ONE OF THE fastest
growing clubs in America. Yes,
now you can be a member of the "I
Hate E.T. Club For more infor-
mation, call 7 52 292 today i Ask
tor Penis Breath
FOR SALE
Cont'd From Page 10
on the court and only
remembered me for my
times on the track
admitted Brooks. "1
didn't start jumping
until my senior year. As
a freshman I had chip-
ped bones in both
knees, which never
completely healed. I
never even considered
jumping
But by the end of the
summer, Brooks had
emerged as the national
high school long and
triple jump champion.
"Brooks could have
been all-America in any
event he participated
in said East Carolina
head track coach Bill
Carson. "He's ex-
tremely talented and
may prove to be one of
ECU's greatest
athletes. The best facet
for a jumper is his
speed, and Chris
Brooks is fast and he
definitely has Olympic
Potential
McCorkle, who is
from Newton, received
his all-America status
for his performance in
the 200-meters. Mc-
Corkle was clocked at
�21.3, which was in the
top five in the nation.
McCork le said he
had never really striven
to become an all-
2 FISHER SPEAKERS model 530s
would like to trade for cassette
deck. Call 75 (9 7 7 or The East
Carolinian 757 MM and leave
message for Geep Johnson.
FOR SALE: 171 HONDA 250 XL
DIRT OR STREET BIKE Call
750 971 Mon. Thur
NICE GRAY AND WHITE RAB
BIT FUR JACKET FOR SALE MS
CALL 750 3094
Bucs Travel To Bayou
Classic During Holidays
America athlete. "My
goal was to just make it
to the nationals and
hope somene would
recognize me and offer
me a track scholar-
ship
While striving to
become a national com-
petitor, McCorkle won
the North Carolina
State 100-and
200-meter races while
representing Newton
Conover High School.
But he still had not
heard from any college
about a definite track
scholarship, although
he received several of-
fers from Wake Forest.
Clemson and West
Virginia for football
scholarships.
McCorkle, only 5-7,
160-pounds, thought he
was too small to excell
in college football. But
after his performance
in the national meet,
the offers began to
pour in. Long before
this, he was being
carefully watched by
ECU's Carson.
"I first saw Nathan
his junior year said
Carson, "and I knew
he had the potential to
be an excellent com-
petitor in the 400
meters. Since he has
been here with us, he
has proven himself to
be extremely confident
about his ability. Not
only will he be a stiff
competitor in the 400,
but will also be very
competitive in the 200.
"I've got a lot of
good plans for both
Nathan and Chris
Carson said. "They
both have an abun-
dance of raw talent, but
its going to have to be
developed the right
way. Its been a long
time since ECU had
two freshmen enter as
all-Americas and its go-
ing to be interesting
watching them
develop
WATERBEDS and bedding one
half off! DON'T pay retail! We
have complete waterbeds as low
as 5H9 9S Also bedding sets as low
as S79 95 Come by Factory Mat-
tress and Waterbed Outlet 730
Greenville Blvd. next to Sweet
Caroline's 355 23.
AVAILABLE JAN. 1: 2 bedroom
duplex near campus. Call 355 057
after 5.
FOR SALE 19�� Coachman trailer
21 foot. Trailer has Air, storms,
deck and is underpinned on lot on
Ayden Trailer Park. Call 74 252
MISC.
TWIN SIZE bed with boxspnng
and metal frame. Good shape, call
FRAN Fritigerald 750 1044.
FOR SALE: YAMAHA Classical
Guitar with case. Excellent condi-
tion S125. Phone 752-241.
X LARGE DESK ISO call 750 S2
FOR SALE: DOUBLE bed 550
two 12x12 carpet, two 7x7 carpet.
Call 750-4717.
3 BEDR HOUSE for rent S225 mo
Call 750-4717.
HAVE A PROBLEM'
NEED INFORMATION'
REAL Crisis Intervention,
24 HOUR SERVICE
H� l THISIS ft N I LH
31 2 E 10th Street
758 HELP Greenville. N C 2 7834
Cont'd From Page 10
The men's team,
meanwhile, will com-
pete in the Bayou
Classic in Lafayette,
La which will be held
on Dec. 17-18. ECU
will play Southwestern
Louisiana on Friday,
while Grambling State
takes on New Mexico
State.
According to Head
coach Charlie Har-
rison, the Louisiana
team is extremely
quick, and possess a
strong lineup, as well as
an excellent bench.
"They run multiple
defenses and like to
play an extremely, ex-
tremely fast game he
said, "they have four
starters back from a
top twenty-ranked
team last year Har-
rison added that every
year the tournament
has been held
Southwestern Loui-
siana has won it. Last
season, SW Louisiana
finished 24-8 under
Head Coach Bobby
Paschal, and went to
the NCAA tourney.
The Bucs will return
home for a meeting
with New Hampshire
on Dec. 28, and will
leave to play George
Mason on Dec.30. The
Bucs will make one
more stop at Virginia
Tech on Jan. 4 before
returning to Greenville.
The ECU-
Appalachian State
game is scheduled to
start at 7:30 p.m Satur-
day, and the men will
play New Hampshire at
the same time.
2704 E. 10th St.
758 1033
Buck's
Gulf
Complete
Automotive Service
24 hr. Towing Service
Jarlran Rentals Available
Student Golf Special
Indian Trails
Country Club
Fairway Dr Griffon, N.C.
Cart (2 riders) & Green Fees
for 18 holes only
s6.00
Monday-Friday
8 a.m5 p.m.
524-5485
KOU
Attention Christmas Shoppers
Men's IZOD Sweaters$17.95
We have old fashioned ear muffs and C.B. Jackets
Golf Balls, including 15-pock top fliteonly $15.95
We also have the largest selection
of SKI EQUIPMENT and APPAREL
in eastern N.C.
IZOD Lacoste Shirts
in sizes remaining,
medium & largeonly $12.00
Large selection of
� IZOD down filled jackets.
GORDON FULP
GOLF, TENNIS and SKI SHOP
Located at Greenville Country Club, oft Memorial Dr.
Open 7 days a week
HAMSTER
&
SPECIAL
PET
VILLAGE
M
511 S. EVANS
756-9222
Hamster or derbil food, wood shavings
and water bottle.
ALL FORs18"
plus 1 FREE Hamster or Gerbil
Complete line of small animal supplies
MENDENHALL I
STUDENT CENTER
will extend operating
hours until 1:00 a.m.
during the Exam Period
(129-1215)
FREE late night COFFEE
will be provided
(main floor)
STUDY AREAS AVAILABLE
New Year's Special
REGULAR
SUGAR FREE
Anybody can make a caffeine
free cola, but there's onfy one
with pottttveiy Pepsi taste
Available in regular or
one catone sugar free
i 5� I
ISO
SAVE50
On any muM pack or 2 Mw M
borne of catwn kee P�pM ft�� regular or sugar kee
.����i
L
from the Attic, the Elbo and ECU Athletics.
Attend the January 8 basketball game
ECU vs. James Madison
and Use Your Ticket Stub For
�FREE ADMISSION at the Attic and a
discount on your first beverage �
�FREE FIRST BEVERAGE at the Elbo
7:30 Tip Off
Watch the Pirates attack.
,� '
n �Kamvmipe m�w
' V � �W �' � ��-
-�rr





AFTER DECEMBER 17,
THIS MAY BE THE ONLY WAY YOU CAN SEE THE WHO.
CAMPUS ENTERTAINMENT NETWORK PRESENTS THE WHO: THE FINAL CONCERT.
BROUGHT TO YOU BY SCHLITZ-THE TASTE THAT ROCKS AMERICA
Schlitz Beer brought The WHO to 32 cities
this year. And now, Campus Entertainment
Network, with the support of Schlitz, brings
you The WHO, live, December 17 for what
may be the last time.
CEN Colleges enjoy many unique entertain-
ment events like The WHO presented live via
satellite. You can share in this historic event
with millions of WHO fans at CEN campuses
and large screen concert video centers every-
where.
ALIVE
I SATELLITE PRESENTATION
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT YOUR STUDENT ACTIVITIES BOARD
OR YOUR LOCAL ROCK RADIO STATION.

i�
iiiiliiiiiiMii mwm





Title
The East Carolinian, December 9, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 09, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.237
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy